WorldWideScience

Sample records for actinium ions

  1. Extraction of actinium with di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid from hydrochloric and nitric acid solutions

    The extraction of actinium with HDEHP from Cl- and NO3- systems has been investigated. It was found that extraction of actinium from HCl solutions is much better than from HNO3 solutions. Stability constants of actinium complexes Ac(X-)+2 with Cl- and NO3- ligands were determined. Our results show that the actinium formed less stable complexes with Cl- than with NO3- ligands. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  2. The sorption of polonium, actinium and protactinium onto geological materials

    This paper describes a combined experimental and modeling program of generic sorption studies to increase confidence in the performance assessment for a potential high-level radioactive waste repository in Japan. The sorption of polonium, actinium and protactinium onto geological materials has been investigated. Sorption of these radioelements onto bentonite, tuff and granodiorite from equilibrated de-ionized water was studied under reducing conditions at room temperature. In addition, the sorption of actinium and protactinium was investigated at 60 C. Thermodynamic chemical modeling was carried out to aid interpretation of the results

  3. Discovery of the actinium, thorium, protactinium, and uranium isotopes

    Fry, C; Thoennessen, M

    2012-01-01

    Currently, 31 actinium, 31 thorium, 28 protactinium, and 23 uranium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  4. Separation of Actinium 227 from the uranium minerals

    The purpose of this work was to separate Actinium 227, whose content is 18%, from the mineral carnotite found in Gomez Chihuahua mountain range in Mexico. The mineral before processing is is pre-concentrated and passed, first through anionic exchange resins, later the eluate obtained is passed through cationic resins. The resins were 20-50 MESH QOWEX and 100-200 MESH 50 X 8-20 in some cased 200-400 MESH AG 50W-X8, 1X8 in other cases. The eluates from the ionic exchange were electrodeposited on stainless steel polished disc cathode and platinum electrode as anode; under a current ODF 10mA for 2.5 to 5 hours and of 100mA for .5 of an hour. it was possible to identify the Actinium 227 by means of its descendents, TH-227 and RA-223, through alpha spectroscopy. Due to the radiochemical purity which the electro deposits were obtained the Actinium 227 was low and was not quantitatively determined. A large majority of the members of the natural radioactive series 3 were identified and even alpha energies reported in the literature with very low percentages of non-identified emissions were observed. We conclude that a more precise study is needed concerning ionic exchange and electrodeposit to obtain an Actinium 227 of radiochemical purity. (Author)

  5. Spectroscopic and computational investigation of actinium coordination chemistry.

    Ferrier, Maryline G; Batista, Enrique R; Berg, John M; Birnbaum, Eva R; Cross, Justin N; Engle, Jonathan W; La Pierre, Henry S; Kozimor, Stosh A; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S; Stein, Benjamin W; Stieber, S Chantal E; Wilson, Justin J

    2016-01-01

    Actinium-225 is a promising isotope for targeted-α therapy. Unfortunately, progress in developing chelators for medicinal applications has been hindered by a limited understanding of actinium chemistry. This knowledge gap is primarily associated with handling actinium, as it is highly radioactive and in short supply. Hence, Ac(III) reactivity is often inferred from the lanthanides and minor actinides (that is, Am, Cm), with limited success. Here we overcome these challenges and characterize actinium in HCl solutions using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics density functional theory. The Ac-Cl and Ac-OH2O distances are measured to be 2.95(3) and 2.59(3) Å, respectively. The X-ray absorption spectroscopy comparisons between Ac(III) and Am(III) in HCl solutions indicate Ac(III) coordinates more inner-sphere Cl(1-) ligands (3.2±1.1) than Am(III) (0.8±0.3). These results imply diverse reactivity for the +3 actinides and highlight the unexpected and unique Ac(III) chemical behaviour. PMID:27531582

  6. Production of high-purity radium-223 from legacy actinium-beryllium neutron sources.

    Soderquist, Chuck Z; McNamara, Bruce K; Fisher, Darrell R

    2012-07-01

    Radium-223 is a short-lived alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide with potential applications in cancer treatment. Research to develop new radiopharmaceuticals employing (223)Ra has been hindered by poor availability due to the small quantities of parent actinium-227 available world-wide. The purpose of this study was to develop innovative and cost-effective methods to obtain high-purity (223)Ra from (227)Ac. We obtained (227)Ac from two surplus actinium-beryllium neutron generators. We retrieved the actinium/beryllium buttons from the sources and dissolved them in a sulfuric-nitric acid solution. A crude actinium solid was recovered from the solution by coprecipitation with thorium fluoride, leaving beryllium in solution. The crude actinium was purified to provide about 40 milligrams of actinium nitrate using anion exchange in methanol-water-nitric acid solution. The purified actinium was then used to generate high-purity (223)Ra. We extracted (223)Ra using anion exchange in a methanol-water-nitric acid solution. After the radium was separated, actinium and thorium were then eluted from the column and dried for interim storage. This single-pass separation produces high purity, carrier-free (223)Ra product, and does not disturb the (227)Ac/(227)Th equilibrium. A high purity, carrier-free (227)Th was also obtained from the actinium using a similar anion exchange in nitric acid. These methods enable efficient production of (223)Ra for research and new alpha-emitter radiopharmaceutical development. PMID:22697483

  7. In-source laser spectroscopy developments at TRILIS—towards spectroscopy on actinium and scandium

    Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources (RILIS) have become a versatile tool for production and study of exotic nuclides at Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL) facilities such as ISAC at TRIUMF. The recent development and addition of a grating tuned spectroscopy laser to the TRIUMF RILIS solid state laser system allows for wide range spectral scans to investigate atomic structures on short lived isotopes, e.g., those from the element actinium, produced in uranium targets at ISAC. In addition, development of new and improved laser ionization schemes for rare isotope production at ISAC is ongoing. Here spectroscopic studies on bound states, Rydberg states and autoionizing (AI) resonances on scandium using the existing off-line capabilities are reported. These results allowed to identify a suitable ionization scheme for scandium via excitation into an autoionizing state at 58,104 cm − 1 which has subsequently been used for ionization of on-line produced exotic scandium isotopes.

  8. Radium, thorium, and actinium extraction from seawater using an improved manganese-oxide-coated fiber

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the efficiency with which improved manganese-oxide-coated acrylic fibers extract radium, thorium, and actinium from seawater. Tests were made using surface seawater spiked with 227Ac, 227Th and 223Ra. For sample volumes of approximately 30 liters and flow rates up to 0.5 liters per minute, radium and actinium are removed quantitatively. Approximately 80-95% of the thorium is removed under these same conditions. (Auth.)

  9. Developments towards in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy studies of actinium isotopes at LISOL

    Raeder, S.; Bastin, B.; Block, M.; Creemers, P.; Delahaye, P.; Ferrer, R.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Ghys, L.; Gaffney, L. P.; Granados, C.; Heinke, R.; Hijazi, L.; Huyse, M.; Kron, T.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lecesne, N.; Luton, F.; Moore, I. D.; Martinez, Y.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Naubereit, P.; Piot, J.; Rothe, S.; Savajols, H.; Sels, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Traykov, E.; Van Beveren, C.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.; Zadvornaya, A.

    2016-06-01

    To study exotic nuclides at the borders of stability with laser ionization and spectroscopy techniques, highest efficiencies in combination with a high spectral resolution are required. These usually opposing requirements are reconciled by applying the in-gas-laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) technique in the supersonic gas jet produced by a de Laval nozzle installed at the exit of the stopping gas cell. Carrying out laser ionization in the low-temperature and low density supersonic gas jet eliminates pressure broadening, which will significantly improve the spectral resolution. This article presents the required modifications at the Leuven Isotope Separator On-Line (LISOL) facility that are needed for the first on-line studies of in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy. Different geometries for the gas outlet and extraction ion guides have been tested for their performance regarding the acceptance of laser ionized species as well as for their differential pumping capacities. The specifications and performance of the temporarily installed high repetition rate laser system, including a narrow bandwidth injection-locked Ti:sapphire laser, are discussed and first preliminary results on neutron-deficient actinium isotopes are presented indicating the high capability of this novel technique.

  10. Production of Actinium-225 via High Energy Proton Induced Spallation of Thorium-232

    Harvey, James T.; Nolen, Jerry; Vandergrift, George; Gomes, Itacil; Kroc, Tom; Horwitz, Phil; McAlister, Dan; Bowers, Del; Sullivan, Vivian; Greene, John

    2011-12-30

    The science of cancer research is currently expanding its use of alpha particle emitting radioisotopes. Coupled with the discovery and proliferation of molecular species that seek out and attach to tumors, new therapy and diagnostics are being developed to enhance the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This latest technology is commonly referred to as Alpha Immunotherapy (AIT). Actinium-225/Bismuth-213 is a parent/daughter alpha-emitting radioisotope pair that is highly sought after because of the potential for treating numerous diseases and its ability to be chemically compatible with many known and widely used carrier molecules (such as monoclonal antibodies and proteins/peptides). Unfortunately, the worldwide supply of actinium-225 is limited to about 1,000mCi annually and most of that is currently spoken for, thus limiting the ability of this radioisotope pair to enter into research and subsequently clinical trials. The route proposed herein utilizes high energy protons to produce actinium-225 via spallation of a thorium-232 target. As part of previous R and D efforts carried out at Argonne National Laboratory recently in support of the proposed US FRIB facility, it was shown that a very effective production mechanism for actinium-225 is spallation of thorium-232 by high energy proton beams. The base-line simulation for the production rate of actinium-225 by this reaction mechanism is 8E12 atoms per second at 200 MeV proton beam energy with 50 g/cm2 thorium target and 100 kW beam power. An irradiation of one actinium-225 half-life (10 days) produces {approx}100 Ci of actinium-225. For a given beam current the reaction cross section increases slightly with energy to about 400 MeV and then decreases slightly for beam energies in the several GeV regime. The object of this effort is to refine the simulations at proton beam energies of 400 MeV and above up to about 8 GeV. Once completed, the simulations will be experimentally verified using 400 MeV and 8 Ge

  11. Production of Actinium-225 via High Energy Proton Induced Spallation of Thorium-232

    The science of cancer research is currently expanding its use of alpha particle emitting radioisotopes. Coupled with the discovery and proliferation of molecular species that seek out and attach to tumors, new therapy and diagnostics are being developed to enhance the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This latest technology is commonly referred to as Alpha Immunotherapy (AIT). Actinium-225/Bismuth-213 is a parent/daughter alpha-emitting radioisotope pair that is highly sought after because of the potential for treating numerous diseases and its ability to be chemically compatible with many known and widely used carrier molecules (such as monoclonal antibodies and proteins/peptides). Unfortunately, the worldwide supply of actinium-225 is limited to about 1,000mCi annually and most of that is currently spoken for, thus limiting the ability of this radioisotope pair to enter into research and subsequently clinical trials. The route proposed herein utilizes high energy protons to produce actinium-225 via spallation of a thorium-232 target. As part of previous R and D efforts carried out at Argonne National Laboratory recently in support of the proposed US FRIB facility, it was shown that a very effective production mechanism for actinium-225 is spallation of thorium-232 by high energy proton beams. The base-line simulation for the production rate of actinium-225 by this reaction mechanism is 8E12 atoms per second at 200 MeV proton beam energy with 50 g/cm2 thorium target and 100 kW beam power. An irradiation of one actinium-225 half-life (10 days) produces ∼100 Ci of actinium-225. For a given beam current the reaction cross section increases slightly with energy to about 400 MeV and then decreases slightly for beam energies in the several GeV regime. The object of this effort is to refine the simulations at proton beam energies of 400 MeV and above up to about 8 GeV. Once completed, the simulations will be experimentally verified using 400 MeV and 8 GeV protons

  12. Neutron-Induced Fission of Actinium-227, Protactinium-231 and Neptunium-237: Mass Distribution

    Results of radiochemical studies on the mass distribution in the neutron-induced fission of actinium-227, protactinium-231 and neptunium-237 have been presented. This work has been carried out as part of a programme to determine the mass distribution in the fission of heavy elements as a function of Z and A. All irradiations have been carried out in the core of the swimming-pool type reactor APSARA with cadmium shielding wherever necessary. Relative yields of several fission product nuclides have been obtained by a method involving a comparison of the fission product activities from the respective targets with those formed from uranium-235 simultaneously irradiated. Thermal-neutron fission yields of uranium-235 have been assumed. These results indicate a predominantly asymmetric mass distribution in all the three cases, and also a distinct though small symmetric peak in the case of actinium-227. (author)

  13. A new method for the determination of low-level actinium-227 in geological samples

    We developed a new method for the determination of 227Ac in geological samples. The method uses extraction chromatographic techniques and alpha-spectrometry and is applicable for a range of natural matrices. Here we report on the procedure and results of the analysis of water (fresh and seawater) and rock samples. Water samples were acidified and rock samples underwent total dissolution via acid leaching. A DGA (N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide) extraction chromatographic column was used for the separation of actinium. The actinium fraction was prepared for alpha spectrometric measurement via cerium fluoride micro-precipitation. Recoveries of actinium in water samples were 80 ± 8 % (number of analyses n = 14) and in rock samples 70 ± 12 % (n = 30). The minimum detectable activities (MDA) were 0.017-0.5 Bq kg-1 for both matrices. Rock sample 227Ac activities ranged from 0.17 to 8.3 Bq kg-1 and water sample activities ranged from below MDA values to 14 Bq kg-1of 227Ac. From the analysis of several standard rock and water samples with the method we found very good agreement between our results and certified values. (author)

  14. Analysis of the gamma spectra of the uranium, actinium, and thorium decay series

    Momeni, M.H.

    1981-09-01

    This report describes the identification of radionuclides in the uranium, actinium, and thorium series by analysis of gamma spectra in the energy range of 40 to 1400 keV. Energies and absolute efficiencies for each gamma line were measured by means of a high-resolution germanium detector and compared with those in the literature. A gamma spectroscopy method, which utilizes an on-line computer for deconvolution of spectra, search and identification of each line, and estimation of activity for each radionuclide, was used to analyze soil and uranium tailings, and ore.

  15. Analysis of the gamma spectra of the uranium, actinium, and thorium decay series

    This report describes the identification of radionuclides in the uranium, actinium, and thorium series by analysis of gamma spectra in the energy range of 40 to 1400 keV. Energies and absolute efficiencies for each gamma line were measured by means of a high-resolution germanium detector and compared with those in the literature. A gamma spectroscopy method, which utilizes an on-line computer for deconvolution of spectra, search and identification of each line, and estimation of activity for each radionuclide, was used to analyze soil and uranium tailings, and ore

  16. Groundwater seepage from the Ranger uranium mine tailings dam: radioisotopes of radium, thorium and actinium. Supervising Scientist report 106

    Monitoring of bores near the Ranger uranium mine tailings dam has revealed deterioration in water quality in several bores since 1983. In a group of bores to the north of the dam, increases have been observed of up to 500 times for sulphate concentrations and of up to 5 times for 226Ra concentrations. Results are presented here of measurements of members of the uranium, thorium and actinium decay series in borewater samples collected between 1985 and 1993. In particular, measurements of all four naturally-occurring radium isotopes have been used in an investigation of the mechanism of radium concentration changes. For the most seepage-affected bores the major findings of the study include: 228Ra/226Ra 223Ra /226Ra and 224Ra/228Ra ratios all increased over the course of the study; barium concentrations show high seasonal variability, being lower in November than May, but strontium concentrations show a steady increase with time. Calculations show that the groundwater is probably saturated with respect to barite but not with respect to celestite or anglesite; sulphide concentrations are low in comparison with sulphate, and are higher in November than in May; and 227Ac concentrations have increased with time, but do not account for the high 223Ra/226Ra ratios. It is concluded on the basis of these observations that increases in Ra isotope concentrations observed in a number of seepage-affected bores arise from increases in salinity leading to desorption of radium from adsorption sites in the vicinity of the bore rather by direct transport of radium from the tailings. Increased salinity is also causing the observed increases in 227Ac and strontium concentrations, while formation of a barite solid phase in the groundwater is causing the removal of some radium from solution. This is the cause of the increasing radium isotope ratios noted above

  17. Radium-228 analysis of natural waters by Cherenkov counting of Actinium-228

    The activities of 228Ra in natural waters were determined by the Cherenkov counting of the daughter nuclide 228Ac. The radium was pre-concentrated on MnO2 and the radium purified via ion exchange and, after a 2-day period of incubation to allow for secular equilibrium between the parent-daughter 228Ra(228Ac), the daughter nuclide 228Ac was isolated by ion exchange according to the method of Nour et al. [2004. Radium-228 determination of natural waters via concentration on manganese dioxide and separation using Diphonix ion exchange resin. Appl. Radiat. Isot. 61, 1173-1178]. The Cherenkov photons produced by 228Ac were counted directly without the addition of any scintillation reagents. The optimum Cherenkov counting window, sample volume, and vial type were determined experimentally to achieve optimum Cherenkov photon detection efficiency and lowest background count rates. An optimum detection efficiency of 10.9±0.1% was measured for 228Ac by Cherenkov counting with a very low Cherenkov photon background of 0.317±0.013 cpm. The addition of sodium salicylate into the sample counting vial at a concentration of 0.1 g/mL yielded a more than 3-fold increase in the Cherenkov detection efficiency of 228Ac to 38%. Tests of the Cherenkov counting technique were conducted with several water standards of known activity and the results obtained compared closely with a conventional liquid scintillation counting technique. The advantages and disadvantages of Cherenkov counting compared to liquid scintillation counting methods are discussed. Advantages include much lower Cherenkov background count rates and consequently lower minimal detectable activities for 228Ra and no need for expensive environmentally unfriendly liquid scintillation cocktails. The disadvantages of the Cherenkov counting method include the need to measure 228Ac Cherenkov photon detection efficiency and optimum Cherenkov counting volume, which are not at all required when liquid scintillation analysis is

  18. Mixed valency of the RE and Ac ions in solid states

    Full text: This review is devoted to consideration of the methods and results of the theoretical and experimental investigations of the electronic state of the rare earths and actinium ions in the separate compound. The methods of the high resolution X ray spectroscopy were used for our consideration. Energy of the X ray lines of the rare earths and actinium ions in free state and solid states was study carefully. Valency shifts of X Ray lines under change of electronic state of nf - ions in different oxide, fluoride and chloride compounds were determined for K -, L- and M - lines for these ions with accuracy near 10 -100 MeV. We studied the electronic state of nf- ions which is changed from '+2' to '+4' and determined the concentration of ions in different electronic state. Relative error for theoretical energy of the most lines for HFP - approach in comparison with experiment is less than 0.5%, and deviation for concentration is less than 5%

  19. Selective Decontamination Effect of Metal Ions in Soil Using Supercritical CO2 and TBP Complex

    Decontamination of soil pollution is difficult because the type of contamination largely depends on the characteristics of the pollutant and the area. Also, existing soil decontamination methods generate large quantities of secondary waste and additional process costs. For this reason, new decontamination methods are always under active investigation. A method involving the use of supercritical carbon dioxide with excellent permeability in place of chemical solvents is currently being studied. Unlike other heavy metals in fission products, uranium is used as fuel, and must be handled carefully. Therefore, in this paper, we studied a supercritical carbon dioxide method for decontaminating heavy metal ions in soil using tri-n-butyl phosphate(TBP), which is well known as a ligand for the extraction of metal ions of actinium. We investigated the decontamination effect of heavy metal ions in the soil using TBP-HNO3 Complex and supercritical carbon dioxide. The study results showed that when heavy metals in soil are extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide, the extraction efficiency is different according to the type of pollutant metal ions in the soil. When TBP-HNO3 Complex is used with an extractant, uranium extraction is very effective, but lithium, strontium, and cesium extraction is not effective. Therefore, in the case of a mixture of uranium and other metals such as lithium, strontium, cesium, and so on in soil contaminated by fission product leaks from nuclear power plants, we can selectively decontaminate uranium with supercritical carbon dioxide and TBP-HNO3 Complex

  20. Selective Decontamination Effect of Metal Ions in Soil Using Supercritical CO{sub 2} and TBP Complex

    Park, Jihye; Park, Kwangheon; Jung, Wonyoung [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Decontamination of soil pollution is difficult because the type of contamination largely depends on the characteristics of the pollutant and the area. Also, existing soil decontamination methods generate large quantities of secondary waste and additional process costs. For this reason, new decontamination methods are always under active investigation. A method involving the use of supercritical carbon dioxide with excellent permeability in place of chemical solvents is currently being studied. Unlike other heavy metals in fission products, uranium is used as fuel, and must be handled carefully. Therefore, in this paper, we studied a supercritical carbon dioxide method for decontaminating heavy metal ions in soil using tri-n-butyl phosphate(TBP), which is well known as a ligand for the extraction of metal ions of actinium. We investigated the decontamination effect of heavy metal ions in the soil using TBP-HNO{sub 3} Complex and supercritical carbon dioxide. The study results showed that when heavy metals in soil are extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide, the extraction efficiency is different according to the type of pollutant metal ions in the soil. When TBP-HNO{sub 3} Complex is used with an extractant, uranium extraction is very effective, but lithium, strontium, and cesium extraction is not effective. Therefore, in the case of a mixture of uranium and other metals such as lithium, strontium, cesium, and so on in soil contaminated by fission product leaks from nuclear power plants, we can selectively decontaminate uranium with supercritical carbon dioxide and TBP-HNO{sub 3} Complex.

  1. Application of lanthanide ions doped in different glasses

    The transfer of optical excitation energy from one ion/molecule to another ion/molecule has proved to be of potential importance in industrial application as well as research. Rare earth elements (RE) although not as rare as some of them occur more prevalently then other well known material (e.g. silver, tin, tungsten) are special group of elements of the periodic table comprising lanthanide series (from lanthanum to lutetium) and actinide series (from actinium to lawrencium). Most of the actinides are highly radioactive hence their uses are limited. Fluorescence is the particular optical property of lanthanide (RE) ions. The narrow absorption and emission lines exhibited by the RE ions in crystals, glasses and solutions have always made these ions attractive as sensitive probes of solids and liquid state and also makes them useful in laser technology, CRT displays, UV to visible converters and optical communications etc. In recent years there has been a special interest to study the properties and applications of rare earth doped in glasses. Lanthanide ions in glasses play an important role, especially by retaining their emission capabilities, in the host matrix. Glass as a dielectric material plays an important role in science and industry. Its chemical, physical and particular optical properties make it suitable for applications such as opto-electronic materials, laboratory equipment, laser gain media, etc. Photoluminescence from rare earth doped glasses are of major interest in the research area of optoelectronic device applications like phosphors, display monitors, lasers and amplifiers for communication systems. Now a days, development of optical devices based on rare-earth ions doped materials is one of the interesting fields of research. Rare earth doped glasses are widely used as laser materials, optical amplifiers, optical memory devices, magneto-optical devices, medical lasers, eye safe lasers, flat panel displays, fluorescent lamps, white LED's etc

  2. Ion Colliders

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  3. Ion colliders

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions (77Asb1, 81Bou1). The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  4. Radium-228 determination of natural waters via concentration on manganese dioxide and separation using Diphonix ion exchange resin

    The objective of this work was to establish a new procedure for 228Ra determination of natural waters via preconcentration of radium on MnO2 and separation of its daughter, 228Ac, using Diphonix ion exchange resin. Following removal of potential interferences via passage through an initial Diphonix Resin column, the first daughter of 228Ra, 228Ac, is isolated by chromatographic separation via a second Diphonix column. A holding time of >30 h for 228Ac ingrowth in between the two column separations ensures secular equilibrium. Barium-133 is used as a yield tracer. Actinium-228 is eluted from the second Diphonix Resin with 5 ml 1 M 1-Hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) and quantified by addition of scintillation cocktail and LSC counting. Radium (and 133Ba) from the load and rinse solutions from the 2nd Diphonix column may be prepared for alpha spectrometry (for determination of 223Ra, 224Ra, and 226Ra) by BaSO4 microprecipitation and filtration. Decontamination tests indicate that U, Th, and Ra series nuclides do not interfere with these measurements, although high contents of 90Sr (90Y) require additional treatment for accurate measurement of 228Ra. Addition of stable Sr as a 'hold back' carrier during the initial MnO2 preconcentration step was shown to remove most 90Sr interference

  5. Ion Chromatography.

    Mulik, James D.; Sawicki, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    Accurate for the analysis of ions in solution, this form of analysis enables the analyst to directly assay many compounds that previously were difficult or impossible to analyze. The method is a combination of the methodologies of ion exchange, liquid chromatography, and conductimetric determination with eluant suppression. (Author/RE)

  6. Ion implantation

    It is the purpose of the present paper to give a review of surface alloy processing by ion implantation. However, rather than covering this vast subject as a whole, the survey is confined to a presentation of the microstructures that can be found in metal surfaces after ion implantation. The presentation is limited to alloys processed by ion implantation proper, that is to processes in which the alloy compositions are altered significantly by direct injection of the implanted ions. The review is introduced by a presentation of the processes taking place during development of the fundamental event in ion implantation - the collision cascade, followed by a summary of the various microstructures which can be formed after ion implantation into metals. This is compared with the variability of microstructures that can be achieved by rapid solidification processing. The microstructures are subsequently discussed in the light of the processes which, as the implantations proceed, take place during and immediately after formation of the individual collision cascades. These collision cascades define the volumes inside which individual ions are slowed down in the implanted targets. They are not only centres for vigorous agitation but also the sources for formation of excess concentrations of point defects, which will influence development of particular microstructures. A final section presents a selection of specific structures which have been observed in different alloy systems. (orig./GSCH)

  7. Ion chromatography

    Tarter, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Similar in many ways to other liquid chromatographic techniques, ion chromatography (IC) is an invaluable method that is used all too rarely in chemical analysis. Its application is particularly promising in the analysis of inorganic anions, an area where more information is needed. Ion Chromatogrphy identifies the merits of this technique. Serving as a review and reference for experienced ion chromatographers and as a teaching aid for individuals new to the field, it provides the information necessary for determining the potential usefulness of IC for a given situation. Among the areas treated, this volume focuses on eluant-suppressed IC, especially for anion and cation analysis, single-column IC, plus ancillary techniques and applications, electrochemical, spectroscopic, and other detecting methods, ion chromatography exclusion (ICE), including its limits and applications.

  8. Controllable Laser Ion Acceleration

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Wang, W. M.; Limpouch, J.; Andreev, A.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sheng, Z. M.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q. S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a future laser ion accelerator is discussed to make the laser-based ion accelerator compact and controllable. Especially a collimation device is focused in this paper. The future laser ion accelerator should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers, and ion post acceleration devices [Laser Therapy 22, 103(2013)]: the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled to meet requirements for a future compact laser ion accelerator for ion cancer therapy or for other purposes. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching would be successfully realized by a multistage laser-target interaction.

  9. ION VATAMANU

    l. Povar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ion Vatamanu was a chemist, writer and public figure. He was equally passionate about both his chosen fields of activity: chemistry and poetry. Chemistry, with its perfect equilibrium of logic and precision, provided inspiration for lyrical creativity, whereas poetry writing enlivened his imagination and passion for chemistry. He loved his parents. He adored his wife Elena, whom he often gifted a sea of flowers. He loved his daughters Mihaela, Mariana, and Leontina. He loved life, and he loved people.

  10. Ion Beam Extraction by Discrete Ion Focusing

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus (900) and methods are disclosed for ion beam extraction. In an implementation, the apparatus includes a plasma source (or plasma) (802) and an ion extractor (804). The plasma source is adapted to generate ions and the ion extractor is immersed in the plasma source to extract a fraction......) in the space-charge surrounding the ion extractor. The strongly curved potential distribution focuses the extracted ions towards an opening (814) on a surface of the biased electrode thereby resulting in an ion beam....... of the generated ions. The ion extractor is surrounded by a space charge (810) formed at least in part by the extracted ions. The ion extractor includes a biased electrode (806) forming an interface with an insulator (808). The interface is customized to form a strongly curved potential distribution (812...

  11. ION GUN

    Dandl, R.A.

    1961-10-24

    An ion gun is described for the production of an electrically neutral ionized plasma. The ion gun comprises an anode and a cathode mounted in concentric relationship with a narrow annulus between. The facing surfaces of the rear portions of the anode and cathode are recessed to form an annular manifold. Positioned within this manifold is an annular intermediate electrode aligned with the an nulus between the anode and cathode. Gas is fed to the manifold and an arc discharge is established between the anode and cathode. The gas is then withdrawn from the manifold through the annulus between the anode and cathode by a pressure differential. The gas is then ionized by the arc discharge across the annulus. The ionized gas is withdrawn from the annulus by the combined effects of the pressure differential and a collimating magnetic field. In a 3000 gauss magnetic field, an arc voltage of 1800 volts, and an arc current of 0.2 amp, a plasma of about 3 x 10/sup 11/ particles/cc is obtained. (AEC)

  12. Natural ion exchangers

    Present article is devoted to natural ion exchangers. Ion exchange properties of minerals are described. Structural types of porous matrixes of natural ion exchangers are considered. Types of sorption centres in minerals are considered as well.

  13. Ion funnel ion trap and process

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-02-15

    An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

  14. Gas phase ion chemistry

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 1 covers papers on the advances of gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the advances in flow tubes and the measurement of ion-molecule rate coefficients and product distributions; the ion chemistry of the earth's atmosphere; and the classical ion-molecule collision theory. The text also describes statistical methods in reaction dynamics; the state selection by photoion-photoelectron coincidence; and the effects of temperature and pressure in the kinetics of ion-molecule reactions. The energy distribution in the unimolecular decomposition of ions, as well

  15. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  16. Ion Coulomb Crystals

    Thompson, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Ion Coulomb crystals (ICC), formed by atomic ions at low temperatures in radiofrequency and Penning ion traps, are structures that have remarkable properties and many applications. Images of Coulomb crystals are striking and reveal the crystal structure, which arises from a balance between the trapping forces acting on the ions and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. Applications of these structures range from frequency standards and quantum simulation through to measurement of the cross sections of chemical reactions of ions.

  17. Electron Beam Ion Sources

    Zschornacka, G; Thorn, A

    2013-01-01

    Electron beam ion sources (EBISs) are ion sources that work based on the principle of electron impact ionization, allowing the production of very highly charged ions. The ions produced can be extracted as a DC ion beam as well as ion pulses of different time structures. In comparison to most of the other known ion sources, EBISs feature ion beams with very good beam emittances and a low energy spread. Furthermore, EBISs are excellent sources of photons (X-rays, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, visible light) from highly charged ions. This chapter gives an overview of EBIS physics, the principle of operation, and the known technical solutions. Using examples, the performance of EBISs as well as their applications in various fields of basic research, technology and medicine are discussed.

  18. FRS ion catcher: Ion survival efficiency of radioactive ions

    At the MATS and LaSpec experiments of the LEB of the Super-FRS, high precision experiments will be done with low-energy exotic nuclei. To reach out to the most exotic nuclei, high efficiencies in the thermalization and beam preparation (e.g., separation and identification) are of upmost importance. Therefore, these parameters are optimized and tested online with the of the FRS Ion Catcher facility and in a separate off-line experiment. An in depth study of ion survival efficiencies has been performed to characterize the cryogenic stopping cell, to understand the slowing down process and to optimize the overall efficiency of the FRS Ion Catcher. Alpha-decay recoil ions from a 223Ra source are used to determine the ion survival and transport efficiencies, which reflect the charge-exchange and stripping cross-sections during the slowing down process of the ions. These investigations as well as other efficiency optimizations of the FRS Ion Catcher are presented.

  19. Ions and light

    Bowers, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 3: Ions and Light discusses how ions are formed by electron impact, ion-molecule reactions, or electrical discharge. This book discusses the use of light emitted by excited molecules to characterize either the chemistry that formed the excited ion, the structure of the excited ion, or both.Organized into 10 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the extension of the classical flowing afterglow technique to include infrared and chemiluminescence and laser-induced fluorescence detection. This text then examines the experiments involving molecules that ar

  20. Highly Charged Ion Sources

    In this work a study is made for the factors affecting the production and extraction of highly charged ion beams. Discussion is made for the production of highly charged ions from: the conventional vacuum are ion sources (Pinning PIG and Duoplasmatron DP) and the recent trends type which are (Electron Beam Ion Sources EBIS, Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources ECRIS and Laser Ion source LIS). The highly charged ions with charge state +7 , O+8 ,Ne+10 , Ar+18 have been extracted from the ECRIS while fully stripped Xe+54 has been extracted from EBIS. Improving the capabilities of the conventional RF ion source to produce multiply charged ions is achieved through the use of electron injection into the plasma or with the use of RF driven ion source. The later is based on coupling the RF power to the discharge through an internal antenna in vacuum are ion source. The argon ion species extracted from these upgraded RF ion sources could reach Ar+5

  1. Ion-ion recombination at high ion density

    By appeal to a Thomson-style treatment of recombination, it is shown that the rate for recombination of ions generated with uniform frequency within a reaction volume is a factor of 9/4 times greater than the rate for recombination of ions which approach each other from infinite separation. A valuable relationship connecting the two problems is uncovered. The analysis is pertinent to recombination involving dilute and high degrees of ionisation. (author)

  2. Applications of decelerated ions

    Many facilities whose sole purpose had been to accelerate ion beams are now becoming decelerators as well. The development and current status of accel-decel operations is reviewed here. Applications of decelerated ions in atomic physics experiments are discussed

  3. Production and ion-ion cooling of highly charged ions in electron string ion source.

    Donets, D E; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B; Syresin, E M

    2009-06-01

    The scheme of an internal injection of Au atoms into the working space of the "Krion-2" electron string ion source (ESIS) was applied and tested. In this scheme Au atoms are evaporated from the thin tungsten wire surface in vicinity of the source electron string. Ion beams with charge states up to Au51+ were produced. Ion-ion cooling with use of C and O coolant ions was studied. It allowed increasing of the Au51+ ion yield by a factor of 2. Ions of Kr up to charge state 28+ were also produced in the source. Electron strings were first formed with injection electron energy up to 6 keV. Methods to increase the ESIS ion output are discussed. PMID:19566200

  4. Ion mobility spectrometry

    Eiceman, GA

    2005-01-01

    Key Developments for Faster, More Precise Detection Capabilities Driven by the demand for the rapid and advanced detection of explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and narcotics, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) undergone significant refinements in technology, computational capabilities, and understanding of the principles of gas phase ion chemistry and mobility. Beginning with a thorough discussion of the fundamental theories and physics of ion mobility, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, Second Edition describes the recent advances in instrumentation and newly

  5. Gas phase ion chemistry

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 2 covers the advances in gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the stabilities of positive ions from equilibrium gas-phase basicity measurements; the experimental methods used to determine molecular electron affinities, specifically photoelectron spectroscopy, photodetachment spectroscopy, charge transfer, and collisional ionization; and the gas-phase acidity scale. The text also describes the basis of the technique of chemical ionization mass spectrometry; the energetics and mechanisms of unimolecular reactions of positive ions; and the photodissociation

  6. Ion Channels, Natural Nanovalves

    Eisenberg, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Ion channels are proteins with holes down their middle that control the flow of ions and electric current across otherwise impermeable biological membranes. The flow of sodium, potassium, calcium (divalent), and chloride ions have been central issues in biology for more than a century. The flow of current is responsible for the signals of the nervous system that propagate over long distances (meters). The concentration of divalent calcium ions is a 'universal' signal that controls many differ...

  7. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources

    Brown, I.

    2014-01-01

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved into a more or less standard laboratory tool for the production of high-current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. Applications include primarily ion implantation for material surface modification research, and good performance has been obtained for the injection of high-current beams of heavy-metal ions, in particular uranium, into particle accelerators. As the use of the sourc...

  8. SEPARATION OF PLUTONYL IONS

    Connick, R.E.; McVey, Wm.H.

    1958-07-15

    A process is described for separating plutonyl ions from the acetate ions with which they are associated in certaln carrier precipitation methods of concentrating plutonium. The method consists in adding alkaline earth metal ions and subsequently alkalizing the solution, causing formation of an alkaltne earth plutonate precipitate. Barium hydroxide is used in a preferred embodiment since it provides alkaline earth metal ion and alkalizes the solution in one step forming insoluble barium platonate.

  9. Ion-kill dosimetry

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  10. Ion trap simulation tools.

    Hamlet, Benjamin Roger

    2009-02-01

    Ion traps present a potential architecture for future quantum computers. These computers are of interest due to their increased power over classical computers stemming from the superposition of states and the resulting capability to simultaneously perform many computations. This paper describes a software application used to prepare and visualize simulations of trapping and maneuvering ions in ion traps.

  11. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    Wang, Shannon X; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Dauler, Eric; Berggren, Karl; Chuang, Isaac L

    2010-01-01

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  12. Plasma Ion Sources

    A wide variety of ion source types has been developed. Ion sources can provide beams of hundreds of amperes for fusion applications, nano-amperes for microprobe trace analysis and broad beams for ion implantation, space thrusters, industrial polymerisation and food sterilisation. Also it can be used in medical, military and accelerators applications. In this paper, three different types of plasma ion sources with different means for producing the discharge current and the ions extracting current from the plasma are studied. The various plasma described include, d.c glow discharge plasma, arc discharge plasma and radio frequency discharge plasma

  13. Microfabricated ion trap array

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  14. Atomic ion clock with two ion traps, and method to transfer ions

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor); Chung, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An atomic ion clock with a first ion trap and a second ion trap, where the second ion trap is of higher order than the first ion trap. In one embodiment, ions may be shuttled back and forth from one ion trap to the other by application of voltage ramps to the electrodes in the ion traps, where microwave interrogation takes place when the ions are in the second ion trap, and fluorescence is induced and measured when the ions are in the first ion trap. In one embodiment, the RF voltages applied to the second ion trap to contain the ions are at a higher frequency than that applied to the first ion trap. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  15. Materials analysis fast ions

    Denker, A; Rauschenberg, J; Röhrich, J; Strub, E

    2006-01-01

    Materials analysis with ion beams exploits the interaction of ions with the electrons and nuclei in the sample. Among the vast variety of possible analytical techniques available with ion beams we will restrain to ion beam analysis with ion beams in the energy range from one to several MeV per mass unit. It is possible to use either the back-scattered projectiles (RBS – Rutherford Back Scattering) or the recoiled atoms itself (ERDA – Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis) from the elastic scattering processes. These techniques allow the simultaneous and absolute determination of stoichiometry and depth profiles of the detected elements. The interaction of the ions with the electrons in the sample produces holes in the inner electronic shells of the sample atoms, which recombine and emit X-rays characteristic for the element in question. Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) has shown to be a fast technique for the analysis of elements with an atomic number above 11.

  16. The Earliest Ion Channels

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.; Wei, C.

    2009-12-01

    Supplying protocells with ions required assistance from channels spanning their membrane walls. The earliest channels were most likely short proteins that formed transmembrane helical bundles surrounding a water-filled pore. These simple aggregates were capable of transporting ions with efficiencies comparable to those of complex, contemporary ion channels. Channels with wide pores exhibited little ion selectivity but also imposed only modest constraints on amino acid sequences of channel-forming proteins. Channels with small pores could have been selective but also might have required a more precisely defined sequence of amino acids. In contrast to modern channels, their protocellular ancestors had only limited capabilities to regulate ion flux. It is postulated that subsequent evolution of ion channels progressed primarily to acquire precise regulation, and not high efficiency or selectivity. It is further proposed that channels and the surrounding membranes co-evolved.

  17. Cluster ion beam facilities

    A brief state-of-the-art review in the field of cluster-surface interactions is presented. Ionised cluster beams could become a powerful and versatile tool for the modification and processing of surfaces as an alternative to ion implantation and ion assisted deposition. The main effects of cluster-surface collisions and possible applications of cluster ion beams are discussed. The outlooks of the Cluster Implantation and Deposition Apparatus (CIDA) being developed in Guteborg University are shown

  18. Improving Ion Computed Tomography

    Hansen, David Christoffer

    2014-01-01

    løsninger i stedet sat bruge ion CT, hvor patienten skannes med de samme partikler, der også bruges til selve strålebehandlingen. Med ion CT kan man beregne partiklernes rækkevidde med en præcision, der erbedre end 1.0%, men ion CT har også visse begrænsninger. Blandt andet gør den begrænsede rækkevidde af...

  19. APPARATUS FOR HEATING IONS

    Chambers, E.S.; Garren, A.A.; Kippenhan, D.O.; Lamb, W.A.S.; Riddell, R.J. Jr.

    1960-01-01

    The heating of ions in a magnetically confined plasma is accomplished by the application of an azimuthal radiofrequency electric field to the plasma at ion cyclotron resonance. The principal novelty resides in the provision of an output tank coil of a radiofrequency driver to induce the radiofrequency field in the plasma and of electron current bridge means at the ends of the plasma for suppressing radial polarization whereby the radiofrequency energy is transferred to the ions with high efficiency.

  20. Collection of ions

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Koster, James E.

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide an improved technique for detecting ions as the area from which ions are attracted to a detector is increased, consequently increasing the number of ions detected. This is achieved by providing the outer electrodes of the detector connected to the electrical potential, together with alternate intermediate electrodes. The other intermediate electrodes and preferably the housing are grounded. The technique renders such detection techniques more sensitive and gives them a lower threshold at which they can function.

  1. Ion optics in an ion source system

    An analysis of ion beams from an ion source which consisted of a hemispherical anode, a plane earthed cathode, and a focusing electrode has been carried out. The focal properties of such electrode arrangement were studied using axially symmetric fields. Axial and radial electric fields were obtained as functions of the axial distance. It was found that the radial component of the gradient of potential pushes the ions towards the axis, which indicates the convergent action of the system. The effect of voltage variation between the boundary and the focusing electrode on the position of the plasma boundary are given using the experimental data of the ion source characteristics and its geometrical parameters. The advantages of plasma diffusing outside the source through a small aperture were used by applying a potential to the focusing electrode. It was possible to extract a large ion current from the expanded plasma. The system constituted a lens with a focal length of 29.4 mm. 7 figs

  2. Electric propulsion using ion-ion plasmas

    Recently, we have proposed to use both positive and negative ions for thrust in an electromagnetic space propulsion system. This concept is called PEGASES for Plasma Propulsion with Electronegative GASES and has been patented by the Ecole Polytechnique in France in 2007. The basic idea is to create a stratified plasma with an electron free (ion-ion plasma) region at the periphery of a highly ionized plasma core such that both positive and negative ions can be extracted and accelerated to provide thrust. As the extracted beam is globally neutral there is no need for a downstream neutralizer. The recombination of positive and negative ions is very efficient and will result in a fast recombination downstream of the thruster and hence there is no creation of a plasma plume downstream. The first PEGASES prototype, designed in 2007, has recently been installed in a small vacuum chamber for preliminary tests in our laboratory and the first results have been presented in several conferences. This paper reviews important work that has been used in the process of designing the first PEGASES prototype.

  3. Ion trap device

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  4. Lithium-ion batteries

    Yoshio, Masaki; Kozawa, Akiya

    2010-01-01

    This book is a compilation of up-to-date information relative to Li-Ion technology. It provides the reader with a single source covering all important aspects of Li-Ion battery operations. It fills the gap between the old original Li-Ion technology and present state of the technology that has developed into a high state of practice. The book is designed to provide a single source for an up-to-date description of the technology associated with the Li-Ion battery industry. It will be useful to researchers interested in energy conversion for the direct conversion of chemical energy into electrica

  5. Doppler ion program description

    The Doppler spectrometer is a conventional Czerny-Turner grating spectrometer with a 1024 channel multiple detector. Light is dispersed across the detector, and its output yields a spectrum covering approximately 200 A. The width of the spectral peak is directly proportional to the temperature of the emitting ions, and determination of the impurity ion temperature allows one to infer the plasma ion temperature. The Doppler ion software system developed at General Atomic uses a TRACOR Northern 1710-31 and an LSI-11/2. The exact configuration of Doublet III is different from TRACOR Northern systems at other facilities

  6. Peristaltic ion source

    Conventional ion sources generate energetic ion beams by accelerating the plasma-produced ions through a voltage drop at the extractor, and since it is usual that the ion beam is to propagate in a space which is at ground potential, the plasma source is biased at extractor voltage. For high ion beam energy the plasma source and electrical systems need to be raised to high voltage, a task that adds considerable complexity and expense to the total ion source system. The authors have developed a system which though forming energetic ion beams at ground potential as usual, operates with the plasma source and electronics at ground potential also. Plasma produced by a nearby source streams into a grided chamber that is repetitively pulsed from ground to high positive potential, sequentially accepting plasma into its interior region and ejecting it energetically. They call the device a peristaltic ion source. In preliminary tests they've produced nitrogen and titanium ion beams at energies from 1 to 40 keV. Here they describe the philosophy behind the approach, the test embodiment that they have made, and some preliminary results

  7. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rohde, Steven B.

    2008-08-26

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  8. Cold Strontium Ion Source for Ion Interferometry

    Jackson, Jarom; Durfee, Dallin

    2015-05-01

    We are working on a cold source of Sr Ions to be used in an ion interferometer. The beam will be generated from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) of Sr atoms by optically ionizing atoms leaking out a carefully prepared hole in the MOT. A single laser cooling on the resonant transition (461 nm) in Sr should be sufficient for trapping, as we've calculated that losses to the atom beam will outweigh losses to dark states. Another laser (405 nm), together with light from the trapping laser, will drive a two photon transition in the atom beam to an autoionizing state. Supported by NSF Award No. 1205736.

  9. Relativistic heavy ion research

    This report discusses the following topics: antiproton production; Bose-Einstein correlations; high-transverse momentum spectra; strangeness enhancement in heavy ion collisions; search for rare negative secondaries of antiprotons and antinuclei produced in heavy ion collisions; quark matter; and time-of-flight systems test at Brookhaven AGS. (LSP)

  10. Where do ions solvate?

    Yan Levin

    2005-06-01

    We study a simple model of ionic solvation inside a water cluster. The cluster is modeled as a spherical dielectric continuum. It is found that unpolarizable ions always prefer the bulk solvation. On the other hand, for polarizable ions, there exists a critical value of polarization above which surface solvation becomes energetically favorable for large enough water clusters.

  11. Ion-beam technologies

    Fenske, G.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

  12. Mechanosensitive ion channels

    Ken Takahashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell surface receptors are involved in numerous important biological processes including embryogenesis, tissue differentiation, and cellular homeostasis. Among them, mechanosensitive ion channels play an essential role in cellular functions of every cell including neurons, cardiomyocytes, and osteocytes. Here, we discuss types, roles, structures, and biophysical factors that affect the functions of mechanosensitive ion channels.

  13. Development of ion sources for ion projection lithography

    Multicusp ion sources are capable of generating ion beams with low axial energy spread as required by the Ion Projection Lithography (IPL). Longitudinal ion energy spread has been studied in two different types of plasma discharge: the filament discharge ion source characterized by its low axial energy spread, and the RF-driven ion source characterized by its long source lifetime. For He+ ions, longitudinal ion energy spreads of 1-2 eV were measured for a filament discharge multicusp ion source which is within the IPL device requirements. Ion beams with larger axial energy spread were observed in the RF-driven source. A double-chamber ion source has been designed which combines the advantages of low axial energy spread of the filament discharge ion source with the long lifetime of the RF-driven source. The energy spread of the double chamber source is lower than that of the RF-driven source

  14. Ion Implantation of Polymers

    Popok, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The current paper presents a state-of-the-art review in the field of ion implantation of polymers. Numerous published studies of polymers modified by ion beams are analysed. General aspects of ion stopping, latent track formation and changes of structure and composition of organic materials...... are discussed. Related to that, the effects of radiothermolysis, degassing and carbonisation are considered. Specificity of depth distributions of implanted into polymers impurities is analysed and the case of high-fluence implantation is emphasised. Within rather broad topic of ion bombardment, the focus...... is put on the low-energy implantation of metal ions causing the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles in the shallow polymer layers. Electrical, optical and magnetic properties of metal/polymer composites are under the discussion and the approaches towards practical applications are overviewed....

  15. Lipid Ion Channels

    Heimburg, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The interpretation electrical phenomena in biomembranes is usually based on the assumption that the experimentally found discrete ion conduction events are due to a particular class of proteins called ion channels while the lipid membrane is considered being an inert electrical insulator. The particular protein structure is thought to be related to ion specificity, specific recognition of drugs by receptors and to macroscopic phenomena as nerve pulse propagation. However, lipid membranes in their chain melting regime are known to be highly permeable to ions, water and small molecules, and are therefore not always inert. In voltage-clamp experiments one finds quantized conduction events through protein-free membranes in their melting regime similar to or even undistinguishable from those attributed to proteins. This constitutes a conceptual problem for the interpretation of electrophysiological data obtained from biological membrane preparations. Here, we review the experimental evidence for lipid ion channels...

  16. Molecular ion photofragment spectroscopy

    A new molecular ion photofragment spectrometer is described which features a supersonic molecular beam ion source and a radio frequency octapole ion trap interaction region. This unique combination allows several techniques to be applied to the problem of detecting a photon absorption event of a molecular ion. In particular, it may be possible to obtain low resolution survey spectra of exotic molecular ions by using a direct vibrational predissociation process, or by using other more indirect detection methods. The use of the spectrometer is demonstrated by measuring the lifetime of the O2+(4π/sub u/) metastable state which is found to consist of two main components: the 4π/sub 5/2/ and 4π/sub -1/2/ spin components having a long lifetime (approx. 129 ms) and the 4π/sub 3/2/ and 4π/sub 1/2/ spin components having a short lifetime (approx. 6 ms)

  17. Ion mobility sensor system

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  18. Nitrate ion association with Sm3+ ion

    A solvent extraction method with TBP as an extractant was used for the determination of the stability constants K10 for the SmNO32+ complex, for different least approach distances aa of ions. It was established that aa=6.5A for SmNO32+. (Author)

  19. Ion-Induced Surface Diffusion in Ion Sputtering

    Makeev, Maxim A.; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    1997-01-01

    Ion bombardment is known to enhance surface diffusion and affect the surface morphology. To quantify this phenomenon we calculate the ion-induced diffusion constant and its dependence on the ion energy, flux and angle of incidence. We find that ion bombardment can both enhance and suppress diffusion and that the sign of the diffusion constant depends on the experimental parameters. The effect of ion-induced diffusion on ripple formation and roughening of ion-sputtered surfaces is discussed an...

  20. A novel ion imager for secondary ion mass spectrometry

    This paper describes a new area detector for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) ion microscope, and its performance. The operational principle is based on detecting the change in potential of a floating photodiode caused by the ion-induced secondary-electron emission and the incoming ion itself. The experiments demonstrated that 101-105 aluminum ions per pixel can be detected with good linear response. Moreover, relative ion sensitivities from hydrogen to lead were constant within a factor of 2. The performance of this area detector provides the potential for detection of kiloelectronvolt ion images with current ion microscopy

  1. Ion channel screening.

    Dunlop, John; Bowlby, Mark; Peri, Ravikumar; Tawa, Gregory; LaRocque, James; Soloveva, Veronica; Morin, John

    2008-08-01

    Ion channels are attractive targets for drug discovery with recent estimates indicating that voltage and ligand-gated channels account for the third and fourth largest gene families represented in company portfolios after the G protein coupled and nuclear hormone receptor families. A historical limitation on ion channel targeted drug discovery in the form of the extremely low throughput nature of the gold standard assay for assessing functional activity, patch clamp electrophysiology in mammalian cells, has been overcome by the implementation of multi-well plate format cell-based screening strategies for ion channels. These have taken advantage of various approaches to monitor ion flux or membrane potential using radioactive, non-radioactive, spectroscopic and fluorescence measurements and have significantly impacted both high-throughput screening and lead optimization efforts. In addition, major advances have been made in the development of automated electrophysiological platforms to increase capacity for cell-based screening using formats aimed at recapitulating the gold standard assay. This review addresses the options available for cell-based screening of ion channels with examples of their utility and presents case studies on the successful implementation of high-throughput screening campaigns for a ligand-gated ion channel using a fluorescent calcium indicator, and a voltage-gated ion channel using a fluorescent membrane potential sensitive dye. PMID:18694388

  2. Polarized negative ions

    This paper presents a survey of methods, commonly in use or under development, to produce beams of polarized negative ions for injection into accelerators. A short summary recalls how the hyperfine interaction is used to obtain nuclear polarization in beams of atoms. Atomic-beam sources for light ions are discussed. If the best presently known techniques are incorporated in all stages of the source, polarized H- and D- beams in excess of 10 μA can probably be achieved. Production of polarized ions from fast (keV) beams of polarized atoms is treated separately for atoms in the H(25) excited state (Lamb-Shift source) and atoms in the H(1S) ground state. The negative ion beam from Lamb-Shift sources has reached a plateau just above 1 μA, but this beam current is adequate for many applications and the somewhat lower beam current is compensated by other desirable characteristics. Sources using fast polarized ground state atoms are in a stage of intense development. The next sections summarize production of polarized heavy ions by the atomic beam method, which is well established, and by optical pumping, which has recently been demonstrated to yield very large nuclear polarization. A short discussion of proposed ion sources for polarized 3He- ions is followed by some concluding remarks

  3. Relativistic heavy ion accelerators

    There is a growing interest in the scientific community in the use of accelerators to produce relativistic heavy ion beams for a number of purposes. It now appears that relativistic heavy ion collisions may provide an opportunity to study nuclear matter far from equilibrium density, pressure, and temperature. Heavy ion beams can also be used as simulated cosmic rays for astrophysical research and in planning space probes. At present the only relativistic heavy ion accelerator is the Belvalac at LBL. It has been devoted to this use since 1974. The operating experience and capabilities of this machine are reviewed as well as present and planned experimental programs. Designs of accelerators for relativistic heavy ions are discussed. A number of considerations will cause a machine to differ from a proton machine if optimally designed for heavy ion acceleration. A possible set of parameters is presented for an accelerator to produce intense beams of mass 10 to 200 ions, at energies up to 10 GeV/amu

  4. Polarized negative ions

    Haeberli, W.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents a survey of methods, commonly in use or under development, to produce beams of polarized negative ions for injection into accelerators. A short summary recalls how the hyperfine interaction is used to obtain nuclear polarization in beams of atoms. Atomic-beam sources for light ions are discussed. If the best presently known techniques are incorporated in all stages of the source, polarized H/sup -/ and D/sup -/ beams in excess of 10 ..mu..A can probably be achieved. Production of polarized ions from fast (keV) beams of polarized atoms is treated separately for atoms in the H(25) excited state (Lamb-Shift source) and atoms in the H(1S) ground state. The negative ion beam from Lamb-Shift sources has reached a plateau just above 1 ..mu..A, but this beam current is adequate for many applications and the somewhat lower beam current is compensated by other desirable characteristics. Sources using fast polarized ground state atoms are in a stage of intense development. The next sections summarize production of polarized heavy ions by the atomic beam method, which is well established, and by optical pumping, which has recently been demonstrated to yield very large nuclear polarization. A short discussion of proposed ion sources for polarized /sup 3/He/sup -/ ions is followed by some concluding remarks.

  5. A track ion counter

    A method to measure the frequency of production of ions in a gas is described. The characteristics of a device, which is named a track ion counter, are presented. The counter consists of two cylindrical volumes separated by a diaphragm with 500μm dia. orifice. The device is connected to an oil diffusion pump with high pumping speed. The gas flow through the orifice determines the pressure in the upper and the lower volumes of the device. The positive ions produced in a cylindrical volume above an orifice by charged particles traversing that volume move in a constant electric field. Some of these ions passing through the orifice are accelerated and detected by an electron multiplier. The absolute efficiency of ions detection from the domain above the orifice have been determined. The measurements were carried out for single charged ions of N2, H2, CH4, CO2. The preliminary measurements of the frequency of ions created within cylindrical gas domain equivalent to 0.15nm dia. and 7.6nm height tissue cylinder are reported

  6. Laser-cooled atomic ions as probes of molecular ions

    Trapped laser-cooled atomic ions are a new tool for understanding cold molecular ions. The atomic ions not only sympathetically cool the molecular ions to millikelvin temperatures, but the bright atomic ion fluorescence can also serve as a detector of both molecular reactions and molecular spectra. We are working towards the detection of single molecular ion spectra by sympathetic heating spectroscopy. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy uses the coupled motion of two trapped ions to measure the spectra of one ion by observing changes in the fluorescence of the other ion. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy is a generalization of quantum logic spectroscopy, but does not require ions in the motional ground state or coherent control of the ion internal states. We have recently demonstrated this technique using two isotopes of Ca+ [Phys. Rev. A, 81, 043428 (2010)]. Limits of the method and potential applications for molecular spectroscopy are discussed

  7. IN MEMORIAM ION VATAMANU

    S.P. Palii

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A dreamer in his creative solitude, an objective and lucid analyst of history and contemporaneity, an energetic and decisive leader with an uncanny ability for crisis management – all these describe Ion Vatamanu. His wife Elena and daughters Mihaela, Mariana, Leontina treasure a personal universe in which the magical spark of Ion Vatamanu’s love and joy of life meld the everyday in and out of poetry. Ion Vatamanu’s instantaneous connection to the audiences and deeply felt words still touch the hearts of his many colleagues and friends. Downloads: 2

  8. Ion implantation technology

    Downey, DF; Jones, KS; Ryding, G

    1993-01-01

    Ion implantation technology has made a major contribution to the dramatic advances in integrated circuit technology since the early 1970's. The ever-present need for accurate models in ion implanted species will become absolutely vital in the future due to shrinking feature sizes. Successful wide application of ion implantation, as well as exploitation of newly identified opportunities, will require the development of comprehensive implant models. The 141 papers (including 24 invited papers) in this volume address the most recent developments in this field. New structures and possible approach

  9. Photodetachment of relativistic ions

    A series of fundamental laser ion beam experiments has been made feasible by the high-quality, relativistic (β = 0.842) H- ion beam available at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The relatavistic Doppler shift of the light from an ordinary ultraviolet laser provides what is, in effect, a continuously tunable vacuum-ultraviolet laser in the rest frame of the moving ions. The Lorentz transformation of a modest laboratory magnetic field provides an electric field of several megavolts/centimeter. The latest results of photo-detachment work with H- beams and our spectroscopic work with H0 beams are presented. Plans for future work are discussed

  10. Jet laser ion source

    External laser injector of multicharged ions (MCI) is developed in which wide-aperture aberration-free wire gauze spherical shape electrodes are applied for effective MCI extraction from laser plasma and beam focusing. Axial plasma compression by solenoid magnetic field is used to reduce ion losses due to transverse movement of the scattering laser plasma. Transverse magnetic field created by another solenoid facilitates the effective laser plasma braking and consequently, leads to the narrowing of energy spectrum of plasma ions and its shift towards lower energies. 2 refs.; 3 figs

  11. Heavy ion physics

    The international school-seminar on heavy ion physics had been organized in Dubna in may of 1993. The scientific program of reports covers the following main topics: synthesis and properties of heavy nuclei; synthesis and investigation of properties of exotic nuclei; experiments with radioactive nuclear beams; interaction between complex nuclei at low and intermediate energies. It also includes reports on laser spectroscopy and exotic nuclear beams, on some application of heavy ion beams for the problems of solid state physics, on construction of multidetector facilities and on developing of heavy ion accelerator complexes. Short communication

  12. Ion trajectories in an electrostatic ion guide for external ion source fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Marto, J A; Marshall, A G; May, M A; Limbach, P A

    1995-10-01

    An electrostatic ion guide (EIG) that consists of concentric cylinder and central wire electrodes can transport ions efficiently from an external ion source to an ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) ion trap for mass analysis, with several advantages over current injection methods. Because the electrostatic force of the EIG captures ions in a stable orbit about the wire electrode, ions with initially divergent trajectories may be redirected toward the ICR ion trap for improved ion transmission efficiency. SIMION trajectory calculations (ion kinetic energy, 1-200 eV; elevation angle, 0.30 °; azimuthal angle, 0.360°) predict that ions of m/z 1000 may be transmitted through a strong (0.01 → 3.0-T) magnetic field gradient. Judicious choice of ion source position and EIG potential minimizes the spread in ion axial kinetic energy at the ICR ion trap. Advantages of the EIG include large acceptance angle, even for ions that have large initial kinetic energy and large radial displacement with respect to the central z-axis, low ion extraction voltage (5-20 V), and efficient trapping because ions need not be accelerated to high velocity to pass through the magnetic field gradient. PMID:24214038

  13. EPR of uranium ions

    A review of the electron paramagnetic resonance data on the uranium ions is given. After a general account of the electronic structure of the uranium free atoms and ions, the influence of the external fields (magnetic field, crystal fields) is discussed. The main information obtained from EPR studies on the uranium ions in crystals are emphasized: identification of the valence and of the ground electronic state, determination of the structure of the centers, crystal field effects, role of the intermediate coupling and of the J-mixing, role of the covalency, determination of the nuclear spin, maqnetic dipole moment and electric quadrupole moment of the odd isotopes of uranium. These data emphasize the fact that the actinide group has its own identity and this is accutely manifested at the beginning of the 5fsup(n) series encompassed by the uranium ions. (authors)

  14. Ion plasma electron gun

    In the disclosed electron gun positive ions generated by a hollow cathode plasma discharge in a first chamber are accelerated through control and shield grids into a second chamber containing a high voltage cold cathode. These positive ions bombard a surface of the cathode causing the cathode to emit secondary electrons which form an electron beam having a distribution adjacent to the cathode emissive surface substantially the same as the distribution of the ion beam impinging upon the cathode. After passing through the grids and the plasma discharge chamber, the electron beam exits from the electron gun via a foil window. Control of the generated electron beam is achieved by applying a relatively low control voltage between the control grid and the electron gun housing (which resides at ground potential) to control the density of the positive ions bombarding the cathode

  15. Ion exchange phenomena

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  16. Sensing with Ion Channels

    Martinac, Boris

    2008-01-01

    All living cells are able to detect and translate environmental stimuli into biologically meaningful signals. Sensations of touch, hearing, sight, taste, smell or pain are essential to the survival of all living organisms. The importance of sensory input for the existence of life thus justifies the effort made to understand its molecular origins. Sensing with Ion Channels focuses on ion channels as key molecules enabling biological systems to sense and process the physical and chemical stimuli that act upon cells in their living environment. Its aim is to serve as a reference to ion channel specialists and as a source of new information to non specialists who want to learn about the structural and functional diversity of ion channels and their role in sensory physiology.

  17. Cluster ion beam evaporation

    Cluster ions can be made by the supercooling due to adiabatic expansion of substances to be vaporized which are ejected from a nozzle. This paper is described on the recent progress of studies concerning the cluster beam. The technique of cluster ion beam has been applied for the studies of thermonuclear plasma, the fabrication of thin films, crystal growth and electronic devices. The density of cluster ion beam is larger than that of atomic ion beam, and the formation of thin films can be easily done in high vacuum. This method is also useful for epitaxial growth. Metallic vapour cluster beam was made by the help of jetting rare gas beam. Various beam sources were developed. The characteristics of these sources were measured and analyzed. (Kato, T.)

  18. Radio frequency ion source

    Shen Guan Ren; Gao Fu; LiuNaiYi

    2001-01-01

    The study on Radio Frequency Ion Source is mainly introduced, which is used for CIAE 600kV ns Pulse Neutron Generator; and obtained result is also presented. The RF ion source consists of a diameter phi 25 mm, length 200 mm, coefficient of expansion =3.5 mA, beam current on target >=1.5 mA, beam spot =100 h.

  19. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  20. Ion beam diagnosis

    This report is an introduction to ion beam diagnosis. After a short description of the most important ion beam parameters measurements of the beam current by means of Faraday cups, calorimetry, and beam current transformers and measurements of the beam profile by means of viewing screens, profile grids and scanning devices, and residual gas ionization monitors are described. Finally measurements in the transverse and longitudinal phase space are considered. (HSI)

  1. Physics of Ion Channels

    Kuyucak, Serdar; Bastug, Turgut

    2003-01-01

    We review the basic physics involved in transport of ions across membrane channels in cells. Electrochemical forces that control the diffusion of ions are discussed both from microscopic and macroscopic perspectives. A case is made for use of Brownian dynamics as the minimal phenomenological model that provides a bridge between experiments and more fundamental theoretical approaches. Application of Brownian and molecular dynamics methods to channels with known molecular structures is discussed.

  2. Ion electric propulsion unit

    Light, Max E; Colestock, Patrick L

    2014-01-28

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) thruster is disclosed having a plasma chamber which is electrically biased with a positive voltage. The chamber bias serves to efficiently accelerate and expel the positive ions from the chamber. Electrons follow the exiting ions, serving to provide an electrically neutral exhaust plume. In a further embodiment, a downstream shaping magnetic field serves to further accelerate and/or shape the exhaust plume.

  3. Ion Mass Determination

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus (100) is described for determining the mass of ions, the apparatus configured to hold a plasma (101 ) having a plasma potential. The apparatus (100) comprises an electrode (102) having a surface extending in a surface plane and an insulator (104) interfacing with the electrode (102......, and a processing unit (108) configured to interpret the detected impact locations in terms of the mass of the impacting ions....

  4. 2010 ion run: completed!

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    After a very fast switchover from protons to lead ions, the LHC has achieved performances that allowed the machine to exceed both peak and integrated luminosity by a factor of three. Thanks to this, experiments have been able to produce high-profile results on ion physics almost immediately, confirming that the LHC was able to keep its promises for ions as well as for protons.   First direct observation of jet quenching. A seminar on 2 December was the opportunity for the ALICE, ATLAS and CMS collaborations to present their first results on ion physics in front of a packed auditorium. These results are important and are already having a major impact on the understanding of the physics processes that involve the basic constituents of matter at high energies. In the ion-ion collisions, the temperature is so high that partons (quarks and gluons), which are usually constrained inside the nucleons, are deconfined to form a highly dense and hot soup known as quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The existence of ...

  5. Nanophotonic Ion Sources

    Stolee, Jessica A.; Walker, Bennett N.; Chen, Yong; Vertes, Akos

    2010-10-01

    Interactions between laser radiation and photonic structures at elevated laser intensities give rise to the production of positive and negative ions from adsorbates. These new types of ion sources exhibit properties that are significantly different from conventional laser desorption ionization sources. In this contribution comparisons are made between matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) of biomolecules with ion production from laser-induced silicon microcolumn arrays (LISMA) and nanopost arrays (NAPA). The sharp increase of ion yields from the nanophotonic ion sources follow a power law behavior with an exponent of up to n≈7, whereas in the case of MALDI n≈5. The strong field enhancement in the vicinity of the columns and posts scales with their aspect ratio. Slender high aspect ratio posts show reduced laser fluence threshold for ionization. Posts with diameters at or below the thermal diffusion length demonstrate high surface temperatures due to the radial confinement of the deposited energy. As a consequence enhanced fragmentation, i.e., lower survival yield of the molecular ions is observed. The origin of protons in the ionization of adsorbates was identified as the entrapped residues of the solvent.

  6. Ion mixing and numerical simulation of different ions produced in the ECR ion source

    This paper is to continue theoretical investigations and numerical simulations in the physics of ECR ion sources within the CERN program on heavy ion acceleration. The gas (ion) mixing effect in ECR sources is considered here. It is shown that the addition of light ions to the ECR plasma has three different mechanisms to improve highly charged ion production: the increase of confinement time and charge state of highly ions as the result of ion cooling; the concentration of highly charged ions in the central region of the source with high energy and density of electrons; the increase of electron production rate and density of plasma. The numerical simulations of lead ion production in the mixture with different light ions and different heavy and intermediate ions in the mixture with oxygen, are carried out to predict the principal ECR source possibilities for LHC applications. 18 refs., 23 refs

  7. Nomenclature for Ion channel Subunits

    Bradley, Jonathan; Frings, Stephan; Yau, King-Wai; Reed, Randall

    2001-01-01

    Presents the nomenclature for ion channel subunits. Role of ion channels in the mediation of visual and olfactory signal transduction; Expression of ion channels in cell types and tissues; Assessment on the nucleotide sensitivity, ion conductance and calcium modulation in heteromers.

  8. Radiative ion-ion neutralization: a new gas-phase atmospheric pressure ion transduction mechanism.

    Davis, Eric J; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H

    2012-06-01

    All atmospheric pressure ion detectors, including photo ionization detectors, flame ionization detectors, electron capture detectors, and ion mobility spectrometers, utilize Faraday plate designs in which ionic charge is collected and amplified. The sensitivity of these Faraday plate ion detectors are limited by thermal (Johnson) noise in the associated electronics. Thus approximately 10(6) ions per second are required for a minimal detection. This is not the case for ion detection under vacuum conditions where secondary electron multipliers (SEMs) can be used. SEMs produce a cascade of approximately 10(6) electrons per ion impinging on the conversion dynode. Similarly, photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) can generate approximately 10(6) electrons per photon. Unlike SEMs, however, PMTs are evacuated and sealed so that they are commonly used under atmospheric pressure conditions. This paper describes an atmospheric pressure ion detector based on coupling a PMT with light emitted from ion-ion neutralization reactions. The normal Faraday plate collector electrode was replaced with an electrode "needle" used to concentrate the anions as they were drawn to the tip of the needle by a strong focusing electric field. Light was emitted near the surface of the electrode when analyte ions were neutralized with cations produced from the anode. Although radiative-ion-ion recombination has been previously reported, this is the first time ions from separate ionization sources have been combined to produce light. The light from this radiative-ion-ion-neutralization (RIIN) was detected using a photon multiplier such that an ion mobility spectrum was obtained by monitoring the light emitted from mobility separated ions. An IMS spectrum of nitroglycerin (NG) was obtained utilizing RIIN for tranducing the mobility separated ions into an analytical signal. The implications of this novel ion transduction method are the potential for counting ions at atmospheric pressure and for obtaining ion

  9. Ion-selective electrode reviews

    Thomas, J D R

    1983-01-01

    Ion-Selective Electrode Reviews, Volume 5 is a collection of articles that covers ion-speciation. The book aims to present the advancements of the range and capabilities of selective ion-sensors. The topics covered in the selection are neutral carrier based ion-selective electrodes; reference electrodes and liquid junction effects in ion-selective electrode potentiometry; ion transfer across water/organic phase boundaries and analytical; and carbon substrate ion-selective electrodes. The text will be of great use to chemists and chemical engineers.

  10. Ion optics of RHIC EBIS

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Tan, Y.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2011-09-10

    RHIC EBIS has been commissioned to operate as a versatile ion source on RHIC injection facility supplying ion species from He to Au for Booster. Except for light gaseous elements RHIC EBIS employs ion injection from several external primary ion sources. With electrostatic optics fast switching from one ion species to another can be done on a pulse to pulse mode. The design of an ion optical structure and the results of simulations for different ion species are presented. In the choice of optical elements special attention was paid to spherical aberrations for high-current space charge dominated ion beams. The combination of a gridded lens and a magnet lens in LEBT provides flexibility of optical control for a wide range of ion species to satisfy acceptance parameters of RFQ. The results of ion transmission measurements are presented.

  11. Ion-selective electrode reviews

    Thomas, J D R

    1985-01-01

    Ion-Selective Electrode Reviews, Volume 7 is a collection of papers that covers the applications of electrochemical sensors, along with the versatility of ion-selective electrodes. The coverage of the text includes solid contact in membrane ion-selective electrodes; immobilized enzyme probes for determining inhibitors; potentiometric titrations based on ion-pair formation; and application of ion-selective electrodes in soil science, kinetics, and kinetic analysis. The text will be of great use to chemists and chemical engineers.

  12. Operation of ECR Ion Source

    2001-01-01

    In 2001, ECR ion source was operated for HIRFL about 5138 hours and 8 species of ion beams, such as ~(12)C~(4+), ~(12)C~(5+), ~(36)Ar~(11+),~(13)C~(4+),~(40)Ca~(11+),~(40)Ar~(11+),~(56)Fe~(10+) and ~(18)O~(6+) were provided. Among these ions,~(56)Fe~(10+)is a new ion beam. In this period, 14 experiments of heavy ion physics application and nuclear research were finished.

  13. Clues From Pluto's Ions

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Nearly a year ago, in July 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft passed by the Pluto system. The wealth of data amassed from that flyby is still being analyzed including data from the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument. Recent examination of this data has revealedinteresting new information about Plutos atmosphere and how the solar wind interacts with it.A Heavy Ion TailThe solar wind is a constant stream of charged particles released by the Sun at speeds of around 400 km/s (thats 1 million mph!). This wind travels out to the far reaches of the solar system, interacting with the bodies it encounters along the way.By modeling the SWAP detections, the authors determine the directions of the IMF that could produce the heavy ions detected. Red pixels represent IMF directions permitted. No possible IMF could reproduce the detections if the ions are nitrogen (bottom panels), and only retrograde IMF directions can produce the detections if the ions are methane. [Adapted from Zirnstein et al. 2016]New Horizons data has revealed that Plutos atmosphere leaks neutral nitrogen, methane, and carbon monoxide molecules that sometimes escape its weak gravitational pull. These molecules become ionized and are subsequently picked up by the passing solar wind, forming a tail of heavy ions behind Pluto. The details of the geometry and composition of this tail, however, had not yet been determined.Escaping MethaneIn a recent study led by Eric Zirnstein (Southwest Research Institute), the latest analysis of data from the SWAP instrument on board New Horizons is reported. The team used SWAPs ion detections from just after New Horizons closest approach to Pluto to better understand how the heavy ions around Pluto behave, and how the solar wind interacts with Plutos atmosphere.In the process of analyzing the SWAP data, Zirnstein and collaborators first establish what the majority of the heavy ions picked up by the solar wind are. Models of the SWAP detections indicate they are unlikely

  14. Dielectric coated ion thruster

    This paper describes an ion accelerator apparatus. It comprises: a source of free electrons; a chamber connected to the source of free electrons; means for accelerating the free electrons within the chamber; means for introducing a flow of a gas comprising atoms having a neutral charge into the chamber, the accelerated free electrons colliding with the atoms of the gas causing valence shell electrons to be lost by the atoms, producing therefrom a plasma of positively charged ions; and a metallic grid plate comprising one wall of the chamber and provided with spaced apart perforations extending therethrough, the grid plate being coated on both its inner and outer sides with a layer of an insulating material having a much higher dielectric constant that the metallic grid plate, the grid plate being connected to an electric potential substantially more negative than the positively charged ions so that ions drifting into the vicinity of the metallic grid plate are accelerated toward it, passing out of the chamber through the perforations. The surface of the layer of insulating material on the inner side of the metallic grid plate has an electric potential approximately equal to that of the plasma and thus acting as a screen grid, both layers of insulating material protecting the metallic grid plate from erosion by charged ions and insulating the chamber against thermal and electrical losses

  15. The ion circus

    The ability to prepare radioactive beams to study nuclear structure and dynamics has seen important developments in recent years. The use of ion traps and buffer-gas cooling now routinely enables the accumulation and purification of even short-lived nuclides [1]. This is a key point for future installations such as EURISOL [2] and SPIRAL2 [3] since higher intensity also brings an increase of isobaric contamination which can be disastrous considering background and even radioprotection. Until now, the development of beam coolers and bunchers has relied on linear (radiofrequency quadrupole) Paul traps. In this contribution we describe the progress in developing a cooling scheme based on a miniature radiofrequency storage ring, formed by bending a linear trap into a circle (see Fig.1). The ion circus, so named for its ability to trap ions at different positions along the ring circumference and to eject them in either tangential or perpendicular direction, has also been designed to operate in an adiabatic mass separation mode in which the resolving power is increased as the ions are cooled during the many turns in the ring. The ion circus has now be built and is under test in Orsay. Details of the concept and design were reported in [3]. Here, we report on the results of the first tests and the future program.(author)

  16. Mitochondrial Ion Channels

    O’Rourke, Brian

    2009-01-01

    In work spanning more than a century, mitochondria have been recognized for their multifunctional roles in metabolism, energy transduction, ion transport, inheritance, signaling, and cell death. Foremost among these tasks is the continuous production of ATP through oxidative phosphorylation, which requires a large electrochemical driving force for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This process requires a membrane with relatively low permeability to ions to minimize energy dissipation. However, a wealth of evidence now indicates that both selective and nonselective ion channels are present in the mitochondrial inner membrane, along with several known channels on the outer membrane. Some of these channels are active under physiological conditions, and others may be activated under pathophysiological conditions to act as the major determinants of cell life and death. This review summarizes research on mitochondrial ion channels and efforts to identify their molecular correlates. Except in a few cases, our understanding of the structure of mitochondrial ion channels is limited, indicating the need for focused discovery in this area. PMID:17059356

  17. Synthetic plasma ion source

    An improved crossed-beam charge-exchange ion gun in which a synthetic plasma is formed by injecting an electron beam into a collimated molecular beam just before the molecules are ionized by charge exchange with a crossed primary ion beam, thereby forming a secondary ion beam from the ionized but space-charge-neutralized and substantially undeflected molecular beam. The plasma thus formed extends to an aperture stop in an aperture tube which extends upstream from an anode downstream of which anode a cathode is placed. A field is formed within the cathode/anode space and within the aperture tube into which the plasma extends. The sheath edge of the plasma within the tube is curved by the field to form a meniscus, and the aperture, being smaller in area than the secondary ion beam upstream of the aperture, both collimates the secondary ion beam and acts as a lens stop for the subsequent immersion lens formed by the meniscus and the field region

  18. [Ion specificity during ion exchange equilibrium in natural clinoptilolite].

    He, Yun-Hua; Li, Hang; Liu, Xin-Min; Xiong, Hai-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Zeolites have been widely applied in soil improvement and environment protection. The study on ion specificity during ion exchange equilibrium is of important significance for better use of zeolites. The maximum adsorption capacities of alkali ions during ion exchange equilibrium in the clinoptilolite showed obvious specificity. For alkali metal ions with equivalent valence, the differences in adsorption capacity increased with the decrease of ionic concentration. These results cannot be well explained by the classical theories including coulomb force, ionic size, hydration, dispersion force, classic induction force and surface complexation. We found that the coupling of polarization effects resulted from the quantum fluctuation of diverse alkali metal ions and electric field near the zeolite surface should be the primary reason for specific ion effect during ion exchange in zeolite. The result of this coupling effect was that the difference in the ion dipole moment increased with the increase of surface potential, which further expanded the difference in the adsorption ability between zeolite surface and ions, resulting in different ion exchange adsorption ability at the solid/liquid interface. Due to the high surface charge density of zeolite, ionic size also played an important role in the distribution of ions in the double diffuse layer, which led to an interesting result that distinct differences in exchange adsorption ability of various alkali metal ions were only detected at high surface potential (the absolute value was greater than 0.2 V), which was different from the ion exchange equilibrium result on the surface with low charge density. PMID:25929073

  19. Collisionless ion acoustic shocks in a negative-ion plasma

    Plasmas containing positive ions and electrons together with an additional negative component (e.g. negative ions or particulates) are of interest in subfields of plasma physics ranging from basic plasma physics (solitons and shocks, dusty plasmas) to ionospheric and space plasmas to plasma processing (electronegative discharges and particulate contamination). Such plasmas support two modes of the ion acoustic wave, a 'slow' mode where positive ions, negative ions and electrons oscillate in phase, and a 'fast' mode where negative ions oscillate out of phase with the other two components. When nonlinear steepening is considered, the fast wave may form a negative-potential solitary wave (NPSW), which, with the addition of dissipation (e.g. ion reflection, collisions, turbulence, electron Landau damping), will either disperse, or, more interestingly, form a shock. Recently, two experiments on the formation of shocks in a Q-machine plasma with negative ions have been reported. A low-temperature, negative-ion component was created when electrons attached to added SF6 molecules. In such a plasma, the electron and positive ion temperatures are comparable (∼ 0.2 eV), so that when the negative ion concentration is small (< 50%), ion waves are strongly Landau damped since their phase velocity is comparable to the positive ion thermal velocity. However, a large negative ion concentration increases the phase velocity to a point where damping is weak. Conditions are then right for the formation of a shock. We have simulated shock formation in such a plasma

  20. Laser ion source for isobaric heavy ion collider experiment

    Kanesue, T., E-mail: tkanesue@bnl.gov; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Kumaki, M. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Heavy-ion collider experiment in isobaric system is under investigation at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. For this experiment, ion source is required to maximize the abundance of the intended isotope. The candidate of the experiment is {sup 96}Ru + {sup 96}Zr. Since the natural abundance of particular isotope is low and composition of isotope from ion source depends on the composites of the target, an isotope enriched material may be needed as a target. We studied the performance of the laser ion source required for the experiment for Zr ions.

  1. Molecular Ion Beam Transportation for Low Energy Ion Implantation

    A joint research and development of steady state intense boron ion sources for 100's of electron-volt ion implanters has been in progress for the past five years. Current density limitation associated with extracting and transporting low energy ion beams result in lower beam currents that in turn adversely affects the process throughput. The transport channel with electrostatic lenses for decaborane (B10H14) and carborane (C2B10H12) ion beams transportation was developed and investigated. The significant increase of ion beam intensity at the beam transport channel output is demonstrated. The transport channel simulation, construction and experimental results of ion beam transportation are presented.

  2. Laser ion source for isobaric heavy ion collider experiment

    Kanesue, T.; Kumaki, M.; Ikeda, S.; Okamura, M.

    2016-02-01

    Heavy-ion collider experiment in isobaric system is under investigation at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. For this experiment, ion source is required to maximize the abundance of the intended isotope. The candidate of the experiment is 96Ru + 96Zr. Since the natural abundance of particular isotope is low and composition of isotope from ion source depends on the composites of the target, an isotope enriched material may be needed as a target. We studied the performance of the laser ion source required for the experiment for Zr ions.

  3. Carbon Ion Therapy

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Herrmann, Rochus;

    On the importance of choice of target size for selective boosting of hypoxic tumor subvolumina in carbon ion therapy Purpose: Functional imaging methods in radiotherapy are maturing and can to some extent uncover radio resistant structures found within a tumour entity. Selective boost of identified...... to the surface where the beam enters) are examined. For each plan the minimum,  maximum and the dose averaged LET of the PTV is calculated. The numbers are translated to OER using several sets of data found in literature for various cell lines. Results: We find a strong dependence of the dose average LET and OER...... effect. All cell lines investigated here did not reach an OER of 1, even for the smaller structures, which may indicate that the achievable dose average LET of carbon ions is too low, and heavier ions than carbon may be considered for functional LET-painting....

  4. Low energy ion generator

    In order to investigate the modification of polymer surface by ion bombardment, low energy ion generator has been constructed. In this report were described system design construction, generator components such as power system and evacuation system, the results of performance test. A maximum beam intensity of Kr+ was 1.6 mA at 35 kV on a Ti-target. From the preliminary experimental results of Kr+ irradiation, the coloration (carbonization) of the polymer surface, i.e. the increase of optical density, was observed. The relationship between the optical density change of irradiated polymer film and Kr+ beam currents as measured by Faraday Cup will provide a convenient method to estimate absorbed ion energy in the film. (author)

  5. Ion Conductivity and Sensors

    Ionic transport in glasses was discovered in the 19th century following the classical work of Warburg (1884). Since then, considerable progress has been achieved in both theoretical understanding and practical applications of ion-conducting vitreous systems (see Frischat, 1975; Malugani and Robert, 1980; Ribes, Barrau and Souquet, 1980; Kennedy and Yang, 1987; Vlasov and Bychkov, 1987; Hayashi, Tatsumisago and Minami, 1999; Doremus, 1962 and references therein). Nevertheless, this topic and especially the ion-conducting mechanisms in disordered solids need additional study using traditional macroscopic methods (ac and dc electrical conductivity, tracer diffusion, and ion transport number measurements), as well as advanced structural techniques on third generation synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron sources over a large range of the scattering vector Q. This approach led to the discovery of important features: in particular, different transport regimes at low and high mobile ion content that are closely related to a competition between the stochastic scenario and a non-random distribution of the mobile ions in the glass network. Well-known experimental findings such as compositional dependence of the Haven ratio HR, interpreted earlier by a number of drastically different ion transport models, can also be explained using a unified approach. Many of the new experimental results were obtained for silver and copper chalcogenide glasses which appear to be useful model materials, in part because of a large accessible composition domain, as well as coverage of five orders of magnitude in the mobile cation content, and corresponding dramatic changes in the ionic transport up to 10 orders of magnitude.

  6. Oxygen ion conductors

    Stephen J Skinner

    2003-03-01

    A very interesting subgroup of this class of materials are the oxides that display oxygen ion conductivity. As well as the intrinsic interest in these materials, there has been a continued drive for their development because of the promise of important technological devices such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC, oxygen separation membranes, and membranes for the conversion of methane to syngas1. All of these devices offer the potential of enormous commercial and ecological benefits provided suitable high performance materials can be developed. In this article we will review the materials currently under development for application in such devices with particular reference to some of the newly discovered oxide ion conductors.

  7. LOW ENERGY ION SCATTERING

    2007-01-01

    Low energy ion scattering (LEIS) is the study of the composition and structure of a surface by the detection of low energy ions with energies ranging from 100 eV to 10 keV elastically scattered off the surface. The extreme sensitivity to the outermost atomic layer makes it as a unique tool for surface analysis. In this paper, concepts of shadowing, blocking, and also polar and azimuthal scans have been described. Surface order and surface atom spacings are revealed by using these concepts and...

  8. Magnetic ions in crystals

    Stevens, K W

    2014-01-01

    There have been many demonstrations, particularly for magnetic impurity ions in crystals, that spin-Hamiltonians are able to account for a wide range of experimental results in terms of much smaller numbers of parameters. Yet they were originally derived from crystal field theory, which contains a logical flaw; electrons on the magnetic ions are distinguished from those on the ligands. Thus there is a challenge: to replace crystal field theory with one of equal or greater predictive power that is based on a surer footing. The theory developed in this book begins with a generic Hamiltonian, on

  9. Ion-selective electrodes

    Mikhelson, Konstantin N. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation). Ion-Selective Electrode Laboratory

    2013-06-01

    Ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) have a wide range of applications in clinical, environmental, food and pharmaceutical analysis as well as further uses in chemistry and life sciences. Based on his profound experience as a researcher in ISEs and a course instructor, the author summarizes current knowledge for advanced teaching and training purposes with a particular focus on ionophore-based ISEs. Coverage includes the basics of measuring with ISEs, essential membrane potential theory and a comprehensive overview of the various classes of ion-selective electrodes. The principles of constructing ISEs are outlined, and the transfer of methods into routine analysis is considered.

  10. Ion-selective electrodes

    Mikhelson, Konstantin N

    2013-01-01

    Ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) have a wide range of applications in clinical, environmental, food and pharmaceutical analysis as well as further uses in chemistry and life sciences. Based on his profound experience as a researcher in ISEs and a course instructor, the author summarizes current knowledge for advanced teaching and training purposes with a particular focus on ionophore-based ISEs. Coverage includes the basics of measuring with ISEs, essential membrane potential theory and a comprehensive overview of the various classes of ion-selective electrodes. The principles of constructing I

  11. Light ion fragmentation

    Validation of heavy ion transport codes for treatment planning and evaluation of radiation effects ideally requires that measurements be made for a sufficiently large number of projectile-target combinations to ensure that calculated and measured cross sections agree within acceptable tolerances. For carbon therapy, the most critical need is for validation at energies around a few hundred MeV/nucleon. For space radiation applications, many primary nuclei with a wide range of energies are present, but it has been demonstrated that 800 MeV/nucleon 28Si is a good surrogate for the mixed space radiation ion field. (author)

  12. [Relativistic heavy ion research

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory, participation in the E802 Experiment, which is the first major heavy-ion experiment at the BNL-AGS, was the main focus of the group during the past four years. The emphases of the E802 experiment were on (a) accurate particle identification and measurements of spectra over a wide kinematical domain (5 degree LAB < 55 degree, p < 20 GeV/c); and (b) measurements of small-angle two-particle correlations, with event characterization tools: multiplicity array, forward and large-angle calorimeters. This experiment and other heavy ion collision experiments are discussed in this report

  13. Interferometry with Strontium Ions

    Jackson, Jarom; Lambert, Enoch; Otterstrom, Nils; Jones, Tyler; Durfee, Dallin

    2014-05-01

    We describe progress on a cold ion matter-wave interferometer. Cold Strontium atoms are extracted from an LVIS. The atoms will be photo-ionized with a two-photon transition to an auto-ionizing state in the continuum. The ions will be split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions from a pair of diode lasers injection locked to two beams from a master laser which have been shifted up and down by half the hyperfine splitting. We are developing laser instrumentation for this project including a method to prevent mode-hopping by analyzing laser frequency noise, and an inexpensive, robust wavelength meter. Supported by NSF Award No. 1205736.

  14. Asymmetric ion trap

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs

  15. Microwave Discharge Ion Sources

    Celona, L

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the basic principles, design features and characteristics of microwave discharge ion sources. A suitable source for the production of intense beams for high-power accelerators must satisfy the requirements of high brightness, stability and reliability. The 2.45 GHz off-resonance microwave discharge sources are ideal devices to generate the required beams, as they produce multimilliampere beams of protons, deuterons and singly charged ions. A description of different technical designs will be given, analysing their performance, with particular attention being paid to the quality of the beam, especially in terms of its emittance.

  16. Analytical applications of ion exchangers

    Inczédy, J

    2013-01-01

    Analytical Applications of Ion Exchangers presents the laboratory use of ion-exchange resins. This book discusses the development in the analytical application of ion exchangers. Organized into 10 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the history and significance of ion exchangers for technical purposes. This text then describes the properties of ion exchangers, which are large molecular water-insoluble polyelectrolytes having a cross-linked structure that contains ionic groups. Other chapters consider the theories concerning the operation of ion-exchange resins and investigate th

  17. Ion-selective electrode reviews

    Thomas, J D R

    1982-01-01

    Ion-Selective Electrode Reviews, Volume 3, provides a review of articles on ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). The volume begins with an article on methods based on titration procedures for surfactant analysis, which have been developed for discrete batch operation and for continuous AutoAnalyser use. Separate chapters deal with detection limits of ion-selective electrodes; the possibility of using inorganic ion-exchange materials as ion-sensors; and the effect of solvent on potentials of cells with ion-selective electrodes. Also included is a chapter on advances in calibration procedures, the d

  18. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Gushenets, V. I.; Seleznev, D. N.; Bugaev, A. S.; Dugin, S.; Oks, E. M.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Alexeyenko, O.; Kozlov, A.; Kropachev, G. N.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Minaev, S.; Vizir, A.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4+ ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  19. Ion-Acoustic Instabilities in a Multi-Ion Plasma

    Noble P. Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have, in this paper, studied the stability of the ion-acoustic wave in a plasma composed of hydrogen, positively and negatively charged oxygen ions, and electrons, which approximates very well the plasma environment around a comet. Modelling each cometary component (H+, O+, and O− by a ring distribution, we find that ion-acoustic waves can be generated at frequencies comparable to the hydrogen ion plasma frequency. The dispersion relation has been solved both analytically and numerically. We find that the ratio of the ring speed (u⊥s to the thermal spread (vts modifies the dispersion characteristics of the ion-acoustic wave. The contrasting behaviour of the phase velocity of the ion-acoustic wave in the presence of O− ions for u⊥s>vts (and vice versa can be used to detect the presence of negatively charged oxygen ions and also their thermalization.

  20. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited)

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4+ ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described

  1. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited).

    Hershcovitch, A; Gushenets, V I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Dugin, S; Oks, E M; Kulevoy, T V; Alexeyenko, O; Kozlov, A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Minaev, S; Vizir, A; Yushkov, G Yu

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4(+) ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described. PMID:26932065

  2. Ion-dust streaming instability with non-Maxwellian ions

    The influence of non-Maxwellian ions on the ion-dust streaming instability in a complex plasma is investigated. The ion susceptibility employed for the calculations self-consistently accounts for the acceleration of the ions by a homogeneous background electric field and their collisions with neutral gas particles via a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision term [e.g., A. V. Ivlev et al., Phys. Rev. E 71, 016405 (2005)], leading to significant deviations from a shifted Maxwellian distribution. The dispersion relation and the properties of the most unstable mode are studied in detail and compared with the Maxwellian case. The largest deviations occur at low to intermediate ion-neutral damping. In particular, the growth rate of the instability for ion streaming below the Bohm speed is found to be lower than in the case of Maxwellian ions, yet remains on a significant level even for fast ion flows above the Bohm speed

  3. Heavy ion fusion

    With controlled thermonuclear fusion holding out the possibility of a prolific and clean new source of energy, the goal remains elusive after many years of continual effort. While the conventional Tokamak route with magnetic confinement continues to hit the headlines, other alternatives are now becoming competitive. One possible solution is to confine the thermonuclear fuel pellet by high power beams. Current research and perspectives for future work in such inertial confinement was the subject of the 'Prospects for Heavy Ion Fusion' European Research Conference held in Aghia Pelaghia, Crete, last year. Its main focus was on the potential of heavy ion accelerators as well as recent advances in target physics with high power lasers and light ion beams. Carlo Rubbia declared that high energy accelerators, with their high efficiency, are the most promising approach to economical fusion energy production. However the need for cost saving in the driver accelerator requires new ideas in target design tailored to the particularities of heavy ion beams, which need to be pushed to the limits of high current and phase space density at the same time

  4. Ion storage dosimetry

    Mathur, V. K.

    2001-09-01

    The availability of a reliable, accurate and cost-effective real-time personnel dosimetry system is fascinating to radiation workers. Electronic dosimeters are contemplated to meet this demand of active dosimetry. The development of direct ion storage (DIS) dosimeters, a member of the electronic dosimeter family, for personnel dosimetry is also an attempt in this direction. DIS dosimeter is a hybrid of the well-established technology of ion chambers and the latest advances in data storage using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) analog memory device. This dosimeter is capable of monitoring legal occupational radiation doses of gamma, X-rays, beta and neutron radiation. Similar to an ion chamber, the performance of the dosimeter for a particular application can be optimized through the selection of appropriate wall materials. The use of the floating gate of a MOSFET as one of the electrodes of the ion chamber allows the miniaturization of the device to the size of a dosimetry badge and avoids the use of power supplies during dose accumulation. The concept of the device, underlying physics and the design of the DIS dosimeter are discussed. The results of preliminary testing of the device are also provided.

  5. Heavy ion accelerator GANIL

    This article presents GANIL, a large national heavy ion accelerator. The broad problems of nuclear physics, atomic physics, astrophysics and physics of condensed media which can be approached and studied with this machine are discussed first, after which the final construction project is described. The project comprises a circular injector, a separated sector cyclotron up beam stripper, and a second separated cyclotron downstream

  6. Relativistic heavy ion reactions

    Relativistic heavy ion reactions are reviewed in terms of our present understanding of some selected experimental results from the LBL Bevalac and the CERN ISR. The Lund Model for nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented and its power of predictivity is illustrated. (authors)

  7. Plating with ion accelerators

    A novel technique for coating surfaces with a thin film has been developed. First, the surface is coated with a chemical compound which is then decomposed by exposure to energetic ion beams. The formation of a thin palladium film on a silicon surface is discussed. (author)

  8. Ion-Beam-Excited Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens;

    1976-01-01

    Self-excited electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in an ion-beam-plasma system produced in a DP-operated Q-machine. The frequency of the waves showed the theoretically predicted variation with the magnetic field.......Self-excited electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in an ion-beam-plasma system produced in a DP-operated Q-machine. The frequency of the waves showed the theoretically predicted variation with the magnetic field....

  9. Compact RF ion source for industrial electrostatic ion accelerator

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung, E-mail: hjkwon@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Il; Cho, Yong-Sub [Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Gyeongsangbukdo 38180 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex is developing a single-ended electrostatic ion accelerator to irradiate gaseous ions, such as hydrogen and nitrogen, on materials for industrial applications. ELV type high voltage power supply has been selected. Because of the limited space, electrical power, and robust operation, a 200 MHz RF ion source has been developed. In this paper, the accelerator system, test stand of the ion source, and its test results are described.

  10. Ion Selectivity in Voltage-gated Biological Ion Channels

    Finnerty, J. J.; Peyser, Alexander; Carloni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that a combination of calculating the exact electrostatic potential and approximate volume exclusion within the sub-nanometer selectivity filter of a biological ion channel is critical for estimating the selectivity of the ion channel. Biological membranes separate solutions of different ionic composition which can lead to significant transmembrane voltages and chemical potentials. Ion selective biological ion channels are used by nature to manage these potentials. The high cha...

  11. Negative hydrogen ion production in fusion dedicated ion sources

    Graphical abstract: In RF sources the acceleration of positive ions to a few tens of eV by the plasma potential difference between the driver and the extraction regions can have an important effect on negative ion production by enhancing the negative ion yield from caesiated surfaces and by charge exchange reactions with caesium atoms. The presence of energetic positive ions can have other implications: modifying the virtual cathode in front of the plasma grid, ionizing caesium atoms. Highlights: ► The physics of volume and surface production of hydrogen negative ions is reviewed. ► Effects of positive ion acceleration by plasma potential difference are investigated. ► Caesium ionization in extraction region by electrons and charge exchange are compared. ► Charge exchange with energetic positive hydrogen ions dominates caesium ionization. ► Negative ion production by charge exchange of positive ions with caesium is discussed. - Abstract: A brief description is given of the basic processes in negative ion sources dedicated to fusion. It is considered that in these sources negative ions are produced by ions and atoms interacting with a caesiated surface, but this mechanism is not unique: the volume production, based on dissociative electron attachment to rovibrationally excited molecules, is also active. We suggest that in RF sources the acceleration of positive ions to a few tens of eV by the plasma potential difference between the driver and the extraction regions can have an important effect on negative ion production by enhancing the negative ion yield from caesiated surfaces, and by charge exchange reactions with caesium atoms. The presence of energetic positive ions can have other implications (modifying the virtual cathode in front of the plasma grid, participating in caesium ionization).

  12. Radioactive ion microscopy

    A novel approach has been studied for the characterization of specimens with a spatial resolution at the micron level. The technique dubbed Radioactive Ion Microscopy, (RIM) uses a beam of radioactive ions, specifically tritium ions, of sufficient energy to pass through a thick specimen (e.g. greater than or equal to 10 μm). After passage through the object, the ions are implanted in a stack of thin mylar sheets (1.5 microns thick). Their rest position is proportional to the thickness and the density of the sample transversed. The location of the radioactive species can be pinpointed by autoradiographing the successive mylar foils. The radiographs are photographed and converted into digital data which is used to generate a density map of the object. From these plots, physical and chemical features may be deduced. The feasibility of RIM has been demonstrated with specimen images obtained from different objects exposed to a 3 MeV 3H+ beam. The specimens used included metal grids to examine spatial resolution and a series of biological samples (cork, wood, mosquito wing) to explore the performance and applicability of RIM. On these samples, which were 10 to 30 microns thick with surface areas of up to 1 cm2, a lateral resolution of approx. 1.5 microns was achieved. A depth resolution or sensitivity to density gradients of 0.2 mg/cm2 was obtained. These detailed specimen images can be obtained with low beam exposures, e.g., in the case of tritium approx. 6 x 1010 ions/cm2 must be implanted, which corresponds to an irradiation of approx. 10 pA/cm2 for 1000 s. The corresponding low radiation doses and minimal heat dissipation render RIM well suited for biological specimens. In comparison to light microscopy, RIM features enhanced microscopic capabilities as it can handle objects that are at the same time opaque to light, thick (up to tens of microns), and fragile

  13. Cs+ ion source for secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Various types of cesium ionization sources currently used in secondary ion mass spectrometry are briefly reviewed, followed by a description of the design and performance of a novel, thermal surface ionization Cs+ source developed in this laboratory. The source was evaluated for secondary ion mass spectrometry applications using the COALA ion microprobe mass analyzer. (orig.)

  14. Using Ion Exchange Chromatography to Separate and Quantify Complex Ions

    Johnson, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography is an important technique in the separation of charged species, particularly in biological, inorganic, and environmental samples. In this experiment, students are supplied with a mixture of two substitution-inert complex ions. They separate the complexes by ion exchange chromatography using a "flash"…

  15. Negative ion sources for tandem accelerator

    Four kinds of negative ion sources (direct extraction Duoplasmatron ion source, radial extraction Penniing ion source, lithium charge exchange ion source and Middleton-type sputter ion source) have been installed in the JAERI tandem accelerator. The ion sources can generate many negative ions ranging from Hydrogen to Uranium with the exception of Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe and Rn. Discussions presented in this report include mechanisms of negative ion formation, electron affinity and stability of negative ions, performance of the ion sources and materials used for negative ion production. Finally, the author will discuss difficult problems to be overcome in order to get any negative ion sufficiently. (author)

  16. Membranes in Lithium Ion Batteries

    Junbo Hou; Min Yang

    2012-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries have proven themselves the main choice of power sources for portable electronics. Besides consumer electronics, lithium ion batteries are also growing in popularity for military, electric vehicle, and aerospace applications. The present review attempts to summarize the knowledge about some selected membranes in lithium ion batteries. Based on the type of electrolyte used, literature concerning ceramic-glass and polymer solid ion conductors, microporous filter type separa...

  17. Swift Heavy Ions in Matter

    The 1989 Symposium on Swift Heavy Ions in Matter is reported. The aim of the symposium is to evidence another aspect of heavy ions research at the interplay between atomic and solid state physics. The scope of the Symposium includes the fundamental aspects of heavy ion excitation, ionization, charge exchange, energy loss, energy dissipation and relaxation in solids, channeling and coherent effects in crystals and ion induced modifications of materials

  18. A Cold Strontium Ion Source

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Lyon, Mary; Blaser, Kelvin; Harper, Stuart; Durfee, Dallin

    2010-03-01

    We present a cold ion source for strontium 87. The source is based off of a standard Low-Velocity-Intense-Source (LVIS) for strontium using permanent magnets in place of anti-Helmholtz coils. Atoms from the LVIS are then ionized in a two photon process as they pass a 20kV anode plate. The result is a mono-energetic beam of ions whose velocity is tunable. Applications for the ions include spectroscopy and ion interferometry.

  19. Ion-pair formation in electron recombination with molecular ions

    By studying ion-pair formation in electron recombination with molecular ions, fundamental knowledge on the molecular dynamics can be obtained. In order to study these types of reactions, both the electron recombination as well as the dynamics all the way to the asymptotic limits must be well described. We have used the wave packet technique to study ion-pair formation in electron recombination with HeH+, HD+, H3+ and HF+. We here discuss what will determine the general shape of the ion-pair cross section, the threshold effects, possible interference effects as well as the ratio of the cross sections of ion-pair formation to dissociative recombination

  20. NA49: lead ion collision

    1995-01-01

    This is an image of an actual lead ion collision taken from tracking detectors on the NA49 experiment, part of the heavy ion project at CERN. These collisions produce a very complicated array of hadrons as the heavy ions break up. It is hoped that one of these collisions will eventually create a new state of matter known as quark-gluon plasma.

  1. NA49: lead ion collision

    1995-01-01

    This is an image of an actual lead ion collision taken from the NA49 experiment, part of the heavy ion project at CERN. These collisions produce a very complicated array of hadrons as the heavy ions break up. It is hoped that one of these collisions will eventually create a new state of matter known as the quark-gluon plasma.

  2. Negative Decaborane Ion Beam from ITEP Bernas Ion Source

    A joint research and development effort focusing on the design of steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress for the past two and a half years with a couple of Russian institutions. The ultimate goal of the effort is to meet the two, energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. This endeavor has already resulted in record steady state output currents of higher charge state antimony and phosphorous ions to meet high-energy implantation requirements. For low energy ion implantation, R and D efforts have involved molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 1 emA of positive decaborane ions were extracted at 10 keV and a smaller current of negative decaborane ions were also extracted. Though of scientific interest, negative decaborane ions did not attract interest from industry, since the semiconductor ion implant industry seems to have solved the wafer-charging problem. This paper describes conditions under which negative decaborane ions are formed and extracted from a Bernas ion source

  3. Production of highly charged ion beams from ECR ion sources

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source development has progressed with multiple-frequency plasma heating, higher mirror magnetic fields and better technique to provide extra cold electrons. Such techniques greatly enhance the production of highly charged ions from ECR ion sources. So far at cw mode operation, up to 300 eμA of O7+ and 1.15 emA of O6+, more than 100 eμA of intermediate heavy ions for charge states up to Ar13+, Ca13+, Fe13+, Co14+ and Kr18+, and tens of eμA of heavy ions with charge states to Kr26+, Xe28+, Au35+, Bi34+ and U34+ have been produced from ECR ion sources. At an intensity of at least 1 eμA, the maximum charge state available for the heavy ions are Xe36+, Au46+, Bi47+ and U48+. An order of magnitude enhancement for fully stripped argon ions (I ≥ 60 enA) also has been achieved. This article will review the ECR ion source progress and discuss key requirement for ECR ion sources to produce the highly charged ion beams

  4. Range of ion specific effects in the hydration of ions

    Merchant, Safir

    2011-01-01

    Within the quasichemical approach, the hydration free energy of an ion is decomposed into a chemical term accounting for ion specific ion-water interactions within the coordination sphere and nonspecific contributions accounting for packing (excluded volume) and long range interactions. The change in the chemical term with a change in the radius of the coordination sphere is the compressive force exerted by the bulk solvent medium on the surface of the coordination sphere. For the Na+, K+, F-, and Cl- ions considered here this compressive force becomes equal for similarly charged ions for coordination radii of about 0.39 nm, not much larger than a water molecule. These results show that ion specific effects are short ranged and arise primarily due to differences in the local ion-water interactions.

  5. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  6. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source.

    Kondo, K; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Okamura, M

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented. PMID:20192366

  7. Ion-ion reactions for charge reduction of biopolymer at atmospheric pressure ambient

    Yue Ming Zhou; Jian Hua Ding; Xie Zhang; Huan Wen Chen

    2007-01-01

    Extractive electrospray ionization source (EESI) was adapted for ion-ion reaction, which was demonstrated by using a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer for the first ion-ion reaction of biopolymers in the atmospheric pressure ambient.

  8. Slow Ion Interferometry

    Erickson, Christopher; Durfee, Dallin

    2009-05-01

    We will discuss an ion interferometer which is under construction. The device will utilize a laser-cooled source of ^87Sr^+ ions which will be split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions inside of a conducting cylinder. The interferometer will be able to measure electric and magnetic fields with unprecedented precision. Potential uses of the device include practical applications such as the precision measurement of the evolution of fields near solids to reveal their electronic structure. It will also be used for fundamental tests of the basic laws of electromagnetism and the search for a non-zero photon rest mass. The device should enable the detection of a possible photon rest mass more than 100 times smaller than previous laboratory experiments. We will discuss both the details of the device and the theory connecting deviations from Coulomb's inverse-square law to a theory of massive photons.

  9. Heavy ion fusion III

    This report updates Heavy Ion Fusion, JSR-82-302, dated January, 1983. During the last four years, program management and direction has been changed and the overall Inertial Confinement Program has been reviewed. This report therefore concentrates on accelerator physics issues, how the program has addressed those issues during the last four years, and how it will be addressing them in the future. 8 refs., 3 figs

  10. Small size ion pumps

    This paper describes some designs of the two versions ion pumps and their range operation for various magnetic fields. The first version is made with different cell size in the anode element and titanium cathode operating in magnetic field from 600 to 650 Gs and the second version with the same anode element but differential Ti/Ta cathode working in magnetic field above 1200 Gs

  11. Lithium ion battery production

    Highlights: ► Sustainable battery manufacturing focus on more efficient methods and recycling. ► Temperature control and battery management system increase battery lifetime. ► Focus on increasing battery performance at low- and high temperatures. ► Production capacity of 100 MWh equals the need of 3000 full-electric cars. - Abstract: Recently, new materials and chemistry for lithium ion batteries have been developed. There is a great emphasis on electrification in the transport sector replacing part of motor powered engines with battery powered applications. There are plans both to increase energy efficiency and to reduce the overall need for consumption of non-renewable liquid fuels. Even more significant applications are dependent on energy storage. Materials needed for battery applications require specially made high quality products. Diminishing amounts of easily minable metal ores increase the consumption of separation and purification energy and chemicals. The metals are likely to be increasingly difficult to process. Iron, manganese, lead, zinc, lithium, aluminium, and nickel are still relatively abundant but many metals like cobalt and rare earths are becoming limited resources more rapidly. The global capacity of industrial-scale production of larger lithium ion battery cells may become a limiting factor in the near future if plans for even partial electrification of vehicles or energy storage visions are realized. The energy capacity needed is huge and one has to be reminded that in terms of cars for example production of 100 MWh equals the need of 3000 full-electric cars. Consequently annual production capacity of 106 cars requires 100 factories each with a 300 MWh capacity. Present day lithium ion batteries have limitations but significant improvements have been achieved recently . The main challenges of lithium ion batteries are related to material deterioration, operating temperatures, energy and power output, and lifetime. Increased lifetime

  12. Relativistic heavy ion reactions

    The theory of quantum chromodynamics predicts that if nuclear matter is heated to a sufficiently high temperature then quarks might become deconfined and a quark-gluon plasma could be produced. One of the aims of relativistic heavy ion experiments is to search for this new state of matter. These lectures survey some of the new experimental results and give an introduction to the theories used to interpret them. 48 refs., 4 tabs., 11 figs

  13. Applications of ion beams

    Charged particle accelerator was invented almost seven decades ago with the primary purpose to break the atomic nucleus. The broader inspiration, however, was to understand the structure of matter and the nature around us. Since then the accelerators have evolved enormously in terms of types, intricacies and sizes. They continue to play, primarily, the same role now also but have necessitated, over the years, invention and development of a large number of technologies that are being driven to cutting edge to meet the demands of scientists to carry their researches to unprecedented frontiers in various branches of science. While the first ever accelerator was built to break a 'simple' nucleus of lithium atom, the accelerators of today are trying to recreate the 'big bang' in the laboratory. They have been serving the scientists over the decades to discover new particles and fields. Charged particle accelerators are very commonly used to generate secondary beams for basic research and applications. The secondary beams include neutrons, antiprotons, mesons, neutrinos etc. In view of the experimentalists needs, accelerators have been developed both for electrons as well as ions. While the basic technologies do not differ much, the two varieties offer their own challenges. For each variety, the accelerator can be of linear type or circular type. Generally, a given accelerator accelerates either electrons or ions. In this report we shall be concerned only with the ion accelerators - more specifically about their applications. The accelerators most commonly used to accelerate ions are Cockroft Walton accelerator, Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator, Van-de- Graaff accelerator, linear accelerator (linac), cyclotron and synchrotron. In many situations they may operate in combination and, rarely, there exists hybrid variety also. (author)

  14. Ion transport in pigmentation

    Bellono, Nicholas W.; Oancea, Elena V.

    2014-01-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system,, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmenta...

  15. Ion-proton pulsars

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been publi...

  16. Collective ion acceleration

    Godfrey, B.B.; Faehl, R.J.; Newberger, B.S.; Shanahan, W.R.; Thode, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    Progress achieved in the understanding and development of collective ion acceleration is presented. Extensive analytic and computational studies of slow cyclotron wave growth on an electron beam in a helix amplifier were performed. Research included precise determination of linear coupling between beam and helix, suppression of undesired transients and end effects, and two-dimensional simulations of wave growth in physically realizable systems. Electrostatic well depths produced exceed requirements for the Autoresonant Ion Acceleration feasibility experiment. Acceleration of test ions to modest energies in the troughs of such waves was also demonstrated. Smaller efforts were devoted to alternative acceleration mechanisms. Langmuir wave phase velocity in Converging Guide Acceleration was calculated as a function of the ratio of electron beam current to space-charge limiting current. A new collective acceleration approach, in which cyclotron wave phase velocity is varied by modulation of electron beam voltage, is proposed. Acceleration by traveling Virtual Cathode or Localized Pinch was considered, but appears less promising. In support of this research, fundamental investigations of beam propagation in evacuated waveguides, of nonneutral beam linear eigenmodes, and of beam stability were carried out. Several computer programs were developed or enhanced. Plans for future work are discussed.

  17. Collective ion acceleration

    Progress achieved in the understanding and development of collective ion acceleration is presented. Extensive analytic and computational studies of slow cyclotron wave growth on an electron beam in a helix amplifier were performed. Research included precise determination of linear coupling between beam and helix, suppression of undesired transients and end effects, and two-dimensional simulations of wave growth in physically realizable systems. Electrostatic well depths produced exceed requirements for the Autoresonant Ion Acceleration feasibility experiment. Acceleration of test ions to modest energies in the troughs of such waves was also demonstrated. Smaller efforts were devoted to alternative acceleration mechanisms. Langmuir wave phase velocity in Converging Guide Acceleration was calculated as a function of the ratio of electron beam current to space-charge limiting current. A new collective acceleration approach, in which cyclotron wave phase velocity is varied by modulation of electron beam voltage, is proposed. Acceleration by traveling Virtual Cathode or Localized Pinch was considered, but appears less promising. In support of this research, fundamental investigations of beam propagation in evacuated waveguides, of nonneutral beam linear eigenmodes, and of beam stability were carried out. Several computer programs were developed or enhanced. Plans for future work are discussed

  18. Recent progress in ion sources

    This paper is intended to survey recent developments in ion sources, particularly work reported at the ''Symposium on Ion Sources and the Formation of Ion Beams'' held in Berkeley in October 1974. The approach here will be to subdivide this topic into three main areas; briefly list and discuss notable progress in each; and finally add some additional detail through a few specific, selected examples. The major items of progress discussed include development of large-area plasma surfaces for multiple- aperture ion sources, a significant increase in available negative-ion current densities, and improved general agreement between extraction electrode design and performance. (U.S.)

  19. GANIL Workshop on Ion Sources

    The proceedings of the GANIL Workshop on Ion Sources held at GANIL - Caen on 18-19 March 1999 contains 13 papers aiming at improving the old source operation and developing new types of sources for nuclear research and studies of ion physics. A number of reports are devoted to applications like surface treatment, ion implantation or fusion injection. The 1+→n+ transformation, charged particle transport in ECR sources, addition of cesium and xenon in negative ion sources and other basic issues in ion sources are also addressed

  20. Charge Breeding of Radioactive Ions

    Wenander, F. J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Charge breeding is a technique to increase the charge state of ions, in many cases radioactive ions. The singly charged radioactive ions, produced in an isotope separator on-line facility, and extracted with a low kinetic energy of some tens of keV, are injected into a charge breeder, where the charge state is increased to Q. The transformed ions are either directed towards a dedicated experiment requiring highly charged ions, or post-accelerated to higher beam energies. In this paper the phy...

  1. Cluster ions and multiply charged ions formed in frozen CO2 molecules under heavy ion impact

    A variety of cluster ions, positive or negative, as well as multiply charged atomic ions have been observed from the frozen CO2 targets under (MeV/amu) energetic, highly charged projectile ion impact. Their spectra are found to be quite different from those produced in the cooled expanding CO2 gas targets

  2. Ion acoustic waves in a positive ion-negative ion plasma

    Experimentally observed wave profiles of ion acoustic waves in a dispersive positive ion-negative ion plasma, reported in the literature, are compared with those theoretically derived ones. The possibility of physical applications for plasma diagnosis is suggested. (author). 3 refs, 3 figs

  3. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    Ji, Q

    2003-01-01

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements...

  4. Instrumentation for atmospheric ion measurements

    Aplin, K L

    2005-01-01

    Small ions are part of the atmospheric aerosol spectrum, and study of ion-aerosol interactions is fundamental in atmospheric physics. Air ion physics and instrumentation are reviewed, including the historical context. A miniaturised Gerdien condenser for ion measurement, operating in situ to minimise inlet errors, is described. Two operating modes using independent current and voltage decay measurements are employed. A more sophisticated self-calibrating and fully programmable ion mobility spectrometer (PIMS) based on the same principles, is also discussed. Detailed analysis of error terms and application of new technology is demonstrated to greatly improve its capability. Self-consistent experimental approaches, including ionisation and ion concentration instruments, are used for calibration. In developing and characterising the individual components of the PIMS, favourable and unfavourable operating regimes are identified: this approach can also be applied to other aspiration ion counting techniques. Use of...

  5. Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    Marsh, B

    2013-01-01

    The application of the technique of laser resonance ionization to the production of singly charged ions at radioactive ion beam facilities is discussed. The ability to combine high efficiency and element selectivity makes a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) an important component of many radioactive ion beam facilities. At CERN, for example, the RILIS is the most commonly used ion source of the ISOLDE facility, with a yearly operating time of up to 3000 hours. For some isotopes the RILIS can also be used as a fast and sensitive laser spectroscopy tool, provided that the spectral resolution is sufficiently high to reveal the influence of nuclear structure on the atomic spectra. This enables the study of nuclear properties of isotopes with production rates even lower than one ion per second and, in some cases, enables isomer selective ionization. The solutions available for the implementation of resonance laser ionization at radioactive ion beam facilities are summarized. Aspects such as the laser r...

  6. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    Boytsov, A. Yu.; Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Katagiri, K.; Noda, K.; Ponkin, D. O.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Salnikov, V. V.; Shutov, V. B.

    2015-08-01

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 1010 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5 × 109 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 1011 C6+ ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the 11C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C4+ ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of 11C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated 11C4+ beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the 11C4+ beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons.

  7. Ion sources for energy extremes of ion implantation (invited)

    For the past four years a joint research and development effort designed to develop steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal to develop ion sources and techniques that meet the two energy extreme range needs of meV and hundreads of eV ion implanters. This endeavor has already resulted in record steady state output currents of high charge state of antimony and phosphorus ions: P2+ [8.6 pmA (particle milliampere)], P3+ (1.9 pmA), and P4+ (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb3+Sb4+, Sb5+, and Sb6+ respectively. For low energy ion implantation, our efforts involve molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 1 emA (electrical milliampere) of positive decaborane ions was extracted at 10 keV and smaller currents of negative decaborane ions were also extracted. Additionally, boron current fraction of over 70% was extracted from a Bernas-Calutron ion source, which represents a factor of 3.5 improvement over currently employed ion sources

  8. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Katagiri, K; Noda, K; Ponkin, D O; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B

    2015-01-01

    The Electron String type of Ion Sources (ESIS) was developed, constructed and tested first in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These ion sources can be the appropriate sources for production of pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams which can be used for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact the test ESIS Krion-6T already now at the solenoid magnetic field only 4.6 T provides more than 10^10 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5*10^9 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable for application at synchrotrons. It was also found, that Krion-6T can provide more than 10^11 C6+ ions per second at 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. As for production of 11C radioactive ion beams ESIS can be the most economic kind of ion source. To proof that the special cryogenic cell for pulse injection of gaseous species into electron string was successfully tested using the ESIS Krion-2M.

  9. Status of ITEP decaborane ion source program

    The joint research and development program is continued to develop steady-state ion source of decaborane beam for ion implantation industry. Both Freeman and Bernas ion sources for decaborane ion beam generation were investigated. Decaborane negative ion beam as well as positive ion beam were generated and delivered to the output of mass separator. Experimental results obtained in ITEP are presented

  10. Liquid metal ion source assembly for external ion injection into an electron string ion source (ESIS)

    Segal, M. J., E-mail: mattiti@gmail.com [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7130 (South Africa); University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town 7700 (South Africa); Bark, R. A.; Thomae, R. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7130 (South Africa); Donets, E. E.; Donets, E. D.; Boytsov, A.; Ponkin, D.; Ramsdorf, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joloit-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    An assembly for a commercial Ga{sup +} liquid metal ion source in combination with an ion transportation and focusing system, a pulse high-voltage quadrupole deflector, and a beam diagnostics system has been constructed in the framework of the iThemba LABS (Cape Town, South Africa)—JINR (Dubna, Russia) collaboration. First, results on Ga{sup +} ion beam commissioning will be presented. Outlook of further experiments for measurements of charge breeding efficiency in the electron string ion source with the use of external injection of Ga{sup +} and Au{sup +} ion beams will be reported as well.

  11. Liquid metal ion source assembly for external ion injection into an electron string ion source (ESIS)

    Segal, M. J.; Bark, R. A.; Thomae, R.; Donets, E. E.; Donets, E. D.; Boytsov, A.; Ponkin, D.; Ramsdorf, A.

    2016-02-01

    An assembly for a commercial Ga+ liquid metal ion source in combination with an ion transportation and focusing system, a pulse high-voltage quadrupole deflector, and a beam diagnostics system has been constructed in the framework of the iThemba LABS (Cape Town, South Africa)—JINR (Dubna, Russia) collaboration. First, results on Ga+ ion beam commissioning will be presented. Outlook of further experiments for measurements of charge breeding efficiency in the electron string ion source with the use of external injection of Ga+ and Au+ ion beams will be reported as well.

  12. Unstable Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves Exited by an Ion Beam

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens;

    1976-01-01

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in a quiescent cesium plasma into which a low‐energy beam of sodium ions was injected. The instability appeared when the beam velocity was above 12 times the ion thermal velocity. The waves propagated along the magnetic field with a velocity somewha...... smaller than that of the beam. The dispersion relation was in good agreement with theory.......Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in a quiescent cesium plasma into which a low‐energy beam of sodium ions was injected. The instability appeared when the beam velocity was above 12 times the ion thermal velocity. The waves propagated along the magnetic field with a velocity somewhat...

  13. Arc-Discharge Ion Sources for Heavy Ion Fusion

    A miniature multiple beamlet approach to an injector system was recently proposed in order to reduce the size, cost, and power requirements of the injector. The beamlets of very high current density are needed to meet the brightness requirement. Besides vacuum arc ion sources, cold-cathode gas ion sources are candidates for this application. Vacuum-arc metal ion sources and vacuum-arc-like gas ion sources are discussed. Experiments are presented that focus on the short-pulse plasma composition and ion charge state distribution. Mg and Sr have been identified as the most promising metals leading to mono-species beams when 20 μs arc pulses are used. It is shown that the efficient production of gas ions requires the presence of a magnetic field

  14. Ion-water clusters, bulk medium effects, and ion hydration

    Merchant, Safir; Dean, Kelsey R; Asthagiri, D

    2011-01-01

    Thermochemistry of gas-phase ion-water clusters together with estimates of the hydration free energy of the clusters and the water ligands are used to calculate the hydration free energy of the ion. Often the hydration calculations use a continuum model of the solvent. The primitive quasichemical approximation to the quasichemical theory provides a transparent framework to anchor such efforts. Here we evaluate the approximations inherent in the primitive quasichemical approach and elucidate the different roles of the bulk medium. We find that the bulk medium can stabilize configurations of the cluster that are usually not observed in the gas phase, while also simultaneously lowering the excess chemical potential of the ion. This effect is more pronounced for soft ions. Since the coordination number that minimizes the excess chemical potential of the ion is identified as the optimal or most probable coordination number, for such soft ions, the optimum cluster size and the hydration thermodynamics obtained with...

  15. Charge Breeding of Radioactive Ions

    Wenander, F J C

    2013-01-01

    Charge breeding is a technique to increase the charge state of ions, in many cases radioactive ions. The singly charged radioactive ions, produced in an isotope separator on-line facility, and extracted with a low kinetic energy of some tens of keV, are injected into a charge breeder, where the charge state is increased to Q. The transformed ions are either directed towards a dedicated experiment requiring highly charged ions, or post-accelerated to higher beam energies. In this paper the physics processes involved in the production of highly charged ions will be introduced, and the injection and extraction beam parameters of the charge breeder defined. A description of the three main charge-breeding methods is given, namely: electron stripping in gas jet or foil; external ion injection into an electron-beam ion source/trap (EBIS/T); and external ion injection into an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). In addition, some preparatory devices for charge breeding and practical beam delivery aspects ...

  16. Gas and metal ion sources

    Oaks, E. [High Current Electronics Institute, Tomsk (Russian Federation)]|[State Academy of Control System and Radioelectronics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Yushkov, G. [High Current Electronics Institute, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-08-01

    The positive ion sources are now of interest owing to both their conventional use, e.g., as injectors in charged-particle accelerators and the promising capabilities of intense ion beams in the processes related to the action of ions on various solid surfaces. For industrial use, the sources of intense ion beams and their power supplies should meet the specific requirements as follows: They should be simple, technologically effective, reliable, and relatively low-cost. Since the scanning of an intense ion beam is a complicated problem, broad ion beams hold the greatest promise. For the best use of such beams it is desirable that the ion current density be uniformly distributed over the beam cross section. The ion beam current density should be high enough for the treatment process be accomplished for an acceptable time. Thus, the ion sources used for high-current, high-dose metallurgical implantation should provide for gaining an exposure dose of {approximately} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}2} in some tens of minutes. So the average ion current density at the surface under treatment should be over 10{sup {minus}5} A/cm{sup 2}. The upper limit of the current density depends on the admissible heating of the surface under treatment. The accelerating voltage of an ion source is dictated by its specific use; it seems to lie in the range from {approximately}1 kV (for the ion source used for surface sputtering) to {approximately}100 kV and over (for the ion sources used for high-current, high-dose metallurgical implantation).

  17. Nonlinear Evolution of the Ion-Ion Beam Instability

    Pécseli, Hans; Trulsen, J.

    1982-01-01

    The criterion for the existence of vortexlike ion phase-space configurations, as obtained by a standard pseudopotential method, is found to coincide with the criterion for the linear instability for two (cold) counterstreaming ion beams. A nonlinear equation is derived, which demonstrates...... that this instability actually evolves into such phase-space configurations. A small, but nonzero, ion-temperature turns out to be essential for the saturation into stationary structures...

  18. Cobalt alloy ion sources for focused ion beam implantation

    Muehle, R.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Zimmermann, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Cobalt alloy ion sources have been developed for silicide formation by focused ion beam implantation. Four eutectic alloys AuCo, CoGe, CoY and AuCoGe were produced by electron beam welding. The AuCo liquid alloy ion source was investigated in detail. We have measured the emission current stability, the current-voltage characteristics, and the mass spectrum as a function of the mission current. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  19. Ion structure and sequence of ion formation in acetylene flames

    Larionova, I.A.; Fialkov, B.S.; Kalinich, K.YA.; Fialkov, A.B.; Ospanov, B.S.

    1993-06-01

    Results of a study of the ion composition of acetylene-air flames burning at low pressures are reported. Data on ion formation are compared for flames of saturated hydrocarbons, oxygen-containing fuels, and acetylene. It is shown that the characteristics of ion formation in the flame front and directly ahead of it are similar to those observed in flames of other fuels. These characteristics, however, are different in the low-temperature region. 9 refs.

  20. Positronium-ion decay

    Puchalski, Mariusz; Czarnecki, Andrzej; Karshenboim, Savely G.

    2007-01-01

    We present a precise theoretical prediction for the decay width of the bound state of two electrons and a positron (a negative positronium ion), Gamma(Ps^-) = 2.087 085(12)/ns. We include O(alpha^2) effects of hard virtual photons as well as soft corrections to the wave function and the decay amplitude. An outcome of a large-scale variational calculation, this is the first result for second-order corrections to a decay of a three-particle bound state. It will be tested experimentally in the n...

  1. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited).

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not "sorcery" but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future. PMID:20192368

  2. Practical aspects of trapped ion mass spectrometry, 5 applications of ion trapping devices

    March, Raymond E

    2009-01-01

    Examines ion/neutral and ion/ion reactions, ion spectroscopy, and the structural characterization of proteins and peptides using quadropole ion trap mass spectrometry, Fourier transform - ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, and traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry.

  3. Negative hydrogen ion production mechanisms

    Negative hydrogen/deuterium ions can be formed by processes occurring in the plasma volume and on surfaces facing the plasma. The principal mechanisms leading to the formation of these negative ions are dissociative electron attachment to ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen/deuterium molecules when the reaction takes place in the plasma volume, and the direct electron transfer from the low work function metal surface to the hydrogen/deuterium atoms when formation occurs on the surface. The existing theoretical models and reported experimental results on these two mechanisms are summarized. Performance of the negative hydrogen/deuterium ion sources that emerged from studies of these mechanisms is reviewed. Contemporary negative ion sources do not have negative ion production electrodes of original surface type sources but are operated with caesium with their structures nearly identical to volume production type sources. Reasons for enhanced negative ion current due to caesium addition to these sources are discussed

  4. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW's. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team

  5. Heavy ion toroidal collective accelerator

    Experiments on HIPAC at Maxwell Laboratories have shown that almost all of the confined electrons are trapped and do not go around the torus. A toroidal electric field produces a negligible toroidal electron current. An ion accelerator where electrons are magnetically contained and their space charge contains ions is considered. A toroidal electric field of suitable magnitude can be applied so that it accelerates all of the ions but does not accelerate most of the electrons. This is possible if the magnetic moment of electrons μsub(e) > μsub(i)/Z, where μsub(i) is the ion magnetic moment and Z is the charge of the ion. Ions would be contained by the electron space-charge electric field E, for energies up to ZeER/2 approximately 100 GeV where Z = 60, E = 107 V/cm and the major radius of the torus is R = 3.3 metres. (author)

  6. Radioactive ion beams at Spiral

    The radioactive ion beam facility SPIRAL, presently under construction, will be based on the very high intensity heavy-ion beams (96A MeV at 6kW from He to Ar) at GANIL, France. The facility will produce radioactive ion beams using the ISOL method and a permanent magnet ECRIS which will allow for the production of multiple charged radioactive ions. The beam will be accelerated by a K = 265 compact cyclotron and delivered into the existing experimental areas. The first tests for the production of radioactive ion beams has been undertaken with the test bench separator SIRa. A description of the facility, including the first results for the production of radioactive ion beams and perspectives are given. (authors). 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  7. Radioactive ion beams at SPIRAL

    The radioactive ion beam facility SPIRAL, presently under construction, will be based on the very high intensity heavy-ion beams (96AMeV at 6kW from He to Ar) at GANIL, France. The facility will produce radioactive ion beams using the ISOL method and a permanent magnet ECRIS which will allow for the production of multiple charged radioactive ions. The beam will be accelerated by a K=265 compact cyclotron and delivered into the existing experimental areas. The first tests for the production of radioactive ion beams have been undertaken with the test bench separator SIRa. A description of the facility, including the first results for the production of radioactive ion beams and perspectives are given. ((orig.))

  8. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  9. Review of Polarized Ion Sources

    Zelenski, A.

    2016-02-01

    Recent progress in polarized ion sources development is reviewed. New techniques for production of polarized H‑ ion (proton), D‑ (D+) and 3He++ ion beams will be discussed. A novel polarization technique was successfully implemented for the upgrade of the RHIC polarized H‑ ion source to higher intensity and polarization. In this technique, a proton beam inside the high magnetic field solenoid is produced by ionization of the atomic hydrogen beam (from an external source) in the He-gas ionizer cell. Polarized electron capture from the optically-pumped Rb vapor further produces proton polarization (Optically Pumped Polarized Ion Source technique). The upgraded source reliably delivered beam for the 2013 polarized run in RHIC at S = 510 GeV. This was a major factor contributing to RHIC polarization increase to over 60 % for colliding beams. Feasibility studies of a new polarization technique for polarized 3He++ source based on BNL Electron Beam Ion Source is also discussed.

  10. Air ions and aerosol science

    Tammet, Hannes

    1996-03-01

    Collaboration between Gas Discharge and Plasma Physics, Atmospheric Electricity, and Aerosol Science is a factor of success in the research of air ions. The concept of air ion as of any carrier of electrical current through the air is inherent to Atmospheric Electricity under which a considerable statistical information about the air ion mobility spectrum is collected. A new model of air ion size-mobility correlation has been developed proceeding from Aerosol Science and joining the methods of neighboring research fields. The predicted temperature variation of the mobility disagrees with the commonly used Langevin rule for the reduction of air ion mobilities to the standard conditions. Concurrent errors are too big to be neglected in applications. The critical diameter distinguishing cluster ions and charged aerosol particles has been estimated to be 1.4-1.8 nm.

  11. Air ions and aerosol science

    Tammet, H. [Department of Environmental Physics, Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia (Estonia) 2400

    1996-03-01

    Collaboration between Gas Discharge and Plasma Physics, Atmospheric Electricity, and Aerosol Science is a factor of success in the research of air ions. The concept of air ion as of any carrier of electrical current through the air is inherent to Atmospheric Electricity under which a considerable statistical information about the air ion mobility spectrum is collected. A new model of air ion size-mobility correlation has been developed proceeding from Aerosol Science and joining the methods of neighboring research fields. The predicted temperature variation of the mobility disagrees with the commonly used Langevin rule for the reduction of air ion mobilities to the standard conditions. Concurrent errors are too big to be neglected in applications. The critical diameter distinguishing cluster ions and charged aerosol particles has been estimated to be 1.4{endash}1.8 nm. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Rectangular Ion Funnel: A New Ion Funnel Interface for Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Webb, Ian K.; Prost, Spencer A.; Harrer, Marques B.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Tang, Keqi; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-01-06

    A recent achievement in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) is the ability for near lossless ion focusing, transfer, and trapping in sub-atmospheric pressure regions. While lossless ion manipulations are advantageously applied to the applications of ion mobility separations and gas phase reactions, ion introduction through ring electrode ion funnels or more conventional ion optics to SLIM can involve discontinuities in electric fields or other perturbations that result in ion losses. In this work, we investigated a new funnel design that aims to seamlessly couple to SLIM at the funnel exit. This rectangular ion funnel (RIF) was initially evaluated by ion simulations, fabricated utilizing printed circuit board technology and tested experimentally. The RIF was integrated to a SLIM-TOFMS system, and the operating parameters, including RF, DC bias of the RIF electrodes, and electric fields for effectively interfacing with a SLIM were characterized. The RIF provided a 2-fold sensitivity increase without significant discrimination over a wide m/z range along with greatly improved SLIM operational stability.

  13. Tandem Terminal Ion Source

    OAK-B135 Tandem Terminal Ion Source. The terminal ion source (TIS) was used in several experiments during this reporting period, all for the(sup 7)Be((gamma))(sup 8)B experiment. Most of the runs used(sup 1)H(sup+) at terminal voltages from 0.3 MV to 1.5 MV. One of the runs used(sup 2)H(sup+) at terminal voltage of 1.4 MV. The other run used(sup 4)He(sup+) at a terminal voltage of 1.37 MV. The list of experiments run with the TIS to date is given in table 1 below. The tank was opened four times for unscheduled source repairs. On one occasion the tank was opened to replace the einzel lens power supply which had failed. The 10 kV unit was replaced with a 15 kV unit. The second time the tank was opened to repair the extractor supply which was damaged by a tank spark. On the next occasion the tank was opened to replace a source canal which had sputtered away. Finally, the tank was opened to replace the discharge bottle which had been coated with aluminum sputtered from the exit canal

  14. Tandem Terminal Ion Source

    OAK-B135 Tandem Terminal Ion Source. The terminal ion source (TIS) was used in several experiments during this reporting period, all for the 7Be(γ)8B experiment. Most of the runs used 1H+ at terminal voltages from 0.3 MV to 1.5 MV. One of the runs used 2H+ at terminal voltage of 1.4 MV. The other run used 4He+ at a terminal voltage of 1.37 MV. The list of experiments run with the TIS to date is given in table 1 below. The tank was opened four times for unscheduled source repairs. On one occasion the tank was opened to replace the einzel lens power supply which had failed. The 10 kV unit was replaced with a 15 kV unit. The second time the tank was opened to repair the extractor supply which was damaged by a tank spark. On the next occasion the tank was opened to replace a source canal which had sputtered away. Finally, the tank was opened to replace the discharge bottle which had been coated with aluminum sputtered from the exit canal

  15. Electrically switched ion exchange

    Lilga, M.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Schwartz, D.T.; Genders, D.

    1997-10-01

    A variety of waste types containing radioactive {sup 137}Cs are found throughout the DOE complex. These waste types include water in reactor cooling basins, radioactive high-level waste (HLW) in underground storage tanks, and groundwater. Safety and regulatory requirements and economics require the removal of radiocesium before these wastes can be permanently disposed of. Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) is an approach for radioactive cesium separation that combines IX and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible, and economic separation method that also produces little or no secondary waste. In the ESIX process, an electroactive IX film is deposited electrochemically onto a high-surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. For cesium, the electroactive films under investigation are ferrocyanides, which are well known to have high selectivities for cesium in concentrated sodium solutions. When a cathode potential is applied to the film, Fe{sup +3} is reduced to the Fe{sup +2} state, and a cation must be intercalated into the film to maintain charge neutrality (i.e., Cs{sup +} is loaded). Conversely, if an anodic potential is applied, a cation must be released from the film (i.e., Cs{sup +} is unloaded). Therefore, to load the film with cesium, the film is simply reduced; to unload cesium, the film is oxidized.

  16. Uranyl ion uptake by polyaniline

    Polyaniline (Pani) was synthesized by the chemical oxidation of aniline. The batch mode experiments showed that Pani could be used for the separation of metal ions like uranyl from a mixture. UO22+ was converted into its anionic complex using suitable complexing agent like thiocyanate and the anionic complex is taken up by Pani. Interference studies showed that uranyl ion can be selectively taken up in presence of transition metal ions present in some binary mixtures. (author)

  17. Micromachining using focused ion beams

    Focused ion beam (FIB) systems prove to be useful precision micromachining tools for a wide variety of applications. This micromachining technique includes scanning ion microscopy (SIM), micromachining by physical sputtering, and the ion-beam induced surface chemistry for etching and deposition. This technique is applied to image and modify IC's, to micromechanical applications, to modify the tip shape of tungsten emitters, and to prepare cross sections of selected regions for inspection in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). (orig.)

  18. Other applications of ion microbeams

    The paper concerns the analytical and non-analytical applications of ion microbeams. The analytical applications considered include:-fusion research, environmental studies, ion implantations and criminology, and each is briefly discussed. Non-analytical applications in which nuclear microprobes have been used include:-thickness and uniformity measurements, energy loss radiography, channelling contrast, tomography, topography, ion implantation, and detector testing, and these are also discussed. (UK)

  19. Equipment for ion beam production

    An equipment has been designed to extend the scope of control of ion beam flux for an intensive ion beam source used for plasma injection in magnetic vessels. The control equipment is connected to the electromagnet power supply. A consumption regulator is fitted in the operating gas supply to the hollow cathode of the ion source. A circuit is also included for discharge voltage maintenance consisting of a control element and a discharge voltage pick-up. (M.D.). 1 fig

  20. NONLINEAR ION STOPPING IN PLASMA

    Avilov, S.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Peter, Th.

    1988-01-01

    We present an exact nonlinear solution of the one-dimensional Coulomb-Vlasov equations describing the stopping power of ions moving through a plasma. The solution is compared with the results of the corresponding linearized equations which are commonly used. We discuss the genuinely nonlinear regime. Nonlinear effects become important for highly charged ions at relatively low velocity. For heavy ion stopping in plasma they are relevant close to the end of the range. The method and the results...

  1. Highly Stripped Ion Sources for MeV Ion Implantation

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2009-06-30

    Original technical objectives of CRADA number PVI C-03-09 between BNL and Poole Ventura, Inc. (PVI) were to develop an intense, high charge state, ion source for MeV ion implanters. Present day high-energy ion implanters utilize low charge state (usually single charge) ion sources in combination with rf accelerators. Usually, a MV LINAC is used for acceleration of a few rnA. It is desirable to have instead an intense, high charge state ion source on a relatively low energy platform (de acceleration) to generate high-energy ion beams for implantation. This de acceleration of ions will be far more efficient (in energy utilization). The resultant implanter will be smaller in size. It will generate higher quality ion beams (with lower emittance) for fabrication of superior semiconductor products. In addition to energy and cost savings, the implanter will operate at a lower level of health risks associated with ion implantation. An additional aim of the project was to producing a product that can lead to long­ term job creation in Russia and/or in the US. R&D was conducted in two Russian Centers (one in Tomsk and Seversk, the other in Moscow) under the guidance ofPVI personnel and the BNL PI. Multiple approaches were pursued, developed, and tested at various locations with the best candidate for commercialization delivered and tested at on an implanter at the PVI client Axcelis. Technical developments were exciting: record output currents of high charge state phosphorus and antimony were achieved; a Calutron-Bemas ion source with a 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art). Record steady state output currents of higher charge state phosphorous and antimony and P ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb {sup 4 +}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. Ultimate commercialization goals did not succeed (even though a number of the products like high

  2. Characterization of protonated phospholipids as fragile ions in quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry

    Garrett, Timothy J.; Merves, Matthew; Yost, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Some ions exhibit “ion fragility” in quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry (QIT-MS) during mass analysis with resonance ejection. In many cases, different ions generated from the same compound exhibit different degrees of ion fragility, with some ions (e.g., the [M+H]+ ion) stable and other ions (e.g., the [M+Na]+ ion) fragile. The ion fragility for quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometry (MS) for protonated and sodiated ions of three phospholipids, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocho...

  3. Electron-Beam Ion Source MIS-1

    INP develops and produces electron-beam ion sources of multicharged ions. These ion sources provide a high density of the electron beam in the ionization area at the ion trap ≥ 103 A/cm2. They produce multicharge ions of various elements, both gaseous and solid ones. These ion sources successfully employ the technique of the dozed inlet of solid elements atoms into the ion trap

  4. Ion Beam Modification of Materials

    Averback, B; de la Rubia, T D; Felter, T E; Hamza, A V; Rehn, L E

    2005-10-10

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Ion Beam Modification of Materials, IBMM 2004, and is published by Elsevier-Science Publishers as a special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods B. The conference series is the major international forum to present and discuss recent research results and future directions in the field of ion beam modification, synthesis and characterization of materials. The first conference in the series was held in Budapest, Hungary, 1978, and subsequent conferences were held every two years at locations around the Globe, most recently in Japan, Brazil, and the Netherlands. The series brings together physicists, materials scientists, and ion beam specialists from all over the world. The official conference language is English. IBMM 2004 was held on September 5-10, 2004. The focus was on materials science involving both basic ion-solid interaction processes and property changes occurring either during or subsequent to ion bombardment and ion beam processing in relation to materials and device applications. Areas of research included Nanostructures, Multiscale Modeling, Patterning of Surfaces, Focused Ion Beams, Defects in Semiconductors, Insulators and Metals, Cluster Beams, Radiation Effects in Materials, Photonic Devices, Ion Implantation, Ion Beams in Biology and Medicine including New Materials, Imaging, and Treatment.

  5. Imaging using accelerated heavy ions

    Several methods for imaging using accelerated heavy ion beams are being investigated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Using the HILAC (Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator) as an injector, the Bevalac can accelerate fully stripped atomic nuclei from carbon (Z = 6) to krypton (Z = 34), and partly stripped ions up to uranium (Z = 92). Radiographic studies to date have been conducted with helium (from 184-inch cyclotron), carbon, oxygen, and neon beams. Useful ranges in tissue of 40 cm or more are available. To investigate the potential of heavy-ion projection radiography and computed tomography (CT), several methods and instrumentation have been studied

  6. Radiometric determination of ion mobility

    With the aid of radionuclides it is possible to measure the migration rate of ions in an electric field and to determine their mobility. The radiometric method enables studies in aqueous and non-aqueous electrolytes. The influence of the electrolyte on the migration rate is shown for the silver cation Ag+. A microsynthesis of perbromate labelled with 82Br is described. The mobility of BrO4- is compared with the mobilities of BrO3- and of Br- in various electrolytes. A phenomenological consideration of hydration numbers of halogen ions indicates a correlation between ion mass and ion mobility. (author)

  7. The DCU laser ion source

    Yeates, Patrick; Costello, John T.; Kennedy, Eugene T.

    2010-01-01

    Laser ion sources are used to generate and deliver highly charged ions of various masses and energies. We present details on the design and basic parameters of the DCU laser ion source (LIS). The theoretical aspects of a high voltage (HV) linear LIS are presented and the main issues surrounding laser-plasma formation, ion extraction and modeling of beam transport in relation to the operation of a LIS are detailed. A range of laser power densities (I ∼ 108–1011 W cm−2) and fluences (F = 0.1–3....

  8. Ion beam assisted film growth

    Itoh, T

    2012-01-01

    This volume provides up to date information on the experimental, theoretical and technological aspects of film growth assisted by ion beams.Ion beam assisted film growth is one of the most effective techniques in aiding the growth of high-quality thin solid films in a controlled way. Moreover, ion beams play a dominant role in the reduction of the growth temperature of thin films of high melting point materials. In this way, ion beams make a considerable and complex contribution to film growth. The volume will be essential reading for scientists, engineers and students working in thi

  9. Ion-Bombardment of X-Ray Multilayer Coatings - Comparison of Ion Etching and Ion Assisted Deposition

    Puik, E. J.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Zeijlemaker, H.; Verhoeven, J.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of two forms of ion bombardment treatment on the reflectivity of multilayer X-ray coatings were compared: ion etching of the metal layers, taking place after deposition, and ion bombardment during deposition, the so-called ion assisted deposition. The ion beam was an Ar+ beam of 200 eV,

  10. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited)

    Hershcovitch, A., E-mail: hershcovitch@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Gushenets, V. I.; Bugaev, A. S.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A.; Yushkov, G. Yu. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Seleznev, D. N.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Kozlov, A.; Kropachev, G. N.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Minaev, S. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow 117218 (Russian Federation); Dugin, S.; Alexeyenko, O. [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation State Research Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Organoelement Compounds, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C{sub 4}H{sub 12}B{sub 10}O{sub 4}) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH{sub 3} = P{sub 4} + 6H{sub 2}; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P{sub 4}{sup +} ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  11. Ion distribution function in ion space-charge region

    Experimental results for the ion distribution functions measured into an ion space-charge region near the negatively biased grid of a multipolar confinement plasma system are presented. The ion space charge is produced in argon plasma at a pressure of about 10-4 mbar. Plasma parameters in source chamber were electron density in the range 108 to 1010 cm-3 and electron temperature in the range 0.5 to 6.0 eV. The ion distribution functions were measured using a small electrostatic analyser with two grids of about 8 mm effective diameter and 48% optical transparency. The are two regimes for ion space-charge formation: one regime is stable and another is unstable. The latter consists of large current fluctuations in external electrical circuits. The ion distribution functions for both regimes are measured and the differences between them are pointed out. In the nonstationary regime the ion distribution functions are broader than in the stationary one. This effect is more important if the distance between the grid and the electrostatic analyser is greater than the ion space-charge position. (authors)

  12. Experimental investigation of ion-ion recombination at atmospheric conditions

    A. Franchin; S. Ehrhart; Leppä, J.; Nieminen, T.; Gagné, S.; Schobesberger, S.; D. Wimmer; J. Duplissy; Riccobono, F.; Dunne, E; L. Rondo; Downard, A.; BIANCHI, F.; Kupc, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of laboratory measurements of the ion-ion recombination coefficient at different temperatures, relative humidities and concentrations of ozone and sulfur dioxide. The experiments were carried out using the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber at CERN, the walls of which are made of conductive material, making it possible to measure s...

  13. Production of slow ion beams from a laser ion source

    Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Torrisi, L.; Ando, L.; Celona, L.; Láska, Leoš; Krása, Josef; Wolowski, J.; Woryna, E.; Parys, P.; Shirkov, G. D.

    Vienna : XX, 2000, s. 1598-1600. [European Particles Acceleration Conference. Wien (AT), 26.06.2000-30.06.2000] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : hybride laser ion source * highly charged ions Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  14. Ion-conducting membranes

    Masel, Richard L.; Chen, Qingmei; Liu, Zengcai; Kutz, Robert

    2016-06-21

    An ion conducting polymeric composition mixture comprises a copolymer of styrene and vinylbenzyl-R.sub.s. R.sub.s is selected from the group consisting of imidazoliums and pyridiniums. The composition contains 10%-90% by weight of vinylbenzyl-R.sub.s. The composition can further comprise a polyolefin comprising substituted polyolefins, a polymer comprising cyclic amine groups, a polymer comprising at least one of a phenylene group and a phenyl group, a polyamide, and/or the reaction product of a constituent having two carbon-carbon double bonds. The composition can be in the form of a membrane. In a preferred embodiment, the membrane is a Helper Membrane that increases the faradaic efficiency of an electrochemical cell into which the membrane is incorporated, and also allows product formation at lower voltages than in cells without the Helper Membrane.

  15. Nonlinear integrable ion traps

    Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

  16. Review of ion accelerators

    The field of ion acceleration to higher energies has grown rapidly in the last years. Many new facilities as well as substantial upgrades of existing facilities have extended the mass and energy range of available beams. Perhaps more significant for the long-term development of the field has been the expansion in the applications of these beams, and the building of facilities dedicated to areas outside of nuclear physics. This review will cover many of these new developments. Emphasis will be placed on accelerators with final energies above 50 MeV/amu. Facilities such as superconducting cyclotrons and storage rings are adequately covered in other review papers, and so will not be covered here

  17. Nonlinear integrable ion traps

    Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab; Danilov, V.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2011-10-01

    Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

  18. Miniature Lightweight Ion Pump

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.

    2010-01-01

    This design offers a larger surface area for pumping of active gases and reduces the mass of the pump by eliminating the additional vacuum enclosure. There are three main components to this ion pump: the cathode and anode pumping elements assembly, the vacuum enclosure (made completely of titanium and used as the cathode and maintained at ground potential) containing the assembly, and the external magnet. These components are generally put in a noble diode (or differential) configuration of the ion pump technology. In the present state of the art, there are two cathodes, one made of titanium and the other of tantalum. The anodes are made up of an array of stainless steel cylinders positioned between the two cathodes. All the elements of the pump are in a vacuum enclosure. After the reduction of pressure in this enclosure to a few microns, a voltage is applied between the cathode and the anode elements. Electrons generated by the ionization are accelerated toward the anodes that are confined in the anode space by the axial magnetic field. For the generation of the axial field along the anode elements, the magnet is designed in a C-configuration and is fabricated from rare earth magnetic materials (Nd-B-Fe or Sm-Co) possessing high energy product values, and the yoke is fabricated from the high permeability material (Hiperco-50A composed of Fe-Co-V). The electrons in this region collide with the gas molecules and generate their positive ions. These ions are accelerated into the cathode and eject cathode material (Ti). The neutral atoms deposit on the anode surfaces. Because of the chemical activity of Ti, the atoms combine with chemically active gas molecules (e.g. N2, O2, etc.) and remove them. New layers of Ti are continually deposited, and the pumping of active gases is thus accomplished. Pumping of the inert gases is accomplished by their burial several atomic layers deep into the cathode. However, they tend to re-emit if the entrapping lattice atoms are

  19. Ion-proton pulsars

    Jones, P B

    2016-01-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  20. Ion-proton pulsars

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  1. Ions at hydrophobic interfaces

    We review the present understanding of the behavior of ions at the air–water and oil–water interfaces. We argue that while the alkali metal cations remain strongly hydrated and are repelled from the hydrophobic surfaces, the anions must be classified into kosmotropes and chaotropes. The kosmotropes remain strongly hydrated in the vicinity of a hydrophobic surface, while the chaotropes lose their hydration shell and can become adsorbed to the interface. The mechanism of adsorption is still a subject of debate. Here, we argue that there are two driving forces for anionic adsorption: the hydrophobic cavitational energy and the interfacial electrostatic surface potential of water. While the cavitational contribution to ionic adsorption is now well accepted, the role of the electrostatic surface potential is much less clear. The difficulty is that even the sign of this potential is a subject of debate, with the ab initio and the classical force field simulations predicting electrostatic surface potentials of opposite sign. In this paper, we will argue that the strong anionic adsorption found in the polarizable force field simulations is the result of the artificial electrostatic surface potential present in the classical water models. We will show that if the adsorption of anions were as large as predicted by the polarizable force field simulations, the excess surface tension of the NaI solution would be strongly negative, contrary to the experimental measurements. While the large polarizability of heavy halides is a fundamental property and must be included in realistic modeling of the electrolyte solutions, we argue that the point charge water models, studied so far, are incompatible with the polarizable ionic force fields when the translational symmetry is broken. The goal for the future should be the development of water models with very low electrostatic surface potential. We believe that such water models will be compatible with the polarizable force fields

  2. Heavy ion driver technology

    Major differences between fusion drivers and traditional accelerators include the following. The final beam current needed (/approximately/20 kA in a short pulse) is very much larger for a driver; such beams are dominated by repulsive space-charge effects since, even at 10 GeV, the ions are non-relativistic (v/c = 0.3). Also, the optical quality of the beams (called emittance by accelerator people) must be extremely good to ensure a suitably small focal spot at the pellet. Two schemes, one with a rf linac and storage rings, the other with a single-pass current-amplifying induction linac, are under study, the latter exclusively in the US. The induction linac approach lends itself to an examination in a sequence of scaled-down laboratory experiments since the most difficulties are expected to occur at the low energy end. Experiments and simulation have centered on a study of the transverse and longitudinal control of space-charge-dominated beams which are best described in terms of a non-neutral plasma rather than the traditional single-particle dynamics picture. An understanding of the high-current instability limits is required for arriving at a safe driver design. The final on-target beam current is so high that it must be carried in 16 separate focusing channels leading into the combustion chamber. While the energy deposition of the ions is expected to be entirely classical, there is a wealth of plasma physics phenomena to be explored (by theory and simulation) in the final propagation of these beams through the low-density gas in the chamber and in the environment of the hot target; it is important that none of these could result in a significant portion of the beam missing the focal spot. 13 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  3. Formation of Ion Phase-Space Vortexes

    Pécseli, Hans; Trulsen, J.; Armstrong, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The formation of ion phase space vortexes in the ion two stream region behind electrostatic ion acoustic shocks are observed in a laboratory experiment. A detailed analysis demonstrates that the evolution of such vortexes is associated with ion-ion beam instabilities and a nonlinear equation for ...

  4. Cluster ion impacts on solids

    Experimental methods for the production of cluster ions by expansion of weakly ionized plasmas through a supersonic nozzle and skimmer were described. Techniques for the production of relatively narrow mass distributions of singly charged ions containing as many as thousands of molecules of Hydrogen, Argon, Water, Alcohols and Hydrocarbons were reviewed with an explanation of the dependence of the mean cluster ion size on stagnation conditions in the ion source and the orifice geometry in nozzle or free jet expansions. Diagnostic techniques for the mass analysis and detection of these high molecule weight cluster ions were reviewed. A description of the BNL 400 kilovolt post-acceleration detection system and the advantages of secondary electron pulse distributions were presented and discussed. The application of energetic cluster ion impacts for deposition of large amounts of translational energy in thin films and solid surfaces was the main topic of the presentation. Cluster ions can be used to generate assemblies of atoms in solid surfaces with energies determined by available acceleration facilities. The production of assemblies of thousands of atoms with energies of in excess of several hundred volts per atom is readily achieved. The consequence of the ability of generate high energy densities is among other things the production of craters, cavities and in thin films holes of sizes that are smaller than those achievable by atomic ion bombardment and wet etching techniques. Examples of such results were presented showing holes in thin carbon films obtained by transmissions electron microscopy

  5. Ions beams. Theory and implementation

    After a presentation of the physical phenomena implied by ions beams (stopping power, defects creation), the implementation of ions beams is described (production, separation in terms of masses, experimental devices). Then, two use modes of ions beams are distinguished: analysis and synthesis. When the ion beam is destined to analysis, there are two possible experiments types. In the first case, the sample to be studied is the source of ions production and the analysis consists to separate in mass the ions extracted; this method is destructive. In the second case, the analysis results of the interaction between the light ions beam and a target: the sample. According to the nature of the analysis, different types of detectors can be used to quantify the energy of the particles diffused by the sample (fluorescence, back-scattering of particles). When ions beams are used as tools of controlled alterations of samples, several parameters (energy, flux, dose, nature of the beam, target temperature) are adjustable following to the searched objective (defects creation, ordering, synthesis of new phases or surfaces alteration). The typical experimental devices used for beams production (scheme of sources principle) and the environment of the sample are described in terms of the applications studied. (O.M.)

  6. Ion temperatures in TORTUR III

    Spatially resolved ion-energy distributions are presented for discharges in the TORTUR III tokamak. The measurements are performed in an active method, using a neutral hydrogen probing beam of 20-30 keV, to enhance charge-exchange processes along its path, as well as by the usual passive method. Ion temperatures can amount up to 1 keV

  7. SPS Ion Induced Desorption Experiment

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    This experiment will give a study about the induced desorption from heavy ion (Indium ion run from week 45 in SPS T4-H8 area) impacting LHC type graphite collimator. 4 different samples are located in the 4 chambers 90° one to each other: pure graphite, graphite with copper coating, graphite with NEG coating, 316LN stainless steal (reference).

  8. Ion guiding in alumina capillaries

    Juhász, Z.; Sulik, B.; Biri, S.;

    2009-01-01

    Transmission of a few keV impact energy Ne ions through capillaries in anodic alumina membranes has been studied with different ion counting methods using an energy dispersive electrostatic spectrometer, a multichannel plate (MCP) array and sensitive current-measurement. In the present work, we...

  9. Bundle Security Protocol for ION

    Burleigh, Scott C.; Birrane, Edward J.; Krupiarz, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This software implements bundle authentication, conforming to the Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) Internet Draft on Bundle Security Protocol (BSP), for the Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) implementation of DTN. This is the only implementation of BSP that is integrated with ION.

  10. Band gap ion mass filter

    Ions in a plasma may be radially separated according to mass using a combination of an axial magnetic field and either a radial or azimuthal electric field. The separation is qualitatively different from that obtained by a plasma centrifuge and the characteristics of confined and unconfined ion orbits are analogous to the phenomenon of band gaps in semiconductors