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Sample records for actinium hydrides

  1. Interstellar Hydrides

    Gerin, Maryvonne; Goicoechea, Javier R

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar hydrides -- that is, molecules containing a single heavy element atom with one or more hydrogen atoms -- were among the first molecules detected outside the solar system. They lie at the root of interstellar chemistry, being among the first species to form in initially-atomic gas, along with molecular hydrogen and its associated ions. Because the chemical pathways leading to the formation of interstellar hydrides are relatively simple, the analysis of the observed abundances is relatively straightforward and provides key information about the environments where hydrides are found. Recent years have seen rapid progress in our understanding of interstellar hydrides, thanks largely to far-IR and submillimeter observations performed with the Herschel Space Observatory. In this review, we will discuss observations of interstellar hydrides, along with the advanced modeling approaches that have been used to interpret them, and the unique information that has thereby been obtained.

  2. Extraction of actinium with di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid from hydrochloric and nitric acid solutions

    The extraction of actinium with HDEHP from Cl- and NO3- systems has been investigated. It was found that extraction of actinium from HCl solutions is much better than from HNO3 solutions. Stability constants of actinium complexes Ac(X-)+2 with Cl- and NO3- ligands were determined. Our results show that the actinium formed less stable complexes with Cl- than with NO3- ligands. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  3. The sorption of polonium, actinium and protactinium onto geological materials

    This paper describes a combined experimental and modeling program of generic sorption studies to increase confidence in the performance assessment for a potential high-level radioactive waste repository in Japan. The sorption of polonium, actinium and protactinium onto geological materials has been investigated. Sorption of these radioelements onto bentonite, tuff and granodiorite from equilibrated de-ionized water was studied under reducing conditions at room temperature. In addition, the sorption of actinium and protactinium was investigated at 60 C. Thermodynamic chemical modeling was carried out to aid interpretation of the results

  4. Separation of Actinium 227 from the uranium minerals

    The purpose of this work was to separate Actinium 227, whose content is 18%, from the mineral carnotite found in Gomez Chihuahua mountain range in Mexico. The mineral before processing is is pre-concentrated and passed, first through anionic exchange resins, later the eluate obtained is passed through cationic resins. The resins were 20-50 MESH QOWEX and 100-200 MESH 50 X 8-20 in some cased 200-400 MESH AG 50W-X8, 1X8 in other cases. The eluates from the ionic exchange were electrodeposited on stainless steel polished disc cathode and platinum electrode as anode; under a current ODF 10mA for 2.5 to 5 hours and of 100mA for .5 of an hour. it was possible to identify the Actinium 227 by means of its descendents, TH-227 and RA-223, through alpha spectroscopy. Due to the radiochemical purity which the electro deposits were obtained the Actinium 227 was low and was not quantitatively determined. A large majority of the members of the natural radioactive series 3 were identified and even alpha energies reported in the literature with very low percentages of non-identified emissions were observed. We conclude that a more precise study is needed concerning ionic exchange and electrodeposit to obtain an Actinium 227 of radiochemical purity. (Author)

  5. Spectroscopic and computational investigation of actinium coordination chemistry.

    Ferrier, Maryline G; Batista, Enrique R; Berg, John M; Birnbaum, Eva R; Cross, Justin N; Engle, Jonathan W; La Pierre, Henry S; Kozimor, Stosh A; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S; Stein, Benjamin W; Stieber, S Chantal E; Wilson, Justin J

    2016-01-01

    Actinium-225 is a promising isotope for targeted-α therapy. Unfortunately, progress in developing chelators for medicinal applications has been hindered by a limited understanding of actinium chemistry. This knowledge gap is primarily associated with handling actinium, as it is highly radioactive and in short supply. Hence, Ac(III) reactivity is often inferred from the lanthanides and minor actinides (that is, Am, Cm), with limited success. Here we overcome these challenges and characterize actinium in HCl solutions using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics density functional theory. The Ac-Cl and Ac-OH2O distances are measured to be 2.95(3) and 2.59(3) Å, respectively. The X-ray absorption spectroscopy comparisons between Ac(III) and Am(III) in HCl solutions indicate Ac(III) coordinates more inner-sphere Cl(1-) ligands (3.2±1.1) than Am(III) (0.8±0.3). These results imply diverse reactivity for the +3 actinides and highlight the unexpected and unique Ac(III) chemical behaviour. PMID:27531582

  6. Discovery of the actinium, thorium, protactinium, and uranium isotopes

    Fry, C; Thoennessen, M

    2012-01-01

    Currently, 31 actinium, 31 thorium, 28 protactinium, and 23 uranium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  7. Production of high-purity radium-223 from legacy actinium-beryllium neutron sources.

    Soderquist, Chuck Z; McNamara, Bruce K; Fisher, Darrell R

    2012-07-01

    Radium-223 is a short-lived alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide with potential applications in cancer treatment. Research to develop new radiopharmaceuticals employing (223)Ra has been hindered by poor availability due to the small quantities of parent actinium-227 available world-wide. The purpose of this study was to develop innovative and cost-effective methods to obtain high-purity (223)Ra from (227)Ac. We obtained (227)Ac from two surplus actinium-beryllium neutron generators. We retrieved the actinium/beryllium buttons from the sources and dissolved them in a sulfuric-nitric acid solution. A crude actinium solid was recovered from the solution by coprecipitation with thorium fluoride, leaving beryllium in solution. The crude actinium was purified to provide about 40 milligrams of actinium nitrate using anion exchange in methanol-water-nitric acid solution. The purified actinium was then used to generate high-purity (223)Ra. We extracted (223)Ra using anion exchange in a methanol-water-nitric acid solution. After the radium was separated, actinium and thorium were then eluted from the column and dried for interim storage. This single-pass separation produces high purity, carrier-free (223)Ra product, and does not disturb the (227)Ac/(227)Th equilibrium. A high purity, carrier-free (227)Th was also obtained from the actinium using a similar anion exchange in nitric acid. These methods enable efficient production of (223)Ra for research and new alpha-emitter radiopharmaceutical development. PMID:22697483

  8. Hydride compressor

    Powell, James R.; Salzano, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Method of producing high energy pressurized gas working fluid power from a low energy, low temperature heat source, wherein the compression energy is gained by using the low energy heat source to desorb hydrogen gas from a metal hydride bed and the desorbed hydrogen for producing power is recycled to the bed, where it is re-adsorbed, with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source. In one embodiment, the adsorption-desorption cycle provides a chemical compressor that is powered by the low energy heat source, and the compressor is connected to a regenerative gas turbine having a high energy, high temperature heat source with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source.

  9. Radium, thorium, and actinium extraction from seawater using an improved manganese-oxide-coated fiber

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the efficiency with which improved manganese-oxide-coated acrylic fibers extract radium, thorium, and actinium from seawater. Tests were made using surface seawater spiked with 227Ac, 227Th and 223Ra. For sample volumes of approximately 30 liters and flow rates up to 0.5 liters per minute, radium and actinium are removed quantitatively. Approximately 80-95% of the thorium is removed under these same conditions. (Auth.)

  10. Synthesis of ruthenium hydride

    Kuzovnikov, M. A.; Tkacz, M.

    2016-02-01

    Ruthenium hydride was synthesized at a hydrogen pressure of about 14 GPa in a diamond-anvil cell. Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction was used to monitor the ruthenium crystal structure as a function of hydrogen pressure up to 30 GPa. The hydride formation was accompanied by phase transition from the original hcp structure of the pristine metal to the fcc structure. Our results confirmed the theoretical prediction of ruthenium hydride formation under hydrogen pressure. The standard Gibbs free energy of the ruthenium hydride formation reaction was calculated assuming the pressure of decomposition as the equilibrium pressure.

  11. Hydrolysis of lithium hydride

    Due to its high hydrogen density and unique nuclear chemistry, lithium hydride, in all its isotopic forms, has an unsurpassed place in modem nuclear weapons. The hydrolysis of the material, and the outgassing of hydrogen from the bulk, are crucial to the performance of the material in service. This thesis describes research conducted at AWE Aldermaston, UK, to examine the hydrolysis and hydrogen outgassing from the bulk material, with the aim of ultimately developing the kinetics 8c mechanisms responsible. The basic chemistry is of great interest, especially the reaction with water. This reaction, whilst being fairly extensively studied in the past, has not been conclusively described with an accepted mechanism and associated kinetics. The last significant UK work on the topic was by Imperial College, London, under contract to AW(R)E in the late 1960s. This thesis describes the development of: (i) a solid state NMR spectroscopy technique to examine semi-quantitatively the surface of bulk lithium hydride for its chemical composition, and (ii) a dedicated lithium hydride inert atmosphere gravimetric analysis glove box to study the hydride/water reaction. Solid State NMR Spectroscopy has been utilised for the first time to probe the hydride/hydroxide ratio of partially hydrolysed lithium hydride. 6Li chemical shifts have been established for species of interest and extremely long, up to 17 hours, T1 relaxation times have been measured for 6Li hydride and hydroxide. A method for semi-quantitatively determining the hydroxide/hydride composition of a partially reacted sample has been developed, based on a 'dual-scan' technique using one short and one long pulse sequence. Gravimetric analysis has been developed for lithium hydride/humidity studies. This facility fully contains gravimetric analysis within an argon glove box, with the ability to control the sample atmosphere from room temperature to 60 deg C and from 0.5 to 40 percent relative humidity. The hydrolysis of

  12. Production of Actinium-225 via High Energy Proton Induced Spallation of Thorium-232

    The science of cancer research is currently expanding its use of alpha particle emitting radioisotopes. Coupled with the discovery and proliferation of molecular species that seek out and attach to tumors, new therapy and diagnostics are being developed to enhance the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This latest technology is commonly referred to as Alpha Immunotherapy (AIT). Actinium-225/Bismuth-213 is a parent/daughter alpha-emitting radioisotope pair that is highly sought after because of the potential for treating numerous diseases and its ability to be chemically compatible with many known and widely used carrier molecules (such as monoclonal antibodies and proteins/peptides). Unfortunately, the worldwide supply of actinium-225 is limited to about 1,000mCi annually and most of that is currently spoken for, thus limiting the ability of this radioisotope pair to enter into research and subsequently clinical trials. The route proposed herein utilizes high energy protons to produce actinium-225 via spallation of a thorium-232 target. As part of previous R and D efforts carried out at Argonne National Laboratory recently in support of the proposed US FRIB facility, it was shown that a very effective production mechanism for actinium-225 is spallation of thorium-232 by high energy proton beams. The base-line simulation for the production rate of actinium-225 by this reaction mechanism is 8E12 atoms per second at 200 MeV proton beam energy with 50 g/cm2 thorium target and 100 kW beam power. An irradiation of one actinium-225 half-life (10 days) produces ∼100 Ci of actinium-225. For a given beam current the reaction cross section increases slightly with energy to about 400 MeV and then decreases slightly for beam energies in the several GeV regime. The object of this effort is to refine the simulations at proton beam energies of 400 MeV and above up to about 8 GeV. Once completed, the simulations will be experimentally verified using 400 MeV and 8 GeV protons

  13. Production of Actinium-225 via High Energy Proton Induced Spallation of Thorium-232

    Harvey, James T.; Nolen, Jerry; Vandergrift, George; Gomes, Itacil; Kroc, Tom; Horwitz, Phil; McAlister, Dan; Bowers, Del; Sullivan, Vivian; Greene, John

    2011-12-30

    The science of cancer research is currently expanding its use of alpha particle emitting radioisotopes. Coupled with the discovery and proliferation of molecular species that seek out and attach to tumors, new therapy and diagnostics are being developed to enhance the treatment of cancer and other diseases. This latest technology is commonly referred to as Alpha Immunotherapy (AIT). Actinium-225/Bismuth-213 is a parent/daughter alpha-emitting radioisotope pair that is highly sought after because of the potential for treating numerous diseases and its ability to be chemically compatible with many known and widely used carrier molecules (such as monoclonal antibodies and proteins/peptides). Unfortunately, the worldwide supply of actinium-225 is limited to about 1,000mCi annually and most of that is currently spoken for, thus limiting the ability of this radioisotope pair to enter into research and subsequently clinical trials. The route proposed herein utilizes high energy protons to produce actinium-225 via spallation of a thorium-232 target. As part of previous R and D efforts carried out at Argonne National Laboratory recently in support of the proposed US FRIB facility, it was shown that a very effective production mechanism for actinium-225 is spallation of thorium-232 by high energy proton beams. The base-line simulation for the production rate of actinium-225 by this reaction mechanism is 8E12 atoms per second at 200 MeV proton beam energy with 50 g/cm2 thorium target and 100 kW beam power. An irradiation of one actinium-225 half-life (10 days) produces {approx}100 Ci of actinium-225. For a given beam current the reaction cross section increases slightly with energy to about 400 MeV and then decreases slightly for beam energies in the several GeV regime. The object of this effort is to refine the simulations at proton beam energies of 400 MeV and above up to about 8 GeV. Once completed, the simulations will be experimentally verified using 400 MeV and 8 Ge

  14. Lightweight hydride storage materials

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The need for lightweight hydrides in vehicular applications has prompted considerable research into the use of magnesium and its alloys. Although this earlier work has provided some improved performance in operating temperature and pressure, substantial improvements are needed before these materials will significantly enhance the performance of an engineered system on a vehicle. We are extending the work of previous investigators on Mg alloys to reduce the operating temperature and hydride heat of formation in light weight materials. Two important results will be discussed in this paper: (1) a promising new alloy hydride was found which has better pressure-temperature characteristics than any previous Mg alloy and, (2) a new fabrication process for existing Mg alloys was developed and demonstrated. The new alloy hydride is composed of magnesium, aluminum and nickel. It has an equilibrium hydrogen overpressure of 1.3 atm. at 200{degrees}C and a storage capacity between 3 and 4 wt.% hydrogen. A hydrogen release rate of approximately 5 x 10{sup -4} moles-H{sub 2}/gm-min was measured at 200{degrees}C. The hydride heat of formation was found to be 13.5 - 14 kcal/mole-H{sub 2}, somewhat lower than Mg{sub 2}Ni. The new fabrication method takes advantage of the high vapor transport of magnesium. It was found that Mg{sub 2}Ni produced by our low temperature process was better than conventional materials because it was single phase (no Mg phase) and could be fabricated with very small particle sizes. Hydride measurements on this material showed faster kinetic response than conventional material. The technique could potentially be applied to in-situ hydride bed fabrication with improved packing density, release kinetics, thermal properties and mechanical stability.

  15. Conference 'Chemistry of hydrides' Proceedings

    This collection of thesis of conference of Chemistry hydrides presents the results of investigations concerning of base questions of chemistry of nonorganic hydrides, including synthesis questions, studying of physical and chemical properties, thermodynamics, analytical chemistry, investigation of structure, equilibriums in the systems of metal-hydrogen, behaviour of nonorganic hydrides in non-water mediums and applying investigations in the chemistry area and technology of nonorganic hydrides

  16. Neutron-Induced Fission of Actinium-227, Protactinium-231 and Neptunium-237: Mass Distribution

    Results of radiochemical studies on the mass distribution in the neutron-induced fission of actinium-227, protactinium-231 and neptunium-237 have been presented. This work has been carried out as part of a programme to determine the mass distribution in the fission of heavy elements as a function of Z and A. All irradiations have been carried out in the core of the swimming-pool type reactor APSARA with cadmium shielding wherever necessary. Relative yields of several fission product nuclides have been obtained by a method involving a comparison of the fission product activities from the respective targets with those formed from uranium-235 simultaneously irradiated. Thermal-neutron fission yields of uranium-235 have been assumed. These results indicate a predominantly asymmetric mass distribution in all the three cases, and also a distinct though small symmetric peak in the case of actinium-227. (author)

  17. A new method for the determination of low-level actinium-227 in geological samples

    We developed a new method for the determination of 227Ac in geological samples. The method uses extraction chromatographic techniques and alpha-spectrometry and is applicable for a range of natural matrices. Here we report on the procedure and results of the analysis of water (fresh and seawater) and rock samples. Water samples were acidified and rock samples underwent total dissolution via acid leaching. A DGA (N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide) extraction chromatographic column was used for the separation of actinium. The actinium fraction was prepared for alpha spectrometric measurement via cerium fluoride micro-precipitation. Recoveries of actinium in water samples were 80 ± 8 % (number of analyses n = 14) and in rock samples 70 ± 12 % (n = 30). The minimum detectable activities (MDA) were 0.017-0.5 Bq kg-1 for both matrices. Rock sample 227Ac activities ranged from 0.17 to 8.3 Bq kg-1 and water sample activities ranged from below MDA values to 14 Bq kg-1of 227Ac. From the analysis of several standard rock and water samples with the method we found very good agreement between our results and certified values. (author)

  18. Metal hydride actuation device

    A self-recocking actuation device is disclosed. One possible use for it is in conjunction with a pneumatic fire protection system. This invention employs the process known as occlusion to store large amounts of gas in a small volume. Metal hydrides in a chamber are used to store hydrogen in the disclosed preferred embodiment. Upon the application of heat-from a heat source like a resistance heater-the charged metal hydride releases its hydrogen (H2) in a chamber having only one exit opening which empties into a sealed bellows. This bellows contacts a piston located in another chamber wherein a biased resetting spring is provided to normally maintain the piston in contact with the bellows. As the pressure from the H2 gas builds up, it overcomes the biased spring to move it and the piston along with an associated pin or other actuator. If used to actuate a pneumatic fire protection system, the pin or actuator at the downward side of its stroke in turn, may puncture a shearable diaphragm or in some other way releases the contents of a container containing a second gas, like nitrogen (N2), which is then released from a second exit port in a different chamber to charge the fire protection system. Recocking of the piston begins as the heating of the metal hydride ceases. As cooling takes place the hydrogen is absorbed to reenter the hydride to decrease the gas pressure supplied. The piston's biased resetting spring then recocks the piston to its original position

  19. Air and metal hydride battery

    Lampinen, M.; Noponen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Applied Thermodynamics

    1998-12-31

    The main goal of the air and metal hydride battery project was to enhance the performance and manufacturing technology of both electrodes to such a degree that an air-metal hydride battery could become a commercially and technically competitive power source for electric vehicles. By the end of the project it was possible to demonstrate the very first prototype of the air-metal hydride battery at EV scale, achieving all the required design parameters. (orig.)

  20. Materials engineering of metal hydrides

    Intermetallic hydrides of the AB5 type have enthalpies in the range valid for chemical heat pumps. A scheme for manufacturing hydrides with optimal properties for a chemical heat pump is described, using LaNi/sub 5-x/Al/sub x/ and ZrV/sub 2x/Cr/sub x as examples. The Laves-phase ternary hydrides appear to be good candidates for gettering hydrogen in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

  1. Effects of microwave irradiation on metal hydrides and complex hydrides

    Effects of single-mode microwave irradiation on metal hydrides, MHn (LiH, MgH2, CaH2, TiH2, VH0.81, ZrH2, and LaH2.48) and complex hydrides MBH4 (LiBH4, NaBH4, and KBH4) were systematically investigated. Among the metal hydrides, TiH2, VH0.81, ZrH2, and LaH2.48 exhibit a rapid heating by microwave irradiation, where small amount of hydrogen (less than 0.5 mass%) are desorbed. On the other hand, LiBH4 is heated above 380 K by microwave irradiation, where 13.7 mass% of hydrogen is desorbed. The rapid heating of metal hydrides such as TiH2, VH0.81, ZrH2, and LaH2.48 are mainly due to the conductive loss. Meanwhile the microwave heating in LiBH4 is attributed to the conductive loss which is caused by a structural transition. The difference in the amount of desorbed hydrogen between metal hydrides and complex hydrides might be caused by the different microwave penetration depth and/or the temperature saturation in the microwave irradiation process. Microwave heating might be applied to hydrogen storage system, though further development of hydrides themselves and engineering techniques are required

  2. Analysis of the gamma spectra of the uranium, actinium, and thorium decay series

    Momeni, M.H.

    1981-09-01

    This report describes the identification of radionuclides in the uranium, actinium, and thorium series by analysis of gamma spectra in the energy range of 40 to 1400 keV. Energies and absolute efficiencies for each gamma line were measured by means of a high-resolution germanium detector and compared with those in the literature. A gamma spectroscopy method, which utilizes an on-line computer for deconvolution of spectra, search and identification of each line, and estimation of activity for each radionuclide, was used to analyze soil and uranium tailings, and ore.

  3. Analysis of the gamma spectra of the uranium, actinium, and thorium decay series

    This report describes the identification of radionuclides in the uranium, actinium, and thorium series by analysis of gamma spectra in the energy range of 40 to 1400 keV. Energies and absolute efficiencies for each gamma line were measured by means of a high-resolution germanium detector and compared with those in the literature. A gamma spectroscopy method, which utilizes an on-line computer for deconvolution of spectra, search and identification of each line, and estimation of activity for each radionuclide, was used to analyze soil and uranium tailings, and ore

  4. Preparation of metallic terbium and terbium hydride

    A method of metallic terbium preparation is described. The method consists in vacuum thermolysis of terbium hydride prepared as a result of terbium chloride interaction with lithium hydride. The prepared modification of terbium hydride demonstrates a high stability in the air. It is pointed out that problems arising from direct hydridation of the metal are responsible for certain advantages of the terbium hydride preparation method described

  5. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  6. Metal hydride air conditioner

    YANG; Ke; DU; Ping; LU; Man-qi

    2005-01-01

    The relationship among the hydrogen storage properties, cycling characteristics and thermal parameters of the metal hydride air conditioning systems was investigated. Based on a new alloy selection model, three pairs of hydrogen storage alloys, LaNi4.4 Mn0.26 Al0.34 / La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1, LaNi4.61Mn0. 26 Al0.13/La0.6 Nd0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 Cu0. 1 and LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0.13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0. 2, were selected as the working materials for the metal hydride air conditioning system. Studies on the factors affecting the COP of the system showed that higher COP and available hydrogen content need the proper operating temperature and cycling time,large hydrogen storage capacity, flat plateau and small hysterisis of hydrogen alloys, proper original input hydrogen content and mass ratio of the pair of alloys. It also needs small conditioning system was established by using LaNi4.61 Mn0.26 Al0. 13/La0.6 Y0.4 Ni4.8 Mn0.2 alloys as the working materials, which showed that under the operating temperature of 180℃/40℃, a low temperature of 13℃ was reached, with COP =0.38 and Wnet =0.09 kW/kg.

  7. Hydride development for hydrogen storage

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Sandrock, G. [SunaTech, Inc., Ringwood, NJ (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate improved hydride materials for hydrogen storage. The work currently is organized into four tasks: hydride development, bed fabrication, materials support for engineering systems, and IEA Annex 12 activities. At the present time, hydride development is focused on Mg alloys. These materials generally have higher weight densities for storing hydrogen than rare earth or transition metal alloys, but suffer from high operating temperatures, slow kinetic behavior and material stability. The authors approach is to study bulk alloy additions which increase equilibrium overpressure, in combination with stable surface alloy modification and particle size control to improve kinetic properties. This work attempts to build on the considerable previous research in this area, but examines specific alloy systems in greater detail, with attention to known phase properties and structures. The authors have found that specific phases can be produced which have significantly improved hydride properties compared to previous studies.

  8. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  9. Low density metal hydride foams

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam. 6 figures

  10. Geoneutrino and Hydridic Earth model

    Bezrukov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Uranium, Thorium and Potassium-40 abundances in the Earth were calculated in the frame of Hydridic Earth model. Terrestrial heat producton from U, Th and K40 decays was calculated also. We must admit the existance of Earth expansion process to understand the obtained large value of terrestrial heat producton. The geoneutrino detector with volume more than 5 kT (LENA type) must be constructed to definitely separate between Bulk Silicat Earth model and Hydridic Earth model.

  11. Mechanical properties and fracture of titanium hydrides

    Titanium hydrides tend to suffer fracture when their thicknesses reach a critical thickness. Morphology and mechanical property of the hydrides are, however, not well known. The study aims to reveal the hydride morphology and fracture types of the hydrides. Chevron shaped plate hydrides were found to be produced on the surface of pure titanium (Grade 1) and Grade 7 titanium absorbing hydrogen. There were tree types of fracture of the hydrides, i.e., crack in hydride layer, exfoliation of the layer and shear-type fracture of the hydride plates, during the growth of the hydrides and deformation. We next estimated the true stress-strain curves of the hydrides on Grade 1 and 7 titanium using the dual Vickers indentation method, and the critical strain causing the Mode-I fine crack by indentation. Fracture strength and strain of the hydrides in Grade 1 titanium were estimated as 566 MPa and 4.5%, respectively. Those of the hydride in Grade 7 titanium were 498 MPa and 16%. Though the fracture strains estimated from the plastic instability of true stress-strain curves were approximately the half of those estimated by finite element method, the titanium hydrides were estimated to possess some extent of toughness or plastic deformation capability. (author)

  12. Hydrogen storage in magnesium-based hydrides and hydride composites

    Mg and Mg-based hydrides have attracted much attention because of their high gravimetric hydrogen storage densities and favourable kinetic properties. Due to novel preparation methods and the development of suitable catalysts, hydrogen uptake and desorption is now possible within less than 2 min. However, the hydrogen reaction enthalpy of pure Mg is too high for many applications, for example, for the zero emission car. Therefore, different routes are explored to tailor the hydrogen reaction enthalpy to potential applications. This article summarizes the recent developments concerning sorption properties and thermodynamics of Mg-based hydrides for hydrogen storage applications. In particular, promising strategies to decrease the hydrogen reaction enthalpy by alloying and the use of reactive hydride composites are discussed

  13. A New Reducing Regent: Dichloroindium Hydride

    A. BABA; I. SHIBATA; N. HAYASHI

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Among the hydride derivatives of group 13 elements, various types of aluminum hydrides and boron hydrides have been employed as powerful reduction tools. Indium hydrides have not received much attention,whereas the synthesis of indium trihydride (InH3) was reported several decades ago[1]. There have been no precedents for monometallic indium hydrides having practical reactivity, while activated hydrides such as an ate complex LiPhn InH4-n (n = 0- 2) and phosphine-coordinated indium hydrides readily reduce carbonyl compounds. In view of this background, we focused on the development of dichloroindium hydrides (Cl2InH) as novel reducing agents that bear characteristic features in both ionic and radical reactions.

  14. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH3– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH3 and α-AlH3 irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH3 and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers

  15. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    Baraban, A.P.; Gabis, I.E.; Dmitriev, V.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Dobrotvorskii, M.A., E-mail: mstislavd@gmail.com [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, V.G. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Matveeva, O.P. [National Mineral Resources University, Saint Petersburg 199106 (Russian Federation); Titov, S.A. [Petersburg State University of Railway Transport, Saint-Petersburg 190031 (Russian Federation); Voyt, A.P.; Elets, D.I. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH{sub 3}– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH{sub 3} and α-AlH{sub 3} irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH{sub 3} and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers.

  16. In-source laser spectroscopy developments at TRILIS—towards spectroscopy on actinium and scandium

    Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources (RILIS) have become a versatile tool for production and study of exotic nuclides at Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL) facilities such as ISAC at TRIUMF. The recent development and addition of a grating tuned spectroscopy laser to the TRIUMF RILIS solid state laser system allows for wide range spectral scans to investigate atomic structures on short lived isotopes, e.g., those from the element actinium, produced in uranium targets at ISAC. In addition, development of new and improved laser ionization schemes for rare isotope production at ISAC is ongoing. Here spectroscopic studies on bound states, Rydberg states and autoionizing (AI) resonances on scandium using the existing off-line capabilities are reported. These results allowed to identify a suitable ionization scheme for scandium via excitation into an autoionizing state at 58,104 cm − 1 which has subsequently been used for ionization of on-line produced exotic scandium isotopes.

  17. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  18. Thermomechanical properties of hafnium hydride

    Fine bulk samples of delta-phase Hf hydride with various hydrogen contents (CH) ranging from 1.62 to 1.72 in the atomic ratio (H/Hf) were prepared, and their thermomechanical properties were characterized. At room temperature, the sound velocity and Vickers hardness were measured. The elastic modulus was calculated from the measured sound velocity. In the temperature range from room temperature to 673 K, the thermal expansion was measured by using a dilatometer, and the linear thermal expansion coefficient was calculated. Empirical equations describing the thermomechanical properties of Hf hydride as a function of CH were proposed. (author)

  19. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption.

  20. Deformation of vanadium and niobium on hydridation

    Deformation of wire samples made of polycrystalline vanadium and niobium on hydridation is studied. It is shown that sample allowance under loading after deformation below the yield strength doesn't cause considerable creep. Cathode saturation of samples with hydrogen sharply accelerates vanadium microdeformation velocity, that is connected with the beginning of intensive vanadium hydride precipitation (β-phase) from α-solid vanadium-hydrogen solution. Niobium hydridation at the first stage doesn't hydridation at the first stage doesn't cause negative deformation, then change in deformation direction takes place at the moment of intensive growth of the hydride phase. The conclusion is made that in both metals microdeformation is determined by contribution of two components: deformation caused by changing a shift module of metal-hydrogen system, and deformation caused by the oriented growth of the hydride phase in the field of apphed stresses

  1. Anodematerials for Metal Hydride Batteries

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the work on development of hydride forming alloys for use as electrode materials in metal hydride batteries. The work has primarily been concentrated on calcium based alloys derived from the compound CaNi5. This compound has a higher capacity compared with alloys used in today...... was developed. The parameters milling time, milling intensity, number of balls and form of the alloying metals were investigated. Based on this a final alloying technique for the subsequent preparation of electrode materials was established. The technique comprises milling for 4 hours twice possibly...... followed by annealing at 700°C for 12 hours. The alloys appeared to be nanocrystalline with an average crystallite size around 10 nm before annealing. Special steel containers was developed for the annealing of the metal powders in inert atmosphere. The use of various annealing temperatures was...

  2. Tritium processing using metal hydrides

    E.I. duPont de Nemours and Company is commissioned by the US Department of Energy to operate the Savannah River Plant and Laboratory. The primary purpose of the plant is to produce radioactive materials for national defense. In keeping with current technology, new processes for the production of tritium are being developed. Three main objectives of this new technology are to ease the processing of, ease the storage of, and to reduce the operating costs of the tritium production facility. Research has indicated that the use of metal hydrides offers a viable solution towards satisfying these objectives. The Hydrogen and Fuels Technology Division has the responsibility to conduct research in support of the tritium production process. Metal hydride technology and its use in the storage and transportation of hydrogen will be reviewed

  3. Drying dichloromethane over calcium hydride

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Lucas Kinard, Kurtis Kasper & Antonios Mikos ### Abstract This protocol describes the drying of dichloromethane by a simple 10 step procedure. One can implement this protocol using common lab glass and lab equipment. First, dichloromethane is refluxed with calcium hydride to remove water. Then, dichloromethane is distilled to separate it from the byproducts of the reflux reaction. This procedure can be implemented in 1 day. ### Introduction In many instances i...

  4. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  5. Nanostructured, complex hydride systems for hydrogen generation

    Robert A. Varin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex hydride systems for hydrogen (H2 generation for supplying fuel cells are being reviewed. In the first group, the hydride systems that are capable of generating H2 through a mechanical dehydrogenation phenomenon at the ambient temperature are discussed. There are few quite diverse systems in this group such as lithium alanate (LiAlH4 with the following additives: nanoiron (n-Fe, lithium amide (LiNH2 (a hydride/hydride system and manganese chloride MnCl2 (a hydride/halide system. Another hydride/hydride system consists of lithium amide (LiNH2 and magnesium hydride (MgH2, and finally, there is a LiBH4-FeCl2 (hydride/halide system. These hydride systems are capable of releasing from ~4 to 7 wt.% H2 at the ambient temperature during a reasonably short duration of ball milling. The second group encompasses systems that generate H2 at slightly elevated temperature (up to 100 °C. In this group lithium alanate (LiAlH4 ball milled with the nano-Fe and nano-TiN/TiC/ZrC additives is a prominent system that can relatively quickly generate up to 7 wt.% H2 at 100 °C. The other hydride is manganese borohydride (Mn(BH42 obtained by mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS. In a ball milled (2LiBH4 + MnCl2 nanocomposite, Mn(BH42 co-existing with LiCl can desorb ~4.5 wt.% H2 at 100 °C within a reasonable duration of dehydrogenation. Practical application aspects of hydride systems for H2 generation/storage are also briefly discussed.

  6. Crystal structure of gold hydride

    Highlights: • Volume expansion of metal hydrides is due to the increase in the s-band filling. • AuH structure is similar to that of Hg having one more s electron compared to Au. • Structure stability of both Hg and AuH is governed by the Hume-Rothery rule. - Abstract: A number of transition metal hydrides with close-packed metal sublattices of fcc or hcp structures with hydrogen in octahedral interstitial positions were obtained by the high-pressure-hydrogen technique described by Ponyatovskii et al. (1982). In this paper we consider volume increase of metals by hydrogenation and possible crystal structure of gold hydride in relation with the structure of mercury, the nearest neighbor of Au in the Periodic table. Suggested structure of AuH has a basic tetragonal body-centered cell that is very similar to the mercury structure Hg-t I 2. The reasons of stability for this structure are discussed within the model of Fermi sphere–Brillouin zone interactions

  7. NMR study of hydride systems

    The hydrides of thorium (ThH2, Th4H15 and Th4D15) and the intermetallic compound system (Zr(Vsub(1-x)Cosub(x))2 and its hydrides were investigated using the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. From the results for the thorium hydride samples it was concluded that the density of states at the Fermi level n(Esub(f)) is higher in Th4H15 than in ThH2; there is an indirect reaction between the protons and the d electrons belonging to the Th atoms in Th4H15; n(E) has a sharp structure near Esub(f). It was also found that the hydrogen diffusion mechanism changes with temperature. From the results for the intermetallic compound system conclusions were drawn concerning variations in the electronic structure, which explain the behavior of the system. In hydrogen diffusion studies in several samples it was found that Co atoms slow the diffusion rate. Quadrupole spectra obtained at low temperatures show that the H atoms preferably occupy tetrahedral sites formed by three V atoms and one Z atom. (H.K.)

  8. Crystal structure of gold hydride

    Degtyareva, Valentina F., E-mail: degtyar@issp.ac.ru

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Volume expansion of metal hydrides is due to the increase in the s-band filling. • AuH structure is similar to that of Hg having one more s electron compared to Au. • Structure stability of both Hg and AuH is governed by the Hume-Rothery rule. - Abstract: A number of transition metal hydrides with close-packed metal sublattices of fcc or hcp structures with hydrogen in octahedral interstitial positions were obtained by the high-pressure-hydrogen technique described by Ponyatovskii et al. (1982). In this paper we consider volume increase of metals by hydrogenation and possible crystal structure of gold hydride in relation with the structure of mercury, the nearest neighbor of Au in the Periodic table. Suggested structure of AuH has a basic tetragonal body-centered cell that is very similar to the mercury structure Hg-t I 2. The reasons of stability for this structure are discussed within the model of Fermi sphere–Brillouin zone interactions.

  9. Developments towards in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy studies of actinium isotopes at LISOL

    Raeder, S.; Bastin, B.; Block, M.; Creemers, P.; Delahaye, P.; Ferrer, R.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Ghys, L.; Gaffney, L. P.; Granados, C.; Heinke, R.; Hijazi, L.; Huyse, M.; Kron, T.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lecesne, N.; Luton, F.; Moore, I. D.; Martinez, Y.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Naubereit, P.; Piot, J.; Rothe, S.; Savajols, H.; Sels, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Traykov, E.; Van Beveren, C.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.; Zadvornaya, A.

    2016-06-01

    To study exotic nuclides at the borders of stability with laser ionization and spectroscopy techniques, highest efficiencies in combination with a high spectral resolution are required. These usually opposing requirements are reconciled by applying the in-gas-laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) technique in the supersonic gas jet produced by a de Laval nozzle installed at the exit of the stopping gas cell. Carrying out laser ionization in the low-temperature and low density supersonic gas jet eliminates pressure broadening, which will significantly improve the spectral resolution. This article presents the required modifications at the Leuven Isotope Separator On-Line (LISOL) facility that are needed for the first on-line studies of in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy. Different geometries for the gas outlet and extraction ion guides have been tested for their performance regarding the acceptance of laser ionized species as well as for their differential pumping capacities. The specifications and performance of the temporarily installed high repetition rate laser system, including a narrow bandwidth injection-locked Ti:sapphire laser, are discussed and first preliminary results on neutron-deficient actinium isotopes are presented indicating the high capability of this novel technique.

  10. Delayed hydride cracking in Zr-2.5 % Nb: effect of hydride blisters

    In the zirconium base alloys subjected to a local thermal gradient, in presence of hydrogen, fully hydride region (frequently called blisters) can be formed. Due to the brittle character of the zirconium hydride, cracks are usually found inside the blisters. These cracks are prone to growing, under stress and temperature, by successive hydride precipitation at the crack tip. This process is called hydride induced delayed cracking (HIDC). In a previous work, hydride platelets were observed in the radial direction of the blister. In the present one, blisters were grown on Zr-2.5 wt % Nb pressure tubes. Then, tensile specimens were submitted to HIDC tests. During the test, the radial hydrides length increase due to stress concentrator effect of the blister. If a crack, that was initiated into the blister, reaches the Zr matrix therefore can propagate through the radial hydrides. (author)

  11. Kinetics of hydride front in Zircaloy-2 and H release from a fractional hydrided surface

    Diaz, M.; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, A.; Moya, J. S.; Remartinez, B.; Perez, S.; Sacedon, J. L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Iberdrola, Tomas Redondo 3, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-15

    The authors study the hydriding process on commercial nuclear fuel claddings from their inner surface using an ultrahigh vacuum method. The method allows determining the incubation and failure times of the fuel claddings, as well as the dissipated energy and the partial pressure of the desorbed H{sub 2} from the outer surface of fuel claddings during the hydriding process. The correlation between the hydriding dissipated energy and the amount of zirconium hydride (formed at different stages of the hydriding process) leads to a near t{sup 1/2} potential law corresponding to the time scaling of the reaction for the majority of the tested samples. The calibrated relation between energy and hydride thickness allows one to calculate the enthalpy of the {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} phase. The measured H{sub 2} desorption from the external surface is in agreement with a proposed kinetic desorption model from the hydrides precipitated at the surface.

  12. Predicting formation enthalpies of metal hydrides

    Andreasen, A.

    2004-01-01

    In order for the hydrogen based society viz. a society in which hydrogen is the primary energy carrier to become realizable an efficient way of storing hydrogen is required. For this purpose metal hydrides are serious candidates. Metal hydrides are formedby chemical reaction between hydrogen and ...

  13. Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Hydride Molecules

    Phillips, T. G.

    1998-05-01

    Simple hydride molecules are of great importance in astrophysics and astrochemistry. Physically they dominate the cooling of dense, warm phases of the ISM, such as the cores and disks of YSOs. Chemically they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or may represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains, which can be used to test the validity of the process. Through the efforts of astronomers, physicists, chemists, and laboratory spectroscopists we have an approximate knowledge of the abundance of some of the important species, but a great deal of new effort will be required to achieve the comprehensive and accurate data set needed to determine the energy balance and firmly establish the chemical pathways. Due to the low moment of inertia, the hydrides rotate rapidly and so have their fundamental spectral lines in the submillimeter. Depending on the cloud geometry and temperature profile they may be observed in emission or absorption. Species such as HCl, HF, OH, CH, CH(+) , NH_2, NH_3, H_2O, H_2S, H_3O(+) and even H_3(+) have been detected, but this is just a fraction of the available set. Also, most deduced abundances are not nearly sufficiently well known to draw definitive conclusions about the chemical processes. For example, the most important coolant for many regions, H_2O, has a possible range of deduced abundance of a factor of 1000. The very low submillimeter opacity at the South Pole site will be a significant factor in providing a new capabilty for interstellar hydride spectroscopy. The new species and lines made available in this way will be discussed.

  14. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  15. Metal Hydrides for Rechargeable Batteries

    Valoeen, Lars Ole

    2000-03-01

    Rechargeable battery systems are paramount in the power supply of modern electronic and electromechanical equipment. For the time being, the most promising secondary battery systems for the future are the lithium-ion and the nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries. In this thesis, metal hydrides and their properties are described with the aim of characterizing and improving those. The thesis has a special focus on the AB{sub 5} type hydrogen storage alloys, where A is a rare earth metal like lanthanum, or more commonly misch metal, which is a mixture of rare earth metals, mainly lanthanum, cerium, neodymium and praseodymium. B is a transition metal, mainly nickel, commonly with additions of aluminium, cobalt, and manganese. The misch metal composition was found to be very important for the geometry of the unit cell in AB{sub 5} type alloys, and consequently the equilibrium pressure of hydrogen in these types of alloys. The A site substitution of lanthanum by misch metal did not decrease the surface catalytic properties of AB{sub 5} type alloys. B-site substitution of nickel with other transition elements, however, substantially reduced the catalytic activity of the alloy. If the internal pressure within the electrochemical test cell was increased using inert argon gas, a considerable increase in the high rate charge/discharge performance of LaNi{sub 5} was observed. An increased internal pressure would enable the utilisation of alloys with a high hydrogen equivalent pressure in batteries. Such alloys often have favourable kinetics and high hydrogen diffusion rates and thus have a potential for improving the high current discharge rates in metal hydride batteries. The kinetic properties of metal hydride electrodes were found to improve throughout their lifetime. The activation properties were found highly dependent on the charge/discharge current. Fewer charge/discharge cycles were needed to activate the electrodes if a small current was used instead of a higher

  16. Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Niemann, Michael U.; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2012-04-10

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  17. Experimental reproducibility analysis in DU hydriding

    Koo, Daeseo; Park, Jongcheol; Chung, Hongsuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A storage and delivery system (SDS) is used for storing hydrogen isotopes as a metal hydride form. The rapid hydriding of tritium is very important not only for safety reasons but also for the economic design and operation of the SDS. For the storage, supply, and recovery of hydrogen isotopes, depleted uranium (DU) has been extensively proposed. To develop nuclear fusion technology, it will be necessary to store and supply hydrogen isotopes needed for Tokamak operation. The experimental reproducibility of bed temperature on DU hydriding was also analyzed. The experimental reproducibility of apparatus was acceptable for all the experiments. The experimental reproducibility of tank pressure on DU hydriding was analyzed. As the hydriding performs, the tank pressure showed decreasing trend. The experimental reproducibility of bed temperature on DU hydriding was also analyzed. As the hydriding performs, the bed temperatures increased up to maximum temperature with exothermic reaction and then they showed decreasing trend. The experimental reproducibility of apparatus was acceptable for all the experiments.

  18. Hydriding failure analysis based on PIE data

    Failure causes of the two fuel rods of a Korean nuclear power plant had been investigated by using PIE technique. The destructive and physico-chemical examinations revealed that the clad hydriding phenomena had caused the rod failures primarily and secondarily in each case. In this study the basic mechanisms of the primary and the secondary hydriding failures are reviewed, PIE data such as cladding inner and outer surface oxide thickness and the restructuring of fuel pellets are analyzed, and they are compared with predicted behaviors by a fuel performance code. The results strongly support that the hydriding processes, primary and secondary, had played critical roles in the respective fuel rods failures. (author)

  19. Solid hydrides as hydrogen storage reservoirs

    Metal hydrides as hydrogen storage materials are briefly reviewed in this paper. Fundamental properties of metal-hydrogen (gas) system such as Pressure-Composition-Temperature (P-C-T) characteristics are discussed on the light of the metal-hydride thermodynamics. Attention is specially paid to light metal hydrides which might have application in the car and transport sector. The pros and cons of MgH2 as a light material are outlined. Researches in course oriented to improve the behaviour of MgH2 are presented. Finally, other very promising alternative materials such as Al compounds (alanates) or borohydrides as light hydrogen accumulators are also considered. (Author)

  20. Hydride observations using the neutrography technique

    Neutron radiography observations were performed at the RA-6 experimental nuclear facility in Bariloche. Images from a prototype of a hydride-based hydrogen storage device have been obtained. The technique allows visualizing the inner hydride space distribution. The hydride appeared compacted at the lower part of the prototype after several cycles of hydrogen charge and discharge. The technique has also been applied to the study of Zr/ZrH2 samples. There is a linear relation between the sample width/hydrogen concentration and the photograph grey scale. This information could be useful for the study of nuclear engineering materials and to determine their possible degradation by hydrogen pick up (author)

  1. The electrochemical impedance of metal hydride electrodes

    Valøen, Lars Ole; Lasia, Andrzej; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Tunold, Reidar

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical impedance responses for different laboratory type metal hydride electrodes were successfully modeled and fitted to experimental data for AB5 type hydrogen storage alloys as well as one MgNi type electrode. The models fitted the experimental data remarkably well. Several AC......, explaining the experimental impedances in a wide frequency range for electrodes of hydride forming materials mixed with copper powder, were obtained. Both charge transfer and spherical diffusion of hydrogen in the particles are important sub processes that govern the total rate of the electrochemical...... observed. The impedance analysis was found to be an efficient method for characterizing metal hydride electrodes in situ....

  2. Tritium removal using vanadium hydride

    The results of an initial examination of the feasibility of separation of tritium from gaseous protium-tritium mixtures using vanadium hydride in cyclic processes is reported. Interest was drawn to the vanadium-hydrogen system because of the so-called inverse isotope effect exhibited by this system. Thus the tritide is more stable than the protide, a fact which makes the system attractive for removal of tritium from a mixture in which the light isotope predominates. The initial results of three phases of the research program are reported, dealing with studies of the equilibrium and kinetics properties of isotope exchange, development of an equilibrium theory of isotope separation via heatless adsorption, and experiments on the performance of a single heatless adsorption stage. In the equilibrium and kinetics studies, measurements were made of pressure-composition isotherms, the HT--H2 separation factors and rates of HT--H2 exchange. This information was used to evaluate constants in the theory and to understand the performance of the heatless adsorption experiments. A recently developed equilibrium theory of heatless adsorption was applied to the HT--H2 separation using vanadium hydride. Using the theory it was predicted that no separation would occur by pressure cycling wholly within the β phase but that separation would occur by cycling between the β and γ phases and using high purge-to-feed ratios. Heatless adsorption experiments conducted within the β phase led to inverse separations rather than no separation. A kinetic isotope effect may be responsible. Cycling between the β and γ phases led to separation but not to the predicted complete removal of HT from the product stream, possibly because of finite rates of exchange. Further experimental and theoretical work is suggested which may ultimately make possible assessment of the feasibility and practicability of hydrogen isotope separation by this approach

  3. Geoneutrino and Hydridic Earth model. Version 2

    Bezrukov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Uranium, Thorium and Potassium-40 abundances in the Earth were calculated in the frame of Hydridic Earth model. Terrestrial heat producton from U, Th and K40 decays was calculated also. We must admit the existance of Earth expansion process to understand the obtained large value of terrestrial heat producton. The geoneutrino detector with volume more than 5 kT (LENA type) must be constructed to definitely separate between Bulk Silicat Earth model and Hydridic Earth model. In second version of...

  4. Atomistic Potentials for Palladium-Silver Hydrides

    Hale, L. M.; Wong, B. M.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Zhou, X.

    2013-01-01

    New EAM potentials for the ternary palladium-silver-hydrogen system are developed by extending a previously developed palladium-hydrogen potential. The ternary potentials accurately capture the heat of mixing and structural properties associated with solid solution alloys of palladium-silver. Stable hydrides are produced with properties that smoothly transition across the compositions. Additions of silver to palladium are predicted to alter the properties of the hydrides by decreasing the mis...

  5. Probing the cerium/cerium hydride interface using nanoindentation

    Brierley, Martin, E-mail: martin.brierley@awe.co.uk [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Knowles, John, E-mail: john.knowles@awe.co.uk [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A disparity exists between the minimum energy and actual shape of a cerium hydride. • Cerium hydride is found to be harder than cerium metal by a ratio of 1.7:1. • A zone of material under compressive stress was identified surrounding the hydride. • No distribution of hardness was apparent within the hydride. - Abstract: A cerium hydride site was sectioned and the mechanical properties of the exposed phases (cerium metal, cerium hydride, oxidised cerium hydride) were measured using nanoindentation. An interfacial region under compressive stress was observed in the cerium metal surrounding a surface hydride that formed as a consequence of strain energy generated by the volume expansion associated with precipitation of the hydride phase.

  6. Probing the cerium/cerium hydride interface using nanoindentation

    Highlights: • A disparity exists between the minimum energy and actual shape of a cerium hydride. • Cerium hydride is found to be harder than cerium metal by a ratio of 1.7:1. • A zone of material under compressive stress was identified surrounding the hydride. • No distribution of hardness was apparent within the hydride. - Abstract: A cerium hydride site was sectioned and the mechanical properties of the exposed phases (cerium metal, cerium hydride, oxidised cerium hydride) were measured using nanoindentation. An interfacial region under compressive stress was observed in the cerium metal surrounding a surface hydride that formed as a consequence of strain energy generated by the volume expansion associated with precipitation of the hydride phase

  7. Influence of hydrides orientation on strain, damage and failure of hydrided zircaloy-4

    In pressurized water reactors of nuclear power plants, fuel pellets are contained in cladding tubes, made of Zirconium alloy, for instance Zircaloy-4. During their life in the primary water of the reactor (155 bars, 300 C), cladding tubes are oxidized and consequently hydrided. A part of the hydrogen given off precipitates as Zirconium hydrides in the bulk material and embrittles the material. This embrittlement depends on many parameters, among which hydrogen content and orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress. This investigation is devoted to the influence of the orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress on strain, damage and failure mechanisms. Macroscopic and SEM in-situ ring tensile tests are performed on cladding tube material (unirradiated cold worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4) hydrided with about 200 and 500 wppm hydrogen, and with different main hydrides orientation: either parallel or perpendicular to the circumferential tensile direction. We get the mechanical response of the material as a function of hydride orientation and hydrogen content and we investigate the deformation, damage and failure mechanisms. In both cases, digital image correlation techniques are used to estimate local and global strain distributions. Neither the tensile stress-strain response nor the global and local strain modes are significantly affected by hydrogen content or hydride orientation, but the failure modes are strongly modified. Indeed, only 200 wppm radial hydrides embrittle Zy-4: sample fail in the elastic domain at about 350 MPa before strain bands could develop; whereas in other cases sample reach at least 750 MPa before necking and final failure, in ductile or brittle mode. To model this particular heterogeneous material behavior, a non-coupled damage approach which takes into account the anisotropic distribution of the hydrides is proposed. Its parameters are identified from the macroscopic strain field measurements and a

  8. gamma-Zr-Hydride Precipitate in Irradiated Massive delta- Zr-Hydride

    Warren, M. R.; Bhattacharya, D. K.

    1975-01-01

    During examination of A Zircaloy-2-clad fuel pin, which had been part of a test fuel assembly in a boiling water reactor, several regions of severe internal hydriding were noticed in the upper-plenum end of the pin. Examination of similar fuel pins has shown that hydride of this type is caused by...

  9. Mechanism of corrosion of zirconium hydride and impact of precipitated hydrides on the Zircaloy-4 corrosion behaviour

    Highlights: • Higher corrosion rate of hydride compared to matrix (Zy4). • Higher oxygen diffusion coefficient through oxide formed on hydride. • Presence of Zr3O phase between hydride and oxide. • Hydrogen from the hydride phase is not integrated in the oxide during the corrosion process. - Abstract: In Pressurized Water Reactors, zirconium hydrides precipitate in the matrix and could increase the oxidation rate of the claddings. To understand their effect, corrosion tests, TEM and μ-XRD analyses have been performed. This work showed that the oxidation rate and the oxygen diffusion coefficient in the oxide formed on massive hydride are much greater than those of Zircaloy-4. Moreover, oxide characterizations indicated an additional phase indexed as the sub-oxide Zr3O between the oxide film and the massive hydride. Finally, the hydrogen of the hydrides is not incorporated in the oxide during the corrosion process

  10. Hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    BORISLAV BOGDANOVIĆ

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex metal hydrides such as sodium aluminohydride (NaAlH4 and sodium borohydride (NaBH4 are solid-state hydrogen-storage materials with high hydrogen capacities. They can be used in combination with fuel cells as a hydrogen source thus enabling longer operation times compared with classical metal hydrides. The most important point for a wide application of these materials is the reversibility under moderate technical conditions. At present, only NaAlH4 has favourable thermodynamic properties and can be employed as a thermally reversible means of hydrogen storage. By contrast, NaBH4 is a typical non- -reversible complex metal hydride; it reacts with water to produce hydrogen.

  11. The versatility of hydride-forming materials

    Full text: Already in 1866 it was realised by Graham that large amounts of hydrogen gas were, as he called it, occluded in pure metallic palladium. Even after more than one century of research in the field of hydrogen storage materials this area is still of great interest. This is not only due to the present-day commercial importance of rechargeable Nickel-Metal Hydride (NiMH) batteries, in which hydride-forming intermetallic materials are widely exploited, but also from a fundamental point of view where new discoveries are still being made. In this review these two areas will be highlighted on the basis of two illustrative examples. The first example relates to the application of hydride-forming bulk materials as electrodes in NiMH batteries. Several hydride-forming compounds are, in principle, available to be used as energy storage electrode material. It turned out, however, that AB5 -type compounds are most successfully applied due to their excellent electrode properties, like high storage capacity, rate capability and rapid electrode activation. Another important aspect is the electrode stability during cycling, which determines the battery cycle life. By designing multicomponent AB5 compounds it has been shown that this stability can be drastically improved. Recently, a second class of very stable compounds has been proposed. These so-called non-stoichiometric AB5+x compounds are characterised by the fact that the severe particle size reduction, always accompanying the hydride-formation process, is reduced. The stability mechanism responsible for this remarkable behaviour will be outlined. The second example relates to thin film applications. Recently, it has been found that the electronic conductivity of thin films composed of rare earth metal hydrides like, for example, yttrium hydride and gadolinium hydride, changes dramatically from metallic in the dihydride state to semiconducting in the trihydride state. In line with these conductivity changes the

  12. Stress induced reorientation of vanadium hydride

    Beardsley, M. B.

    1977-10-01

    The critical stress for the reorientation of vanadium hydride was determined for the temperature range 180/sup 0/ to 280/sup 0/K using flat tensile samples containing 50 to 500 ppM hydrogen by weight. The critical stress was observed to vary from a half to a third of the macroscopic yield stress of pure vanadium over the temperature range. The vanadium hydride could not be stress induced to precipitate above its stress-free precipitation temperature by uniaxial tensile stresses or triaxial tensile stresses induced by a notch.

  13. Automotive cooling systems based on metal hydrides

    Linder, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The present work focuses on metal hydride sorption systems as an alternative technology for automotive air-conditioning systems. Although this technology offers the possibility to increase the energy efficiency of a car (by utilising waste heat) and consequently reduces the CO2 emissions, its weight specific cooling power has so far been the main obstacle for an automotive application. Based on investigations of various metal hydrides, two alloys (LmNi4.91Sn0.15 and Ti0.99Zr0.01V0.43Fe0.09Cr0...

  14. Effects of δ-hydride precipitation at a crack tip on crack propagation in delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-2

    Highlights: • Steady state crack velocity of delayed hydride cracking in Zircaloy-2 was analyzed. • A large stress peak is induced at an end of hydride by volume expansion of hydride. • Hydrogen diffuses to the stress peak, thereby accelerating steady hydride growth. • Crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the stress peak. • There was good agreement between calculation results and experimental data. -- Abstract: Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) of Zircaloy-2 is one possible mechanism for the failure of boiling water reactor fuel rods in ramp tests at high burnup. Analyses were made for hydrogen diffusion around a crack tip to estimate the crack velocity of DHC in zirconium alloys, placing importance on effects of precipitation of δ-hydride. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride, which was strictly analyzed using a finite element computer code. Then, stress-driven hydrogen diffusion under the altered stress distribution was analyzed by a differential method. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed in front of the crack tip, it grew almost steadily accompanying the interaction of hydrogen diffusion, hydride growth and the stress alteration by hydride precipitation. Finally, crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the crack tip as a function of temperature, stress intensity factor and material strength. There was qualitatively good agreement between calculation results and experimental data

  15. Effect of yttrium on nucleation and growth of zirconium hydrides

    Addition of yttrium in zirconium causes precipitates of yttrium, which form two types of particles and are oxidized upon heat treatment. One type of particles with sub-micrometer scale sizes has a low population, whereas the other with nano scale sizes has a high population and cluster distribution. Owing to strong affinity of yttrium to hydrogen, the nanoparticles, mostly within the grains of the Zr–Y alloy, attract nucleation of hydrides at the clusters of the nanoparticles and cause preferential distribution of intragranular hydrides. In comparison with that of Zr, additional nanoparticles in the Zr–Y alloy impede further growth of hydride precipitates during hydriding. It is deduced that the impediment of growing hydride precipitates by the nanoparticles is developed during an auto-catalytic nucleation process, which leads to formation of thin and intragranular hydrides, favorable to mitigation of hydride embrittlement

  16. Effect of yttrium on nucleation and growth of zirconium hydrides

    Li, Changji; Xiong, Liangyin; Wu, Erdong; Liu, Shi, E-mail: sliu@imr.ac.cn

    2015-02-15

    Addition of yttrium in zirconium causes precipitates of yttrium, which form two types of particles and are oxidized upon heat treatment. One type of particles with sub-micrometer scale sizes has a low population, whereas the other with nano scale sizes has a high population and cluster distribution. Owing to strong affinity of yttrium to hydrogen, the nanoparticles, mostly within the grains of the Zr–Y alloy, attract nucleation of hydrides at the clusters of the nanoparticles and cause preferential distribution of intragranular hydrides. In comparison with that of Zr, additional nanoparticles in the Zr–Y alloy impede further growth of hydride precipitates during hydriding. It is deduced that the impediment of growing hydride precipitates by the nanoparticles is developed during an auto-catalytic nucleation process, which leads to formation of thin and intragranular hydrides, favorable to mitigation of hydride embrittlement.

  17. Metal hydrides for hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen batteries

    Metal hydride hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen (Ni/H2) batteries has been shown to increase battery energy density and improve battery heat management capabilities. However the properties of metal hydrides in a Ni/H2 battery environment, which contains water vapor and oxygen in addition to the hydrogen, have not been well characterized. This work evaluates the use of hydrides in Ni/H2 batteries by fundamental characterization of metal hydride properties in a Ni/H2 cell environment. Hydrogen sorption properties of various hydrides have been measured in a Ni/H2 cell environment. Results of detailed thermodynamic and kinetic studies of hydrogen sorption in LaNi5 in a Ni/H2 cell environment are presented. Long-term cycling studies indicate that degradation of the hydride can be minimized by cycling between certain pressure limits. A model describing the mechanism of hydride degradation is presented

  18. Are RENiAl hydrides metallic?

    Eichinger, K.; Havela, L.; Prokleška, J.; Stelmakhovych, O.; Daniš, S.; Šantavá, Eva; Miliyanchuk, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 9 (2009), s. 1200-1202. ISSN 1862-5282 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/07/0418 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : rare earth metals * magnetism * hydrides Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.862, year: 2009

  19. Computational study of metal hydride cooling system

    Satheesh, A.; Muthukumar, P.; Dewan, Anupam [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India)

    2009-04-15

    A computational study of a metal hydride cooling system working with MmNi{sub 4.6}Al{sub 0.4}/MmNi{sub 4.6}Fe{sub 0.4} hydride pair is presented. The unsteady, two-dimensional mathematical model in an annular cylindrical configuration is solved numerically for predicting the time dependent conjugate heat and mass transfer characteristics between coupled reactors. The system of equations is solved by the fully implicit finite volume method (FVM). The effects of constant and variable wall temperature boundary conditions on the reaction bed temperature distribution, hydrogen concentration, and equilibrium pressures of the reactors are investigated. A dynamic correlation of the pressure-concentration-temperature plot is presented. At the given operating temperatures of 363/298/278 K (T{sub H}/T{sub M}/T{sub C}), the cycle time for the constant and variable wall temperature boundary conditions of a single-stage and single-effect metal hydride system are found to be 1470.0 s and 1765.6 s, respectively. The computational results are compared with the experimental data reported in the literature for LaNi{sub 4.61}Mn{sub 0.26}Al{sub 0.13}/La{sub 0.6}Y{sub 0.4}Ni{sub 4.8}Mn{sub 0.2} hydride pair and a good agreement between the two was observed. (author)

  20. Hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: the hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys

    The massive and common use of hydrogen as an energy carrier requires an adequate solution to the problem of storing it. High pressure or low temperatures are not entirely satisfactory, having each a limited range of applications. Reversible metal hydrides cover a range of applications intermediate to high pressure gas and low temperature liquid hydrogen, retaining very favorable safety and energy density characteristics, both for mobile and stationary applications. This work demonstrates the technical viability of storing hydrogen in metal hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys. Also, it shows that technology, a product of science, can be generated within an academic environment, of the goal is clear, the demand outstanding and the means available. We review briefly theoretical models relating to metal hydride properties, specially the thermodynamics properties relevant to this work. We report our experimental results on hydrides of magnesium-nickel alloys of various compositions including data on structure, hydrogen storage capacities, reaction kinetics, pressure-composition isotherms. We selected a promising alloy for mass production, built and tested a modular storage tank based on the hydrides of the alloy, with a capacity for storing 10 Nm sup(3) of hydrogen of 1 atm and 20 sup(0)C. The tank weighs 46,3 Kg and has a volume of 21 l. (author)

  1. Metal hydrides based high energy density thermal battery

    Highlights: • The principle of the thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides was demonstrated. • The thermal battery used MgH2 and TiMnV as a working pair. • High energy density can be achieved by the use of MgH2 to store thermal energy. - Abstract: A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides was studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilized a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The pair of hydrides that was identified and developed was: (1) catalyzed MgH2 as the high temperature hydride material, due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics; and (2) TiV0.62Mn1.5 alloy as the matching low temperature hydride. Further, a proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested, demonstrating the potential of the system as HVAC for transportation vehicles

  2. METHOD OF FABRICATING A URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE REACTOR CORE

    Weeks, I.F.; Goeddel, W.V.

    1960-03-22

    A method is described of evenly dispersing uranlum metal in a zirconium hydride moderator to produce a fuel element for nuclear reactors. According to the invention enriched uranium hydride and zirconium hydride powders of 200 mesh particle size are thoroughly admixed to form a mixture containing 0.1 to 3% by weight of U/sup 235/ hydride. The mixed powders are placed in a die and pressed at 100 tons per square inch at room temperature. The resultant compacts are heated in a vacuum to 300 deg C, whereby the uranium hydride deoomposes into uranium metal and hydrogen gas. The escaping hydrogen gas forms a porous matrix of zirconium hydride, with uramum metal evenly dispersed therethrough. The advantage of the invention is that the porosity and uranium distribution of the final fuel element can be more closely determined and controlled than was possible using prior methods of producing such fuel ele- ments.

  3. SANS Measurement of Hydrides in Uranium

    SANS scattering is shown to be an effective method for detecting the presence of hydrogen precipitates in uranium. High purity polycrystalline samples of depleted uranium were given several hydriding treatments which included extended exposures to hydrogen gas at two different pressures at 630 C as well as a furnace anneal at 850 C followed by slow cooling in the near absence hydrogen gas. All samples exhibited neutron scattering that was in proportion to the expected levels of hydrogen content. While the scattering signal was strong, the shape of the scattering curve indicated that the scattering objects were large sized objects. Only by use of a very high angular resolution SANS technique was it possible to make estimates of the major diameter of the scattering objects. This analysis permits an estimate of the volume fraction and means size of the hydride precipitates in uranium

  4. NMR investigations of YMn2Hx hydrides

    The YMn2Hx hydrides with x = 1, 2, 3 were investigated by 55Mn NMR spin echo measurements at atmospheric and high pressure. Resonance lines at frequencies up to 440 MHz were observed for the hydrides, corresponding to a huge increase of the hyperfine fields at those Mn with hydrogen neighbours. At high pressure the initial decrease of the magnitude of the Mn hyperfine field of YMn2H1 at 4.2 K was found to be 4% per kbar which is an order of magnitude bigger than observed in the other magnetically ordered materials. The effects are interpreted in terms of changes of the orbital contribution and valence electron contribution to the hyperfine field caused by hydrogenation and the influence of the external pressure. (orig.)

  5. The electrochemical impedance of metal hydride electrodes

    Valøen, Lars Ole; Lasia, Andrzej; Jensen, Jens Oluf;

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical impedance responses for different laboratory type metal hydride electrodes were successfully modeled and fitted to experimental data for AB5 type hydrogen storage alloys as well as one MgNi type electrode. The models fitted the experimental data remarkably well. Several AC......, explaining the experimental impedances in a wide frequency range for electrodes of hydride forming materials mixed with copper powder, were obtained. Both charge transfer and spherical diffusion of hydrogen in the particles are important sub processes that govern the total rate of the electrochemical...... hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction. To approximate the experimental data, equations describing the current distribution in porous electrodes were needed. Indications of one or more parallel reduction/oxidation processes competing with the electrochemical hydrogen absorption/desorption reaction were...

  6. Synthesis of metal hydrides by cold rolling

    'Full text:' In the development of metal hydrides for commercial applications, a special attention should be devoted to the ways of production. For commercial success, the raw elements of the hydrogen storage materials should be of low cost, the synthesis process should be inexpensive and easily scalable. Therefore, it is important to put some effort on the elaboration of new and more efficient means of producing metal hydrides. In this perspective, cold rolling was investigated as a new means of producing nanocrystalline materials. This technique is well-known in the industry and easily scalable. Cold rolling was performed on Mg-Ni system. The evolution of morphology, crystal structure, crystallite size, deformation, and preferred orientation was studied as a function of number of rolling passes. Cold rolling followed by a heat treatment produced the intermetallic Mg2Ni. Without heat treatment and for a large number of rolling, an amorphous phase was synthesized. (author)

  7. Numerical study of a magnesium hydride tank

    Delhomme, Baptiste; de Rango, Patricia; Marty, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen storage in metal hydride tanks (MHT) is a very promising solution. Several experimental tanks, studied by different teams, have already proved the feasibility and the interesting performances of this solution. However, in much cases, an optimization of tank geometry is still needed in order to perform fast hydrogen loading. The development of efficient numerical tools is a key issue for MHT design and optimization. We propose a simple model representing a metal hydride tank exchanging its heat of reaction with a thermal fluid flow. In this model, the radial and axial discretisations have been decoupled by using Matlab® one-dimensional tools. Calculations are compared to experimental results obtained in a previous study. A good agreement is found for the loading case. The discharging case shows some discrepancies, which are discussed in this paper.

  8. The hydride fluoride crystal structure database, HFD

    Gingl, F.; Gelato, L.; Yvon, K. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland). Lab. Crystallographie aux Rayons X

    1997-05-20

    HFD is a new data base containing crystal structure information on more than one thousand metal hydrides and fluorides. It includes space group, cell parameters, standardized atom positions, site occupancies and references. The compilation is critical as only refined crystal structures are considered and the data are checked for internal consistency. It is comprehensive as structural information is extracted from all major scientific journals, and it is continuously updated. HFD can be searched according to various criteria such as symmetry, chemical elements, composition etc. The primary motivation for creating HFD was to predict new metal hydrides and to study their structural analogies with metal fluorides. However, HFD can also be used for other applications such as the simulation of diffraction patterns and the drawing of crystal structures. (orig.) 13 refs.

  9. Speciesion arsenic and selenium using hydride method atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Hydrides production - atomic absorption spectroscopy system was studied. Hydrides production tool and gas-liquid separator were tested and successfully used in this work. Hydride was produced through natrium borohydride reaction with sample solution. Emitted gas was separated by gas-liquid separator before it is carried by nitrogen gas through T tube which is put in atomic absorption flame spectrophotometer. Efficiency of the system was tested through standard reference sample and seawater / sediment samples which is collected from Negeri Johor water bays

  10. Plasmonic hydrogen sensing with nanostructured metal hydrides.

    Wadell, Carl; Syrenova, Svetlana; Langhammer, Christoph

    2014-12-23

    In this review, we discuss the evolution of localized surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensors based on nanostructured metal hydrides, which has accelerated significantly during the past 5 years. We put particular focus on how, conceptually, plasmonic resonances can be used to study metal-hydrogen interactions at the nanoscale, both at the ensemble and at the single-nanoparticle level. Such efforts are motivated by a fundamental interest in understanding the role of nanosizing on metal hydride formation processes in the quest to develop efficient solid-state hydrogen storage materials with fast response times, reasonable thermodynamics, and acceptable long-term stability. Therefore, a brief introduction to the thermodynamics of metal hydride formation is also given. However, plasmonic hydrogen sensors not only are of academic interest as research tool in materials science but also are predicted to find more practical use as all-optical gas detectors in industrial and medical applications, as well as in a future hydrogen economy, where hydrogen is used as a carbon free energy carrier. Therefore, the wide range of different plasmonic hydrogen sensor designs already available is reviewed together with theoretical efforts to understand their fundamentals and optimize their performance in terms of sensitivity. In this context, we also highlight important challenges to be addressed in the future to take plasmonic hydrogen sensors from the laboratory to real applications in devices, including poisoning/deactivation of the active materials, sensor lifetime, and cross-sensitivity toward other gas species. PMID:25427244

  11. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING URANIUM-HYDRIDE COMPACTS

    Wellborn, W.; Armstrong, J.R.

    1959-03-10

    A method and apparatus are presented for making compacts of pyrophoric hydrides in a continuous operation out of contact with air. It is particularly useful for the preparation of a canned compact of uranium hydride possessing high density and purity. The metallic uranium is enclosed in a container, positioned in a die body evacuated and nvert the uranium to the hydride is admitted and the container sealed. Heat is applied to bring about the formation of the hydride, following which compression is used to form the compact sealed in a container ready for use.

  12. Spectrophotometric determination of volautile inorganic hydrides in binary gaseous mixtures

    A study was made on possibility of single and continuons analysis of binary mixtures (hydride-gas) for the content of volatile inorganic hydrides (VIH) from absorption spectra in the 185-280 nm band. Dependences of the percentage of VIH transmission on the wavelength are presented. It is shown that the maximum of their absorption depends on the element-hydrogen the bond length and binding energy. Detection limit for boron hydride was established to be n x 10-3% vol at 185-190 nm wavelength. Technique for spectrophotometric hydride determination in binary mixtures with hydrogen, argon, helium was developed. The technique provides the continuous control of gaseous mixture composition

  13. Identification of the zirconium hydrides metallography in zircaloy-2

    Technique for the Identification of the zirconium hydrides in metallographic specimens have been developed. Microhardness, quantitative estimation and relative orientation of the present hydrides as well as grain size determination of the different Zircaloy-2 tube specimens have also been made. The specimens used were corrosion- tested in water during various periods of time at 300 degree castrating, prior to the metallographic examination. Reference specimens, as received, and heavily hydride specimens in a hydrogen atmosphere at 800 degree centigrees, have been used in the previous stages of the work. No difficulties have been met in this early stage of acquaintanceship with the zirconium hydrides. (Author) 5 refs

  14. Groundwater seepage from the Ranger uranium mine tailings dam: radioisotopes of radium, thorium and actinium. Supervising Scientist report 106

    Monitoring of bores near the Ranger uranium mine tailings dam has revealed deterioration in water quality in several bores since 1983. In a group of bores to the north of the dam, increases have been observed of up to 500 times for sulphate concentrations and of up to 5 times for 226Ra concentrations. Results are presented here of measurements of members of the uranium, thorium and actinium decay series in borewater samples collected between 1985 and 1993. In particular, measurements of all four naturally-occurring radium isotopes have been used in an investigation of the mechanism of radium concentration changes. For the most seepage-affected bores the major findings of the study include: 228Ra/226Ra 223Ra /226Ra and 224Ra/228Ra ratios all increased over the course of the study; barium concentrations show high seasonal variability, being lower in November than May, but strontium concentrations show a steady increase with time. Calculations show that the groundwater is probably saturated with respect to barite but not with respect to celestite or anglesite; sulphide concentrations are low in comparison with sulphate, and are higher in November than in May; and 227Ac concentrations have increased with time, but do not account for the high 223Ra/226Ra ratios. It is concluded on the basis of these observations that increases in Ra isotope concentrations observed in a number of seepage-affected bores arise from increases in salinity leading to desorption of radium from adsorption sites in the vicinity of the bore rather by direct transport of radium from the tailings. Increased salinity is also causing the observed increases in 227Ac and strontium concentrations, while formation of a barite solid phase in the groundwater is causing the removal of some radium from solution. This is the cause of the increasing radium isotope ratios noted above

  15. Uranium-zirconium hydride fuel properties

    Olander, D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: fuelpr@nuc.berkeley.edu; Greenspan, Ehud [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Garkisch, Hans D. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 (United States); Petrovic, Bojan [School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Properties of the two-phase hydride U{sub 0.3}ZrH{sub 1.6} pertinent to performance as a nuclear fuel for LWRs are reviewed. Much of the available data come from the Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) program of 4 decades ago and from the more restricted data base prepared for the TRIGA research reactors some 3 decades back. Transport, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties are summarized. A principal difference between oxide and hydride fuels is the high thermal conductivity of the latter. This feature greatly decreases the temperature drop over the fuel during operation, thereby reducing the release of fission gases to the fraction due only to recoil. However, very unusual early swelling due to void formation around the uranium particles has been observed in hydride fuels. Avoidance of this source of swelling limits the maximum fuel temperature to {approx}650 deg. C (the design limit recommended by the fuel developer is 750 deg. C). To satisfy this temperature limitation, the fuel-cladding gap needs to be bonded with a liquid metal instead of helium. Because the former has a thermal conductivity {approx}100 times larger than the latter, there is no restriction on gap thickness as there is in helium-bonded fuel rods. This opens the possibility of initial gap sizes large enough to significantly delay the onset of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). The large fission-product swelling rate of hydride fuel (3x that of oxide fuel) requires an initial radial fuel-cladding gap of {approx}300 m if PCMI is to be avoided. The liquid-metal bond permits operation of the fuel at current LWR linear-heat-generation rates without exceeding any design constraint. The behavior of hydrogen in the fuel is the source of phenomena during operation that are absent in oxide fuels. Because of the large heat of transport (thermal diffusivity) of H in ZrH{sub x}, redistribution of hydrogen in the temperature gradient in the fuel pellet changes the initial H/Zr ratio of 1

  16. Uranium-zirconium hydride fuel properties

    Properties of the two-phase hydride U0.3ZrH1.6 pertinent to performance as a nuclear fuel for LWRs are reviewed. Much of the available data come from the Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) program of 4 decades ago and from the more restricted data base prepared for the TRIGA research reactors some 3 decades back. Transport, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties are summarized. A principal difference between oxide and hydride fuels is the high thermal conductivity of the latter. This feature greatly decreases the temperature drop over the fuel during operation, thereby reducing the release of fission gases to the fraction due only to recoil. However, very unusual early swelling due to void formation around the uranium particles has been observed in hydride fuels. Avoidance of this source of swelling limits the maximum fuel temperature to ∼650 deg. C (the design limit recommended by the fuel developer is 750 deg. C). To satisfy this temperature limitation, the fuel-cladding gap needs to be bonded with a liquid metal instead of helium. Because the former has a thermal conductivity ∼100 times larger than the latter, there is no restriction on gap thickness as there is in helium-bonded fuel rods. This opens the possibility of initial gap sizes large enough to significantly delay the onset of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). The large fission-product swelling rate of hydride fuel (3x that of oxide fuel) requires an initial radial fuel-cladding gap of ∼300 m if PCMI is to be avoided. The liquid-metal bond permits operation of the fuel at current LWR linear-heat-generation rates without exceeding any design constraint. The behavior of hydrogen in the fuel is the source of phenomena during operation that are absent in oxide fuels. Because of the large heat of transport (thermal diffusivity) of H in ZrHx, redistribution of hydrogen in the temperature gradient in the fuel pellet changes the initial H/Zr ratio of 1.6 to ∼1.45 at the center and

  17. Stress field computation for hydride blister forming in Zr alloys

    Hydrogen migration under thermal gradient in zirconium alloys results in formation of hydride blisters. An array of blisters makes Zirconium alloy components of nuclear reactors susceptible to fracture. The whole process of hydride blister formation and fracture of these components is very complex and involves hydrogen migration under thermal gradient, hydride precipitation, straining of the matrix, setting up of hydrostatic stress gradient, enhanced hydrogen migration under the combined influence of thermal and stress gradients, stress reorientation of hydrides, cracking of hydrides, crack growth by delayed hydride cracking mechanism, interlinking of blisters and spontaneous fracture of the component. In this work we estimate the stress components in hydride blisters and the surrounding matrix for certain assumed blister depth as a function of hydride matrix yield strength ratio. The simulation was carried out for a semi ellipsoidal blister using ABAQUS finite element package. The blister formation was simulated by single step and multiple step transformation of the matrix to hydride. It is felt that the same methodology can be used to estimate the stress field around semi constrained inclusion such as hydride blister(s) in hydride forming metals like uranium, zirconium, titanium etc. and of localized corrosion products in metals and alloys. A matrix of dimension in the ratio 5 (along direction 1):1 (along direction 2) was considered for the computations. The Zr matrix having hexagonal crystal structure and faced centered cubic zirconium hydride was modeled as elastically isotropic. Both matrix and hydride was modeled to undergo linear work hardening up to ultimate tensile strength (=1.25Xyield strength), corresponding to a plastic strain of 10 percent. A small strain small displacement theory was adopted. Computations were made for an axisymmetric case with the symmetry axis along the 2 direction. Transformation of zirconium hydrogen solid solution into hydride

  18. High ramp rate thermogravimetric analysis of zirconium(II) hydride and titanium(II) hydride

    Highlights: • A unique arc image device has been proposed for high ramp rate thermogravimetry. • Powder oxidation influences decomposition kinetics at temperatures below 933 K. • Particle size has a negligible effect on TiH2 decomposition behavior. • Improvements to the device are required to conduct accurate kinetic analysis. - Abstract: Zirconium and titanium hydride are utilized in liquid phase metal foam processing techniques. This application results in immediate exposure to molten metal and almost immediate decomposition at high temperatures. Most decomposition characterization techniques utilize slow heating rates and are unable to capture the decomposition behavior of hydrides under foam processing conditions. In order to address this issue a specialized high ramp rate thermogravimetric analyzer was created from a xenon arc image refiner. In addition to thermogravimetry, complimentary techniques including X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize hydride decomposition and compare the results to literature. Hydrides were partially oxidized and separated into particles size ranges to evaluate the influence of these factors on decomposition. Oxidizing treatments were found to decrease decomposition rate only at temperatures below 933 K (660 °C) while particle size effects appeared to be negligible. Several improvements to the unique TGA apparatus presented in the current work are suggested to allow reliable kinetic modeling and analysis

  19. Electrochemical and Optical Properties of Magnesium-Alloy Hydrides Reviewed

    Thirugnasambandam G. Manivasagam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available As potential hydrogen storage media, magnesium based hydrides have been systematically studied in order to improve reversibility, storage capacity, kinetics and thermodynamics. The present article deals with the electrochemical and optical properties of Mg alloy hydrides. Electrochemical hydrogenation, compared to conventional gas phase hydrogen loading, provides precise control with only moderate reaction conditions. Interestingly, the alloy composition determines the crystallographic nature of the metal-hydride: a structural change is induced from rutile to fluorite at 80 at.% of Mg in Mg-TM alloy, with ensuing improved hydrogen mobility and storage capacity. So far, 6 wt.% (equivalent to 1600 mAh/g of reversibly stored hydrogen in MgyTM(1-yHx (TM: Sc, Ti has been reported. Thin film forms of these metal-hydrides reveal interesting electrochromic properties as a function of hydrogen content. Optical switching occurs during (dehydrogenation between the reflective metal and the transparent metal hydride states. The chronological sequence of the optical improvements in optically active metal hydrides starts with the rare earth systems (YHx, followed by Mg rare earth alloy hydrides (MgyGd(1-yHx and concludes with Mg transition metal hydrides (MgyTM(1-yHx. In-situ optical characterization of gradient thin films during (dehydrogenation, denoted as hydrogenography, enables the monitoring of alloy composition gradients simultaneously.

  20. Kinetics of Final Degassing of Hydrogen Desorption by Metal Hydrides

    Drozdov, I V

    2014-01-01

    The proposed model concerns the 'confluent shrinking core' scenario and reproduces the desorption kinetic after the complete decay of the stoichiometric hydride ($\\beta$-phase). The exact analytical solution is obtained, the numerical values are demonstrated by the example of magnesium hydride.

  1. High energy density battery based on complex hydrides

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-26

    A battery and process of operating a battery system is provided using high hydrogen capacity complex hydrides in an organic non-aqueous solvent that allows the transport of hydride ions such as AlH.sub.4.sup.- and metal ions during respective discharging and charging steps.

  2. Growth and decomposition of Lithium and Lithium hydride on Nickel

    Engbæk, Jakob; Nielsen, Gunver; Nielsen, Jane Hvolbæk;

    2006-01-01

    -hydride films. By only making thin films of LiH it is possible to study the stability of these hydride layers and compare it directly with the stability of pure Li without having any transport phenomena or adsorbed oxygen to obscure the results. The desorption of metallic lithium takes place at a lower...

  3. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  4. Ultra-sonic observation in niobium hydride precipitation

    The hidrogen embrittlement of exothermic ocluders, had been considered as due to applied stress induced hydride precipitates leading to brittle fracture. The results of simultaneous measurements of macroscopic deformation and elastic change due to hydride precipitation, using the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique are showed. THen it was tested the possibility of kinectis precipitation parameters evoluation. (Author)

  5. Preferred hydride growth orientations on oxide-coated gadolinium surfaces

    Highlights: ► The preferred hydride growth orientations on gadolinium metal coated by a thin oxide layer are presented. ► A preferred growth of the (1 0 0)h plane of the face centered cubic (FCC) GdH2 is observed for the hydride spots forming below the oxidation layer. ► A change to the (1 1 1)h plane of the cubic hydride dominates for the hydride's Growth Centers. ► The texture change is attributed to the surface normal compressive stress component exerted by the oxidation layer on the developing hydride. - Abstract: The initial development of hydrides on polycrystalline gadolinium (Gd), as on some other hydride forming metals, is characterized by two sequential steps. The first step involves the rapid formation of a dense pattern of small hydride spots (referred to as the “small family” of hydrides) below the native oxidation layer. The second stage takes place when some of the “small family” nucleants (referred to as “growth centers”, GCs) break the oxide layer, leading to their rapid growth and finally to the massive hydriding of the sample. In the present study, the texture of the two hydride families was studied, by combining X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis with a microscopic analysis of the hydride, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It has been observed that for the “small family”, a preferred growth of the (1 0 0)h plane of the cubic GdH2 takes place, whereas for the GCs, a change to the (1 1 1)h plane of the cubic hydride dominates. These preferred growth orientations were analyzed by their structure relation with the (0 0 .1)m basal plane of the Gd metal. It has been concluded that the above texture change is due to the surface normal compressive stress component exerted by the oxidation overlayer on the developing hydride, preventing the (0 0 .1)m||(1 1 1)h growth orientation. This stress is relieved upon the rupture of that overlayer and the development of the GCs, leading to the

  6. Modular hydride beds for mobile applications

    Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.

    1997-08-01

    Design, construction, initial testing and simple thermal modeling of modular, metal hydride beds have been completed. Originally designed for supplying hydrogen to a fuel cell on a mobile vehicle, the complete bed design consists of 8 modules and is intended for use on the Palm Desert Vehicle (PDV) under development at the Schatz Energy Center, Humbolt State University. Each module contains approximately 2 kg of a commercially available, low temperature, hydride-forming metal alloy. Waste heat from the fuel cell in the form of heated water is used to desorb hydrogen from the alloy for supplying feed hydrogen to the fuel cell. In order to help determine the performance of such a modular bed system, six modules were constructed and tested. The design and construction of the modules is described in detail. Initial testing of the modules both individually and as a group showed that each module can store {approximately} 30 g of hydrogen (at 165 PSIA fill pressure, 17 C), could be filled with hydrogen in 6 minutes at a nominal, 75 standard liters/min (slm) fueling rate, and could supply hydrogen during desorption at rates of 25 slm, the maximum anticipated hydrogen fuel cell input requirement. Tests made of 5 modules as a group indicated that the behavior of the group run in parallel both in fueling and gas delivery could be directly predicted from the corresponding, single module characteristics by using an appropriate scaling factor. Simple thermal modeling of a module as an array of cylindrical, hydride-filled tubes was performed. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with experimental data.

  7. Metal hydrides for concentrating solar thermal power energy storage

    Sheppard, D. A.; Paskevicius, M.; Humphries, T. D.; Felderhoff, M.; Capurso, G.; Bellosta von Colbe, J.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Ward, P. A.; Teprovich, J. A.; Corgnale, C.; Zidan, R.; Grant, D. M.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    The development of alternative methods for thermal energy storage is important for improving the efficiency and decreasing the cost of concentrating solar thermal power. We focus on the underlying technology that allows metal hydrides to function as thermal energy storage (TES) systems and highlight the current state-of-the-art materials that can operate at temperatures as low as room temperature and as high as 1100 °C. The potential of metal hydrides for thermal storage is explored, while current knowledge gaps about hydride properties, such as hydride thermodynamics, intrinsic kinetics and cyclic stability, are identified. The engineering challenges associated with utilising metal hydrides for high-temperature TES are also addressed.

  8. Helium trapping at erbium oxide precipitates in erbium hydride

    Foiles, Stephen M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The formation of He bubbles in erbium tritides is a significant process in the aging of these materials. Due to the long-standing uncertainty about the initial nucleation process of these bubbles, there is interest in mechanisms that can lead to the localization of He in erbium hydrides. Previous work has been unable to identify nucleation sites in homogeneous erbium hydride. This work builds on the experimental observation that erbium hydrides have nano- scale erbium oxide precipitates due to the high thermodynamic stability of erbium oxide and the ubiquitous presence of oxygen during materials processing. Fundamental DFT calculations indicate that the He is energetically favored in the oxide relative to the bulk hydride. Activation energies for the motion of He in the oxide and at the oxide-hydride interface indicate that trapping is kinetically feasible. A simple kinetic Monte Carlo model is developed that demonstrates the degree of trapping of He as a function of temperature and oxide fraction.

  9. Low-frequency excitations in zirconium hydrides

    The slow inelastic neutron scattering (INS) on ZrHx systems (x = 0.38, 0.52) revealed new excitations located within the energy range 2-10 MeV. Besides the acoustic vibrations specific to α-HCP Zr and γ-FCO Zr hydride the fine structure of these excitations is clearly observed. The origin of the new observed peaks is not very clear but a proton tunneling or a resonance effect in α-Zr lattice could be taken into account

  10. Tritium immobilization and packaging using metal hydrides

    Tritium recovered from CANDU heavy water reactors will have to be packaged and stored in a safe manner. Tritium will be recovered in the elemental form, T2. Metal tritides are effective compounds in which to immobilize the tritium as a stable non-reactive solid with a high tritium capacity. The technology necessary to prepare hydrides of suitable metals, such as titanium and zirconium, have been developed and the properties of the prepared materials evaluated. Conceptual designs of packages for containing metal tritides suitable for transportation and long-term storage have been made and initial testing started. (author)

  11. Nanostructured Magnesium Hydride for Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    de Rango, P.; Chaise, A.; Fruchart, D.; Miraglia, S.; Marty, Ph.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop suitable materials to store hydrogen in a solid state. A systematic investigation of the co-milling process of magnesium hydride with a transition metal was undertaken in order to produce nanostructured and highly reactive powders. The initiating role of the transition metal was evidenced by in situ neutron diffraction experiments. High performances in terms of thermal and mechanical behavior were achieved introducing expanded graphite and compacting the mixture to form composite materials. Absorption and desorption kinetics have been measured versus temperature and H2 pressure.

  12. Formation of hydrides blisters in zirconium alloys

    The formation of zirconium hydrides blisters in zirconium alloys due to the presence of a thermal gradient is a possible phenomenon which may occur in structural components of a reactor (pressure tubes), thus resulting a very important matter for the nuclear industry. For this reason, a series of experiments were initiated in the Hydrogen Damage Laboratory so as to obtain blisters of zirconium alloys and to study the aspects related to them. Zry-4 and Zr-2.5% Nb blisters were obtained. The propagation of a fissure present in a blister and the fracture surface were observed. The fissure propagated weakly in the blister and stopped in the Zry-4 matrix. (Author)

  13. Hydrogen in novel solid-state metal hydrides

    Solid-state metal hydrides display hydrogen densities close to that of liquid hydrogen and thus provide a safe and efficient way of storing hydrogen. As a result of recent neutron and synchrotron diffraction work some novel metal hydrides have been characterized that shed new light on the nature of metal-hydrogen interactions. While hydrogen appears as an anion surrounded by a large inventory of cation configurations in ionic hydrides such as Ca4Mg3H14, Ca19Mg8H54, Eu2MgD6, Eu6Mg7D26 and Eu2Mg3D10, it acts as a terminal ligand in covalently bonded hydride complexes based on p-elements such as [BH4]- and d-elements such as [IrH5]4- and [IrH4]5- in the complex hydrides LiBH4 and Mg6Ir2H11, respectively. Surprisingly, hydride complexes and hydride anions can also be discerned in typically metallic (interstitial) hydrides such as NdMgNi4H4 (= Nd3+Mg+2.[Ni4H4]5-) and LaMg2NiD7 (= La3+Mg+22.[NiH4]4-.3H-). Some hydrides also reveal other interesting features such as a hydrogenation induced Ce4+→Ce3+ valence change in CeMn1.8Al0.2H4.4 at room temperature that is accompanied by a Mn/Al metal atom exchange over distances of ∝2.6 A, and a hydrogen induced metal-to-nonmetal transition near ambient conditions that leads from the metallic compound Mg3Ir to the red colored hydride Mg6Ir2H11. In this article recent work and some methodological aspects are highlighted. (orig.)

  14. Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides

    Dennis C. Kunerth

    2014-09-01

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone, M4FT-14IN0805023, Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides, under Work Package Number FT-14IN080502. During service, zirconium alloy fuel cladding will degrade via corrosion/oxidation. Hydrogen, a byproduct of the oxidation process, will be absorbed into the cladding and eventually form hydrides due to low hydrogen solubility limits. The hydride phase is detrimental to the mechanical properties of the cladding and therefore it is important to be able to detect and characterize the presence of this constituent within the cladding. Presently, hydrides are evaluated using destructive examination. If nondestructive evaluation techniques can be used to detect and characterize the hydrides, the potential exists to significantly increase test sample coverage while reducing evaluation time and cost. To demonstrate the viability this approach, an initial evaluation of eddy current and ultrasonic techniques were performed to demonstrate the basic ability to these techniques to detect hydrides or their effects on the microstructure. Conventional continuous wave eddy current techniques were applied to zirconium based cladding test samples thermally processed with hydrogen gas to promote the absorption of hydrogen and subsequent formation of hydrides. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that eddy current inspection approaches have the potential to detect both the physical damage induced by hydrides, e.g. blisters and cracking, as well as the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates on the electrical properties of the zirconium alloy. Similarly, measurements of ultrasonic wave velocities indicate changes in the elastic properties resulting from the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates as well as changes in geometry in regions of severe degradation. However, for both approaches, the signal responses intended to make the desired measurement incorporate a number of contributing

  15. Development of hydride absorber for fast reactor. Application of hafnium hydride to control rod of large fast reactor

    The application of hafnium hydride (Hf-hydride) to a control rod for a large fast reactor where the B4C control rod is originally employed is studied. Three types of Hf-hydride control rods are designed. The control rod worth and its change during the burnup are evaluated for different hydrogen-to-hafnium ratios and are compared with those of the original B4C control rod. The result indicates that the worths of the Hf-hydride and the 10B-enriched B4C control rods are approximately the same, and the lifetime of the Hf-hydride control rod is almost four times longer than that of the 10B-enriched B4C control rod. The core performances of the shutdown margin, sodium void reactivity, Doppler reactivity coefficient, and breeding ratio are analyzed. It is indicated that those for the Hf-hydride control rod are almost the same as those for the original B4C control rod. The behavior of neutrons moderated by the Hf-hydride control rod is analyzed. It is confirmed that the Hf-hydride control rod does not cause any thermal spike problems in the fast reactor core. (author)

  16. Nanoindentation measurements of the mechanical properties of zirconium matrix and hydrides in unirradiated pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding

    Rico, A., E-mail: alvaro.rico@urjc.es [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Martin-Rengel, M.A., E-mail: mamartin@mater.upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ruiz-Hervias, J., E-mail: jesus.ruiz@upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren SN, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, J. [DIMME, Departamento de Tecnología Mecánica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipán s/n, E-28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Sanchez, F.J., E-mail: javier.gomez@amsimulation.com [Advanced Material Simulation, S.L, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    It is well known that the mechanical properties of the nuclear fuel cladding may be affected by the presence of hydrides. The average mechanical properties of hydrided cladding have been extensively investigated from a macroscopic point of view. In addition, the mechanical and fracture properties of bulk hydride samples fabricated from zirconium plates have also been reported. In this paper, Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress are measured for each phase, namely zirconium hydrides and matrix, of pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding. To this end, nanoindentation tests were performed on ZIRLO samples in as-received state, on a hydride blister and in samples with 150 and 1200 ppm of hydrogen homogeneously distributed along the hoop direction of the cladding. The results show that the measured mechanical properties of the zirconium hydrides and ZIRLO matrix (Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress) are rather similar. From the experimental data, the hydride volume fraction in the cladding samples with 150 and 1200 ppm was estimated and the average mechanical properties were calculated by means of the rule of mixtures. These values were compared with those obtained from ring compression tests. Good agreement between the results obtained by both methods was found.

  17. Neutron scattering on hydrides of intermetallic compounds

    This review surveys the application of neutron scattering for the investigation of the microscopic behaviour of hydrogen in intermetallic compounds. This concerns the structure as well as the dynamics. Neutron diffraction experiments were performed on Ti1.2Mn1.8D3 and LaNi5D7. In the latter case the dominant nickel scattering could be suppressed by isotope substitution with 60Ni, and the anisotropic broadening of the Bragg peaks could be modelled in a correspondingly modified Rietveld-profile refinement. For the investigation of hydrogen diffusion in intermetallic hydrides by means of quasielastic neutron scattering an iterative multiple scattering correction procedure has been developped which allows a reliable determination of hydrogen diffusion coefficients. The mechanism of hydrogen diffusion in intermetallic hydrides comprises three types of jumps: escape jumps out of energetically lower interstitials, transport jumps over the energetically higher sites and locally restricted jump processes. For Ti1.2Mn1.8H3 the main features of the diffusional behaviour could be described quantitatively in the framework of a three state model. By means of neutron vibrational spectroscopy information about the occupied hydrogen sites and thus about the structure can be extracted from the symmetry splitting of the vibrational modes. In this way we showed that in α-LaNi5Hx, La2Ni4-octahedral and La2Ni2-tetrahedral interstitial sites are occupied. (orig./GG)

  18. Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy of Ethylmercury Hydride

    Goubet, M.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2012-06-01

    The first millimeter-wave rotational spectrum of an organomercury compound, ethylmercury hydride (CH_3CH_2HgH), has been recorded using the Lille fast-scan spectrometer in the frequency range 120 -- 180 GHz. The spectroscopic study is complemented by quantum chemical calculations taking into account relativistic effects on the mercury atom. The very good agreement between theoretical and experimental molecular parameters validates the chosen ab initio method, in particular its capability to predict the accurate values of the quartic centrifugal distortion constants related to this type of compound. Estimations of the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants are not as predictive as the structural parameters but good enough to satisfy the spectroscopic needs. In addition, the orientation of the H--Hg--C bonds axis deduced from the experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants compares well with the corresponding ab initio value. From the good agreement between experimental and theoretical results, together with the observation of the six most abundant isotopes of mercury, ethylmercury hydride is unambiguously identified and its calculated equilibrium geometry is confirmed. Alekseev, E.A. et al. Radio Physics and Radio Astronomy 3 (2012) 78.

  19. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Metal Hydrides

    1981-01-01

    In the last five years, the study of metal hydrides has ex­ panded enormously due to the potential technological importance of this class of materials in hydrogen based energy conversion schemes. The scope of this activity has been worldwide among the industrially advanced nations. There has been a consensus among researchers in both fundamental and applied areas that a more basic understanding of the properties of metal/hydrogen syster;,s is required in order to provide a rational basis for the selection of materials for specific applications. The current worldwide need for and interest in research in metal hydrides indicated the timeliness of an Advanced Study Insti­ tute to provide an in-depth view of the field for those active in its various aspects. The inclusion of speakers from non-NATO coun­ tries provided the opportunity for cross-fertilization of ideas for future research. While the emphasis of the Institute was on basic properties, there was a conscious effort to stimulate interest in the applic...

  20. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries. PMID:18849978

  1. Synthesis and hydride transfer reactions of cobalt and nickel hydride complexes to BX3 compounds.

    Mock, Michael T; Potter, Robert G; O'Hagan, Molly J; Camaioni, Donald M; Dougherty, William G; Kassel, W Scott; DuBois, Daniel L

    2011-12-01

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H(2) gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe)(2) (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane)) was capable of reducing a variety of BX(3) compounds having a hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to the HA of BEt(3). This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities (ΔG(H(-))°) of HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX(3) compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX(3) compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe)(2) was observed to transfer H(-) to BX(3) compounds with X = H, OC(6)F(5), and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh)(3) is accompanied by the formation of dmpe-(BH(3))(2) and dmpe-(BH(2)(SPh))(2) products that follow from a reduction of multiple B-SPh bonds and a loss of dmpe ligands from cobalt. Reactions between HCo(dmpe)(2) and B(SPh)(3) in the presence of triethylamine result in the formation of Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh and Et(3)N-BH(3) with no loss of a dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) with B(SPh)(3) under analogous conditions give Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe)(2)(SPh)](+). The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe)(2) (dedpe = Et(2)PCH(2)CH(2)PPh(2)) from H(2) and a base is also discussed, including the formation of an uncommon trans dihydride species, trans-[(H)(2)Co(dedpe)(2)][BF(4)]. PMID:22040085

  2. Effect of metal hydrides on the burning characteristics of boron

    Highlights: • The effect of some metal hydrides on the burning characteristics of boron is studied for the first time. • We are the first to conduct a TG experiment on boron samples at high temperatures (a maximum of 1750 °C). • The thermal reaction process of boron is firstly divided into five stages according to the weight gain rate of the sample. • Specific values of metal hydrides on ignition delay time and combustion intensity of boron are obtained. - Abstract: In this study, the effect of four metal hydrides on the burning characteristics of boron was investigated. Thermogravimetric experiment results show that the thermal reaction process of boron samples can be divided into five stages. The thermal reactions of boron can be significantly promoted with LiH, which can reduce the initial temperature of the first violent reaction stage by ∼140 °C. The starting temperature of the post-reaction stage also decreases by ∼260 °C. The results of the laser ignition experiment suggest that all four metal hydrides can promote boron burning. Nonetheless, different metal hydrides display varied promotional effects. Among the studied hydrides, LiH is the most effective additive and shortens the ignition delay time of boron by ∼34.1%. Moreover, it enhances the combustion intensity of boron by ∼117.6%. The other three metal hydrides (CaH2, TiH2, and ZrH2) can also contribute to boron burning

  3. Zircaloy-4 hydriding. Hydrogen distribution in PWR's rod cladding

    In pressurised water reactors, Zircaloy 4 is used as fuel cladding in contact with hot water. The precipitation of hydrides at room temperatures causes mechanical deterioration of the cladding. As the cladding is subjected to a radial temperature gradient, the hydrogen distribution is greatly affected. The image analysis method is used to determine the hydride distribution in the irradiated cladding. To calibrate this method, a device was specially built for the preparation of Zircaloy specimens with known hydrogen contents. The hydriding conditions and hydrogen content determination procedures were fixed. We have successfully realized specimens with various hydrogen contents. With these specimens, a relationship between the parameter Sv (surface density of hydrides) and the hydrogen content was established. This parameter Sv is independent from the Zircaloy 4 metallurgical state (i.e. stress relieved or recrystallized) and from the analysis section (longitudinal or transverse). Study of hydrogen content and hydride distribution in irradiated cladding by means of image analysis showed that the method is limited by its ability of separation between neighbouring hydrides at cladding's periphery where the hydrogen content can reach several thousands ppm. Nevertheless, this method gives us some information about hydride distribution inside the cladding. A model for thermal diffusion was developped to stimulate the migration of hydrogen in Zirconium alloys. This model was used to predict hydrogen distribution in the irradiated cladding. Comparison of model predictions with results of image analysis shows good agreement. (Author). refs., figs., tabs

  4. Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and uranium hydride powder

    Highlights: • Isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and uranium hydride powder can be rapid and reversible. • Gas–solid exchange rate is controlled by transport within ∼0.7 μm hydride particles. • Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using uranium hydride is feasible. - Abstract: Isotope exchange between gaseous hydrogen and solid uranium hydride has been studied by flowing hydrogen (deuterium) gas through packed powder beds of uranium deuteride (hydride). We used a residual gas analyzer system to perform real-time analysis of the effluent gas composition. We also developed an exchange and transport model and, by fitting it to the experimental data, extracted kinetic parameters for the isotope exchange reaction. Our results suggest that, from approximately 70 to 700 kPa and 25 to 400 °C, the gas-to-solid exchange rate is controlled by hydrogen and deuterium transport within the ∼0.7 μm diameter uranium hydride particles. We use our kinetic parameters to show that gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen and deuterium using uranium hydride could be feasible

  5. The development of metal hydrides using as concentrating solar thermal storage materials

    Qu, Xuanhui; Li, Yang; Li, Ping; Wan, Qi; Zhai, Fuqiang

    2015-12-01

    Metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique has great promising future prospects in solar power generation, industrial waste heat utilization and peak load regulating of power system. This article introduces basic principle of metal hydrides for thermal storage, and summarizes developments in advanced metal hydrides high-temperature thermal storage materials, numerical simulation and thermodynamic calculation in thermal storage systems, and metal hydrides thermal storage prototypes. Finally, the future metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique is been looked ahead.

  6. Structural relationships in complex hydrides of the late transition metals

    Literature data on complex hydrides of the late transition metals (groups 7-10), such as the hydrogen storage material Mg2NiH4, are reviewed with respect to order-disorder phase transitions and structural relationships. They are analysed in terms of crystallographic group-subgroup trees and their use in understanding the different crystal structures from a symmetry point of view is demonstrated. New data are presented on the low temperature behaviour of magnesium iridium hydrides and strontium rhodium hydrides studied by powder X-ray diffraction. (orig.)

  7. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  8. PIE techniques for hydride reorientation test at NDC

    Dry storage of spent fuels in the interim storage facility is being planned in Japan. However, the gradual deterioration of the mechanical property of fuel cladding due to internal pressure and temperature during the storage term is known. Therefore, the integrity of stored fuel rods should be confirmed before the start of dry storage. For the last several years, NDC had a lot of experiences on the hydride reorientation test. The specimen preparation techniques on the hydride reorientation test and the mechanical testing techniques after the hydride reorientation are shown in this paper. (author)

  9. Delayed hydride in zirconium based alloys

    Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) velocity along the axial direction of Zirconium-2.5% Nb pressure tube materials of different origins i.e. CANDU and RBMK (TMT -I), has been determined in the temperature range of 162 to 250 degree C. DHC crack growth was monitored using Direct Current Potential Drop Technique. It has been observed that the DHC velocity of both materials increases with increase in test temperature. The DHC velocity for the RBMK (TMT -I) material was found about 2 to 5 times lower than that for the CANDU materials at each temperature. In addition, the activation energy of the phenomena was calculated taking into account that DHC is a thermal activated mechanism, following an Arrhenius-type law. (author)

  10. The progress of nanocrystalline hydride electrode materials

    This paper reviews research at the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, on the synthesis of nanocrystalline hydride electrode materials. Nanocrystalline materials have been synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA) followed by annealing. Examples of the materials include TiFe-, ZrV2-, LaNi5 and Mg2Ni-type phases. Details on the process used and the enhancement of properties due to the nanoscale structures are presented. The synthesized alloys were used as negative electrode materials for Ni-MH battery. The properties of hydrogen host materials can be modified substantially by alloying to obtain the desired storage characteristics. For example, it was found that the respective replacement of Fe in TiFe by Ni and/or by Cr, Co, Mo improved not only the discharge capacity but also the cycle life of these electrodes. The hydrogen storage properties of nanocrystalline ZrV2- and LaNi5-type powders prepared by mechanical alloying and annealing show no big difference with those of melt casting (polycrystalline) alloys. On the other hand, a partial substitution of Mg by Mn or Al in Mg2Ni alloy leads to an increase in discharge capacity, at room temperature. Furthermore, the effect of the nickel and graphite coating on the structure of some nanocrystalline alloys and the electrodes characteristics were investigated. In the case of Mg2Ni-type alloy mechanical coating with graphite effectively reduced the degradation rate of the studied electrode materials. The combination of a nanocrystalline TiFe-, ZrV2- and LaNi5-type hydride electrodes and a nickel positive electrode to form a Ni-MH battery, has been successful. (authors)

  11. Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2005-11-01

    Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

  12. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications-metal hydride

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software. (review article)

  13. Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications-metal hydride

    Crevier, Marie-Charlotte; Richard, Martin; Rittenhouse, D Matheson; Roy, Pierre-Olivier; Bedard, Stephane [Victhom Human Bionics Inc., Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures, QC (Canada)

    2007-03-01

    In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software. (review article)

  14. Formation of hydride blisters in zirconium alloy pressure tubes

    The fracture of the Zircaloy-2 pressure tube in the Pickering Unit 2 power reactor was associated with the growth of hydride blisters at points of contact between the pressure tube and the cooler calandria tube surrounding it. Similar blisters have been observed in a Zr-2.5 wt% Nb pressure tube in WR-1, an organic-cooled research reactor. These hydride blisters were formed and grew as a result of the thermal diffusion of hydrogen in the zirconium, a mechanism whereby hydrogen diffuses down a temperature gradient. If the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen is exceeded in the cooler regions, hydride will precipitate. In this paper, the time required to grow these hydride blisters will be estimated from the blister size and the hydrogen distribution in its neighborhood, by using simple equations derived from thermal diffusion theory

  15. Out-of-pile accelerated hydriding of Zircaloy fasteners

    Mechanical joints between Zircaloy and nickel-bearing alloys, mainly the Zircaloy-4/Inconel-600 combination, were exposed to water at 4500F and 5200F to study hydriding of Zircaloy in contact with a dissimilar metal. Accelerated hydriding of the Zircaloy occurred at both temperatures. At 4500F the dissolved hydrogen level of the water was over ten times that at 5200F. At 5200F the initially high hydrogen ingress rate decreased rapidly as exposure time increased and was effectively shut off in about 25 days. Severely hydrided Zircaloy components successfully withstood thermal cycling and mechanical testing. Chromium plating of the nickel-bearing parts was found to be an effective and practical barrier in preventing nickel-alloy smearing and accelerated hydriding of Zircaloy

  16. A nuclear analytical model for uranium zirconium hydride reactor core

    The nuclear analytical model and codes for the uranium zirconium hydride reactor are outlined. The criticality and control rods effeciency of abroad TRIGA reactor are obtained using this model and codes. The results are satisfactory

  17. A mechanistic approach to develop the secondary hydriding criteria

    Reliable criteria of secondary hydriding failures are important to assure safe operation of nuclear fuel in LWR power units. The present paper reviews available data on massive hydriding of Zirconium claddings covering out-of-pile studies and in-pile tests in research reactors. Analyses of these experimental data give evidence that threshold conditions leading to the onset of massive hydriding are drastically changed under irradiation. The changes are caused mainly by irradiation damage of oxygen sublattice in ZrO2 by fission fragments leaving the periphery of fuel pellets. The tests in research reactors provide a basis to develop a parametric dependency which relates the threshold of massive hydriding to composition of steam-hydrogen mixture, irradiation dose rate and temperature

  18. Transparent yttrium hydride thin films prepared by reactive sputtering

    Mongstad, T.; Platzer-Björkman, C.; Karazhanov, S. Zh.; Holt, A.; Maehlen, J. P.; Hauback, B. C.

    2011-01-01

    Metal hydrides have earlier been suggested for utilization in solar cells. With this as a motivation we have prepared thin films of yttrium hydride by reactive magnetron sputter deposition. The resulting films are metallic for low partial pressure of hydrogen during the deposition, and black or yellow-transparent for higher partial pressure of hydrogen. Both metallic and semiconducting transparent YHx films have been prepared directly in-situ without the need of capping layers and post-deposi...

  19. The Production of Uranium Metal by Metal Hydrides Incorporated

    Alexander, P. P.

    1943-01-01

    Metal Hydrides Incorporated was a pioneer in the production of uranium metal on a commercial scale and supplied it to all the laboratories interested in the original research, before other methods for its production were developed. Metal Hydrides Inc. supplied the major part of the metal for the construction of the first experimental pile which, on December 2, 1942, demonstrated the feasibility of the self-sustaining chain reaction and the release of atomic energy.

  20. Electronic structure and optical properties of lightweight metal hydrides

    Setten, van M.J.; Popa, V.A.; Wijs, de G.A.; Brocks, G.

    2007-01-01

    We study the dielectric functions of the series of simple hydrides LiH, NaH, MgH2, and AlH3, and of the complex hydrides Li3AlH6, Na3AlH6, LiAlH4, NaAlH4, and Mg(AlH4)2, using first-principles density-functional theory and GW calculations. All compounds are large gap insulators with GW single-partic

  1. Thin-film metal hydrides for solar energy applications

    2012-01-01

    Thin-film metal hydrides may become important solar energy materials in the future. This thesis demonstrates interesting material properties of metal hydride films, relevant for applications as semiconducting materials for photovoltaic (PV) solar cells and for regulation of light using smart window technology. List of papers. Papers II-VI are removed from the thesis due to copyright restrictions. Paper I C. Platzer-Björkman, T. Mongstad, S. Zh. Karazhanov, J. P. Mæhlen, E. S. Marst...

  2. Suppression of the critical temperature in binary vanadium hydrides

    Highlights: • Addition of 10 mol% Cr to V increases the β-hydride TC to >200 °C. • Addition of 10 mol% Ni to V increases the β-hydride TC to >400 °C. • Addition of 10 mol% Al to V decreases the β-hydride TC to 90Al10 membrane can be cycled to 2 without β-hydride formation. -- Abstract: The tendency of vanadium-based alloy membranes to embrittle is the biggest commercialisation barrier for this hydrogen separation technology. Excessive hydrogen absorption and the α → β hydride transition both contribute to brittle failure of these membranes. Alloying is known to reduce absorption, but the influence of alloying on hydride phase formation under conditions relevant to membrane operation has not been studied in great detail previously. Here, the effect of Cr, Ni, and Al alloying additions on V–H phase equilibrium has been studied using hydrogen absorption measurements and in situ X-ray diffraction studies. The addition of 10 mol% Ni increases the critical temperature for α + β hydride formation to greater than 400 °C, compared to 170 °C for V. Cr also increases the critical temperature, to between 200 and 300 °C. The addition of 10 mol% Al, however, suppresses the critical temperature to less than 30 °C, thereby enabling this material to be cycled thermally and hydrostatically while precluding formation of the β-hydride phase. This is despite Al also decreasing hydrogen absorption. The implication of this finding is that one of the mechanisms of brittle failure in vanadium-based hydrogen-selective membranes has been eliminated, thereby increasing the robustness of this material relative to V

  3. Modelling of fuel rod hydriding failures in water reactors

    Mechanistic models which were developed to describe primary hydriding phenomena in claddings of initially intact rods with residual moisture are described. The models include the following key processes: fuel rod thermal behavior, UO2 fuel oxidation in steam-hydrogen atmosphere under irradiation, hydrogen diffusion in zirconium and in the hydride, growth of the hydride phase. Fuel rod thermomechanical behavior is calculated by using RTOP integral fuel code. An oxidation model represents the effects of temperature dynamics and temperature profile along fuel axis and radius on fuel oxidation as well as on hydrogen accumulation inside the fuel rod. Along with ordinary thermal dissociation of water molecules, the oxidation model also addresses radiolysis of the steam-hydrogen mixture due to fission fragments. The present radiolysis model takes into account the effects of the gas mixture composition, temperature and pressure. A new model of cladding hydriding is proposed in which calculation of the massive hydride growth is performed in 2-D geometry. Hydrogen transport in zirconium cladding is modeled with account for thermodiffusion. The RTOP code comprising the models developed allows us to calculate different scenarios of hydriding rod failures under given operation conditions. Test calculations were carried out and compared to available data. It is shown that there are threshold values of initial steam content inside the intact fuel rod which lead to the possibility of through-cladding hydride growth and formation of the primary defect. The threshold values depend on the oxidation state of the cladding inner surface, linear power profile in the fuel rod, fuel rod geometry, cladding temperature conditions and hydrogen diffusivities in zirconium and zirconium hydride

  4. Hydride distribution around a blister in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes

    Blisters were grown in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube sections by a thermal gradient without applying external stress. The surrounding hydride distribution was analyzed. Hydride platelets were observed in the radial direction of the blister. The precipitation of these hydrides was found to be favored by low temperature of blister growth and slow cooling rate after blister formation. The misfit strain produced by hydride blister growth provides the stress necessary to promote radial precipitation. During the subsequent tensile test at 200 C (delayed hydride cracking test) the radial hydride length and thickness are increased. This increase is explained by a stress concentrator effect of the blister. When this effect vanishes, the increase of radial hydrides continues by an autocatalytic effect and stress concentrator effect of the hydride platelet. If a crack originated in the blister reaches the matrix it could propagate along a radial hydride previously precipitated. (orig.)

  5. Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2013-09-30

    The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

  6. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    Ewa C. E. Rönnebro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later, which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT metal hydride operating reversibly at 600–800 °C to generate heat, as well as a low-temperature (LT hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is the need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day or during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram-sized samples scaled up to kilogram quantities with retained performance. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a ~200-kWh/m3 bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated, and we demonstrated the ability to meet or exceed all performance targets.

  7. Metal hydrides based high energy density thermal battery

    Fang, Zhigang Zak, E-mail: zak.fang@utah.edu [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Zhou, Chengshang; Fan, Peng [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Udell, Kent S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Bowman, Robert C. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 135 South 1460 East, Room 412, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States); Vajo, John J.; Purewal, Justin J. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, 3011 Malibu Canyon Road, Malibu, CA 90265 (United States); Kekelia, Bidzina [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, The University of Utah, 50 S. Central Campus Dr., Room 2110, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0114 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • The principle of the thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides was demonstrated. • The thermal battery used MgH{sub 2} and TiMnV as a working pair. • High energy density can be achieved by the use of MgH{sub 2} to store thermal energy. - Abstract: A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides was studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilized a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The pair of hydrides that was identified and developed was: (1) catalyzed MgH{sub 2} as the high temperature hydride material, due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics; and (2) TiV{sub 0.62}Mn{sub 1.5} alloy as the matching low temperature hydride. Further, a proof-of-concept prototype was built and tested, demonstrating the potential of the system as HVAC for transportation vehicles.

  8. U-8 wt %Mo and 7 wt %Mo alloys powder obtained by an hydride-de hydride process

    Uranium-molybdenum alloys are been tested as a component in high-density LEU dispersion fuels with very good performances. These alloys need to be transformed to powder due to the manufacturing requirements of the fuels. One method to convert ductile alloys into powder is the hydride-de hydride process, which takes advantage of the ability of the U-α phase to transform to UH3: a brittle and relatively low-density compound. U-Mo alloys around 7 and 8 wt % Mo were melted and heat treated at different temperature ranges in order to partially convert γ -phase to α -phase. Subsequent hydriding transforms this α -phase to UH3. The volume change associated to the hydride formation embrittled the material which ends up in a powdered alloy. Results of the optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction during different steps of the process are shown. (author)

  9. A quantitative phase field model for hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys: Part II. Modeling of temperature dependent hydride precipitation

    A quantitative free energy functional developed in Part I (Shi and Xiao, 2014 [1]) was applied to model temperature dependent δ-hydride precipitation in zirconium in real time and real length scale. At first, the effect of external tensile load on reorientation of δ-hydrides was calibrated against experimental observations, which provides a modification factor for the strain energy in free energy formulation. Then, two types of temperature-related problems were investigated. In the first type, the effect of temperature transient was studied by cooling the Zr–H system at different cooling rates from high temperature while an external tensile stress was maintained. At the end of temperature transients, the average hydride size as a function of cooling rate was compared to experimental data. In the second type, the effect of temperature gradients was studied in a one or two dimensional temperature field. Different boundary conditions were applied. The results show that the hydride precipitation concentrated in low temperature regions and that it eventually led to the formation of hydride blisters in zirconium. A brief discussion on how to implement the hysteresis of hydrogen solid solubility on hydride precipitation and dissolution in the developed phase field scheme is also presented

  10. Hydriding and dehydriding characteristics of LiBH4 and transition metals-added magnesium hydride

    Graphical abstract: Hydriding reaction curves under 12 bar H2, and dehydriding reaction curves under 1.0 bar H2, at 593 K at the 1st cycle for MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti and MgH2. Highlights: ► Addition of Ni, LiBH4, and Ti to MgH2 to increase reaction rates. ► Sample preparation by reactive mechanical grinding. ► At n = 2, the sample absorbed 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H2. ► Analysis of rate-controlling step for dehydriding of the sample at n = 3. - Abstract: In this study, MgH2 was used as a starting material instead of Mg. Ni, Ti, and LiBH4 with a high hydrogen-storage capacity of 18.4 wt% were added. A sample with a composition of MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti was prepared by reactive mechanical grinding. The activation of MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti was completed after the first hydriding–dehydrding cycle. The hydriding rate decreases as the temperature increases due to the decrease in the driving force for the hydriding reaction. At the 1st cycle, the sample desorbs 1.45 wt% H for 10 min, 2.54 wt% H for 20 min, 3.13 wt% H for 30 min, and 3.40 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 1.0 bar H2. At the 2nd cycle, the sample absorbs 3.84 wt% H for 5 min, 3.96 wt% H for 10 min, and 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H2. MgH2–10Ni–2LiBH4–2Ti after reactive mechanical grinding contained MgH2, Mg, Ni, TiH1.924, and MgO phases. The reactive mechanical grinding of Mg with Ni, LiBH4, and Ti is considered to create defects on the surface and in the interior of Mg (to facilitate nucleation), and to reduce the particle size of Mg (to shorten diffusion distances of hydrogen atoms). The formation of Mg2Ni during hydriding–dehydriding cycling increases the hydriding and dehydriding rates of the sample

  11. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  12. Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer in DU Hydriding

    The sources of nuclear fusion reaction are deuterium (D) and tritium (T). Generally, D is fused into T, which generates helium atoms and neutrons. At this time, a tremendous amount of energy is generated. D + T → 4He + n (E = 17.6 MeV) Hydrogen is a gas, and cannot be stored in large amounts. In addition, it can be explosive. Therefore, one of the storing methods for hydrogen is metal hydride. In this research, several kinds of metal hydrides including U, Zr, ZrCo, ZrNi, and LaNi5 have been simulated through modeling work of hydrogen absorption, desorption, and pressure effect in a bed using DU. For the exact modeling of the hydriding process, it is necessary to calculate simultaneous heat and mass transfer because, in the hydriding process, not only is hydrogen gas transported by mass transport and chemisorption but heat transfer also occurs through absorption. Therefore, in this paper, we tried to calculate the simultaneous heat and mass transfer using numerical analysis methods. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer in DU hydriding is well fitted compared to the experimental data, and is more reasonable considering only one variable. The hydriding process changes the temperature and atomic ratio simultaneously, and thus it is necessary to consider in company with two transport phenomena. The numerical analysis method applied Euler's method; however, the Runge-Kutta method is a more widely used numerical solution of a differential equation. Therefore, when analyzing the hydriding process, Runge-Kutta or another method will henceforth be applied

  13. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  14. Hydriding and neutron irradiation in zircaloy-4

    The composition of Zircaloy-4 for nuclear applications is specified by the ASTM B350 Standard, that fixes the amount of alloying elements (Sn, Fe, Cr) and impurities (Ni, Hf, O, N, C, among others) to optimize good corrosion and mechanical behavior.The recycling of zircaloy-4 scrap and chips resulting from cladding tube fabrication is an interesting issue.However, changes in the final composition of the recycled material may occur due to contamination with tool pieces, stainless steel chips, turnings, etc. while scrap is stored and handled. Since the main components of the possible contaminants are Fe, Cr and Ni, it arises the interest in studying up to what limit the Fe, Ni and Cr contents could be exceeded beyond the standard specification without affecting significantly the alloy properties.Zircaloy-4 alloys elaborated with Fe, Cr and Ni additions and others of standard composition in use in nuclear plants are studied by tensile tests, SEM observations and EDS microanalysis.Some samples are tested in the initial condition and others after hydriding treatments and neutron irradiation in the RA6

  15. Reactions of NO with nitrogen hydrides x

    Mebel, A. M.; Lin, M. C.

    In this review, we consider the reactions of NO ( x 1,2) with the nitrogen x hydrides NH, NH and NH . The reactions are relevant to the post-combustion, non-catalytic reduction of NO with NH in the thermal de-NO process and with x x HNCO in the rapid reduction of NO as well as to the thermal decomposition of x some high-energy materials, including ammonium dinitramide. The practical importance has motivated considerable theoretical interest in these reactions. We review numerous ab - initio molecular orbital studies of potential energy surfaces for NO NH and theoretical calculations of their kinetic parameters, such as x y thermal rate constants and branching ratios of various products. The most advanced theoretical calculations are carried out using the Gaussian-2 family of methods which provides the chemical accuracy (within 2 kcal mol ) for the energetics and molecular parameters of the reactants, products, intermediates and transition states. We present a detailed comparison of the theoretical results with available experimental data. We show that the reactions of NO with NH and NH x are very fast because they occur without a barrier and lead to the formation of multiple products which include radicals and stable molecules. The reactions of NO with NH , taking place by the H abstraction to form NH and HNO , are slow x x but still relevant to the NH de-NO system, because of their fast reverse processes x which have not yet been measured experimentally.

  16. Micro-scale fracture experiments on zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries

    Chan, H.; Roberts, S. G.; Gong, J.

    2016-07-01

    Fracture properties of micro-scale zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries were studied using microcantilever testing methods. FIB-machined microcantilevers were milled on cross-sectional surfaces of hydrided samples, with the most highly-stressed regions within the δ-hydride film, within the α-Zr or along the Zr-hydride interface. Cantilevers were notched using the FIB and then tested in bending using a nanoindenter. Load-displacement results show that three types of cantilevers have distinct deformation properties. Zr cantilevers deformed plastically. Hydride cantilevers fractured after a small amount of plastic flow; the fracture toughness of the δ-hydride was found to be 3.3 ± 0.4 MPam1/2 and SEM examination showed transgranular cleavage on the fracture surfaces. Cantilevers notched at the Zr-hydride interface developed interfacial voids during loading, at loads considerably lower than that which initiate brittle fracture of hydrides.

  17. Numerical simulation and performance test of metal hydride hydrogen storage system

    Tzu-Hsiang Yen, Bin-Hao Chen, Bao-Dong Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal hydride reactors are widely used in many industrial applications, such as hydrogen storage, thermal compression, heat pump, etc. According to the research requirement of metal hydride hydrogen storage, the thermal analyses have been implemented in the paper. The metal hydride reaction beds are considered as coupled cylindrical tube modules which combine the chemical absorption and desorption in metal hydride. The model is then used metal hydride LaNi5 as an example to predict the performance of metal hydride hydrogen storage devices, such as the position of hydration front and the thermal flux. Under the different boundary condition the characteristics of heat transfer and mass transfer in metal hydride have influence on the hydrogen absorption and desorption. The researches revealed that the scroll design can improve the temperature distribution in the reactor and the porous tube for directing hydrogen can increase the penetration depth of hydride reaction to decrease the hydrogen absorption time.

  18. Sodium-based hydrides for thermal energy applications

    Sheppard, D. A.; Humphries, T. D.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    Concentrating solar-thermal power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) represents an attractive alternative to conventional fossil fuels for base-load power generation. Sodium alanate (NaAlH4) is a well-known sodium-based complex metal hydride but, more recently, high-temperature sodium-based complex metal hydrides have been considered for TES. This review considers the current state of the art for NaH, NaMgH3- x F x , Na-based transition metal hydrides, NaBH4 and Na3AlH6 for TES and heat pumping applications. These metal hydrides have a number of advantages over other classes of heat storage materials such as high thermal energy storage capacity, low volume, relatively low cost and a wide range of operating temperatures (100 °C to more than 650 °C). Potential safety issues associated with the use of high-temperature sodium-based hydrides are also addressed.

  19. Influence of Specific Surface Area of Powder on Hydrogen Desorption Kinetics for Metal Hydrides

    Drozdov, I V

    2014-01-01

    The observable results for desorption kinetics by powder of metal hydride on the example of mangesium hydride are reproduced with the model formulated in terms of specific surface of powder. A volumetric measurement of hydrogen desorption process is evaluated on an example of wet ball milled magnesium hydride, and can be applied generally for any metal hydride. The exact solution of the model reproduces the shape of experimental curves for desorption process providing a satisfying agreement with experimental data.

  20. A study of advanced magnesium-based hydride and development of a metal hydride thermal battery system

    Zhou, Chengshang

    Metal hydrides are a group of important materials known as energy carriers for renewable energy and thermal energy storage. A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides is studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilizes a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The hot hydride that is identified and developed is catalyzed MgH2 due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics. TiV0.62Mn1.5, TiMn2, and LaNi5 alloys are selected as the matching cold hydride. A systematic experimental survey is carried out in this study to compare a wide range of additives including transitions metals, transition metal oxides, hydrides, intermetallic compounds, and carbon materials, with respect to their effects on dehydrogenation properties of MgH2. The results show that additives such as Ti and V-based metals, hydride, and certain intermetallic compounds have strong catalytic effects. Solid solution alloys of magnesium are exploited as a way to destabilize magnesium hydride thermodynamically. Various elements are alloyed with magnesium to form solid solutions, including indium and aluminum. Thermodynamic properties of the reactions between the magnesium solid solution alloys and hydrogen are investigated, showing that all the solid solution alloys that are investigated in this work have higher equilibrium hydrogen pressures than that of pure magnesium. Cyclic stability of catalyzed MgH2 is characterized and analyzed using a PCT Sievert-type apparatus. Three systems, including MgH2-TiH 2, MgH2-TiMn2, and MgH2-VTiCr, are examined. The hydrogenating and dehydrogenating kinetics at 300°C are stable after 100 cycles. However, the low temperature (25°C to 150°C) hydrogenation kinetics suffer a severe degradation during hydrogen cycling. Further experiments confirm that the low temperature kinetic degradation can be mainly related the extended hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions. Proof

  1. A metal hydride-polymer composite for hydrogen storage applications

    To address the issue of the breakdown into fine powders that occurs in the practical use of metal hydrides, the possibility of using a polymeric material as a matrix that contains the active metal particles was experimentally assessed. A ball milling approach in the tumbling mode was used to develop a metal hydride-polymer composite with a high metal to polymer weight ratio. The alloy powder was blended with the polymer and a coating of the metal particles was obtained. The composite was consolidated by hot pressing and the pellets were characterized in terms of their hydriding-dehydriding properties. The materials did not show significant losses in either loading capacity or kinetic properties. The polymeric matrix resulted as being stable under hydrogen cycling. Further, from SEM observation it was confirmed that the metal powders remained embedded in the polymeric matrix even after a number of cycles and that the overall dimensional integrity was retained.

  2. Theoretical Estimate of Hydride Affinities of Aromatic Carbonyl Compounds

    AI Teng; ZHU Xiao-Qing; CHENG Jin-Pei

    2003-01-01

    @@ Aromatic carbonyl compounds are one type of the most important organic compounds, and the reductions ofthem by hydride agents such as LiAlH4 or NaBH4 are widely used in organic synthesis. The reactivity of carbonyl compounds generally increases in the following order: ketone < aldehyde, and amide < acid < ester < acid halide, which could be related to their hydride affinities (HA). In the previous paper, Robert[1] calculated the absolute HAof a series of small non-aromatic carbonyl compounds. In this paper, we use DFT method at B3LYP/6-311 + + G (2d, 2p)∥B3LYP/6-31 + G* level to estimate hydride affinities of five groups of aromatic carbonyl compounds. The detailed results are listed in Table 1.

  3. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy of lithium hydride

    The fundamental and hot bands of the vibration--rotation transitions of 6 LiH, 7 LiH, 6 LiD, and 7 LiD were observed by infrared diode laser spectroscopy at Doppler-limited resolution. Lithium hydride molecules were produced by the reaction of the Li vapor with hydrogen at elevated temperatures. Some 40 transitions were observed and, after combined with submillimeter-wave spectra reported by G. M. Plummer et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 4893 (1984)], were analyzed to yield Dunham-type constants with accuracies more than an order of magnitude higher than those published in the literature. It was clearly demonstrated that the Born--Oppenheimer approximation did not hold, and some parameters representing the breakdown were evaluated. The Born--Oppenheimer internuclear distance r/sup BO//sub e/ was derived to be 1.594 914 26 (59) A, where a new value of Planck's constant recommended by CODATA was employed. The relative intensity of absorption lines was measured to determine the ratio of the permanent dipole moment to its first derivative with respect to the internuclear distance: μ/sub e/ [(partialμpartialr)/sub e/ r/sub e/ ] = 1.743(86). The pressure broadening parameter Δν/sub p/ P was determined to be 6.40 (22) MHzTorr by measuring the linewidth dependence on the pressure of hydrogen, which was about four times larger than the value for the dipole--quadrupole interaction estimated by Kiefer and Bushkovitch's theory

  4. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    Holland, Patrick L. [Yale University

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  5. Dissolution and Precipitation Temperatures of δ Hydrides in Zirconium

    Anelastic effects due to the formation and dissolution of hydrides on crystal bar Zirconium (O-6 and 2x10-5 , in a gaseous atmosphere (He) to allow a better thermal conductivity inside the pendulum.Hydriding was achieved inside the pendulum by the inlet of hydrogen gas.The final hydrogen contents was determined by fusion analysis and resulted in 36 ppm.The first ''in situ'' hydriding is obtained by introducing an hydrogen pressure of 60kPa in the pendulum during 1h at 295K. Then, the hydrogen atmosphere is extracted by mechanical vacuum and an helium atmosphere is reinserted.The IF and G measurements are made in this condition. During the first heating an anomaly at 430K and a little step in the modulus G are obtained, indicating a d dissolution temperature TSSD of 430K for 8.6 wt ppm of H.After a solubilization of 10min at 495K, there are simultaneous effects: a step in G and an IF peak which is not enough developed on its right side.They presume a d precipitation temperature TSSP of 485K for 20 wt ppm of H. After a 1h at 490K, the peaks are again obtained with slight changes.The second ''in situ'' hydration during 8h at 173K, give rise to several peaks and modulus variations in the temperature range (300-400)K which are assessed to be due to transitions occurring to metastable γ and ε hydrides formed upon hydriding at low temperature, and to the δ hydride

  6. Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Li, Xiang [Center for Space Science and Technology, University of Maryland–Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu [Department of Chemistry and Physics, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K. [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States)

    2014-04-28

    Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, B{sub x}Al{sub y}H{sub z}{sup −}, were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms.

  7. Energy management of fuel cell electric vehicle with hydrid tanks

    Ravey, Alexandre; FAIVRE, Sébastien; HIGEL, Charles; HAREL, Fabien; Djerdir, Abdesslem

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel control strategy for fuel cell electric vehicle including hydrid tanks using fuzzy logic controller. The aim of the study is to manage both thermal and electric energy with the same controller in order to use the fuel cell system as a range extender by preventing the batteries state of charge to drop too quickly. The presented controller use both batteries state of charge and thermal status of hydrid tank to control the fuel cell power. This work is a part of the M...

  8. Hydriding and dehydriding properties of CaSi

    The hydriding and dehydriding properties of CaSi were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. First-principles calculations suggested that CaSiH n is thermodynamically stable. Experimentally, the p -c isotherms clearly demonstrated plateau pressures in a temperature range of 473-573 K and the maximum hydrogen content was 1.9 weight % (wt.%) under a hydrogen pressure of 9 MPa at 473 K. The structure of CaSiH n is different from those of ZrNi hydrides, although CaSi has the CrB-type structure as well as ZrNi

  9. Exploring "aerogen-hydride" interactions between ZOF2 (Z = Kr, Xe) and metal hydrides: An ab initio study

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a new σ-hole interaction formed between ZOF2 (Z = Kr and Xe) as the Lewis acid and a series of metal-hydrides HMX (M = Be, Mg, Zn and X = H, F, CN, CH3) is reported. The nature of this interaction, called "aerogen-hydride" interaction, is unveiled by molecular electrostatic potential, non-covalent interaction, quantum theory of atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. Our results indicate that the aerogen-hydride interactions are quite strong and can be comparable in strength to other σ-hole bonds. An important charge-transfer interaction is also associated with the formation of OF2Z⋯HMX complexes.

  10. Observations on Hydride Structures at the Tip of Arrested Cracks Grown under Conditions of Delayed Hydride Cracking

    One sample of Zr2.5%Nb and one sample of cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy-4 which have been tested for hydrogen induced crack growth have been examined in the crack tip region with the aim of determining the mechanism behind the growth of cracks. The proposed mechanisms are brittle failure of a crack tip hydride and hydrogen enhanced localized shear. The examinations were done by TEM and SEM. However attempts to produce a TEM specimen with a thinned region at the tip of the crack were unsuccessful in both samples. One feature observed in the Zr2.5%Nb material may however be an indication of intense shear deformation at the tip of the crack. On the other hand all observations on the Zircaloy-4 sample indicate precipitation of hydrides ahead of the crack tip and the presence of hydrides on the crack flanks

  11. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  12. Studies of boron hydrides: new heteroboranes

    I. The chemistry of the bipentaborane 2,2'-(B5H8)2 is investigated to some extent. Pyrolysis of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 resulted in the formation of non-volatile solid boron hydrides and hydrogen. Treatment of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 with bromine in the presence of AlBr3 resulted in the isolation of 1,1'Br2-2,2'-(B5H7)2. Reaction of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 with deprotonating agents resulted in the formation of the corresponding anions. Reaction of 2,2'-(B5H8)2 with diborane followed by acidification afforded n-B9H15 and B10H14 in moderate yield. II. Reaction of K+B9H12S- with potassium polyselenide resulted in the isolation of stable white crystals of B9H9SSe. Treatment of B9H9SSe with one equivalent of base in methanol gave the unstable heteroborane B8H9(OCH3)SSE and treatment with two equivalents of base afforded yellow crystals of B7H9SSe. Reaction of K+B9H12S- with arsenic trioxide in aqueous basic solution gave the electron-rich heteroborane, B8H8As2S in moderate yield. This resulted in the isolation and identification of Et3N.BH3 and the new metalloborane B7H7As2SCo(C5H5). Treatment of B10H11Se- with As2O3 resulted in the isolation of the stable nido-heteroborane B8H8As2Se in low yield. Reaction of B7C2H13 with potassium polyselenide gave the arachno selenacarborane B7H2C11Se in low yield. The structure of the new heteroborane is proposed on the basis of 11B and 1H nmr spectra. Reaction of B7C2H13 with AsCl3 resulted in the isolation of white stable crystals of B7C2H9As2 in 40 percent yield

  13. Uranium Hydride Nucleation Kinetics: Effects of Oxide Thickness and Vacuum Outgassing

    Many factors such as impurities in the oxide and metal, microstructure, gas impurities, and oxide thickness may influence the rate and location of the nucleation of hydride on uranium. This work has concentrated on isolating one of these variables, the oxide thickness, and measuring the effect of the oxide thickness on uranium hydride nucleation. Uranium samples, all from the same lot, were prepared with different oxide thicknesses. The oxide thickness was measured using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy. Oxidized uranium samples were then exposed to ultra-high purity hydrogen gas under constant volume conditions. Decreases in pressure indicated hydrogen uptake by the sample. The time for hydride nucleation--as well as the maximum hydriding rate--was then calculated from the measured decreases in pressure. The time to nucleate a hydride was found to increase whereas the maximum hydriding rate was found to decrease with increasing oxide thickness. The density of hydride pits also decreased with increasing oxide thickness. The observed results support the argument that the nucleation of hydride is controlled somewhat by diffusion of hydrogen through the oxide layer. Vacuum outgassing of samples, thereby removing the oxide impurities and keeping the oxide thickness constant, dramatically decreased the nucleation time and increased the maximum hydriding rate. Again, this is consistent with hydrogen diffusion through the oxide controlling the nucleation of hydride. Impurities in the oxide layer can decrease the diffusivity of hydrogen and therefore delay the nucleation of uranium hydride

  14. Internal friction study of hydrides in zirconium at low hydrogen contents

    Full text: Internal friction and shear modulus measurements were carried out on crystal bar zirconium in the as received and hydride conditions using an inverted forced pendulum. Hydriding was achieved in two ways: inside and out of the pendulum. The final hydrogen content determined by fusion analysis in the 'in situ' hydride sample was of 36 ppm. Another sample was hydride by the cathodic charge method with 25 ppm. The thermal solid solubility (TSS) phase boundary presents hysteresis between the precipitation (TSSP) and the dissolution (TSSD) temperatures for the zirconium hydrides. During the first thermal cycling the anelastic effects could be attributed to the δ, ε and metastable γ zirconium hydrides. After 'in situ' annealing at 490 K, these peaks completely disappear in the electrolytically charged sample, while in the 'in situ' hydride, the peaks remain with decreasing intensity. This effect can be understood in terms of the different surface conditions of the samples. (author)

  15. Comparison of irradiation hardening and microstructure evolution in ion-irradiated delta and epsilon hydrides

    Oono, Naoko, E-mail: n-oono@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Higuchi, Toru; Sakamoto, Kan; Nakatsuka, Masafumi [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163 Naritacho Oarai, Higashi-Ibaraki, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Hasegawa, Akiko; Kondo, Sosuke; Iwata, Noriyuki Y.; Matsui, Hideki; Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    A δ-Zr-hydride was irradiated with 6.4 MeV Fe{sup 3+} ions to clarify the relationship between hardening and microstructural changes of bulk Zr-hydrides under neutron irradiation. Irradiation hardening was measured by nanoindentation tests. Transmission electron microscope cross-sectional observations showed that the deformation mechanism of the δ-Zr-hydride was both slip and twinning. Dislocation loops were observed in the irradiated hydride matrix. These irradiation-induced defects make slip deformation difficult and consequently promote the twin deformation of δ-Zr-hydride. This work is a continuation of the previous our work (J. Nucl. Mater. 419 (2011) 366–370) focused upon ε-Zr-hydride and we discuss a comparison between the two Zr-hydrides.

  16. Cooling Performance Improvement of the Heat Driven Type Metal Hydride Refrigerator-Heat Transfer Enhancement Influence of Metal Hydride Sheet Loading Into a Metal Hydride Particle Bed

    Bae, Sangchul; Katsuta, Masafumi; Homma, Ikuto; Morita, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    In the refrigeration and air conditioning fields, the demands of energy conservation and renewable energy have been increased recently. In this study, we aim at the development of the heat driven type metal hydride (abbr., MH) that can be driven by the low temperature exhaust or solar heat under 100ᵒC. In order to use this system commercially, heat transfer enhancement of MH particle bed, activation characteric improvement and production cost reduction of MH must be achieved. In this study, w...

  17. Electrochromism of Mg-Ni hydride switchable mirrors

    Isidorsson, Jan; Giebels, I. A. M. E.; Di Vece, M.; Griessen, Ronald

    2001-11-01

    Switchable mirrors have so far been made of rare-earth and rare-earth-magnesium based metal-hydrides. In this investigation we study Mg-Ni-hydrides, which have been shown by Richardson et al. to exhibit switchable properties similar to those of the rare-earth hydrides. Cyclic voltammetry on MgzNiHx samples with 0.8 less than z less than 3.7 shows that addition of one Mg atom per Mg2Ni gives the best ab/desorption kinetics for hydrogen. X- ray diffraction reveals a structural change as hydrogen is absorbed. The metal-insulator transition is confirmed with simultaneous resistivity measurements. A pressure- composition isotherm of Mg2NiHx is also determined electrochemically. Optical spectrometry during gas loading gives an optical band gap of 1.6 eV for Mg2NiH4. This gap increases with increasing Mg content in a way similar to that of the Mg-doped rare-earth hydrides.

  18. Structural deformation of metallic uranium surrounding hydride growth sites

    Highlights: • UH3 formation on uranium surfaces by a controlled uptake of hydrogen at 240 °C. • Large hydride growths (35–125 μm in diameter) form at the surface. • Confined hydride expansion during growth generates stress in the subsurface. • EBSD scans found micro-cracking and twins as forms of stress relief in the metal. - Abstract: Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was utilised to probe the microstructure of uranium metal in the vicinity of surface corrosion pits, resulting from hydrogen exposure (5 × 104 Pa, at 240 °C). Microstructural analysis of the surface revealed a subtle increase of grain orientation variation for grains at the border of the hydride growths. Cross sectional analysis, at pit sites, revealed significant microstructure deformation in the form of crystal twinning and micro-cracking beneath the surface. These observations provide qualitative evidence that local stress intensities generated as a consequence of hydride growth and confinement, were sufficient to cause deformation within the parent metal

  19. Design and integration of a hydrogen storage on metallic hydrides

    This work presents a hydrogen storage system using metal hydrides for a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system. Hydride storage technology has been chosen due to project specifications: high volumetric capacity, low pressures (≤ 3.5 bar) and low temperatures (≤ 75 C: fuel cell temperature). During absorption, heat from hydride generation is dissipated by fluid circulation. An integrated plate-fin type heat exchanger has been designed to obtain good compactness and to reach high absorption/desorption rates. At first, the storage system has been tested in accordance with project specifications (absorption 3.5 bar, desorption 1.5 bar). Then, the hydrogen charge/discharge times have been decreased to reach system limits. System design has been used to simulate thermal and mass comportment of the storage tank. The model is based on the software Fluent. We take in consideration heat and mass transfers in the porous media during absorption/desorption. The hydride thermal and mass behaviour has been integrated in the software. The heat and mass transfers experimentally obtained have been compared to results calculated by the model. The influence of experimental and numerical parameters on the model behaviour has also been explored. (author)

  20. Nanocrystalline Metal Hydrides Obtained by Severe Plastic Deformations

    Jacques Huot

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD techniques could be used to obtain nanostructured metal hydrides with enhanced hydrogen sorption properties. In this paper we review the different SPD techniques used on metal hydrides and present some specific cases of the effect of cold rolling on the hydrogen storage properties and crystal structure of various types of metal hydrides such as magnesium-based alloys and body centered cubic (BCC alloys. Results show that generally cold rolling is as effective as ball milling to enhance hydrogen sorption kinetics. However, for some alloys such as TiV0.9Mn1.1 alloy ball milling and cold rolling have detrimental effect on hydrogen capacity. The exact mechanism responsible for the change in hydrogenation properties may not be the same for ball milling and cold rolling. Nevertheless, particle size reduction and texture seems to play a leading role in the hydrogen sorption enhancement of cold rolled metal hydrides.

  1. Study on the effect of hydrogen purification with metal hydride

    The effects of hydrogen purification with a AB5-type metal hydride were studied for the development of hydrogen purification system. The system set up two packed-beds, heat exchangers, data acquisition equipment and automatic control unit was used in the work and the compositions of two different gas-mixtures have CO, CH4, CO2, O2 and N2. We investigated about its tolerance against impurities, pressure-composition-isotherm and life cycle test, XRD and particle size analysis with a used metal hydride. Gas chromatograph was used for the analysis of feed and product gas. The used metal hydride is a La, Nd-rich Mm-based AB5 type which has the hydrogen storage capacity of 1.4 wt%. In life cycle test, there were no change of plateau pressure and hysteresis after 600 cycles but hydrogen storage capacity was decreased by about 6.8% and 10.7% after 220, 600 cycles, respectively. The used sample is high strong against CH4 and CO2 but very weak in CO atmosphere. The hydrogen purification performance with gas mixtures was decreased in the order of CH4 ≥ CO ≥ O2 ≥ N2 ≥ CO2. The reason CO investigated high purification effect in gas mixture is due to a strong chemisorption in metal hydride matrix that CO was not released out of the alloy. (authors)

  2. Hydrogen adsorption on palladium and palladium hydride at 1 bar

    Johansson, Martin; Skulason, Egill; Nielsen, Gunver;

    2010-01-01

    The dissociative sticking probability for H-2 on Pd films supported on sputtered Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) has been derived from measurements of the rate of the H-D exchange reaction at 1 bar. The sticking probability for H-2, S. is higher on Pd hydride than on Pd (a factor of 1.4 ...

  3. Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite

    Congdon, James W.

    2009-03-17

    An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

  4. Thin-film metal hydrides for solar energy applications

    Mongstad, Trygve Tveiteraas

    2012-11-01

    Thin-film metal hydrides may become important solar energy materials in the future. This thesis demonstrates interesting material properties of metal hydride films, relevant for applications as semiconducting materials for photovoltaic (PV) solar cells and for regulation of light using smart window technology.The work presented here has comprised an experimental study, focusing on three different materials: Magnesium hydride (MgH2), magnesium nickel hydride (Mg2NiH4) and yttrium hydride (YHx). Reactive sputter deposition was used to prepare the metal hydride film samples.This synthesis method is relatively uncommon for metal hydrides. Here,the first demonstration of reactive sputtering synthesis for YHx and Mg2NiH4 is given. Different challenges in forming singlephase, pure metal hydrides were identified: MgH2 could not be deposited without 3-16% metallic Mg present in the films, and YHx was found to react strong-ly to oxygen (O) during the deposition process. On the other hand, Mg2NiH4 films formed easily and apparently without major metallic clusters and with low O content.Mg2NiH4 is a semiconductor with an optical band gap that is suitable for PV solar cells. This study has showed that films with promising electrical and optical properties can be synthesized using reactive cosputtering of Mg and Ni. Using optical methods, the band gap for the as deposited samples was estimated to 1.54-1.76 eV, depending on the Mg-Ni composition. The asdeposited films were amorphous or nano-crystalline, but could be crystallized into the high-temperature fcc structure of Mg2NiH4 using heat treatment at 523 K. The band gap of the crystalline films was 2.1-2.2 eV, depending on the composition.A pronounced photochromic reaction to visible and UV light was observed for transparent yttrium hydride (T-YHx) samples. The optical transmission was reduced when the samples were illuminated, and the original optical transmission was restored when the samples were kept under dark conditions

  5. Synthesis of hydrides by interaction of intermetallic compounds with ammonia

    Tarasov, Boris P., E-mail: tarasov@icp.ac.ru [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Fokin, Valentin N.; Fokina, Evelina E. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Yartys, Volodymyr A., E-mail: volodymyr.yartys@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller NO 2027 (Norway); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim NO 7491 (Norway)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Interaction of the intermetallics A{sub 2}B, AB, AB{sub 2}, AB{sub 5} and A{sub 2}B{sub 17} with NH{sub 3} was studied. • The mechanism of interaction of the alloys with ammonia is temperature-dependent. • Hydrides, hydridonitrides, disproportionation products or metal–N–H compounds are formed. • NH{sub 4}Cl was used as an activator of the reaction between ammonia and intermetallics. • Interaction with ammonia results in the synthesis of the nanopowders. - Abstract: Interaction of intermetallic compounds with ammonia was studied as a processing route to synthesize hydrides and hydridonitrides of intermetallic compounds having various stoichiometries and types of crystal structures, including A{sub 2}B, AB, AB{sub 2}, AB{sub 5} and A{sub 2}B{sub 17} (A = Mg, Ti, Zr, Sc, Nd, Sm; B = transition metals, including Fe, Co, Ni, Ti and nontransition elements, Al and B). In presence of NH{sub 4}Cl used as an activator of the reaction between ammonia and intermetallic alloys, their interaction proceeds at rather mild P–T conditions, at temperatures 100–200 °C and at pressures of 0.6–0.8 MPa. The mechanism of interaction of the alloys with ammonia appears to be temperature-dependent and, following a rise of the interaction temperature, it leads to the formation of interstitial hydrides; interstitial hydridonitrides; disproportionation products (binary hydride; new intermetallic hydrides and binary nitrides) or new metal–nitrogen–hydrogen compounds like magnesium amide Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}. The interaction results in the synthesis of the nanopowders where hydrogen and nitrogen atoms become incorporated into the crystal lattices of the intermetallic alloys. The nitrogenated materials have the smallest particle size, down to 40 nm, and a specific surface area close to 20 m{sup 2}/g.

  6. Synthesis and enhanced hydrogen desorption kinetics of magnesium hydride using hydriding chemical vapor synthesis

    Kim, Jin-Ho [Icheon Branch, Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology (KICET), Icheon-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Goan [Korea Energy Materials Co.Ltd., 409, Daegu Technopark, 1-11, Hosan-Dong, Dalse-Gu 704-230 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yong-Mook, E-mail: dake@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Dongguk University-Seoul, 100715 Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We synthesized pure MgH{sub 2} by a hydriding chemical vapor synthesis process in a hydrogen atmosphere. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The particle size HCVS-MgH{sub 2} was drastically reduced to the sub-micron or micrometer-scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCVS-MgH{sub 2} showed different shapes (needle-like nanofibers and angulated plate) depending on the deposited position. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCVS-MgH{sub 2} desorbed hydrogen up to about 7.2 wt% and 7.1 wt%. - Abstract: This paper describes the hydriding chemical vapor synthesis (HCVS) of the hydrogen storage alloy MgH{sub 2} in a hydrogen atmosphere and the product's hydrogenation properties. Mg powder was used as a starting material to produce submicron MgH{sub 2} and uniformly heated to a temperature of 600 Degree-Sign C for Mg vaporization. The effects of deposited positions in HCVS reactor on the morphology and the composition of the obtained products were examined by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses. It is clearly seen that after the HCVS process, the particle size of synthesized MgH{sub 2} was drastically reduced to the sub-micron or micrometer-scale and these showed different shapes (needle-like nanofibers and angulated plate) depending on the deposited position. The hydrogen desorption temperatures of HCVS-MgH{sub 2} were measured using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). It was found that after the HCVS process, the desorption temperature of HCVS-MgH{sub 2} decreased from 430 to 385 Degree-Sign C and, simultaneously, the smallest particle size and the highest specific surface area were obtained. These observations indicate that the minimum hydrogen desorption temperature of HCVS-MgH{sub 2} powder with needle-like form can be obtained, and that this temperature is dependent on the particle size and the specific surface area of the products. The thermogravimetric

  7. Exploring metal hydrides using autoclave and multi-anvil hydrogenations

    Puhakainen, Kati

    Metal hydride materials have been intensively studied for hydrogen storage applications. In addition to potential hydrogen economy applications, metal hydrides offer a wide variety of other interesting properties. For example, hydrogen-dominant materials, which are hydrides with the highest hydrogen content for a particular metal/semimetal composition, are predicted to display high-temperature superconductivity. On the other side of the spectrum are hydrides with small amounts of hydrogen (0.1 - 1 at.%) that are investigated as viable magnetic, thermoelectric or semiconducting materials. Research of metal hydride materials is generally important to gain fundamental understanding of metal-hydrogen interactions in materials. Hydrogenation of Zintl phases, which are defined as compounds between an active metal (alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth) and a p-block metal/semimetal, were attempted by a hot sintering method utilizing an autoclave loaded with gaseous hydrogen (Hydride formation competes with oxidative decomposition of a Zintl phase. The oxidative decomposition, which leads to a mixture of binary active metal hydride and p-block element, was observed for investigated aluminum (Al) and gallium (Ga) containing Zintl phases. However, a new phase Li2Al was discovered when Zintl phase precursors were synthesized. Using the single crystal x-ray diffraction (SCXRD), the Li2Al was found to crystallize in an orthorhombic unit cell (Cmcm) with the lattice parameters a = 4.6404(8) Å, b = 9.719(2) Å, and c = 4.4764(8) Å. Increased demand for materials with improved properties necessitates the exploration of alternative synthesis methods. Conventional metal hydride synthesis methods, like ball-milling and autoclave technique, are not responding to the demands of finding new materials. A viable alternative synthesis method is the application of high pressure for the preparation of hydrogen-dominant materials. Extreme pressures in the gigapascal ranges can open access to

  8. Hydride redistribution and crack growth in Zr-2.5 wt.% Nb stressed in torsion

    The effect of applied shear stresses on zirconium hydride solubility in a zirconium alloy was investigated. Recent studies have shown that zirconium hydride precipiates probably nucleate and grow by means of a shear transformation mechanism. It is postulated that these transformation shear strains can interact with applied shear stress gradients in the same way that the dilatational strains can interact with a dilatational stress gradient, providing a driving force for hydride accumulation, hydride embrittlement and crack propagation. To test this proposition, crack growth experiments were carried out under torsional loading conditions on hydrided, round notched bar specimens of cold-worked Zr-2.5 wt.% Nb cut from Pickering-type pressure tube material. Postmortem metallographic examination of the hydride distribution in these samples showed that, in many cases, the hydrides appeared to have reoriented in response to the applied shear stress and that hydride accumulation at the notch tip had occurred. However, except in a few cases, the rate of accumulation of reoriented hydrides at the notch tip due to applied shear stresses was much less than the rate due to corresponding applied uniaxial stresss. Moreover, the process in shear appears to be more sensitive to the inital hydride size. Attempts to elucidate the fracture mechanism by fractographic examination using scanning and replica transmission electron microscopy proved to be inconclusive because of smearing of the fracture face. (auth)

  9. Metal Hydride Wall Stress Measurements on a Four-Inch Short (FISH) Bed

    A 38 cm (15 inch) long metal hydride bed fabricated using 11.4 cm (4.5 inch) O.D., standard schedule 316/316L stainless steel pipe was fitted with 22 strain gauges to measure tangential and longitudinal stress resulting from hydride absorption and desorption cycling. Tests were conducted using two different LaNi4.25Al0.75 metal hydride fill-levels in the bed.Tests conducted with hydride filled to two-thirds (1.75L) of the 2.63L total bed volume resulted in a maximum stress less than one-third of the pipe's ASME Code allowable, for hydride absorption up to a hydrogen-to-metal ratio (H/M) of 0.86. After 15 absorption/desorption tests and hydride passivation, examination of the bed interior revealed a significant decrease in particle size and increase in hydride height. The second fill level had 0.4L of fresh hydride added to the bed's cycled hydride material, and 56 absorption/desorption tests, up to a gas loading of 0.83 H/M performed. Second fill tests resulted in maximum stresses less than 40% of the ASME Code allowable. Post-test bed radiographs showed a further increase in the apparent hydride fill height, and internal component deformation

  10. In situ study of hydride precipitation kinetics and re-orientation in Zircaloy using synchrotron radiation

    The orientation and distribution of hydrides formed in zirconium alloy nuclear fuel cladding can strongly influence material behavior and in particular resistance to crack growth. The hydride microstructure and hydride platelet orientation (whether in-plane or radial relative to the cladding tubes) are crucial to determining cladding failure limits during mechanical testing. Hydride formation is normally studied by post-facto metallography, performed at room temperature and in the absence of applied stress. This study uses synchrotron radiation to observe in situ the kinetics of hydride dissolution and precipitation in previously hydrided Zircaloy samples. The experiments allow the direct observation of hydride dissolution, re-precipitation, and re-orientation, during heating and cooling under load. The solubility limits and the hydride-matrix orientation relationship determined from in situ experiments were in good agreement with previous post-facto examinations of bulk materials. The present measurements performed under stress and at temperature showed a characteristic diffraction signature of reoriented hydrides. The results suggest a threshold stress for hydride re-orientation between 75 and 80 MPa for the microstructure/texture studied. These results are discussed in light of existing knowledge.

  11. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested

  12. Effect of alloy elements and hydride morphology on hydrogen embrittlement of zirconium alloy

    The effects of Nb and Sn on hydride embrittlement of Zr alloys were investigated. For this, experimental Zr alloys were prepared in a sheet shape and charged with hydrogen. The microstructure and hydride morphology were analyzed and the tensile properties were measured to understand the role of Nb and Sn on the hydride embrittlement of Zr alloy. With addition of Nb and Sn, recrystallization was retarded during the final annealing heat treatment. The retardation was mainly caused from β-Nb precipitates and Sn solute atoms, which was confirmed from texture analyses. Of the two, Sn was found to more effective in retarding recrystallization. When hydrogen was charged, hydride clusters with stacked hydride platelets were observed in unalloyed Zr. However, with addition of Nb and Sn, such hydride clusters were replaced with hydrides platelets which were more or less aligned with the rolling direction and linked up on the rolling plane, and hydride length and the spacing between hydrides were increased. This change in hydride morphology was caused by the retardation of recrystallization. Again, Sn was found to be more effective in in modifying the hydride morphology and aligning hydrides on the rolling plane. Both Nb and Sn contributed to the strengthening of Zr alloys, but Sn is more effective in strengthening than Nb. However, tensile strengths of the experimental alloys were nearly independent of the absorbed hydrogen contents. While ductility was reduced with increasing hydrogen contents, the degree of ductility loss was dependent on Nb and Sn contents which increased hydrogen solubility and retarded recrystallization. For alloys with 1%-Nb and/or 1%-Sn, increase in hydrogen solubility was the main contributor to increase in resistance to hydride embrittlement. On the other hand, for an alloy with 2%-Nb resulted in large amount of β-Nb precipitates, which in turn significantly retarded recrystallization. Therefore, the added contribution of retardation of

  13. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: (1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs; (2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs; (3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs; and (4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs

  14. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-03-10

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

  15. Formation and growth of hydride blisters in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes

    Hydride blisters were formed on the outer surface of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube by a nonuniform steady thermal diffusion process. A thermal gradient was applied to the pressure tube with a heat bath kept at a temperature of 415 .deg. C and an aluminum cold finger cooled with flowing water of 15 .deg. C. Optical microscopy and three-dimensional laser profilometry were used to characterize the hydride blisters with different hydrogen concentrations and thermal diffusion time. Hydride blisters were expected to start at a hydrogen concentration of 30 - 70 ppm and a thermal diffusion time of 4 - 6x105 sec. The hydride blister size increases with higher hydrogen concentrations and longer thermal diffusion time. Some of the samples revealed cracks on the hydride blisters. The ratio of hydride blister depth to height was estimated as approximately 8:1

  16. Molecular early main group metal hydrides: synthetic challenge, structures and applications.

    Harder, Sjoerd

    2012-11-25

    Within the general area of early main group metal chemistry, the controlled synthesis of well-defined metal hydride complexes is a rapidly developing research field. As group 1 and 2 metal complexes are generally highly dynamic and lattice energies for their [MH](∞) and [MH(2)](∞) salts are high, the synthesis of well-defined soluble hydride complexes is an obvious challenge. Access to molecular early main group metal hydrides, however, is rewarding: these hydrocarbon-soluble metal hydrides are highly reactive, have found use in early main group metal catalysis and are potentially also valuable molecular model systems for polar metal hydrides as a hydrogen storage material. The article focusses specifically on alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydride complexes and discusses the synthetic challenge, molecular structures, reactivity and applications. PMID:23012695

  17. On the high-pressure superconducting phase in platinum hydride

    Szczȩśniak, D.; Zemła, T. P.

    2015-08-01

    Motivated by the ambiguous experimental data for the superconducting phase in silane (SiH4), which may originate from platinum hydride (PtH), we provide a theoretical study of the superconducting state in the latter alloy. The quantitative estimates of the thermodynamics of PtH at 100 GPa are given for a wide range of Coulomb pseudopotential values ({μ }*) within the Eliashberg formalism. The obtained critical temperature value ({T}{{C}}\\in for {μ }*\\in ) agrees well with the experimental TC for SiH4, which may be ascribed to PtH. Moreover, the calculated characteristic thermodynamic ratios exceed the predictions of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory, implying the occurrence of strong-coupling and retardation effects in PtH. We note that our results may be of high relevance for future theoretical and experimental studies on hydrides.

  18. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy study of zirconium hydride

    X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) measurements are reported for ZrH/sub 1.65/ and Zr metal. The valence-band measurements are compared with available band-theory density-of-states calculations for the metal and hydride. The hydride spectrum differs significantly from the metal spectrum. Most important, a strong peak associated with hydrogen s electrons appears approximately 7 eV below the Fermi level. XPS measurements of Zr 4p core levels show a binding-energy shift of 1 eV between Zr metal and ZrH/sub 1.65/. It is argued that this shift results from charge readjustment in the vicinity of the Zr site. With the addition of hydrogen, net charge must be transferred from the Zr site to the hydrogen site. A charge-density analysis based on simplified cluster calculations is presented

  19. Effects of metastability on hydrogen sorption in fluorine substituted hydrides

    Pinatel, E.R.; Corno, M.; Ugliengo, P.; Baricco, M., E-mail: marcello.baricco@unito.it

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Fluorine substitution in simple metal hydrides has been modelled. • The stability of the MH{sub (1−x)}F{sub x} solid solutions has been discussed. • Conditions for reversibility of sorption reactions have been suggested. - Abstract: In this work ab initio calculations and Calphad modelling have been coupled to describe the effect of fluorine substitution on the thermodynamics of hydrogenation–dehydrogenation in simple hydrides (NaH, AlH{sub 3} and CaH{sub 2}). These example systems have been used to discuss the conditions required for the formation of a stable hydride–fluoride solid solution necessary to obtain a reversible hydrogenation reaction.

  20. Hydride precipitation in zirconium studied by pendulum techniques

    Measurements of the precipitation peak, the autotwisting strain and the properties of hydride dislocations have been used to map the hydrogen terminal solid solubility boundary in polycrystalline samples and a single-crystal sample of α-zirconium. A low-frequency torsion pendulum was employed for some of the measurements and a low-frequency flexure pendulum for others. These pendulum techniques were successful in extending measurements of the hydrogen terminal solid solubility boundary in α-zirconium to the relatively low hydrogen concentration range 2 to 50 μg/g of technological interest in the nuclear industry. In addition, the results were used to obtain qualitative and quantitative information about the stress dependence of the hydrogen terminal solid solubility boundary and the kinetics of hydride precipitation or dissolution in response to a step change in the applied stress

  1. Detecting low concentrations of plutonium hydride with magnetization measurements

    Kim, Jae Wook; Mun, E. D.; Baiardo, J. P.; Zapf, V. S.; Mielke, C. H. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, MPA-CMMS, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Smith, A. I.; Richmond, S.; Mitchell, J.; Schwartz, D. [Nuclear Material Science Group, MST-16, LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-02-07

    We report the formation of plutonium hydride in 2 at. % Ga-stabilized δ-Pu, with 1 at. % H charging. We show that magnetization measurements are a sensitive, quantitative measure of ferromagnetic plutonium hydride against the nonmagnetic background of plutonium. It was previously shown that at low hydrogen concentrations, hydrogen forms super-abundant vacancy complexes with plutonium, resulting in a bulk lattice contraction. Here, we use magnetization, X-ray, and neutron diffraction measurements to show that in addition to forming vacancy complexes, at least 30% of the H atoms bond with Pu to precipitate PuH{sub x} on the surface of the sample with x ∼ 1.9. We observe magnetic hysteresis loops below 40 K with magnetic remanence, consistent with ferromagnetic PuH{sub 1.9}.

  2. Detecting low concentrations of plutonium hydride with magnetization measurements

    We report the formation of plutonium hydride in 2 at. % Ga-stabilized δ-Pu, with 1 at. % H charging. We show that magnetization measurements are a sensitive, quantitative measure of ferromagnetic plutonium hydride against the nonmagnetic background of plutonium. It was previously shown that at low hydrogen concentrations, hydrogen forms super-abundant vacancy complexes with plutonium, resulting in a bulk lattice contraction. Here, we use magnetization, X-ray, and neutron diffraction measurements to show that in addition to forming vacancy complexes, at least 30% of the H atoms bond with Pu to precipitate PuHx on the surface of the sample with x ∼ 1.9. We observe magnetic hysteresis loops below 40 K with magnetic remanence, consistent with ferromagnetic PuH1.9

  3. Development of a novel metal hydride-air secondary battery

    Gamburzev, S.; Zhang, W.; Velev, O.A.; Srinivasan, S.; Appleby, A.J. [Texas A and M University, College Station (United States). Center for Electrochemical Systems and Hydrogen Research; Visintin, A. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Insituto Nacional de Investigaciones Fisicoquimica Teoricas y Applicadas

    1998-05-01

    A laboratory metal hydride/air cell was evaluated. Charging was via a bifunctional air gas-diffusion electrode. Mixed nickel and cobalt oxides, supported on carbon black and activated carbon, were used as catalysts in this electrode. At 30 mA cm{sup -2} in 6 M KOH, the air electrode potentials were -0.2 V (oxygen reduction) and +0.65 V (oxygen evolution) vs Hg/HgO. The laboratory cell was cycled for 50 cycles at the C/2 rate (10 mA cm{sup -2}). The average discharge/charge voltages of the cell were 0.65 and 1.6 V, respectively. The initial capacity of the metal hydride electrode decreased by about 15% after 50 cycles. (author)

  4. Influence of oxide layer on hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride

    Hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride with hydrogen content of 1.95 H/Zr in He and He-5%O2 atmospheres was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The morphology, structure and valence states of the oxide layer formed on the surface of zirconium hydride were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that hydrogen desorption is retarded in the presence of oxygen. Heating in He leads to a large desorption range starting at 500 deg. C while heating in He-5%O2 atmosphere delays decomposition to relatively higher temperature of 525 deg. C. A protective oxide layer composed of monoclinic ZrO2 and small amount of tetragonal ZrO1.88, which acts as a very effective diffusion barrier. The O-H bond was observed in the oxide layer, which is beneficial to fix hydrogen atoms and prevent hydrogen diffusion

  5. Effect of thermo-mechanical cycling on zirconium hydride reorientation studied in situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Colas, Kimberly B.; Motta, Arthur T.; Daymond, Mark R.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    The circumferential hydrides normally present in nuclear reactor fuel cladding after reactor exposure may dissolve during drying for dry storage and re-precipitate when cooled under load into a more radial orientation, which could embrittle the fuel cladding. It is necessary to study the rates and conditions under which hydride reorientation may happen in order to assess fuel integrity in dry storage. The objective of this work is to study the effect of applied stress and thermal cycling on the hydride morphology in cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 by combining conventional metallography and in situ X-ray diffraction techniques. Metallography is used to study the evolution of hydride morphology after several thermo-mechanical cycles. In situ X-ray diffraction performed at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron provides real-time information on the process of hydride dissolution and precipitation under stress during several thermal cycles. The detailed study of diffracted intensity, peak position and full-width at half-maximum provides information on precipitation kinetics, elastic strains and other characteristics of the hydride precipitation process. The results show that thermo-mechanical cycling significantly increases the radial hydride fraction as well as the hydride length and connectivity. The radial hydrides are observed to precipitate at a lower temperature than circumferential hydrides. Variations in the magnitude and range of hydride strains due to reorientation and cycling have also been observed. These results are discussed in light of existing models and experiments on hydride reorientation. The study of hydride elastic strains during precipitation shows marked differences between circumferential and radial hydrides, which can be used to investigate the reorientation process. Cycling under stress above the threshold stress for reorientation drastically increases both the reoriented hydride fraction and the hydride size. The reoriented hydride

  6. Ground-state energy and relativistic corrections for positronium hydride

    Variational calculations of the ground state of positronium hydride (HPs) are reported, including various expectation values, electron-positron annihilation rates, and leading relativistic corrections to the total and dissociation energies. The calculations have been performed using a basis set of 4000 thoroughly optimized explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions. The relative accuracy of the variational energy upper bound is estimated to be of the order of 2x10-10, which is a significant improvement over previous nonrelativistic results.

  7. Geoneutrinos and Hydridic Earth (or primordially Hydrogen-Rich Planet)

    Bezrukov, L.; Sinev, V.

    2014-01-01

    Geoneutrino is a new channel of information about geochemical composition of the Earth. We alnalysed here the following problem. What statistics do we need to distinguish between predictions of Bulk Silicate Earth model and Hydridic Earth model for Th/U signal ratio? We obtained the simple formula for estimation of error of Th/U signal ratio. Our calculations show that we need more than $22 kt \\cdot year$ exposition for Gran-Sasso underground laboratory and Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. We ne...

  8. Scanning electron microscope techniques for studying Zircaloy corrosion and hydriding

    A procedure has been developed for preparing scanning electron microscope (SEM) samples of irradiated or unirradiated Zircaloy, suitable for oxide layer imaging, hydride concentration and morphology determination, and X-ray microanalysis (EPMA). The area fraction of the hydride phase is determined by image analysis of backscattered electron images (BEI). Measurements performed on unirradiated laboratory-hydrided samples, as well as cladding samples from pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel irradiated to a burnup of about 40 MWd/kg U, gave good agreement with hot extraction hydrogen analysis over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations, based on the assumption that all the hydrogen i present as the δ-phase hydride. The local hydrogen concentration can be determined quantitatively with a spatial resolution of less than 100μm. This capability was used to determine the radial hydrogen concentration profiles across the cladding wall for PWR samples with different total hydrogen contents, surface oxide thicknesses, and local heat rating. The results indicated that the hydrogen concentration profile was essentially flat (uniform) across the wall thickness for the samples with a low total hydrogen content (∼200 ppm) or a negligible radial heat flux (plenum), while the samples from fueled sections with >200 ppm or a negligible radial heat flux (plenum), while the samples from fueled sections with >200 ppm H had a steep increase in the hydrogen concentration close to the outer surface. Analysis of a longitudinal section showed peak hydrogen concentrations opposite pellet interfaces a factor of two higher than in the mid-pellet region

  9. Inelastic neutron scattering from amorphous hydride of Zr2Pd

    Time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering data was obtained on hydrided Zr2Pd metallic glass using the Crystal Analyzer Spectrometer at the Los Alamos pulsed spallation neutron source. Energy transfers from about 40 MeV to several hundred MeV were obtained with sufficiently good statistics and signal to noise ratio to show the second harmonic as well as the fundamental hydrogen optic mode

  10. Thermomechanics of hydrogen storage in metallic hydrides: modeling and analysis

    Roubíček, Tomáš; Tomassetti, G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 7 (2014), s. 2313-2333. ISSN 1531-3492 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/0917 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : metal-hydrid phase transformation * hydrogen diffusion * swelling Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.768, year: 2014 http://aimsciences.org/journals/pdfs.jsp?paperID=10195&mode=full

  11. Dendritic surface morphology of palladium hydride produced by electrolytic deposition

    Conventional and high-resolution electron microscopic studies of electrolytically-deposited palladium hydride reveal a fascinating variety of surface profile morphologies. The observations provide direct information concerning the surface structure of palladium electrodes and the mechanism of electrolytic deposition of palladium black. Both classical electrochemical mechanisms and recent 'modified diffusion-limited-aggregation' computer simulations are discussed in comparison with the experimental results. 13 refs., 9 figs

  12. The calculated rovibronic spectrum of scandium hydride, ScH

    Lodi, Lorenzo; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The electronic structure of six low-lying electronic states of scandium hydride, $X\\,{}^{1}\\Sigma^+$, $a\\,{}^{3}\\Delta$, $b\\,{}^{3}\\Pi$, $A\\,{}^{1}\\Delta$ $c\\,{}^{3}\\Sigma^+$, and $B\\,{}^{1}\\Pi$, is studied using multi-reference configuration interaction as a function of bond length. Diagonal and off-diagonal dipole moment, spin-orbit coupling and electronic angular momentum curves are also computed. The results are benchmarked against experimental measurements and calculations on atomic scan...

  13. Hydrogen storage materials and metal hydride-Ni batteries

    The hydrogen storage alloy is the key active material in metal hydride-Ni (MH-Ni) batteries. A brief review of hydrogen storage negative electrode materials including misch-nickel-based alloys, Laves phase alloys, magnesium-based alloys, vanadium-based solid solutions and nanotubes is presented. Current problems that need to be solved are mentioned. In addition, recent developments of MH/Ni-batteries with high power and energy are introduced

  14. Hydride effect on the tensile properties of HANA-4 alloy

    KAERI has developed some Zr-based new alloys, called HANA alloys, for high burn-up fuel cladding material. The sample specimens of HANA cladding tube material showed good performance in corrosion and creep properties at the irradiation test in Halden test reactor up to 10GW/MtU as well as the un-irradiation tests. Zirconium alloys has been used as nuclear fuel cladding material because they have satisfactory mechanical strength and corrosion resistance. It was reported that zirconium alloys responded abnormally in mechanical behavior over a certain temperature and strain rates. For example, the embrittlement of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-1.5Sn-0.2Fe-0.1Cr) alloy can be increased over 227 ∼ 427 .deg. C due to dynamic strain aging(DSA). The change of mechanical properties of HANA-4(Zr-1.5Nb-0.4Sn-0.2Fe-0.1Cr) alloy from DSA was already studied from room temperature to 500 .deg. C when its specimens had been tested with the strain rate of 1.67x10-2/s and 8.33x10-5/s. When a zirconium alloy is used in a nuclear reactor, hydrides form in it from not only external hydrogen sources such as waterside corrosion, dissolved hydrogen in coolant, water radiolysis but also internal sources such as hydrogen content in fuel pellets and moisture absorbed by the uranium dioxide fuel pellet. Hydrogen embrittlement of zirconium alloys has been extensively studied because hydrides may act as a sudden failure at very low strain. For low and medium hydrogen content, the hydrides crack during tensile loading and accelerate the ductile fracture process. To study the effect of hydride on the mechanical properties of HANA-4 cladding tube which had been finally heat-treated at 470 .deg. C, this research was done with tensile tests as an extension of the prior study

  15. Corrosion and hydridation features of RBMK type reactor technological channels

    Generalization results, obtained in the course of monitoring the corrosion state and hydridation of RBMK-1000 and RBMK-1500 reactor technological channels (TC) are presented. It is shown, that the corrosion behaviour of TC tube metal in reactors differs notably. Comparison of data on hybridization of RBMK-100 and RBMK-1500 reactor technological tubes allows one to suppose a possibly higher tendency to hydrogen absorption in Zr - 2.5% of Nb alloy under TMT-1 and TMT-2 states

  16. Computational modelling of structure and dynamics in lightweight hydrides

    Aeberhard, Philippe C.; David, William I. F.; Edwards, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen storage in lightweight hydrides continues to attract significant interest as the lack of a safe and efficient storage of hydrogen remains the major technological barrier to the widespread use of hydrogen as a fuel. The metal borohydrides Ca(BH₄)₂ and LiBH₄ form the subject of this thesis; three aspects of considerable academic interest were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) modelling. (i) High-pressure crystal structures of Ca(BH₄)₂ were pred...

  17. Proximity breakdown of hydrides in superconducting niobium cavities

    Romanenko, A.; Barkov, F.; Cooley, L. D.; Grassellino, A.

    2012-01-01

    Many modern and proposed future particle accelerators rely on superconducting radio frequency cavities made of bulk niobium as primary particle accelerating structures. Such cavities suffer from the anomalous field dependence of their quality factors Q0. High field degradation - so-called high field Q-slope - is yet unexplained even though an empirical cure is known. Here we propose a mechanism based on the presence of proximity-coupled niobium hydrides, which can explain this effect. Further...

  18. Powder production of U-Mo alloy, HMD process (Hydriding- Milling- Dehydriding)

    Uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloys can be hydrided massively in metastable γ (gamma) phase. The brittle hydride can be milled and dehydrided to acquire the desired size distributions needed for dispersion nuclear fuels. The developments of the different steps of this process called hydriding-milling- dehydriding (HMD Process) are described. Powder production scales for industrial fabrication is easily achieved with conventional equipment, small man-power and low investment. (author)

  19. High Temperature Metal Hydrides as Heat Storage Materials for Solar and Related Applications

    Borislav Bogdanović; Michael Felderhoff

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 °C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described.

  20. High Temperature Metal Hydrides as Heat Storage Materials for Solar and Related Applications

    Borislav Bogdanović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 °C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described.

  1. High temperature metal hydrides as heat storage materials for solar and related applications.

    Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanović, Borislav

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 degrees C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described. PMID:19333448

  2. Oxidation of Group 8 transition-Metal Hydrides and Ionic Hydrogenation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    Smith, Kjell-Tore

    1996-08-01

    Transition-metal hydrides have received considerable attention during the last decades because of their unusual reactivity and their potential as homogeneous catalysts for hydrogenation and other reactions of organic substrates. An important class of catalytic processes where transition-metal hydrides are involved is the homogeneous hydrogenation of alkenes, alkynes, ketones, aldehydes, arenes and nitro compounds. This thesis studies the oxidation of Group 8 transition-metal hydrides and the ionic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes.

  3. Transparent yttrium hydride thin films prepared by reactive sputtering

    Research highlights: → Thin films of transparent (semiconducting) and black (metallic) yttrium hydride. → Magnetron sputtering with an yttrium target and hydrogen as a reactive gas. → Optical transmission and reflection resemble β-YH2 (black) and γ-YH3 (transparent). → XRD shows that transparent films have an expanded fcc lattice with a = 5.35 A. → Samples are stable at ambient conditions. - Abstract: Metal hydrides have earlier been suggested for utilization in solar cells. With this as a motivation we have prepared thin films of yttrium hydride by reactive magnetron sputter deposition. The resulting films are metallic for low partial pressure of hydrogen during the deposition, and black or yellow-transparent for higher partial pressure of hydrogen. Both metallic and semiconducting transparent YHx films have been prepared directly in situ without the need of capping layers and post-deposition hydrogenation. Optically the films are similar to what is found for YHx films prepared by other techniques, but the crystal structure of the transparent films differ from the well-known YH3-η phase, as they have an fcc lattice instead of hcp.

  4. Superconductivity of novel tin hydrides (SnnHm) under pressure

    Mahdi Davari Esfahani, M.; Wang, Zhenhai; Oganov, Artem R.; Dong, Huafeng; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Shengnan; Rakitin, Maksim S.; Zhou, Xiang-Feng

    2016-03-01

    With the motivation of discovering high-temperature superconductors, evolutionary algorithm USPEX is employed to search for all stable compounds in the Sn-H system. In addition to the traditional SnH4, new hydrides SnH8, SnH12 and SnH14 are found to be thermodynamically stable at high pressure. Dynamical stability and superconductivity of tin hydrides are systematically investigated. Im2-SnH8, C2/m-SnH12 and C2/m-SnH14 exhibit higher superconducting transition temperatures of 81, 93 and 97 K compared to the traditional compound SnH4 with Tc of 52 K at 200 GPa. An interesting bent H3–group in Im2-SnH8 and novel linear H in C2/m-SnH12 are observed. All the new tin hydrides remain metallic over their predicted range of stability. The intermediate-frequency wagging and bending vibrations have more contribution to electron-phonon coupling parameter than high-frequency stretching vibrations of H2 and H3.

  5. Structural and magnetic properties of DyFe3 hydrides

    The ternary hydride phases, DyFe3H/sub x/ with x = 1.7, 2.5, and 4.2 all retain the PuNi3 rhombohedral structure of DyFe3 with a maximum volume expansion of 18% for DyFe3H/sub 4.2/. All phases show a preferential expansion parallel to the c0 axis. From bulk magnetization measurements, the Dy-Fe spin compensation temperature is found to decrease linearly from 5450K for DyFe3 to 1500K for DyFe3H/sub 4.2/ with increasing volume of the hydride phases. The 161Dy Moessbauer results for the two Dy sites in the structure indicate a slight reduction occurs in free-ion moment found for DyFe3 in all hydride phases. In addition, the 57Fe Moessbauer data show that the average Fe moment for the five inequivalent Fe sites increases with hydrogen concentration up to x = 2.5

  6. Superconductivity of novel tin hydrides (SnnHm) under pressure

    Mahdi Davari Esfahani, M.; Wang, Zhenhai; Oganov, Artem R.; Dong, Huafeng; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Shengnan; Rakitin, Maksim S.; Zhou, Xiang-Feng

    2016-01-01

    With the motivation of discovering high-temperature superconductors, evolutionary algorithm USPEX is employed to search for all stable compounds in the Sn-H system. In addition to the traditional SnH4, new hydrides SnH8, SnH12 and SnH14 are found to be thermodynamically stable at high pressure. Dynamical stability and superconductivity of tin hydrides are systematically investigated. Im2-SnH8, C2/m-SnH12 and C2/m-SnH14 exhibit higher superconducting transition temperatures of 81, 93 and 97 K compared to the traditional compound SnH4 with Tc of 52 K at 200 GPa. An interesting bent H3–group in Im2-SnH8 and novel linear H in C2/m-SnH12 are observed. All the new tin hydrides remain metallic over their predicted range of stability. The intermediate-frequency wagging and bending vibrations have more contribution to electron-phonon coupling parameter than high-frequency stretching vibrations of H2 and H3. PMID:26964636

  7. Permeation analysis of tritium through the titanium hydride storage vessel

    A preliminary design of a stainless steel vessel for the long-term storage of hydrogen isotopes has been proposed. The immobilized hydrogen as a titanium hydride could be used in a stainless steel vessel for this application. The vessel as a primary package is designed to form titanium hydride and to contain the hydrogen isotopes and helium-3 produced from the tritium decay. In order to predict against the possibility of a contamination and the deterioration of the mechanical properties, a numerical calculation was carried out for a diffusion analysis of the hydrogen isotopes and helium inside the stainless steel vessel. Numerical results showed that a negligible amount of tritium would be released by a permeation through the vessel wall of a 0.7cm thickness at normal conditions over the entire period of the storage. In the case that the vessel was heated up to a temperature of 600 C for the routine condition of an activation or exothermic hydriding, it would be of little concern regarding a tritium loss or a contamination. However, when the vessel was exposed to a fire condition with a temperature of 800 C, permeation of the hydrogen through the vessel wall resulted in a serious increase in the amount of tritium escaping, in a very short time

  8. The electronic structure of zirconium in hydrided and oxidized states

    Highlights: • XANES and XPS of zirconium in oxidized and hydrided states were studied. • The variations in the XANES spectra are explained with density functional theory. • Hydrogen preferentially bonds to specific oxygen sites in the monoclinic ZrO2. • The monoclinic ZrO2 offers the strongest barrier against hydriding attack. - Abstract: Valence band energy shifts for pure zirconium and a model zirconium alloy (Zircaloy-4) in oxidized and hydrided states have been investigated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) technique. With XANES, we show that O/H interactions in oxidized Zr can be detected in the near-edge region of O K. Using density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we have determined where H atoms bond in the monoclinic ZrO2 lattice. The preferred stoichiometry is ZrO2:H, but the O-H bond is weak; increasing H causes the H atoms to form H2 molecules rather than O-H bonds. These interactions cause energy shifts in the Zr 3d XPS spectra. The results illustrate the complex processes of hydrogen and oxygen interactions at the Zr surface

  9. Safety aspects of tritium storage in metal hydride form

    Air or nitrogen ingress accident scenarios into JET tritium storage containers, filled with uranium or intermetallic compound (IMC) hydrides, are discussed based on the experimentally determined kinetics of the reaction of these hydrides with air, O2 and N2. Reaction of uranium with air can occur at room temperature. For the initiation of the reactions of uranium with N2 or of some intermetallic compounds with air, elevated temperatures are required. Temperature rises of the metal hydrides due to air ingress are estimated for various cases. Modern tritium storage containers are protected against air ingress by intermediate and secondary containments which can be either evacuated or filled with inert gas. Therefore, air ingress can only occur due to double failure: failure of secondary containment and process containment at the same time. At JET, the secondary containments are filled with N2. However, even for N2, temperature increases are expected during the ingress into uranium beds (U-beds) for particular scenarios. It is shown that the JET design would not fail in this event. The calculation also shows that the smallest temperature rises during air, O2 or N2 ingress are expected for a getter bed design with free space above the metal getter layer for the gas to flow from inlet to outlet tube. 14 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Modellization of Metal Hydride Canister for Hydrogen Storage

    Rocio Maceiras

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen shows very interesting features for its use on-board applications as fuel cell vehicles. This paper presents the modelling of a tank with a metal hydride alloy for on-board applications, which provides good performance under ambient conditions. The metal hydride contained in the tank is Ti0.98Zr0.02V0.43Fe0.09Cr0.05Mn1.5. A two-dimensional model has been performed for the refuelling process (absorption and the discharge process (desorption. For that, individual models of mass balance, energy balance, reaction kinetics and behaviour of hydrogen gas has been modelled. The model has been developed under Matlab / Simulink© environment. Finally, individual models have been integrated into a global model, and simulated under ambient conditions. With the aim to analyse the temperature influence on the state of charge and filling and emptying time, other simulations were performed at different temperatures. The obtained results allow to conclude that this alloy offers a good behaviour with the discharge process under normal ambient conditions. Keywords: Hydrogen storage; metal hydrides; fuel cell; simulation; board applications

  11. Hydrogen Storage using Metal Hydrides in a Stationary Cogeneration System

    In the frame of the development of a hydrogen production and storage unit to supply a 40 kW stationary fuel cell, a metal hydride storage tank was chosen according to its reliability and high energetic efficiency. The study of AB5 compounds led to the development of a composition adapted to the project needs. The absorption/desorption pressures of the hydride at 75 C (2 / 1.85 bar) are the most adapted to the specifications. The reversible storage capacity (0.95 %wt) has been optimized to our work conditions and chemical kinetics is fast. The design of the Combined Heat and Power CHP system requires 5 kg hydrogen storage but in a first phase, only a 0.1 kg prototype has been realised and tested. Rectangular design has been chosen to obtain good compactness with an integrated plate fin type heat exchanger designed to reach high absorption/desorption rates. In this paper, heat and mass transfer characteristics of the Metal Hydride tank (MH tank) during absorption/desorption cycles are given. (authors)

  12. Neutron diffraction studies of metal hydrides alloys for hydrogen storage

    In this paper we present results obtained from two different classes of metal hydrides. First, we will discuss the effect of ball milling on the hydrogen storage properties of magnesium hydride. High energy milling of MgD2 produces a nanocrystalline structure made of a mixture of β-MgD2 and the high temperature/high pressure phase γ-MgD2. Neutron powder diffraction showed that the ball-milled β-MgD2 and γ-MgD2 structures are distorted compared to the same phases synthesised at high-pressure and high temperature. The Mg-D bond lengths are modified in β-MgD2. In γ-MgD2 phase, only one bond length is changed. This may be the explanation for the limited amount of γ-MgD2 synthesized by energetic ball milling. The second case is the crystal structure of a new class of metal hydrides, the so called 'Laves phase related BCC solid solution'. From neutron diffraction, we found that two phases are present in the as-cast alloy TiV0.9Mn1.1. One is a BCC solid solution, the other is a C14 Laves phase. We found that in the C14 phase there is a preferential site for titanium atoms while the vanadium and manganese atoms are distributed on the other two sites. (author)

  13. Performance study of a hydrogen powered metal hydride actuator

    Mainul Hossain Bhuiya, Md; Kim, Kwang J.

    2016-04-01

    A thermally driven hydrogen powered actuator integrating metal hydride hydrogen storage reactor, which is compact, noiseless, and able to generate smooth actuation, is presented in this article. To test the plausibility of a thermally driven actuator, a conventional piston type actuator was integrated with LaNi5 based hydrogen storage system. Copper encapsulation followed by compaction of particles into pellets, were adopted to improve overall thermal conductivity of the reactor. The operation of the actuator was thoroughly investigated for an array of operating temperature ranges. Temperature swing of the hydride reactor triggering smooth and noiseless actuation over several operating temperature ranges were monitored for quantification of actuator efficiency. Overall, the actuator generated smooth and consistent strokes during repeated cycles of operation. The efficiency of the actuator was found to be as high as 13.36% for operating a temperature range of 20 °C-50 °C. Stress-strain characteristics, actuation hysteresis etc were studied experimentally. Comparison of stress-strain characteristics of the proposed actuator with traditional actuators, artificial muscles and so on was made. The study suggests that design modification and use of high pressure hydride may enhance the performance and broaden the application horizon of the proposed actuator in future.

  14. Air passivation of metal hydride beds for waste disposal

    One waste acceptance criteria for hydride bed waste disposal is that the bed be non-pyrophoric. Batch-wise air ingress tests were performed which determined the amount of air consumed by a metal hydride bed. A desorbed, 4.4 kg titanium prototype hydride storage vessel (HSV) produced a 4.4 deg.C internal temperature rise upon the first air exposure cycle and a 0.1 deg.C temperature rise upon a second air exposure. A total of 346 sec air was consumed by the bed (0.08 sec per gram Ti). A desorbed, 9.66 kg LaNi4.25Al0.75 prototype storage bed experienced larger temperature rises over successive cycles of air ingress and evacuation. The cycles were performed over a period of days with the bed effectively passivated after the 12. cycle. Nine to ten STP-L of air reacted with the bed producing both oxidized metal and water. (authors)

  15. Multidimensional Chemical Modeling. III. Abundance and excitation of diatomic hydrides

    Bruderer, Simon; Stäuber, P; Doty, Steven D

    2010-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory opens the sky for observations in the far infrared at high spectral and spatial resolution. A particular class of molecules will be directly observable; light diatomic hydrides and their ions (CH, OH, SH, NH, CH+, OH+, SH+, NH+). These simple constituents are important both for the chemical evolution of the region and as tracers of high-energy radiation. If outflows of a forming star erode cavities in the envelope, protostellar far UV (FUV; 6 100 K) for water ice to evaporate. If the cavity shape allows FUV radiation to penetrate this hot-core region, the abundance of FUV destroyed species (e.g. water) is decreased. In particular, diatomic hydrides and their ions CH$+, OH+ and NH+ are enhanced by many orders of magnitude in the outflow walls due to the combination of high gas temperatures and rapid photodissociation of more saturated species. The enhancement of these diatomic hydrides is sufficient for a detection using the HIFI and PACS instruments onboard Herschel. The effect...

  16. Effect of the hydrogen content and cooling velocity in the hydrides precipitation in α-zirconium

    Zirconium specimens containing 50-300 ppm hydrogen have been cooled from the hydrogen solution treatment temperature at different rates by furnace cooling, air cooling and oil quenching. Optical and electron microscopical investigations have revealed grain boundary Δ - hydrides in slowly cooled specimens. At higher cooling rates γ and Δ hydrides have been found precipitated both intergranularly and intragranularly. Grain boundary Δ hydrides have been also observed in oil quenched specimens with 300 ppm hydrogen. Quenched specimens have revealed Widmanstatten and parallel plate type hydride morphologies. (Author)

  17. Measurement and modeling of strain fields in zirconium hydrides precipitated at a stress concentration

    Allen, Gregory B.; Kerr, Matthew; Daymond, Mark R.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen adsorption into zirconium, as a result of corrosion in aqueous environments, leads to the precipitation of a secondary brittle hydride phase. These hydrides tend to first form at stress concentrations such as fretting flaws or cracks in engineering components, potentially degrading the structural integrity of the component. One mechanism for component failure is a slow crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC), where hydride fracture occurs followed by crack arrest in the ductile zirconium matrix. The current work employs both an experimental and a modeling approach to better characterize the effects and behavior of hydride precipitation at such stress concentrations. Strains around stress concentrations containing hydrides were mapped using High Energy X-ray Diffraction (HEXRD). These studies highlighted important differences in the behavior of the hydride phase and the surrounding zirconium matrix, as well as the strain associated with the precipitation of the hydride. A finite element model was also developed and compared to the X-ray strain mapping results. This model provided greater insight into details that could not be obtained directly from the experimental approaches, as well as providing a framework for future modeling to predict the effects of hydride precipitation under varied conditions.

  18. Mechanical characteristics of hydrides in titanium and titanium-palladium alloy

    With the aim of estimating of stress-strain curve and fracture strain of thin layer hydrides of pure titanium (Gr.1) and titanium-palladium alloy (Gr.17), we utilized dual indentation method and advanced indentation machine equipped with acoustic emission (AE) monitoring system. We first estimated stress-strain curves of two base metals and two hydrides utilizing the dual indentation method. Next we estimated the fracture strain of two hydrides by FEM method using the critical indentation force to cause the Mode-I crack in hydrides during indentation tests. The critical force was correctly determined by waveform analysis of AEs detected during indentation test. The fracture strain of hydride of Gr.1 was estimated as 8.1% and larger than that (4.3%) of Gr.17 hydride. Fracture strains of two hydrides appear to be due to the chemical composition of the hydrides. Gr.1 produced a TiH2 hydride, while Gr.1 did a TiH1.971. (author)

  19. Investigation of Liquid Metal Bonded Hydride Fuels for LWRs - A Review

    Hydride fuels have been proposed for power production applications in LWRs. The fuel consists of uranium-zirconium hydride pellets clad with Zircaloy tubing. The fuel-cladding gap is filled with a liquid lead-tin- bismuth alloy. Incentives for hydride fuel incorporation into LWRs are briefly reviewed followed by a detailed discussion of material properties, steady-state and transient behaviour, and irradiation effects on hydride fuels. The discussion is based on historical data from the SNAP program and General Atomics' TRIGA reactors and recent research conducted at Universities of Tokyo and California, Berkeley. (author)

  20. Some new techniques in tritium gas handling as applied to metal hydride synthesis

    A state-of-the-art tritium Hydride Synthesis System (HSS) was designed and built to replace the existing system within the Tritium Salt Facility (TSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This new hydriding system utilized unique fast-cycling 5.63 mole uranium beds (50.9 g to T2 at 100% loading) and novel gas circulating hydriding furnaces. Tritium system components discussed include fast-cycling uranium beds, circulating gas hydriding furnaces, valves, storage volumes, manifolds, gas transfer pumps, and graphic display and control consoles. Many of the tritium handling and processing techniques incorporated into this system are directly applicable to today's fusion fuel loops

  1. Some new techniques in tritium gas handling as applied to metal hydride synthesis

    A state-of-the-art tritium Hydriding Synthesis System (HSS) was designed and built to replace the existing system within the Tritium Salt Facility (TSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This new hydriding system utilizes unique fast-cycling 7.9 mole uranium beds (47.5g of T at 100% loading) and novel gas circulating hydriding furnaces. Tritium system components discussed include fast-cycling uranium beds, circulating gas hydriding furnaces, valves, storage volumes, manifolds, gas transfer pumps, and graphic display and control consoles. Many of the tritium handling and processing techniques incorporated into this system are directly applicable to today's fusion fuel loops. 12 refs., 7 figs

  2. Hydride phase equilibria in V-Ti-Ni alloy membranes

    Highlights: • V70Ti15Ni15 (at.%) comprises a vanadium solid solution plus NiTi and NiTi2. • Dissolution of Ni and Ti into vanadium solid solution increase critical temperature for BCT β-hydride formation. • Three VSS hydride phase fields were observed: BCC, BCC + BCT, BCT + BCT. • NiTi and NiTi2 phases do not stabilise the alloy against brittle failure. - Abstract: Vanadium is highly permeable to hydrogen which makes it one of the leading alternatives to Pd alloys for hydrogen-selective alloy membrane applications, but it is prone to brittle failure through excessive hydrogen absorption and transitions between the BCC α and BCT β phases. V-Ti-Ni alloys are a prospective class of alloy for hydrogen-selective membrane applications, comprising a highly-permeable vanadium solid solution and several interdendritic Ni-Ti compounds. These Ni-Ti compounds are thought to stabilise the alloy against brittle failure. This hypothesis was investigated through a systematic study of V70Ti15Ni15 by hydrogen absorption and X-ray diffraction under conditions relevant to membrane operation. Dissolved hydrogen concentration in the bulk alloy and component phases, phase identification, thermal and hydrogen-induced expansion, phase quantification and hydride phase transitions under a range of pressures and temperatures have been determined. The vanadium phase passes through three different phase fields (BCC, BCC + BCT, BCT + BCT) during cooling under H2 from 400 to 30 °C. Dissolution of Ni and Ti into the vanadium phase increases the critical temperature for β-hydride formation from <200 to >400 °C. Furthermore, the Ni-Ti phases also exhibit several phase transitions meaning their ability to stabilise the alloy is questionable. We conclude that this alloy is significantly inferior to V with respect to its stability when used as a hydrogen-selective membrane, but the hydride phase transitions suggest potential application for high-temperature hydrogen and thermal energy

  3. Reactivity patterns of transition metal hydrides and alkyls

    The complex PPN+ CpV(CO)3H- (Cp=eta5-C5H5 and PPN = (Ph3P)2) was prepared in 70% yield and its physical properties and chemical reactions investigated. PPN+ CpV(CO)3H- reacts with a wide range of organic halides. The organometallic products of these reactions are the vanadium halides PPN+[CpV(C)3X]- and in some cases the binuclear bridging hydride PPN+ [CpV(CO)3]2H-. The borohydride salt PPN+[CpV(CO)3BH4]- has also been prepared. The reaction between CpV(CO)3H- and organic halides was investigated and compared with halide reductions carried out using tri-n-butyltin hydride. Results demonstrate that in almost all cases, the reduction reaction proceeds via free radical intermediates which are generated in a chain process, and are trapped by hydrogen transfer from CpV(CO)3H-. Sodium amalgam reduction of CpRh(CO)2 or a mixture of CpRh(CO)2 and CpCo(CO)2 affords two new anions, PPN+ [Cp2Rh3(CO)4]- and PPN+[Cp2RhCo(CO)2]-. CpMo(CO)3H reacts with CpMo(CO)3R (R=CH3,C2H5, CH2C6H5) at 25 to 500C to produce aldehyde RCHO and the dimers [CpMo(CO)3]2 and [CpMo(CO)2]2. In general, CpV(CO)3H- appears to transfer a hydrogen atom to the metal radical anion formed in an electron transfer process, whereas CpMo(CO)3H transfers hydride in a 2-electron process to a vacant coordination site. The chemical consequences are that CpV(CO)3H- generally reacts with metal alkyls to give alkanes via intermediate alkyl hydride species whereas CpMo(CO)3H reacts with metal alkyls to produce aldehyde, via an intermediate acyl hydride species

  4. Hydride precipitation and its influence on mechanical properties of notched and unnotched Zircaloy-4 plates

    Wang, Zhiyang, E-mail: zw603@uowmail.edu.au [Faculty of Engineering, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); The Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Garbe, Ulf [The Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Li, Huijun [Faculty of Engineering, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Harrison, Robert P.; Toppler, Karl [The Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Studer, Andrew J. [The Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Palmer, Tim [The Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Planchenault, Guillaume [Electricite De France, 6 Avenue Montaigne, 93192 Noisy Le Grand Cédex (France)

    2013-05-15

    The hydride formation and its influence on the mechanical performance of hydrided Zircaloy-4 plates containing different hydrogen contents were studied at room temperature. For the unnotched plate samples with the hydrogen contents ranging from 25 to 850 wt. ppm, the hydrides exerted an insignificant effect on the tensile strength, while the ductility was severely degraded with increasing hydrogen content. The fracture mode and degree of embrittlement were strongly related to the hydrogen content. When the hydrogen content reached a level of 850 wt. ppm, the plate exhibited negligible ductility, resulting in almost completely brittle behavior. For the hydrided notched plate, the tensile stress concentration associated with the notch tip facilitated the hydride accumulation at the region near the notch tip and the premature crack propagation through the hydride fracture during hydriding. The final brittle through-thickness failure for this notched sample was mainly attributed to the formation of a continuous hydride network on the thickness section and the obtained very high hydrogen concentration (estimated to be 1965 wt. ppm)

  5. Cracking in hydride blisters in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes

    When the pressure tubes contact to the calandria tubes in the CANDU reactor, temperature gradient in the Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube causes the thermal diffusion of hydrogen and formation of hydride blisters. This surface shape change is a result of the volume expansion associated with the transformation from pressure tube matrix to δ-phase hydride. Cracking in the hydride blisters may cause a direct failure of pressure tubes or develope to the delayed hydride cracking. The Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube specimen are hydrided by an electrolytic method and homogenized considering the temperature and time of hydrogen diffusion. The hydride blisters are formed on the outer surface of the specimen by a thermal diffusion between a heat bath maintained at the temperature of 415 deg C and an aluminum cold finger cooled with the flowing water of 15 deg C. An optical microscopy and 3-dimensional profilometry were used to characterize the hydride blisters with different hydrogen concentrations and thermal diffusion times. It reveals higher possibility of cracking for higher hydrogen concentration and longer time for thermal diffusion. The mechanism of cracking in the hydride blister is discussed

  6. Hydride trapping for AAS: Complex analytical problems can be handled with a simple instrumentation

    Dědina, Jiří; de Moraes, D. P.; Dessuy, M. B.; Kratzer, Jan; Matoušek, Tomáš; de Moraes Flores, E. M.; Vale, M. G. R.

    Ankara Üniversitesi, 2011. [National Spectroscopy Congress /12./. 18.05.2011-22.05.2011, Antalya] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1783 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : atomic absorption spectrometry * hydride generation * hydride trapping Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  7. Absorption kinetics and hydride formation in magnesium films: Effect of driving force revisited

    Electrochemical hydrogen permeation measurements and in situ gas-loading X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on polycrystalline Mg films. Hydrogen diffusion constants, the hydride volume content and the in-plane stress were determined for different values of driving forces at 300 K. For α-Mg–H, a hydrogen diffusion constant of DHMg=7(±2)·10-11 m2 s−1 was determined. For higher concentrations, different kinetic regimes with reduced apparent diffusion constants DHtot were found, depending on the driving force, decreasing to about DHtot = 10−18 m2 s−1. This lowest measured diffusion constant is two orders of magnitude larger than that of bulk β-MgH2, and the difference is ascribed to a contribution from a fast diffusion along grain boundaries. The different kinetics regimes are attributed to the spatial distribution of hydrides. A heterogeneous hydride nucleation and growth model is suggested that is based on hemispherical hydrides spatially distributed according to the nuclei densities expressed as a function of the driving force. The model allows us to qualitatively explain the complex stress development, the different diffusion regimes and the blocking-layer thickness. As the blocking-layer thickness inversely scales with the driving force, small driving forces allow the hydriding of large film volume fractions. Maximum stress situations occur for hydride distances reaching four times the hydride radius and for hydride distances equaling the film thickness

  8. Hydride precipitation crack propagation in zircaloy cladding during a decreasing temperature history

    An assessment of safety, design, and cost tradeoff issues for short (ten to fifty years) and longer (fifty to hundreds of years) interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel in Zircaloy rods shall address potential failures of the Zircaloy cladding caused by the precipitation response of zirconium hydride platelets. To perform such assessment analyses rigorously and conservatively will be necessarily complex and difficult. For Zircaloy cladding, a model for zirconium hydride induced crack propagation velocity was developed for a decreasing temperature field and for hydrogen, temperature, and stress dependent diffusive transport of hydrogen to a generic hydride platelet at a crack tip. The development of the quasi-steady model is based on extensions of existing models for hydride precipitation kinetics for an isolated hydride platelet at a crack tip. An instability analysis model of hydride-crack growth was developed using existing concepts in a kinematic equation for crack propagation at a constant thermodynamic crack potential subject to brittle fracture conditions. At the time an instability is initiated, the crack propagation is no longer limited by hydride growth rate kinetics, but is then limited by stress rates. The model for slow hydride-crack growth will be further evaluated using existing available data. (authors)

  9. Experiments on hadronic-atom x-ray intensities of hydrides and deuterides

    Wiegand, C.E.; Lum, G.K.; Godfrey, G.L.

    1977-04-01

    Kaonic-atom x-ray intensities of elements Z = 3, 6, 8, 11, and 20 were significantly reduced when the elements were in hydride form. The ratios I (ZH/sub m/)/I (Z) have a noticeable Z dependence. Deuterides of C and O showed slightly less x-ray emission than their hydride counterparts.

  10. Thermal and mechanical properties of zirconium hydrides with various hafnium contents

    Zirconium (Zr) hydride is currently expected as a neutron shield material for fast reactors. In order to evaluate safety and economic efficiency of the nuclear reactor, the thermal and mechanical properties of the hydride should be understood. In addition, since chemical properties of Zr and hafnium (Hf) are quite similar, Zr contains a few percent Hf generally. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the effect of Hf content on the properties of Zr hydride. In the present study, fine bulk samples of δ-phase Zr hydrides with various Hf contents were prepared and their thermal and mechanical properties were investigated. We examined the phase states and the microstructure of the hydrides by means of X-ray diffraction and SEM/EDX analyses. In the temperature range from room temperature to 673 K, the heat capacity and the thermal diffusivity of the hydrides were measured and the thermal conductivity was evaluated. The Vickers hardness and the sound velocity of the hydrides were measured at room temperature, and the elastic modulus was calculated from the measured sound velocity. The effects of temperature and Hf content on the properties of Zr hydrides were studied. (author)

  11. Hydride precipitation and its influence on mechanical properties of notched and unnotched Zircaloy-4 plates

    The hydride formation and its influence on the mechanical performance of hydrided Zircaloy-4 plates containing different hydrogen contents were studied at room temperature. For the unnotched plate samples with the hydrogen contents ranging from 25 to 850 wt. ppm, the hydrides exerted an insignificant effect on the tensile strength, while the ductility was severely degraded with increasing hydrogen content. The fracture mode and degree of embrittlement were strongly related to the hydrogen content. When the hydrogen content reached a level of 850 wt. ppm, the plate exhibited negligible ductility, resulting in almost completely brittle behavior. For the hydrided notched plate, the tensile stress concentration associated with the notch tip facilitated the hydride accumulation at the region near the notch tip and the premature crack propagation through the hydride fracture during hydriding. The final brittle through-thickness failure for this notched sample was mainly attributed to the formation of a continuous hydride network on the thickness section and the obtained very high hydrogen concentration (estimated to be 1965 wt. ppm)

  12. Mathematical modeling of the nickel/metal hydride battery system

    Paxton, B K [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-09-01

    A group of compounds referred to as metal hydrides, when used as electrode materials, is a less toxic alternative to the cadmium hydroxide electrode found in nickel/cadmium secondary battery systems. For this and other reasons, the nickel/metal hydride battery system is becoming a popular rechargeable battery for electric vehicle and consumer electronics applications. A model of this battery system is presented. Specifically the metal hydride material, LaNi{sub 5}H{sub 6}, is chosen for investigation due to the wealth of information available in the literature on this compound. The model results are compared to experiments found in the literature. Fundamental analyses as well as engineering optimizations are performed from the results of the battery model. In order to examine diffusion limitations in the nickel oxide electrode, a ``pseudo 2-D model`` is developed. This model allows for the theoretical examination of the effects of a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the state of charge of the active material. It is found using present data from the literature that diffusion in the solid phase is usually not an important limitation in the nickel oxide electrode. This finding is contrary to the conclusions reached by other authors. Although diffusion in the nickel oxide active material is treated rigorously with the pseudo 2-D model, a general methodology is presented for determining the best constant diffusion coefficient to use in a standard one-dimensional battery model. The diffusion coefficients determined by this method are shown to be able to partially capture the behavior that results from a diffusion coefficient that varies with the state of charge of the active material.

  13. Another Look at the Mechanisms of Hydride Transfer Enzymes with Quantum and Classical Transition Path Sampling.

    Dzierlenga, Michael W; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven D

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in enzymatic hydride transfer have been studied for years, but questions remain due, in part, to the difficulty of probing the effects of protein motion and hydrogen tunneling. In this study, we use transition path sampling (TPS) with normal mode centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) to calculate the barrier to hydride transfer in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and human heart lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Calculation of the work applied to the hydride allowed for observation of the change in barrier height upon inclusion of quantum dynamics. Similar calculations were performed using deuterium as the transferring particle in order to approximate kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). The change in barrier height in YADH is indicative of a zero-point energy (ZPE) contribution and is evidence that catalysis occurs via a protein compression that mediates a near-barrierless hydride transfer. Calculation of the KIE using the difference in barrier height between the hydride and deuteride agreed well with experimental results. PMID:26262969

  14. Characteristics of hydriding and hydrogen embrittlement of the Ti-Al-Zr alloy

    The characteristics of hydriding and hydrogen embrittlement of the Ti-Al-Zr alloy were evaluated. The amount of hydrogen absorbed into the alloy at 500 deg. C was continuously monitored using a hydrogen pressure measurement. The rate of decrease in hydrogen pressure indicated a high absorption rate of hydrogen into the alloy, following a linear rate law. X-ray diffraction studies showed the formation of δ-phase titanium hydride (TiH1.97) after hydriding. At room temperature, the alloy showed much sensitivity to embrittlement in ductility by hydrogen. The δ-hydrides in the grain boundaries promoted the crack propagation in the presence of stress, leading to the cleavage failure mode. However, the tensile strengths were almost independent of the hydrogen content up to 1174 ppm. It is thus concluded that the δ-hydride acts to decrease the ductility without affecting tensile strengths

  15. Evaluation of hydride blisters in zirconium pressure tube in CANDU reactor

    When the garter springs for maintaining the gap between the pressure tube and the calandria tube are displaced in the CANDU reactor, the sagging of pressure tube results in a contact to the calandria tube. This causes a temperature difference between the inner and outer surface of the pressure tube. The hydride can be formed at the cold spot of outer surface and the volume expansion by hydride dormation causes the blistering in the zirconium alloys. An incident of pressure tube rupture due to the hydride blisters had happened in the Canadian CANDU reactor. This report describes the theoretical development and models on the formation and growth of hydride blister and some experimental results. The evaluation methodology and non-destructive testing for hydride blister in operating reactors are also described

  16. Assessing nanoparticle size effects on metal hydride thermodynamics using the Wulff construction.

    Kim, Ki Chul; Dai, Bing; Karl Johnson, J; Sholl, David S

    2009-05-20

    The reaction thermodynamics of metal hydrides are crucial to the use of these materials for reversible hydrogen storage. In addition to altering the kinetics of metal hydride reactions, the use of nanoparticles can also change the overall reaction thermodynamics. We use density functional theory to predict the equilibrium crystal shapes of seven metals and their hydrides via the Wulff construction. These calculations allow the impact of nanoparticle size on the thermodynamics of hydrogen release from these metal hydrides to be predicted. Specifically, we study the temperature required for the hydride to generate a H(2) pressure of 1 bar as a function of the radius of the nanoparticle. In most, but not all, cases the hydrogen release temperature increases slightly as the particle size is reduced. PMID:19420649

  17. Assessing nanoparticle size effects on metal hydride thermodynamics using the Wulff construction

    The reaction thermodynamics of metal hydrides are crucial to the use of these materials for reversible hydrogen storage. In addition to altering the kinetics of metal hydride reactions, the use of nanoparticles can also change the overall reaction thermodynamics. We use density functional theory to predict the equilibrium crystal shapes of seven metals and their hydrides via the Wulff construction. These calculations allow the impact of nanoparticle size on the thermodynamics of hydrogen release from these metal hydrides to be predicted. Specifically, we study the temperature required for the hydride to generate a H2 pressure of 1 bar as a function of the radius of the nanoparticle. In most, but not all, cases the hydrogen release temperature increases slightly as the particle size is reduced.

  18. Strategies for the improvement of the hydrogen storage properties of metal hydride materials.

    Wu, Hui

    2008-10-24

    Metal hydrides are an important family of materials that can potentially be used for safe, efficient and reversible on-board hydrogen storage. Light-weight metal hydrides in particular have attracted intense interest due to their high hydrogen density. However, most of these hydrides have rather slow absorption kinetics, relatively high thermal stability, and/or problems with the reversibility of hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. This paper discusses a number of different approaches for the improvement of the hydrogen storage properties of these materials, with emphasis on recent research on tuning the ionic mobility in mixed hydrides. This concept opens a promising pathway to accelerate hydrogenation kinetics, reduce the activation energy for hydrogen release, and minimize deleterious possible by-products often associated with complex hydride systems. PMID:18821548

  19. Mobility and chemical bond of hydrogen in titanium and palladium hydrides

    The probabilities for π- meson capture by hydrogen are measured at 25, 155 and 200 deg C in TiHsub(1.65) hydride and at 25, -120 and -196 deg C in PdHsub(0.67) hydride. An analysis of the results obtained shows that within the accuracy of the measurements (approximately 10%) a sharp (up to 1012) change in the mobility of hydrogen in the hydrides induced by temperature changes within the ranges indicated does not noticeably affect the probabilities for π- meson capture by bound hydrogen, i.e. does not lead to appreciable changes in the Me-H bond. A comparison of the capture probabilities for palladium hydride and hydrides of neighboring transition metals shows that there are no pronounced anomalies in the Pd-H bond

  20. Hydride Ions, HCO+ and Ionizing Irradiation in Star Forming Region

    Benz, Arnold O.; Bruderer, Simon; van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2016-06-01

    Hydrides are fundamental precursor molecules in cosmic chemistry and many hydride ions have become observable in high quality for the first time thanks to the Herschel Space Observatory. Ionized hydrides, such as CH+ and OH+ and also HCO+ affect the chemistry of molecules such as water. They also provide complementary information on irradiation by far UV (FUV) or X-rays and gas temperature.We explore hydrides of the most abundant heavier elements in an observational survey covering star forming regions with different mass and evolutionary state. Twelve YSOs were observed with HIFI on Herschel in 6 spectral settings providing fully velocity-resolved line profiles. The YSOs include objects of low (Class 0 and I), intermediate, and high mass, with luminosities ranging from 4 Ls to 2 105 Ls.The targeted lines of CH+, OH+, H2O+, and C+ are detected mostly in blue-shifted absorption. H3O+ and SH+ are detected in emission and only toward some high-mass objects. For the low-mass YSOs the column density ratios of CH+/OH+ can be reproduced by simple chemical models implying an FUV flux of 2 – 400 times the ISRF at the location of the molecules. In two high-mass objects, the UV flux is 20 – 200 times the ISRF derived from absorption lines, and 300 – 600 ISRF using emission lines. Upper limits for the X-ray luminosity can be derived from H3O+ observations for some low-mass objects.If the FUV flux required for low-mass objects originates at the central protostar, a substantial FUV luminosity, up to 1.5 Ls, is required. For high-mass regions, the FUV flux required to produce the observed molecular ratios is smaller than the unattenuated flux expected from the central object(s) at the Herschel beam radius. This is consistent with an FUV flux reduced by circumstellar extinction or by bloating of the protostar.The ion molecules are proposed to form in FUV irradiated cavity walls that are shocked by the disk wind. The shock region is turbulent, broadening the lines to some 1

  1. Data acquisition for delayed hydride cracking studies using DCPD technique

    Direct current potential drop (DCPD) is a commonly used technique for making measurements on crack propagation in Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) studies on materials. It consists of passing a highly stable current ( 5-15A) through a Compact Toughness (CT) specimen of the material subjected to a mechanical load at the requisite elevated temperature, and precisely measuring and tracking the very small voltage developed across two points of specific geometry on it. Though simple in principle, this involves measuring and extracting very small signals from inevitable large spurious signals in a harsh environment, and it requires a high quality data acquisition and analysis system to extract the required information from the experiment

  2. Equilibrium composition for the reaction of plutonium hydride with air

    2002-01-01

    There are six independent constituents with 4 chemical elements, i.e. PuH2.7(s), PuN(s), Pu2O3(s), N2, O2 and H2, therefore , the system described involves of 2 independent reactions ,both those of the experimental, which indicates that the chemical equilibrium is nearly completely approached. Therefore, it is believed that the reaction rate of plutonium hydride with air is extremely rapid. The present paper has briefly discussed the simultaneous reactions and its thermodynamic coupling effect.

  3. Simulation of metal hydride reactor with aluminium foam matrix

    'Full text:' A 1-D model has been developed for testing different designs of hydride reactors. The computer program can simulate a complete reactor or a part of it in planar, cylindrical or spherical geometry. It reproduces an experimental loop: absorption followed by desorption and calculates heat transfer during the reaction. Simulation results have been confronted to experimental data with very good correlation. A reactor with a heat transfer matrix inside, such as aluminum foam, can be simulated. We have evaluated the size limits of a reactor and the category of foam that preserves the good reaction kinetic performances of a reactor filled with LaNi5. (author)

  4. Uranium-zirconium hydride TRIGA-LEU fuel

    The development and testing of TRIGA-LEU fuel with up to 45 wt-% U is described. Topics that are discussed include properties of hydride fuels, the prompt negative temperature coefficient, pulse heating tests, fission product retention, and the limiting design basis parameter and values. General specifications for Er-U-ZrH TRIGA-LEU fuel with 8.5 to 45 wt-% U and an outline of the inspections during manufacture of the fuel are also included. (author). 8 figs, 1 tab

  5. Comparison between different reactions of group IV hydride with H

    ZHANG; Shaolong; ZHANG; Xuqiang; ZHANG; Qinggang; ZHANG; Yici

    2006-01-01

    The four-dimensional time-dependent quantum dynamics calculations for reactions of group IV hydride with H are carried out by employing the semirigid vibrating rotor target model and the time-dependent wave packet method. The reaction possibility, cross section and rate constants for reactions (H+SiH4 and H+GeH4) in different initial vibrational and rotational states are obtained. The common feature for such kind of reaction process is summarized. The theoretical result is consistent with available measurement, which indicates the credibility of this theory and the potential energy surface.

  6. A compact hydrogen recycling system using metal hydrides

    A gas recycling system to prevent losses of isotopically enriched hydrogen gas has been developed for the operation of a liquid target (2.7 l) used by the Radiative Muon Capture group at TRIUMF. The experimental requirements for high gas purity (chemical impurities below 10-9), low operating pressure (below 1 bar abs) and high loading pressure (about 10 bar needed for a palladium purifier) together with the usual hydrogen safety requirements were satisfied with a metal hydride storage device in combination with a small pump/compressor system. A description of the complete system together with its characteristic operational data are given in this paper. ((orig.))

  7. The calculated rovibronic spectrum of scandium hydride, ScH

    Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson\\, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The electronic structure of six low-lying electronic states of scandium hydride, $X\\,{}^{1}\\Sigma^+$, $a\\,{}^{3}\\Delta$, $b\\,{}^{3}\\Pi$, $A\\,{}^{1}\\Delta$ $c\\,{}^{3}\\Sigma^+$, and $B\\,{}^{1}\\Pi$, is studied using multi-reference configuration interaction as a function of bond length. Diagonal and off-diagonal dipole moment, spin-orbit coupling and electronic angular momentum curves are also computed. The results are benchmarked against experimental measurements and calculations on atomic scandium. The resulting curves are used to compute a line list of molecular ro-vibronic transitions for $^{45}$ScH.

  8. Precipitation of reoriented hydrides and textural change of α-zirconium grains during delayed hydride cracking of Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube

    Cantilever beam (CB) specimens referred to as L90 and L60 with the notch directions tilted normal to, and at an angle of 60 deg. to, the transverse direction of a cold-worked and annealed Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube, respectively, were subjected to delayed hydride cracking (DHC) testing at 250 deg. C. L60 specimen showed slanted growth of the DHC crack compared to L90 without tilting. An X-ray diffractometric study was carried out on the fractured surfaces of the two CB specimens after DHC testing. The δ-hydride phase was confirmed to sit on the fracture surface, demonstrating the growth of the DHC crack through fracturing of the reoriented hydrides. Furthermore, the texture of the reoriented hydrides was determined for the first time. Comparing the pole figures of the {1 1 1}δ-hydride and the (0 0 0 1)α-zirconium, it is concluded that the reoriented hydrides nucleate first of all at the α-zirconium grains. A change in the orientation of the α-zirconium grains, mainly by twinning on the {1 0 1-bar} planes, was demonstrated to occur during the propagation of the DHC crack. On the basis of the above findings, a mechanism of the DHC was discussed

  9. Formation of alloys in Ti-V system in hydride cycle and synthesis of their hydrides in self-propagating high-temperature synthesis regime

    Aleksanyan, A.G., E-mail: a.g.aleks_yan@mail.ru [A.B. Nalbandyan Institute of Chemical Physics of Armenian NAS, 5/2 P.Sevak Str., Yerevan 0014 (Armenia); Dolukhanyan, S.K. [A.B. Nalbandyan Institute of Chemical Physics of Armenian NAS, 5/2 P.Sevak Str., Yerevan 0014 (Armenia); Shekhtman, V.Sh. [Institute of Solid State Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow District 142432 (Russian Federation); Huot, J., E-mail: jacques_huot@uqtr.ca [Institut de recherche sur l' hydrogene, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres (Canada); Ter-Galstyan, O.P.; Mnatsakanyan, N.L. [A.B. Nalbandyan Institute of Chemical Physics of Armenian NAS, 5/2 P.Sevak Str., Yerevan 0014 (Armenia)

    2011-09-15

    Research highlights: > We synthesize Ti-V alloys by new 'hydride cycle' method. Structural characteristics of formed alloys we investigate by X-ray diffraction. > We show that the alloys contain mainly BCC crystal structure. > We investigate the interaction of the synthesized alloys with hydrogen in combustion regime. > We study the properties of hydrides by X-ray, DTA and DSC analyses. - Abstract: In the present work, the possibility of formation of titanium and vanadium based alloys of BCC structure using hydride cycle was investigated. The mechanism of formation of alloys in Ti-V system from the powders of hydrides TiH{sub 2} and VH{sub 0.9} (or of V) by compaction followed by dehydrogenation was studied. Then, the interaction of the synthesized alloys with hydrogen in combustion regime (self-propagating high-temperature synthesis, SHS) resulting in hydrides of these alloys was investigated. DTA and DSC analyses of some alloys and their hydrides were performed and their thermal characteristics were measured.

  10. A quantitative phase field model for hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys: Part I. Development of quantitative free energy functional

    A temperature dependent, quantitative free energy functional was developed for the modeling of hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys within a phase field scheme. The model takes into account crystallographic variants of hydrides, interfacial energy between hydride and matrix, interfacial energy between hydrides, elastoplastic hydride precipitation and interaction with externally applied stress. The model is fully quantitative in real time and real length scale, and simulation results were compared with limited experimental data available in the literature with a reasonable agreement. The work calls for experimental and/or theoretical investigations of some of the key material properties that are not yet available in the literature

  11. Development of a component design tool for metal hydride heat pumps

    Waters, Essene L.

    Given current demands for more efficient and environmentally friendly energy sources, hydrogen based energy systems are an increasingly popular field of interest. Within the field, metal hydrides have become a prominent focus of research due to their large hydrogen storage capacity and relative system simplicity and safety. Metal hydride heat pumps constitute one such application, in which heat and hydrogen are transferred to and from metal hydrides. While a significant amount of work has been done to study such systems, the scope of materials selection has been quite limited. Typical studies compare only a few metal hydride materials and provide limited justification for the choice of those few. In this work, a metal hydride component design tool has been developed to enable the targeted down-selection of an extensive database of metal hydrides to identify the most promising materials for use in metal hydride thermal systems. The material database contains over 300 metal hydrides with various physical and thermodynamic properties included for each material. Sub-models for equilibrium pressure, thermophysical data, and default properties are used to predict the behavior of each material within the given system. For a given thermal system, this tool can be used to identify optimal materials out of over 100,000 possible hydride combinations. The selection tool described herein has been applied to a stationary combined heat and power system containing a high-temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, a hot water tank, and two metal hydride beds used as a heat pump. A variety of factors can be used to select materials including efficiency, maximum and minimum system pressures, pressure difference, coefficient of performance (COP), and COP sensitivity. The targeted down-selection of metal hydrides for this system focuses on the system's COP for each potential pair. The values of COP and COP sensitivity have been used to identify pairs of highest interest for

  12. Kinetic deuterium isotope effects on ligand migrations in metal hydrides

    Variable-temperature (VT) 1H and 13C NMR studies of the complexes (μ-X)2Os3(CO)9(μ3-η2-(CH3CH2)2C2) (X = H or D) reveal that alkyne migration over the face of the cluster is directly linked to hydride migrations on the metal core as evidenced by a temperature-independent isotope effect (kHH/kDD = 1.7). In a related study of the VT 13C NMR of (μ-X)2M3(CO)9(μ3-S) (X = H or D; M = Ru, Os) the observation of a kHH/kDD = 1.6 for both the osmium and ruthenium complexes demonstrates that the first stage of carbonyl averaging is brought about by hydride migration and not axial-radial exchange of carbonyl groups, a process that occurs only at higher temperatures. The mechanistic implications of these results are discussed in the context of the reactivity of metal clusters and the dynamic properties of the metal-hydrogen bond

  13. Lab-size rechargeable metal hydride-air cells

    Hu, Wei-Kang; Noreus, Dag [Department of Materials and Enviromental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-09-01

    Lab-size rechargeable metal hydride-air (MH-air) cells with a gas management device were designed in order to minimize the loss of electrolyte. An AB{sub 5}-type hydrogen storage alloy was used as anode materials of the MH-air. The thickness of the metal hydride electrodes was in the range of 3.0-3.4 mm. Porous carbon-based air electrodes with Ag{sub 2}O catalysts were used as bi-functional electrodes for oxygen reduction and generation. The electrodes were first examined in half-cells to evaluate their performance and then assembled into one MH-air cell. The results showed the good cycling stability of the rechargeable MH-air cell with a capacity of 1990 mAh. The discharge voltage was 0.69 V at 0.05-0.1 C. The charge efficiency was about 90%. The specific and volumetric energy densities were about 95Wh kg{sup -1} and 140 Wh L{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  14. Separation of covalent hydrides by gas-solid chromatography

    A fully automated method was developed for separating the hydrides of elements of the IVth to VIIIth main subgroup of the periodic system and of Kr and Xe on the basis of their volatility using gas chromatography. The automated instrument allowing to carry out reduction, separation of the gaseous phase, the loading of a PORAPAK-packed column, the chromatographic separation and sampling was controlled by a HP 2116B computer. The elution time, peak area and the number of theoretical column plates were computed from chromatograms. The capture probably proceeded by a type of nonpolar nonspecific sorption (ΔH/Tsub(b) = 19.2 cal/mol.deg). The height of the theoretical plate was 0.05 to 0.1 cm. The technique may be used as a routine radiochemical method for group separations and for the separation of radioactive hydrides contained in the solution of targets irradiated with neutrons or charged particles in the preparation of radioactive sources of short-lived radionuclides, or in destructive activation analysis. (M.K.)

  15. Gas phase contributions to topochemical hydride reduction reactions

    Kobayashi, Yoji [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Li, Zhaofei [Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hirai, Kei [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tassel, Cédric [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); The Hakubi Center for Advanced Research, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8302 (Japan); Loyer, François [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR 6226 Université de Rennes 1-CNRS, équipe CSM, Bât. 10B, Campus de Beaulieu, 263, Avenue du Général Leclerc, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Ichikawa, Noriya [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Abe, Naoyuki [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yamamoto, Takafumi [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Shimakawa, Yuichi [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); and others

    2013-11-15

    Alkali and alkali earth hydrides have been used as solid state reductants recently to yield many interesting new oxygen-deficient transition metal oxides. These reactions have tacitly been assumed to be a solid phase reaction between the reductant and parent oxide. We have conducted a number of experiments with physical separation between the reductant and oxides, and find that in some cases reduction proceeds even when the reagents are physically separated, implying reactions with in-situ generated H{sub 2} and, to a lesser extent, getter mechanisms. Our findings change our understanding of these topochemical reactions, and should enhance the synthesis of additional new oxides and nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: Topochemical reductions with hydrides: Solid state or gas phase reaction? Display Omitted - Highlights: • SrFeO{sub 2} and LaNiO{sub 2} were prepared by topochemical reduction of oxides. • Separating the reducing agent (CaH{sub 2}, Mg metal) from the oxide still results in reduction. • Such topochemical reactions can occur in the gas phase.

  16. Electronic Principles of Hydrogen Incorporation and Dynamics in Metal Hydrides

    Ljiljana Matović

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An approach to various metal hydrides based on electronic principles is presented. The effective medium theory (EMT is used to illustrate fundamental aspects of metal-hydrogen interaction and clarify the most important processes taking place during the interaction. The elaboration is extended using the numerous existing results of experiment and calculations, as well as using some new material. In particular, the absorption/desorption of H in the Mg/MgH2 system is analyzed in detail, and all relevant initial structures and processes explained. Reasons for the high stability and slow sorption in this system are noted, and possible solutions proposed. The role of the transition-metal impurities in MgH2 is briefly discussed, and some interesting phenomena, observed in complex intermetallic compounds, are mentioned. The principle mechanism governing the Li-amide/imide transformation is also discussed. Latterly, some perspectives for the metal-hydrides investigation from the electronic point of view are elucidated.

  17. Gas desorption properties of ammonia borane and metal hydride composites

    'Full text': Ammonia borane (NH3BH3) has been of great interest owing to its ideal combination of low molecular weight and high H2 storage capacity of 19.6 mass %, which exceeds the current capacity of gasoline. DOE's year 2015 targets involve gravimetric as well as volumetric energy densities. In this work, we have investigated thermal decomposition of ammonia borane and calcium hydride composites at different molar ratio. The samples were prepared by planetary ball milling under hydrogen gas atmosphere pressure of 1Mpa at room temperature for 2, and 10 hours. The gas desorption properties were examined by thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDMS). The identification of phases was carried out by X-ray diffraction. The results obtain were shown in fig (a),(b),and (c). Hydrogen desorption properties were observed at all molar ratios, but the desorption temperature is significantly lower at around 70 oC at molar ratio 1:1 as shown in fig (c), and unwanted gas (ammonia) emissions were remarkably suppressed by mixing with the calcium hydride. (author)

  18. Electronic structure of the palladium hydride studied by compton scattering

    Mizusaki, S; Yamaguchi, M; Hiraoka, N; Itou, M; Sakurai, Y

    2003-01-01

    The hydrogen-induced changes in the electronic structure of Pd have been investigated by Compton scattering experiments associated with theoretical calculations. Compton profiles (CPs) of single crystal of Pd and beta phase hydride PdH sub x (x=0.62-0.74) have been measured along the [100], [110] and [111] directions with a momentum resolution of 0.14-0.17 atomic units using 115 keV x-rays. The theoretical Compton profiles have been calculated from the wavefunctions obtained utilizing the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the local density approximation for Pd and stoichiometric PdH. The experimental and the theoretical results agreed well with respect to the difference in the CPs between PdH sub x and Pd, and the anisotropy in the CPs of Pd or PdH sub x. This study provides lines of evidence that upon hydride formation the lowest valance band of Pd is largely modified due to hybridization with H 1s-orbitals and the Fermi energy is raised into the sp-band. (author)

  19. Gallium Nitride Nanowires Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    LIU Zhan-Hui; XIU Xiang-Qan; YAN Huai-Yue; ZHANG Rong; XIE Zi-Li; HAN Ping; SHI Yi; ZHENG You-Dou

    2011-01-01

    @@ GaN nanowires are grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy using nickel as a catalyst.The properties of the obtained GaN nanowires are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy,electron diffraction,roomtemperature photoluminescence and energy dispersive spectroscopy.The results show that the nanowires are wurtzite single crystals growing along the[0001]direction and a redshift in the photoluminescence is observed due to a superposition of several effects.The Raman spectra are close to those of the bulk GaN and the significantly broadening of those modes indicates the phonon confinement effects associated with the nanoscale dimensions of the system.%GaN nanowires are grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy using nickel as a catalyst. The properties of the obtained GaN nanowires are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, room-temperature photoluminescence and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results show that the nanowires are wurtzite single crystals growing along the [0001] direction and a redshift in the photoluminescence is observed due to a superposition of several effects. The Raman spectra are close to those of the bulk GaN and the significantly broadening of those modes indicates the phonon confinement effects associated with the nanoscale dimensions of the system.

  20. Interstellar chemistry of nitrogen hydrides in dark clouds

    Gal, Romane Le; Faure, Alexandre; Forêts, Guillaume Pineau des; Rist, Claire; Maret, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to perform a comprehensive analysis of the interstellar chemistry of nitrogen, focussing on the gas-phase formation of the smallest polyatomic species and in particular nitrogen hydrides. We present a new chemical network in which the kinetic rates of critical reactions have been updated based on recent experimental and theoretical studies, including nuclear spin branching ratios. Our network thus treats the different spin symmetries of the nitrogen hydrides self-consistently together with the ortho and para forms of molecular hydrogen. This new network is used to model the time evolution of the chemical abundances in dark cloud conditions. The steady-state results are analysed, with special emphasis on the influence of the overall amounts of carbon, oxygen, and sulphur. Our calculations are also compared with Herschel/HIFI observations of NH, NH$_2$, and NH$_3$ detected towards the external envelope of the protostar IRAS 16293-2422. The observed abundances and abundance ratios ...

  1. A low tritium hydride bed inventory estimation technique

    Low tritium hydride beds were developed and deployed into tritium service in Savannah River Site. Process beds to be used for low concentration tritium gas were not fitted with instrumentation to perform the steady-state, flowing gas calorimetric inventory measurement method. Low tritium beds contain less than the detection limit of the IBA (In-Bed Accountability) technique used for tritium inventory. This paper describes two techniques for estimating tritium content and uncertainty for low tritium content beds to be used in the facility's physical inventory (PI). PI are performed periodically to assess the quantity of nuclear material used in a facility. The first approach (Mid-point approximation method - MPA) assumes the bed is half-full and uses a gas composition measurement to estimate the tritium inventory and uncertainty. The second approach utilizes the bed's hydride material pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) properties and a gas composition measurement to reduce the uncertainty in the calculated bed inventory

  2. Superconductive "sodalite"-like clathrate calcium hydride at high pressures

    Wang, Hui; Tanaka, Kaori; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Ma, Yanming

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen-rich compounds hold promise as high-temperature superconductors under high pressures. Recent theoretical hydride structures on achieving high-pressure superconductivity are composed mainly of H2 fragments. Through a systematic investigation of Ca hydrides with different hydrogen contents using particle-swam optimization structural search, we show that in the stoichiometry CaH6 a body-centred cubic structure with hydrogen that forms unusual "sodalite" cages containing enclathrated Ca stabilizes above pressure 150 GPa. The stability of this structure is derived from the acceptance by two H2 of electrons donated by Ca forming a "H4" unit as the building block in the construction of the 3-dimensional sodalite cage. This unique structure has a partial occupation of the degenerated orbitals at the zone centre. The resultant dynamic Jahn-Teller effect helps to enhance electron-phonon coupling and leads to superconductivity of CaH6. A superconducting critical temperature (Tc) of 220-235 K at 150 GPa obtained...

  3. Electron and nuclear magnetic resonances in compounds and metallic hydrides

    Proton pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements were performed on the metallic hydrides ZrCr2Hx (x = 2, 3, 4) and ZrV2Hy (y = 2, 3, 4, 5) as a function of temperature between 180 and 400K. The ultimate aim was the investigation of the relaxation mechanisms in these systems by means of the measurement of both the proton (1H) spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times and to use these data to obtain information about the diffusive motion of the hydrogen atoms. The diffusional activation energies, the jump frequencies and the Korringa constant, Ck, related with the conduction electron contribution to the 1H relaxation were determined for the above hydrides as a function of hydrogen concentration. Our results were analysed in terms of the relaxation models described by Bloembergen, Purcell and Pound (BPP model) and by Torrey. The Korringa type relaxation due to the conduction electrons in metallic systems was also used to interpret the experimental results. We also present the Electron Paramagnetic Ressonance (EPR) study of Gd3+, Nd3+ and Er3+ ions as impurities in several AB3 intermetallic compounds where A = LA, Ce, Y, Sc, Th, Zr and B = Rh, Ir, Pt. The results were analysed in terms of the multiband model previously suggested to explain the behaviour of the resonance parameter in AB2 Laves Phase compounds. (author)

  4. Multi-scale characterization of nanostructured sodium aluminum hydride

    NaraseGowda, Shathabish

    Complex metal hydrides are the most promising candidate materials for onboard hydrogen storage. The practicality of this class of materials is counter-poised on three critical attributes: reversible hydrogen storage capacity, high hydrogen uptake/release kinetics, and favorable hydrogen uptake/release thermodynamics. While a majority of modern metallic hydrides that are being considered are those that meet the criteria of high theoretical storage capacity, the challenges lie in addressing poor kinetics, thermodynamics, and reversibility. One emerging strategy to resolve these issues is via nanostructuring or nano-confinement of complex hydrides. By down-sizing and scaffolding them to retain their nano-dimensions, these materials are expected to improve in performance and reversibility. This area of research has garnered immense interest lately and there is active research being pursued to address various aspects of nanostructured complex hydrides. The research effort documented here is focused on a detailed investigation of the effects of nano-confinement on aspects such as the long range atomic hydrogen diffusivities, localized hydrogen dynamics, microstructure, and dehydrogenation mechanism of sodium alanate. A wide variety of microporous and mesoporous materials (metal organic frameworks, porous silica and alumina) were investigated as scaffolds and the synthesis routes to achieve maximum pore-loading are discussed. Wet solution infiltration technique was adopted using tetrahydrofuran as the medium and the precursor concentrations were found to have a major role in achieving maximum pore loading. These concentrations were optimized for each scaffold with varying pore sizes and confinement was quantitatively characterized by measuring the loss in specific surface area. This work is also aimed at utilizing neutron and synchrotron x-ray characterization techniques to study and correlate multi-scale material properties and phenomena. Some of the most advanced

  5. Main Group Lewis Acid-Mediated Transformations of Transition-Metal Hydride Complexes.

    Maity, Ayan; Teets, Thomas S

    2016-08-10

    This Review highlights stoichiometric reactions and elementary steps of catalytic reactions involving cooperative participation of transition-metal hydrides and main group Lewis acids. Included are reactions where the transition-metal hydride acts as a reactant as well as transformations that form the metal hydride as a product. This Review is divided by reaction type, illustrating the diverse roles that Lewis acids can play in mediating transformations involving transition-metal hydrides as either reactants or products. We begin with a discussion of reactions where metal hydrides form direct adducts with Lewis acids, elaborating the structure and dynamics of the products of these reactions. The bulk of this Review focuses on reactions where the transition metal and Lewis acid act in cooperation, and includes sections on carbonyl reduction, H2 activation, and hydride elimination reactions, all of which can be promoted by Lewis acids. Also included is a section on Lewis acid-base secondary coordination sphere interactions, which can influence the reactivity of hydrides. Work from the past 50 years is included, but the majority of this Review focuses on research from the past decade, with the intent of showcasing the rapid emergence of this field and the potential for further development into the future. PMID:27164024

  6. Preparation and chemical crystallographic study of new hydrides and hydro-fluorides of ionic character

    Within the context of a growing interest in the study of reversible hydrides with the perspective of their application in hydrogen storage, this research thesis more particularly addressed the case of ternary hydrides and fluorides, and of hydro-fluorides. The author reports the development of a method of preparation of alkaline hydrides, of alkaline earth hydrides and of europium hydride, and then the elaboration of ternary hydrides. He addresses the preparation of caesium fluorides and of calcium or nickel fluorides, of Europium fluorides, and of ternary fluorides. Then, he addresses the preparation of hydro-fluorides (caesium, calcium, europium fluorides, and caesium and nickel fluorides). The author presents the various experimental techniques: chemical analysis, radio-crystallographic analysis, volumetric mass density measurement, magnetic measurements, ionic conductivity measurements, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance. He reports the crystallographic study of some ternary alkaline and alkaline-earth hydrides (KH-MgH2, RbH-CaH2, CsH-CaH2, RbH-MgH2 and CsH-MgH2) and of some hydro-fluorides (CsCaF2H, EuF2H, CsNiF2H)

  7. Hydride blister formation in Zr-2.5wt%Nb pressure tube alloy

    Hydride blisters were grown over a period of 5-91 days under controlled thermal boundary condition using Zr-2.5wt%Nb pressure tube sections. Rectangular plate type specimens were hydrided to hydrogen concentration in the range of 20-250 ppm by weight and homogenized at 400 deg. C. These specimens were held in a specially fabricated jig capable of producing the required thermal gradients. The bulk specimen and the cold spot temperatures were maintained in the range of 270-400 deg. C and 40-100 deg. C respectively. Depending on the thermal gradients employed, two types of blister morphology were identified. The type I blister was single, round and located at the cold spot region whereas the type II blister consisted of several small blisters along a ring around the cold spot. Microstructural examination of the blister cross-section revealed three regions; a single-phase region consisting of hydrides, a region consisting of matrix containing both radial and circumferential hydrides, and another region consisting of matrix and circumferential hydrides. An attempt was made to rationalize the observed radial-circumferential hydride platelet orientation. Hydride blister growth rates were found to vary strongly with hydrogen concentration and bulk specimen temperature. The observed time for blister growth was found to be in agreement with the Sawatzky's model

  8. Characterisation of hydride blister in reactor operated zircaloy-2 pressure tube

    Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes pickup Hydrogen species (H and D) during in-reactor service. The hydrogen pickup leads to hydride precipitation and in the event of a contact between the pressure tube and the calandria tube, hydrogen migrates to the cold spot leading to the formation of hydride blister. One such hydride blister location in an operated Zircaloy-2 pressure tube of RAPS-2 was subjected to metallographic studies and mapping of the microstructure across the tube thickness. Mapping of the hydrogen concentration across the tube thickness was carried out by careful sampling and H estimation by DSC technique. The H profile across the tube thickness, up to the blister boundary, was generated. The hydride blister region was found to be made up of microstructurally different regions starting from dense massive hydride at the outer surface and followed in sequence by a region with dense and thick platelets oriented parallel to the blister boundary and radial platelet region, which subsequently merged with the background platelet distribution appropriate for the average hydrogen content of the pressure tube. The equivalent blister depth corresponding to H content of 16,000 w/ppm has been estimated from the H profile at the blister location. In the case of a hydride blister with measured thickness of 0.4mm the equivalent blister thickness was found to be 0.414mm. Mapping of the hardness of the massive hydride and the adjoining microstructurally different regions was carried out by microhardness measurements at room temperature. (author)

  9. The role of stress-state on the deformation and fracture mechanism of hydrided and non-hydrided Zircaloy-4

    Cockeram, B. V.; Hollenbeck, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Zircaloy-4 was tested at room-temperature over a range of hydrogen content between 10 and 200 ppm, and stress-states between a triaxiality of -0.23 and 0.9. Triaxiality (η) is defined as the ratio of hydrostatic stress to von Mises stress and was controlled through use of select mechanical test specimen designs. Testing of smooth and notched tensile specimens (η = 0.33 to 0.9) results in an increase in the stress to initiate plastic deformation and a decrease in strain to failure at higher values of η. Increases in triaxiality are shown to have a more significant effect on reducing the strain to failure when the material is hydrided. Increases in strain to failure are observed at lower values of triaxiality for dual keyhole specimens (η = 0.1) and compression specimens (η = -0.17 to -0.23), with hydrided material showing much less decrement in strain to failure at these lower triaxialities. Examinations of microstructure are used to show that a change in mechanism for deformation and fracture with triaxiality can explain these differences in mechanical behavior and a model is developed to describe the observed changes in strain to failure with stress-state.

  10. Effect of thermo-mechanical cycling on zirconium hydride reorientation studied in situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    The circumferential hydrides normally present in nuclear reactor fuel cladding after reactor exposure may dissolve during drying for dry storage and re-precipitate when cooled under load into a more radial orientation, which could embrittle the fuel cladding. It is necessary to study the rates and conditions under which hydride reorientation may happen in order to assess fuel integrity in dry storage. The objective of this work is to study the effect of applied stress and thermal cycling on the hydride morphology in cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 by combining conventional metallography and in situ X-ray diffraction techniques. Metallography is used to study the evolution of hydride morphology after several thermo-mechanical cycles. In situ X-ray diffraction performed at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron provides real-time information on the process of hydride dissolution and precipitation under stress during several thermal cycles. The detailed study of diffracted intensity, peak position and full-width at half-maximum provides information on precipitation kinetics, elastic strains and other characteristics of the hydride precipitation process. The results show that thermo-mechanical cycling significantly increases the radial hydride fraction as well as the hydride length and connectivity. The radial hydrides are observed to precipitate at a lower temperature than circumferential hydrides. Variations in the magnitude and range of hydride strains due to reorientation and cycling have also been observed. These results are discussed in light of existing models and experiments on hydride reorientation. The study of hydride elastic strains during precipitation shows marked differences between circumferential and radial hydrides, which can be used to investigate the reorientation process

  11. Hydride re-orientation in Zircaloy and its effect on the tensile properties. Revised edition

    Based on literature studies and experimental work, investigations were carried out to determine the stress and thermal conditions required for the reorientation of hydrides from an initial circumferential orientation to a radial one. The section of microscopic reference was transverse, in hydride ring samples of Zircaloy. It was found that, both the degree of reorientation and the relative amount of radial hydrides achieved, were dependent on the hydrogen content of the material, given the same stress and thermal conditions. The need to take most of the hydrides into solution at the uppermost temperature of the thermal cycle, in order for complete reorientation to occur, became also clear. In general, an upper temperature of 500 deg C, in combination with an orientation stress in the interval 150-200 MPa was found to be adequate for the reorientation to radial hydrides. On the basis of these initial results, attempts were then made to produce ring test samples in which the hydrides had assumed the radial orientation. These were subsequently subjected to the tensile test in order to investigate the effect of hydride reorientation on the tensile properties of the material. The tests, which were conducted at room temperature and higher temperatures (100 deg C - 300 deg C), showed that the hydrides were brittle at room temperature but became less so at higher temperatures. With the exception of the samples which were tested at room temperature, all the other samples did show a ductile failure. At the strain rate employed in the present work (0.02cm/mm) therefore, the radial hydrides could not be said to have a reducing effect on the ductile characteristics of Zircaloy at higher temperatures

  12. Small Angle Neutron Scattering Investigation of Hydride Precipitations in Zircaloy-4

    The precipitation and annealing behavior of hydrogen in Zircaloy-4 was investigated by means of small angle neutron scattering. The results show that already during cool down in the air lock of the applied furnace zirconium hydride precipitates are formed. The size of the hydrides seems to be greater than the upper detection limit of the SANS experiments performed. These hydrides seem to be stable during various annealing at temperatures between 573 and 773 K for 1 to 16 days in inert atmosphere. (author)

  13. Thermal decomposition kinetics of titanium hydride and Al alloy melt foaming process

    YANG; Donghui; HE; Deping; YANG; Shangrun

    2004-01-01

    A temperature programmed decomposition (TPD) apparatus with metal tube structure, in which Ar is used as the carrier gas, is established and the TPD spectrum of titanium hydride is acquired. Using consulting table method (CTM), spectrum superposition method (SSM) and differential spectrum technique, TPD spectrum of titanium hydride is separated and a set of thermal decomposition kinetics equations are acquired. According to these equations, the relationship between decomposition quantity and time for titanium hydride at the temperature of 940 K is obtained and the result well coincides with the Al alloy melt foaming process.

  14. Rapid Microwave Synthesis, Characterization and Reactivity of Lithium Nitride Hydride, Li4NH

    Nuria Tapia-Ruiz; Natalie Sorbie; Nicolas Vaché; Hoang, Tuan K. A.; Gregory, Duncan H.

    2013-01-01

    Lithium nitride hydride, Li4NH, was synthesised from lithium nitride and lithium hydride over minute timescales, using microwave synthesis methods in the solid state for the first time. The structure of the microwave-synthesised powders was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction [tetragonal space group I41/a; a = 4.8864(1) Å, c = 9.9183(2) Å] and the nitride hydride reacts with moist air under ambient conditions to produce lithium hydroxide and subsequently lithium carbonate. Li4NH undergoes n...

  15. Proton beam production by a laser ion source with hydride target

    Okamura, M., E-mail: okamura@bnl.gov [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Stifler, C. [Engineering Physics Systems Department, Providence College, Providence, Rhode Island 02918 (United States); Palm, K. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Steski, D.; Kanesue, T. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Ikeda, S. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kanagawa (Japan); Kumaki, M. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    We studied proton beam production from a laser ion source using hydrogen rich target materials. In general, gas based species are not suitable for laser ion sources since formation of a dense laser target is difficult. In order to achieve reliable operation, we tested hydride targets using a sub nanosecond Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, which may help suppress target material consumption. We detected enough yields of protons from a titanium hydride target without degradation of beam current during the experiment. The combination of a sub nanosecond laser and compressed hydride target may provide stable proton beam.

  16. Generalized computational model for high-pressure metal hydrides with variable thermal properties

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rokni, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    This study considers a detailed 1D fueling model applied to a metal hydride system, with Ti1.1CrMn as the absorbing alloy, to predict the weight fraction of the absorbed hydrogen and the solid bed temperature. Dependencies of thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity upon pressure and...... hydrogen content, respectively, are accounted for by interpolating experimental data. The effect of variable parameters on the critical metal hydride thickness is investigated and compared to results obtained from a constant-parameter analysis. Finally, the discrepancy in the metal hydride thickness value...

  17. The storage of hydrogen in the form of metal hydrides: An application to thermal engines

    Gales, C.; Perroud, P.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using LaNi56, FeTiH2, or MgH2 as metal hydride storage sytems for hydrogen fueled automobile engines is discussed. Magnesium copper and magnesium nickel hydrides studies indicate that they provide more stable storage systems than pure magnesium hydrides. Several test engines employing hydrogen fuel have been developed: a single cylinder motor originally designed for use with air gasoline mixture; a four-cylinder engine modified to run on an air hydrogen mixture; and a gas turbine.

  18. Behaviour of depleted uranium as metal hydride in a storage vessel

    Full text: The storage of hydrogen isotopes as metal hydrides is considered a safe and modern technique. The metal hydrides offer a great opportunity for improvement of tritium processing. They allow the design of safe, compact and efficient tritium handling equipment. The paper presents our experience in developing a technology of making experimental hydride storage vessels for tritium handling and processing. The vessel, using depleted uranium as metallic matrix, was tested to determine the experimental conditions for activation, loading and desorption hydrogen. Using depleted uranium, a hydrogen/metal ratio (H/Me) of 2.9 could be achieved. The equipment was tested by successive absorption/desorption cycles. (authors)

  19. Proton beam production by a laser ion source with hydride target

    We studied proton beam production from a laser ion source using hydrogen rich target materials. In general, gas based species are not suitable for laser ion sources since formation of a dense laser target is difficult. In order to achieve reliable operation, we tested hydride targets using a sub nanosecond Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, which may help suppress target material consumption. We detected enough yields of protons from a titanium hydride target without degradation of beam current during the experiment. The combination of a sub nanosecond laser and compressed hydride target may provide stable proton beam

  20. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of some hydrides of the lanthanides and actinides

    This work deals mainly with the thermodynamic and physical properties of the hydrides of the lanthanides and actinides. In addition, statistical models have been developed and applied to metal-hydrogen systems. A kinetic study of the uranium-hydrogen system was performed. The thermodynamic properties of the hydrides of neptunium, thorium, praseodymium, neodymium, samarium and europium were determined. In addition the samarium-europium-hydrogen ternary system was investigated. Moessbauer effect measurements of cubic neptunium hydrides were interpreted according to a model presented. A comparison. (author)

  1. Analytical control of production of As, P, Si, B hydrides and the mixtures on their basis

    Highly sensitive and selective detectors which are in the basis of some analytical devices, such as chromatograph Tzvet 500G attachment POU-80, gigrometer Enisej gas analyzer Platon that permit to control the production of As, P, Si, B hydrides, are tested. The techniques of tetermination of constant gases, general carbon, moisture in the mixtures based on As, P, Si, B hydrides with diluting gases (H2, He, Ar) as well as hydrides in them and in the air of working premises, are suggested

  2. Niche applications of metal hydrides and related thermal management issues

    Lototskyy, M., E-mail: mlototskyy@uwc.ac.za [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Satya Sekhar, B. [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Muthukumar, P. [Mechanical Department, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Linkov, V.; Pollet, B.G. [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • MH H{sub 2} storage, compression & heat management: developments/thermal management. • Thermodynamic criteria for proper selection of MH for different gas phase applications. • Factors influencing on H{sub 2} charge/discharge dynamic performance and energy efficiency. • The improvement of MH heat transfer characteristics is crucial. • Ways of improvement of heat transfer in the MH systems. - Abstract: This short review highlights and discusses the recent developments and thermal management issues related to metal hydride (MH) systems for hydrogen storage, hydrogen compression and heat management (refrigeration, pump and upgrade, etc.). Special attention is paid to aligning the system features with the requirements of the specific application. The considered system features include the MH material, the MH bed on the basis of its corresponding MH container, as well as the layout of the integrated system.

  3. The elaborated metal hydride unit for hydrogen storage/compression

    The laboratory setup for investigations of hydrogen capacity of materials has been created at the Institute for Problems of Materials Science of NAS of Ukraine. It completely meets the modern requirements for the experimental equipment of this class. The setup design makes it possible to investigate hydrogen-sorption characteristics of different materials with low specific density, including nano-carbon structures and composites on their basis, by the volumetric method in the pressure range between 0.01 and 16 MPa H2 and at temperatures from 77 K to 1273 K. The setup provides a sufficient degree of accuracy. It is equipped with a metal-hydride unit for hydrogen storage/compression. The design and service conditions of this device are discussed. (authors)

  4. Noble-gas hydrides: new chemistry at low temperatures.

    Khriachtchev, Leonid; Räsänen, Markku; Gerber, R Benny

    2009-01-20

    Noble-gas chemistry has been undergoing a renaissance in recent years, due in large part to noble-gas hydrides, HNgY, where Ng = noble-gas atom and Y = electronegative fragment. These molecules are exceptional because of their relatively weak bonding and large dipole moments, which lead to strongly enhanced effects of the environment, complexation, and reactions. In this Account, we discuss the matrix-isolation synthesis of noble-gas hydrides, their spectroscopic and structural properties, and their stabilities.This family of species was discovered in 1995 and now has 23 members that are prepared in noble-gas matrices (HXeBr, HKrCl, HXeH, HXeOH, HXeO, etc.). The preparations of the first neutral argon molecule, HArF, and halogen-free organic noble-gas molecules (HXeCCH, HXeCC, HKrCCH, etc.) are important highlights of the field. These molecules are formed by the neutral H + Ng + Y channel. The first addition reaction involving HNgY molecules was HXeCC + Xe + H --> HXeCCXeH, and this led to the first hydride with two noble-gas atoms (recently extended by HXeOXeH). The experimental synthesis of HNgY molecules starts with production of H and Y fragments in solid noble gas via the UV photolysis of suitable precursors. The HNgY molecules mainly form upon thermal mobilization of the fragments.One of the unusual properties of these molecules is the hindered rotation of some HNgY molecules in solid matrices; this has been theoretically modeled. HNgY molecules also have unusual solvation effects, and the H-Xe stretching mode shifts to higher frequencies (up to about 150 cm-1) upon interaction with other species.The noble hydrides have a new bonding motif: HNgY molecules can be represented in the form (H-Ng)+Y-, where (H-Ng)+ is mainly covalent, whereas the interaction between (HNg)+ and Y- is predominantly ionic. The HNgY molecules are highly metastable species representing high-energy materials. The decomposition process HNgY --> Ng + HY is always strongly exoergic

  5. Delayed hydride cracking: theoretical model testing to predict cracking velocity

    Pressure tubes from Candu nuclear reactors as any other component manufactured with Zr alloys are prone to delayed hydride cracking. That is why it is important to be able to predict the cracking velocity during the component lifetime from parameters easy to be measured, such as: hydrogen concentration, mechanical and microstructural properties. Two of the theoretical models reported in literature to calculate the DHC velocity were chosen and combined, and using the appropriate variables allowed a comparison with experimental results of samples from Zr-2.5 Nb tubes with different mechanical and structural properties. In addition, velocities measured by other authors in irradiated materials could be reproduced using the model described above. (author)

  6. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: recent advances and future prospects

    Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman; Bowman, Robert C.

    2016-04-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the MHs. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units, are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modelling of a two-stage compressor aimed at describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS and the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the MH compression in the overall development of the hydrogen-driven energy systems. The work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.

  7. Proton-hydride tautomerism in hydrogen evolution catalysis.

    Quintana, Luis M Aguirre; Johnson, Samantha I; Corona, Sydney L; Villatoro, Walther; Goddard, William A; Takase, Michael K; VanderVelde, David G; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B; Blakemore, James D

    2016-06-01

    Efficient generation of hydrogen from renewable resources requires development of catalysts that avoid deep wells and high barriers. Information about the energy landscape for H2 production can be obtained by chemical characterization of catalytic intermediates, but few have been observed to date. We have isolated and characterized a key intermediate in 2e(-) + 2H(+) → H2 catalysis. This intermediate, obtained by treatment of Cp*Rh(bpy) (Cp*, η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl; bpy, κ(2)-2,2'-bipyridyl) with acid, is not a hydride species but rather, bears [η(4)-Cp*H] as a ligand. Delivery of a second proton to this species leads to evolution of H2 and reformation of η(5)-Cp* bound to rhodium(III). With suitable choices of acids and bases, the Cp*Rh(bpy) complex catalyzes facile and reversible interconversion of H(+) and H2. PMID:27222576

  8. Niche applications of metal hydrides and related thermal management issues

    Highlights: • MH H2 storage, compression & heat management: developments/thermal management. • Thermodynamic criteria for proper selection of MH for different gas phase applications. • Factors influencing on H2 charge/discharge dynamic performance and energy efficiency. • The improvement of MH heat transfer characteristics is crucial. • Ways of improvement of heat transfer in the MH systems. - Abstract: This short review highlights and discusses the recent developments and thermal management issues related to metal hydride (MH) systems for hydrogen storage, hydrogen compression and heat management (refrigeration, pump and upgrade, etc.). Special attention is paid to aligning the system features with the requirements of the specific application. The considered system features include the MH material, the MH bed on the basis of its corresponding MH container, as well as the layout of the integrated system

  9. Study on hydrogen permeation barrier of zirconium hydride

    By using gas-solid reaction method, the hydrogen permeation barrier with 5-20 μm thickness was prepared on the surface of zirconium and zirconium hydride. The examinations of the morphology and structure of the barrier were accomplished by optical microscope and SEM. The compositions of the barrier were determined by EDS. The phases in the barrier were also analyzed by XRD. The results indicate that the barrier is well distributed and compact, moreover it combines firmly with the matrix. There are Zr, O, C, P and H etc. elements in the barrier. Otherwise the oxygen diffuses in matrix apparently. The main phases of the barrier are the ZrO2 and ZrP. There exists the ZrC phase or other phases. (authors)

  10. Final report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the R&D activities within the U.S. Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) from March 2005 to June 2010. The purpose of the MHCoE has been to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE 2010 and 2015 system goals for hydrogen storage materials. The MHCoE combines three broad areas: mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials), materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized) and system design and engineering (which allow these new materials to be realized as practical automotive hydrogen storage systems). This Final Report summarizes the organization and execution of the 5-year research program to develop practical hydrogen storage materials for light duty vehicles. Major results from the MHCoE are summarized, along with suggestions for future research areas.

  11. Modelling zirconium hydrides using the special quasirandom structure approach

    Wang, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The study of the structure and properties of zirconium hydrides is important for understanding the embrittlement of zirconium alloys used as cladding in light water nuclear reactors. Simulation of the defect processes is complicated due to the random distribution of the hydrogen atoms. We propose the use of the special quasirandom structure approach as a computationally efficient way to describe this random distribution. We have generated six special quasirandom structure cells based on face centered cubic and face centered tetragonal unit cells to describe ZrH2-x (x = 0.25-0.5). Using density functional theory calculations we investigate the mechanical properties, stability, and electronic structure of the alloys. © the Owner Societies 2013.

  12. Hydride Formation in Neutron Irradiated Material Under In Reactor Conditions

    The present is a brief summary of the three reports completed within the framework of the SPAR III project. The following is a resume of our aims, techniques used to achieve the objectives and conclusions attained under the guiding thread of the hydride formation in neutron irradiated zirconium alloys and other reactor in operating conditions. As is it known, under reactor operating conditions zirconium components go through transformations which affect their original microstructural and thermodynamical properties. Both concerns are starting points of many research lines for the zirconium alloys used in the nuclear power reactors. Regarding microstructural transformations, one of the most important topics is the phase stability of these alloys. To cite a well-known case, second phase particles of zircaloy-4 shown to be unstable under neutron radiation. Since such phases play a role in the corrosion rate control, this instability became a problem for high burnup fuel claddings design. Similar observations can be made about the β−Zr phase in the Zr-2.5Nb CANDU pressure tubes alloy. On the other hand, there are issues directly involved with thermodynamics, e.g., hydrogen behaviour and its role in the degradation processes of fuel assemblies and other zirconium alloys components, which showed to be affected by neutron radiation. Finally, applied stresses and thermal cycling are part of these operating conditions, which can be simulated performing experiments in situ which allows testing hydrogen solubility behaviour and hydride reorientation. In the context described above, the research topics proposed to SPAR III were aimed to improve the knowledge of these degradation processes. In this scheme, zircaloy-4 which remained more than ten years at full power operation and virgin unirradiated zirconium alloys were suited by the more improved micro analytical techniques to characterize microstructural transformations cited above

  13. Physics of hydrogen storage in metal-hydrides

    Physical aspects of the hydrogenation-dehydrogenation mechanisms of metal-metal hydride systems were examined. Experimental investigation was conducted for magnesium hydride as a case study. Theoretical analysis and computational study were carried out. The kinetics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation of traditionally prepared Mg-MgH2 and chemically synthesized Mg-MgH2 were experimentally investigated. A detailed investigation was carried out to determine the reasons for the improved performance of a chemically synthesized Mg-MgH2 previously reported by Bogdanovic and co-workers. A scanning electron microscope was used to examine the surface morphology of the samples. The surface of chemically prepared samples appeared to be covered with micro-spheroidal beads ranging in radius between 0.5 μm and 0.05 μm formed in a fractal-like configuration. Theoretical analysis indicated that the unusual surface structure of the chemically prepared samples could be responsible for the rapid uptake and release of hydrogen. The uptake and release enhancement is believed to be partially due to the substantial increase n the surface area and partially due fast diffusion into the smaller particles. The effect of the addition to nickel to the surface was also investigated. Theoretical analysis was carried, out. Models for the process at the surface as well as in the bulk were developed. Diffusion equation was examined taking into account the diffusion coefficient being function of concentration. A nonlinear differential equation resulted for this case. The differential equation was numerically solved

  14. Catalytic Radical Reduction in Aqueous Solution by a Ruthenium Hydride Intermediate.

    Htet, Yamin; Tennyson, Andrew G

    2016-07-18

    Some manganese complexes can catalyze both antioxidant and pro-oxidant reactions, whereby the disparate reactivity modes are determined by the catalyst environment and afford distinct therapeutic effects. We recently reported the reduction of radicals in buffered aqueous solution catalyzed by a ruthenium complex with biologically relevant non-tertiary alcohols as terminal reductants. Mechanistic evidence is presented, indicating that this catalytic radical reduction is achieved by a Ru-hydride intermediate formed by β-hydride elimination from a Ru-alkoxide species. A similar mechanism and Ru-hydride intermediate was previously reported to kill cancer cells with catalytic pro-oxidant effects. Therefore, our demonstration of catalytic antioxidant effects by the same type of intermediate reveals new potential therapeutic strategies and applications for catalytic systems that form Ru-hydride intermediates. PMID:27254303

  15. Speciation without chromatography using hydride generation for the selective determination of inorganic arsenic

    Pétursdóttir, Á. H.; Musil, Stanislav; Friedrich, N.; Raab, A.; Gunnlaugsdóttir, H.; Krupp, E.; Feldmann, J.; Nelson, J.

    Baltimore, 2014. [Conference on Mass Spectrometry and Allied Topics /62./. 15.06.2014-19.06.2014, Baltimore] Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : inorganic arsenic * hydride generation * ICP-MS/MS Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  16. Nanometric Antimony Powder Synthesis by Activated Alkaline Hydride Reduction of Antimony Pentachloride

    A novel chemical reduction method using an activated alkaline hydride (LiH or NaH-t-BuONa) in tetrahydrofuran solvent has been applied to antimony salt reduction. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies have been carried out to characterize the morphology and structure of the materials. Alkali hydride nature influence has been proved. In both cases the process allows to prepare antimony particles in nanometer range from few nanometers to about 20nm which could be used as anodic materials for lithium-ion batteries. With lithium hydride well-crystallized particles inclined to agglomeration were observed whereas finely dispersed amorphous particles were pointing out after activated sodium hydride reduction

  17. Ultrasonic C-Scan Parameters for Detection of Hydride Blisters in Zirconium Pressure Tube

    EMAT Since Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes have a high risk for the formation of blisters during their operation in pressurized heavy water reactors, there has been a strong incentive to develop a method for the non-destructive detection of blisters grown on the tube surfaces. However, because there is little mismatch in acoustic impedance between the hydride blisters and zirconium matrix, it is not easy to distinguish the boundary between the blister and zirconium matrix wit h the conventional methods. This study focused on the development of the ultrasonic method to detect the hydride blisters formed on Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes. Hydride blisters were grown on the outer surface of the zirconium pressure tubes using a cold finger attached to steady state thermal diffusion equipment. An ultrasonic velocity ratio method as well as conventional ultrasonic parameters with immersion technique was developed to detect smaller hydride blisters on the zirconium pressure tube.

  18. The two steps thermal decomposition of titanium hydride and two steps foaming of Al alloy

    SHANG; Jintang; HE; Deping

    2005-01-01

    Two steps foaming (TSF) technique was proposed to prepare shaped Al alloy foam. Based on the thermal decomposition kinetics equation of titanium hydride, the relationship between two steps thermal decomposition kinetics of titanium hydride and two steps foaming Al alloy melt was studied. Two steps thermal decomposition curve of titanium hydride under increasing and constant temperature was calculated respectively. The hydrogen mass needed in the second foaming step was also calculated. Results showed that the hydrogen mass of the second thermal decomposition of titanium hydride is enough for the second foaming step in the condition of as-received Al melt foaming. Experimental and theoretical results indicate that two steps foaming technique can be used to prepare Al alloy foam with high porosity, shaped components and sandwich with Al alloy foam core.

  19. The microstructure and hydriding characteristics of high temperature aged U-13 at.%Nb alloy

    Ji, Hefei; Shi, Peng; Li, Ruiwen; Jiang, Chunli; Yang, Jiangrong; Hu, Guichao

    2015-09-01

    Niobium as alloying element significantly improves physical and chemical properties of metallic uranium, exhibiting great application potential in uranium alloy materials. The corrosion resistance performance as well as the internal alloy phase structure of uranium-niobium alloy is closely related to aging processes. Microstructure and hydriding characteristics of the 400 °C/9 h + 500 °C/2 h aged uranium-13 at.% niobium alloys (U-13 at.%Nb) were investigated from the point of view of relationship between the microstructure and growth of the hydriding areas. The microstructure, morphology and composition of the alloy phases before and after the hydriding were well characterized by the laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Experimental results indicated that the hydrogen preferentially reacted with the Nb-depleted phase α-like-U to form monolithic β-UH3Nbx, and the alloy microstructure played an important role in hydride growth.

  20. In situ probing of surface hydrides on hydrogenated amorphous silicon using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy

    Kessels, W M M; Sanden, M C M; Aydil, E S

    2002-01-01

    An in situ method based on attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is presented for detecting surface silicon hydrides on plasma deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films and for determining their surface concentrations. Surface silicon hydrides are desorbed by exposing the a-Si:H films to low energy ions from a low density Ar plasma and by comparing the infrared spectrum before and after this low energy ion bombardment, the absorptions by surface hydrides can sensitively be separated from absorptions by bulk hydrides incorporated into the film. An experimental comparison with other methods that utilize isotope exchange of the surface hydrogen with deuterium showed good agreement and the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are discussed. Furthermore, the determination of the composition of the surface hydrogen bondings on the basis of the literature data on hydrogenated crystalline silicon surfaces is presented, and quantification of the h...

  1. Hydrides of intermetallic compounds R3Ni8Al (R=Sm, Tu, Lu)

    Interaction of hydrogen with intermetallic compounds (IC) R3Ni8Al (R=Sm, Tu, Lu) with the structure of Ce3Co8Si type was studied. Formation of hydride Sm3Ni8AlH11.7 takes place at a high rate and it is accompanied by increase in the volume of unit cell of IC structure by 23 %. According to the data of X-ray diffraction study the volume of unit cells of hydride structure [Tu, Lu]3Ni8AlHx (1) is 0.7-1.2 % higher than the volume of unit cells of the structures of intermetallic compounds. Thermal decomposition of hydride takes place in two stages at 340-390 K, and that of hydride phase of (1) - in one stage at 340 and 450 K respectively

  2. The uranium zirconium hydride research reactor and its applications in research and education

    This paper describes briefly the performance, the configuration and the prospects of extensive applications in science, technology and education of the Uranium Zirconium Hydride research reactor in China. (author)

  3. The uranium zirconium hydride research reactor and its applications in research and education

    Chen Wei; Wang Daohua; Jiang Xinbiao; A Jinyan; Yang Jun; Chen Da [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an (China)

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes briefly the performance, the configuration and the prospects of extensive applications in science, technology and education of the Uranium Zirconium Hydride research reactor in China. (author)

  4. PWR fuel failure analysis due to hydriding based on PIE data

    Recently failures of nuclear fuel rods in Korean nuclear power plants were reported and their failure causes have been investigated by using PIE techniques. Destructive and physico-chemical examinations reveal that the clad hydriding phenomena had caused the rod failures primarily and secondarily in each case. In this study, the basic mechanisms of the primary and the secondary hydriding failures are reviewed, PIE data such as cladding inner and outer surface oxide thickness and the restructuring of the fuel pellets are analyzed, and they are compared with the predicted behaviors by a fuel performance code. In addition, post-defected fuel behaviors are reviewed and qualitatively analyzed. The results strongly support that the hydriding processes, primary and secondary, played critical roles in the respective fuel rods failures and the secondary hydriding failure can take place even in the fuel rod with low linear heat generation rate. (author)

  5. Electrochemical selenium hydride generation with in situ trapping in graphite tube atomizers

    A manifold coupling continuous electrolytic hydride generation of volatile hydrides with atomization in graphite tube atomizers after in situ collection was used for Se(IV) determination. Laboratory-made thin-layer flow-through cells with lead wire (cell I) and granular lead (cell II) as the cathode material were used as the electrolytic generators of volatile selenium hydride. The automatic sampling equipment of the graphite atomizer, with an untreated fused silica capillary, was used both for the introduction of volatile hydride into the atomizer and for pretreatment of the graphite furnace surface with a palladium modifier. The influence of the experimental parameters on the analytical signal was studied and optimum conditions for selenium determination were found. The optimum experimental parameters for hydride generation were: catholyte (1 mol l-1 HCl)/anolyte (2 mol l-1 H2SO4) flow rate of 2.0 ml min-1; applied generation current of 1.2 A (cell I) and 0.8 A (cell II); and carrier gas flow rate of 40 (cell I) and 70 ml min-1 (cell II). The hydride generated was collected in the graphite tube (pre-treated with 5 μg of Pd reduced at 800 deg. C) at a temperature of 400 deg. C for 30 s. The overall efficiency of H2Se electrochemical generation, transport and collection was 71±7% for cell I and 80±5% for cell II. The results for electrochemical generation of H2Se (cell II) (absolute limit of detection 50 pg, 3σ criterion) were compared with the original generation of H2Se using NaBH4 as a reduction agent (absolute limit of detection 30 pg) and with conventional liquid sampling. The repeatability at the 1.0 ng ml-1 level was better than 2.4% (relative standard deviation) for electrochemical hydride generation and better than 2.8% for chemical hydride generation

  6. Dehydrogenation in lithium borohydride/conventional metal hydride composite based on a mutual catalysis

    Yu, X.B.; Shi, Qing; Vegge, Tejs;

    2009-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of LiBH4 ball-milled with hydrogenated 40Ti–15Mn–15Cr–30V alloy was investigated. It was found that there is a mutual catalysis between the two hydrides, lowering the temperature of hydrogen release from both hydrides. In the case of 1h milled LiBH4/40Ti–15Mn–15Cr–30V with a...

  7. The formation and characteristics of hydride blisters in c.w. Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes

    Under the auspices of the IAEA, a consultants' meeting was arranged in Vienna, 1994 July 25-29, at which a Canadian delegation, consisting of AECL and Ontario Hydro Technologies personnel, presented information on their knowledge of the behaviour of hydride blisters in Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes. This document contains the 10 papers presented by the Canadian delegation to the meeting. It is believed that they represent a good reference document on hydride blister phenomena

  8. Hydrogen charging, hydrogen content analysis and metallographic examination of hydride in zirconium alloys

    Gaseous and electrolytic hydrogen charging techniques for introducing controlled amount of hydrogen in zirconium alloy is described. Zr-1wt%Nb fuel tube, zircaloy-2 pressure tube and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube samples were charged with up to 1000 ppm of hydrogen by weight using one of the aforementioned methods. These hydrogen charged Zr-alloy samples were analyzed for estimating the total hydrogen content using inert gas fusion technique. Influence of sample surface preparation on the estimated hydrogen content is also discussed. In zirconium alloys, hydrogen in excess of the terminal solid solubility precipitates out as brittle hydride phase, which acquire platelet shaped morphology due to its accommodation in the matrix and can make the host matrix brittle. The FN number, which represents susceptibility of Zr-alloy tubes to hydride embrittlement was measured from the metallographs. The volume fraction of the hydride phase, platelet size, distribution, interplatelet spacing and orientation were examined metallographically using samples sliced along the radial-axial and radial-circumferential plane of the tubes. It was observed that hydride platelet length increases with increase in hydrogen content. Considering the metallographs generated by Materials Science Division as standard, metallographs prepared by the IAEA round robin participants for different hydrogen concentration was compared. It is felt that hydride micrographs can be used to estimate not only that approximate hydrogen concentration of the sample but also its size, distribution and orientation which significantly affect the susceptibility to hydride embrittlement of these alloys. (author)

  9. Investigation of Lithium Metal Hydride Materials for Mitigation of Deep Space Radiation

    Rojdev, Kristina; Atwell, William

    2016-01-01

    Radiation exposure to crew, electronics, and non-metallic materials is one of many concerns with long-term, deep space travel. Mitigating this exposure is approached via a multi-faceted methodology focusing on multi-functional materials, vehicle configuration, and operational or mission constraints. In this set of research, we are focusing on new multi-functional materials that may have advantages over traditional shielding materials, such as polyethylene. Metal hydride materials are of particular interest for deep space radiation shielding due to their ability to store hydrogen, a low-Z material known to be an excellent radiation mitigator and a potential fuel source. We have previously investigated 41 different metal hydrides for their radiation mitigation potential. Of these metal hydrides, we found a set of lithium hydrides to be of particular interest due to their excellent shielding of galactic cosmic radiation. Given these results, we will continue our investigation of lithium hydrides by expanding our data set to include dose equivalent and to further understand why these materials outperformed polyethylene in a heavy ion environment. For this study, we used HZETRN 2010, a one-dimensional transport code developed by NASA Langley Research Center, to simulate radiation transport through the lithium hydrides. We focused on the 1977 solar minimum Galactic Cosmic Radiation environment and thicknesses of 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, and 100 g/cm2 to stay consistent with our previous studies. The details of this work and the subsequent results will be discussed in this paper.

  10. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  11. Metal hydrides reactors with improved dynamic characteristics for a fast cycling hydrogen compressor

    This paper presents an investigation of coupled heat and mass transfer process in metal hydrides hydrogen storage reactors. Hydrogen storage and compression performance of our designed and developed reactors are studied by varying the operating parameters and analyzing the effects of metal hydride bed parameters. The metal alloy selected to characterize the cycling behaviour of reactors is LaNi5, material synthesized and characterized by us in the range 20-800C. Four types of metal hydride reactors were tested with the aim to provide a fast hydrogen absorption-desorption cycle, able to be thermally cycled at rapid rates. Some new technical solutions have been studied to make a step forward in reducing the duration of the reactors cycle, which combines the effective increase of the thermal conductivity and good permeability to hydrogen gas. Dynamic characteristic of developed fast metal hydride reactors is improved using our novel mixture metal hydride-CA conductive additive due to the increased effective thermal conductivity of the alloy bed. The advanced hydride bed design with high heat transfer capabilities can be thermally cycled at a rapid rate, under 120 seconds, in order to process high hydrogen flow rates.

  12. Influence of lanthanon hydride catalysts on hydrogen storage properties of sodium alanates

    WU Zhe; CHEN Lixin; XIAO Xuezhang; FAN Xiulin; LI Shouquan; WANG Qidong

    2013-01-01

    NaAlH4 complex hydrides doped with lanthanon hydrides were prepared by hydrogenation of the ball-milled NaH/Al+xmol.% RE-H composites (RE=La,Ce; x=2,4,6) using NaHl and A1 powder as raw materials.The influence of lanthanon hydride catalysts on the hydriding and dehydriding behaviors of the as-synthesized composites were investigated.It was found that the composite doped with 2 mol.% La.H3.01 displayed the highest hydrogen absorption capacity of 4.78 wt.% and desorption capacity of 4.66wt.%,respectively.Moreover,the composite doped with 6 mol% CeH2.51 showed the best hydriding/dehydriding reaction kinetics.The proposed catalytic mechanism for reversible hydrogen storage properties of the composite was attributed to the presence of active LaH3.01 and CeH2.51 particles,which were scattering on the surface of NaH and A1 particles,acting as the catalytic active sites for hydrogen diffusion and playing an important catalytic role in the improved hydriding/dehydriding reaction.

  13. Solvent influence on the thermodynamics for hydride transfer from bis(diphosphine) complexes of nickel.

    Connelly Robinson, Samantha J; Zall, Christopher M; Miller, Deanna L; Linehan, John C; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-06-14

    The thermodynamic hydricity of a metal hydride can vary considerably between solvents. This parameter can be used to determine the favourability of a hydride-transfer reaction, such as the reaction between a metal hydride and CO2 to produce formate. Because the hydricities of these species do not vary consistently between solvents, reactions that are thermodynamically unfavourable in one solvent can be favourable in others. The hydricity of a water-soluble, bis-phosphine nickel hydride complex was compared to the hydricity of formate in water and in acetonitrile. Formate is a better hydride donor than [HNi(dmpe)2](+) by 7 kcal mol(-1) in acetonitrile, and no hydride transfer from [HNi(dmpe)2](+) to CO2 occurs in this solvent. The hydricity of [HNi(dmpe)2](+) is greatly improved in water relative to acetonitrile, in that reduction of CO2 to formate by [HNi(dmpe)2](+) was found to be thermodynamically downhill by 8 kcal mol(-1). Catalysis for the hydrogenation of CO2 was pursued, but the regeneration of [HNi(dmpe)2] under catalytic conditions was unfavourable. However, the present results demonstrate that the solvent dependence of thermodynamic parameters such as hydricity and acidity can be exploited in order to produce systems with balanced or favourable overall thermodynamics. This approach should be advantageous for the design of future water-soluble catalysts. PMID:27071366

  14. Fracture mechanism of TiAl intermetallics caused by hydride and atomic hydrogen

    高克玮; 王燕斌; 林志; 乔利杰; 褚武扬

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of TiAl intermetallics was studied at room temperature. The results showed that there were two forms of HE in TiAl intermetallics, i.e. hydride HE and atomic HE. Most of hydrogen in TiAl intermetallics was transformed into hydrides at room temperature. The hydride exists as (TiAl)Hx for a low hydrogen concentration while it exists in several forms for a higher hydrogen concentration. Stress intensity factor KIC decreased with increase in hydride concentration. KIC decreased further when TiAl intermetallics were charged cathodically with hydrogen in 1 mol/L H2SO4 solution. Stress intensity factor during hydrogen charging KIH was about 50% KIC. 20% of the decrease was caused by hydrides while 30% was caused by atomic hydrogen. Mechanism of HE caused hydrides was the same as any other second phase in nature. Delayed fracture caused by atomic hydrogen resulted from hydrogen induced local plastic deformation.

  15. On the chemistry of hydrides of N atoms and O$^+$ ions

    Awad, Zainab; Williams, David A

    2016-01-01

    Previous work by various authors has suggested that the detection by Herschel/HIFI of nitrogen hydrides along the low density lines of sight towards G10.6-0.4 (W31C) cannot be accounted for by gas-phase chemical models. In this paper we investigate the role of surface reactions on dust grains in diffuse regions, and we find that formation of the hydrides by surface reactions on dust grains with efficiency comparable to that for H$_2$ formation reconciles models with observations of nitrogen hydrides. However, similar surface reactions do not contribute significantly to the hydrides of O$^+$ ions detected by Herschel/HIFI present along many sight lines in the Galaxy. The O$^+$ hydrides can be accounted for by conventional gas-phase chemistry either in diffuse clouds of very low density with normal cosmic ray fluxes or in somewhat denser diffuse clouds with high cosmic ray fluxes. Hydride chemistry in dense dark clouds appears to be dominated by gas-phase ion-molecule reactions.

  16. Trapping of hydride forming elements within miniature electrothermal devices: part 1. Investigation of collection of arsenic and selenium hydrides on a molybdenum foil strip

    Dočekal, Bohumil; Gucer, S.; Selecká, Anna

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 4 (2004), s. 487-495. ISSN 0584-8547. [CSI. Presymposium on Sample Introduction in Atomic Spectrometry /33./. Zaragoza, 03.09.2003-06.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/01/0453 Grant ostatní: Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK)(TR) NATO-PC B Advanced Fellowship-Project No. 304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : Arsenic hydride generation * Selenium hydride generation * Molybdenum foil trap Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.086, year: 2004

  17. Hydrogen generation using silicon nanoparticles and their mixtures with alkali metal hydrides

    Patki, Gauri Dilip

    mole of Si. We compare our silicon nanoparticles (˜10nm diameter) with commercial silicon nanopowder (Metal hydrides are also promising hydrogen storage materials. The optimum metal hydride would possess high hydrogen storage density at moderate temperature and pressure, release hydrogen safely and controllably, and be stable in air. Alkali metal hydrides have high hydrogen storage density, but exhibit high uncontrollable reactivity with water. In an attempt to control this explosive nature while maintaining high storage capacity, we mixed our silicon nanoparticles with the hydrides. This has dual benefits: (1) the hydride- water reaction produces the alkali hydroxide needed for base-catalyzed silicon oxidation, and (2) dilution with 10nm coating by, the silicon may temper the reactivity of the hydride, making the process more controllable. Initially, we analyzed hydrolysis of pure alkali metal hydrides and alkaline earth metal hydrides. Lithium hydride has particularly high hydrogen gravimetric density, along with faster reaction kinetics than sodium hydride or magnesium hydride. On analysis of hydrogen production we found higher hydrogen yield from the silicon nanoparticle—metal hydride mixture than from pure hydride hydrolysis. The silicon-hydride mixtures using our 10nm silicon nanoparticles produced high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical yield. Some evidence of slowing of the hydride reaction rate upon addition of silicon nanoparticles was observed.

  18. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ≥ 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ≥ 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space

  19. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries.

    Aymard, Luc; Oumellal, Yassine; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH) with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g(-1) at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li(+)/Li(0)) and the lowest electrode polarization (hydrides Mg2MH x and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MH x + xLi(+) + xe(-) in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths-involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content-were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should be inspired by the emergent nano-research prospects which

  20. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries

    Luc Aymard

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g−1 at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li+/Li0 and the lowest electrode polarization (2, TiH2, complex hydrides Mg2MHx and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MHx + xLi+ + xe− in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths—involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content—were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should be inspired by the emergent

  1. Delayed hydride cracking of zirconium alloy fuel cladding

    This report describes the work performed in a coordinated research project on Hydrogen and Hydride Degradation of the Mechanical and Physical Properties of Zirconium Alloys. It is the second in the series. In 2005-2009 that work was extended within a new CRP called Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zirconium Alloy Fuel Cladding. The project consisted of adding hydrogen to samples of Zircaloy-4 claddings representing light water reactors (LWRs), CANDU and Atucha, and measuring the rates of delayed hydride cracking (DHC) under specified conditions. The project was overseen by a supervisory group of experts in the field who provided advice and assistance to participants as required. All of the research work undertaken as part of the CRP is described in this report, which includes details of the experimental procedures that led to a consistent set of data for LWR cladding. The participants and many of their co-workers in the laboratories involved in the CRP contributed results and material used in this report, which compiles the results, their analysis, discussions of their interpretation and conclusions and recommendations for future work. The research was coordinated by an advisor and by representatives in three laboratories in industrialized Member States. Besides the basic goal to transfer the technology of the testing technique from an experienced laboratory to those unfamiliar with the methods, the CRP was set up to harmonize the experimental procedures to produce consistent sets of data, both within a single laboratory and between different laboratories. From the first part of this project it was demonstrated that by following a standard set of experimental protocols, consistent results could be obtained. Thus, experimental vagaries were minimized by careful attention to detail of microstructure, temperature history and stress state in the samples. The underlying idea for the test programme was set out at the end of the first part of the project on pressure tubes. The

  2. Development of delayed hydride cracking resistant-pressure tube

    Kim, Young Suk; Kwon, Sang Chul; Kim, S. S.; Yim, K. S

    2000-10-01

    For the first time, we demonstrate that the pattern of nucleation and growth of a DHC crack is governed by the precipitation of hydrides so that the DHC velocity and K{sub IH} are determined by an angle of the cracking plane and the hydride habit plane 10.7. Since texture controls the distribution of the 10.7 habit plane in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube, we draw a conclusion that a textural change in Zr-2.5Nb tube from a strong tangential texture to the radial texture shall increase the threshold stress intensity factor, K{sub IH}, and decrease the delayed hydride cracking velocity. This conclusion is also verified by a complimentary experiment showing a linear dependence of DHCV and K{sub IH} with an increase in the basal component in the cracking plane. On the basis of the study on the DHC mechanism and the effect of manufacturing processes on the properties of Zr-2.5Nb tube, we have established a manufacturing procedure to make pressure tubes with improved DHC resistance. The main features of the established manufacturing process consist in the two step-cold pilgering process and the intermediate heat treatment in the {alpha} + {beta} phase for Zr-2.5Nb alloy and in the {alpha} phase for Zr-1Nb-1.2Sn-0.4Fe alloy. The manufacturing of DHC resistant-pressure tubes of Zr-2.5Nb and Zr-1N-1.2Sn-0.4Fe was made in the ChMP zirconium plant in Russia under a joint research with Drs. Nikulina and Markelov in VNIINM (Russia). Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube made with the established manufacturing process has met all the specification requirements put by KAERI. Chracterization tests have been jointly conducted by VNIINM and KAERI. As expected, the Zr-2.5Nb tube made with the established procedure has improved DHC resistance compared to that of CANDU Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube used currently. The measured DHC velocity of the Zr-2.5Nb tube meets the target value (DHCV <5x10{sup -8} m/s) and its other properties also were equivalent to those of the CANDU Zr-2.5Nb tube used currently. The Zr-1Nb-1

  3. Hydrides formation In Zircaloy-4 irradiated with neutrons

    Under reactor operating conditions zirconium components go through transformations which affect their original properties. Two phenomena of significant consequences for the integrity of the components are hydrogen uptake and radiation damage, since both contribute to the material fragilization. In the case of the Atucha I nuclear power reactor, the cooling channels, Zircaloy-4 tubular structural components about 6 meters long, were designed to withstand the entire lifetime of the reactor. Inside them, fuel elements 5.3 meters long are located. The fuel elements are cooled by a heavy water flow which circulates from the bottom (250o) to the top of the reactor (305oC). The channels are affected by a fast neutron flux (En>1 Mev), increasing from a nominal value of 1.35 x 1013 neutrons/cm2 sec at the bottom to 1.69 x 1013 neutrons/cm2 sec at the top, reaching a maximum value of 3.76 x 1013 neutrons/cm2 sec at the center of the channels. However, due to the reactor operating conditions, they are replaced after about 10 effective full power years, time at which they reach 1022 neutrons/cm2 at the most neutronically active regions of the reactor. Studies on cooling channels are meaningful from many points of view. The channels are structural components which do not work under internal pressure or any other type of structural stress. The typical temperature of the cladding tubes in the reactor is about 350oC, at which many types of irradiation defects are annealed [1]. The temperature range of the cooling channels lies between 200oC-235oC (outer foil of the channels) and 260oC-300oC (internal tube), a difference which makes the defect recovery kinetics slower. In the present context, following the program developed in the research contract 15810, we continue with the work started on the effects of the radiation on the hydride formation focusing on the dislocation loops in the zirconium matrix and its possible role as preferential sites for hydride precipitation. The

  4. Precipitation and dissolution peaks of hydride in Zr-2.5 Nb during quasistatic thermal cycles

    Full text: Two internal friction peaks have been observed in hydride forming metals upon heating and cooling, respectively. The corresponding discontinuity ('knee') points on the curves of elastic modulus versus temperature are, respectively, associated with the maximum slope points of the two peaks. Knowledge of the solvus (or terminal solid solubility (TSS)) for precipitation and dissolution of hydrides in Zr alloys is of great interest to nuclear industry because of the potential effect of hydrides on fracture behaviour. In the present work, measurements of the elastic modulus as function of temperature and hold time (quasistatic thermal cycling) were made in Zr-2.5 Nb samples containing hydrogen using a composite oscillator technique. The increment of elastic modulus during an isothermal hold is proportional to the decrease in hydrogen concentration in solid solution of the Zr alloy. As a result, elastic modulus measurements provide a mean for the concentration/temperature of the hydride transition (solvus) to be detected. It is confirmed experimentally that the two peaks reflect the variation of hydride transition rate during heating or cooling. This result also provides a direct experimental evidence of the physical process involved in a general phase transformation peak. It was well established that for such a peak, the internal friction represents the amount of phase transformation in each vibration period of the measurement. It is demonstrated by the present work that the maximum slope point of the high temperature side of each peak provides the most reliable indicator of the end of dissolution of hydride during heating or the beginning of precipitation of hydride during cooling. (author)

  5. Experimental and Theoretical Study of CO2 Insertion into Ruthenium Hydride Complexes.

    Ramakrishnan, Srinivasan; Waldie, Kate M; Warnke, Ingolf; De Crisci, Antonio G; Batista, Victor S; Waymouth, Robert M; Chidsey, Christopher E D

    2016-02-15

    The ruthenium hydride [RuH(CNN)(dppb)] (1; CNN = 2-aminomethyl-6-tolylpyridine, dppb = 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane) reacts rapidly and irreversibly with CO2 under ambient conditions to yield the corresponding Ru formate complex 2. In contrast, the Ru hydride 1 reacts with acetone reversibly to generate the Ru isopropoxide, with the reaction free energy ΔG°(298 K) = -3.1 kcal/mol measured by (1)H NMR in tetrahydrofuran-d8. Density functional theory (DFT), calibrated to the experimentally measured free energies of ketone insertion, was used to evaluate and compare the mechanism and energetics of insertion of acetone and CO2 into the Ru-hydride bond of 1. The calculated reaction coordinate for acetone insertion involves a stepwise outer-sphere dihydrogen transfer to acetone via hydride transfer from the metal and proton transfer from the N-H group on the CNN ligand. In contrast, the lowest energy pathway calculated for CO2 insertion proceeds by an initial Ru-H hydride transfer to CO2 followed by rotation of the resulting N-H-stabilized formate to a Ru-O-bound formate. DFT calculations were used to evaluate the influence of the ancillary ligands on the thermodynamics of CO2 insertion, revealing that increasing the π acidity of the ligand cis to the hydride ligand and increasing the σ basicity of the ligand trans to it decreases the free energy of CO2 insertion, providing a strategy for the design of metal hydride systems capable of reversible, ergoneutral interconversion of CO2 and formate. PMID:26835983

  6. Trapping interference effects of arsenic, antimony and bismuth hydrides in collection of selenium hydride within iridium-modified transversally-heated graphite tube atomizer

    Furdíková, Zuzana; Dočekal, Bohumil

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 4 (2009), s. 323-328. ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/1441 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : selenium hydride trapping * arsine * stibine Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.719, year: 2009

  7. Proton and hydride affinities in excited states: magnitude reversals in proton and hydride affinities between the lowest singlet and triplet states of annulenyl and benzannulenyl anions and cations

    Rosenberg, Martin; Ottosson, Henrik; Kilså, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    aromatic and those with 4n+2 pi-electrons are antiaromatic, opposite to Huckel's rule for aromaticity in S(0). Our hypothesis is now that the relative magnitudes of proton and hydride affinities of annulenyl anions and cations reverts systematically as one goes from S(0) to T(1) as a result of the opposite...

  8. Influence of hydrides orientation on strain, damage and failure of hydrided zircaloy-4; Influence de l'orientation des hydrures sur les modes de deformation, d'endommagement et de rupture du zircaloy-4 hydrure

    Racine, A

    2005-09-15

    In pressurized water reactors of nuclear power plants, fuel pellets are contained in cladding tubes, made of Zirconium alloy, for instance Zircaloy-4. During their life in the primary water of the reactor (155 bars, 300 C), cladding tubes are oxidized and consequently hydrided. A part of the hydrogen given off precipitates as Zirconium hydrides in the bulk material and embrittles the material. This embrittlement depends on many parameters, among which hydrogen content and orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress. This investigation is devoted to the influence of the orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress on strain, damage and failure mechanisms. Macroscopic and SEM in-situ ring tensile tests are performed on cladding tube material (unirradiated cold worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4) hydrided with about 200 and 500 wppm hydrogen, and with different main hydrides orientation: either parallel or perpendicular to the circumferential tensile direction. We get the mechanical response of the material as a function of hydride orientation and hydrogen content and we investigate the deformation, damage and failure mechanisms. In both cases, digital image correlation techniques are used to estimate local and global strain distributions. Neither the tensile stress-strain response nor the global and local strain modes are significantly affected by hydrogen content or hydride orientation, but the failure modes are strongly modified. Indeed, only 200 wppm radial hydrides embrittle Zy-4: sample fail in the elastic domain at about 350 MPa before strain bands could develop; whereas in other cases sample reach at least 750 MPa before necking and final failure, in ductile or brittle mode. To model this particular heterogeneous material behavior, a non-coupled damage approach which takes into account the anisotropic distribution of the hydrides is proposed. Its parameters are identified from the macroscopic strain field measurements and a

  9. Electronic structure and crystal phase stability of palladium hydrides

    The results of electronic structure calculations for a variety of palladium hydrides are presented. The calculations are based on density functional theory and used different local and semilocal approximations. The thermodynamic stability of all structures as well as the electronic and chemical bonding properties are addressed. For the monohydride, taking into account the zero-point energy is important to identify the octahedral Pd-H arrangement with its larger voids and, hence, softer hydrogen vibrational modes as favorable over the tetrahedral arrangement as found in the zincblende and wurtzite structures. Stabilization of the rocksalt structure is due to strong bonding of the 4d and 1s orbitals, which form a characteristic split-off band separated from the main d-band group. Increased filling of the formerly pure d states of the metal causes strong reduction of the density of states at the Fermi energy, which undermines possible long-range ferromagnetic order otherwise favored by strong magnetovolume effects. For the dihydride, octahedral Pd-H arrangement as realized, e.g., in the pyrite structure turns out to be unstable against tetrahedral arrangement as found in the fluorite structure. Yet, from both heat of formation and chemical bonding considerations, the dihydride turns out to be less favorable than the monohydride. Finally, the vacancy ordered defect phase Pd3H4 follows the general trend of favoring the octahedral arrangement of the rocksalt structure for Pd:H ratios less or equal to one

  10. Superhalogens as Building Blocks of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Srivastava, Ambrish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Superhalogens are species whose electron affinity (EA) or vertical detachment energy (VDE) exceed to those of halogen. These species typically consist of a central electropositive atom with electronegative ligands. The EA or VDE of species can be further increased by using superhalogen as ligands, which are termed as hyperhalogen. Having established BH4- as a superhalogen, we have studied BH4-x(BH4)x- (x = 1 to 4) hyperhalogen anions and their Li-complexes, LiBH4-x(BH4)x using density functional theory. The VDE of these anions is larger than that of BH4-, which increases with the increase in the number of peripheral BH4 moieties (x). The hydrogen storage capacity of LiBH4-x(BH4)x complexes is higher but binding energy is smaller than that of LiBH4, a typical complex hydride. The linear correlation between dehydrogenation energy of LiBH4-x(BH4)x complexes and VDE of BH4-x(BH4)x- anions is established. These complexes are found to be thermodynamically stable against dissociation into LiBH4 and borane. This stud...

  11. Hydride blister formation simulation in Candu type reactors

    We have developed a computer code for the probability study of hydride blister formation in pressure tubes named BLIFO. The basic hypothesis of the model are: the pressure tube is divided into five areas according to the existence of four garter springs. For each area the probability of blister formation is the probability of the hydrogen content exceeding a critical threshold when contact tube is present; the probability of a blister in a tube is the OR combination of the probabilities of a blister in each area; the tube contact is a function of the garter springs location, and the time; the critical hydrogen threshold is sorted over the areas within the pressure tube; hydrogen pick-up rate was sorted with a Gaussian distribution; the initial hydrogen content values for each tube were measured before the ensamble and they are used in the code. For Embalse evaluation, we build up a subroutine that simulate Gaussian distribution using the parameters of a typical nuclear power Candu reactor garter spring distribution. (author)

  12. Atomistic simulation of hydrogen dynamics near dislocations in vanadium hydrides

    Ogawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: h.ogawa@aist.go.jp

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Hydrogen–dislocation interaction was simulated by molecular dynamics method. • Different distribution of H atoms were observed at edge and screw dislocation. • Planner distribution of hydrogen may be caused by partialized edge dislocation. • Hydrogen diffusivity was reduced in both edge and screw dislocation models. • Pipe diffusion was observed for edge dislocation but not for screw dislocation. - Abstract: Kinetics of interstitial hydrogen atoms near dislocation cores were analyzed by atomistic simulation. Classical molecular dynamics method was applied to model structures of edge and screw dislocations in α-phase vanadium hydride. Simulation showed that hydrogen atoms aggregate near dislocation cores. The spatial distribution of hydrogen has a planner shape at edge dislocation due to dislocation partialization, and a cylindrical shape at screw dislocation. Simulated self-diffusion coefficients of hydrogen atoms in dislocation models were a half- to one-order lower than that of dislocation-free model. Arrhenius plot of self-diffusivity showed slightly different activation energies for edge and screw dislocations. Directional dependency of hydrogen diffusion near dislocation showed high and low diffusivity along edge and screw dislocation lines, respectively, hence so called ‘pipe diffusion’ possibly occur at edge dislocation but does not at screw dislocation.

  13. Delayed hydride cracking: alternative pre-cracking method

    The internal components of nuclear reactors built-in Zr alloys are prone to a failure mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC). This situation has triggered numerous scientific studies in order to measure the crack propagation velocity and the threshold stress intensity factor associated to DHC. Tests are carried out on fatigued pre-crack samples to ensure similar test conditions and comparable results. Due to difficulties in implementing the fatigue pre-crack method it would be desirable to replace it with a pre-crack produced by the same process of DHC, for which is necessary to demonstrate equivalence of this two methods. In this work tests on samples extracted from two Zr-2.5 Nb tubes were conducted. Some of the samples were heat treated to obtain a range in their metallurgical properties as well as different DHC velocities. A comparison between velocities measured in test samples pre-cracked by fatigue and RDIH is done, demonstrating that the pre-cracking method does not affect the measured velocity value. In addition, the incubation (tinc), which is the time between the application of the load and the first signal of crack propagation, in samples pre-cracked by RDIH, was measured. It was found that these times are sufficiently short, even in the worst cases (lower speed) and similar to the ones of fatigued pre-cracked samples. (author)

  14. Metal Borohydrides synthesized from metal borides and metal hydrides

    Sommer, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    and Ca(BH4)2, respectively [3,4]. An attempt to synthesize alkali and alkaline earth metal borohydrides from various borides by ball milling under high hydrogen pressure is presented here. MgB2, AlB2 and CaB6 have been milled with MHx (M = Li, Na, Mg, Ca) at p(H2) = 110 bar for 24 hours. All samples......Metal Borohydrides Synthesized from Metal Borides and Metal Hydrides Alexander Fogha, Sanna Sommera, Kasper T. Møllera, T. R. Jensena aCenter for Materials Crystallography (CMC), Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Chemistry Department, Aarhus University, Langelandsgade 140, DK-8000...... Aarhus C, Denmark email: gallafogh@hotmail.com / sanna-sommer@hotmail.com Magnesium boride, MgB2, ball milled with MH (M = Li, Na, Ca) followed by hydrogenation under high hydrogen pressure, readily forms the corresponding metal borohydrides, M(BH4)x (M = Li, Na, Ca) and MgH2 according to reaction scheme...

  15. Ti–V–Mn based metal hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Highlights: •Ti0.47V0.46Mn and Ti0.50V0.51Mn alloys were produced by arc melting. •Compositional differences led to different unit cell volumes for the C14 Laves phase. •Change in composition caused a significant change in plateau pressure and hysteresis. -- Abstract: Two Ti–V–Mn BCC-Laves phase alloys with the nominal composition Ti0.5V0.5±xMn (x = −0.04 and 0.01), were synthesised by arc melting. This compositional difference resulted in different compositions and unit cell volumes for the C14 Laves phase. Ti0.47V0.46Mn and Ti0.50V0.51Mn demonstrated reversible hydrogen sorption capacities of 1.53 and 1.56 ± 0.05 wt.% (at 120 bar H2 at 303 K) respectively, however, the change in composition results in a small change in the enthalpy of hydride decomposition, and a significant change in plateau pressure and hysteresis. This may allow for the plateau pressure to be tuned to meet the requirements of different solid-state hydrogen storage applications

  16. Delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding

    Crack propagation rates, grown by the delayed hydride cracking mechanism, were measured in Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding, according to a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). During the first stage of the program a Round Robin Testing was performed on fuel cladding samples provided by Studsvik (Sweden), of the type used in PWR reactors. Crack growth in the axial direction is obtained through the specially developed 'pin load testing' (PLT) device. In these tests, crack propagation rates were determined at 250 C degrees on several samples of the material described above, obtaining a mean value of about 2.5 x 10-8 m s-1. The results were analyzed and compared satisfactorily with those obtained by the other laboratories participating in the CRP. At the present moment, similar tests on CANDU and Atucha I type fuel cladding are being performed. It is thought that the obtained results will give valuable information concerning the analysis of possible failures affecting fuel cladding under reactor operation. (author)

  17. Atomistic simulation of hydrogen dynamics near dislocations in vanadium hydrides

    Highlights: • Hydrogen–dislocation interaction was simulated by molecular dynamics method. • Different distribution of H atoms were observed at edge and screw dislocation. • Planner distribution of hydrogen may be caused by partialized edge dislocation. • Hydrogen diffusivity was reduced in both edge and screw dislocation models. • Pipe diffusion was observed for edge dislocation but not for screw dislocation. - Abstract: Kinetics of interstitial hydrogen atoms near dislocation cores were analyzed by atomistic simulation. Classical molecular dynamics method was applied to model structures of edge and screw dislocations in α-phase vanadium hydride. Simulation showed that hydrogen atoms aggregate near dislocation cores. The spatial distribution of hydrogen has a planner shape at edge dislocation due to dislocation partialization, and a cylindrical shape at screw dislocation. Simulated self-diffusion coefficients of hydrogen atoms in dislocation models were a half- to one-order lower than that of dislocation-free model. Arrhenius plot of self-diffusivity showed slightly different activation energies for edge and screw dislocations. Directional dependency of hydrogen diffusion near dislocation showed high and low diffusivity along edge and screw dislocation lines, respectively, hence so called ‘pipe diffusion’ possibly occur at edge dislocation but does not at screw dislocation

  18. Another Look at the Mechanisms of Hydride Transfer Enzymes from Quantum and Classical Transition Path Sampling

    Dzierlenga, Michael; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    The mechanisms involved in enzymatic hydride transfer have been studies for years but questions remain, due to the difficulty in determining the participation of protein dynamics and quantum effects, especially hydrogen tunneling. In this study, we use transition path sampling (TPS) with normal mode centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) to calculate the barrier to hydride transfer in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Calculation of the work applied to the hydride during the reaction allows for observation of the change in barrier height due to inclusion of quantum effects. Additionally, the same calculations were performed using deuterium as the transferring particle to validate our methods with experimentally measured kinetic isotope effects. The change in barrier height in YADH upon inclusion of quantum effects is indicative of a zero-point energy contribution, and is evidence that the protein mediates a near-barrierless transfer of the rate-limiting hydride. Calculation of kinetic isotope effects using the average difference in barrier between hydride and deuteride agreed well with experimental results. The authors acknowledge the support of the National Institutes of Health Grants GM068036 and GM102226.

  19. Cool-down induced hydride reorientation of hydrogen-charged Zirconium alloy cladding tubes

    250 and 500ppm hydrogen-charged Zirconium alloy tubes were employed to investigate hydride reorientation behaviors when they were cool down from 400 to 300, 200degC and room temperature with various cooling rates of 0.3, 2.0, 4.0, 7.0 and 15.0degC/min under a tensile hoop stress of 150MPa. These cool-down tests indicate that the slower cooling rate and the lower terminal cool-down temperature produced the more hydrides precipitated along with the larger fraction and the longer length of radial hydrides. These phenomena may be explained by terminal solid solubility of hydrogen for dissolution and precipitation and cooling rate-dependent hydride nucleation and growth rates. On the other hand, a dramatic decrease of ultimate tensile strength and plastic strain of the cool-down tested specimens may be explained by the amount of the radial hydrides precipitated during the cool-down process. (author)

  20. Formation and characterization of hydride blisters in Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes

    Hellouin de Menibus, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.hellouin-de-menibus@cea.fr [French Atomic Energy Comission - CEA Saclay/DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Mines ParisTech/Centre des matériaux, CNRS UMR 7633, 91003 Evry (France); Auzoux, Quentin; Dieye, Ousmane [French Atomic Energy Comission - CEA Saclay/DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Berger, Pascal [French Atomic Energy Comission - CEA Saclay/DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); CNRS UMR 3299, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bosonnet, Sophie [French Atomic Energy Comission - CEA Saclay/DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Foy, Eddy [French Atomic Energy Comission - CEA Saclay/DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); CNRS UMR 3299, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Macdonald, Vincent [French Atomic Energy Comission - CEA Saclay/DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Besson, Jacques; Crépin, Jerome [Mines ParisTech/Centre des matériaux, CNRS UMR 7633, 91003 Evry (France)

    2014-06-01

    This article is focused on the formation of hydride blisters in zirconium alloys an experimental and theoretical standpoint, and their characterization in terms of morphology, hydrides crystallographic phases, hardness and hydrogen concentration. An experimental setup was developed to grow hydride blisters on pre-hydrided Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes by thermo-diffusion. The thermal conditions were optimized based on thermo-diffusion calculations, that take into account the hysteresis in the hydrogen solubility limit, to obtain a high blister growth rate. Micro-X-ray Diffraction (XRD), nano-hardness and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) showed that the blisters contain a hydrogen gradient, with pure δ-hydride phase close to the external surface over one third of the blister depth. Thermo-diffusion calculations showed these half thickness blisters should grow in only a few days in PWR conditions. Eventually, the Diffusion Equilibrium Threshold (DET) was defined as a criterion that limits the blister growth, and emphasizes that the hysteresis in the hydrogen solubility limit in zirconium must be taken into account to model hydrogen thermo-diffusion in zirconium alloys.

  1. Detection of hydride blister in PHWR pressure tubes using ultrasonic velocity ratio method

    When the pressure tubes(PT) contact to the calandria tube(CT) in the pressurized heavy water reactor(PHWR), the temperature difference between inner and outer wall of PT results in a thermal diffusion of hydrogen (deuterium) and hydride blisters are formed on the outer surface of PT. Because the hydride blisters are acoustically continued to zirconium matrix, it is not easy to detect the blisters with conventional ultrasonic method. An ultrasonic velocity ratio method was developed to detect small hydride blisters on the zirconium pressure tube. Hydride blisters were grown in the PT specimen with a steady state thermal diffusion device. Ultrasonic velocity ratio method were developed for detection of hydride blisters. The flight time of longitudinal echo and reflected shear echo from the outer surface were measured and calculated to the parameter of velocity ratio of longitudinal wave to shear wave. The velocity ratio was plotted to modified c-scan display and converted to contour plot. The plots shows the capability that the blisters could be detected as well as imaged the shapes.

  2. Detection of Hydride Blisters in Zirconium Pressure Tubes using Ultrasonic Mode Conversion and Velocity Ratio Method

    When the pressure tubes(f are in contact with the calandria tube(CT) in the pressurized heavy water reactor(PHWR), the temperature difference between inner and outer wall of W results in a thermal diffusion of hydrogen (deuterium) and hydride blisters are formed on the outer surface of PT. Because the hydride blisters and zirconium matrix are acoustically continuous, it is not easy to distinguish the blisters from the matrix with conventional ultrasonic method. An ultrasonic velocity ratio method was developed to detect small hydride blisters on the zirconium pressure tube. Hydride blisters were grown in the PT specimen using a steady state thermal diffusion device. The flight times of longitudinal echo and reflected shear echo from the outer surface were measured accurately. The velocity ratio of the longitudinal wave to the shear wave was calculated and displayed using contour plot. Compared to the conventional flight time method of longitudinal wave, the velocity ratio method shows superior sensitivity to detect smaller blisters as well as better images for the blister shapes. Detectable limit of the outer shape of the hydride blisters was conservatively estimated as 50μm, with the same specifications of ultrasonic transducer used in the actual PHWR pressure tube inspection

  3. Cantilever beam test of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes with hydride blisters

    The hydride blisters can be formed by the temperature gradient in the Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube if the pressure tubes contact to the calandria tubes. A volume expansion due to hydride blister causes steep stress gradient in the region of blister-matrix interface, possibly develops to delayed hydride cracking (DHC). After the rupture of pressure tubes due to hydride blisters in Pickering unit 2, many investigations concluded that the probability of blister to DHC may be low because the numerical analysis shows high compressive stresses are developed in the region of blister-matrix interface. This paper investigated fracture behavior of blister and possibility of DHC through cantilever beam test of blistered specimen produced by thermal diffusion processes in laboratory. The fractured surface after cantilever beam test shows a brittle fracture in the region of blister, typical DHC behavior in the region of Zr-2.5Nb matrix, and brittle fracture of crowded circumferential hydrides in the region of blister-matrix interface, where a steep stress gradient is expected

  4. Formation and characterization of hydride blisters in Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes

    This article is focused on the formation of hydride blisters in zirconium alloys an experimental and theoretical standpoint, and their characterization in terms of morphology, hydrides crystallographic phases, hardness and hydrogen concentration. An experimental setup was developed to grow hydride blisters on pre-hydrided Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes by thermo-diffusion. The thermal conditions were optimized based on thermo-diffusion calculations, that take into account the hysteresis in the hydrogen solubility limit, to obtain a high blister growth rate. Micro-X-ray Diffraction (XRD), nano-hardness and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) showed that the blisters contain a hydrogen gradient, with pure δ-hydride phase close to the external surface over one third of the blister depth. Thermo-diffusion calculations showed these half thickness blisters should grow in only a few days in PWR conditions. Eventually, the Diffusion Equilibrium Threshold (DET) was defined as a criterion that limits the blister growth, and emphasizes that the hysteresis in the hydrogen solubility limit in zirconium must be taken into account to model hydrogen thermo-diffusion in zirconium alloys

  5. Characterization of a U-Mo alloy subjected to direct hydriding of the gamma phase

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has imposed the need to develop plate-type fuel elements based on high density uranium compounds, such as U-Mo alloys. One of the steps in the fabrication of the fuel elements is the pulverization of the fissile material. In the case of the U-Mo alloys, the pulverization can be accomplished through hydriding - dehydriding. Two alternative methods of the hydriding-dehydriding process, namely the selective hydriding in alpha phase (HS-alpha) and the massive hydriding in gamma phase (HM-gamma) are currently being studied at the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica. The HM-gamma method was reproduced at laboratory scale starting from a U-7 wt % Mo alloy. The hydrided and dehydrided materials were characterized using metallographic techniques, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray diffraction. These results are compared with previous results of the HS-alpha method. (author)

  6. Phase Diagram and High-Temperature Superconductivity of Compressed Selenium Hydrides

    Zhang, Shoutao; Wang, Yanchao; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhong, Xin; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2015-10-01

    Recent discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (Tc = 190 K) in sulfur hydrides at megabar pressures breaks the traditional belief on the Tc limit of 40 K for conventional superconductors, and opens up the doors in searching new high-temperature superconductors in compounds made up of light elements. Selenium is a sister and isoelectronic element of sulfur, with a larger atomic core and a weaker electronegativity. Whether selenium hydrides share similar high-temperature superconductivity remains elusive, but it is a subject of considerable interest. First-principles swarm structure predictions are performed in an effort to seek for energetically stable and metallic selenium hydrides at high pressures. We find the phase diagram of selenium hydrides is rather different from its sulfur analogy, which is indicated by the emergence of new phases and the change of relative stabilities. Three stable and metallic species with stoichiometries of HSe2, HSe and H3Se are identified above ~120 GPa and they all exhibit superconductive behaviors, of which the hydrogen-rich HSe and H3Se phases show high Tc in the range of 40-110 K. Our simulations established the high-temperature superconductive nature of selenium hydrides and provided useful route for experimental verification.

  7. Characterization of nano-scaled metal-hydrides confined in nano-porous carbon frameworks

    Peaslee, David Edward

    Metal hydrides are currently being studied to provide hydrogen for use in fuel cells and for transportation applications. Hydrogen can be stored in chemical compounds at higher density and lower volume than liquid H2 or compressed gas. Thermodynamic properties of metal hydrides differ between bulk and nano-sized particles. Many metal hydrides with useful volumetric and gravimetric capacities have high decomposition temperatures, but when placed in nano-sized frameworks (or templates) desorption and adsorption temperatures can be fine-tuned to meet engineering requirements for real-world systems. Additionally, some metal hydrides have shown a change in the decomposition pathway when infiltrated into these frameworks, thereby reducing the amount of unwanted byproducts, and potentially improving the cyclability of the material. The Temperature Programmed Decomposition Mass Spectrum Residual Gas Analyzer can be used to characterize gas desorption, decomposition temperatures, picogram changes in mass, and ionization energies for a variety of materials and gasses. The goal of the system is to characterize desorption of the hydrogen (including byproduct gasses) and the decomposition of the metal hydrides. The experimental apparatus is composed of four main components: the residual gas analyzer (RGA), the low temperature stage quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), the high temperature heating stage, and two vacuum chambers separated by a small flow hole which allows a direct line-of-site to the RGA.

  8. Investigation on a three-stage hydrogen thermal compressor based on metal hydrides

    In this paper we report our recent investigation about a there-stage hydrogen thermal compressor based on metal hydrides (HTC) in order to reach an overall compression ratio 28:1. The research was focused to: (i) elaborate hydride alloys with good storage capacity and higher thermodynamic characteristics acquired by tailoring of their properties; (ii) develop new technical solutions based on advanced materials, and fast mass and heat transfer for a hydrogen storage-compression reactor; (iii) built up a prototype of the HTC. Cyclic performance of the hydrogen compressor is studied following up the operating parameters: supply pressure, storage volumes, cold and hot fluid temperatures, cycle duration. The experiments show that the HTC can attain a high overall compression ratio 28:1, it will raise the hydrogen pressure from 2 bars to 56 bars, using three hydride compression stages working between 20 and 800C. Cycling the compressor at a short absorption-desorption cycle, about 2 minutes, a satisfactory hydrogen flow rate was obtain 10 l/cycle, which ensures a hydrogen flow rate about 300l/hour using a small quantity of hydride alloy, about 360 g. To improve the efficiency and economics of compression process, HTC prototype based on metal hydrides must operate in conjunction with advanced hydrogen production technologies from renewable resources.

  9. Studies on a metal hydride based sensor-cum-thermal actuator

    Metal hydrides have been investigated for use in a number of applications, such as hydrogen storage devices, re-chargeable batteries, refrigerators, heat pumps and hydrogen compressors. Recently, suggestions have been made for the use of metal hydrides for bio-mimetic sensors and thermal actuators. Preliminary studies show that metal hydride based sensors offer several advantages compared to other materials such as Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs). In the present work, a simple mathematical model of a metal hydride based sensor-cum-actuator is presented. The model takes into account the heat and mass transfer aspects of the metal hydride reactor subjected to radiation and also the behaviour of the flexible bellows that gives rise to the motion of the actuator with absorption and desorption of hydrogen from the reactor. The governing equations in the form of coupled differential equations are solved numerically. The model presented can be used for design optimization and performance prediction of these sensors under different operating conditions. (authors)

  10. Numerical simulation of coupled heat and mass transfer in metal hydride-based hydrogen storage reactor

    In this paper, a numerical investigation of two-dimensional heat and mass transfer during absorption of hydrogen in a cylindrical metal hydride bed containing MmNi6.4Al0.4 is presented. By considering the variation in cooling fluid temperature along the axial direction (variable wall temperature), the changes in hydrogen concentration, hydride equilibrium pressure, and average hydride bed temperature at different axial locations are presented. The average bed temperature profiles and hydrogen storage capacities at different supply pressures showed good agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature. As the absorption progresses, the change in cooling fluid temperature along the axial direction is found to decrease and becomes unchanged at the end of the absorption process. The effect of variable wall temperature on hydrogen absorption rate for different supply pressures and hydride bed thicknesses are presented. The effect of variable wall temperature on absorption time is found to be significant for the hydride beds of thickness of above 7.5 mm. For a supply pressure of 20 bar, the maximum difference in absorption time between variable wall temperature and constant wall temperature boundary conditions is about 300 s for 17.5 mm bed thickness

  11. Complex rare-earth aluminum hydrides: mechanochemical preparation, crystal structure and potential for hydrogen storage.

    Weidenthaler, Claudia; Pommerin, André; Felderhoff, Michael; Sun, Wenhao; Wolverton, Christopher; Bogdanović, Borislav; Schüth, Ferdi

    2009-11-25

    A novel type of complex rare-earth aluminum hydride was prepared by mechanochemical preparation. The crystal structure of the REAlH(6) (with RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd) compounds was calculated by DFT methods and confirmed by preliminary structure refinements. The trigonal crystal structure consists of isolated [AlH(6)](3-) octahedra bridged via [12] coordinated RE cations. The investigation of the rare-earth aluminum hydrides during thermolysis shows a decrease of thermal stability with increasing atomic number of the RE element. Rare-earth hydrides (REH(x)) are formed as primary dehydrogenation products; the final products are RE-aluminum alloys. The calculated decomposition enthalpies of the rare-earth aluminum hydrides are at the lower end for reversible hydrogenation under moderate conditions. Even though these materials may require somewhat higher pressures and/or lower temperatures for rehydrogenation, they are interesting examples of low-temperature metal hydrides for which reversibility might be reached. PMID:19886669

  12. Low and high-pressure hydriding of V-0.5at.%C

    The low-pressure hydriding characteristics of V-0.5at.%C alloy were determined in this study. There are several prior reports on the pressure-composition-temperature (p-c-T) isotherms and stability of the low-pressure vanadium hydride phases (V2H or β1), and of vanadium alloyed with transition elements, but there are no reports on the hydrides of V-C alloys. The thermodynamic properties of the vanadium did not change significantly with the addition of carbon. In addition to low-pressure studies on V-0.5at.%C, we also performed high-pressure studies on V2H ↔ VH ↔ VH2 (β1 ↔ β2 ↔ γ) hydrides, including thermal cycling (778 cycles) between the β and γ phases. Thermal cycling between VH ↔ VH2 increased the pressure hysteresis. The effects of thermal cycling (4000 cycles) on the absorption and desorption isotherms of V-0.5at.%C and on the H/M ratios for the β1-, β2- and γ-phase hydrides are also presented. There was minimal decrepitation (pulverization) of the alloy; decrepitation of the V-0.5at.%C alloy was dramatically less than that of pure vanadium.

  13. Hydrogen transmission/storage with a metal hydride/organic slurry

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J.; McClaine, A. [Thermo Power Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Thermo Power Corporation has developed a new approach for the production, transmission, and storage of hydrogen. In this approach, a chemical hydride slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. The slurry protects the hydride from unanticipated contact with moisture in the air and makes the hydride pumpable. At the point of storage and use, a chemical hydride/water reaction is used to produce high-purity hydrogen. An essential feature of this approach is the recovery and recycle of the spent hydride at centralized processing plants, resulting in an overall low cost for hydrogen. This approach has two clear benefits: it greatly improves energy transmission and storage characteristics of hydrogen as a fuel, and it produces the hydrogen carrier efficiently and economically from a low cost carbon source. The preliminary economic analysis of the process indicates that hydrogen can be produced for $3.85 per million Btu based on a carbon cost of $1.42 per million Btu and a plant sized to serve a million cars per day. This compares to current costs of approximately $9.00 per million Btu to produce hydrogen from $3.00 per million Btu natural gas, and $25 per million Btu to produce hydrogen by electrolysis from $0.05 per Kwh electricity. The present standard for production of hydrogen from renewable energy is photovoltaic-electrolysis at $100 to $150 per million Btu.

  14. Behavior and failure of fresh, hydrided and irradiated Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings under RIA conditions

    The purpose of this study is to characterize and simulate the mechanical behaviour and failure of fresh, hydrided and irradiated (in pressurized water reactors) cold-worked stress relieved Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings under reactivity initiated accident conditions. A model is proposed to describe the anisotropic viscoplastic mechanical behavior of the material as a function of temperature (from 20 C up to 1100 C), strain rate (from 3.10-4 s-1 up to 5 s-1), fluence (from 0 up to 1026 n.m-2) and irradiation conditions. Axial tensile, hoop tensile, expansion due to compression and hoop plane strain tensile tests are performed at 25 C, 350 C and 480 C in order to analyse the anisotropic plastic and failure properties of the non-irradiated material hydrided up to 1200 ppm. Material strength and strain hardening depend on temperature and hydrogen in solid solution and precipitated hydride contents. Plastic anisotropy is not significantly modified by hydrogen. The material is embrittled by hydrides at room temperature. The plastic strain that leads to hydride cracking decreases with increasing hydrogen content. The material ductility, which increases with increasing temperature, is not deteriorated by hydrogen at 350 C and 480 C. Macroscopic fracture modes and damage mechanisms depend on specimen geometry, temperature and hydrogen content. A Gurson type model is finally proposed to describe both the anisotropic viscoplastic behavior and the ductile fracture of the material as a function of temperature and hydrogen content. (author)

  15. Hydrides blister formation and induced embrittlement on zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in reactivity initiated conditions

    Our aim is to study the cladding fracture with mechanical tests more representative of RIA conditions, taking into account the hydrides blisters, representative strain rates and stress states. To obtain hydride blisters, we developed a thermodiffusion setup that reproduces blister growth in reactor conditions. By metallography, nano-hardness, XRD and ERDA, we showed that they are constituted by 80% to 100% of δ hydrides in a Zircaloy-4 matrix, and that the zirconium beneath has some radially oriented hydrides. We modeled the blister growth kinetics taking into account the hysteresis of the hydrogen solubility limit and defined the thermal gradient threshold for blister growth. The modeling of the dilatometric behavior of hydrided zirconium indicates the important role of the material crystallographic texture, which could explain differences in the blister shape. Mechanical tests monitored with an infrared camera showed that significant local heating occurred at strain rates higher than 0.1/s. In parallel, the Expansion Due to Compression test was optimized to increase the bi-axiality level from uniaxial stress to plane strain (HB-EDC and VHB-EDC tests). This increase in loading bi-axiality lowers greatly the fracture strain at 25 C and 350 C only in homogeneous material without blister. Eventually, the ductility decrease of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube in function of the blister depth was quantified. (author)

  16. Bed geometries, fueling strategies and optimization of heat exchanger designs in metal hydride storage systems for automotive applications: A review

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Dornheim, Martin; Sloth, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    This review presents recent developments for effective heat management systems to be integrated in metal hydride storage tanks, and investigates the performance improvements and limitations of each particular solution. High pressures and high temperatures metal hydrides can lead to different desi...

  17. Hydrogen storage: hydrogen as a hydride. 1974-May, 1980 (citations from the NTIS Data Base). Report for 1974-May 80. [135 abstracts

    Cavagnaro, D.M.

    1980-06-01

    The bibliography covers hydrogen storage as a hydride. Topics include the chemical and physical properties of the hydride, and how useful it may be for hydrogen storage. Also considered is the conversion of hydrogen to a hydride and the conversion back to hydrogen. (This updated bibliography contains 135 abstracts, 14 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  18. Fourier transformation IR spectroscopy of rare earth hydrides and manganates

    The publication describes IR optical investigations of rare earth hybrids and manganates. Both of these material systems have a pronounced interaction with light in the IR spectral region and are therefore well suited for Fourier transformation IR spectroscopy. Especially the spectra of the La1-xCaxMnO3 films contain many structures that derive both from the investigated film and the substrate. Quantitative information on the properties of the material system is obtained by separating the optical properties of LCMO from the substrate by means of adaptation using a multilayer formalism. The temperature dependence of the IR spectra was investigated down to the low-temperature range. Splitting and frequency shifts of the phonon modes were quantified, and the sensitive influence of the oxygen concentration of the samples on their optical properties was demonstrated. As representatives of the class of rare earth hybrids, various aspects of the material systems NdH2, EuH2 and YHx were investigated in thin film samples grown on substrates by means of molecular beam epitaxy. Detailed RHEED and Auger electron spectroscopy investigations provided information on the growth process, crystalline structure and chemical composition of the samples. By using a buffer layer between the rare earth metals and the palladium protective layer which is necessary with Nd and Eu, the minimum thickness of the Pd layer could be reduced about by half. The structural changes resulting from hydrogen loading are investigated by means of Raman measurements of the Nd hydride. The raman-active phonons that were observed for the first time by this method are strongly dependent on the crystal structure, i.e. the various phases are identified as a function of the hydrogen concentration. With the aid of the isotope effect, the origin of the phonons observed in the IR reflection and transmission spectra can be attributed to hydrogen oscillations. Evaluation of the spectra by multilayer formalism provides

  19. Computational study of sodium magnesium hydride for hydrogen storage applications

    Soto Valle, Fernando Antonio

    Hydrogen offers considerable potential benefits as an energy carrier. However, safe and convenient storage of hydrogen is one of the biggest challenges to be resolved in the near future. Sodium magnesium hydride (NaMgH 3) has attracted attention as a hydrogen storage material due to its light weight and high volumetric hydrogen density of 88 kg/m3. Despite the advantages, hydrogen release in this material occurs at approximately 670 K, which is well above the operable range for on-board hydrogen storage applications. In this regard, hydrogen release may be facilitated by substitution doping of transition-metals. This dissertation describes first-principles computational methods that enable an examination of the hydrogen storage properties of NaMgH3. The novel contribution of this dissertation includes a combination of crystal, supercell, and surface slab calculations that provides new and relevant insights about the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of NaMgH3. First-principles calculations on the pristine crystal structure provide a starting reference point for the study of this material as a hydrogen storage material. To the best of our knowledge, it is reported for the first time that a 25% mol doping concentration of Ti, V, Cu, and Zn dopants reduce the reaction enthalpy of hydrogen release for NaMgH3. The largest decrease in the DeltaH(298 K) value corresponds to the Zn-doped model (67.97 kJ/(mol H2)). Based on cohesive energy calculations, it is reported that at the 6.25% mol doping concentration, Ti and Zn dopants are the only transition metals that destabilize the NaMgH3 hydride. In terms of hydrogen removal energy, it is quantified that the energy cost to remove a single H from the Ti-doped supercell model is 0.76 eV, which is lower with respect to the pristine model and other prototypical hydrogen storage materials. From the calculation of electronic properties such as density of states, electron density difference, and charge population analysis

  20. High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides

    Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

    2007-07-27

    This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

  1. Development of Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems Based on Complex Metal Hydrides

    Morten B. Ley

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review describes recent research in the development of tank systems based on complex metal hydrides for thermolysis and hydrolysis. Commercial applications using complex metal hydrides are limited, especially for thermolysis-based systems where so far only demonstration projects have been performed. Hydrolysis-based systems find their way in space, naval, military and defense applications due to their compatibility with proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cells. Tank design, modeling, and development for thermolysis and hydrolysis systems as well as commercial applications of hydrolysis systems are described in more detail in this review. For thermolysis, mostly sodium aluminum hydride containing tanks were developed, and only a few examples with nitrides, ammonia borane and alane. For hydrolysis, sodium borohydride was the preferred material whereas ammonia borane found less popularity. Recycling of the sodium borohydride spent fuel remains an important part for their commercial viability.

  2. Pulsed laser deposition of air-sensitive hydride epitaxial thin films: LiH

    Oguchi, Hiroyuki, E-mail: oguchi@nanosys.mech.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Nanomechanics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Micro System Integration Center (muSIC), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan); Isobe, Shigehito [Creative Research Institution, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kuwano, Hiroki [Department of Nanomechanics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro [Advanced Institute for Materials Research (AIMR), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Orimo, Shin-ichi [Advanced Institute for Materials Research (AIMR), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the epitaxial thin film growth of an air-sensitive hydride, lithium hydride (LiH), using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). We first synthesized a dense LiH target, which is key for PLD growth of high-quality hydride films. Then, we obtained epitaxial thin films of [100]-oriented LiH on a MgO(100) substrate at 250 °C under a hydrogen pressure of 1.3 × 10{sup −2} Pa. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the film demonstrates a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and that the film with a thickness of ∼10 nm has a good surface flatness, with root-mean-square roughness R{sub RMS} of ∼0.4 nm.

  3. Pulsed laser deposition of air-sensitive hydride epitaxial thin films: LiH

    Hiroyuki Oguchi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on the epitaxial thin film growth of an air-sensitive hydride, lithium hydride (LiH, using pulsed laser deposition (PLD. We first synthesized a dense LiH target, which is key for PLD growth of high-quality hydride films. Then, we obtained epitaxial thin films of [100]-oriented LiH on a MgO(100 substrate at 250 °C under a hydrogen pressure of 1.3 × 10−2 Pa. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the film demonstrates a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and that the film with a thickness of ∼10 nm has a good surface flatness, with root-mean-square roughness RRMS of ∼0.4 nm.

  4. Mathematical model of metal-hydride phase change applied to Yttrium

    We present a mathematical model for the kinetics of hydriding and dehydriding of metal powders. The single powder particle is considered. Its shape is approximated by one of the symmetric ones: sphere, long thin cylinder (wire), or flat thin plate. A few concurrent processes are considered. The model equations are derived from the mass conservation law. We consider the case of the 'shrinking core' morphology, i.e. formation of the hydride skin on the surface of the particle with subsequent growth of this skin. We consider three successive stages of the phase change: skin development, skin growth, and final saturation or degassing. We apply the model to experimental data for Yttrium and show that the approximation of the experimental curves by the model ones is comparable for different cycles and different shapes for similar sets of the kinetic parameters. This also shows that shape of powder particles do not influence significantly on the kinetics of hydriding and dehydriding

  5. Mathematical model of metal-hydride phase change applied to Yttrium

    Chernov, I. A.; Manicheva, S. V.; Gabis, I. E.

    2013-08-01

    We present a mathematical model for the kinetics of hydriding and dehydriding of metal powders. The single powder particle is considered. Its shape is approximated by one of the symmetric ones: sphere, long thin cylinder (wire), or flat thin plate. A few concurrent processes are considered. The model equations are derived from the mass conservation law. We consider the case of the "shrinking core" morphology, i.e. formation of the hydride skin on the surface of the particle with subsequent growth of this skin. We consider three successive stages of the phase change: skin development, skin growth, and final saturation or degassing. We apply the model to experimental data for Yttrium and show that the approximation of the experimental curves by the model ones is comparable for different cycles and different shapes for similar sets of the kinetic parameters. This also shows that shape of powder particles do not influence significantly on the kinetics of hydriding and dehydriding.

  6. Structural information on ball milled magnesium hydride from vibrational spectroscopy and ab-initio calculations

    Schimmel, H.G. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Johnson, M.R. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Kearley, G.J. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Ramirez-Cuesta, A.J. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Huot, J. [Institut de recherche sur l' hydrogene, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, 3351 des Forges, PO Box 500, Trois-Rivieres, Que., G9A 5H7 (Canada); Mulder, F.M. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)]. E-mail: f.m.mulder@iri.tudelft.nl

    2005-05-03

    Ball milled magnesium hydride with an average size of about 40 nm and bulk magnesium hydride have been studied with vibrational spectroscopy together with density functional computer calculations. Using this combination of techniques structural information can now be obtained on a nanometer scale, which is especially important for nanosized samples. Such samples exhibit very broad diffraction lines, from which limited information about the structure can be extracted. It was found that ball milling distorts the vibrational spectra due to distribution in stresses over the sample. Cycling of the hydrogen content of ball milled samples results in the spectrum of unmilled samples, while the particle size remains small and hydrogen storage characteristics continue to be better for ball milled samples. We conclude that improved performance for hydrogen storage applications of ball milled magnesium hydride has to be attributed to the reduction of the particle size, while defect densities inside the particles play less of a role.

  7. Structural information on ball milled magnesium hydride from vibrational spectroscopy and ab-initio calculations

    Ball milled magnesium hydride with an average size of about 40 nm and bulk magnesium hydride have been studied with vibrational spectroscopy together with density functional computer calculations. Using this combination of techniques structural information can now be obtained on a nanometer scale, which is especially important for nanosized samples. Such samples exhibit very broad diffraction lines, from which limited information about the structure can be extracted. It was found that ball milling distorts the vibrational spectra due to distribution in stresses over the sample. Cycling of the hydrogen content of ball milled samples results in the spectrum of unmilled samples, while the particle size remains small and hydrogen storage characteristics continue to be better for ball milled samples. We conclude that improved performance for hydrogen storage applications of ball milled magnesium hydride has to be attributed to the reduction of the particle size, while defect densities inside the particles play less of a role

  8. Titanium tritide radioisotope heat source development : palladium-coated titanium hydriding kinetics and tritium loading tests.

    Van Blarigan, Peter; Shugard, Andrew D.; Walters, R. Tom (Savannah River National Labs, Aiken, SC)

    2012-01-01

    We have found that a 180 nm palladium coating enables titanium to be loaded with hydrogen isotopes without the typical 400-500 C vacuum activation step. The hydriding kinetics of Pd coated Ti can be described by the Mintz-Bloch adherent film model, where the rate of hydrogen absorption is controlled by diffusion through an adherent metal-hydride layer. Hydriding rate constants of Pd coated and vacuum activated Ti were found to be very similar. In addition, deuterium/tritium loading experiments were done on stacks of Pd coated Ti foil in a representative-size radioisotope heat source vessel. The experiments demonstrated that such a vessel could be loaded completely, at temperatures below 300 C, in less than 10 hours, using existing department-of-energy tritium handling infrastructure.

  9. Computer simulation of the reflection of hydrogen and the sputtering of hydrogen from metal hydrides

    Reflection of 0.1 to 2 keV H atoms from Ti, Fe and their 'metal hydrides', together with the H sputtered from the latter, have been calculated using the binary collision cascade program MARLOWE. The fraction of particles and energy reflected is found to decrease with increasing hydrogen content of the metal hydride and this decrease is independent of the incident ion energy. It is found that the heavy metal atoms of the metal hydride are responsible for the reflection and that most of the sputtering is produced by the reflected ion as it exists through the surface layer. It is also found that tritium ions sputter H from 'FeH' much more effectively than H ions sputter T from 'FeT'. (Auth.)

  10. Computer simulation of the reflection of hydrogen and the sputtering of hydrogen from metal hydrides

    Reflection of 0.1 to 2 keV H atoms from Ti, Fe and their ''metal hydrides,'' together with the H sputtered from the latter, have been calculated using the binary collision cascade program MARLOWE. The fraction of particles and energy reflected is found to decrease with increasing hydrogen content of the metal hydride and this decrease is independent of the incident ion energy. It is found that the heavy metal atoms of the metal hydride are responsible for the reflection and that most of the sputtering is produced by the reflected ion as it exits through the surface layer. It is also found that tritium ions sputter H from ''FeH'' much more effectively than H ions sputter T from ''FeT.''

  11. Measured and calculated fast neutron spectra in a depleted uranium and lithium hydride shielded reactor

    Lahti, G. P.; Mueller, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of MeV neutron were made at the surface of a lithium hydride and depleted uranium shielded reactor. Four shield configurations were considered: these were assembled progressively with cylindrical shells of 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, 13-centimeter-thick lithium hydride, 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, 13-centimeter-thick lithium hydride, 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, and 3-centimeter-thick depleted uranium. Measurements were made with a NE-218 scintillation spectrometer; proton pulse height distributions were differentiated to obtain neutron spectra. Calculations were made using the two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DOT and ENDF/B (version 3) cross sections. Good agreement between measured and calculated spectral shape was observed. Absolute measured and calculated fluxes were within 50 percent of one another; observed discrepancies in absolute flux may be due to cross section errors.

  12. Pulsed laser deposition of air-sensitive hydride epitaxial thin films: LiH

    We report on the epitaxial thin film growth of an air-sensitive hydride, lithium hydride (LiH), using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). We first synthesized a dense LiH target, which is key for PLD growth of high-quality hydride films. Then, we obtained epitaxial thin films of [100]-oriented LiH on a MgO(100) substrate at 250 °C under a hydrogen pressure of 1.3 × 10−2 Pa. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the film demonstrates a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and that the film with a thickness of ∼10 nm has a good surface flatness, with root-mean-square roughness RRMS of ∼0.4 nm

  13. Structure and Dynamics of Perovskite Hydrides: AMgH3, A=Na,K,Rb

    Fornari, M. [Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant; Subedi, Alaska P [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    We report density functional studies of the structure and dynamics of NaMgH{sub 3}, KMgH{sub 3}, and RbMgH{sub 3} in the cubic perovskite structure as well as the corresponding fluorides and the alloy (Na,Li)MgH{sub 3}. The hydrides are ionic materials with structural properties very similar to fluorides. However, even though the structures of the hydrides and fluorides are very similar, we find that the dynamics can be quite different. We ascribe these differences to breathing of the hydride ion. This is also reflected in a reduced tendency toward Li off-centering in (Na,Li)MgH{sub 3}.

  14. An Investigation on the Persistence of Uranium Hydride during Storage of Simulant Nuclear Waste Packages

    Harker, N. J.; Hallam, K. R.; Paraskevoulakos, C.; Banos, A.; Rennie, S.; Jowsey, J.

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron X-rays have been used to study the oxidation of uranium and uranium hydride when encapsulated in grout and stored in de-ionised water for 10 months. Periodic synchrotron X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction have allowed measurement and identification of the arising corrosion products and the rates of corrosion. The oxidation rates of the uranium metal and uranium hydride were slower than empirically derived rates previously reported for each reactant in an anoxic water system, but without encapsulation in grout. This was attributed to the grout acting as a physical barrier limiting the access of oxidising species to the uranium surface. Uranium hydride was observed to persist throughout the 10 month storage period and industrial consequences of this observed persistence are discussed. PMID:26176551

  15. Electronic structure of metal hydrides: a review of experimental and theoretical progress

    This chapter discusses metal-hydrogen electronic interactions in bulk hydrides by reviewing recent theoretical and experimental results for typical monohydrides (VH, NbH, and TaH), dihydrides (LaH2, PrH2, and NdH2), and trihydrides (LaH3). It attempts to highlight the basic physics behind the metal-hydrogen interaction in a variety of hydrides and compares experimental results with theoretical band structures and densities of states and finds generally good agreement, with exceptions noted. The chapter concludes that with the understanding of these relatively simple hydrides, it should be possible to examine the role of the electronic structure in the more complicated systems such as LaNi5H /SUB 6.7/

  16. Digestion and preparation methods of different samples determine elements produced hydride generation

    The aim of this work is to explain the principle of hydride generation technique, which is another technique of atomic absorption spectrometry, in addition to flame and graphite techniques. This technique is used to determine some metals and nonmetals (Se, Sn, Te, Sb, Bi, AS, Hg ) which produce volatile compounds in their reactions. The study focuses on the analytical capabilities of the hydride generation technique, the principle of hydride generation process, the interferences that affect the analysis process (spectra interference, chemical interference, kinetic interference, oxidation state interference, gas layer interference) and the methods to overcome these interferences. The working steps of the technique have been reported, finally some experimental work has been performed on different kind of samples such as: waste, tripolyphosphate, volcanic rock and phosphogypsum to determine mercury and blood sample to determine arsenic. (Authors)

  17. Behavior of Fatigue Crack Propagation for Grade 2 Titanium on the Hydride Formation

    Fatigue crack growth tests were carried out to investigate the crack growth behavior of hydrided ASTM Grade 2 Titanium plate at 25 .deg. C and 300 .deg. C. The hydride in the α type titanium was formed by ingressing H2 gas(100-300mbar) at 300 .deg. C-500 .deg. C. Fatigue crack growth rates of the Ti specimens at 300 .deg. C were higher than the growth rates at room temperature. The fatigue crack growth rates along the rolling direction were always higher than those of along the transverse rolling direction. The fatigue crack growth rate of hydrogen charged Ti was strongly dependent on the crack plane orientation in the rolled sheet and the arrangement of hydrides relative to the crack growth direction

  18. Tailoring Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Hydrogen Storage in Complex Hydrides towards Applications.

    Liu, Yongfeng; Yang, Yaxiong; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state hydrogen storage using various materials is expected to provide the ultimate solution for safe and efficient on-board storage. Complex hydrides have attracted increasing attention over the past two decades due to their high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities. In this account, we review studies from our lab on tailoring the thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage in complex hydrides, including metal alanates, borohydrides and amides. By changing the material composition and structure, developing feasible preparation methods, doping high-performance catalysts, optimizing multifunctional additives, creating nanostructures and understanding the interaction mechanisms with hydrogen, the operating temperatures for hydrogen storage in metal amides, alanates and borohydrides are remarkably reduced. This temperature reduction is associated with enhanced reaction kinetics and improved reversibility. The examples discussed in this review are expected to provide new inspiration for the development of complex hydrides with high hydrogen capacity and appropriate thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage. PMID:26638824

  19. Room temperature and thermal decomposition of magnesium hydride/deuteride thin films

    Ares, J.R.; Leardini, F.; Bodega, J.; Macia, M.D.; Diaz-Chao, P.; Ferrer, I.J.; Fernandez, J.F.; Sanchez, C. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Lab. de Materiales de Interes en Energias Renovables

    2010-07-01

    Magnesium hydride (MgH{sub 2}) can be considered an interesting material to store hydrogen as long as two main drawbacks were solved: (i) its high stability and (ii) slow (de)hydriding kinetics. In that context, magnesium hydride films are an excellent model system to investigate the influence of structure, morphology and dimensionality on kinetic and thermodynamic properties. In the present work, we show that desorption mechanism of Pd-capped MgH{sub 2} at room temperature is controlled by a bidimensional interphase mechanism and a similar rate step limiting mechanism is observed during thermal decomposition of MgH{sub 2}. This mechanism is different to that occurring in bulk MgH{sub 2} (nucleation and growth) and obtained activation energies are lower than those reported in bulk MgH{sub 2}. We also investigated the Pd-capping properties upon H-absorption/desorption by means of RBS and isotope experiments. (orig.)

  20. Compensation Effect in the Hydrogenation/Dehydrogenation Kinetics of Metal Hydrides

    Andreasen, A.; Vegge, T.; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2005-01-01

    The possible existence of a compensation effect, i.e. concurrent changes in activation energy and prefactor, is investigated for the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation kinetics of metal hydrides, by analyzing a series of reported kinetic studies on Mg and LaNi5 based hydrides. For these systems, we...... find a clear linear relation between apparent prefactors and apparent activation energies, as obtained from an Arrhenius analysis, indicating the existence of a compensation effect. Large changes in apparent activation energies in the case of Mg based hydrides are rationalized in terms of a dependency...... of observed apparent activation energy on the degree of surface oxidation, i.e., a physical effect. On the other hand, we find the large concurrent changes in apparent prefactors to be a direct result of the Arrhenius analysis. Thus, we find the observed compensation effect to be an artifact of the data...

  1. Electronic structure of alkali metal hydrides on data of cluster calculations by LCAO MO SCF CNDO

    The results of quantum-chemical study in where by M = Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs, are presented. The calculation expresses the expected electron density distributions in hydrides on the hydrogen and metal atoms as well as the energy characteristics: M-H, M-M and compounds binding energies. The latter ones qualitatively correlate with the binding energies of LiH-CsH compounds. The calculated values for the Fermi energy and the width of the forbidden zone at the Fermi level make it possible to suppose that the ideally formed lithium hydride crystal will be characterized by the highest electrical resistance. It is established that quantum-chemical characteristics of the MH hydrides structure change nonmonotonously by transfer from Li to Cs

  2. Zirconium hydride precipitation kinetics in Zircaloy-4 observed with synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Blackmur, M.S., E-mail: matthew.blackmur@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [Materials Performance Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Robson, J.D.; Preuss, M. [Materials Performance Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Zanellato, O. [PIMM, Ensam – Cnam – CNRS, 151 Boulevard de l’Hôpital, 75013 Paris (France); Cernik, R.J. [Materials Performance Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Shi, S.-Q. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Ribeiro, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, CEN Cadarache, 13115 St. Paul Les Durance (France); Andrieux, J. [Beamline ID15, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2015-09-15

    High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the isothermal precipitation of δ-hydride platelets in Zircaloy-4 at a range of temperatures relevant to reactor conditions, during both normal operation and thermal transients. From an examination of the rate kinetics of the precipitation process, precipitation slows with increasing temperature above 200 °C, due to a reduction in the thermodynamic driving force. A model for nucleation rate as a function of temperature was developed, to interpret the precipitation rates seen experimentally. While the strain energy associated with the misfit between hydrides and the matrix makes a significant contribution to the energy barrier for nucleation, a larger contribution arises from the interfacial energy. Diffusion distance calculations show that hydrogen is highly mobile in the considered thermal range and on the scale of inter-hydride spacing and it is not expected to be significantly rate limiting on the precipitation process that takes place under reactor operating conditions.

  3. Zirconium hydride precipitation kinetics in Zircaloy-4 observed with synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Blackmur, M. S.; Robson, J. D.; Preuss, M.; Zanellato, O.; Cernik, R. J.; Shi, S.-Q.; Ribeiro, F.; Andrieux, J.

    2015-09-01

    High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the isothermal precipitation of δ-hydride platelets in Zircaloy-4 at a range of temperatures relevant to reactor conditions, during both normal operation and thermal transients. From an examination of the rate kinetics of the precipitation process, precipitation slows with increasing temperature above 200 °C, due to a reduction in the thermodynamic driving force. A model for nucleation rate as a function of temperature was developed, to interpret the precipitation rates seen experimentally. While the strain energy associated with the misfit between hydrides and the matrix makes a significant contribution to the energy barrier for nucleation, a larger contribution arises from the interfacial energy. Diffusion distance calculations show that hydrogen is highly mobile in the considered thermal range and on the scale of inter-hydride spacing and it is not expected to be significantly rate limiting on the precipitation process that takes place under reactor operating conditions.

  4. Impedance and self-discharge mechanism studies of nickel metal hydride batteries for energy storage applications

    Zhu, Wenhua; Zhu, Ying; Tatarchuk, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Nickel metal hydride battery packs have been found wide applications in the HEVs (hybrid electric vehicles) through the on-board rapid energy conservation and efficient storage to decrease the fossil fuel consumption rate and reduce CO2 emissions as well as other harmful exhaust gases. In comparison to the conventional Ni-Cd battery, the Ni-MH battery exhibits a relatively higher self-discharge rate. In general, there are quite a few factors that speed up the self-discharge of the electrodes in the sealed nickel metal hydride batteries. This disadvantage eventually reduces the overall efficiency of the energy conversion and storage system. In this work, ac impedance data were collected from the nickel metal hydride batteries. The self-discharge mechanism and battery capacity degradation were analyzed and discussed for further performance improvement.

  5. Preparation of Uranium Powder having Reactive Shape using Uranium Hydridation

    The accident tolerance of the LWR fuel has become a primary matter of concern. So, it is indispensable to develop the innovative nuclear fuel material concepts and technologies which can overcome degradation of fuel safety and integrity. Uranium nitride fuel has been proposed as a potential fuel material for advanced nuclear reactors because nitride fuel has the advantages of both metallic and oxide fuels. That is, the high melting point, high uranium density, and high thermal conductivity are the representative merits of nitride fuel. Nitride fuel is also considered as a fuel material for the accident tolerant fuel of current LWRs to compensate for the decrease in fissile fuel material caused by adopting a thickened cladding such as SiC composites. However, nitride fuel has a critical disadvantage of a serious reaction with water at a typical LWR condition. Bulk uranium nitride is known to be dissolved in water at a temperature above 230 .deg. C. Uranium nitride powder is more unstable and reacts with water at about 150 .deg. C. Therefore, the water-proof nitride fuel must be developed to apply to current LWRs. Several strategies to prevent or reduce the reaction of nitride fuel with water have been suggested. KAERI is developing uranium nitride-oxide composite fuel pellet that is expected to have higher fuel performance and lower water reactivity. In the development of the fabrication technologies of uranium based composite fuel pellet, uranium nitride powder should be prepared, first. We have considered a simple reaction method to fabricate uranium nitride powders directly from metal uranium powders. Also, to create reactive uranium powder with nitrogen, it is applied that the uranium powder is pretreated in the hydrogen atmosphere. In this study, to investigate the behavior of the uranium powder hydriding process, thermal analysis tests were performed

  6. Optical hydrogen sensors based on metal-hydrides

    Slaman, M.; Westerwaal, R.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.

    2012-06-01

    For many hydrogen related applications it is preferred to use optical hydrogen sensors above electrical systems. Optical sensors reduce the risk of ignition by spark formation and are less sensitive to electrical interference. Currently palladium and palladium alloys are used for most hydrogen sensors since they are well known for their hydrogen dissociation and absorption properties at relatively low temperatures. The disadvantages of palladium in sensors are the low optical response upon hydrogen loading, the cross sensitivity for oxygen and carbon, the limited detection range and the formation of micro-cracks after some hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles. In contrast to Pd, we find that the use of magnesium or rear earth bases metal-hydrides in optical hydrogen sensors allow tuning of the detection levels over a broad pressure range, while maintaining a high optical response. We demonstrate a stable detection layer for detecting hydrogen below 10% of the lower explosion limit in an oxygen rich environment. This detection layer is deposited at the bare end of a glass fiber as a micro-mirror and is covered with a thin layer of palladium. The palladium layer promotes the hydrogen uptake at room temperature and acts as a hydrogen selective membrane. To protect the sensor for a long time in air a final layer of a hydrophobic fluorine based coating is applied. Such a sensor can be used for example as safety detector in automotive applications. We find that this type of fiber optic hydrogen sensor is also suitable for hydrogen detection in liquids. As example we demonstrate a sensor for detecting a broad range of concentrations in transformer oil. Such a sensor can signal a warning when sparks inside a high voltage power transformer decompose the transformer oil over a long period.

  7. Study of hydride precipitation on zircaloy-4 by electrolysis process

    It had been conducted the hydration of zircaloy-4 by electrolysis in sulphuric acid electrolyte. In this experiment hydrogen in the from of atoms and ion is produced from electrolysis in a dilute sulphuric acid. The hydrogen is liberated in the vicinity of the cathode and the specimen itself was as the cathode. Electrolysis was performed at the current of 10 amperes and the potential of 30 volts. In this potential the affinity of zirconium increases and it is reactive enough to absorb hydrogen, which is close to the cathode. The absorbed hydrogen dissolves through the zircaloy-4. The hydrogenated specimens were heated at temperature 400 oC in inert atmosphere. Furthermore, the specimens were cooled in the furnace by the appropriate furnace cooling. The optical microscope was used for performing the metallographical analysis. The specimens were etched with solution of 25 ml 30% H2O2, 25 ml 70% HNO3 and 10 drops of 48% HF by swabbing technique for 10-20 seconds and washed by water. Based on ASTM 353 at 100x magnification the length of platelets is not less than 1.5 mm. From the microstructure image, hydride platelets have improperly been found, because part of them is in the particle from with diameter in the range of 1.4-7 micron meters which is uniformly distributed in the materials. The particle density is in the range of 13-36 particles per 3.5 mm2 of the material surface. The platelet orientation is not parallel to the rolling direction. This fact indicated that the basal plane of zircaloy-4 crystals is not paral let to the rolling direction

  8. Stability of the hydrides REMgNi{sub 4}H{sub 4} (RE = Y, Gd) from first principles

    Roquefere, Jean-Gabriel [Institut de Recherche sur l' Hydrogene, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, 3351 Boul. des Forges, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec G9A 5H7 (Canada); Matar, Samir F.; Bobet, Jean-Louis [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 Av. du Dr. A. Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac (France)

    2010-08-15

    YMgNi{sub 4}H{sub 4} and GdMgNi{sub 4}H{sub 4} hydrides were studied from first principles. Starting from the experimental crystallographic values, the Equation Of State (EOS) of the intermetallics as well as the hydrides have been established. Considering the two possible structures reported for such pseudo Laves phase hydrides (i.e. cubic and orthorhombic), the relative stabilities of the hydrides have been compared. The orthorhombic configuration is confirmed for REMgNi{sub 4}H{sub 4} (RE = Y, Gd) as seen experimentally. Nevertheless, in a larger cell (i.e. REMgNi{sub 4-x}Al{sub x} solid solution), it has been shown experimentally that the hydride remains cubic, and the present calculations show that the hydrogen atoms have to be considered within the [RENi{sub 3}] tetrahedrons. (author)

  9. Formation and physical properties of uranium hydride under conditions relevant to metallic fuel and nuclear waste storage

    Orr, Robin; Godfrey, Hugh; Broan, Chris; Goddard, Dave; Woodhouse, Guy; Durham, Peter; Diggle, Andrew; Bradshaw, John

    2016-08-01

    The formation of uranium hydride is recognised as a hazard during the storage of uranium metal owing to its potentially pyrophoric properties. This study has assessed the influence of water vapour on the potential for uranium hydride to form at low temperatures and shows that it increases the duration of the induction period but does not necessarily prevent uranium hydride formation and also does not significantly change the reaction rate with hydrogen. It is further shown that the α-UH3 fraction in the uranium hydride gradually increases at decreasing temperatures and is likely to be the dominant phase formed under typical storage conditions. Particle morphology and specific surface area of uranium hydride prepared between 30 °C and 200 °C have also been characterised but show only modest variation compared with the phase composition.

  10. Ultrasonic estimation of hydride degradation of zirconium pressure tubes of RBMK fuel channel

    Fuel channels of nuclear reactors, which are major structural elements of a reactor core, have to meet strict requirements in terms of operational reliability. The middle part of the fuel channel, located in a graphite stack, is a tube made of a zirconium-2.5% niobium alloy. However, zirconium alloys can pick up hydrogen during operation as a consequence of corrosion reaction with water. Hydrogen redistributes easily at elevated temperatures migrating down a temperature or concentration gradient and up a stress gradient. When the terminal solid solubility is exceeded in a component such as a pressure tube that is highly stressed for long periods of time, delayed hydride cracking failures may occur. To estimate degradation of the zirconium alloy in the presence of hydrides, predetermined amounts of hydrogen were added to the sections of the fuel channel tubes by electrolytic deposition of a layer of hydride on the surface of the pressure tube material followed by dissolving the hydride layer by diffusion annealing at an elevated temperature. For estimation of the concentration of zirconium hydride platelets in the zirconium alloy test samples ultrasonic testing methods were proposed. The first method is based on precise measurement of velocity of longitudinal and shear wave at different directions and the second is based on the investigation of high frequency ultrasonic signals backscattered in a focal zone of an ultrasonic transducer. The experimental investigations were performed on the zirconium alloy samples of different concentration of hydrides in the immersion tank at a room temperature. The results obtained on testing samples using different excitation conditions and different types of ultrasonic waves are presented. (orig.)

  11. Study of hydride blisters in Zr-alloy using neutron tomography

    Highlights: ► We have established neutron tomography as a potential tool for the study of blister formation. ► Location, size and hydride distribution in the vicinity of blisters has been imaged. ► Hydrogen concentration up to 25 wppm in the reconstructed images has been detected. ► Linear relation between mode of image histogram and hydrogen concentration has been found. ► Spatial in-homogeneity of hydride distribution has also been identified in tomographic images. - Abstract: Formation of hydride blisters in Zircaloy pressure tubes of pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) is a major life limiting factor which hinders the safe and uninterrupted operation of the reactor. Nondestructive detection and evaluation of location and size of these blisters as well as hydride distribution in the matrix surrounding them may help in damage quantification and residual life extension. In this article we present the neutron tomography studies carried out on simulated hydride blister samples grown on Zircaloy tubes. Characterization on samples having various levels of hydrogen concentrations were also carried out for quantification of the detectability of our neutron tomography system. We could identify the spatial in-homogeneity of hydride concentration present in the samples. Quantitatively hydrogen concentration difference up to 25 wppm has been observed experimentally and calibrated against image intensity in the reconstructed image. This study establishes neutron tomography as a potential non-destructive evaluation tool for the estimation of the severity of damage in the integrity of the pressure tubes and provides valuable information about kinetics of blister formation.

  12. Analysis of the hydridation dynamics of metals by gaseous impedance spectroscopy. Application to electrolytic hydrogen storage

    In this work, the hydridation dynamics in presence of impurities is analyzed by pneumato-chemical impedance spectroscopy. The measurements are carried out with a Sieverts volumetric frame. The obtention conditions of the experimental impedances are discussed in relation with the thermodynamic states of the metal-H studied systems. A software of specific modelling has been developed: with this software, it is possible to calculate the experimental impedances and, from model equations, to accede to the microscopic kinetic parameters bound to the hydridation reactions. The results obtained on different materials, in presence of oxygen, are presented and analyzed. (O.M.)

  13. The oxidation of uranium hydride during its instantaneous or gradual exposure to oxygen

    The oxidation behaviour of uranium hydride when exposed to oxygen gas either gradually or instantaneously at an ambient temperature of approximately 37 °C has been investigated. The proportion of the sample converted to oxide and the mean hydride mound temperature rise accompanying the oxidation process were recorded. Pressure changes in the reaction cell were used to deduce the nature of the oxide generated during the oxidation process and the nature of the gaseous reaction products. For the gradual oxidation of the hydride, typically only about 15% of the hydride mass was converted to oxide during the initial period of oxidation defined by an observed temperature excursion lasting a finite time; during this oxidation period it is concluded that, despite the only moderate recoded mean temperature rises, the generated oxide is U3O8 rather than UO2. Typically also for such gradual exposure experiments, hydrogen was the principal gaseous reaction product with negligible water being produced. For the instantaneous exposure of the hydride to oxygen, much higher hydride mound mean temperature rises were recorded but the proportion of hydride converted to oxide was quite variable and apparently dependent on several experimental variables; for these experiments, although hydrogen was a major reaction product typically some water was also produced. The boundary between pyrophoric and non-pyrophoric oxidation of uranium hydride for given oxidising conditions is discussed in terms of a calculated particle “thermal runaway temperature”. - Highlights: • Only about 15% of UH3 is oxidised on its gradual exposure to oxygen. • During the gradual exposure of UH3 to oxygen U3O8 rather than UO2 is generated. • For such gradual exposure, predominantly H2 rather than H2O was generated. • For the instantaneous exposure of UH3 to O2 the amount oxidised was variable. • For these experiments, H2 + some H2O was generally produced. • Pyrophoric or non-pyrophoric behaviour

  14. White Paper Summary of 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding

    Sindelar, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Louthan, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); PNNL, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-05-29

    This white paper recommends that ASTM International develop standards to address the potential impact of hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium alloys. The need for such standards was apparent during the 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding and Assembly Components, sponsored by ASTM International Committee C26.13 and held on June 10-12, 2014, in Jackson, Wyoming. The potentially adverse impacts of hydrogen and hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium-alloy cladding on used fuel were shown to depend on multiple factors such as alloy chemistry and processing, irradiation and post irradiation history, residual and applied stresses and stress states, and the service environment. These factors determine the hydrogen content and hydride morphology in the alloy, which, in turn, influence the response of the alloy to the thermo-mechanical conditions imposed (and anticipated) during storage, transport and disposal of used nuclear fuel. Workshop presentations and discussions showed that although hydrogen/hydride induced degradation of zirconium alloys may be of concern, the potential for occurrence and the extent of anticipated degradation vary throughout the nuclear industry because of the variations in hydrogen content, hydride morphology, alloy chemistry and irradiation conditions. The tools and techniques used to characterize hydrides and hydride morphologies and their impacts on material performance also vary. Such variations make site-to-site comparisons of test results and observations difficult. There is no consensus that a single material or system characteristic (e.g., reactor type, burnup, hydrogen content, end-of life stress, alloy type, drying temperature, etc.) is an effective predictor of material response during long term storage or of performance after long term storage. Multi-variable correlations made for one alloy may not represent the behavior of another alloy exposed to

  15. A semi-empirical approach to accurate standard enthalpies of formation for solid hydrides

    Klaveness, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: arnekla@kjemi.uio.no; Fjellvag, H.; Kjekshus, A.; Ravindran, P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Swang, O. [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, P.O. Box 124, Blindern, N-0314 Oslo (Norway)

    2009-02-05

    A semi-empirical method for estimation of enthalpies of formation of solid hydrides is proposed. The method is named Ionic for short. By combining experimentally known enthalpies of formation for simple hydrides and reaction energies computed using band-structure density functional theory (DFT) methods, startling accurate results can be achieved. The approach relies on cancellation of errors when comparing DFT energies for systems with similar electronic structures. The influence of zero-point energies, polaritons, and vibrational excitations on the results has been examined and found to be minor.

  16. Zirconium-hydride solid zero power reactor and its application research

    The Zirconium Hydride Solid Zero Power Reactor built at China Institute of Atomic Energy is introduced. In the reactor Zirconium-hydride is used as moderator, plexiglass as reflector and U3O8 with enrichment of 20% as the fuel, Since its initial criticality, the physical characteristics and safety features have been measured with the result showing that the reactor has sound stability and high sensitivity, etc. It has been successfully used for the personnel training and for the testing of reactor control instruments and experiment devices. It also presents the special advantage for the pre-research of some applications

  17. The oxidation of uranium hydride during its instantaneous or gradual exposure to oxygen

    Glascott, J., E-mail: joe.glascott@awe.co.uk; Findlay, I.M.

    2015-11-15

    The oxidation behaviour of uranium hydride when exposed to oxygen gas either gradually or instantaneously at an ambient temperature of approximately 37 °C has been investigated. The proportion of the sample converted to oxide and the mean hydride mound temperature rise accompanying the oxidation process were recorded. Pressure changes in the reaction cell were used to deduce the nature of the oxide generated during the oxidation process and the nature of the gaseous reaction products. For the gradual oxidation of the hydride, typically only about 15% of the hydride mass was converted to oxide during the initial period of oxidation defined by an observed temperature excursion lasting a finite time; during this oxidation period it is concluded that, despite the only moderate recoded mean temperature rises, the generated oxide is U{sub 3}O{sub 8} rather than UO{sub 2}. Typically also for such gradual exposure experiments, hydrogen was the principal gaseous reaction product with negligible water being produced. For the instantaneous exposure of the hydride to oxygen, much higher hydride mound mean temperature rises were recorded but the proportion of hydride converted to oxide was quite variable and apparently dependent on several experimental variables; for these experiments, although hydrogen was a major reaction product typically some water was also produced. The boundary between pyrophoric and non-pyrophoric oxidation of uranium hydride for given oxidising conditions is discussed in terms of a calculated particle “thermal runaway temperature”. - Highlights: • Only about 15% of UH{sub 3} is oxidised on its gradual exposure to oxygen. • During the gradual exposure of UH{sub 3} to oxygen U{sub 3}O{sub 8} rather than UO{sub 2} is generated. • For such gradual exposure, predominantly H{sub 2} rather than H{sub 2}O was generated. • For the instantaneous exposure of UH{sub 3} to O{sub 2} the amount oxidised was variable. • For these experiments, H{sub 2

  18. Effect of preparation method of metal hydride electrode on efficiency of hydrogen electrosorption process

    Giza, Krystyna [Czestochowa University of Technology (Poland). Faculty of Production Engineering and Materials Technology; Drulis, Henryk [Trzebiatowski Institute of Low Temperatures and Structure Research PAS, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-02-15

    The preparation of negative electrodes for nickel-metal hydride batteries using LaNi{sub 4.3}Co{sub 0.4}Al{sub 0.3} alloy is presented. The constant current discharge technique is employed to determine the discharge capacity, the exchange current density and the hydrogen diffusion coefficient of the studied electrodes. The electrochemical performance of metal hydride electrode is strongly affected by preparation conditions. The results are compared and the advantages and disadvantages of preparation methods of the electrodes are also discussed.

  19. Effect of preparation method of metal hydride electrode on efficiency of hydrogen electrosorption process

    The preparation of negative electrodes for nickel-metal hydride batteries using LaNi4.3Co0.4Al0.3 alloy is presented. The constant current discharge technique is employed to determine the discharge capacity, the exchange current density and the hydrogen diffusion coefficient of the studied electrodes. The electrochemical performance of metal hydride electrode is strongly affected by preparation conditions. The results are compared and the advantages and disadvantages of preparation methods of the electrodes are also discussed.

  20. Modifications of the hydriding kinetics of a metallic surface, using ion implantation

    Uranium reacts with hydrogen to form an hydride: this reaction leads to the total destruction of the material. To modify the reactivity of an uranium surface towards hydrogen, ion implantation was selected, among surface treatments techniques. Four elements (carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur) were implanted to different doses. The results show a modification of the hydriding mechanism and a significant increase in the reaction induction times, notably at high implantation doses. Several techniques (SIMS, X-rays phases analysis and residual stresses determination) were used to characterize the samples and understand the different mechanisms involved

  1. Enhancement of Hydrogen Storage Behavior of Complex Hydrides via Bimetallic Nanocatalysts Doping

    Sharma, Prakash C.; Sesha S. Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    Pristine complex quaternary hydride (LiBH4/2LiNH2) and its destabilized counterpart (LiBH4/2LiNH2/nanoMgH2) have recently shown promising reversible hydrogen storage capacity under moderate operating conditions. The destabilization of complex hydride via nanocrystalline MgH2 apparently lowers the thermodynamic heat values and thus enhances the reversible hydrogen storage behavior at moderate temperatures. However, the kinetics of these materials is rather low and needs to be improved for on-b...

  2. Transformation of 1,3-dioxacycloalkanes by the action of di-ethylaluminum hydride and triethylaluminum

    Volkov, A.A.; Kravets, E.K.; Rakhmankulov, D.L.; Zlot-skii, S.S.

    1985-12-01

    The authors study the possibility of a selective hydrogenation of different 1,3-dioxacycloalkanes by industrial grade mixtures of diethylaluminum hydride and triethylaluminum. Experiments have shown that by the action of 0.4 mole of diethylaluminum hydride and 0.3 mole of triethylaluminum in 100 g of kerosene, 2-mono- and 2,2-disubstituted 2,3-dioxacycloalkanes selectively transform into the corresponding ethylene glycol monoethers. The PMR spectra of the isolated compounds are given. A Tesla BS-467 spectrometer, hexamethyldisiloxane as internal standard, and CC1/sub 4/ as solvent were used.

  3. Effects of Hf on thermal and mechanical properties of Zr hydrides

    The polycrystalline fine bulk samples of δ-phase Zr hydrides with various Hf contents were prepared and their thermal and mechanical properties were investigated. In the temperature range from room temperature to 973 K, the phase states were examined by high-temperature X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry/differential thermal analyses. In the temperature range from room temperature to 673 K, the coefficient of linear thermal expansion, specific heat capacity, and thermal conductivity were evaluated. The Vickers hardness and sound velocity were measured at room temperature, and the elastic modulus was evaluated. The effects of Hf on the thermal and mechanical properties of Zr hydrides were studied. (author)

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A FABRICATION PROCESS FOR SOL-GEL/METAL HYDRIDE COMPOSITE GRANULES

    Hansen, E; Eric Frickey, E; Leung Heung, L

    2004-02-23

    An external gelation process was developed to produce spherical granules that contain metal hydride particles in a sol-gel matrix. Dimensionally stable granules containing metal hydrides are needed for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification that require columns containing metal hydrides. Gases must readily flow through the metal hydride beds in the columns. Metal hydrides reversibly absorb and desorb hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes. This is accompanied by significant volume changes that cause the metal hydride to break apart or decrepitate. Repeated cycling results in very fine metal hydride particles that are difficult to handle and contain. Fine particles tend to settle and pack making it more difficult to flow gases through a metal hydride bed. Furthermore, the metal hydrides can exert a significant force on the containment vessel as they expand. These problems associated with metal hydrides can be eliminated with the granulation process described in this report. Small agglomerates of metal hydride particles and abietic acid (a pore former) were produced and dispersed in a colloidal silica/water suspension to form the feed slurry. Fumed silica was added to increase the viscosity of the feed slurry which helped to keep the agglomerates in suspension. Drops of the feed slurry were injected into a 27-foot tall column of hot ({approx}70 C), medium viscosity ({approx}3000 centistokes) silicone oil. Water was slowly evaporated from the drops as they settled. The drops gelled and eventually solidified to form spherical granules. This process is referred to as external gelation. Testing was completed to optimize the design of the column, the feed system, the feed slurry composition, and the operating parameters of the column. The critical process parameters can be controlled resulting in a reproducible fabrication technique. The residual silicone oil on the surface of the granules was removed by washing in mineral spirits. The granules were

  5. Arsenic hydride radicals studied by laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Arsenic hydride radicals have been studied by Laser Magnetic Resonance (LMR) spectroscopy. Their spectra have been analysed to give molecular parameters whose interpretation has provided information on the molecular and electronic structure of these species. In LMR spectroscopy an applied magnetic field removes the degeneracy of the MJ levels of a paramagnetic species. Scanning the magnetic field tunes rotational transitions between these levels into resonance with a nearby laser line leading to the observation of absorption signals. Two LMR spectrometers were used in this work: the mid-IR CO LMR spectrometer in Oxford and the far-IR LMR spectrometer at NIST, Boulder. Vibration-rotation transitions in the υ = 1 - 0 band and the υ = 2 - 1 and 3 - 2 hot bands of AsH in its ground electronic state (X3Σ-) have been recorded by MIR LMR. As υ = 2 - 1 and 3 - 2 transitions have been observed for the first time, the vibrational dependences of several parameters have been determined. In particular, the vibrational anharmonicity, wexe, has been measured very accurately; the parameter weye has also been determined. The precision and accuracy of the band origin have been improved and the observation of transitions between different spin-states has allowed a direct determination, therefore more accurate values, of the spin-spin coupling constant λ0 and spin-rotation coupling constant γ0. Pure rotational transitions in the υ = 0 level of AsH in its first excited electronic state (a1Δ) have been recorded by FIR LMR. The rotational constants have been determined much more precisely than previously; hyperfine parameters for 75As and 1H, and the Zeeman parameters, have also been determined. FIR LMR has also been used to record pure rotational transitions in the υ = 0 level of AsH2 in its ground electronic state (X-tilde2 B1). AsH2 is an asymmetric top and a good spread of N and Kc values are involved in the observed transitions, giving an expanded and more reliable set of

  6. Influence of temperature and hydrogen content on stress-induced radial hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Radial hydride precipitation in stress relieved Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings is studied using a new thermal–mechanical test. Two maximum temperatures for radial hydride precipitation heat treatment are studied, 350 and 450 °C with hydrogen contents ranging between 50 and 600 wppm. The new test provides two main results of interest: the minimum hoop stress required to precipitate radial hydrides and a maximum stress above which, all hydrides precipitate in the radial direction. Based on these two extreme stress conditions, a model is derived to determine the stress level required to obtain a given fraction of radial hydrides after high temperature thermal–mechanical heat treatment. The proposed model is validated using metallographic observation data on pressurized tubes cooled down under constant pressure. Most of the samples with reoriented hydrides are further subjected to a ductility test. Using finite element modeling, the test results are analyzed in terms of crack nucleation within radial hydrides at the outer diameter and crack growth through the thickness of the tubular samples. The combination of test results shows that samples with hydrogen contents of about 100 wppm had the lowest ductility

  7. Reductive demercuration of hex-5-enyl-1-mercuric bromide by metal hydrides. Rearrangement, isotope effects, and mechanism

    The use of the rearrangement of hex-5-enyl radical intermediates as a mechanistic probe has been examined in the reductive demercurations of hex-5-enyl-l-mercuric bromide (1). Methylcyclopentane and 1-hexene are the major products from reductions of 1 by sodium borohydride, lithium aluminum hydride, and tri-n-butyltin hydride. The formation of methylcyclopentane and the absence of cyclohexane are consistent with a noncage, free-radical chain mechanism for these reductions. The sodium amalgam reduction of 1 produces only 1-hexene. Hex-5-en-l-ol and a peroxide are formed from sodium borohydride reductions of 1 in the presence of molecular oxygen. Isotope effects for transfer of hydrogen to the intermediate hex-5-enyl radicals have been determined from the 1-hexene/methylcyclopentane product ratio, since rearrangement of the 5-hexenyl radical competes with hydrogen abstraction. The magnitude of these isotope effects (1.8 +- 0.2) is the same for reductive demercurations of 1 by sodium borohydride, lithium aluminum hydride, and tri-n-butyltin hydride; these results provide evidence for a common hydrogen-transfer agent, such as hex-5-enyl-1-mercuric hydride, for all of these metal-hydride reductions. The validity of the competing rearrangement method of determining hydrogen isotope effects has been demonstrated by determining the isotope effect for the tri-n-butyltin hydride reduction of 6-bromo-1-hexene (2.8 +- 0.2) at 400C

  8. Exploring preconcentration of volatile hydrides in quartz trap for ICP-MS

    Matoušek, Tomáš; Kašpar, M.; Kratzer, Jan; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2014. s. 236-236. [Rio Symposium on Atomic Spectrometry /13./. 19.10.2014-24.10.2014, Merida, Yucatan] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S; GA ČR(CZ) GPP206/11/P002 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : Arsenic * antimony * hydride generation Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  9. Arsenic speciation analysis by post-separation hydride generation and atomic fluorescence detection

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Rychlovský, P.; Dědina, Jiří

    2014. s. 133-133. [Rio Symposium on Atomic Spectrometry /13./. 19.10.2014-24.10.2014, Merida, Yucatan] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : arsenic speciation analysis * hydride generation * atomic fluorescence spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  10. Loss of di- and trimethylarsine on Nafion membrane dryers following hydride generation

    Taurková, Petra; Svoboda, Milan; Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 1 (2011), s. 220-223. ISSN 0267-9477 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1783 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : hydride generation * speciation analysis * arsenic Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.220, year: 2011

  11. New cryogenic trap design for speciation analysis of arsenic by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry

    Svoboda, Milan; Kratzer, Jan; Dědina, Jiří

    Praha, 2014. s. 240-240. ISBN 978-80-905704-1-2. [European Symposium on Atomic Spectrometry ESAS 2014 & Czech-Slovak Spectroscopic Conference /15./. 16.03.2014-21.03.2014, Praha] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200311202 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : atomic absorption spectrometry * hydride generation * cryogenic trapping Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  12. Speciation without chromatography using selective hydride generation: Inorganic arsenic in rice and samples of marine origin

    Musil, Stanislav; Pétursdóttir, A. H.; Raab, A.; Gunnlaugsdóttir, H.; Krupp, E.; Feldmann, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 2 (2014), s. 993-999. ISSN 0003-2700 Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200311271 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : inorganic arsenic * hydride generation * inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.636, year: 2014

  13. Application of thermal electrochemical equation to metal-hydride half-cell system

    LIU Kai-yu; HUANG Bai-yun; ZHANG Ping-min; HE Yue-hui; ZHOU Ke-chao; SU Geng

    2006-01-01

    Application of thermal electrochemical equation to metal-hydride half-cell system was investigated, and the influence of state of charge on the thermal electrochemical performance of hydrogen storage materials was studied. The results show that both the absolute value of the molar enthalpy change and the internal resistance of evolution hydrogen reaction are less than that of absorption hydrogen reaction at the same state of charge. The molar reaction enthalpy change of absorption and evolution of hydride electrode change contrarily with the enhancement of filling degree of hydrogen in hydride electrode. The relation curve of molar reaction enthalpy change to state of charge, both absorption and evolution hydrogen reaction, is close to a constant when the state of charge is 10%-60%, and during state of charge below 10% or state of charge above 60%, the molar reaction enthalpy change varies sharply. Meanwhile, the internal resistance of electrode reaction has an ascending trend with the enhancement on filling degree of hydrogen in hydride electrode in both absorption and evolution hydrogen reaction.

  14. Internal hydriding in irradiated defected Zircaloy fuel rods: A review (LWBR Development Program)

    Although not a problem in recent commercial power reactors, including the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor, internal hydriding of Zircaloy cladding was a persistent cause of gross cladding failures during the 1960s. It occurred in the fuel rods of water-cooled nuclear power reactors that had a small cladding defect. This report summarizes the experimental findings, causes, mechanisms, and methods of minimizing internal hydriding in defected Zircaloy-clad fuel rods. Irradiation test data on the different types of defected fuel rods, intentionally fabricated defected and in-pile operationally defected rods, are compared. Significant factors affecting internal hydriding in defected Zircaloy-clad fuel rods (defect hole size, internal and external sources of hydrogen, Zircaloy cladding surface properties, nickel alloy contamination of Zircaloy, the effect of heat flux and fluence) are discussed. Pertinent in-pile and out-of-pile test results from Bettis and other laboratories are used as a data base in constructing a qualitative model which explains hydrogen generation and distribution in Zircaloy cladding of defected water-cooled reactor fuel rods. Techniques for minimizing internal hydride failures in Zircaloy-clad fuel rods are evaluated

  15. First Principles Studies of Phase Stability and Reaction Dynamics in Complex Metal Hydrides

    Chou, Mei-Yin

    2014-09-29

    Complex metal hydrides are believed to be one of the most promising materials for developing hydrogen storage systems that can operate under desirable conditions. At the same time, these are also a class of materials that exhibit intriguing properties. We have used state-of-the-art computational techniques to study the fundamental properties of these materials.

  16. The impact of carbon materials on the hydrogen storage properties of light metal hydrides

    Adelhelm, P.A.; de Jongh, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    The safe and efficient storage of hydrogen is still one of the remaining challenges towards fuel cell powered cars. Metal hydrides are a promising class of materials as they allow the storage of large amounts of hydrogen in a small volume at room temperature and low pressures. However, usually the k

  17. Titanium compacts produced by the pulvimetallurgical hydride-dehydride method for biomedical applications

    Titanium powder production by the hydride-dehydride method has been developed as a non-expensive process. In this work, commercially pure grade two Ti specimens were hydrogenated. The hydrided material was milled in a planetary mill. The hydrided titanium powder was dehydrided and then sieved to obtain a particle size between 37 and 125 μm in order to compare it with a commercial powder produced by chemical reduction with a particle size lower than 150 μm. Cylindrical green compacts were obtained by uniaxial pressing of the powders at 343 MPa and sintering in vacuum. The powders and the density of sintered compacts were characterized, the oxygen content was measured and in vivo tests were performed in the tibia bones of Wistar rats in order to evaluate their biocompatibility. No differences were observed between the materials which were produced either with powders obtained by the hydride-dehydride method or with commercial powders produced by chemical reduction regarding modifications in compactation, sintering and biological behaviour.

  18. Aluminum-titanium hydride-boron carbide composite provides lightweight neutron shield material

    Poindexter, A. M.

    1967-01-01

    Inexpensive lightweight neutron shield material has high strength and ductility and withstands high internal heat generation rates without excessive thermal stress. This composite material combines structural and thermal properties of aluminum, neutron moderating properties of titanium hydride, and neutron absorbing characteristics of boron carbide.

  19. An electrical pulse hydride injector (EPHI) for reactor fueling and tritium handling applications

    An electrical pulse hydride injector (EPHI) has been developed for reactor fuelling as well as for handling of hydrogen isotopes in facilities operating with tritium. Salient features of the EPHI are the accuracy with which the fuelling rate can be controlled and the avoidance of a pressurized ballast. The generator is simple and allows for safe operation with tritium. (orig.)

  20. A Model of Hydrogen Desorption Kinetics Controlled both by Interface and Surface Reactions for Metal Hydrides

    Drozdov, I

    2014-01-01

    The desorption kinetics was modelled with the both interface- and surface reactions as rate-controlling steps. It has been shown analytically, that in the model of 'shrinking core' desorption, the finite hydride-decomposition-rate causes a modified slope of kinetics. The dependence of desorption time on the powder particle size has the same power of order as for the surface controlled desorption.

  1. Characterization of the whiskerlike products formed by hydriding magnesium metal powders

    Herley, P. J.; Jones, W.; Vigeholm, Bjørn

    1985-01-01

    The structure of filamentary crystals produced during the hydriding of magnesium powder has been studies in detail. The needles of small dimensions (typically 0.5 μm in diameter) have been identified by electron analytical techniques to be oriented microcrystals of metallic magnesium. Their forma...

  2. In-situ study of hydriding kinetics in Pd-based thin film systems

    Delmelle, Renaud; Proost, Joris [Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Div. of Materials and Process Engineering

    2010-07-01

    The hydriding kinetics of Pd thin films has been investigated in detail. The key experimental technique used in this work consists of a high resolution curvature measurement setup, which continuously monitors the reflections of multiple laser beams coming off a cantilevered sample. After mounting the sample inside a vacuum chamber, a H-containing gas mixture is introduced to instantaneously generate a given hydrogen partial pressure (p{sub H2}) inside the chamber. The resulting interaction of H with the Pd layer then leads to a volume expansion of the thin film system. This induces in turn changes in the sample curvature as a result of internal stresses developing in the Pd film during a hydriding cycle. Based on such curvature date obtained in-situ at different p{sub H2}, a two-step model for the kinetics of Pd-hydride formation has been proposed and expressions for the hydrogen adsorption and absorption velocities have been derived. The rate-limiting steps have been identified by studying the p{sub H2}-dependence of these velocities. Furthermore, from our in-situ experimental data, relevant kinetic parameters have been calculated. The effect of dry air exposure of the Pd films on the hydriding kinetics has been considered as well. (orig.)

  3. Titanium compacts produced by the pulvimetallurgical hydride-dehydride method for biomedical applications

    Barreiro, M M [Materiales Dentales, Facultad de OdontologIa, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Marcelo T de Alvear 2142 (1122), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Grana, D R; Kokubu, G A [PatologIa I. Escuela de OdontologIa, Facultad de Medicina. Asociacion Odontologica Argentina-Universidad del Salvador, Tucuman 1845 (1050) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Luppo, M I; Mintzer, S; Vigna, G, E-mail: mbarreiro@mater.odon.uba.a, E-mail: dgrana@usal.edu.a, E-mail: luppo@cnea.gov.a, E-mail: vigna@cnea.gov.a [Departamento Materiales, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Gral Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San MartIn, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-04-15

    Titanium powder production by the hydride-dehydride method has been developed as a non-expensive process. In this work, commercially pure grade two Ti specimens were hydrogenated. The hydrided material was milled in a planetary mill. The hydrided titanium powder was dehydrided and then sieved to obtain a particle size between 37 and 125{mu}m in order to compare it with a commercial powder produced by chemical reduction with a particle size lower than 150{mu}m. Cylindrical green compacts were obtained by uniaxial pressing of the powders at 343 MPa and sintering in vacuum. The powders and the density of sintered compacts were characterized, the oxygen content was measured and in vivo tests were performed in the tibia bones of Wistar rats in order to evaluate their biocompatibility. No differences were observed between the materials which were produced either with powders obtained by the hydride-dehydride method or with commercial powders produced by chemical reduction regarding modifications in compactation, sintering and biological behaviour.

  4. Laboratory Rotational Spectroscopy of the Interstellar Diatomic Hydride Ion SH+ (X 3Σ-)

    Halfen, DeWayne; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2016-06-01

    Diatomic hydride are among the most common molecular species in the interstellar medium (ISM). The low molecular mass and thus moments of inertia cause their rotational spectra to lie principally in the submillimeter and far-infrared regions. Diatomic hydrides, both neutral (MH) and ionic (MH+) forms, are also basic building blocks of interstellar chemistry. In ionic form, they may be the “hidden” carriers of refractory elements in dense gas. They are therefore extremely good targets for space-borne and airborne platforms such as Herschel, SOFIA, and SAFIR. However, in order to detect these species in the ISM, their rotational spectra must first be measured in the laboratory. To date, there is very little high resolution data available for many hydride species, in particular the ionic form. Using submillimeter/THz direct absorption methods in the Ziurys laboratory, spectra of the interstellar diatomic hydride SH+ (X 3Σ-) have been recorded. Recent work has concerned measurement of all three fine structure components of the fundamental rotational transition N = 1 ← 0 in the range 345 - 683 GHz. SH+ was generated from H2S and argon in an AC discharge. The data have been analyzed, and spectroscopic constants for this species have been refined. SH+ is found in Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs) and X-ray Dominated Regions (XDRs) and is thought to trace energetic processes in the ISM. These current measurements confirm recent observations of this species at submillimeter/THz wavelengths with ALMA and other ground-based telescopes.

  5. Non-Precious Bimetallic Catalysts for Selective Dehydrogenation of an Organic Chemical Hydride System

    Shaikh Ali, Anaam

    2015-07-06

    Methylcyclohexane (MCH)-Toluene (TOL) chemical hydride cycles as a hydrogen carrier system is successful with the selective dehydrogenation reaction of MCH to TOL, which has been achieved only using precious Pt-based catalysts. Herein, we report improved selectivity using non-precious metal nickel-based bimetallic catalysts, where the second metal occupies the unselective step sites.

  6. Energy and diffusion of hydrogen atoms in titanium substituted vanadium hydrides from ab initio calculations

    The equilibrium lattice parameters, formation energy, and diffusion behavior of hydrogen atoms in vanadium hydrides with and without Ti substitution were calculated by ab initio calculations and quantum correction by zero point energy was achieved using phonon vibration calculations. The calculated formation energies indicated that Ti substitution induces instability in the vanadium hydrides and electron density calculations showed that hydrogen has strong electrochemical affinity with Ti. The diffusion behavior was examined by the nudged elastic band (NEB) method to investigate the transition states of the hydrides. It revealed that Ti substitution is shown to reduce the diffusion coefficient and this effect was decreased with increasing temperature. The results of this study are expected to provide useful guidelines for understanding hydrogen absorption and desorption properties of hydrogen storage materials. - Highlights: • Ti substitution expands any crystal structure of vanadium metal or hydride. • H atoms are repulsed by Ti atoms despite their high electrochemical affinity. • Strong electrochemical bonding between Ti and H lowers the formation energy. • Ti substitution reduces hydrogen diffusion by over 90% at room temperature

  7. Structure and magnetic properties of hydrides based on uranium bcc alloys

    Havela, L.; Paukov, M.; Tkach, I.; Matěj, Z.; Kim-Ngan, N.-T.H.; Andreev, Alexander V.

    Cambridge: Materials Research Society, 2014 - (Riseborough, P.; Soderlind, P.; Havela, L.; Lukens, W.; Migliori, A.) ISBN 978-1-60511-664-8. [Materials Research Society Spring Meeting 2014. San Francisco (US), 21.04.2014-25.04.2014] Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : uranium * hydrides * amorphous state * ferromagnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  8. Molecular early main group metal hydrides : synthetic challenge, structures and applications

    Harder, Sjoerd

    2012-01-01

    Within the general area of early main group metal chemistry, the controlled synthesis of well-defined metal hydride complexes is a rapidly developing research field. As group 1 and 2 metal complexes are generally highly dynamic and lattice energies for their [MH](infinity) and [MH2](infinity) salts

  9. Energy and diffusion of hydrogen atoms in titanium substituted vanadium hydrides from ab initio calculations

    Kim, Jiwoong, E-mail: jwk@kigam.re.kr; Yoo, Jeong-Hyun, E-mail: yjh0010@naver.com; Cho, Sung-Wook, E-mail: cho@kigam.re.kr

    2014-12-15

    The equilibrium lattice parameters, formation energy, and diffusion behavior of hydrogen atoms in vanadium hydrides with and without Ti substitution were calculated by ab initio calculations and quantum correction by zero point energy was achieved using phonon vibration calculations. The calculated formation energies indicated that Ti substitution induces instability in the vanadium hydrides and electron density calculations showed that hydrogen has strong electrochemical affinity with Ti. The diffusion behavior was examined by the nudged elastic band (NEB) method to investigate the transition states of the hydrides. It revealed that Ti substitution is shown to reduce the diffusion coefficient and this effect was decreased with increasing temperature. The results of this study are expected to provide useful guidelines for understanding hydrogen absorption and desorption properties of hydrogen storage materials. - Highlights: • Ti substitution expands any crystal structure of vanadium metal or hydride. • H atoms are repulsed by Ti atoms despite their high electrochemical affinity. • Strong electrochemical bonding between Ti and H lowers the formation energy. • Ti substitution reduces hydrogen diffusion by over 90% at room temperature.

  10. Using first principles calculations to identify new destabilized metal hydride reactions for reversible hydrogen storage.

    Alapati, Sudhakar V; Karl Johnson, J; Sholl, David S

    2007-03-28

    Hydrides of period 2 and 3 elements are promising candidates for hydrogen storage, but typically have heats of reaction that are too high to be of use for fuel cell vehicles. Recent experimental work has focused on destabilizing metal hydrides through mixing metal hydrides with other compounds. A very large number of possible destabilized metal hydride reaction schemes exist, but the thermodynamic data required to assess the enthalpies of these reactions are not available in many cases. We have used density functional theory calculations to predict the reaction enthalpies for more than 300 destabilization reactions that have not previously been reported. The large majority of these reactions are predicted not to be useful for reversible hydrogen storage, having calculated reaction enthalpies that are either too high or too low, and hence these reactions need not be investigated experimentally. Our calculations also identify multiple promising reactions that have large enough hydrogen storage capacities to be useful in practical applications and have reaction thermodynamics that appear to be suitable for use in fuel cell vehicles and are therefore promising candidates for experimental work. PMID:17356751

  11. Structural stability of complex hydrides LiBH4 revisited

    Lodziana, Zbigniew; Vegge, Tejs

    2004-01-01

    A systematic approach to study the phase stability of LiBH4 based on ab initio calculations is presented. Three thermodynamically stable phases are identified and a new phase of Cc symmetry is proposed for the first time for a complex hydride. The x-ray diffraction pattern and vibrational spectra...

  12. Fabrication and test of thin double-layered annulus metal hydride bed

    Metal hydride bed for the storage and delivery of tritium is one of the essential components of tokamak fuel cycle. For the development of metal hydride bed, rapid delivery/recovery rate according to the tokamak operation scenario and accurate and rapid measurement of tritium inventory are major concerns. It has to store the tritium safely and satisfy the requirements of the facility where metal hydride bed is installed. To fulfill these requirements, we developed a thin double-layered annulus metal hydride bed. A mock-up with the capacity of 70 g tritium storage (1250 g ZrCo) is fabricated. Using hydrogen gas, the recovery and delivery performance during absorption or desorption process is tested. With 7.5 mole of H2 gas, the recovery rate of 72.5 Pa m3/s for 90% absorption and the delivery rate of 15.6 Pa m3/s for 90% desorption is achieved. The thermal insulation test and tritium inventory measurement test using in-bed gas flowing calorimetry are also performed. It took less than 24 h for the in-bed calorimetry procedure to reach the steady state.

  13. Application of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis processes in chemistry and technology of hydrides

    Described is the procedure of obtaining hydrides through self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of refractory compounds from elements in burning regime. The flow chart of producing hydrides by this process is presented. The starting components are intimately mixed, compressed and burnt in a constant-pressure cylinder, in a hydrogen atmosphere, at a pressure of 3 to 100 atm. The reaction rates are determined by photorecording of the heat. In the Ti-B-H2 system, the reagent ratio B/Ti varies from 0.1 to 2. The combustion yields titanium hydrides for a charge with the B/Ti ratio of 0.1 to 0.5, and titanium borides containing from 1 to 0.2w.% of H2 for compositions with the B/Ti ratio of 0.6 to 2. The major factors governing the formation of the yield products have been revealed. When Ti and Zr burn in hydrogen, a change in pressure from 1 to 100 atm does not affect the hydrogen content in the hydride. When rare earth elements burn, an increase in pressure in the case of light lanthanides leads to a higher hydrogen content in the product. In the case of heavy lanthanides, a hexagonal trihydride phase appears along with the cubic dihydride phase. The percentage of hydrogen in the yield product is independent of the mass of the metal hydrogenated in the reactor

  14. Amorphous 5f ferromagnetic hydrides UH.sub.3./sub.Mo.sub.x./sub

    Tkach, I.; Kim-Ngan, N.-T.H.; Mašková, S.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Matěj, Z.; Havela, L.

    Vol. 126 č1. Warsaw : Polish Academy of Sciences, 2014, s. 292-293. ISSN 0587-4246. [Czech and Slovak Conference on Magnetism /15./. Košice (CZ), 17.06.2013-21.06.2013] Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : uranium * hydrides * amorphous state * ferromagnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  15. Slurry sampling hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry for arsenic speciation analysis in baby food

    Huber, C. S.; Vale, M. G. R.; Dessuy, M. B.; Svoboda, Milan; Dědina, Jiří

    Hungarian Chemical Society, 2016 - (Mihucz, V.). s. 165 ISBN 978-963-9970-65-6. [European Symposium on Atomic Spectrometry /ESAS 2016/ & Hungarian Spectrochemical Conference /59./. 31.03.2016-02.04.2016, Eger] Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : arsenic speciation * atomic spectrometry * hydride generation Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  16. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma atomizer for hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry-Performance evaluation for selenium

    Duben, Ondřej; Boušek, J.; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 111, SEP (2015), s. 57-63. ISSN 0584-8547 Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200311202 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : dielectric barrier discharge * hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry * selenium Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.176, year: 2014

  17. Achieving 100% Efficient Postcolumn Hydride Generation for As Speciation Analysis by Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 88, APR (2016), s. 4041-4047. ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : arsenic speciation analysis * hydride generation * HPLC Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.636, year: 2014

  18. A Prototype Four Inch Short Hydride (Fish) Bed As A Replacement Tritium Storage Bed

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities have used 1st generation (Gen1) metal hydride storage bed assemblies with process vessels (PVs) fabricated from 3 inch nominal pipe size (NPS) pipe to hold up to 12.6 kg of LaNi4.25Al0.75 metal hydride for tritium gas absorption, storage, and desorption for over 15 years. The 2nd generation (Gen2) of the bed design used the same NPS for the PV, but the added internal components produced a bed nominally 1.2 m long, and presented a significant challenge for heater cartridge replacement in a footprint limited glove-box. A prototype 3rd generation (Gen3) metal hydride storage bed has been designed and fabricated as a replacement candidate for the Gen2 storage bed. The prototype Gen3 bed uses a PV pipe diameter of 4 inch NPS so the bed length can be reduced below 0.7 m to facilitate heater cartridge replacement. For the Gen3 prototype bed, modeling results show increased absorption rates when using hydrides with lower absorption pressures. To improve absorption performance compared to the Gen2 beds, a LaNi4.15Al0.85 material was procured and processed to obtain the desired pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) properties. Other bed design improvements are also presented.

  19. The influence of stress state on the reorientation of hydrides in a zirconium alloy

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N.; Koss, Donald A.; Motta, Arthur T.

    2016-08-01

    Hydride reorientation can occur in spent nuclear fuel cladding when subjected to a tensile hoop stress above a threshold value during cooling. Because in these circumstances the cladding is under a multiaxial stress state, the effect of stress biaxiality on the threshold stress for hydride reorientation is investigated using hydrided CWSR Zircaloy-4 sheet specimens containing ∼180 wt ppm of hydrogen and subjected to a two-cycle thermo-mechanical treatment. The study is based on especially designed specimens within which the stress biaxiality ratios range from uniaxial (σ2/σ1 = 0) to "near-equibiaxial" tension (σ2/σ1 = 0.8). The threshold stress is determined by mapping finite element calculations of the principal stresses and of the stress biaxiality ratio onto the hydride microstructure obtained after the thermo-mechanical treatment. The results show that the threshold stress (maximum principal stress) decreases from 155 to 75 MPa as the stress biaxiality increases from uniaxial to "near-equibiaxial" tension.

  20. Achieving 100% Efficient Postcolumn Hydride Generation for As Speciation Analysis by Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 88, - (2016), s. 4041-4047. ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : arsenic speciation analysis * hydride generation * HPLC Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry , Separation Impact factor: 5.636, year: 2014

  1. The uranium-zirconium hydride pulsed reactor and its use in science and technology

    The performance of the first Chinese pulsed reactor is described briefly. The second reactor being built in China has a large prompt negative temperature coefficient of reactivity and uses uranium-zirconium hydride alloy as fuel element. Therefore its most outstanding features are its 'inherent safety' fairly high pulsed power capacity. The pulsed reactor is now widely used in science and technology. (orig.)

  2. Enhancement of Hydrogen Storage Behavior of Complex Hydrides via Bimetallic Nanocatalysts Doping

    Prakash C. Sharma

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pristine complex quaternary hydride (LiBH4/2LiNH2 and its destabilized counterpart (LiBH4/2LiNH2/nanoMgH2 have recently shown promising reversible hydrogen storage capacity under moderate operating conditions. The destabilization of complex hydride via nanocrystalline MgH2 apparently lowers the thermodynamic heat values and thus enhances the reversible hydrogen storage behavior at moderate temperatures. However, the kinetics of these materials is rather low and needs to be improved for on-board vehicular applications. Nanocatalyst additives such as nano Ni, nano Fe, nano Co, nano Mn and nano Cu at low concentrations on the complex hydride host structures have demonstrated a reduction in the decomposition temperature and overall increase in the hydrogen desorption reaction rates. Bi-metallic nanocatalysts such as the combination of nano Fe and nano Ni have shown further pronounced kinetics enhancement in comparison to their individual counterparts. Additionally, the vital advantage of using bi-metallic nanocatalysts is to enable the synergistic effects and characteristics of the two transitional nanometal species on the host hydride matrix for the optimized hydrogen storage behavior.

  3. Investigations of the structural stability of metal hydride composites by in-situ neutron imaging

    Herbrig, Kai; Pohlmann, Carsten; Gondek, Łukasz; Figiel, Henryk; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, André; Manke, Ingo; Banhart, John; Kieback, Bernd; Röntzsch, Lars

    2015-10-01

    Metal hydride composites (MHC) with expanded natural graphite (ENG) exhibiting enhanced thermal conductivity and reduced porosity compared to metal hydride powders can enable a reversible, compact and safe way for hydrogen storage. In this study, neutron imaging during cyclic hydrogenation was utilized to investigate the structural stability and the spatial-temporal hydrogen concentration of application-oriented MHC with 40 mm in diameter compared to a loose metal hydride powder. In particular, swelling and shrinking effects of a radially confined MHC which could freely expand upwards were studied. It was found that the loose powder bed was easily torn apart during dehydrogenation, which leads to increased thermal resistance within the hydride bed. In contrast, the thermal resistance between MHC and container wall was minimized since the initial gap closes during initial hydrogenation and does not reopen thereafter. Further cyclic hydrogenation caused MHC volume changes, i.e. an almost reversible swelling/shrinking (so-called "MHC breathing"). Moreover, neutron imaging allowed for the observation of reaction fronts within the MHC and the powder bed that are governed by the heat transfer.

  4. Reproduction in laboratory of the morphology distribution and orientation of hydrides in different stages fuel cycle; Reproduccion en laboratorio de la morfologia, distribucion y orientacion de hidruros en distintas etapas del ciclo de combustible

    Martin-Rengel, M. A.; Gomez, F. J.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the experimental techniques employed to reproduce in the laboratory the distribution, morphology and orientation of the hydrides during the different steps of the nuclear fuel cycle are reported. A cathodic charging technique was employed to produce ZIRLO cladding samples with an homogeneous distribution of hydrides and concentrations of 150, 250, 500, 1200 and 2000 ppm of hydrogen. The treatments developed to produce radial hydride reorientation, hydride blisters and a peripheral rim of hydrides are described.

  5. Numerical study of hydrogen purification using metal hydride reactor with aluminium foam

    The present paper describes a numerical study of heat and mass transfer processes in a metal hydride reactor for hydrogen purification with aluminium foam. The mathematical model, which was used previously for numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer processes in different types of metal hydride reactors, was modified for a reactor with aluminium foam. To validate the thermal equilibrium between the aluminium foam and metal hydride, pore-scale modelling was performed. In the case of pure hydrogen sorption, the model was validated by a comparison with experimental data; good agreement for sorption dynamics was obtained. The effects of various parameters of the pressure swing absorption method on the effectiveness of metal hydride systems for hydrogen purification were studied. The obtained results show that the use of aluminium foam enhances intensity of heat and mass transfer and consequently decreases the time required for hydrogen purification (up to two times) compared to a case without aluminium foam, while the volumetric capacity of the system is reduced slightly (9%). It is shown that pressure swing absorption method with fixed time interval between purges and the method with fixed interval of the fraction changing of the transformed material between purges provide a similar performance; in the second case the hydrogen recovery ratio remains constant during the hydrogen purification process. - Highlights: • The H2 purification process in metal hydride reactors was modelled. • A PSA-like method of H2 purification was considered. • The use of aluminium foam improves the time required for H2 sorption. • The effects of the various parameters on the performance were studied

  6. Optimal design of metal hydride reactors based on CFD–Taguchi combined method

    Highlights: ► A 3D CFD model was established for metal hydride reactors. ► The CFD–Taguchi method was used to optimize the structure parameters of the reactors. ► The reactor performance is most sensitive to the number of heat exchanger tubes. ► The CFD–Taguchi method is found effective to search for the optimum design scheme. - Abstract: In this paper, Taguchi method, an optimization procedure successfully applied in many fields, was used to optimize the design parameters of the metal hydride thermal energy storage reactors. The performance of metal hydride reactors was evaluated by numerical simulations based on an established 3D CFD model. The parameters under investigation were the number of heat exchanger tubes (N), the heat exchanger tube diameter (do) and the heat exchanger tube pitch (S), all of which involved three levels. The optimization objective was to maximize the average heat storage rate per unit mass (Q.ave) of the metal hydride thermal energy storage reactors. Performance statistics with regard to each parameter was obtained. The analysis results indicated that the most important parameter affecting Q.ave was the number of heat exchanger tubes, followed by the heat exchanger tube diameter. The optimal conditions for the metal hydride reactor were determined by the CFD–Taguchi combined method. The optimal parameters of the reactor were given as following: N was 10, S was 18 mm and do was 8 mm, and accordingly the maximum value of Q.ave was 3.287 W kg−1.

  7. Development of a metal hydride refrigeration system as an exhaust gas-driven automobile air conditioner

    Qin, Feng; Chen, Jiangping; Chen, Zhijiu [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Lu, Manqi; Yang, Ke [Engineering Center, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110016 (China); Zhou, Yimin [Research Center, Zhejiang Yinlun Machinery Co. Ltd., Tiantai County, Zhejiang Province 317200 (China)

    2007-10-15

    Aiming at developing exhaust gas-driven automobile air conditioners, two types of systems varying in heat carriers were preliminarily designed. A new hydride pair LaNi{sub 4.61}Mn{sub 0.26}Al{sub 0.13}/La{sub 0.6}Y{sub 0.4}Ni{sub 4.8}Mn{sub 0.2} was developed working at 120-200 C/20-50 C/-10-0 C. P-C isotherms and reaction kinetics were tested. Reaction enthalpy, entropy and theoretical cycling coefficient of performance (COP) were deducted from Van't-Hoff diagram. Test results showed that the hydride pair has flat plateau slopes, fast reaction dynamics and small hystereses; the reaction enthalpy of the refrigeration hydride is -27.1 kJ/mol H{sub 2} and system theoretical COP is 0.711. Mean particle sizes during cycles were verified to be an intrinsic property affected by constitution, heat treatment and cycle numbers rather than initial grain sizes. Based on this work pair, cylindrical reactors were designed and a function proving metal hydride intermittent refrigeration system was constructed with heat conducting oil as heat source and water as heat sink. The reactor equivalent thermal conductivity is merely 1.3 W/(m K), which still has not meet practical requirement. Intermittent refrigeration cycles were achieved and the average cooling power is 84.6 W at 150 C/30 C/0 C with COP being 0.26. The regulations of cycling performance and minimum refrigeration temperature (MRT) were determined by altering heat source temperature. Results showed that cooling power and system COP increase while MRT decreases with the growth of heat source temperature. This study develops a new hydride pair and confirms its application in automobile refrigeration systems, while their heat transfer properties still need to be improved for better performance. (author)

  8. Advanced chemical hydride-based hydrogen generation/storage system for fuel cell vehicles

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J. [Thermo Power Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Because of the inherent advantages of high efficiency, environmental acceptability, and high modularity, fuel cells are potentially attractive power supplies. Worldwide concerns over clean environments have revitalized research efforts on developing fuel cell vehicles (FCV). As a result of intensive research efforts, most of the subsystem technology for FCV`s are currently well established. These include: high power density PEM fuel cells, control systems, thermal management technology, and secondary power sources for hybrid operation. For mobile applications, however, supply of hydrogen or fuel for fuel cell operation poses a significant logistic problem. To supply high purity hydrogen for FCV operation, Thermo Power`s Advanced Technology Group is developing an advanced hydrogen storage technology. In this approach, a metal hydride/organic slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. At the point of use, high purity hydrogen will be produced by reacting the metal hydride/organic slurry with water. In addition, Thermo Power has conceived the paths for recovery and regeneration of the spent hydride (practically metal hydroxide). The fluid-like nature of the spent hydride/organic slurry will provide a unique opportunity for pumping, transporting, and storing these materials. The final product of the program will be a user-friendly and relatively high energy storage density hydrogen supply system for fuel cell operation. In addition, the spent hydride can relatively easily be collected at the pumping station and regenerated utilizing renewable sources, such as biomass, natural, or coal, at the central processing plants. Therefore, the entire process will be economically favorable and environmentally friendly.

  9. The hydride anion in an extended transition metal oxide array: LaSrCoO3H0.7.

    Hayward, M A; Cussen, E J; Claridge, J B; Bieringer, M; Rosseinsky, M J; Kiely, C J; Blundell, S J; Marshall, I M; Pratt, F L

    2002-03-01

    We present the synthesis and structural characterization of a transition metal oxide hydride, LaSrCoO3H0.7, which adopts an unprecedented structure in which oxide chains are bridged by hydride anions to form a two-dimensional extended network. The metal centers are strongly coupled by their bonding with both oxide and hydride ligands to produce magnetic ordering at temperatures up to at least 350 kelvin. The synthetic route is sufficiently general to allow the prediction of a new class of transition metal--containing electronic and magnetic materials. PMID:11884751

  10. Synthesis and characterisation of the nanostructured magnesium-lanthanum-nickel alloys for Ni-metal hydride battery applications

    Holm, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Affordable price, high abundance of magnesium and high densities of hydrogenin the Mg-based hydrides attract interest to these hydrides tailored for hydrogenand energy storage applications. Ternary La-Mg-Ni hydrogen storage alloys withcomposition La3-xMgxNi9 (x = 0.8-1.2) form a new class of the materials for thenegative electrodes in Ni-Metal Hydride (MH) batteries. The electrochemical dischargecapacity of such alloys reaches 400 mAh/g which is 25 % greater than thatof the commercial AB5-typ...

  11. Poisoning Experiments Aimed at Discriminating Active and Less-Active Sites of Silica-Supported Tantalum Hydride for Alkane Metathesis

    Saggio, Guillaume

    2010-10-04

    Only 50% of the silica-supported tantalum hydride sites are active in the metathesis of propane. Indeed, more than 45% of the tantalum hydride can be eliminated by a selective oxygen poisoning of inactive sites with no significant decrease in the global turnover. Conversely, cyclopentane induces no such selective poisoning. Hence, the active tantalum hydride sites that show greater resistance to oxygen poisoning correspond to the νTa-H bands of higher wavenumbers, particularly that at 1860cm-1. These active tantalum hydride sites should correspond to tris- or monohydride species relatively far from silica surface oxygen atoms. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Effect of delivery condition on desorption rate of ZrCo metal hydride bed for fusion fuel cycle

    Kang, H.G.; Yun, S.H.; Chung, D.; Oh, Y.H.; Chang, M.H.; Cho, S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, K.M. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    For the safety of fusion fuel cycle, hydrogen isotope gases including tritium are stored as metal hydride form. To satisfy fueling requirement of fusion machine, rapid delivery from metal hydride bed is one of major factors for the development of tritium storage and delivery system. Desorption from metal hydride depends on the operation scenario by pressure and temperature control of the bed. The effect of operation scenario and pump performance on desorption rate of metal hydride bed was experimentally investigated using ZrCo bed. The results showed that the condition of pre-heating scenario before actual delivery of gas affected the delivery performance. Different pumps were connected to desorption line from bed and the effect of pump capacity on desorption rate were also found to be significant. (authors)

  13. Hydrophilic pyrazine-based phosphane ligands: synthesis and application in asymmetric hydride transfer and H2-hydrogenation of acetophenone

    Nikishkin, N.; Huskens, J.; Verboom, W.

    2013-01-01

    Pyrazine-based hydrophilic phosphanes are useful ligands for the ruthenium- and rhodium-catalyzed hydrogenations of acetophenone under hydride transfer and dihydrogen conditions. The effect of alcohol additives on the catalytic, enantioselective aqueous hydrogenation of acetophenone is examined with

  14. Effects of Hydride Precipitation on the Stress Developed in ZrO2 Thin Film

    It has been reported that the effect of thermal redistribution of hydrides across the metal-oxide interface, coupled with thermal feedback on the metal-oxide interface, is a dominating factor in the accelerated oxidation in zirconium alloys cladding PWR fuel. Especially the precipitated and redistributed hydrides are known to relieve the stress imposed onto the metal/oxide interface during the waterside corrosion of zirconium alloys. Without the hydrides the stress exceeds the critical value of 3 GPa which induce the tetragonal ZrO2 phase formation. Therefore, in this study enhanced oxidation due to the precipitated hydrides are experimentally confirmed and stress on the interface is measured with steam beam apparatus in order to support hypothesis hydrides precipitates relieve the stress. In steam beam apparatus, Oxidation reaction occurs only the surface exposed to the steam beam. In order to avoid the oxidation of the other side of specimen, whole chamber is evacuated down to ultra-high vacuum (down to 10-5 Torr). The oxide thickness is measured with weight gain measurement and the curvature of the single side oxidized specimen is measured with spherometer. Specimen is thin film zirconium foil whose thickness is 40μm and diameter is 20mm. Only single surface of specimen exposed to the steam beam oxidizes at 400 .deg. C which is attained by halogen lamp. Basically the measurement technique used in this study is based on the curvature build-up during the single side oxidation process. The stress build-up can be directly evaluated according to the Stoney's formula. Measured stress from the curvature estimation are plotted as a function of thin oxide film thickness. And atmospheric oxidation was also carried out in the electric furnace using the specimen holder, which is designed to protect the other side oxidation of specimen. The stress in the oxide increases as the thickness decreases and the highest stress measured in this study is 5.2 GPa which is higher than

  15. Ultrapure hydrogen thermal compressor based on metal hydrides for fuel cells and hybrid vehicles

    Full text: In hydrogen economy, efficient compressors are indispensable elements in the storage, transport and distribution of the produced hydrogen. Energetic efficient technologies can contribute to H2 pipelines transport to the point of use and to distribute H2 by refuelling stations. Characteristic for metal hydrides systems is the wide area of possibilities to absorb hydrogen at low pressure from any source of hydrogen, to store and deliver it hydrogen at high pressure (compression ratio more than 30). On the basis of innovative concepts and advanced materials for H2 storage/compression (and fast thermal transfer), a fast mass (H2) and heat transfer unit will be developed suitable to be integrated in a 3 stage thermal compressor. Metal hydrides used for a three stage hydrogen compression system must have different equilibrium pressures, namely: for stage 1, low pressure H2 absorption and resistant to poisoning with impurities of hydrogen, for stage 2, medium pressure H2 absorption and for stage 3, high pressure hydrogen delivery (120 bar). In the case of compression device based on metallic hydrides the most important properties are the hydrogen absorption/desorption rate, a smaller process enthalpy and a great structural stability on long term hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. These properties require metal hydrides with large differences between the hydrogen absorption and desorption pressures at equilibrium, within a rather small temperature range. The main goal of this work is to search and develop metal hydride integrated systems for hydrogen purification, storage and compression. After a careful screening three hydrogen absorbing alloys will be selected. After selection, the work up of the alloys composition on the bases of detailed solid state studies, new multi-component alloys will be developed, with suitable thermodynamic and kinetic properties for a hydrogen compressor. The results of the study are the following: new types of hydrogen

  16. Magnesium based metal hydride reactor incorporating helical coil heat exchanger: Simulation study and optimal design

    Highlights: • A new 3D modeling for Mg-based metal hydride reactor is proposed. • Hydriding kinetics of Mg-based alloys is modeled based on the experimental data. • Helical coil heat exchanger has better heat transfer effect than traditional one. • The reactor with smaller non-dimensional pitch has favorable performance. - Abstract: Magnesium based metal hydride has been viewed as one of the most commonly-used materials in the practical applications of hydrogen energy systems. The heat and mass transfer processes have significant effects on the hydrogen storage performance of magnesium based metal hydride reactors. Incorporating helical coil heat exchanger into the reactor could be an effective way to improve the performance of heat and mass transfer. In this work, a new three-dimensional model for magnesium based metal hydride reactor with helical coil heat exchanger is proposed and solved using the commercial software package COMSOL Multiphysics V3.5a. The comparison of hydrogen storage behaviors between the reactors incorporating the traditional straight pipe and new helical coil heat exchangers is firstly conducted based on the numerical simulation. The comparison results show that the helical coil heat exchanger has better effect on improving the characteristics of reactor than the straight pipe heat exchanger due to its secondary circulation. The effects of key parameters, including the initial conditions, heat transfer coefficients of heat transfer fluid and helical coil geometry on the characteristics of reactor with the helical coil heat exchanger are also analyzed systematically. It is discovered that larger initial hydrogen pressure and lower initial temperature are beneficial to the improvement of hydrogen absorption kinetics, because of the greater driving force for the hydriding reaction. The results of optimal design suggest that smaller non-dimensional pitch, the ratio of helical pitch to helical diameter, improves the heat and mass transfer

  17. Development of a direct hydride generation nebulizer for the determination of selenium by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    A study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a new direct hydride generation nebulizer system for determination of hydride forming elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. This system was designed and optimized to obtain the highest sensitivity. Several experimental designs were used for these purposes. To optimize the individual parameters of the system, and to study the interaction between these parameters for both direct hydride generation nebulizers, a central composite orthogonal design with eight factors was set up. Significant behavioral differences were observed in the two direct hydride generation nebulizers studied. Finally, a 70 μm gas orifice nebulizer exhibits a better detection limit than the 120 μm nebulizer. Generally, for determination of selenium, this new direct hydride generation nebulizer system exhibits a linear dynamic range and detection limit (3σb) of 3 orders of magnitude and 0.2 μg l-1 for selenium, respectively. This new hydride generator is much simpler system that conventional hydride generation systems, which does not need to be changed to work in normal mode with the inductively coupled plasma, since this system may be used for hydride forming elements and those that do not form them. It produces a rapid response with low memory effect. It reduces the interference level of Ni, Co and Cu to 600, 500 and 5 mg l-1, respectively. The accuracy of the system was verified by the determination of selenium in several standard reference materials of ambient, food and clinical sample matrices. No statistically significant differences (95 confidence level) were obtained between our method and the reference values

  18. Angle-dependent hard X-ray photoemission study of Nb hydride formation in high-pressure supercritical water

    Soda, Kazuo, E-mail: j45880a@cc.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kondo, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Kanta; Kato, Masahiko [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Shiraki, Tatsuhito; Niwa, Ken; Kusaba, Keiji; Hasegawa, Masashi [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Xeniya, Kozina; Ikenaga, Eiji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nb hydrides in 10-GPa supercritical water are studied by photoelectron spectroscopy. • The hydride components of the Nb 3d core-level spectra are increased with the depth. • The bulk valence-band spectrum shows a split band due to the Nb–H bond formation. • The hydrides are formed in the bulk and their surfaces are covered with Nb oxides. - Abstract: Nb hydrides formation in 10-GPa supercritical water has been investigated by angle-dependent micro-beam hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. In the Nb 3d core-level spectra, Nb hydride components are found in the slightly high binding energy side of the metallic components, and the oxide ones are observed even though little oxides are recognized in X-ray diffraction patterns. Obtained emission-angle dependence of the Nb 3d core-level spectra of Nb hydride specimens shows that the Nb hydride components increase with the emission angle decreased i.e. the sampling depth increased, while the oxide ones decrease. The bulk valence-band spectrum is obtained by decomposing the measured valence-band spectra into a bulk and surface components with use of the emission-angle dependence of the core-level and valence-band spectra; it consists of two bands. This implies the Nb–H chemical bond formation and Nb in an oxidation state, consistent with reported band structure calculations and the observed core-level chemical shifts. Thus it is confirmed by valence-band and core-level photoelectron spectroscopy that the Nb hydrides are formed inside the specimen, irrespective to the well-known high oxidation ability of supercritical water.

  19. Structural and mechanical properties of alkali hydrides investigated by the first-principles calculations and principal component analysis

    Settouti, Nadera; Aourag, Hafid

    2016-08-01

    The structural and mechanical properties of alkali hydrides (LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH) were investigated via first-principles calculations which cover the optimized structural parameters. The density functional theory in combination with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) were used in this study. From the present study, one could note that alkali hydrides are brittle materials and mechanically stable. It was found that stiffness and shear resistance are greater in LiH than in other hydrides. It is more brittle in nature, and comparatively harder than the other materials under study; it also presents a high degree of anisotropy. The results were then investigated and analyzed with principal component analysis (PCA), which is one of the most common techniques in multivariate analysis, was used to explore the correlations among material properties of alkali hydrides and to study their trends. The alkali hydrides obtained by the first-principles calculations were also compared with the alkaline-earth metal hydrides (BeH2, MgH2, CaH2, SrH2, and BaH2) and discussed in this work.

  20. Study of hydride re orientation and mechanical property to evaluate spent fuel integrity during interim Dry storage

    The operating condition of modern PWRs is getting severer for the nuclear fuel cladding to meet the needs for an economical power generation. As the operating condition, oxide and the subsequent hydrogen caused by the waterside corrosion are generated in the cladding, which decreases the initial ductility of the cladding. Such an oxide and hydrogen act as a negative effect on the cladding safety under the Back End Fuel Cycle. In Korea, 23 nuclear power plants are in operation and lots of spent fuels are on the onsite storage. The onsite storage capacity in Korea is supposed to be full around at the year of 2016 and interim storage facilities could be considered to be constructed before 2016. Therefore, the dry storage concept is becoming a major technical consideration for intermediate spent fuel storage at present. In relation to this, studies on the effects of interim dry storage conditions to spent fuel integrity have recently been initiated in Korea. During the interim dry storage condition, the fuel cladding failure is affected by oxide thickness, hydride content and hydride re-orientation, among that the most important factor of the fuel cladding failure is the hydride reorientation, because the hydride reorientation behavior is shown by decrease cladding temperature in dry storage. however, the hydride reorientation mechanism was not clearly defined. To achieve this, it should be secured that the base technology for integrity assessment in dry storage. In this study, the hydride re orientation and its effect on the mechanical property of fuel cladding was studied

  1. Fast, quantitative, and nondestructive evaluation of hydrided LWR fuel cladding by small angle incoherent neutron scattering of hydrogen

    A nondestructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the uptake of hydrogen and the distribution of hydride precipitates in light water reactor (LWR) fuel cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding used in commercial LWRs was used to produce hydrided specimens. The hydriding apparatus consists of a closed stainless-steel vessel that contains Zr alloy specimens and hydrogen gas. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentrations were selected for the neutron study. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distribution of circumferential hydrides across the wall thickness. Small angle neutron incoherent scattering was performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Our study demonstrates that the hydrogen in commercial Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately in minutes by this nondestructive method over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations from a very small amount (≈20 ppm) to over 1000 ppm. The hydrogen distribution in a tube sample was obtained by scaling the neutron scattering rate with a factor determined by a calibration process using standard, destructive direct chemical analysis methods on the specimens. This scale factor can be used in future tests with unknown hydrogen concentrations, thus providing a nondestructive method for determining absolute hydrogen concentrations

  2. Investigation of hydride powder bed swelling and shrinking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles under different compressive stresses

    Highlights: ► Decrepitation creates hydride bed densification while cycling under hydrogen. ► Axial compressive stress decreases the ability of a hydride bed to change its volume. ► Internal friction increases along with cycles. ► Friction of the hydride with the side walls increases the powder density. -- Abstract: The solid storage through hydrides allows good compactness and safety due to low pressure. Intermetallic hydride materials have a significant volume increase and decrease (10–35%) upon absorption/desorption respectively. The measurement of the mechanical behavior of these materials is of major interest for the design of H2 storage tanks. In the present work, Ti–V–Cr hydride powder beds underwent hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles in a cylindrical instrumented cell with a mobile upper piston. Different compressive stresses have been applied by the piston and a spring on the powder bed. The variations of samples volume were measured upon cycling and analyzed while considering the mechanical behavior of this granular medium. In particular, part of the volume change is balanced by the variation of the intergranular porosity of the granular media. Changing upper stress reveals the combined importance of the powder sample friction on the cell side walls, and of internal friction strongly influenced by the grains interlocking in the cyclic powder densification process observed

  3. Technical challenges and future direction for high-efficiency metal hydride thermal energy storage systems

    Ward, Patrick A.; Corgnale, Claudio; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Motyka, Theodore; Hardy, Bruce; Sheppard, Drew; Buckley, Craig; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in thermal energy storage (TES) systems for concentrated solar power (CSP) plants, which allow for continuous operation when sunlight is unavailable. Thermochemical energy storage materials have the advantage of much higher energy densities than latent or sensible heat materials. Furthermore, thermochemical energy storage systems based on metal hydrides have been gaining great interest for having the advantage of higher energy densities, better reversibility, and high enthalpies. However, in order to achieve higher efficiencies desired of a thermal storage system by the US Department of Energy, the system is required to operate at temperatures >600 °C. Operation at temperatures >600 °C presents challenges including material selection, hydrogen embrittlement and permeation of containment vessels, appropriate selection of heat transfer fluids, and cost. Herein, the technical difficulties and proposed solutions associated with the use of metal hydrides as TES materials in CSP applications are discussed and evaluated.

  4. Aluminum hydride as a hydrogen and energy storage material: Past, present and future

    Aluminum hydride (AlH3) and its associated compounds make up a fascinating class of materials that have motivated considerable scientific and technological research over the past 50 years. Due primarily to its high energy density, AlH3 has become a promising hydrogen and energy storage material that has been used (or proposed for use) as a rocket fuel, explosive, reducing agent and as a hydrogen source for portable fuel cells. This review covers the past, present and future research on aluminum hydride and includes the latest research developments on the synthesis of α-AlH3 and the other polymorphs (e.g., microcrystallization reaction, batch and continuous methods), crystallographic structures, thermodynamics and kinetics (e.g., as a function of crystallite size, catalysts and surface coatings), high-pressure hydrogenation experiments and possible regeneration routes.

  5. Development of a modular room-temperature hydride storage system for vehicular applications

    Capurso, Giovanni; Schiavo, Benedetto; Jepsen, Julian; Lozano, Gustavo; Metz, Oliver; Saccone, Adriana; De Negri, Serena; Bellosta von Colbe, José M.; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The subject of this paper concerns the development of a vehicular hydrogen tank system, using a commercial interstitial metal hydride as storage material. The design of the tank was intended to feed a fuel cell in a light prototype vehicle, and the chosen hydride material, Hydralloy C5 by GfE, was expected to be able to absorb and desorb hydrogen in a range of pressure suitable for this purpose. A systematic analysis of the material in laboratory scale allows an extrapolation of the thermodynamic and reaction kinetics data. The following development of the modular tank was done according to the requirements of the prototype vehicle propulsion system and led to promising intermediate results. The modular approach granted flexibility in the design, allowing both to reach carefully the design goals and to learn the limiting factors in the sorption process. Proper heat management and suitable equipment remain key factors in order to achieve the best performances.

  6. Neutral and Ionized Hydrides in Star-forming Regions -- Observations with Herschel/HIFI

    O. Benz, Arnold; Bruderer, Simon; F. van Dishoeck, Ewine;

    2013-01-01

    The cosmic abundance of hydrides depends critically on high-energy UV, X-ray, and particle irradiation. Here we study hydrides in star-forming regions where irradiation by the young stellar object can be substantial, and density and temperature can be much enhanced over interstellar values. Lines...... of OH, CH, NH, SH and their ions OH+, CH+, NH+, SH+, H2O+, and H3O+ were observed in star-forming regions by the HIFI spectrometer onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. Molecular column densities are derived from observed ground-state lines, models, or rotational diagrams. We report here on two...... including emission in the far UV (FUV, 6 -- 13.6 eV) irradiating the outflow walls that separate the outflowing gas and infalling envelope material. We confirm that the effect of FUV in two dimensional models with enlarged irradiated surfaces is clearly noticeable. A molecule that is very sensitive to FUV...

  7. Degradation Behavior of Electrochemical Performance of Sealed-Type Nickel/Metal Hydride Batteries

    李丽; 吴锋; 杨凯

    2003-01-01

    The degradation mechanism of electrochemical performance of sealed-type nickel/metal hydride batteries was investigated. The results indicate that the degradation behavior of Ni/MH battery is not only owing to the lack of electrolyte, but also the deterioration of the active materials on the positive and negative electrodes of Ni/MH batteries. Scanning electron micrographs (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser granularity analyses are presented. The particle pulverization and oxidation during charge/discharge are identified as the main causes for deterioration of the negative and positive electrode in nickel/metal hydride batteries, as well as the cross-section cracking of both anode and cathode.

  8. Electrochemical preconcentration and hydride generation methods for trace determination of selenium by atomic absorption spectrometry

    The use of atomic absorption spectrometry in combination with two different preconcentration/separation techniques for the determination of trace concentrations of selenium is described. Electrochemical preconcentration onto a platinum electrode with a subsequent atomization of selenium is discussed briefly. Several parameters are considered such as the presence of depolarizers, and the temperature of the electrolyzed solutions. Special attention is payed to the efficiency of the atomization step, and a method to improve this is proposed. Applications of the technique to real samples are also reported. Secondly, the separation of the selenium as the volatile selenium hydride from the sample solution is considered. Several papers in this thesis deal with commonly occurring interferants as nickel and copper and with ways of minimizing or avoiding the interferring effects, whereas other papers relate to more theoretical aspects of the hydride generation process. New methods for the determination of selenium in technical samples with high contents of nickel and copper are also presented

  9. Use of Solid Hydride Fuel for Improved long-Life LWR Core Designs

    Greenspan, E

    2006-04-30

    The primary objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of improving the performance of PWR and BWR cores by using solid hydride fuels instead of the commonly used oxide fuel. The primary measure of performance considered is the bus-bar cost of electricity (COE). Additional performance measures considered are safety, fuel bundle design simplicity – in particular for BWR’s, and plutonium incineration capability. It was found that hydride fuel can safely operate in PWR’s and BWR’s without restricting the linear heat generation rate of these reactors relative to that attainable with oxide fuel. A couple of promising applications of hydride fuel in PWR’s and BWR’s were identified: (1) Eliminating dedicated water moderator volumes in BWR cores thus enabling to significantly increase the cooled fuel rods surface area as well as the coolant flow cross section area in a given volume fuel bundle while significantly reducing the heterogeneity of BWR fuel bundles thus achieving flatter pin-by-pin power distribution. The net result is a possibility to significantly increase the core power density – on the order of 30% and, possibly, more, while greatly simplifying the fuel bundle design. Implementation of the above modifications is, though, not straightforward; it requires a design of completely different control system that could probably be implemented only in newly designed plants. It also requires increasing the coolant pressure drop across the core. (2) Recycling plutonium in PWR’s more effectively than is possible with oxide fuel by virtue of a couple of unique features of hydride fuel – reduced inventory of U-238 and increased inventory of hydrogen. As a result, the hydride fuelled core achieves nearly double the average discharge burnup and the fraction of the loaded Pu it incinerates in one pass is double that of the MOX fuel. The fissile fraction of the Pu in the discharged hydride fuel is only ~2/3 that of the MOX fuel and the

  10. Rietveld analysis of neutron powder diffraction of Mg6Pd alloy at various hydriding stages

    The evolution of the crystal structure of Mg6Pd alloy, synthesized by ball milling, was investigated by simultaneous Rietveld refinement of neutron and X-ray powder diffraction. Samples with different deuterium contents were measured, corresponding to reaction end-products of proposed hydrogenation step. After full hydrogenation, Mg6Pd alloy transforms to MgPd alloy and MgD2. Increases in lattice parameters of MgPd alloy agrees well with measured hydrogen capacities. There are some evidences that at each hydrogenation step in magnesium alloys, magnesium atoms with high values of thermal parameters are the ones that will form magnesium hydride upon hydrogenation. Magnesium hydride phases presented a high level of strain which could be related to the important hysteresis in the pressure-composition isotherm curve.

  11. Delayed hydride cracking of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy under thermal cycles

    The present paper reports the experimental results obtained in determining a crack propagation rate, when the Zr-2.5%Nb DHC mechanism starts, accompanied by mechanical stress and by thermal cycling. The mechanical stress and thermal ramps to which the tested samples have been submitted harmonized with the conditions that the pressure tube withstands during in-reactor operation. We had in view the simulation of startup conditions - operation under normal conditions - steady-state, situations where hydrides precipitated in the alloy undertake a dissolving process - precipitation, cycle reproduced at every thermal ramp. At the same time, the reorientation of hydrides at the crack tip was emphasized: this event speeds up the mechanism of DHC-type cracks propagation. (author)

  12. Delayed hydride cracking in Zr-2.5% wt Nb pressure tubes

    During service, pressure tubes of CANDU nuclear power reactor are prone to suffer crack growth by delayed hydride cracking (DHC). For a given H2 plus D2 concentration there is a critical temperature (Tc) below which DHC may occur. In this work, Tc was measured for CCT specimens cut from Zr-2.5 Wt % Nb pressure tubes. Hydrogen was added to the specimens to get concentrations of 40, 59 and 72 ppm. It was found that Tc is higher than the corresponding precipitation temperature. The axial crack velocity (Vp) was also measured. Decreasing temperature from Tc makes Vp increase until a maximum is attained at a temperature close to precipitation temperature. At lower temperatures, in the presence of precipitated hydrides, decreasing temperature implies lower velocities, following an Arrhenius law: Vp=Aexp(-Q/RT), with an activation energy Q= 66 KJ/mol K. (author)

  13. Metal hydrides used as negative electrode materials for Li-ion batteries

    Sartori, Sabrina; Cuevas, Fermin; Latroche, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Energy is a key issue for future generation. Researches are conducted worldwide to develop new efficient means for energy conversion and storage. Electrochemical storage is foreseen as an efficient way to handle intermittent renewable energy production. The most advanced batteries are nowadays based on lithium-ion technology though their specific capacities should be significantly increased to bring solution to mass storage. Conversion reactions are one way to step forward larger capacities at the anode. We here review the possibility to use metallic or complex hydrides as negative electrode using conversion reaction of hydride with lithium. Moreover, promising alloying of lithium with the metallic species might provide additional reversible capacities. Both binary and ternary systems are reviewed and results are compared in the frame of the electrochemical application.

  14. In-bed accountability of tritium in production scale metal hydride storage beds

    An 'in-bed accountability' (IBA) flowing gas calorimetric measurement method has been developed and implemented to eliminate the need to remove tritium from production scale metal hydride storage beds for inventory measurement purposes. Six-point tritium IBA calibration curves have been completed for two, 390 gram tritium metal hydride storage beds. The calibration curves for the two tritium beds are similar to those obtained from the 'cold' test program. Tritium inventory errors at the 95 percent confidence level ranged from ± 7.3 to 8.6 grams for the cold test results compared to ± 4.2 to 7.5 grams obtained for the two tritium calibrated beds. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. A dehydrogenation mechanism of metal hydrides based on interactions between Hdelta+ and H-.

    Lu, Jun; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2006-10-16

    This paper describes a reaction mechanism that explains the dehydrogenation reactions of alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydrides. These light metal hydrides, e.g., lithium-based compounds such as LiH, LiAlH4, and LiNH2, are the focus of intense research recently as the most promising candidate materials for on-board hydrogen storage applications. Although several interesting and promising reactions and materials have been reported, most of these reported reactions and materials have been discovered by empirical means because of a general lack of understanding of any underlying principles. This paper describes an understanding of the dehydrogenation reactions on the basis of the interaction between negatively charged hydrogen (H-, electron donor) and positively charged hydrogen (Hdelta+, electron acceptor) and experimental evidence that captures and explains many observations that have been reported to date. This reaction mechanism can be used as a guidance for screening new material systems for hydrogen storage. PMID:17029387

  16. Biological impact tests on complex hydrides used as hydrogen storage materials

    Tanaka, H.; Kiyobayashi, T.; Kuriyama, N. [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Tokoyoda, K. [R and D Center, Taiheiyo Cement Corporation, 2-4-2 Osaku, Sakura, Chiba 285-8655 (Japan); Matsumoto, M. [Materials Department, Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    The mutagenicity of a series of the light element hydrides (containing NaAlH{sub 4}, Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}, LiBH{sub 4}, etc.) was examined by evaluating the frequency of mutation in bacterial DNAs. Although some materials were suspected to be slightly mutagenic, their effect was much less malignant than that of well-known potent mutagens. The hydrides exhibited high cytotoxicity, rather than mutagenicity. A Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}-related material was also subjected to a series of toxicity tests on aqueous organisms, i.e., algae, water fleas and fish. The result suggests that the material is as toxic as alkaline metal hydroxides, such as NaOH and KOH. (author)

  17. Using magnetization measurements to detect small amounts of plutonium hydride formation in plutonium metal

    Kim, Jae Wook [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Mielke, Charles H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zapf, Vivien [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baiardo, Joseph P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mitchell, Jeremy N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Richmond, Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schwartz, Daniel S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mun, Eun D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Alice Iulia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-20

    We report the formation of plutonium hydride in 2 at % Ga-stabilized δ-Pu, with 1 atomic % H charging. We show that magnetization measurements are a sensitive, quantitative measure of ferromagnetic plutonium hydride against the nonmagnetic background of plutonium. It was previously shown that at low hydrogen concentrations, hydrogen forms super-abundant vacancy complexes with plutonium, resulting in a bulk lattice contraction. Here we use magnetization, X-ray and neutron diffraction measurements to show that in addition to forming vacancy complexes, at least 30% of the H atoms bond with Pu to precipitate PuHx, largely on the surface of the sample with x ~ 1.9. We observe magnetic hysteresis loops below 40 K with magnetic remanence, consistent with precipitates of ferromagnetic PuH1.9.

  18. Thermal and mechanical properties of hydrides of Zr–Hf alloys

    Polycrystalline bulk samples of δ-phase Hf hydrides with various Zr contents were prepared and their high-temperature stability and thermal and mechanical properties were investigated. The phase structure was examined between room temperature and 973 K using high-temperature X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric–differential thermal analysis. From room temperature to 673 K, the coefficient of linear thermal expansion, specific heat capacity, and thermal conductivity were evaluated. The Vickers hardness and sound velocity were measured at room temperature, and the elastic modulus was evaluated. The effect of the Zr content on the high-temperature stability and the thermal and mechanical properties of Hf hydrides was studied. (author)

  19. YNi and its hydrides: Phase stabilities, electronic structures and chemical bonding properties from first principles

    Matar, S.F., E-mail: matar@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France); Nakhl, M. [Universite Libanaise, Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique des Materiaux LCPM, Fanar (Lebanon); Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N. [Universite Saint-Esprit de Kaslik, Faculte des Sciences et de Genie Informatique, Jounieh (Lebanon); Chevalier, B. [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France)

    2010-11-25

    Graphical abstract: Base centered orthorhombic YNiH{sub X} structure. For x = 3, only H1 and H2 are present. Highest hydrogen content YNiH{sub 4} is obtained when H3 are added. - Abstract: Within density functional theory, establishing the equations of states of YNi in two different controversial structures in the literature, leads to determine the orthorhombic FeB-type as the ground state one with small energy difference. For YNiH{sub 3} and YNiH{sub 4} hydrides crystallizing in the orthorhombic CrB-type structure the geometry optimization and the ab initio determination of the H atomic positions show that the stability of hydrogen decreases from the tri- to the tetra- hydride. New states brought by hydrogen within the valence band lead to its broadening and to enhanced localization of metal density of states. The chemical bonding analysis shows a preferential Ni-H bonding versus Y-H.

  20. Analytic Force Field for Clusters and Nanoparticles of Aluminum and Its Hydride

    Zhang, Qingfan; Tang, Enoch; Xi, Yongjie; Han, Bo; Legenski, Nicole; Chalas, Guadalupe; Chan, Frankie; Cheng, Hansong; Forrey, Robert C.

    2014-06-01

    An analytic potential energy function is developed for simulating clusters and nanoparticles of aluminum and its hydride. An embedded-atom method is used which modulates the background electron density as a function of the number of nearest-neighbor atoms. The method is parametrized and tested using an extensive training set computed from first-principle density-functional theory. The potential energy function is found to be reliable for clusters of arbitrary size, shape, and composition ratio. The force field obtained from the analytic potential energy function is computationally efficient and well suited for simulating large systems of aluminum and aluminum hydride particles. A proposed molecular dynamics simulation related to hydrogen-storage technologies for onboard automotive applications is briefly discussed.