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Sample records for actinides combined estimation

  1. Actinide solubility in deep groundwaters - estimates for upper limits based on chemical equilibrium calculations

    A chemical equilibrium model is used to estimate maximum upper concentration limits for some actinides (Th, U, Np, Pu, Am) in groundwaters. Eh/pH diagrams for solubility isopleths, dominant dissolved species and limiting solids are constructed for fixed parameter sets including temperature, thermodynamic database, ionic strength and total concentrations of most important inorganic ligands (carbonate, fluoride, phosphate, sulphate, chloride). In order to assess conservative conditions, a reference water is defined with high ligand content and ionic strength, but without competing cations. In addition, actinide oxides and hydroxides are the only solid phases considered. Recommendations for 'safe' upper actinide solubility limits for deep groundwaters are derived from such diagrams, based on the predicted Eh/pH domain. The model results are validated as far as the scarce experimental data permit. (Auth.)

  2. Subsurface Biogeochemistry of Actinides

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Univ. Relations and Science Education; Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst.

    2016-06-29

    A major scientific challenge in environmental sciences is to identify the dominant processes controlling actinide transport in the environment. It is estimated that currently, over 2200 metric tons of plutonium (Pu) have been deposited in the subsurface worldwide, a number that increases yearly with additional spent nuclear fuel (Ewing et al., 2010). Plutonium has been shown to migrate on the scale of kilometers, giving way to a critical concern that the fundamental biogeochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface are not well understood (Kersting et al., 1999; Novikov et al., 2006; Santschi et al., 2002). Neptunium (Np) is less prevalent in the environment; however, it is predicted to be a significant long-term dose contributor in high-level nuclear waste. Our focus on Np chemistry in this Science Plan is intended to help formulate a better understanding of Pu redox transformations in the environment and clarify the differences between the two long-lived actinides. The research approach of our Science Plan combines (1) Fundamental Mechanistic Studies that identify and quantify biogeochemical processes that control actinide behavior in solution and on solids, (2) Field Integration Studies that investigate the transport characteristics of Pu and test our conceptual understanding of actinide transport, and (3) Actinide Research Capabilities that allow us to achieve the objectives of this Scientific Focus Area (SFA and provide new opportunities for advancing actinide environmental chemistry. These three Research Thrusts form the basis of our SFA Science Program (Figure 1).

  3. Actinide chemistry using singlet-paired coupled cluster and its combinations with density functionals

    Garza, Alejandro J; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2015-01-01

    Singlet-paired coupled cluster doubles (CCD0) is a simplification of CCD that relinquishes a fraction of dynamic correlation in order to be able to describe static correlation. Combinations of CCD0 with density functionals that recover specifically the dynamic correlation missing in the former have also been developed recently. Here, we assess the accuracy of CCD0 and CCD0+DFT (and variants of these using Brueckner orbitals) as compared to well-established quantum chemical methods for describing ground-state properties of singlet actinide molecules. The $f^0$ actinyl series (UO$_2^{2+}$, NpO$_2^{2+}$, PuO$_2^{2+}$), the isoelectronic NUN, and Thorium (ThO, ThO$^{2+}$) and Nobelium (NoO, NoO$_2$) oxides are studied.

  4. Combining theoretical chemistry and Xanes multi-edge experiments to probe actinide valence states

    Both structural and electronic properties of the actinide cations are of fundamental interest in order to describe the intramolecular interactions. The 5f and 6d orbitals are the first partially or totally vacant states of these elements and their properties reflect the nature of the actinide-ligand bond. Because of its chemical and orbital selectivities, XANES spectroscopy is useful to probe the actinides' frontier orbitals and then understand the cation reactivity toward chelating ligands. The actinide L3 edge contains structural information on the coordination polyhedron because of important scattering features. But very little electronic information can be extracted, due to the short core-hole lifetime, broadening the edge signal. On the other hand, the actinide M4,5 edges provide a better resolution and allow one to achieve electronic and structural information. Furthermore, coupling simulations of the experimental spectra and quantum chemical calculations lead to quantitative information such as the determination of the actinide coordination sphere and its effective charge. (authors)

  5. Combining theoretical chemistry and Xanes multi-edge experiments to probe actinide valence states

    Fillaux, C.; Guilbaud, Ph.; Guillaumont, D.; Moisy, Ph.; Den Auwer, Ch. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN/DRCP/SCPS), 30 - Marcoule (France); Berthet, J.C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Recherche sur l' Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules (DSM/DRECAM/SCM), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Conradsonc, St.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hennig, C. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, ROBL at ESRF, 38 - Grenoble (France); Roques, J.; Simoni, E. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Shuh, D.K.; Tyliszczak, T.; Castro-Rodriguez, I. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Both structural and electronic properties of the actinide cations are of fundamental interest in order to describe the intramolecular interactions. The 5f and 6d orbitals are the first partially or totally vacant states of these elements and their properties reflect the nature of the actinide-ligand bond. Because of its chemical and orbital selectivities, XANES spectroscopy is useful to probe the actinides' frontier orbitals and then understand the cation reactivity toward chelating ligands. The actinide L3 edge contains structural information on the coordination polyhedron because of important scattering features. But very little electronic information can be extracted, due to the short core-hole lifetime, broadening the edge signal. On the other hand, the actinide M4,5 edges provide a better resolution and allow one to achieve electronic and structural information. Furthermore, coupling simulations of the experimental spectra and quantum chemical calculations lead to quantitative information such as the determination of the actinide coordination sphere and its effective charge. (authors)

  6. A Shrinkage Estimator for Combination of Bioassays

    Jian Xiong; D.G. Chen; Zhen-hai Yang

    2007-01-01

    A shrinkage estimator and a maximum likelihood estimator are proposed in this paper for combination of bioassays. The shrinkage estimator is obtained in closed form which incorporates prior information just on the common log relative potency after the homogeneity test for combination of bioassays is accepted. It is a practical improvement over other estimators which require iterative procedure to obtain the estimator for the relative potency. A real data is also used to show the superiorities for the newly-proposed procedures.

  7. A Bayesian Framework for Combining Valuation Estimates

    Yee, Kenton K

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining more accurate equity value estimates is the starting point for stock selection, value-based indexing in a noisy market, and beating benchmark indices through tactical style rotation. Unfortunately, discounted cash flow, method of comparables, and fundamental analysis typically yield discrepant valuation estimates. Moreover, the valuation estimates typically disagree with market price. Can one form a superior valuation estimate by averaging over the individual estimates, including market price? This article suggests a Bayesian framework for combining two or more estimates into a superior valuation estimate. The framework justifies the common practice of averaging over several estimates to arrive at a final point estimate.

  8. Actinide recycle

    A multitude of studies and assessments of actinide partitioning and transmutation were carried out in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Probably the most comprehensive of these was a study coordinated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conclusions of this study were that only rather weak economic and safety incentives existed for partitioning and transmuting the actinides for waste management purposes, due to the facts that (1) partitioning processes were complicated and expensive, and (2) the geologic repository was assumed to contain actinides for hundreds of thousands of years. Much has changed in the few years since then. A variety of developments now combine to warrant a renewed assessment of the actinide recycle. First of all, it has become increasingly difficult to provide to all parties the necessary assurance that the repository will contain essentially all radioactive materials until they have decayed. Assurance can almost certainly be provided to regulatory agencies by sound technical arguments, but it is difficult to convince the general public that the behavior of wastes stored in the ground can be modeled and predicted for even a few thousand years. From this point of view alone there would seem to be a clear benefit in reducing the long-term toxicity of the high-level wastes placed in the repository

  9. Computational Benchmark for Estimation of Reactivity Margin from Fission Products and Minor Actinides in PWR Burnup Credit

    This report proposes and documents a computational benchmark problem for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin available in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from fission products and minor actinides in a burnup-credit storage/transport environment, relative to SNF compositions containing only the major actinides. The benchmark problem/configuration is a generic burnup credit cask designed to hold 32 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies. The purpose of this computational benchmark is to provide a reference configuration for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin, which is encouraged in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidance for partial burnup credit (ISG8), and document reference estimations of the additional reactivity margin as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Consequently, the geometry and material specifications are provided in sufficient detail to enable independent evaluations. Estimates of additional reactivity margin for this reference configuration may be compared to those of similar burnup-credit casks to provide an indication of the validity of design-specific estimates of fission-product margin. The reference solutions were generated with the SAS2H-depletion and CSAS25-criticality sequences of the SCALE 4.4a package. Although the SAS2H and CSAS25 sequences have been extensively validated elsewhere, the reference solutions are not directly or indirectly based on experimental results. Consequently, this computational benchmark cannot be used to satisfy the ANS 8.1 requirements for validation of calculational methods and is not intended to be used to establish biases for burnup credit analyses

  10. Computational Benchmark for Estimation of Reactivity Margin from Fission Products and Minor Actinides in PWR Burnup Credit

    Wagner, J.C.

    2001-08-02

    This report proposes and documents a computational benchmark problem for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin available in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from fission products and minor actinides in a burnup-credit storage/transport environment, relative to SNF compositions containing only the major actinides. The benchmark problem/configuration is a generic burnup credit cask designed to hold 32 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies. The purpose of this computational benchmark is to provide a reference configuration for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin, which is encouraged in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidance for partial burnup credit (ISG8), and document reference estimations of the additional reactivity margin as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Consequently, the geometry and material specifications are provided in sufficient detail to enable independent evaluations. Estimates of additional reactivity margin for this reference configuration may be compared to those of similar burnup-credit casks to provide an indication of the validity of design-specific estimates of fission-product margin. The reference solutions were generated with the SAS2H-depletion and CSAS25-criticality sequences of the SCALE 4.4a package. Although the SAS2H and CSAS25 sequences have been extensively validated elsewhere, the reference solutions are not directly or indirectly based on experimental results. Consequently, this computational benchmark cannot be used to satisfy the ANS 8.1 requirements for validation of calculational methods and is not intended to be used to establish biases for burnup credit analyses.

  11. Feasibility of actinide separation from UREX-like raffinates using a combination of sulfur- and oxygen-donor extractants

    A synergistic combination of bis(o-trifluoromethylphenyl)dithios-phosphinic acid and trioctylphosphine oxide has been recently shown to selectively remove uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium from aqueous environment containing up to 0.5 M nitric acid and 5.5 g/l fission products. Here the feasibility of performing this complete actinide recovery from aqueous mixtures is forecasted for a new organic formulation containing sulfur donor extractant of modified structure based on Am(III) and Eu(III) extraction data. A mixture of bis(bis-m,m-trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-dithios-phosphinic acid and TOPO in toluene enhances the extraction performance, accomplishing Am/Eu differentiation in aqueous mixtures up to 1 M nitric acid. The new organic recipe is also less susceptible to oxidative damage resulting from radiolysis. (authors)

  12. Comparison of Computational Estimations of Reactivity Margin From Fission Products and Minor Actinides in PWR Burnup Credit

    This paper has presented the results of a computational benchmark and independent calculations to verify the benchmark calculations for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin available from fission products and minor actinides in a PWR burnup credit storage/transport environment. The calculations were based on a generic 32 PWR-assembly cask. The differences between the independent calculations and the benchmark lie within 1% for the uniform axial burnup distribution, which is acceptable. The Δk for KENO - MCNP results are generally lower than the other Δk values, due to the fact that HELIOS performed the depletion part of the calculation for both the KENO and MCNP results. The differences between the independent calculations and the benchmark for the non-uniform axial burnup distribution were within 1.1%

  13. Biometric estimation of chest wall thickness of female radiation workers as an aid in in-vivo detection of the actinides

    An equation was derived to estimate female chest wall thickness from a series of biometric measurements. This technique will result in improved performance for actinide detection in females by accounting for variations in chest wall thickness in derivation of calibration factors

  14. Actinides-1981

    1981-09-01

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry.

  15. Actinides-1981

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry

  16. Study of natural zircon-xenotime assemblages for estimation of the actinide waste forms stability

    In order to estimate compositions and structural stability of YPO4-ZrSiO4-USiO4-ThSiO4 solid solution, natural specimens of (U, Th)-enriched zircon-xenotime assemblages were studied. The samples were picked from granitic pegmatites of North Karelia of about 1,850 Ma age. TEM data show that amorphization of the zircon structure is not complete. Xenotime has typical crystal structure. ASEM and EPMA results indicate that zircon and xenotime are micro-heterogeneous in there compositions. Numerous micro-inclusions (3+ vs. Zr4+ and P5+ vs. Si4+). Data on high amounts of rare earth elements and phosphorus in natural zircons are result from REE-phosphate inclusions in analyzed zircons. Content of U in the zircon allowed the estimation of the solubility of coffinite end member to be no less than 5 mol.% USiO4

  17. Novel estimated surface tension data of actinide halide salts in the molten state

    The surface tension of ThF4, UF4 and UF6 is theoretically estimated, as function of temperature, whereas eight other halide salts only for temperature equal to their melting points. Calculations are based on a model, using statistical thermodynamics of Eyring theory. It is observed that the surface tension decreases linearly with temperature. The results are strictly compared with the available experimental data. The technique can be applied for conditions where experimental data are currently missing. The compressibility and surface tension products, of all salts under study, were also calculated

  18. Novel estimated surface tension data of actinide halide salts in the molten state

    Aqra, Fathi, E-mail: fathiaqra2009@hotmail.com

    2014-05-01

    The surface tension of ThF{sub 4}, UF{sub 4} and UF{sub 6} is theoretically estimated, as function of temperature, whereas eight other halide salts only for temperature equal to their melting points. Calculations are based on a model, using statistical thermodynamics of Eyring theory. It is observed that the surface tension decreases linearly with temperature. The results are strictly compared with the available experimental data. The technique can be applied for conditions where experimental data are currently missing. The compressibility and surface tension products, of all salts under study, were also calculated.

  19. Contribution of the ''simple solutions'' concept to estimate density of actinides concentrated solutions

    In order to calculate criticality parameters of nuclear fuel solution systems, number density of nuclides are needed and they are generally estimated from density equations. Most of the relations allowing the calculation of the density of aqueous solutions containing the electrolytes HNO3-UO2(NO3)2-Pu(NO3)4, usually called 'nitrate dilution laws' are strictly empirical. They are obtained from a fit of assumed polynomial expressions on experimental density data. Out of their interpolation range, such mathematical expressions show discrepancies between calculated and experimental data appearing in the high concentrations range. In this study, a physico-chemical approach based on the isopiestic mixtures rule is suggested. The behaviour followed by these mixtures was first observed in 1936 by Zdanovskii and expressed as: 'Binary solutions (i.e. one electrolyte in water) having a same water activity are mixed without variation of this water activity value'. With regards to this behaviour, a set of basic thermodynamic expressions has been pointed out by Ryazanov and Vdovenko in 1965 concerning enthalpy, entropy, volume of mixtures, activity and osmotic coefficient of the components. In particular, a very simple relation for the density is obtained from the volume mixture expression depending on only two physico-chemical variables: i) concentration of each component in the mixture and in their respectively binary solutions having the same water activity as the mixture and ii), density of each component respectively in the binary solution having the same water activity as the mixture. Therefore, the calculation needs the knowledge of binary data (water activity, density and concentration) of each component at the same temperature as the mixture. Such experimental data are largely published in the literature and are available for nitric acid and uranyl nitrate. Nevertheless, nitric acid binary data show large discrepancies between the authors and need to be revised. In the

  20. The clearance of Pu and Am from the respiratory system of rodents after the inhalation of oxide aerosols of these actinides either alone or in combination with other metals

    In this series of studies in rodents the lung clearance and tissue distribution of both plutonium and americium have been measured following their inhalation as mixed actinide oxides either alone or in combination with other metals. The aerosols used were materials to which workers in the nuclear industry may be occupationally exposed or which could be generated in the event of an accident in a reactor core or fuel fabrication plant. The studies showed that, at least for some PuO2 aerosols, the lung model currently being used by ICRP for estimating tissue doses from inhaled actinides may overestimate, by about a factor of ten, the amount of plutonium translocated to the blood. The presence of oxides of other metals can, however, appreciably influence the clearance of plutonium from the lung. While in some mixtures plutonium dioxide behaves as an insoluble (Class Y) compound and in others as a soluble (Class W) compound, it may also have transportability characteristics between these two extremes. Americium-241 behaves as a soluble (Class W) compound when inhaled as the oxide. However, if it is present in trace quantities in mixed-oxide aerosols its behaviour depends upon that of the materials present in greatest mass. (author)

  1. Calorimetric assay of minor actinides

    Rudy, C.; Bracken, D.; Cremers, T.; Foster, L.A.; Ensslin, N.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reviews the principles of calorimetric assay and evaluates its potential application to the minor actinides (U-232-4, Am-241, Am- 243, Cm-245, Np-237). We conclude that calorimetry and high- resolution gamma-ray isotopic analysis can be used for the assay of minor actinides by adapting existing methodologies for Pu/Am-241 mixtures. In some cases, mixtures of special nuclear materials and minor actinides may require the development of new methodologies that involve a combination of destructive and nondestructive assay techniques.

  2. Calorimetric assay of minor actinides

    This paper reviews the principles of calorimetric assay and evaluates its potential application to the minor actinides (U-232-4, Am-241, Am- 243, Cm-245, Np-237). We conclude that calorimetry and high- resolution gamma-ray isotopic analysis can be used for the assay of minor actinides by adapting existing methodologies for Pu/Am-241 mixtures. In some cases, mixtures of special nuclear materials and minor actinides may require the development of new methodologies that involve a combination of destructive and nondestructive assay techniques

  3. Multi-podant diglycolamides and room temperature ionic liquid impregnated resins: An excellent combination for extraction chromatography of actinides.

    Gujar, R B; Ansari, S A; Verboom, W; Mohapatra, P K

    2016-05-27

    Extraction chromatography resins, prepared by impregnating two multi-podant diglycolamide ligands, viz. diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arene (C4DGA) and tripodal diglycolamide (T-DGA) dissolved in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (RTIL: C4mimTf2N) on Chromosorb-W (an inert solid support), gave excellent results for the removal of trivalent actinides from acidic waste solutions. Distribution coefficient measurements on several metal ions showed selective sorption of Am(III) over hexavalent uranyl ions and other fission product elements such as strontium and cesium. The sorbed metal ions could be efficiently desorbed with a complexing solution containing guanidine carbonate and EDTA buffer. The sorption of Am(III) on both resins followed pseudo-second order rate kinetics with rate constants of 1.37×10(-6) and 6.88×10(-7)g/cpmmin for T-DGA and C4DGA resins, respectively. The metal sorption on both resins indicated the Langmuir monolayer chemisorption phenomenon with Eu(III) sorption capacities of 4.83±0.21 and 0.52±0.05mg per g of T-DGA and C4DGA resins, respectively. The results of column studies show that these resins are of interest for a possible application for the recovery of hazardous trivalent actinides from dilute aqueous solutions. PMID:27130582

  4. Using Robust Variance Estimation to Combine Multiple Regression Estimates with Meta-Analysis

    Williams, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the use of robust variance estimation for combining commonly specified multiple regression models and for combining sample-dependent focal slope estimates from diversely specified models. The proposed estimator obviates traditionally required information about the covariance structure of the dependent…

  5. Measurement of standard potentials of actinides (U,Np,Pu,Am) in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and separation of actinides from rare earths by electrorefining

    Pyrochemical separation of actinides from rare earths in LiCl-KCl eutectic-liquid metal systems has been studied. The electromotive forces of galvanic cells of the form, Ag vertical stroke Ag(I), LiCl-KCl parallel actinide(III), LiCl-KCl vertical stroke actinide, were measured and standard potentials were determined for uranium, neptunium and plutonium to be -1.283 V, -1.484 V and -1.593 V (at 450 C vs. Ag/AgCl (1wt%-AgCl)), respectively. A typical cyclic voltammogram of americium chloride has two cathodic peaks, which suggests reduction Am(III)→Am(II) occurs followed by reduction of Am(II) to americium metal. Standard potential of Am(II)/Am(0) was estimated to be -1.642 V. Electrorefining experiments to separate actinides (U, Np, Pu and Am) from rare earths (Y, La, Ce, Nd and Gd) in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt were carried out. It was shown that the actinide metals were recovered on the cathodes and that americium was the most difficult to separate from rare earths. The actinide separation will be achieved by means of the combination of electrorefining with multistage extraction. (orig.)

  6. Bayesian Estimation of Combined Accuracy for Tests with Verification Bias

    Lyle D. Broemeling

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This presentation will emphasize the estimation of the combined accuracy of two or more tests when verification bias is present. Verification bias occurs when some of the subjects are not subject to the gold standard. The approach is Bayesian where the estimation of test accuracy is based on the posterior distribution of the relevant parameter. Accuracy of two combined binary tests is estimated employing either “believe the positive” or “believe the negative” rule, then the true and false positive fractions for each rule are computed for two tests. In order to perform the analysis, the missing at random assumption is imposed, and an interesting example is provided by estimating the combined accuracy of CT and MRI to diagnose lung cancer. The Bayesian approach is extended to two ordinal tests when verification bias is present, and the accuracy of the combined tests is based on the ROC area of the risk function. An example involving mammography with two readers with extreme verification bias illustrates the estimation of the combined test accuracy for ordinal tests.

  7. ALMR potential for actinide consumption

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored fast reactor design based on the Power Reactor, Innovative Small Module (PRISM) concept originated by General Electric. This reactor combines a high degree of passive safety characteristics with a high level of modularity and factory fabrication to achieve attractive economics. The current reference design is a 471 MWt modular reactor fueled with ternary metal fuel. This paper discusses actinide transmutation core designs that fit the design envelope of the ALMR and utilize spent LWR fuel as startup material and for makeup. Actinide transmutation may be accomplished in the ALMR core by using either a breeding or burning configuration. Lifetime actinide mass consumption is calculated as well as changes in consumption behavior throughout the lifetime of the reactor. Impacts on system operational and safety performance are evaluated in a preliminary fashion. Waste disposal impacts are discussed. (author)

  8. Chemical compatibility of HLW borosilicate glasses with actinides

    During liquid storage of HLLW the formation of actinide enriched sludges is being expected. Also during melting of HLW glasses an increase of top-to-bottom actinide concentrations can take place. Both effects have been studied. Besides, the vitrification of plutonium enriched wastes from Pu fuel element fabrication plants has been investigated with respect to an isolated vitrification process or a combined one with the HLLW. It is shown that the solidification of actinides from HLLW and actinide waste concentrates will set no principal problems. The leaching of actinides has been measured in salt brine at 230C and 1150C. (orig.)

  9. Estimating combining ability in popcorn lines using multivariate analysis

    Leandro Simôes Azeredo Gonçalves; Silverio de Paiva Freitas Júnior; Antônio Teixeira do Amaral Júnior; Carlos Alberto Scapim; Rosana Rodrigues; Caillet Dornelles Marinho; Eduardo Stefani Pagliosa

    2014-01-01

    Aiming to estimate the combining ability in tropical and temperate popcorn (Zea mays L. var. everta Sturt.) lines using multivariate analysis, ten popcorn lines were crossed in a complete diallel without reciprocals and the lines and hybrids were tested in two randomized complete block experiments with three replicates. Data were subjected to univariate and multivariate ANOVA, principal component analysis, and univariate and multivariate diallel analysis. For multivariate diallel analysis, va...

  10. Density estimation in tiger populations: combining information for strong inference

    Gopalaswamy, Arjun M.; Royle, J. Andrew; Delampady, Mohan; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas; Macdonald, David W.

    2012-01-01

    A productive way forward in studies of animal populations is to efficiently make use of all the information available, either as raw data or as published sources, on critical parameters of interest. In this study, we demonstrate two approaches to the use of multiple sources of information on a parameter of fundamental interest to ecologists: animal density. The first approach produces estimates simultaneously from two different sources of data. The second approach was developed for situations in which initial data collection and analysis are followed up by subsequent data collection and prior knowledge is updated with new data using a stepwise process. Both approaches are used to estimate density of a rare and elusive predator, the tiger, by combining photographic and fecal DNA spatial capture–recapture data. The model, which combined information, provided the most precise estimate of density (8.5 ± 1.95 tigers/100 km2 [posterior mean ± SD]) relative to a model that utilized only one data source (photographic, 12.02 ± 3.02 tigers/100 km2 and fecal DNA, 6.65 ± 2.37 tigers/100 km2). Our study demonstrates that, by accounting for multiple sources of available information, estimates of animal density can be significantly improved.

  11. The lanthanides and actinides

    This paper relates the chemical properties of the actinides to their position in the Mendeleev periodic system. The changes in the oxidation states of the actinides with increasing atomic number are similar to those of the 3d elements. Monovalent and divalent actinides are very similar to alkaline and alkaline earth elements; in the 3+ and 4+ oxidation states they resemble d elements in the respective oxidation states. However, in their highest oxidation states the actinides display their individual properties with only a slight resemblance to d elements. Finally, there is a profound similarity between the second half of the actinides and the first half of the lanthanides

  12. Combinations of Estimation of Distribution Algorithms and Other Techniques

    Qingfu Zhang; Jianyong Sun; Edward Tsang

    2007-01-01

    This paper summaries our recent work on combining estimation of distribution algorithms (EDA) and other techniques for solving hard search and optimization problems: a) guided mutation, an offspring generator in which the ideas from EDAs and genetic algorithms are combined together, we have shown that an evolutionary algorithm with guided mutation outperforms the best GA for the maximum clique problem, b) evolutionary algorithms refining a heuristic, we advocate a strategy for solving a hard optimization problem with complicated data structure, and c) combination of two different local search techniques and EDA for numerical global optimization problems, its basic idea is that not all the new generated points are needed to be improved by an expensive local search.

  13. Nonparametric estimation receiver operating characteristic analysis for performance evaluation on combined detection and estimation tasks.

    Wunderlich, Adam; Goossens, Bart

    2014-10-01

    In an effort to generalize task-based assessment beyond traditional signal detection, there is a growing interest in performance evaluation for combined detection and estimation tasks, in which signal parameters, such as size, orientation, and contrast are unknown and must be estimated. One motivation for studying such tasks is their rich complexity, which offers potential advantages for imaging system optimization. To evaluate observer performance on combined detection and estimation tasks, Clarkson introduced the estimation receiver operating characteristic (EROC) curve and the area under the EROC curve as a summary figure of merit. This work provides practical tools for EROC analysis of experimental data. In particular, we propose nonparametric estimators for the EROC curve, the area under the EROC curve, and for the variance/covariance matrix of a vector of correlated EROC area estimates. In addition, we show that reliable confidence intervals can be obtained for EROC area, and we validate these intervals with Monte Carlo simulation. Application of our methodology is illustrated with an example comparing magnetic resonance imaging [Formula: see text]-space sampling trajectories. MATLAB® software implementing the EROC analysis estimators described in this work is publicly available at http://code.google.com/p/iqmodelo/. PMID:26158044

  14. A note on weighted combination methods for probability estimation

    Sečkárová, Vladimíra

    Prague : Institute of Information Theory and Automation, 2013 - (Guy, T.; Kárný, M.) ISBN 978-80-903834-8-7. [The 3rd International Workshop on Scalable Decision Making: Uncertainty, Imperfection, Deliberation held in conjunction with ECML/PKDD 2013. Prague (CZ), 23.09.2013-23.09.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13502S Grant ostatní: GA UK(CZ) SVV 267315 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : weighting methods * parameter estimation * Kerridge inaccuracy * maximum entropy principle * binomial distribution Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/AS/seckarova-a note on weighted combination methods for probability estimation.pdf

  15. Lanthanides and actinides in ionic liquids

    Binnemans, Koen

    2007-01-01

    This lecture gives an overview of the research possibilities offered by combining f-elements (lanthanides and actinides) with ionic liquids [1] Many ionic liquids are solvents with weakly coordinating anions. Solvation of lanthanide and actinide ions in these solvents is different from what is observed in conventional organic solvents and water. The poorly solvating behavior can also lead to the formation of coordination compounds with low coordination numbers. The solvation of f-elements can...

  16. A Combined Approach for Estimating Health Staff Requirements.

    Ali Fakhri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have been carried out and many methods have been used for estimating health staff re-quirements in health facilities or system, each have different advantages and disadvantages. Differences in the extent to which utilization matches needs in different conditions intensify the limitations of each approach when used in iso-lation. Is the utilization-based approach efficient in a situation of over servicing? Is it sufficient in a situation of under-utilization? These questions can be similarly asked about the needs-based approach. This study is looking for a flexible approach to estimate the health staff requirements efficiently in these different conditions.This study was carried out in 2011 in some stages: It was conducted in order to identify the formula used in the different approaches. The basic formulas used in the utilization-based approach and the needs-based approach were identified and then combined using simple mathematical principles to develop a new formula. Finally, the new formula was piloted by assessing family health staff requirements in the health posts in Kashan City, Iran.Comparison of the two formulas showed that the basic formulas used in the two approaches can be com-bined by including the variable 'Coverage'. The pilot study confirmed the role of coverage in the suggested combined approach.The variables in the developed formula allow combining needs-based, target-based and utilization-based approaches. A limitation of this approach is applicability to a given service package.

  17. A Combined Approach for Estimating Health Staff Requirements

    FAKHRI, Ali; SEYEDIN, Hesam; DAVIAUD, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Many studies have been carried out and many methods have been used for estimating health staff re-quirements in health facilities or system, each have different advantages and disadvantages. Differences in the extent to which utilization matches needs in different conditions intensify the limitations of each approach when used in iso-lation. Is the utilization-based approach efficient in a situation of over servicing? Is it sufficient in a situation of under-utilization? These questions can be similarly asked about the needs-based approach. This study is looking for a flexible approach to estimate the health staff requirements efficiently in these different conditions. Method This study was carried out in 2011 in some stages: It was conducted in order to identify the formula used in the different approaches. The basic formulas used in the utilization-based approach and the needs-based approach were identified and then combined using simple mathematical principles to develop a new formula. Finally, the new formula was piloted by assessing family health staff requirements in the health posts in Kashan City, Iran. Results Comparison of the two formulas showed that the basic formulas used in the two approaches can be com-bined by including the variable ‘Coverage’. The pilot study confirmed the role of coverage in the suggested combined approach. Conclusions The variables in the developed formula allow combining needs-based, target-based and utilization-based approaches. A limitation of this approach is applicability to a given service package. PMID:26060687

  18. Optimizing matching and analysis combinations for estimating causal effects

    Colson, K. Ellicott; Rudolph, Kara E.; Zimmerman, Scott C.; Goin, Dana E.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Laan, Mark Van Der; Ahern, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Matching methods are common in studies across many disciplines. However, there is limited evidence on how to optimally combine matching with subsequent analysis approaches to minimize bias and maximize efficiency for the quantity of interest. We conducted simulations to compare the performance of a wide variety of matching methods and analysis approaches in terms of bias, variance, and mean squared error (MSE). We then compared these approaches in an applied example of an employment training program. The results indicate that combining full matching with double robust analysis performed best in both the simulations and the applied example, particularly when combined with machine learning estimation methods. To reduce bias, current guidelines advise researchers to select the technique with the best post-matching covariate balance, but this work finds that such an approach does not always minimize mean squared error (MSE). These findings have important implications for future research utilizing matching. To minimize MSE, investigators should consider additional diagnostics, and use of simulations tailored to the study of interest to identify the optimal matching and analysis combination.

  19. Actinides and the environment

    The book combines in one volume the opinions of experts regarding the interaction of radionuclides with the environment and possible ways to immobilize and dispose of nuclear waste. The relevant areas span the spectrum from pure science, such as the fundamental physics and chemistry of the actinides, geology, environmental transport mechanisms, to engineering issues such as reactor operation and the design of nuclear waste repositories. The cross-fertilization between these various areas means that the material in the book will be accessible to seasoned scientists who may wish to obtain an overview of the current state of the art in the field of environmental remediation of radionuclides, as well as to beginning scientists embarking on a career in this field. refs

  20. Actinide environmental chemistry

    In order to predict release and transport rates, as well as design cleanup and containment methods, it is essential to understand the chemical reactions and forms of the actinides under aqueous environmental conditions. Four important processes that can occur with the actinide cations are: precipitation, complexation, sorption and colloid formation. Precipitation of a solid phase will limit the amount of actinide in solution near the solid phase and have a retarding effect on release and transport rates. Complexation increases the amount of actinide in solution and tends to increase release and migration rates. Actinides can sorb on to mineral or rock surfaces which tends to retard migration. Actinide ions can form or become associated with colloidal sized particles which can, depending on the nature of the colloid and the solution conditions, enhance or retard migration of the actinide. The degree to which these four processes progress is strongly dependent on the oxidation state of the actinide and tends to be similar for actinides in the same oxidation state. In order to obtain information on the speciation of actinides in solution, i.e., oxidation state, complexation form, dissolved or colloidal forms, the use of absorption spectroscopy has become a method of choice. The advent of the ultrasensitive, laser induced photothermal and fluorescence spectroscopies has made possible the detection and study of actinide ions at the parts per billion level. With the availability of third generation synchrotrons and the development of new fluorescence detectors, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is becoming a powerful technique to study the speciation of actinides in the environment, particularly for reactions at the solid/solution interfaces. (orig.)

  1. Combined Estimation of Hydrogeologic Conceptual Model and Parameter Uncertainty

    Meyer, Philip D.; Ye, Ming; Neuman, Shlomo P.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2004-03-01

    The objective of the research described in this report is the development and application of a methodology for comprehensively assessing the hydrogeologic uncertainties involved in dose assessment, including uncertainties associated with conceptual models, parameters, and scenarios. This report describes and applies a statistical method to quantitatively estimate the combined uncertainty in model predictions arising from conceptual model and parameter uncertainties. The method relies on model averaging to combine the predictions of a set of alternative models. Implementation is driven by the available data. When there is minimal site-specific data the method can be carried out with prior parameter estimates based on generic data and subjective prior model probabilities. For sites with observations of system behavior (and optionally data characterizing model parameters), the method uses model calibration to update the prior parameter estimates and model probabilities based on the correspondence between model predictions and site observations. The set of model alternatives can contain both simplified and complex models, with the requirement that all models be based on the same set of data. The method was applied to the geostatistical modeling of air permeability at a fractured rock site. Seven alternative variogram models of log air permeability were considered to represent data from single-hole pneumatic injection tests in six boreholes at the site. Unbiased maximum likelihood estimates of variogram and drift parameters were obtained for each model. Standard information criteria provided an ambiguous ranking of the models, which would not justify selecting one of them and discarding all others as is commonly done in practice. Instead, some of the models were eliminated based on their negligibly small updated probabilities and the rest were used to project the measured log permeabilities by kriging onto a rock volume containing the six boreholes. These four

  2. Object tracking by combining detection, motion estimation, and verification

    Sidla, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Object detection and tracking play an increasing role in modern surveillance systems. Vision research is still confronted with many challenges when it comes to robust tracking in realistic imaging scenarios. We describe a tracking framework which is aimed at the detection and tracking of objects in real-world situations (e.g. from surveillance cameras) and in real-time. Although the current system is used for pedestrian tracking only, it can easily be adapted to other detector types and object classes. The proposed tracker combines i) a simple background model to speed up all following computations, ii)1 a fast object detector realized with a cascaded HOG detector, iii) motion estimation with a KLT Tracker iv) object verification based on texture/color analysis by means of DCT coefficients and , v) dynamic trajectory and object management. The tracker has been successfully applied in indoor and outdoor scenarios it a public transportation hub in the City of Graz, Austria.

  3. Combining ungrouped and grouped wildfire data to estimate fire risk

    Hernandez-Magallanes, I.

    2013-10-11

    © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Frequently, models are required to combine information obtained from different data sources and on different scales. In this work, we are interested in estimating the risk of wildfire ignition in the USA for a particular time and location by merging two levels of data, namely, individual points and aggregate count of points into areas. The data for federal lands consist of the point location and time of each fire. Nonfederal fires are aggregated by county for a particular year. The probability model is based on the wildfire point process. Assuming a smooth intensity function, a locally weighted likelihood fit is used, which incorporates the group effect. A logit model is used under the assumption of the existence of a latent process, and fuel conditions are included as a covariate. The model assessment is based on a residual analysis, while the False Discovery Rate detects spatial patterns. A benefit of the proposed model is that there is no need of arbitrary aggregation of individual fires into counts. A map of predicted probability of ignition for the Midwest US in 1990 is included. The predicted ignition probabilities and the estimated total number of expected fires are required for the allocation of resources.

  4. Estimating combining ability in popcorn lines using multivariate analysis

    Leandro Simôes Azeredo Gonçalves

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to estimate the combining ability in tropical and temperate popcorn (Zea mays L. var. everta Sturt. lines using multivariate analysis, ten popcorn lines were crossed in a complete diallel without reciprocals and the lines and hybrids were tested in two randomized complete block experiments with three replicates. Data were subjected to univariate and multivariate ANOVA, principal component analysis, and univariate and multivariate diallel analysis. For multivariate diallel analysis, variables were divided into group I (grain yield, mean weight of ears with grains, popping expansion, mean number of ears per plant, and final stand and group II (days to silking, plant height, first ear height, and lodged or broken plants. The P2 line had positive values for agronomic traits related to yield and popping expansion for group I, whereas the P4 line had fewer days to silking and lodged or broken plants for group II. Regarding the hybrids, P2 x P7 exhibited favorable values for most of the analyzed variables and had potential for recommendation. The multivariate diallel analysis can be useful in popcorn genetic improvement programs, particularly when directed toward the best cross combinations, where the objective is to simultaneously obtain genetic gains in multiple traits.

  5. Actinide Source Term Program, position paper. Revision 1

    The Actinide Source Term represents the quantity of actinides that could be mobilized within WIPP brines and could migrate with the brines away from the disposal room vicinity. This document presents the various proposed methods for estimating this source term, with a particular focus on defining these methods and evaluating the defensibility of the models for mobile actinide concentrations. The conclusions reached in this document are: the 92 PA open-quotes expert panelclose quotes model for mobile actinide concentrations is not defensible; and, although it is extremely conservative, the open-quotes inventory limitsclose quotes model is the only existing defensible model for the actinide source term. The model effort in progress, open-quotes chemical modeling of mobile actinide concentrationsclose quotes, supported by a laboratory effort that is also in progress, is designed to provide a reasonable description of the system and be scientifically realistic and supplant the open-quotes Inventory limitsclose quotes model

  6. Research in actinide chemistry

    This research studies the behavior of the actinide elements in aqueous solution. The high radioactivity of the transuranium actinides limits the concentrations which can be studied and, consequently, limits the experimental techniques. However, oxidation state analogs (trivalent lanthanides, tetravalent thorium, and hexavalent uranium) do not suffer from these limitations. Behavior of actinides in the environment are a major USDOE concern, whether in connection with long-term releases from a repository, releases from stored defense wastes or accidental releases in reprocessing, etc. Principal goal of our research was expand the thermodynamic data base on complexation of actinides by natural ligands (e.g., OH-, CO32-, PO43-, humates). The research undertakes fundamental studies of actinide complexes which can increase understanding of the environmental behavior of these elements

  7. TUCS/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    Nash, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This program has as its objective the development of a new technology that combines cation exchange and mineralization to reduce the concentration of heavy metals (in particular actinides) in groundwaters. The treatment regimen must be compatible with the groundwater and soil, potentially using groundwater/soil components to aid in the immobilization process. The delivery system (probably a water-soluble chelating agent) should first concentrate the radionuclides then release the precipitating anion, which forms thermodynamically stable mineral phases, either with the target metal ions alone or in combination with matrix cations. This approach should generate thermodynamically stable mineral phases resistant to weathering. The chelating agent should decompose spontaneously with time, release the mineralizing agent, and leave a residue that does not interfere with mineral formation. For the actinides, the ideal compound probably will release phosphate, as actinide phosphate mineral phases are among the least soluble species for these metals. The most promising means of delivering the precipitant would be to use a water-soluble, hydrolytically unstable complexant that functions in the initial stages as a cation exchanger to concentrate the metal ions. As it decomposes, the chelating agent releases phosphate to foster formation of crystalline mineral phases. Because it involves only the application of inexpensive reagents, the method of phosphate mineralization promises to be an economical alternative for in situ immobilization of radionuclides (actinides in particular). The method relies on the inherent (thermodynamic) stability of actinide mineral phases.

  8. Research in actinide chemistry

    1991-01-01

    This report contains research results on studies of inorganic and organic complexes of actinide and lanthanide elements. Special attention is given to complexes of humic acids and to spectroscopic studies.

  9. Bias estimates used in lieu of validation of fission products and minor actinides in MCNP Keff calculations for PWR burnup credit casks

    Mueller, Don E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Marshall, William J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wagner, John C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bowen, Douglas G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation recently issued Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) 8, Revision 3. This ISG provides guidance for burnup credit (BUC) analyses supporting transport and storage of PWR pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel in casks. Revision 3 includes guidance for addressing validation of criticality (keff) calculations crediting the presence of a limited set of fission products and minor actinides (FP&MA). Based on previous work documented in NUREG/CR-7109, recommendation 4 of ISG-8, Rev. 3, includes a recommendation to use 1.5 or 3% of the FP&MA worth to conservatively cover the bias due to the specified FP&MAs. This bias is supplementary to the bias and bias uncertainty resulting from validation of keff calculations for the major actinides in SNF and does not address extension to actinides and fission products beyond those identified herein. The work described in this report involves comparison of FP&MA worths calculated using SCALE and MCNP with ENDF/B-V, -VI, and -VII based nuclear data and supports use of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias when either SCALE or MCNP codes are used for criticality calculations, provided the other conditions of the recommendation 4 are met. The method used in this report may also be applied to demonstrate the applicability of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias to other codes using ENDF/B V, VI or VII based nuclear data. The method involves use of the applicant s computational method to generate FP&MA worths for a reference SNF cask model using specified spent fuel compositions. The applicant s FP&MA worths are then compared to reference values provided in this report. The applicants FP&MA worths should not exceed the reference results by more than 1.5% of the reference FP&MA worths.

  10. Concurrent signal combining and channel estimation in digital communications

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Mason, John J.

    2011-08-30

    In the reception of digital information transmitted on a communication channel, a characteristic exhibited by the communication channel during transmission of the digital information is estimated based on a communication signal that represents the digital information and has been received via the communication channel. Concurrently with the estimating, the communication signal is used to decide what digital information was transmitted.

  11. Report of the panel on inhaled actinides

    Some topics discussed are as follows: assessment of risks to man of inhaling actinides; use of estimates for developing protection standards; epidemiology of lung cancer in exposed human populations; development of respiratory tract models; and effects in animals: dose- and effect-modifying factors

  12. Actinides and Life's Origins.

    Adam, Zachary

    2007-12-01

    There are growing indications that life began in a radioactive beach environment. A geologic framework for the origin or support of life in a Hadean heavy mineral placer beach has been developed, based on the unique chemical properties of the lower-electronic actinides, which act as nuclear fissile and fertile fuels, radiolytic energy sources, oligomer catalysts, and coordinating ions (along with mineralogically associated lanthanides) for prototypical prebiotic homonuclear and dinuclear metalloenzymes. A four-factor nuclear reactor model was constructed to estimate how much uranium would have been required to initiate a sustainable fission reaction within a placer beach sand 4.3 billion years ago. It was calculated that about 1-8 weight percent of the sand would have to have been uraninite, depending on the weight percent, uranium enrichment, and quantity of neutron poisons present within the remaining placer minerals. Radiolysis experiments were conducted with various solvents with the use of uraniumand thorium-rich minerals (metatorbernite and monazite, respectively) as proxies for radioactive beach sand in contact with different carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen reactants. Radiation bombardment ranged in duration of exposure from 3 weeks to 6 months. Low levels of acetonitrile (estimated to be on the order of parts per billion in concentration) were conclusively identified in 2 setups and tentatively indicated in a 3(rd) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These low levels have been interpreted within the context of a Hadean placer beach prebiotic framework to demonstrate the promise of investigating natural nuclear reactors as power production sites that might have assisted the origins of life on young rocky planets with a sufficiently differentiated crust/mantle structure. Future investigations are recommended to better quantify the complex relationships between energy release, radioactive grain size, fissionability, reactant phase, phosphorus

  13. Actinide isotopic analysis systems

    This manual provides instructions and procedures for using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's two-detector actinide isotope analysis system to measure plutonium samples with other possible actinides (including uranium, americium, and neptunium) by gamma-ray spectrometry. The computer program that controls the system and analyzes the gamma-ray spectral data is driven by a menu of one-, two-, or three-letter options chosen by the operator. Provided in this manual are descriptions of these options and their functions, plus detailed instructions (operator dialog) for choosing among the options. Also provided are general instructions for calibrating the actinide isotropic analysis system and for monitoring its performance. The inventory measurement of a sample's total plutonium and other actinides content is determined by two nondestructive measurements. One is a calorimetry measurement of the sample's heat or power output, and the other is a gamma-ray spectrometry measurement of its relative isotopic abundances. The isotopic measurements needed to interpret the observed calorimetric power measurement are the relative abundances of various plutonium and uranium isotopes and americium-241. The actinide analysis system carries out these measurements. 8 figs

  14. Combined imaging and velocity estimation by Joint Migration Inversion

    Staal, X.R.

    2015-01-01

    Seismic imaging projects aim to reveal the structure of the earths crust from seismic data. These projects typically include three separate processing steps, being: • attenuation of multiple reflections in the seismic data. • estimating seismic wave propagation velocities from the seismic data. • ma

  15. Radiochemistry and actinide chemistry

    The analysis of trace amounts of actinide elements by means of radiochemistry, is discussed. The similarities between radiochemistry and actinide chemistry, in the case of species amount by cubic cm below 1012, are explained. The parameters which allow to define what are the observable chemical reactions, are given. The classification of radionuclides in micro or macrocomponents is considered. The validity of the mass action law and the partition function in the definition of the average number of species for trace amounts, is investigated. Examples illustrating the results are given

  16. Estimating Risk and Return Combinations for New Derivatives Funds

    Alexandre Bona

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Active funds are typically managed by placing bets against a well defined passive bench-mark. In this context, when examining the launching of a new actively managed fund with a target expected excess rate of return relative to the benchmark equal to µ, asset managers face the problem of estimating the risk σ of excess rates of return. This estimate is critical to examine whether the product is commercially feasible and to define risk limits for the manager, if the product is launched. This paper proceeds to examine the solution to this problem assuming an especial form of the binomial model, in the context of the market timing structure advanced by Merton (1981. The paper shows that two variables are relevant for the solution of the proposed problem. The first, and the most relevant, is the skill level of the manager. A ore skilled manager is able to operate a less risky product with the same target excess rate of return µ. The second relevant variable is the trade-off between risk and return determined by existing investment opportunities in the market. The smaller the increases in risk exposure required to obtain an increase in excess returns, the less risky the product will be After solving the problem under specific assumptions, the paper proceeds to test empirically their validity using a representative sample of hedge funds in the Brazilian market. The empirical results strongly support the validity of the required assumptions.

  17. An estimation of Erinaceidae phylogeny: a combined analysis approach.

    Kai He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Erinaceidae is a family of small mammals that include the spiny hedgehogs (Erinaceinae and the silky-furred moonrats and gymnures (Galericinae. These animals are widely distributed across Eurasia and Africa, from the tundra to the tropics and the deserts to damp forests. The importance of these animals lies in the fact that they are the oldest known living placental mammals, which are well represented in the fossil record, a rarity fact given their size and vulnerability to destruction during fossilization. Although the Family has been well studied, their phylogenetic relationships remain controversial. To test previous phylogenetic hypotheses, we combined molecular and morphological data sets, including representatives of all the genera. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We included in the analyses 3,218 bp mitochondrial genes, one hundred and thirty-five morphological characters, twenty-two extant erinaceid taxa, and five outgroup taxa. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed using both partitioned and combined data sets. As in previous analyses, our results strongly support the monophyly of both subfamilies (Galericinae and Erinaceinae, the Hylomys group (to include Neotetracus and Neohylomys, and a sister-relationship of Atelerix and Erinaceus. As well, we verified that the extremely long branch lengths within the Galericinae are consistent with their fossil records. Not surprisingly, we found significant incongruence between the phylogenetic signals of the genes and the morphological characters, specifically in the case of Hylomys parvus, Mesechinus, and relationships between Hemiechinus and Paraechinus. CONCLUSIONS: Although we discovered new clues to understanding the evolutionary relationships within the Erinaceidae, our results nonetheless, strongly suggest that more robust analyses employing more complete taxon sampling (to include fossils and multiple unlinked genes would greatly enhance our understanding of the

  18. Actinide separative chemistry

    Actinide separative chemistry has focused very heavy work during the last decades. The main was nuclear spent fuel reprocessing: solvent extraction processes appeared quickly a suitable, an efficient way to recover major actinides (uranium and plutonium), and an extensive research, concerning both process chemistry and chemical engineering technologies, allowed the industrial development in this field. We can observe for about half a century a succession of Purex plants which, if based on the same initial discovery (i.e. the outstanding properties of a molecule, the famous TBP), present huge improvements at each step, for a large part due to an increased mastery of the mechanisms involved. And actinide separation should still focus R and D in the near future: there is a real, an important need for this, even if reprocessing may appear as a mature industry. We can present three main reasons for this. First, actinide recycling appear as a key-issue for future nuclear fuel cycles, both for waste management optimization and for conservation of natural resource; and the need concerns not only major actinide but also so-called minor ones, thus enlarging the scope of the investigation. Second, extraction processes are not well mastered at microscopic scale: there is a real, great lack in fundamental knowledge, useful or even necessary for process optimization (for instance, how to design the best extracting molecule, taken into account the several notifications and constraints, from selectivity to radiolytic resistivity?); and such a need for a real optimization is to be more accurate with the search of always cheaper, cleaner processes. And then, there is room too for exploratory research, on new concepts-perhaps for processing quite new fuels- which could appear attractive and justify further developments to be properly assessed: pyro-processes first, but also others, like chemistry in 'extreme' or 'unusual' conditions (supercritical solvents, sono-chemistry, could be

  19. FMRI group analysis combining effect estimates and their variances.

    Chen, Gang; Saad, Ziad S; Nath, Audrey R; Beauchamp, Michael S; Cox, Robert W

    2012-03-01

    Conventional functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) group analysis makes two key assumptions that are not always justified. First, the data from each subject is condensed into a single number per voxel, under the assumption that within-subject variance for the effect of interest is the same across all subjects or is negligible relative to the cross-subject variance. Second, it is assumed that all data values are drawn from the same Gaussian distribution with no outliers. We propose an approach that does not make such strong assumptions, and present a computationally efficient frequentist approach to FMRI group analysis, which we term mixed-effects multilevel analysis (MEMA), that incorporates both the variability across subjects and the precision estimate of each effect of interest from individual subject analyses. On average, the more accurate tests result in higher statistical power, especially when conventional variance assumptions do not hold, or in the presence of outliers. In addition, various heterogeneity measures are available with MEMA that may assist the investigator in further improving the modeling. Our method allows group effect t-tests and comparisons among conditions and among groups. In addition, it has the capability to incorporate subject-specific covariates such as age, IQ, or behavioral data. Simulations were performed to illustrate power comparisons and the capability of controlling type I errors among various significance testing methods, and the results indicated that the testing statistic we adopted struck a good balance between power gain and type I error control. Our approach is instantiated in an open-source, freely distributed program that may be used on any dataset stored in the universal neuroimaging file transfer (NIfTI) format. To date, the main impediment for more accurate testing that incorporates both within- and cross-subject variability has been the high computational cost. Our efficient implementation makes this approach

  20. Criticality analysis of aggregations of actinides from commerical nuclear waste in geological storage

    An underground nuclear-waste terminal-storage facility for either spent fuel elements or high level waste from a reprocessing plant will contain large amounts of fissionable actinides. Such a facility must be designed to preclude the concentration of these isotopes into a critical mass. Information on the critical masses of the various isotopes present in spent fuel or high level waste is required as part of such a design effort. This study provides this information. The results of this study will be used, in conjunction with geologic transport rates of the actinide compounds, to estimate mass formation probabilities in waste repositories. A computational model was developed as part of the study to perform criticality calculations rapidly and efficiently and to produce tables and plots of actinide concentration in geologic material versus critical mass. The criticality model uses a discrete ordinates approximation to neutron transport theory and treats six energy groups and spherical geometry. Neutron cross sections were obtained from ENDF/B-IV or ENDF/B-V cross section libraries. Critical masses calculated with the computational model were checked against experimental values and against more detailed calculational values and were found to be from 30 percent less to 10 percent greater. Critical mass calculations were made for five waste types, five waste ages, five actinide elements, and four geologic compositions. Minimum critical masses were calculated for over 400 combinations of the above variables. The relative importance for criticality of the various actinides and waste types is presented in terms of the number of possible critical masses per waste container

  1. Synergistic extraction of actinides : Part I. Hexa-and pentavalent actinides

    A detailed discussion on the reported literature on the synergistic extraction of hexa- and pentavalent actinide ions, by different combinations of extractants and from different aqueous media, is presented. Structural aspects of the various complexes involved in synergism also are reviewed. A short account of the applications based on synergistic extraction is also given. (author)

  2. Photochemistry of the actinides

    It has been found that all three major actinides have a useful variety of photochemical reactions which could be used to achieve a separations process that requires fewer reagents. Several features merit enumerating: (1) Laser photochemistry is not now as uniquely important in fuel reprocessing as it is in isotopic enrichment. The photochemistry can be successfully accomplished with conventional light sources. (2) The easiest place to apply photo-reprocessing is on the three actinides U, Pu, and Np. The solutions are potentially cleaner and more amenable to photoreactions. (3) Organic-phase photoreactions are probably not worth much attention because of the troublesome solvent redox chemistry associated with the photochemical reaction. (4) Upstream process treatment on the raffinate (dissolver solution) may never be too attractive since the radiation intensity precludes the usage of many optical materials and the nature of the solution is such that light transmission into it might be totally impossible

  3. Recovering actinide values

    Actinide values are recovered from sodium carbonate scrub waste solutions containing these and other values along with organic compounds resulting from the radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation of neutral organophosphorus extractants such as tri-n butyl phosphate (TBP) and dihexyl-N, N-diethyl carbamylmethylene phosphonate (DHDECMP) which have been used in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear reactor fuels. The scrub waste solution is made acidic with mineral acid, to form a feed solution which is then contacted with a water-immiscible, highly polar organic extractant which selectively extracts the degradation products from the feed solution. The feed solution can then be processed to recover the actinides for storage or recycled back into the high-level waste process stream. The extractant can be recycled after stripping the degradation products with a neutral sodium carbonate solution. (author)

  4. Actinides: why are they important biologically

    The following topics are discussed: actinide elements in energy systems; biological hazards of the actinides; radiation protection standards; and purposes of actinide biological research with regard to toxicity, metabolism, and therapeutic regimens

  5. Photoelectron spectra of actinide compounds

    A brief overview of the application of photoelectron spectroscopy is presented for the study of actinide materials. Phenomenology as well as specific materials are discussed with illustrative examples

  6. Fitting a linear regression model by combining least squares and least absolute value estimation

    Allende, Sira; Bouza, Carlos; Romero, Isidro

    1995-01-01

    Robust estimation of the multiple regression is modeled by using a convex combination of Least Squares and Least Absolute Value criterions. A Bicriterion Parametric algorithm is developed for computing the corresponding estimates. The proposed procedure should be specially useful when outliers are expected. Its behavior is analyzed using some examples.

  7. Neutron interrogation of actinides with a 17 MeV electron accelerator and first results from photon and neutron interrogation non-simultaneous measurements combination

    Sari, A., E-mail: adrien.sari@cea.fr [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Carrel, F.; Lainé, F. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Lyoussi, A. [CEA, DEN, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2013-10-01

    In this article, we demonstrate the feasibility of neutron interrogation using the conversion target of a 17 MeV linear electron accelerator as a neutron generator. Signals from prompt neutrons, delayed neutrons, and delayed gamma-rays, emitted by both uranium and plutonium samples were analyzed. First results from photon and neutron interrogation non-simultaneous measurements combination are also reported in this paper. Feasibility of this technique is shown in the frame of the measurement of uranium enrichment. The latter was carried out by combining detection of prompt neutrons from thermal fission and delayed neutrons from photofission, and by combining delayed gamma-rays from thermal fission and delayed gamma-rays from photofission.

  8. Optical techniques for actinide research

    In recent years, substantial gains have been made in the development of spectroscopic techniques for electronic properties studies. These techniques have seen relatively small, but growing, application in the field of actinide research. Photoemission spectroscopies, reflectivity and absorption studies, and x-ray techniques will be discussed and illustrative examples of studies on actinide materials will be presented

  9. Estimation of unemployment rates using small area estimation model by combining time series and cross-sectional data

    Muchlisoh, Siti; Kurnia, Anang; Notodiputro, Khairil Anwar; Mangku, I. Wayan

    2016-02-01

    Labor force surveys conducted over time by the rotating panel design have been carried out in many countries, including Indonesia. Labor force survey in Indonesia is regularly conducted by Statistics Indonesia (Badan Pusat Statistik-BPS) and has been known as the National Labor Force Survey (Sakernas). The main purpose of Sakernas is to obtain information about unemployment rates and its changes over time. Sakernas is a quarterly survey. The quarterly survey is designed only for estimating the parameters at the provincial level. The quarterly unemployment rate published by BPS (official statistics) is calculated based on only cross-sectional methods, despite the fact that the data is collected under rotating panel design. The study purpose to estimate a quarterly unemployment rate at the district level used small area estimation (SAE) model by combining time series and cross-sectional data. The study focused on the application and comparison between the Rao-Yu model and dynamic model in context estimating the unemployment rate based on a rotating panel survey. The goodness of fit of both models was almost similar. Both models produced an almost similar estimation and better than direct estimation, but the dynamic model was more capable than the Rao-Yu model to capture a heterogeneity across area, although it was reduced over time.

  10. Comparison of Point and Line Features and Their Combination for Rigid Body Motion Estimation

    Pilz, Florian; Pugeault, Nicolas; Krüger, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the usage of dierent image features and their combination in the context of estimating the motion of rigid bodies (RBM estimation). From stereo image sequences, we extract line features at local edges (coded in so called multi-modal primitives) as well as point features (by...... means of SIFT descriptors). All features are then matched across stereo and time, and we use these correspondences to estimate the RBM by solving the 3D-2D pose estimation problem. We test dierent feature sets on various stereo image sequences, recorded in realistic outdoor and indoor scenes. We...

  11. A digital combining-weight estimation algorithm for broadband sources with the array feed compensation system

    Vilnrotter, V. A.; Rodemich, E. R.

    1994-01-01

    An algorithm for estimating the optimum combining weights for the Ka-band (33.7-GHz) array feed compensation system was developed and analyzed. The input signal is assumed to be broadband radiation of thermal origin, generated by a distant radio source. Currently, seven video converters operating in conjunction with the real-time correlator are used to obtain these weight estimates. The algorithm described here requires only simple operations that can be implemented on a PC-based combining system, greatly reducing the amount of hardware. Therefore, system reliability and portability will be improved.

  12. Combining Lidar and Synthetic Aperture Radar Data to Estimate Forest Biomass: Status and Prospects

    Sanna Kaasalainen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research activities combining lidar and radar remote sensing have increased in recent years. The main focus in combining lidar-radar forest remote sensing has been on the retrieval of the aboveground biomass (AGB, which is a primary variable related to carbon cycle in land ecosystems, and has therefore been identified as an essential climate variable. In this review, we summarize the studies combining lidar and radar in estimating forest AGB. We discuss the complementary use of lidar and radar according to the relevance of the added value. The most promising prospects for combining lidar and radar data are in the use of lidar-derived ground elevations for improving large-area biomass estimates from radar, and in upscaling of lidar-based AGB data across large areas covered by spaceborne radar missions.

  13. Managing Inventories of Heavy Actinides

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has stored a limited inventory of heavy actinides contained in irradiated targets, some partially processed, at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The 'heavy actinides' of interest include plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes; specifically 242Pu and 244Pu, 243Am, and 244/246/248Cm. No alternate supplies of these heavy actinides and no other capabilities for producing them are currently available. Some of these heavy actinide materials are important for use as feedstock for producing heavy isotopes and elements needed for research and commercial application. The rare isotope 244Pu is valuable for research, environmental safeguards, and nuclear forensics. Because the production of these heavy actinides was made possible only by the enormous investment of time and money associated with defense production efforts, the remaining inventories of these rare nuclear materials are an important part of the legacy of the Nuclear Weapons Program. Significant unique heavy actinide inventories reside in irradiated Mark-18A and Mark-42 targets at SRS and ORNL, with no plans to separate and store the isotopes for future use. Although the costs of preserving these heavy actinide materials would be considerable, for all practical purposes they are irreplaceable. The effort required to reproduce these heavy actinides today would likely cost billions of dollars and encompass a series of irradiation and chemical separation cycles for at least 50 years; thus, reproduction is virtually impossible. DOE has a limited window of opportunity to recover and preserve these heavy actinides before they are disposed of as waste. A path forward is presented to recover and manage these irreplaceable National Asset materials for future use in research, nuclear forensics, and other potential applications.

  14. Analysis of optical properties of actinide dioxides

    Ionic calculations, symmetry considerations, and detailed analysis of reflectivity experiments have been used to identify general features of the band structure of actinide dioxides with a fluorite lattice. The ionic calculations adjust atomic energy levels by the electrostatic energies arising from long range electric fields of the ionic lattice; the labelling of high lying energy bands is determined by symmetry; experimental analysis includes the use of appropriate sum rules. A combination of these considerations enable a tentative band scheme to be constructed. It is suggested that there are filled valence bands (GAMMA15,GAMMA'25) originating in oxygen 2p-states and empty conduction bands (GAMMA1,GAMMA12,GAMMA'25) originating in actinide 7s and 6d states. The mean band gap (Penn gap) is of the order of 14 eV. The actinide f-electron states, which lie approximately 5 eV below the conduction bands, are taken to be localized - at least in UO2. (author)

  15. ESTIMATION OF IN-PLACE STRENGTH OF CONCRETE WITH COMBINED NONDESTRUCTIVE METHOD

    İsa YÜKSEL

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents estimation of concrete strength by the SONREB method that is a combined non-destructive testing method and application of the method on a reinforced concrete building structure. Comparison of results of both destructive and non-destructive test results is introduced also. The SONREB method is based on evaluation of the combination of Schmidt hammer readings and ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements. The measured material properties are correlated with compressive strength...

  16. Concentration of actinides in the food chain

    Considerable concern is now being expressed over the discharge of actinides into the environment. This report presents a brief review of the chemistry of the actinides and examines the evidence for interaction of the actinides with some naturally-occurring chelating agents and other factors which might stimulate actinide concentration in the food chain of man. This report also reviews the evidence for concentration of actinides in plants and for uptake through the gastrointestinal tract. (author)

  17. Combined InSAR and GRACE estimate of West Antarctic mass changes

    Ingo Sasgen; Martinec, Z.; J. Bamber; Kevin Fleming;  

    2008-01-01

    We provide mass balance estimates for seven West Antarctic drainage basins using InSAR and GRACE Level 2 data.We combine both data sets in a constrained gravity- field inversion, which involves forward modelling of geoid changes based on mass balance estimates and their uncertainties from InSAR. We determine the spatial resolution of GRACE over Antarctica and use it to calculate unconstrained (GRACE only) mass balance estimates for a reduced number of drainage basins. We compare InSAR, constr...

  18. Production and measurement of minor actinides in the commercial fuel cycle

    Stanbro, W.D. [comp.

    1997-03-01

    The minor actinide elements, particularly neptunium and americium, are produced as a normal byproduct of the operation of thermal power reactors. Because of the existence of long-lived isotopes of these elements, they constitute the major sources of the residual radiation in spent fuel or in wastes resulting from reprocessing. This has led to examinations by some countries of the possibility of separating the minor actinides from waste products. The papers found in this report address the production of minor actinides in common thermal power reactors as well as approaches to measure these materials in various media. The first paper in this volume, {open_quotes}Production of Minor Actinides in the Commercial Fuel Cycle,{close_quotes} uses calculations with the ORIGEN2 reactor and decay code to estimate the amounts of minor actinides in spent fuel and separated plutonium as a function of reactor irradiation and the time after discharge. The second paper, {open_quotes}Destructive Assay of Minor Actinides,{close_quotes} describes a number of promising approaches for the chemical analysis of minor actinides in the various forms in which they are found at reprocessing plants. The next paper, {open_quotes}Hybrid KED/XRF Measurement of Minor Actinides in Reprocessing Plants,{close_quotes} uses the results of a simulation model to examine the possible applications of the hybrid KED/XRF instrument to the determination of minor actinides in some of the solutions found in reprocessing plants. In {open_quotes}Calorimetric Assay of Minor Actinides,{close_quotes} the authors show some possible extensions of this powerful technique beyond the normal plutonium assays to include the minor actinides. Finally, the last paper in this volume, {open_quotes}Environment Measurements of Transuranic Nuclides,{close_quotes} discusses what is known about the levels of the minor actinides in the environment and ways to analyze for these materials in environmental matrices.

  19. Combining the triangle method with thermal inertia to estimate regional evapotranspiration

    Stisen, Simon; Sandholt, Inge; Nørgaard, Anette;

    2008-01-01

    Spatially distributed estimates of evaporative fraction and actual evapotranspiration are pursued using a simple remote sensing technique based on a remotely sensed vegetation index (NDVI) and diurnal changes in land surface temperature. The technique, known as the triangle method, is improved by...... utilizing the high temporal resolution of the geostationary MSG-SEVIRI sensor. With 15 min acquisition intervals, the MSG-SEVIRI data allow for a precise estimation of the morning rise in land surface temperature which is a strong proxy for total daytime sensible heat fluxes. Combining the diurnal change in...... surface temperature, dTs with an interpretation of the triangular shaped dTs-NDVI space allows for a direct estimation of evaporative fraction. The mean daytime energy available for evapotranspiration (Rn-G) is estimated using several remote sensors and limited ancillary data. Finally regional estimates...

  20. Estimating demographic parameters using a combination of known-fate and open N-mixture models

    Schmidt, Joshua H.; Johnson, Devin S.; Lindberg, Mark S.; Adams, Layne G.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimates of demographic parameters are required to infer appropriate ecological relationships and inform management actions. Known-fate data from marked individuals are commonly used to estimate survival rates, whereas N-mixture models use count data from unmarked individuals to estimate multiple demographic parameters. However, a joint approach combining the strengths of both analytical tools has not been developed. Here we develop an integrated model combining known-fate and open N-mixture models, allowing the estimation of detection probability, recruitment, and the joint estimation of survival. We demonstrate our approach through both simulations and an applied example using four years of known-fate and pack count data for wolves (Canis lupus). Simulation results indicated that the integrated model reliably recovered parameters with no evidence of bias, and survival estimates were more precise under the joint model. Results from the applied example indicated that the marked sample of wolves was biased toward individuals with higher apparent survival rates than the unmarked pack mates, suggesting that joint estimates may be more representative of the overall population. Our integrated model is a practical approach for reducing bias while increasing precision and the amount of information gained from mark–resight data sets. We provide implementations in both the BUGS language and an R package.

  1. [Hygienic estimation of combined influence of noise and infrasound on the organism of military men].

    Akhmetzianov, I M; Zinkin, V N; Petreev, I V; Dragan, S P

    2011-11-01

    Hygienic estimation of combined influence of noise and infrasound on the organism of military men. Combined influence of noise and infrasound is accompanied by essential increase of risk of development neurosensory deafness and hypertensive illness. At combined influence of noise and infrasound with a maximum of a spectrum in the field of a sound range the probability of development neurosensory deafness will prevail. Thus probability of development of pathology of ear above the values established ISO 1999:1990. In a case if the spectrum maximum is necessary on an infrasonic range the probability of development of a hypertensive illness. PMID:22329172

  2. Generalized weighted functional proportional mean combining forecasting model and its method of parameter estimation

    万玉成; 盛昭瀚

    2004-01-01

    A new kind of combining forecasting model based on the generalized weighted functional proportional mean is proposed and the parameter estimation method of its weighting coefficients by means of the algorithm of quadratic programming is given. This model has extensive representation. It is a new kind of aggregative method of group forecasting.By taking the suitable combining form of the forecasting models and seeking the optimal parameter, the optimal combining form can be obtained and the forecasting accuracy can be improved. The effectiveness of this model is demonstrated by an example.

  3. Estimation of concrete strength by non-destructive combined method and its application

    The purpose of this report is to obtain a practical expression for estimating the compressive strength of concrete using the non-destructive method of testing combining rebound number and ultrasonic pulse velocity at the construction sites for obtaining highest accuracy in predicting the compressive strength

  4. Combining satellite altimetry and gravimetry data to improve Antarctic mass balance and gia estimates

    Gunter, B.C.; Didova, O.; Riva, R.E.M.; van den Broeke, M.R.; Ligtenberg, S.R.M.; Lenaerts, J.T.M.; King, M.; Urban, T.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores an approach that simultaneously estimates Antarctic mass balance and glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) through the combination of satellite gravity and altimetry data sets. The results improve upon previous efforts by incorporating reprocessed data sets over a longer period of t

  5. Environmental research on actinide elements

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers

  6. ESTIMATION OF IN-PLACE STRENGTH OF CONCRETE WITH COMBINED NONDESTRUCTIVE METHOD

    İsa YÜKSEL

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents estimation of concrete strength by the SONREB method that is a combined non-destructive testing method and application of the method on a reinforced concrete building structure. Comparison of results of both destructive and non-destructive test results is introduced also. The SONREB method is based on evaluation of the combination of Schmidt hammer readings and ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements. The measured material properties are correlated with compressive strength of concrete by using special iso-strength curves established in the laboratory. The strength is also checked with strength of cores drilled from suitable positions on the building. In-place strength of concrete giving without any structural damage to the structure could be estimated rapidly and approximately with the SONREB method. It was concluded that the special isostrength curves increase sensitivity of in-place compressive strength estimation of concrete.

  7. Selective extraction of trivalent actinides from lanthanides with dithiophosphinic acids and tributylphosphate

    A variety of chemical systems have been developed to separate trivalent actinides from lanthanides based on the slightly stronger complexation of the trivalent actinides with ligands that contain soft donor atoms. The greater stability of the actinide complexes in these systems has often been attributed to a slightly greater covalent bonding component for the actinide ions relative to the lanthanide ions. The authors have investigated several synergistic extraction systems that use ligands with a combination of oxygen and sulfur donor atoms that achieve a good group separation of the trivalent actinides and lanthanides. For example, the combination of dicyclohexyldithiophosphinic acid and tributylphosphate has shown separation factors of up to 800 for americium over europium in a single extraction stage. Such systems could find application in advanced partitioning schemes for nuclear waste

  8. Properties of minor actinide nitrides

    The present status of the research on properties of minor actinide nitrides for the development of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle based on nitride fuel and pyrochemical reprocessing is described. Some thermal stabilities of Am-based nitrides such as AmN and (Am, Zr)N were mainly investigated. Stabilization effect of ZrN was cleary confirmed for the vaporization and hydrolytic behaviors. New experimental equipments for measuring thermal properties of minor actinide nitrides were also introduced. (author)

  9. Actinides in irradiated graphite of RBMK-1500 reactor

    Highlights: • Activation of actinides in the graphite of the RBMK-1500 reactor was analyzed. • Numerical modeling using SCALE 6.1 and MCNPX was used for actinide calculation. • Measurements of the irradiated graphite sample were used for model validation. • Results are important for further decommissioning process of the RBMK type reactors. - Abstract: The activation of graphite in the nuclear power plants is the problem of high importance related with later graphite reprocessing or disposal. The activation of actinide impurities in graphite due to their toxicity determines a particular long term risk to waste management. In this work the activation of actinides in the graphite constructions of the RBMK-1500 reactor is determined by nuclear spectrometry measurements of the irradiated graphite sample from the Ignalina NPP Unit I and by means of numerical modeling using two independent codes SCALE 6.1 (using TRITON-VI sequence) and MCNPX (v2.7 with CINDER). Both models take into account the 3D RBMK-1500 reactor core fragment with explicit graphite construction including a stack and a sleeve but with a different simplification level concerning surrounding graphite and construction of control roads. The verification of the model has been performed by comparing calculated and measured isotope ratios of actinides. Also good prediction capabilities of the actinide activation in the irradiated graphite have been found for both calculation approaches. The initial U impurity concentration in the graphite model has been adjusted taking into account the experimental results. The specific activities of actinides in the irradiated RBMK-1500 graphite constructions have been obtained and differences between numerical simulation results, different structural parts (sleeve and stack) as well as comparison with previous results (Ancius et al., 2005) have been discussed. The obtained results are important for further decommissioning process of the Ignalina NPP and other RBMK

  10. Actinide behavior under final repository relevant conditions

    Experiments on the solubility behavior and the redox chemistry of actinides and long-living fission products under different geochemical boundary conditions, here on the Np(V) solubility in alkaline CaCl2 systems, provide basic information on processes that can occur in a nuclear final repository in case of water ingress. The thermodynamic constants derived from these experiments allow the geochemical modeling of these processes and a rough estimation of radionuclide solubility limits for different scenarios. Scientific research projects on this issue will reduce the uncertainties of long-term safety analyses for final repositories for high-level radioactive wastes significantly.

  11. Gamma spectrometry of chemically separated actinides and lanthanides

    The long lived alpha emitting actinide elements present in radioactive effluents from irradiated fuel reprocessing plants are considered the main problem in waste management. In the waste of Th-U fuel cycle protactinium and neptunium are of special interest and their estimation technique is described

  12. Electron-phonon coupling of the actinide metals

    Skriver, H. L.; Mertig, I.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have estimated the strength of the electron-phonon coupling in Fr and Ra plus the light actinides Ac through Pu. The underlying self-consistent band-structure calculations were performed by the scalar relativistic linear-muffin-tin-orbital method including l quantum numbers s through g...

  13. A Bayesian Combined Model for Time-Dependent Turning Movement Proportions Estimation at Intersections

    Pengpeng Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-dependent turning movement flows are very important input data for intelligent transportation systems but are impossible to be detected directly through current traffic surveillance systems. Existing estimation models have proved to be not accurate and reliable enough during all intervals. An improved way to address this problem is to develop a combined model framework that can integrate multiple submodels running simultaneously. This paper first presents a back propagation neural network model to estimate dynamic turning movements, as well as the self-adaptive learning rate approach and the gradient descent with momentum method for solving. Second, this paper develops an efficient Kalman filtering model and designs a revised sequential Kalman filtering algorithm. Based on the Bayesian method using both historical data and currently estimated results for error calibration, this paper further integrates above two submodels into a Bayesian combined model framework and proposes a corresponding algorithm. A field survey is implemented at an intersection in Beijing city to collect both time series of link counts and actual time-dependent turning movement flows, including historical and present data. The reported estimation results show that the Bayesian combined model is much more accurate and stable than other models.

  14. In vivo measurement of actinides in the human lung

    The problems associated with the in vivo detection and measurement of actinides in the human lung are discussed together with various measurement systems currently in use. In particular, the methods and calibration procedures employed at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, namely, the use of twin Phoswich detectors and a new, more realistic, tissue-equivalent phantom, are described. Methods for the measurement of chest-wall thickness, fat content, and normal human background counts are also discussed. Detection-efficiency values and minimum detectable activity estimates are given for three common actinides, 238Pu, 239Pu, and 241Am

  15. Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants

    The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977

  16. Simultaneous derivative spectrophotometric estimation of aceclofenac and tramadol with paracetamol in combination solid dosage forms

    Srinivasan K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A derivative spectrophotometric procedure has been developed for the simultaneous determination of individual combination of aceclofenac and tramadol with paracetamol in combined tablet preparation. Tablet extracts of the drugs were prepared in distilled water. The zero crossing point technique and the compensation technique were used to estimate the amount of each drug in the combined formulations, and were compared. The results were found to be accurate and free from interferences. The procedure is rapid, simple, nondestructive, and does not require solutions of equations. Calibration graphs are linear (r=0.9999, with a zero intercept up to 24 mg/ml of each drug in combination with paracetamol. Detection limits at the p = 0.05 level of significance were calculated to be 0.5 mg/ml of aceclofenac, tramadol and paracetamol respectively.

  17. Potential radiation dose from eating fish exposed to actinide contamination

    Emery, R.M.; Klopfer, D.C.; Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a maximum potential for transporting actinides to man via fish consumption. The study took place in U-Pond, a nuclear waste pond on the Hanford Site. It has concentrations of /sup 238/U, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 239,240/Pu and /sup 241/Am that are approximately three orders of magnitude greater than background levels. Fish living in the pond contain higher actinide concentrations than those observed in fish from any other location. Experiments were performed in U-pond to determine maximum quantities of actinides that could accumulate in fillets and whole bodies of two centrarchid fish species. Doses to hypothetical consumers were then estimated by assuming that actinide behavior in their bodies was similar to that defined for Standard Man by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Results indicate that highest concentrations occurring in bluegill or bass muscle after more than a year's exposure to the pond would not be sufficient to produce a significant radiation dose to a human consumer, even if he ate 0.5 kg (approx.1 lb) of these fillets every day for 70 years. Natural predators (heron or coyote), having lifetime diets of whole fish from U-Pond, would receive less radiation dose from the ingested actinides than from natural background sources. 34 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Potential radiation dose from eating fish exposed to actinide contamination

    The purpose of this work is to establish a maximum potential for transporting actinides to man via fish consumption. The study took place in U-Pond, a nuclear waste pond on the Hanford Site. It has concentrations of 238U, 238Pu, /sup 239,240/Pu and 241Am that are approximately three orders of magnitude greater than background levels. Fish living in the pond contain higher actinide concentrations than those observed in fish from any other location. Experiments were performed in U-pond to determine maximum quantities of actinides that could accumulate in fillets and whole bodies of two centrarchid fish species. Doses to hypothetical consumers were then estimated by assuming that actinide behavior in their bodies was similar to that defined for Standard Man by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Results indicate that highest concentrations occurring in bluegill or bass muscle after more than a year's exposure to the pond would not be sufficient to produce a significant radiation dose to a human consumer, even if he ate 0.5 kg (∼1 lb) of these fillets every day for 70 years. Natural predators (heron or coyote), having lifetime diets of whole fish from U-Pond, would receive less radiation dose from the ingested actinides than from natural background sources. 34 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Systematic view of optical absorption spectra in the actinide series

    In recent years sufficient new spectra of actinides in their numerous valence states have been measured to encourage a broader scale analysis effort than was attempted in the past. Theoretical modelling in terms of effective operators has also undergone development. Well established electronic structure parameters for the trivalent actinides are being used as a basis for estimating parameters in other valence states and relationships to atomic spectra are being extended. Recent contributions to our understanding of the spectra of 4+ actinides have been particularly revealing and supportive of a developing general effort to progress beyond a preoccupation with modelling structure to consideration of the much broader area of structure-bonding relationships. We summarize here both the developments in modelling electronic structure and the interpretation of apparent trends in bonding. 60 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  20. Estimation of Heterosis and Combining Ability in Petunia (Petunia hybrida Hort.

    Hassan BAYAT

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Combining ability and heterosis were estimated for ornamental and vegetative traits of four petunia (Petunia hybrida Hort. inbred lines viz. L5 (P1, L8 (P2, L11 (P3 and L17 (P4 and their diallel hybrids in horticultural research farm of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran in 2011. The measured traits were plant height at first flower, number of leaf to first flower, flower diameter, flower tube length, internode length, stem diameter, plant height at flowering stage, plant spreading, number of branches per plant, leaf length and width. The results of combining ability for all studied traits revealed that both additive and non-additive gene effects contributed to the inheritance of the traits. Estimates of general combining ability effects showed that parent P3 was a good general combiner for most of the studied traits. For flower diameter, hybrid combination P1 � P2 had the highest significant positive specific combining ability effects. Reciprocal effects were significant for all traits and hybrid combination P1 � P2 had the highest significant positive reciprocal effects for flower tube length and plant height. Heterosis was found significant relative to both the mid parent and batter parent for all traits. For flower diameter, the highest positive values of heterotic effects were recorded in hybrid combination P2 � P3 both relative to the parental mean (37.3% and relative to the better parent (33.9%. It is obvious that heterotic effects represent an important resource in hybrid breeding of petunia.

  1. THERMODYNAMICS OF THE ACTINIDES

    Cunningham, Burris B.

    1962-04-01

    Recent work on the thermodynamic properties of the transplutonium elements is presented and discussed in relation to trends in thermodynamic properties of the actinide series. Accurate values are given for room temperature lattice parameters of two crystallographic forms, (facecentred cubic) fcc and dhcp (double-hexagonal closepacked), of americium metal and for the coefficients of thermal expansion between 157 and 878 deg K (dhcp) and 295 to 633 deg K (fcc). The meiting point of the metal, and its magnetic susceptibility between 77 and 823 deg K are reported and the latter compared with theoretical values for the tripositive ion calculated from spectroscopic data. Similar data (crystallography, meiting point and magnetic susceptibility) are given for metallic curium. A value for the heat of formation of americium monoxide is reported in conjunction with crystallographic data on the monoxide and mononitride. A revision is made in the current value for the heat of formation of Am/O/sub 2/ and for the potential of the Am(III)-Am(IV) couple. The crystal structures and lattice parameters are reported for the trichloride, oxychloride and oxides of californium. (auth)

  2. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    Nash, Ken [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Martin, Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lumetta, Gregg [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-02

    necessary for commercial fuel processing supporting transmutation of transplutonium elements. This research project continued basic themes investigated by this research group during the past decade. In the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program at DOE, the current favorite process for accomplishing the separation of trivalent actinides from fission product lanthanides is the TALSPEAK process. TALSPEAK is a solvent extraction method (developed at Oak Ridge National Lab in the 1960s) based on the combination of a cation exchanging extractant (e.g., HDEHP), an actinide-selective aminopolycarboxylate complexing agent (e.g., DTPA), and a carboxylic acid buffer to control pH in the range of 3-4. Considerable effort has been expended in this research group during the past 8 years to elaborate the details of TALSPEAK in the interest of developing improved approaches to the operation of TALSPEAK-like systems. In this project we focused on defining aggregation phenomena in conventional TALSPEAK separations, on supporting the development of Advanced TALSPEAK processes, on profiling the aqueous complexation kinetics of lanthanides in TALSPEAK relevant aqueous media, on the design of new diglycolamide and N-donor extractants, and on characterizing cation-cation complexes of pentavalent actinides.

  3. A Probabilistic Power Estimation Method for Combinational Circuits Under Real Gate Delay Model

    Theodoridis, G.; S. Theoharis; Soudris, D.; C. Goutis

    2001-01-01

    Our aim is the development of a novel probabilistic method to estimate the power consumption of a combinational circuit under real gate delay model handling temporal, structural and input pattern dependencies. The chosen gate delay model allows handling both the functional and spurious transitions. It is proved that the switching activity evaluation problem assuming real gate delay model is reduced to the zero delay switching activity evaluation problem at specific time instances. A modified ...

  4. SIMULTANEOUS ESTIMATION OF ABACAVIR, LAMIVUDINE AND ZIDOVUDINE IN COMBINED TABLET DOSAGE FORM BY UV SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC METHOD

    Nagulwar Vaishali P; Bhusari Kishor P

    2011-01-01

    The present study deals with the development of an accurate, economical and reproducible UV spectrophotometric method for the simultaneous estimation of abacavir, lamivudine and zidovudine in pure bulk drug and in combined tablet dosage form. The stock solutions were prepared in acetonitrile followed by the further required dilutions with distilled water. The λ max for abacavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine were observed at 295.6, 279.8 and 266.2 nm respectively and linearity was also shown at ...

  5. An approach for parameter estimation of combined CPPM and LFM radar signal

    Zhang Wei; Xiong Ying; Wang Pei; Wang Jun; Tang Bin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,the problem of parameter estimation of the combined radar signal adopting chaotic pulse position modulation (CPPM) and linear frequency modulation (LFM),which can be widely used in electronic countermeasures,is addressed.An approach is proposed to estimate the initial frequency and chirp rate of the combined signal by exploiting the second-order cyclostationarity of the intra-pulse signal.In addition,under the condition of the equal pulse width,the pulse repetition interval (PRI) of the combined signal is predicted using the low-order Volterra adaptive filter.Simulations demonstrate that the proposed cyclic autocorrelation Hough transform (CHT) algorithm is theoretically tolerant to additive white Gaussian noise.When the value of signal noise to ratio (SNR) is less than-4 dB,it can still estimate the intra-pulse parameters well.When SNR =-3 dB,a good prediction of the PRI sequence can be achieved by the Volterra adaptive filter algorithm,even only 100 training samples.

  6. Actinide burning and waste disposal

    Here we review technical and economic features of a new proposal for a synergistic waste-management system involving reprocessing the spent fuel otherwise destined for a U.S. high-level waste repository and transmuting the recovered actinides in a fast reactor. The proposal would require a U.S. fuel reprocessing plant, capable of recovering and recycling all actinides, including neptunium americium, and curium, from LWR spent fuel, at recoveries of 99.9% to 99.999%. The recovered transuranics would fuel the annual introduction of 14 GWe of actinide-burning liquid-metal fast reactors (ALMRs), beginning in the period 2005 to 2012. The new ALMRs would be accompanied by pyrochemical reprocessing facilities to recover and recycle all actinides from discharged ALMR fuel. By the year 2045 all of the LWR spent fuel now destined f a geologic repository would be reprocessed. Costs of constructing and operating these new reprocessing and reactor facilities would be borne by U.S. industry, from the sale of electrical energy produced. The ALMR program expects that ALMRs that burn actinides from LWR spent fuel will be more economical power producers than LWRs as early as 2005 to 2012, so that they can be prudently selected by electric utility companies for new construction of nuclear power plants in that era. Some leaders of DOE and its contractors argue that recovering actinides from spent fuel waste and burning them in fast reactors would reduce the life of the remaining waste to about 200-300 years, instead of 00,000 years. The waste could then be stored above ground until it dies out. Some argue that no geologic repositories would be needed. The current view expressed within the ALMR program is that actinide recycle technology would not replace the need for a geologic repository, but that removing actinides from the waste for even the first repository would simplify design and licensing of that repository. A second geologic repository would not be needed. Waste now planned

  7. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions

  8. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  9. Biological pathways and chemical behavior of plutonium and other actinides in the environment

    The principal long-lived actinide elements that may enter the environment from either U or Pu fuel cycles are Pu, Am, Cm, and Np. Approximately 25% of the alpha activity estimated to be released to the atmosphere from the LMFBR fuel cycle will be contributed by 241Am, 242Cm, and 244Cm. The balance of the alpha activity will come from Pu isotopes. Activities of 242Cm, 244Cm, 241Am, 243Am, and 237Np in waste may exceed concentrations of Pu isotopes in waste after various periods of decay. Thorium and uranium isotopes may also be released by operations of the thorium fuel cycle. Environmental actinides are discussed under the following headings: sources of man-made actinide elements; pathways of exposure; environmental chemistry of actinides; uptake of actinides by plants; distribution of actinides in components of White Oak Lake; entry of actinides into terrestrial food chains; relationship between chemical behavior and uptake of actinides by organisms; and behavior of Pu in freshwater and marine food chains

  10. Combining GOSAT XCO2 observations over land and ocean to improve regional CO2 flux estimates

    Deng, Feng; Jones, Dylan B. A.; O'Dell, Christopher W.; Nassar, Ray; Parazoo, Nicholas C.

    2016-02-01

    We used the GEOS-Chem data assimilation system to examine the impact of combining Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) XCO2 data over land and ocean on regional CO2 flux estimates for 2010-2012. We found that compared to assimilating only land data, combining land and ocean data produced an a posteriori CO2 distribution that is in better agreement with independent data and fluxes that are in closer agreement with existing top-down and bottom-up estimates. Adding XCO2 data over oceans changed the tropical land regions from a source of 0.64 Pg C/yr to a sink of -0.60 Pg C/yr and produced a corresponding reduction in the estimated sink in northern and southern land regions by 0.49 Pg C/yr and 0.80 Pg C/yr, respectively. This highlights the importance of improved observational coverage in the tropics to better quantify the latitudinal distribution of the terrestrial fluxes. Based only on land XCO2 data, we estimated a strong source in northern tropical South America, which experienced wet conditions in 2010-2012. In contrast, with the land and ocean data, we estimated a sink for this wet region in the north, and a source for the seasonally dry regions in the south and east, which is consistent with our understanding of the impact of moisture availability on the carbon balance of the region. Our results suggest that using satellite data with a more zonally balanced observational coverage could help mitigate discrepancies in CO2 flux estimates; further improvement could be expected with the greater observational coverage provided by the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2.

  11. Thermal-hydraulics of actinide burner reactors

    As a part of conceptual study of actinide burner reactors, core thermal-hydraulic analyses were conducted for two types of reactor concepts, namely (1) sodium-cooled actinide alloy fuel reactor, and (2) helium-cooled particle-bed reactor, to examine the feasibility of high power-density cores for efficient transmutation of actinides within the maximum allowable temperature limits of fuel and cladding. In addition, calculations were made on cooling of actinide fuel assembly. (author)

  12. Mathematical modeling of the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate biodegradation on actinide speciation

    Biodegradation of natural and anthropogenic chelating agents directly and indirectly affects the speciation, and, hence, the mobility of actinides in subsurface environments. We combined mathematical modeling with laboratory experimentation to investigate the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate biodegradation on actinide [Np(IV/V), Pu(IV)] speciation. Under aerobic conditions, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) biodegradation rates were strongly influenced by the actinide concentration. Actinide-chelate complexation reduced the relative abundance of available growth substrate in solution and actinide species present or released during chelate degradation were toxic to the organisms. Aerobic bio-utilization of the chelates as electron-donor substrates directly affected actinide speciation by releasing the radionuclides from complexed form into solution, where their fate was controlled by inorganic ligands in the system. Actinide speciation was also indirectly affected by pH changes caused by organic biodegradation. The two concurrent processes of organic biodegradation and actinide aqueous chemistry were accurately linked and described using CCBATCH, a computer model developed at Northwestern University to investigate the dynamics of coupled biological and chemical reactions in mixed waste subsurface environments. CCBATCH was then used to simulate the fate of Np during anaerobic citrate biodegradation. The modeling studies suggested that, under some conditions, chelate degradation can increase Np(IV) solubility due to carbonate complexation in closed aqueous systems

  13. Mathematical modelling of the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate biodegradation on actinide speciation

    Biodegradation of natural and anthropogenic chelating agents directly and indirectly affects the speciation, and hence, the mobility of actinides in subsurface environments. We combined mathematical modelling with laboratory experimentation to investigate the effects of aerobic and anaerobic chelate biodegradation on actinide [Np(IV/V), Pu(IV)] speciation. Under aerobic conditions, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) biodegradation rates were strongly influenced by the actinide concentration. Actinide-chelate complexation reduced the relative abundance of available growth substrate in solution and actinide species present or released during chelate degradation were toxic to the organisms. Aerobic bioutilization of the chelates as electron-donor substrates directly affected actinide speciation by releasing the radionuclides from complexed form into solution, where their fate was controlled by inorganic ligands in the system. Actinide speciation was also indirectly affected by pH changes caused by organic biodegradation. The two concurrent processes of organic biodegradation and actinide aqueous chemistry were accurately linked and described using CCBATCH, a computer model developed at Northwestern University to investigate the dynamics of coupled biological and chemical reactions in mixed waste subsurface environments. CCBATCH was then used to simulate the fate of Np during anaerobic citrate biodegradation. The modelling studies suggested that, under some conditions, chelate degradation can increase Np(IV) solubility due to carbonate complexation in closed aqueous systems. (orig.)

  14. Soil moisture estimation under a vegetation cover: combined active passive microwave remote sensing approach

    Data gathered during the NASA sponsored Multisensor Aircraft Campaign Hydrology (MACHYDRO) experiment in central Pennsylvania (U.S.A.) in July, 1990 have been analysed to study the combined use of active and passive microwave sensors for estimating soil moisture from vegetated areas. These data sets were obtained during an eleven-day period with NASA's Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR), and Push-Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) over an instrumented watershed, which included agricultural fields with a number of different crop covers. Simultaneous ground truth measurements were also made in order to characterize the state of vegetation and soil moisture under a variety of meteorological conditions. Various multi-sensor techniques are currently under investigation to improve the accuracy of remote sensing estimates of the soil moisture in the presence of vegetation and surface roughness conditions using these data sets. One such algorithm involving combination of active and passive microwave sensors is presented here, and is applied to representative corn fields in the Mahantango watershed that was the focus of study during the MACHYDRO experiment. In this algorithm, a simple emission model is inverted to obtain Fresnel reflectivity in terms of ground and vegetation parameters. Since Fresnel reflectivity depends on soil dielectric constant, soil moisture is determined from reflectivity using dielectric-soil moisture relations. The algorithm requires brightness temperature, vegetation and ground parameters as the input parameters. The former is measured by a passive microwave technique and the later two are estimated by using active microwave techniques. The soil moisture estimates obtained by this combined use of active and passive microwave remote sensing techniques, show an excellent agreement with the in situ soil moisture measurements made during the MACHYDRO experiment. (author)

  15. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO2+) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO2+; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO2+ cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO2+·UO22+, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO2+ species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO2+ have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO2+ cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe3+ and Cr3+ and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO2+·UO22+, NpO2+·Th4+, PuO2+·UO22+, and PuO2+·Th4+ at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 ± 0.2, 1.8 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 1.5, and ∼0.8 M-1

  16. Orbital effects in actinide systems

    Actinide magnetism presents a number of important challenges; in particular, the proximity of 5f band to the Fermi energy gives rise to strong interaction with both d and s like conduction electrons, and the extended nature of the 5f electrons means that they can interact with electron orbitals from neighboring atoms. Theory has recently addressed these problems. Often neglected, however, is the overwhelming evidence for large orbital contributions to the magnetic properties of actinides. Some experimental evidence for these effects are presented briefly in this paper. They point, clearly incorrectly, to a very localized picture for the 5f electrons. This dichotomy only enhances the nature of the challenge

  17. Fabrication of actinide mononitride fuel

    Fabrication of actinide mononitride fuel in JAERI is summarized. Actinide mononitride and their solid solutions were fabricated by carbothermic reduction of the oxides in N2 or N2-H2 mixed gas stream. Sintering study was also performed for the preparation of pellets for the property measurements and irradiation tests. The products were characterized to be high-purity mononitride with a single phase of NaCl-type structure. Moreover, fuel pins containing uranium-plutonium mixed nitride pellets were fabricated for the irradiation tests in JMTR and JOYO. (author)

  18. Estimation of Heterosis, Combining ability and Gene action in Pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L. Millsp.

    Yamanura,, *Lokesha R., Dharmaraj, P.S., Muniswamy, S. and Diwan, J.R.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Eight cytoplasmic-genetic male sterile lines with A2 (Cajanus scarabaeoides and A4 (Cajanus cajanifolius cytoplasm were crossed with 10 testers in a line × tester design. Resultant 80 experimental hybrids were evaluated along with parents and check (Maruti in lattice design with two replications. Combining ability analysis evinced predominance of non-additive gene effects for 10 characters indicating relevance of heterosis breeding for improving yield attributes. The gca effects of parents revealed that ICPA-2078, GT-308A, PKV-TATA, ARCCV-2 and GPHR-08-11 were good general combiners for seed yield and its direct components. The estimates of sca effects revealed that nine experimental hybrids had significant, desirable and positive sca effects for seed yield. The cross combination ICPA-2092 x VIPUL, ICPA-2078 x BSMR-856 and ICPA-2078 x ARCCV-2 were good specific combiners for number of secondary branches, number of pods per plant, seed yield per plant. These parental combinations are being used for exploitation of hybrid vigour.

  19. Fast Burner Reactor Devoted to Minor Actinide Incineration

    This study proposes a new fast reactor core concept dedicated to plutonium and minor actinide burning by transmutation. This core has a large power level of ∼1500 MW(electric) favoring the economic aspect. To promote plutonium and minor actinide burning as much as possible, total suppression of 238U, which produces 239Pu by conversion, and large quantities of minor actinides in the core are desirable. Therefore, the 238U-free fuel is homogeneously mixed with a considerable quantity of minor actinides.From the safety point of view, both the Doppler effect and the coolant (sodium) void reactivity become less favorable in a 238U-free core. To preserve these two important safety parameters on an acceptable level, a hydrogenated moderator separated from the fuel and nuclides, such as W or 99Tc, is added to the core in the place of 238U. Tungsten and 99Tc have strong capture resonances at appropriate energies, and 99Tc itself is a long-lived fission product to be transmuted with profit.This core allows the achievement of a consumption rate of ∼100 kg/TW(electric).h of transuranic elements, ∼70 kg/TW(electric).h for plutonium (due to 238U suppression), and 30 to 35 kg/TW(electric).h for minor actinides. In addition, ∼14 kg/TW(electric).h of 99Tc is destroyed when this element is present in the core (the initial loading of 99Tc is >4000 kg in the core).The activity of newly designed subassemblies has also been investigated in comparison to standard fast reactor subassemblies (neutron sources, decay heat, and gamma dose rate). Finally, a transmutation scenario involving pressurized water reactors and minor actinide-burning fast reactors has been studied to estimate the necessary proportion of burner reactors and the achievable radiotoxicity reduction with respect to a reference open cycle

  20. Combination of SPOT-5 and ALOS PALSAR images in estimating aboveground biomass of lowland Dipterocarp forest

    Aboveground biomass (AGB) of forests is the one of the key parameters for carbon accounting. However, estimating AGB by using remote sensing approach has been challenging as it is constrained by various limitations, especially in a complex tropical forest ecosystem. Optical or radar system has its potential in retrieving AGB but issues such as cloud cover, complex forest ecosystem and saturation at certain biomass levels remain unanswered and are continuously being studied. The study was conducted to investigate the possibility of combining both optical and radar to improve the accuracy of AGB estimation in lowland dipterocarp forest. SPOT-5 and ALOS PALSAR data were used and regression models were developed between the measured AGB and variables derived from both satellite images. The study found that the best performing model was from the multivariate regression from incorporating both normalized difference fraction index (NDFI) with HV-polarized backscatter with R2 of 0.803 and RMSE of 32.6 Mg ha−1. The study found that the combination of optical and radar images can counter limitations of each other and has improved slightly the estimate

  1. ESTIMATING TOTAL GLOMERULAR NUMBER IN HUMAN KIDNEYS WITH A PHYSICAL DISECTOR/FRACTIONATOR COMBINATION

    Kelli J Johnson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available End-stage renal disease (ESRD has emerged as a major health issue for Australian Aborigines. This phenomenon is paralleled in other populations that have adopted a Westernised lifestyle, including African Americans. It has been suggested that abnormal glomerular hypertrophy (glomerulomegaly is an important predisposing factor for ESRD. The pathogenesis of glomerulomegaly remains unknown. It may represent a compensatory hypertrophic response to decreased nephron endowment during fetal development. Alternatively, glomerulomegaly may represent an abnormal haemodynamic/metabolic response to repeated infections, including renal infections during postnatal life. Since glomerular number and size are important issues associated with ESRD, an optimum quantitative method is required for estimating these parameters in human kidneys. The total number of glomeruli in the normal human kidney appears to vary by a factor of three or more, ranging from approximately 300,000 to more than 1 million. Recently, unbiased stereological methods for estimating total glomerular number in kidneys have been developed. The general aim of the present study was to evaluate (in terms of precision and efficiency a stereological method for estimating total glomerular number in human kidneys; the physical disector/fractionator combination. This method provided consistent estimates of total glomerular number. Estimates of total glomerular number obtained for four human kidneys ranged from 364,161 to 586,094 (coefficients of variation 9.2% to 20.0%. Mean glomerular volume for the four kidneys ranged from 6.04 to 10.32 μm3 x 106. These results indicate that this method is a precise and consistent method for estimating total glomerular number in human kidneys. The simple sampling technique developed in this study will be employed in future studies to determine if there is a difference in total glomerular, and hence nephron, number between Australian Aborigines and Caucasians, and

  2. Comparing marginal structural models to standard methods for estimating treatment effects of antihypertensive combination therapy

    Gerhard Tobias

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to time-dependent confounding by blood pressure and differential loss to follow-up, it is difficult to estimate the effectiveness of aggressive versus conventional antihypertensive combination therapies in non-randomized comparisons. Methods We utilized data from 22,576 hypertensive coronary artery disease patients, prospectively enrolled in the INternational VErapamil-Trandolapril STudy (INVEST. Our post-hoc analyses did not consider the randomized treatment strategies, but instead defined exposure time-dependently as aggressive treatment (≥3 concomitantly used antihypertensive medications versus conventional treatment (≤2 concomitantly used antihypertensive medications. Study outcome was defined as time to first serious cardiovascular event (non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, or all-cause death. We compared hazard ratio (HR estimates for aggressive vs. conventional treatment from a Marginal Structural Cox Model (MSCM to estimates from a standard Cox model. Both models included exposure to antihypertensive treatment at each follow-up visit, demographics, and baseline cardiovascular risk factors, including blood pressure. The MSCM further adjusted for systolic blood pressure at each follow-up visit, through inverse probability of treatment weights. Results 2,269 (10.1% patients experienced a cardiovascular event over a total follow-up of 60,939 person-years. The HR for aggressive treatment estimated by the standard Cox model was 0.96 (95% confidence interval 0.87-1.07. The equivalent MSCM, which was able to account for changes in systolic blood pressure during follow-up, estimated a HR of 0.81 (95% CI 0.71-0.92. Conclusions Using a MSCM, aggressive treatment was associated with a lower risk for serious cardiovascular outcomes compared to conventional treatment. In contrast, a standard Cox model estimated similar risks for aggressive and conventional treatments. Trial registration Clinicaltrials

  3. Combining MEMS-based IMU data and vision-based trajectory estimation

    Tsai, F.; Chang, H.; Su, A. Y. S.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents an efficient location tracking algorithm that integrates vision-based motion estimation and IMU data. Orientation and translation parameters of the mobile device are estimated from video frames or highly overlapped image sequences acquired with built-in cameras of mobile devices. IMU data are used to maintain continuity of the orientation estimation between sampling of the image homography calculation. The developed algorithm consists of six primary steps: (1) pre-processing; (2) feature points detection and matching; (3) homography calculation; (4) control points detection and registration; (5) motion estimation and filtering; (6) IMU data integration. The pre-processing of the input video frames or images is to control the sampling rate and image resolution in order to increase the computing efficiency. The overlap rate between selected frames is designed to remain above 60 % for matching. After preprocessing, feature points will be extracted and matched between adjacent frames as the conjugate points. A perspective homography is constructed and used to map one image to another if the co-planar feature points between subsequent images are fully matched. The homography matrix can provide the camera orientation and translation parameters according to the conjugate pairs. An area-based image-matching method is employed to recognize landmarks as reference nodes (RNs). In addition, a filtering mechanism is proposed to ensure the rotation angle was correctly recorded and to increase the tracking accuracy. Comparisons of the trajectory results with different combinations among vision-based motion estimation, filtering mechanism and IMU data integration are evaluated thoroughly and the accuracy is validated with on-site measurement data. Experimental results indicate that the develop algorithm can effectively estimate the trajectory of moving mobile devices and can be used as a cost-effective alternative for LBS device both in outdoor and indoor

  4. Improved estimation of hydraulic conductivity by combining stochastically simulated hydrofacies with geophysical data

    Zhu, Lin; Gong, Huili; Chen, Yun; Li, Xiaojuan; Chang, Xiang; Cui, Yijiao

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic conductivity is a major parameter affecting the output accuracy of groundwater flow and transport models. The most commonly used semi-empirical formula for estimating conductivity is Kozeny-Carman equation. However, this method alone does not work well with heterogeneous strata. Two important parameters, grain size and porosity, often show spatial variations at different scales. This study proposes a method for estimating conductivity distributions by combining a stochastic hydrofacies model with geophysical methods. The Markov chain model with transition probability matrix was adopted to re-construct structures of hydrofacies for deriving spatial deposit information. The geophysical and hydro-chemical data were used to estimate the porosity distribution through the Archie’s law. Results show that the stochastic simulated hydrofacies model reflects the sedimentary features with an average model accuracy of 78% in comparison with borehole log data in the Chaobai alluvial fan. The estimated conductivity is reasonable and of the same order of magnitude of the outcomes of the pumping tests. The conductivity distribution is consistent with the sedimentary distributions. This study provides more reliable spatial distributions of the hydraulic parameters for further numerical modeling.

  5. Thermodynamics of the volatilization of actinide metals in the high-temperature treatment of radioactive wastes. 1998 annual progress report

    'In this project, the authors perform a detailed study of the volatilization behavior of U, Pu and possibly Am and Np under conditions relevant to the thermal treatment (destruction) of actinide-containing organic-based mixed and radioactive wastes. The primary scientific goal of the proposed work is to develop a basic thermochemical understanding of actinide volatilization and partitioning/speciation behavior in the thermal processes that are central to DOE/EM''s mixed waste treatment program. This subject addresses several technical needs/problem areas recently identified by DOE/EM''s Office of Science and Technology. In the Low-Level and Mixed Low-Level Waste problem area, emission-free destruction of organic wastes is listed as the first exemplary science need. In the TRU Waste, Plutonium Materials, and Spent Nuclear Fuel problem areas, interactions between actinides and organic residues and materials stabilization are listed as exemplary science needs. Both of these needs require high-temperature thermodynamic studies of actinides and actinide-organic interactions. A sound basis for designing safe and effective thermal treatment systems and the ability to allay public concerns about radioactive fugitive emissions are the principal benefits of the project. The proposed work is a combination of experimental studies and thermodynamic modeling. Vapor pressure measurements will be made to determine U, Pu and possibly Am volatile species and the extent of their volatilization when UO2/U3O8, PuO2 and AmO2 solids are heated to temperatures of 500 to 1,500 C under pyrolyzing (reducing) conditions or under oxidizing conditions (i.e. O2 (g) + H2O(g) mixtures) in the presence of chlorine (Cl2 (g) or HCl(g)). Work on uranium volatilization under reducing conditions will be performed in a laboratory at U. C. Berkeley in a collaboration with Professor D. R. Olander. In parallel with the experimental effort, a complete thermodynamic database for expected actinide gaseous

  6. Research on the chemical speciation of actinides

    A demand for the safe and effective management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plant draws increasing attention with the growth of nuclear power industry. The objective of this project is to establish the basis of research on the actinide chemistry by using advanced laser-based highly sensitive spectroscopic systems. Researches on the chemical speciation of actinides are prerequisite for the development of technologies related to nuclear fuel cycles, especially, such as the safe management of high level radioactive wastes and the chemical examination of irradiated nuclear fuels. For supporting these technologies, laser-based spectroscopies have been performed for the chemical speciation of actinide in an aqueous solutions and the quantitative analysis of actinide isotopes in spent nuclear fuels. In this report, results on the following subjects have been summarized. (1) Development of TRLFS technology for chemical speciation of actinides, (2) Development of LIBD technology for measuring solubility of actinides, (3) Chemical speciation of plutonium complexes by using a LWCC system, (4) Development of LIBS technology for the quantitative analysis of actinides, (5) Development of technology for the chemical speciation of actinides by CE, (6) Evaluation on the chemical reactions between actinides and humic substances, (7) Chemical speciation of actinides adsorbed on metal oxides surfaces, (8) Determination of actinide source terms of spent nuclear fuel

  7. Environmental research on actinide elements

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  8. ENDF/B-V actinides

    This document summarizes the contents of the actinides part of the ENDF/B-V nuclear data library released by the US National Nuclear Data Center. This library or selective retrievals of it, are available from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  9. Decorporation of inhaled actinides by chelation therapy

    This article describes recent work in NRPB laboratories that has identified some of the factors influencing the behaviour of plutonium, americium and curium compounds in the body after inhalation, together with a number of experimental approaches that are being developed to optimise their treatment with DTPA. It is concluded that the most effective treatment has yet to be developed, but progress must depend on a better understanding of the factors governing the transport of actinides in the body. It cannot be assumed that because the inhaled material is readily translocated to blood, that treatment regimens with Ca-DTPA based solely on previous understanding of the metabolic fate of soluble actinide complexes will be successful. In fact, depending on the nature of the material involved in the accident, inhalation alone or combined with prolonged infusion of DTPA may be more effective than the periodic intravenous injections of the chelating agent alone. For poorly transportable materials such as insoluble plutonium-239 dioxide, chelation treatment remains essentially ineffective. (U.K.)

  10. Estimating national forest carbon stocks and dynamics: combining models and remotely sensed information

    Smallman, Luke; Williams, Mathew

    2016-04-01

    Forests are a critical component of the global carbon cycle, storing significant amounts of carbon, split between living biomass and dead organic matter. The carbon budget of forests is the most uncertain component of the global carbon cycle - it is currently impossible to quantify accurately the carbon source/sink strength of forest biomes due to their heterogeneity and complex dynamics. It has been a major challenge to generate robust carbon budgets across landscapes due to data scarcity. Models have been used but outputs have lacked an assessment of uncertainty, making a robust assessment of their reliability and accuracy challenging. Here a Metropolis Hastings - Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MH-MCMC) data assimilation framework has been used to combine remotely sensed leaf area index (MODIS), biomass (where available) and deforestation estimates, in addition to forest planting and clear-felling information from the UK's national forest inventory, an estimate of soil carbon from the Harmonized World Database (HWSD) and plant trait information with a process model (DALEC) to produce a constrained analysis with a robust estimate of uncertainty of the UK forestry carbon budget between 2000 and 2010. Our analysis estimates the mean annual UK forest carbon sink at -3.9 MgC ha‑1yr‑1 with a 95 % confidence interval between -4.0 and -3.1 MgC ha‑1 yr‑1. The UK national forest inventory (NFI) estimates the mean UK forest carbon sink to be between -1.4 and -5.5 MgC ha‑1 yr‑1. The analysis estimate for total forest biomass stock in 2010 is estimated at 229 (177/232) TgC, while the NFI an estimated total forest biomass carbon stock of 216 TgC. Leaf carbon area (LCA) is a key plant trait which we are able to estimate using our analysis. Comparison of median estimates for LCA retrieved from the analysis and a UK land cover map show higher and lower values for LCA are estimated areas dominated by needle leaf and broad leaf forests forest respectively, consistent with

  11. FAO-56 Dual Model Combined with Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing for Regional Evapotranspiration Estimations

    Rim Amri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study is to evaluate the potential of the FAO-56 dual technique for the estimation of regional evapotranspiration (ET and its constituent components (crop transpiration and soil evaporation, for two classes of vegetation (olives trees and cereals in the semi-arid region of the Kairouan plain in central Tunisia. The proposed approach combines the FAO-56 technique with remote sensing (optical and microwave, not only for vegetation characterization, as proposed in other studies but also for the estimation of soil evaporation, through the use of satellite moisture products. Since it is difficult to use ground flux measurements to validate remotely sensed data at regional scales, comparisons were made with the land surface model ISBA-A-gs which is a physical SVAT (Soil–Vegetation–Atmosphere Transfer model, an operational tool developed by Météo-France. It is thus shown that good results can be obtained with this relatively simple approach, based on the FAO-56 technique combined with remote sensing, to retrieve temporal variations of ET. The approach proposed for the daily mapping of evapotranspiration at 1 km resolution is approved in two steps, for the period between 1991 and 2007. In an initial step, the ISBA-A-gs soil moisture outputs are compared with ERS/WSC products. Then, the output of the FAO-56 technique is compared with the output generated by the SVAT ISBA-A-gs model.

  12. Estimating combining ability of yield and its components in upland cotton through line tester analysis

    Combining ability estimates are very important genetic attributes to cotton breeders in predicting improvement that could be envisaged from hybridisation and selection programmes. The crosses were attempted in a line tester mating design, which involved five female and three testers, hence 15 F1 hybrids were developed. The experiment was carried out in a randomised complete block design with four replications. The mean squares due to general combining ability (GCA) of lines and testers and specific combining ability (SCA) of lines testers interactions were significant, for all the characters studied. The significance of GCA and SCA variances suggests that both additive and non-additive genes were controlling the characters, yet additive genes of female lines were predominant because their variances were generally, higher than GCA of testers and SCA of lines * testers. Among the lines, parents CIM-506, CRIS-134 and Sadori and from testers, Bt-cotton and Sindh-1 exhibited higher GCA effects hence proved to be the best general combiners for most of the traits studied. Results further suggested that these potential parents can reliably be used in hybridisation and selection programmes for extracting desirable plants from segregating populations. The F1 hybrids like Sadori Sindh-1, Chandi Bt-cotton and Sadori BH-160 were best specific combiners for earliness (bolls formation and opening at 90 and 120 days after planting), bolls per plant, boll weight, seed cotton yield per plant, lint % and staple length. The performance of F1 hybrids per se was very well reflected in SCA effects, conferring the potentiality of F1 hybrids. (author)

  13. Combining Electrical Techniques to map a Till Aquitard for Quantifying Lateral Flows and Improved Recharge Estimation

    Thatcher, K. E.; Mackay, R.

    2007-12-01

    Where low permeability layers are present in the unsaturated zone, groundwater recharge can be significantly modified by lateral flows. To improve estimates of the magnitude and spatial distribution of lateral flows, a well defined model of the unsaturated zone hydraulic properties is required. Electromagnetic (EM) surveys, using Geonics EM31 and EM34, along with Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) have been used in the Tern Catchment, Shropshire, UK to determine the distribution of Quaternary glacial deposits above the Triassic sandstone aquifer. The deposits are generally less than 10m thick and comprise low permeability lodgement till and high permeability outwash. Modelling studies have shown the depth and slope of the till surface to be key parameters controlling the magnitude of lateral flows with recharge focussed at the till edge. The distribution of permeability within the till is of secondary importance. The spatial extent of the till is well constrained by EM data and is shown to be continuous. ERT profiles provide data on the depth to the till surface in detailed 2D sections. Combining the two data sets has enabled the depth estimates from the ERT surveys to be extrapolated across a 2D map area. Recharge estimates based on the depth maps take into account lateral flows across the top of the till and show that these flows can contribute significantly to catchment recharge.

  14. A combined segmenting and non-segmenting approach to signal quality estimation for ambulatory photoplethysmography.

    Wander, J D; Morris, D

    2014-12-01

    Continuous cardiac monitoring of healthy and unhealthy patients can help us understand the progression of heart disease and enable early treatment. Optical pulse sensing is an excellent candidate for continuous mobile monitoring of cardiovascular health indicators, but optical pulse signals are susceptible to corruption from a number of noise sources, including motion artifact. Therefore, before higher-level health indicators can be reliably computed, corrupted data must be separated from valid data. This is an especially difficult task in the presence of artifact caused by ambulation (e.g. walking or jogging), which shares significant spectral energy with the true pulsatile signal. In this manuscript, we present a machine-learning-based system for automated estimation of signal quality of optical pulse signals that performs well in the presence of periodic artifact. We hypothesized that signal processing methods that identified individual heart beats (segmenting approaches) would be more error-prone than methods that did not (non-segmenting approaches) when applied to data contaminated by periodic artifact. We further hypothesized that a fusion of segmenting and non-segmenting approaches would outperform either approach alone. Therefore, we developed a novel non-segmenting approach to signal quality estimation that we then utilized in combination with a traditional segmenting approach. Using this system we were able to robustly detect differences in signal quality as labeled by expert human raters (Pearson's r = 0.9263). We then validated our original hypotheses by demonstrating that our non-segmenting approach outperformed the segmenting approach in the presence of contaminated signal, and that the combined system outperformed either individually. Lastly, as an example, we demonstrated the utility of our signal quality estimation system in evaluating the trustworthiness of heart rate measurements derived from optical pulse signals. PMID:25407849

  15. A combined segmenting and non-segmenting approach to signal quality estimation for ambulatory photoplethysmography

    Continuous cardiac monitoring of healthy and unhealthy patients can help us understand the progression of heart disease and enable early treatment. Optical pulse sensing is an excellent candidate for continuous mobile monitoring of cardiovascular health indicators, but optical pulse signals are susceptible to corruption from a number of noise sources, including motion artifact. Therefore, before higher-level health indicators can be reliably computed, corrupted data must be separated from valid data. This is an especially difficult task in the presence of artifact caused by ambulation (e.g. walking or jogging), which shares significant spectral energy with the true pulsatile signal. In this manuscript, we present a machine-learning-based system for automated estimation of signal quality of optical pulse signals that performs well in the presence of periodic artifact. We hypothesized that signal processing methods that identified individual heart beats (segmenting approaches) would be more error-prone than methods that did not (non-segmenting approaches) when applied to data contaminated by periodic artifact. We further hypothesized that a fusion of segmenting and non-segmenting approaches would outperform either approach alone. Therefore, we developed a novel non-segmenting approach to signal quality estimation that we then utilized in combination with a traditional segmenting approach. Using this system we were able to robustly detect differences in signal quality as labeled by expert human raters (Pearson’s r = 0.9263). We then validated our original hypotheses by demonstrating that our non-segmenting approach outperformed the segmenting approach in the presence of contaminated signal, and that the combined system outperformed either individually. Lastly, as an example, we demonstrated the utility of our signal quality estimation system in evaluating the trustworthiness of heart rate measurements derived from optical pulse signals. (paper)

  16. Potential radiation dose from eating fish exposed to actinide contamination

    The purpose of this work is to establish a maximum potential for transporting actinides to man via fish consumption. The study took place in U-pond, a nuclear waste pond on the Hanford Site. It has concentrations of 238U, 238Pu, sup(239,240)Pu and 241Am that are approx. 3 orders of magnitude greater than background levels. Fish living in the pond contain higher actinide concentrations than those observed in fish from any other location. Experiments were performed in U-Pond to determine maximum quantities of actinides that could accumulate in fillets and whole bodies of two centrarchid fish species. Doses to hypothetical consumers were then estimated. Results indicate that highest concentrations occurring in bluegill or bass muscle after more than a year's exposure to the pond would not be sufficient to produce a significant radiation dose to a human consumer, even if he ate 0.5 kg (of the order of 1 lb) of these fillets every day for 70 yr. Natural predators (heron or coyote), having lifetime diets of whole fish from U-Pond, would receive less radiation dose from the ingested actinides than from natural background sources. (author)

  17. Potential radiation dose from eating fish exposed to actinide contamination

    Emery, R.M.; Klopfer, D.C.; Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (USA))

    1981-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a maximum potential for transporting actinides to man via fish consumption. The study took place in U-pond, a nuclear waste pond on the Hanford Site. It has concentrations of /sup 238/U, /sup 238/Pu, sup(239,240)Pu and /sup 241/Am that are approx. 3 orders of magnitude greater than background levels. Fish living in the pond contain higher actinide concentrations than those observed in fish from any other location. Experiments were performed in U-Pond to determine maximum quantities of actinides that could accumulate in fillets and whole bodies of two centrarchid fish species. Doses to hypothetical consumers were then estimated. Results indicate that highest concentrations occurring in bluegill or bass muscle after more than a year's exposure to the pond would not be sufficient to produce a significant radiation dose to a human consumer, even if he ate 0.5 kg (of the order of 1 lb) of these fillets every day for 70 yr. Natural predators (heron or coyote), having lifetime diets of whole fish from U-Pond, would receive less radiation dose from the ingested actinides than from natural background sources.

  18. Machine Learning on Images: Combining Passive Microwave and Optical Data to Estimate Snow Water Equivalent

    Dozier, J.; Tolle, K.; Bair, N.

    2014-12-01

    We have a problem that may be a specific example of a generic one. The task is to estimate spatiotemporally distributed estimates of snow water equivalent (SWE) in snow-dominated mountain environments, including those that lack on-the-ground measurements. Several independent methods exist, but all are problematic. The remotely sensed date of disappearance of snow from each pixel can be combined with a calculation of melt to reconstruct the accumulated SWE for each day back to the last significant snowfall. Comparison with streamflow measurements in mountain ranges where such data are available shows this method to be accurate, but the big disadvantage is that SWE can only be calculated retroactively after snow disappears, and even then only for areas with little accumulation during the melt season. Passive microwave sensors offer real-time global SWE estimates but suffer from several issues, notably signal loss in wet snow or in forests, saturation in deep snow, subpixel variability in the mountains owing to the large (~25 km) pixel size, and SWE overestimation in the presence of large grains such as depth and surface hoar. Throughout the winter and spring, snow-covered area can be measured at sub-km spatial resolution with optical sensors, with accuracy and timeliness improved by interpolating and smoothing across multiple days. So the question is, how can we establish the relationship between Reconstruction—available only after the snow goes away—and passive microwave and optical data to accurately estimate SWE during the snow season, when the information can help forecast spring runoff? Linear regression provides one answer, but can modern machine learning techniques (used to persuade people to click on web advertisements) adapt to improve forecasts of floods and droughts in areas where more than one billion people depend on snowmelt for their water resources?

  19. Estimating antimalarial drugs consumption in Africa before the switch to artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs

    Vreeke Ed

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Having reliable forecasts is critical now for producers, malaria-endemic countries and agencies in order to adapt production and procurement of the artemisinin-based combination treatments (ACTs, the new first-line treatments of malaria. There is no ideal method to quantify drug requirements for malaria. Morbidity data give uncertain estimations. This study uses drug consumption to provide elements to help estimate quantities and financial requirements of ACTs. Methods The consumption of chloroquine, sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and quinine both through the private and public sector was assessed in five sub-Saharan Africa countries with different epidemiological patterns (Senegal, Rwanda, Tanzania, Malawi, Zimbabwe. From these data the number of adult treatments per capita was calculated and the volumes and financial implications derived for the whole of Africa. Results Identifying and obtaining data from the private sector was difficult. The quality of information on drug supply and distribution in countries must be improved. The number of adult treatments per capita and per year in the five countries ranged from 0.18 to 0.50. Current adult treatment prices for ACTs range US$ 1–1.8. Taking the upper range for both volumes and costs, the highest number of adult treatments consumed for Africa was estimated at 314.5 million, corresponding to an overall maximum annual need for financing ACT procurement of US$ 566.1 million. In reality, both the number of cases treated and the cost of treatment are likely to be lower (projections for the lowest consumption estimate with the least expensive ACT would require US $ 113 million per annum. There were substantial variations in the market share between public and private sources among these countries (the public sector share ranging from 98% in Rwanda to 33% in Tanzania. Conclusion Additional studies are required to build a more robust methodology, and to assess current consumptions

  20. Actinides recycling assessment in a thermal reactor

    Highlights: • Actinides recycling is assessed using BWR fuel assemblies. • Four fuel rods are substituted by minor actinides rods in a UO2 and in a MOX fuel assembly. • Performance of standard fuel assemblies and the ones with the substitution is compared. • Reduction of actinides is measured for the fuel assemblies containing minor actinides rods. • Thermal reactors can be used for actinides recycling. - Abstract: Actinides recycling have the potential to reduce the geological repository burden of the high-level radioactive waste that is produced in a nuclear power reactor. The core of a standard light water reactor is composed only by fuel assemblies and there are no specific positions to allocate any actinides blanket, in this assessment it is proposed to replace several fuel rods by actinides blankets inside some of the reactor core fuel assemblies. In the first part of this study, a single uranium standard fuel assembly is modeled and the amount of actinides generated during irradiation is quantified for use it as reference. Later, in the same fuel assembly four rods containing 6 w/o of minor actinides and using depleted uranium as matrix were replaced and depletion was simulated to obtain the net reduction of minor actinides. Other calculations were performed using MOX fuel lattices instead of uranium standard fuel to find out how much reduction is possible to obtain. Results show that a reduction of minor actinides is possible using thermal reactors and a higher reduction is obtained when the minor actinides are embedded in uranium fuel assemblies instead of MOX fuel assemblies

  1. Molecular solids of actinide hexacyanoferrate: Structure and bonding

    The hexacyanometallate family is well known in transition metal chemistry because the remarkable electronic delocalization along the metal-cyano-metal bond can be tuned in order to design systems that undergo a reversible and controlled change of their physical properties. We have been working for few years on the description of the molecular and electronic structure of materials formed with [Fe(CN)6]n- building blocks and actinide ions (An = Th, U, Np, Pu, Am) and have compared these new materials to those obtained with lanthanide cations at oxidation state +III. In order to evaluate the influence of the actinide coordination polyhedron on the three-dimensional molecular structure, both atomic number and formal oxidation state have been varied : oxidation states +III, +IV. EXAFS at both iron K edge and actinide LIII edge is the dedicated structural probe to obtain structural information on these systems. Data at both edges have been combined to obtain a three-dimensional model. In addition, qualitative electronic information has been gathered with two spectroscopic tools : UV-Near IR spectrophotometry and low energy XANES data that can probe each atom of the structural unit : Fe, C, N and An. Coupling these spectroscopic tools to theoretical calculations will lead in the future to a better description of bonding in these molecular solids. Of primary interest is the actinide cation ability to form ionic - covalent bonding as 5f orbitals are being filled by modification of oxidation state and/or atomic number.

  2. UV spectrophotometric simultaneous estimation of valdecoxib and paracetamol in combined tablet dosage form

    Nagulwar Vaishali

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the development of a simple, accurate and economical method for the simultaneous estimation of valdecoxib and paracetamol in combined tablet dosage form by Vierodt′s UV spectrophotometric method. The λmax values of valdecoxib and paracetamol in 0.1 N NaOH were 244 nm and 257 nm respectively. Both the drugs followed Beer′s law in the concentration range of 1-6 µg/ml and 5-30 µg/ml respectively. The A1% 1 cm values for valdecoxib and paracetamol at 244 nm and 257 nm were 520 and 420, 510.8 and 636.8 respectively.

  3. Competitive hopfield network combined with estimation of distribution for maximum diversity problems.

    Wang, Jiahai; Zhou, Yalan; Yin, Jian; Zhang, Yunong

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents a discrete competitive Hopfield neural network (HNN) (DCHNN) based on the estimation of distribution algorithm (EDA) for the maximum diversity problem. In order to overcome the local minimum problem of DCHNN, the idea of EDA is combined with DCHNN. Once the network is trapped in local minima, the perturbation based on EDA can generate a new starting point for DCHNN for further search. It is expected that the further search is guided to a promising area by the probability model. Thus, the proposed algorithm can escape from local minima and further search better results. The proposed algorithm is tested on 120 benchmark problems with the size ranging from 100 to 5000. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm is better than the other improved DCHNN such as multistart DCHNN and DCHNN with random flips and is better than or competitive with metaheuristic algorithms such as tabu-search-based algorithms and greedy randomized adaptive search procedure algorithms. PMID:19336334

  4. A Combined Network Architecture Using Art2 and Back Propagation for Adaptive Estimation of Dynamic Processes

    Einar Sørheim

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available A neural network architecture called ART2/BP is proposed. Thc goal has been to construct an artificial neural network that learns incrementally an unknown mapping, and is motivated by the instability found in back propagation (BP networks: after first learning pattern A and then pattern B, a BP network often has completely 'forgotten' pattern A. A network using both supervised and unsupervised training is proposed, consisting of a combination of ART2 and BP. ART2 is used to build and focus a supervised backpropagation network consisting of many small subnetworks each specialized on a particular domain of the input space. The ART2/BP network has the advantage of being able to dynamically expand itself in response to input patterns containing new information. Simulation results show that the ART2/BP network outperforms a classical maximum likelihood method for the estimation of a discrete dynamic and nonlinear transfer function.

  5. Synergistic extraction of actinides : Part II. Tetra-and trivalent actinides

    A detailed discussion on the synergistic solvent extraction behaviour of tetra- and trivalent actinide ions is presented. Structural aspects of the natural donor adducts of the tetravalent actinide ion chelates involved in synergism are also discussed. (author)

  6. Age estimation in forensic sciences: Application of combined aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon analysis

    Alkass, K; Buchholz, B A; Ohtani, S; Yamamoto, T; Druid, H; Spalding, S L

    2009-11-02

    Age determination of unknown human bodies is important in the setting of a crime investigation or a mass disaster, since the age at death, birth date and year of death, as well as gender, can guide investigators to the correct identity among a large number of possible matches. Traditional morphological methods used by anthropologists to determine age are often imprecise, whereas chemical analysis of tooth dentin, such as aspartic acid racemization has shown reproducible and more precise results. In this paper we analyze teeth from Swedish individuals using both aspartic acid racemization and radiocarbon methodologies. The rationale behind using radiocarbon analysis is that above-ground testing of nuclear weapons during the cold war (1955-1963) caused an extreme increase in global levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) which have been carefully recorded over time. Forty-four teeth from 41 individuals were analyzed using aspartic acid racemization analysis of tooth crown dentin or radiocarbon analysis of enamel and ten of these were split and subjected to both radiocarbon and racemization analysis. Combined analysis showed that the two methods correlated well (R2=0.66, p < 0.05). Radiocarbon analysis showed an excellent precision with an overall absolute error of 0.6 {+-} 04 years. Aspartic acid racemization also showed a good precision with an overall absolute error of 5.4 {+-} 4.2 years. Whereas radiocarbon analysis gives an estimated year of birth, racemization analysis indicates the chronological age of the individual at the time of death. We show how these methods in combination can also assist in the estimation of date of death of an unidentified victim. This strategy can be of significant assistance in forensic casework involving dead victim identification.

  7. Considerations when combining data from multiple nutrition experiments to estimate genetic parameters for feed efficiency.

    Hardie, L C; Armentano, L E; Shaver, R D; VandeHaar, M J; Spurlock, D M; Yao, C; Bertics, S J; Contreras-Govea, F E; Weigel, K A

    2015-04-01

    Prior to genomic selection on a trait, a reference population needs to be established to link marker genotypes with phenotypes. For costly and difficult-to-measure traits, international collaboration and sharing of data between disciplines may be necessary. Our aim was to characterize the combining of data from nutrition studies carried out under similar climate and management conditions to estimate genetic parameters for feed efficiency. Furthermore, we postulated that data from the experimental cohorts within these studies can be used to estimate the net energy of lactation (NE(L)) densities of diets, which can provide estimates of energy intakes for use in the calculation of the feed efficiency metric, residual feed intake (RFI), and potentially reduce the effect of variation in energy density of diets. Individual feed intakes and corresponding production and body measurements were obtained from 13 Midwestern nutrition experiments. Two measures of RFI were considered, RFI(Mcal) and RFI(kg), which involved the regression of NE(L )intake (Mcal/d) or dry matter intake (DMI; kg/d) on 3 expenditures: milk energy, energy gained or lost in body weight change, and energy for maintenance. In total, 677 records from 600 lactating cows between 50 and 275 d in milk were used. Cows were divided into 46 cohorts based on dietary or nondietary treatments as dictated by the nutrition experiments. The realized NE(L) densities of the diets (Mcal/kg of DMI) were estimated for each cohort by totaling the average daily energy used in the 3 expenditures for cohort members and dividing by the cohort's total average daily DMI. The NE(L) intake for each cow was then calculated by multiplying her DMI by her cohort's realized energy density. Mean energy density was 1.58 Mcal/kg. Heritability estimates for RFI(kg), and RFI(Mcal) in a single-trait animal model did not differ at 0.04 for both measures. Information about realized energy density could be useful in standardizing intake data from

  8. Improving global fire carbon emissions estimates by combining moderate resolution burned area and active fire observations

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; Giglio, L.; Rogers, B. M.; van der Werf, G.

    2011-12-01

    In several important biomes, including croplands and tropical forests, many small fires exist that have sizes that are well below the detection limit for the current generation of burned area products derived from moderate resolution spectroradiometers. These fires likely have important effects on greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions and regional air quality. Here we developed an approach for combining 1km thermal anomalies (active fires; MOD14A2) and 500m burned area observations (MCD64A1) to estimate the prevalence of these fires and their likely contribution to burned area and carbon emissions. We first estimated active fires within and outside of 500m burn scars in 0.5 degree grid cells during 2001-2010 for which MCD64A1 burned area observations were available. For these two sets of active fires we then examined mean fire radiative power (FRP) and changes in enhanced vegetation index (EVI) derived from 16-day intervals immediately before and after each active fire observation. To estimate the burned area associated with sub-500m fires, we first applied burned area to active fire ratios derived solely from within burned area perimeters to active fires outside of burn perimeters. In a second step, we further modified our sub-500m burned area estimates using EVI changes from active fires outside and within of burned areas (after subtracting EVI changes derived from control regions). We found that in northern and southern Africa savanna regions and in Central and South America dry forest regions, the number of active fires outside of MCD64A1 burned areas increased considerably towards the end of the fire season. EVI changes for active fires outside of burn perimeters were, on average, considerably smaller than EVI changes associated with active fires inside burn scars, providing evidence for burn scars that were substantially smaller than the 25 ha area of a single 500m pixel. FRP estimates also were lower for active fires outside of burn perimeters. In our

  9. Spin Hamiltonians for actinide ions

    The breakdown of Russel Saunders coupling for correlated f-levels of actinide ions is due to both spin orbit coupling and the crystalline electric field (CEF). Experiments on curium, an S-state ion in the metal for which the CEF is weak indicate a g-factor close to the Russel-Saunders value. Spin-orbit coupling is therefore too weak to produce jj coupling. This suggests a model for magnetic actinide ions in which the CEF ground multiplet is well separated from higher levels, completely determining thermodynamic magnetic properties. On this basis simplified spin Hamiltonians are derived for GAMMA1-GAMMA5 ground states in order to interpret thermodynamic measurements and ordering phenomena. (author)

  10. Actinide chemistry in ionic liquids.

    Takao, Koichiro; Bell, Thomas James; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2013-04-01

    This Forum Article provides an overview of the reported studies on the actinide chemistry in ionic liquids (ILs) with a particular focus on several fundamental chemical aspects: (i) complex formation, (ii) electrochemistry, and (iii) extraction behavior. The majority of investigations have been dedicated to uranium, especially for the 6+ oxidation state (UO2(2+)), because the chemistry of uranium in ordinary solvents has been well investigated and uranium is the most abundant element in the actual nuclear fuel cycles. Other actinides such as thorium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curiumm, although less studied, are also of importance in fully understanding the nuclear fuel engineering process and the safe geological disposal of radioactive wastes. PMID:22873132

  11. Estimating additive and dominance variances for complex traits in pigs combining genomic and pedigree information.

    Costa, E V; Diniz, D B; Veroneze, R; Resende, M D V; Azevedo, C F; Guimaraes, S E F; Silva, F F; Lopes, P S

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of dominance effects should improve ge-netic evaluations, provide the accurate selection of purebred animals, and enable better breeding strategies, including the exploitation of het-erosis in crossbreeds. In this study, we combined genomic and pedi-gree data to study the relative importance of additive and dominance genetic variation in growth and carcass traits in an F2 pig population. Two GBLUP models were used, a model without a polygenic effect (ADM) and a model with a polygenic effect (ADMP). Additive effects played a greater role in the control of growth and carcass traits than did dominance effects. However, dominance effects were important for all traits, particularly in backfat thickness. The narrow-sense and broad-sense heritability estimates for growth (0.06 to 0.42, and 0.10 to 0.51, respectively) and carcass traits (0.07 to 0.37, and 0.10 to 0.76, respec-tively) exhibited a wide variation. The inclusion of a polygenic effect in the ADMP model changed the broad-sense heritability estimates only for birth weight and weight at 21 days of age. PMID:26125833

  12. Combining remote sensing and climatic data to estimate net primary production across Oregon

    A range in productivity and climate exists along an east—west transect in Oregon. Remote sensing and climatic data for several of the Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research Project (OTTER) forested sites and neighboring shrub sites were combined to determined whether percentage intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (%IPAR) can be estimated from remotely sensed observations and to evaluate climatic constraints on the ability of vegetation to utilize intercepted of radiation for production. The Thematic Mappers Simulator (TMS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) provided a good linear estimate of %IPAR (R2 = 0.97). Vegetation intercepted from 24.8% to 99.9% of incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and aboveground net primary production (ANPP) ranged from 53 to 1310 g·m—2·yr—1. The ANPP was linearly related to annual IPAR across sites (R2 = 0.70). Constraints on the ability of each species to utilize intercepted light, as defined by differential responses to freezing temperatures, drought, and vapor pressure deficit, were quantified from hourly meteorological station measurements near the sites and field physiological measurements. Vegetation could utilize from 30% of intercepted radiation at the eastside semiarid juniper woodland and shrub sites to 97% at the maritime coastal sites. Energy—size efficiency (ϵu), calculated from aboveground production and IPAR modified by the environmental limits, averaged 0.5 g/MJ for the shrub sites and 0.9 g/MJ for the forested sites. (author)

  13. Actinide recovery techniques utilizing electromechanical processes

    Under certain conditions, the separation of actinides using electromechanical techniques may be an effective means of residue processing. The separation of granular mixtures of actinides and other materials discussed in this report is based on appreciable differences in the magnetic and electrical properties of the actinide elements. In addition, the high density of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium, may render a simultaneous separation based on mutually complementary parameters. Both high intensity magnetic separation and electrostatic separation have been investigated for the concentration of an actinide waste stream. Waste stream constituents include an actinide metal alloy and broken quartz shards. The investigation of these techniques is in support of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept currently being developed at Argonne National Laboratory under the auspices of the Department of Energy

  14. Actinide Waste Forms and Radiation Effects

    Ewing, R. C.; Weber, W. J.

    Over the past few decades, many studies of actinides in glasses and ceramics have been conducted that have contributed substantially to the increased understanding of actinide incorporation in solids and radiation effects due to actinide decay. These studies have included fundamental research on actinides in solids and applied research and development related to the immobilization of the high level wastes (HLW) from commercial nuclear power plants and processing of nuclear weapons materials, environmental restoration in the nuclear weapons complex, and the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium as a result of disarmament activities. Thus, the immobilization of actinides has become a pressing issue for the twenty-first century (Ewing, 1999), and plutonium immobilization, in particular, has received considerable attention in the USA (Muller et al., 2002; Muller and Weber, 2001). The investigation of actinides and

  15. Estimating daily forest carbon fluxes using a combination of ground and remotely sensed data

    Chirici, Gherardo; Chiesi, Marta; Corona, Piermaria; Salvati, Riccardo; Papale, Dario; Fibbi, Luca; Sirca, Costantino; Spano, Donatella; Duce, Pierpaolo; Marras, Serena; Matteucci, Giorgio; Cescatti, Alessandro; Maselli, Fabio

    2016-02-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that Monteith's approach can efficiently predict forest gross primary production (GPP), while the modeling of net ecosystem production (NEP) is more critical, requiring the additional simulation of forest respirations. The NEP of different forest ecosystems in Italy was currently simulated by the use of a remote sensing driven parametric model (modified C-Fix) and a biogeochemical model (BIOME-BGC). The outputs of the two models, which simulate forests in quasi-equilibrium conditions, are combined to estimate the carbon fluxes of actual conditions using information regarding the existing woody biomass. The estimates derived from the methodology have been tested against daily reference GPP and NEP data collected through the eddy correlation technique at five study sites in Italy. The first test concerned the theoretical validity of the simulation approach at both annual and daily time scales and was performed using optimal model drivers (i.e., collected or calibrated over the site measurements). Next, the test was repeated to assess the operational applicability of the methodology, which was driven by spatially extended data sets (i.e., data derived from existing wall-to-wall digital maps). A good estimation accuracy was generally obtained for GPP and NEP when using optimal model drivers. The use of spatially extended data sets worsens the accuracy to a varying degree, which is properly characterized. The model drivers with the most influence on the flux modeling strategy are, in increasing order of importance, forest type, soil features, meteorology, and forest woody biomass (growing stock volume).

  16. Solar resources estimation combining digital terrain models and satellite images techniques

    Bosch, J.L.; Batlles, F.J. [Universidad de Almeria, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Ctra. Sacramento s/n, 04120-Almeria (Spain); Zarzalejo, L.F. [CIEMAT, Departamento de Energia, Madrid (Spain); Lopez, G. [EPS-Universidad de Huelva, Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica y Termica, Huelva (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    One of the most important steps to make use of any renewable energy is to perform an accurate estimation of the resource that has to be exploited. In the designing process of both active and passive solar energy systems, radiation data is required for the site, with proper spatial resolution. Generally, a radiometric stations network is used in this evaluation, but when they are too dispersed or not available for the study area, satellite images can be utilized as indirect solar radiation measurements. Although satellite images cover wide areas with a good acquisition frequency they usually have a poor spatial resolution limited by the size of the image pixel, and irradiation must be interpolated to evaluate solar irradiation at a sub-pixel scale. When pixels are located in flat and homogeneous areas, correlation of solar irradiation is relatively high, and classic interpolation can provide a good estimation. However, in complex topography zones, data interpolation is not adequate and the use of Digital Terrain Model (DTM) information can be helpful. In this work, daily solar irradiation is estimated for a wide mountainous area using a combination of Meteosat satellite images and a DTM, with the advantage of avoiding the necessity of ground measurements. This methodology utilizes a modified Heliosat-2 model, and applies for all sky conditions; it also introduces a horizon calculation of the DTM points and accounts for the effect of snow covers. Model performance has been evaluated against data measured in 12 radiometric stations, with results in terms of the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 10%, and a Mean Bias Error (MBE) of +2%, both expressed as a percentage of the mean value measured. (author)

  17. Anthropogenic Actinides in the Environment

    The use of nuclear energy and the testing of nuclear weapons have led to significant releases of anthropogenic isotopes, in particular a number of actinide isotopes generally not abundant in nature. Most prominent amongst these are 239Pu, 240Pu, and 236U. The study of these actinides in nature has been an active field of study ever since. Measurements of actinides are applied to nuclear safeguards, investigating the sources of contamination, and as a tracer for a number of erosion and hydrology studies. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is ideally suited for these studies and generally offers higher sensitivities than competing techniques, like ICP-MS or decay counting. Recent advances in AMS allow the study of “minor” plutonium isotopes (241Pu, 242Pu, and 244Pu). Furthermore, 236U can now be measured at the levels expected from the global stratospheric fall-out of the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests in the 1950s and 1960s. Even the pre-anthropogenic isotope ratios could be within reach. However, the distribution and abundance levels of these isotopes are not well known yet. I will present an overview of the field, and in detail two recent studies on minor plutonium isotopes and 236U, respectively.(author)

  18. Combining corpus-derived sense profiles with estimated frequency information to disambiguate clinical abbreviations.

    Xu, Hua; Stetson, Peter D; Friedman, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Abbreviations are widely used in clinical notes and are often ambiguous. Word sense disambiguation (WSD) for clinical abbreviations therefore is a critical task for many clinical natural language processing (NLP) systems. Supervised machine learning based WSD methods are known for their high performance. However, it is time consuming and costly to construct annotated samples for supervised WSD approaches and sense frequency information is often ignored by these methods. In this study, we proposed a profile-based method that used dictated discharge summaries as an external source to automatically build sense profiles and applied them to disambiguate abbreviations in hospital admission notes via the vector space model. Our evaluation using a test set containing 2,386 annotated instances from 13 ambiguous abbreviations in admission notes showed that the profile-based method performed better than two baseline methods and achieved a best average precision of 0.792. Furthermore, we developed a strategy to combine sense frequency information estimated from a clustering analysis with the profile-based method. Our results showed that the combined approach largely improved the performance and achieved a highest precision of 0.875 on the same test set, indicating that integrating sense frequency information with local context is effective for clinical abbreviation disambiguation. PMID:23304376

  19. XAFS study on electronic structure analysis of actinide complexes

    Structures and electronic states of actinide complexes in solution were reviewed in relation to chemical separation required from nuclear fuel processing and nuclear waste disposal. Actinide complexes formed from organic compounds were studied in respect of solvent extraction in a wet method for nuclear fuel reprocessing. Particular attention was paid to the experiments by XAFS using synchrotron radiation. A Fourier transformation form of EXAFS oscillation was shown for a U(VI)-amide complex in dodecane solution. The structure radial function of Uranium-DH2EHA (N, N-dihyxyl-2-ethylhexanamice) in solution was determined by EXAFS, and the contributions of two oxygens in an axial direction and of ligand atoms coordinated in an equatorial plane, which combined with a central uranium ion, were indicated in the structure radial function. Structure parameters for U-, Np- and Pu-TBP(Tributyl phosphate) complexes, and for U-amide complexes were listed in Table. A theory predicted a systematic increase of covalency for complexes formed from UO22+∼PO22+ and TEP with an increase of atomic number of actinides, but for U-amide and U∼Pu-TBP complexes the effect of covalency was not reflected in interatomic distances. Some correlations between distribution ratios and different substituents were found in the interatomic distances between uranium and ligand atoms-Distribution ratios of U(VI) depended on interatomic distances between actinide atoms and oxygen ions in carbonyl and in nitric acid. Similarity of chemical bonds in all U-amide complexes except DH2EHA was indicated from XANES spectra of U LIII absorption edge. Three structures for Np(V)-carbon complexes were shown in a ball-and-stick model, and the structure parameters determined by EXAFS were also summarized in Table. Separation of trivalent actinide from the same valent lanthanide was described in connection with soft donors, which have donors such as sulfur and nitrogen atoms. (Kazumata, Y.)

  20. PWRs potentialities for minor actinides burning

    In the frame of the SPIN program at CEA, the impacts of the minor actinides (MA) incineration in PWRs are analysed. The aim is to reduce the mass, the potential radiotoxicity level. The recycling of all actinide elements is evaluated in a PWR nuclear yard. A sensitivity study is done to evaluate the incineration for each minor actinide element. This gives the most efficient way of incineration for each MA elements in a PWR and helps to design a PWR burner. This burner is disposed in a PWR nuclear system in which the actinides are recycled until equilibrium. (author)

  1. Research on the chemical speciation of actinides

    A demand for the safe and effective management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plant draws increasing attention with the growth of nuclear power industry. The objective of this project is to establish the basis of research on the actinide chemistry by using highly sensitive and advanced laser-based spectroscopic systems. Researches on the chemical speciation of actinides are prerequisite for the development of technologies related to nuclear fuel cycles, especially, such as the safe management of high level radioactive wastes and the chemical examination of irradiated nuclear fuels. For supporting these technologies, laser-based spectroscopies have been applied for the chemical speciation of actinide in aqueous solutions and the quantitative analysis of actinide isotopes in spent nuclear fuels. In this report, results on the following subjects have been summarized. Development of TRLFS technology for the chemical speciation of actinides, Development of laser-induced photo-acoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) system, Application of LIBD technology to investigate dynamic behaviors of actinides dissolution reactions, Development of nanoparticle analysis technology in groundwater using LIBD, Chemical speciation of plutonium complexes by using a LWCC system, Development of LIBS technology for the quantitative analysis of actinides, Evaluation on the chemical reactions between actinides and humic substances, Spectroscopic speciation of uranium-ligand complexes in aqueous solution, Chemical speciation of actinides adsorbed on metal oxides surfaces

  2. Chemistry of actinides and fission products

    This task is concerned primarily with the fundamental chemistry of the actinide and fission product elements. Special efforts are made to develop research programs in collaboration with researchers at universities and in industry who have need of national laboratory facilities. Specific areas currently under investigation include: (1) spectroscopy and photochemistry of actinides in low-temperature matrices; (2) small-angle scattering studies of hydrous actinide and fission product polymers in aqueous and nonaqueous solvents; (3) kinetic and thermodynamic studies of complexation reactions in aqueous and nonaqueous solutions; and (4) the development of inorganic ion exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide separations. Recent results from work in these areas are summarized here

  3. Long-term plant availability of actinides

    Environmental releases of actinide elements raise issues about which data are very limited. Quantitative information is required to assess the long-term behavior of actinides and their potential hazards resulting from the transport through food chains leading to man. Of special interest is the effect of time on the changes in the availability of actinide elements for uptake by plants from soil. This study provides valuable information on the effects of weathering and aging on the uptake of actinides from soil by range and crop plants grown under realistic field conditions

  4. Chemical and Ceramic Methods Toward Safe Storage of Actinides

    A very important, extremely-long-term, use for monazite as a radwaste encapsulant has been proposed. The use of ceramic La-monazite for sequestering actinides (isolating them from the environment), especially plutonium and some other radioactive elements (e.g., fission-product rare earths), had been especially championed by Lynn Boatner of ORNL. Monazite may be used alone or, copying its compatibility with many other minerals in nature, may be used in diverse composite combinations

  5. Chemical and Ceramic Methods Toward Safe Storage of Actinides

    P.E.D. Morgan; R.M. Housley; J.B. Davis; M.L. DeHaan

    2005-08-19

    A very import, extremely-long-term, use for monazite as a radwaste encapsulant has been proposed. THe use of ceramic La-monazite for sequestering actinides (isolating them from the environment), especially plutonium and some other radioactive elements )e.g., fission-product rare earths), had been especially championed by Lynn Boatner of ORNL. Monazite may be used alone or, copying its compatibility with many other minerals in nature, may be used in diverse composite combinations.

  6. QMEANclust: estimation of protein model quality by combining a composite scoring function with structural density information

    Schwede Torsten

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The selection of the most accurate protein model from a set of alternatives is a crucial step in protein structure prediction both in template-based and ab initio approaches. Scoring functions have been developed which can either return a quality estimate for a single model or derive a score from the information contained in the ensemble of models for a given sequence. Local structural features occurring more frequently in the ensemble have a greater probability of being correct. Within the context of the CASP experiment, these so called consensus methods have been shown to perform considerably better in selecting good candidate models, but tend to fail if the best models are far from the dominant structural cluster. In this paper we show that model selection can be improved if both approaches are combined by pre-filtering the models used during the calculation of the structural consensus. Results Our recently published QMEAN composite scoring function has been improved by including an all-atom interaction potential term. The preliminary model ranking based on the new QMEAN score is used to select a subset of reliable models against which the structural consensus score is calculated. This scoring function called QMEANclust achieves a correlation coefficient of predicted quality score and GDT_TS of 0.9 averaged over the 98 CASP7 targets and perform significantly better in selecting good models from the ensemble of server models than any other groups participating in the quality estimation category of CASP7. Both scoring functions are also benchmarked on the MOULDER test set consisting of 20 target proteins each with 300 alternatives models generated by MODELLER. QMEAN outperforms all other tested scoring functions operating on individual models, while the consensus method QMEANclust only works properly on decoy sets containing a certain fraction of near-native conformations. We also present a local version of QMEAN for the per

  7. A combined telemetry - tag return approach to estimate fishing and natural mortality rates of an estuarine fish

    Bacheler, N.M.; Buckel, J.A.; Hightower, J.E.; Paramore, L.M.; Pollock, K.H.

    2009-01-01

    A joint analysis of tag return and telemetry data should improve estimates of mortality rates for exploited fishes; however, the combined approach has thus far only been tested in terrestrial systems. We tagged subadult red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) with conventional tags and ultrasonic transmitters over 3 years in coastal North Carolina, USA, to test the efficacy of the combined telemetry - tag return approach. There was a strong seasonal pattern to monthly fishing mortality rate (F) estimates from both conventional and telemetry tags; highest F values occurred in fall months and lowest levels occurred during winter. Although monthly F values were similar in pattern and magnitude between conventional tagging and telemetry, information on F in the combined model came primarily from conventional tags. The estimated natural mortality rate (M) in the combined model was low (estimated annual rate ?? standard error: 0.04 ?? 0.04) and was based primarily upon the telemetry approach. Using high-reward tagging, we estimated different tag reporting rates for state agency and university tagging programs. The combined telemetry - tag return approach can be an effective approach for estimating F and M as long as several key assumptions of the model are met.

  8. Cross Time-Frequency Analysis for Combining Information of Several Sources: Application to Estimation of Spontaneous Respiratory Rate from Photoplethysmography

    Peláez-Coca, M. D.; Orini, M.; Lázaro, J.; Bailón, R.; Gil, E.

    2013-01-01

    A methodology that combines information from several nonstationary biological signals is presented. This methodology is based on time-frequency coherence, that quantifies the similarity of two signals in the time-frequency domain. A cross time-frequency analysis method, based on quadratic time-frequency distribution, has been used for combining information of several nonstationary biomedical signals. In order to evaluate this methodology, the respiratory rate from the photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal is estimated. The respiration provokes simultaneous changes in the pulse interval, amplitude, and width of the PPG signal. This suggests that the combination of information from these sources will improve the accuracy of the estimation of the respiratory rate. Another target of this paper is to implement an algorithm which provides a robust estimation. Therefore, respiratory rate was estimated only in those intervals where the features extracted from the PPG signals are linearly coupled. In 38 spontaneous breathing subjects, among which 7 were characterized by a respiratory rate lower than 0.15 Hz, this methodology provided accurate estimates, with the median error {0.00; 0.98} mHz ({0.00; 0.31}%) and the interquartile range error {4.88; 6.59} mHz ({1.60; 1.92}%). The estimation error of the presented methodology was largely lower than the estimation error obtained without combining different PPG features related to respiration. PMID:24363777

  9. Cross Time-Frequency Analysis for Combining Information of Several Sources: Application to Estimation of Spontaneous Respiratory Rate from Photoplethysmography

    M. D. Peláez-Coca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology that combines information from several nonstationary biological signals is presented. This methodology is based on time-frequency coherence, that quantifies the similarity of two signals in the time-frequency domain. A cross time-frequency analysis method, based on quadratic time-frequency distribution, has been used for combining information of several nonstationary biomedical signals. In order to evaluate this methodology, the respiratory rate from the photoplethysmographic (PPG signal is estimated. The respiration provokes simultaneous changes in the pulse interval, amplitude, and width of the PPG signal. This suggests that the combination of information from these sources will improve the accuracy of the estimation of the respiratory rate. Another target of this paper is to implement an algorithm which provides a robust estimation. Therefore, respiratory rate was estimated only in those intervals where the features extracted from the PPG signals are linearly coupled. In 38 spontaneous breathing subjects, among which 7 were characterized by a respiratory rate lower than 0.15 Hz, this methodology provided accurate estimates, with the median error {0.00; 0.98} mHz ({0.00; 0.31}% and the interquartile range error {4.88; 6.59} mHz ({1.60; 1.92}%. The estimation error of the presented methodology was largely lower than the estimation error obtained without combining different PPG features related to respiration.

  10. Nuclear Air-Brayton Combined Cycle Power Conversion Design, Physical Performance Estimation and Economic Assessment

    Andreades, Charalampos

    The combination of an increased demand for electricity for economic development in parallel with the widespread push for adoption of renewable energy sources and the trend toward liberalized markets has placed a tremendous amount of stress on generators, system operators, and consumers. Non-guaranteed cost recovery, intermittent capacity, and highly volatile market prices are all part of new electricity grids. In order to try and remediate some of these effects, this dissertation proposes and studies the design and performance, both physical and economic, of a novel power conversion system, the Nuclear Air-Brayton Combined Cycle (NACC). The NACC is a power conversion system that takes a conventional industrial frame type gas turbine, modifies it to accept external nuclear heat at 670°C, while also maintaining its ability to co-fire with natural gas to increase temperature and power output at a very quick ramp rate. The NACC addresses the above issues by allowing the generator to gain extra revenue through the provision of ancillary services in addition to energy payments, the grid operator to have a highly flexible source of capacity to back up intermittent renewable energy sources, and the consumer to possibly see less volatile electricity prices and a reduced probability of black/brown outs. This dissertation is split into six sections that delve into specific design and economic issues related to the NACC. The first section describes the basic design and modifications necessary to create a functional externally heated gas turbine, sets a baseline design based upon the GE 7FB, and estimates its physical performance under nominal conditions. The second section explores the off-nominal performance of the NACC and characterizes its startup and shutdown sequences, along with some of its safety measures. The third section deals with the power ramp rate estimation of the NACC, a key performance parameter in a renewable-heavy grid that needs flexible capacity. The

  11. Combining Wind-Tunnel and Field Measurements of Street-Canyon Flow via Stochastic Estimation

    Perret, Laurent; Blackman, Karin; Savory, Eric

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate how application of the stochastic estimation method can be employed to combine spatially well-resolved wind-tunnel particle image velocimetry measurements with instantaneous velocity signals from a limited number of sensors (six sonic anemometers located within the canyon in the present case) to predict full-scale flow dynamics in an entire street-canyon cross-section. The investigated configuration corresponds to a street-canyon flow in a neutrally stratified atmospheric boundary layer with the oncoming flow being perpendicular to the main canyon axis. Data were obtained during both full-scale and 1:200-scale wind-tunnel experiments. The performance of the proposed method is investigated using both wind-tunnel data and signals from five sonic anemometers to predict the velocity from the sixth one. In particular, based on analysis of the influence of the high-frequency velocity fluctuations on the quality of the reconstruction, it is shown that stochastic estimation is able to correctly reproduce the large-scale temporal features of the flow with the present set-up. The full dataset is then used to spatially extrapolate the instantaneous flow measured by the six sonic anemometers and perform detailed analysis of instantaneous flow features. The main features of the flow, such as the presence of the shear layer that develops over the canyon and the intermittent ejection and penetration events across the canyon opening, are well predicted by stochastic estimation. In addition, thanks to the high spatial resolution made possible by the technique, the intermittency of the main vortical structure existing within the canyon is demonstrated, as well as its meandering motion in the canyon cross-section. It is also shown that the canyon flow, particularly its spanwise component, is affected by large-scale fluctuations of low temporal frequency along the canyon axis. Finally, the proposed techniques based on wind-tunnel data can prove useful for a priori

  12. The chemical thermodynamics of actinide elements and compounds

    This compilation forms the twelfth part of a comprehensive assessment and selection of actinide thermodynamic data. The other parts of the compilation deal mostly with actinide elements and compounds. This part, which is the last one to be published in this Series, concerns inorganic actinide complexes in aqueous solution. The properties considered include the stability constant as a function of ionic strength and temperature and, whenever possible, enthalpy and entropy values. The present assessment is based on a literature survey that was terminated in early 1989. In tabulating literature data, only experimental results were used; estimates as well as recalculated data were ignored. Unlike in previous assessments of this kind in this assessment the selection of a best value is discussed and justified, and reasons are given for the rejection of data. In addition, our estimates of the thermodynamic properties, based on interrelationships between analogous systems, are given when this can be done reliably. Another essential aim of this assessment is to indicate those areas in which additional research is required. Refs

  13. On-line topical importance estimation: an effective focused crawling algorithm combining link and content analysis

    Can WANG; Zi-yu GUAN; Chun CHEN; Jia-jun BU; Jun-feng WANG; Huai-zhong LIN

    2009-01-01

    Focused crawling is an important technique for topical resource discovery on the Web. The key issue in focusedcrawling is to prioritize uncrawled uniform resource locators (URLs) in the frontier to focus the crawling on relevant pages.Traditional focused crawlers mainly rely on content analysis. Link-based techniques are not effectively exploited despite their usefulness. In this paper, we propose a new frontier prioritizing algorithm, namely the on-line topical importance estimation (OTIE) algorithm. OTIE combines link-and content-based analysis to evaluate the priority of an uncrawled URL in the frontier. We performed real crawling experiments over 30 topics selected from the Open Directory Project (ODP) and compared harvest rate and target recall of the four crawling algorithms: breadth-first, link-context-prediction, on-line page importance computation (OPlC) and our OTIE. Experimental results showed that OTIE significantly outperforms the other three algorithms on the average target recall while maintaining an acceptable harvest rate. Moreover, OTIE is much faster than the traditional focused crawling algorithm.

  14. SIMULTANEOUS ESTIMATION OF VALSARTAN AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE IN FIXED DOSE COMBINATION IN UV SPECTROPHOTOMETRY

    M. M. Deshpande et al.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Valsartan (VAL and Hydrochlorothiazide (HTZ are used in combination in treatment of Hypertension. Two simple, accurate, precise, economical and reproducible UV spectrophotometric methods have been developed for the estimation of Valsartan and Hydrochlorothiazide in Pharmaceutical formulation. Method I- Absorption ratio method (Q-analysis using two wavelengths, 265nm (isobestic point at which both the drugs exhibit absorbance 249nm (λmax of Valsartan and Method II- Area under Curve method. For the second method Area under the Curve in the range of 249 -259nm and 261-281nm was selected for the analysis of Valsartan and Hydrochlorothiazide respectively. Linearity for detector response was observed in the concentration range of 2-24g/ml & 2-14g/ml for Valsartan and Hydrochlorothiazide respectively. The results of analysis have been validated statistically and by recovery studies the value of standard deviation was satisfactory and recovery studies ranging from 99.54 - 99.97 % for Valsartan and 99.75 - 101.04 % for Hydrochlorothiazide were indicative of the accuracy and precision of the proposed method The proposed methods were successfully applied for the determination of Valsartan and Hydrochlorothiazide in commercial pharmaceutical preparation. All two methods were validated statistically as per ICH guidelines.

  15. Combined Resistivity and Shear Wave Velocity Soil-type Estimation Beneath a Coastal Protection Levee.

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Goff, D.; Hayashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Unconsolidated Holocene deltaic sediments comprise levee foundation soils in New Orleans, USA. Whereas geotechnical tests at point locations are indispensable for evaluating soil stability, the highly variable sedimentary facies of the Mississippi delta create difficulties to predict soil conditions between test locations. Combined electrical resistivity and seismic shear wave studies, calibrated to geotechnical data, may provide an efficient methodology to predict soil types between geotechnical sites at shallow depths (0- 10 m). The London Avenue Canal levee flank of New Orleans, which failed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, 2005, presents a suitable site in which to pioneer these geophysical relationships. Preliminary cross-plots show electrically resistive, high-shear-wave velocity areas interpreted as low-permeability, resistive silt. In brackish coastal environments, low-resistivity and low-shear-wave-velocity areas may indicate both saturated, unconsolidated sands and low-rigidity clays. Via a polynomial approximation, soil sub-types of sand, silt and clay can be estimated by a cross-plot of S-wave velocity and resistivity. We confirm that existent boring log data fit reasonably well with the polynomial approximation where 2/3 of soil samples fall within their respective bounds—this approach represents a new classification system that could be used for other mid-latitude, fine-grained deltas.

  16. Performance and operational economics estimates for a coal gasification combined-cycle cogeneration powerplant

    Nainiger, J. J.; Burns, R. K.; Easley, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A performance and operational economics analysis is presented for an integrated-gasifier, combined-cycle (IGCC) system to meet the steam and baseload electrical requirements. The effect of time variations in steam and electrial requirements is included. The amount and timing of electricity purchases from sales to the electric utility are determined. The resulting expenses for purchased electricity and revenues from electricity sales are estimated by using an assumed utility rate structure model. Cogeneration results for a range of potential IGCC cogeneration system sizes are compared with the fuel consumption and costs of natural gas and electricity to meet requirements without cogeneration. The results indicate that an IGCC cogeneration system could save about 10 percent of the total fuel energy presently required to supply steam and electrical requirements without cogeneration. Also for the assumed future fuel and electricity prices, an annual operating cost savings of 21 percent to 26 percent could be achieved with such a cogeneration system. An analysis of the effects of electricity price, fuel price, and system availability indicates that the IGCC cogeneration system has a good potential for economical operation over a wide range in these assumptions.

  17. Combining ability estimates for earliness in cotton leaf curl virus resistant inbred parents

    Four female cotton leaf curl virus-resistant resistant (cclv) parents consisting of advance strains and commercial varieties (VH-137, FH-901, CRIS-467 and Cyto-51) and four male parents, all clcv resistant Punjab varieties (FH-945, CIM-707, CIM-473 and FH-1000) were mated in a cross classification Design-II fashion. The results show that genetic variances due to additive genes were higher than the dominant variances, yet both types of variances were substantial, implying that significant improvement could reliably be made from segregating populations. The general combining ability (gca) estimates by and large suggested that for improvement in the appearance of first white flower and 1st sympodial branch node number, parents FH-945 and VH-137 whereas for 1st effective boll setting, parents FH-1000 and FH-901 and for percent of open bolls at 120 days after planting, parents CIM-707 and CRIS-467 may be given preference. However, for hybrid cotton development regarding earliness, hybrids CRIS-467 x CIM-707, VH-137 x FH-945 and Cyto-51 x FH-1000 may be chosen. (author)

  18. Calculated Atomic Volumes of the Actinide Metals

    Skriver, H.; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1979-01-01

    The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium.......The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium....

  19. Environmental chemistry of the actinide elements

    The environmental chemistry of the actinide elements is a new branch of science developing with the application of nuclear energy on a larger and larger scale. Various aspects of the environmental chemistry of the actinide elements are briefly reviewed in this paper, such as its significance in the nuclear waste disposal, its coverage of research fields and possible directions for future study

  20. Covariance evaluation for actinide nuclear data in JENDL-4

    Full text: The JENDL-4.0 was released in March 2010. It provides neutron nuclear data for 79 actinides from Ac to Fm. All of the actinides include covariance data. The covariance data were evaluated for reaction cross sections, resonance parameters, angular distributions of elastic scattering, average number of neutrons per fission, and prompt fission neutron spectra. They were deduced basically based on the consistent methodologies with the nuclear data evaluations. Statistical processing of experimental data sometimes gives unacceptably small uncertainty compared with experimental data. They may arise from ignoring unknown errors and correlation of experimental data and also from the modeling errors. The covariance data obtained from statistical estimation using the least-squares method were sometimes modified to be reasonable taking account of consistency with dispersion of experimental data, which may reflect the uncertainties of the data. For the fast neutron fission cross sections of 6 major actinides of 233,235,238U and 239,240,241Pu were evaluated simultaneously using both cross section and their ratio data with the least- squares fitting code SOK. It gave the covariance matrices that have cross correlations between different nuclei included in the analyses. For the minor actinide, the least-squares fitting code GMA was used for fission cross section evaluation for fast neutrons. The covariance data were obtained from the calculations at the same time. For other reaction cross sections, covariance matrices were evaluated using CCONE-KALMAN code system. Sensitivities to model parameters were calculated by CCONE code and used to estimate covariance matrices of the parameters with KALMAN code. Covariance matrices for other data such as resonance parameters and average numbers of fission neutrons were also evaluated based on experimental data. The evaluated covariance data were compiled to the ENDF-6 format files and included in JENDL-4.

  1. PIE analysis for minor actinide

    Minor actinide (MA) is generated in nuclear fuel during the operation of power reactor. For fuel design, reactivity decrease due to it should be considered. Out of reactors, MA plays key role to define the property of spent fuel (SF) such as α-radioactivity, neutron emission rate, and criticality of SF. In order to evaluate the calculation codes and libraries for predicting the amount of MA, comparison between calculation results and experimentally obtained data has been conducted. In this report, we will present the status of PIE data of MA taken by post irradiation examinations (PIE) and several calculation results. (author)

  2. Superabsorbing gel for actinide, lanthanide, and fission product decontamination

    Kaminski, Michael D.; Mertz, Carol J.

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides an aqueous gel composition for removing actinide ions, lanthanide ions, fission product ions, or a combination thereof from a porous surface contaminated therewith. The composition comprises a polymer mixture comprising a gel forming cross-linked polymer and a linear polymer. The linear polymer is present at a concentration that is less than the concentration of the cross-linked polymer. The polymer mixture is at least about 95% hydrated with an aqueous solution comprising about 0.1 to about 3 percent by weight (wt %) of a multi-dentate organic acid chelating agent, and about 0.02 to about 0.6 molar (M) carbonate salt, to form a gel. When applied to a porous surface contaminated with actinide ions, lanthanide ions, and/or other fission product ions, the aqueous gel absorbs contaminating ions from the surface.

  3. Study of lanthanum orthophosphates polymorphism, in view of actinide conditioning

    In order to perform researches on the substitution lanthanide-actinide in a view of actinide conditioning, a preliminary study of the polymorphism of lanthanum orthophosphates has been carried out by different techniques. LaPO4 formed by reaction of lanthanum nitrate with phosphoric acid contains 0.5 mol of water in open channel of the hexagonal structure (rhabdophane-type). The combination of thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and 31P solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance clearly shows the different steps of the thermal treatment. The zeolitic water evaporates between 180 and 280 deg. C. After heating up to 700 deg. C, a monoclinic structure (monazite-type) is formed by compacting the chains of PO4 tetrahedron alternating with LaO9 polyhedron

  4. Actinides analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry

    At the ANTARES accelerator at ANSTO a new beamline has been commissioned, incorporating new magnetic and electrostatic analysers, to optimise the efficiency for Actinides detection by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The detection of Actinides, particularly the isotopic ratios of uranium and plutonium, provide unique signatures for nuclear safeguards purposes. We are currently engaged in a project to evaluate the application of AMS to the measurement of Actinides in environmental samples for nuclear safeguards. Levels of certain fission products, Actinides and other radioactive species can be used as indicators of undeclared nuclear facilities or activities, either on-going or in the past Other applications of ultra-sensitive detection of Actinides are also under consideration. neutron-attenuation images of a porous reservoir rock

  5. Actinide co-conversion by internal gelation

    Suitable microstructures and homogenous microspheres of actinide compounds are of interest for future nuclear fuel or transmutation target concepts to prevent the generation and dispersal of actinide powder. Sol-gel routes are being investigated as one of the possible solutions for producing these compounds. Preliminary work is described involving internal gelation to synthesize mixed compounds including minor actinides, particularly mixed actinide or mixed actinide-inert element compounds. A parameter study is discussed to highlight the importance of the initial broth composition for obtaining gel microspheres without major defects (cracks, craters, etc.). In particular, conditions are defined to produce gel beads from Zr(IV)/Y(III)/Ce(III) or Zr(IV)/An(III) systems. After gelation, the heat treatment of these microspheres is described for the purpose of better understanding the formation of cracks after calcination and verifying the effective synthesis of an oxide solid-solution. (authors)

  6. Actinide ion sensor for pyroprocess monitoring

    Jue, Jan-fong; Li, Shelly X.

    2014-06-03

    An apparatus for real-time, in-situ monitoring of actinide ion concentrations which comprises a working electrode, a reference electrode, a container, a working electrolyte, a separator, a reference electrolyte, and a voltmeter. The container holds the working electrolyte. The voltmeter is electrically connected to the working electrode and the reference electrode and measures the voltage between those electrodes. The working electrode contacts the working electrolyte. The working electrolyte comprises an actinide ion of interest. The reference electrode contacts the reference electrolyte. The reference electrolyte is separated from the working electrolyte by the separator. The separator contacts both the working electrolyte and the reference electrolyte. The separator is ionically conductive to the actinide ion of interest. The reference electrolyte comprises a known concentration of the actinide ion of interest. The separator comprises a beta double prime alumina exchanged with the actinide ion of interest.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of minor actinides transmutation to physical and technological parameters

    Kooyman Timothée

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Minor actinides transmutation is one of the three main axis defined by the 2006 French law for management of nuclear waste, along with long-term storage and use of a deep geological repository. Transmutation options for critical systems can be divided in two different approaches: (a homogeneous transmutation, in which minor actinides are mixed with the fuel. This exhibits the drawback of “polluting” the entire fuel cycle with minor actinides and also has an important impact on core reactivity coefficients such as Doppler Effect or sodium void worth for fast reactors when the minor actinides fraction increases above 3 to 5% depending on the core; (b heterogeneous transmutation, in which minor actinides are inserted into transmutation targets which can be located in the center or in the periphery of the core. This presents the advantage of decoupling the management of the minor actinides from the conventional fuel and not impacting the core reactivity coefficients. In both cases, the design and analyses of potential transmutation systems have been carried out in the frame of Gen IV fast reactor using a “perturbation” approach in which nominal power reactor parameters are modified to accommodate the loading of minor actinides. However, when designing such a transmutation strategy, parameters from all steps of the fuel cycle must be taken into account, such as spent fuel heat load, gamma or neutron sources or fabrication feasibility. Considering a multi-recycling strategy of minor actinides, an analysis of relevant estimators necessary to fully analyze a transmutation strategy has been performed in this work and a sensitivity analysis of these estimators to a broad choice of reactors and fuel cycle parameters has been carried out. No threshold or percolation effects were observed. Saturation of transmutation rate with regards to several parameters has been observed, namely the minor actinides volume fraction and the irradiation time

  8. Testing actinide fission yield treatment in CINDER90 for use in MCNP6 burnup calculations

    Most of the development of the MCNPX/6 burnup capability focused on features that were applied to the Boltzman transport or used to prepare coefficients for use in CINDER90, with little change to CINDER90 or the CINDER90 data. Though a scheme exists for best solving the coupled Boltzman and Bateman equations, the most significant approximation is that the employed nuclear data are correct and complete. Thus, the CINDER90 library file contains 60 different actinide fission yields encompassing 36 fissionable actinides (thermal, fast, high energy and spontaneous fission). Fission reaction data exists for more than 60 actinides and as a result, fission yield data must be approximated for actinides that do not possess fission yield information. Several types of approximations are used for estimating fission yields for actinides which do not possess explicit fission yield data. The objective of this study is to test whether or not certain approximations of fission yield selection have any impact on predictability of major actinides and fission products. Further we assess which other fission products, available in MCNP6 Tier 3, result in the largest difference in production. Because the CINDER90 library file is in ASCII format and therefore easily amendable, we assess reasons for choosing, as well as compare actinide and major fission product prediction for the H. B. Robinson benchmark for, three separate fission yield selection methods: (1) the current CINDER90 library file method (Base); (2) the element method (Element); and (3) the isobar method (Isobar). Results show that the three methods tested result in similar prediction of major actinides, Tc-99 and Cs-137; however, certain fission products resulted in significantly different production depending on the method of choice

  9. Combined State of Charge and State of Health estimation over lithium-ion battery cell cycle lifespan for electric vehicles

    Zou, Yuan; Hu, Xiaosong; Ma, Hongmin; Li, Shengbo Eben

    2015-01-01

    A combined SOC (State Of Charge) and SOH (State Of Health) estimation method over the lifespan of a lithium-ion battery is proposed. First, the SOC dependency of the nominal parameters of a first-order RC (resistor-capacitor) model is determined, and the performance degradation of the nominal model over the battery lifetime is quantified. Second, two Extended Kalman Filters with different time scales are used for combined SOC/SOH monitoring: the SOC is estimated in real-time, and the SOH (the capacity and internal ohmic resistance) is updated offline. The time scale of the SOH estimator is determined based on model accuracy deterioration. The SOC and SOH estimation results are demonstrated by using large amounts of testing data over the battery lifetime.

  10. Enhancing the actinide sciences in Europe through hot laboratories networking and pooling: from ACTINET to TALISMAN

    Since 2004, Europe supports the strengthening of the European actinides sciences scientific community through the funding of dedicated networks: (i) from 2004 to 2008, the ACTINET6 network of excellence (6. Framework Programme) gathered major laboratories involved in nuclear research and a wide range of academic research organisations and universities with the specific aims of funding and implementing joint research projects to be performed within the network of pooled facilities; (ii) from 2009 to 2013, the ACTINET-I3 integrated infrastructure initiative (I3) supports the cost of access of any academics in the pooled EU hot laboratories. In this continuation, TALISMAN (Trans-national Access to Large Infrastructures for a Safe Management of Actinides) gathers now the main European hot laboratories in actinides sciences in order to promote their opening to academics and universities and strengthen the EU-skills in actinides sciences. Furthermore, a specific focus is set on the development of advanced cutting-edge experimental and spectroscopic capabilities, the combination of state-of-the art experimental with theoretical first-principle methods on a quantum mechanical level and to benefit from the synergy between the different scientific and technical communities. ACTINET-I3 and TALISMAN attach a great importance and promote the Education and Training of the young generation of actinides scientists in the Trans-national access but also by organizing Schools (general Summer Schools or Theoretical User Lab Schools) or by granting students to attend International Conference on actinide sciences. (authors)

  11. Salton Trough regional deformation estimated from combined trilateration and survey-mode GPS data

    Anderson, G.; Agnew, D.C.; Johnson, H.O.

    2003-01-01

    The Salton Trough in southeastern California, United States, has one of the highest seismicity and deformation rates in southern California, including 20 earthquakes M 6 or larger since 1892. From 1972 through 1987, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measured a 41-station trilateration network in this region. We remeasured 37 of the USGS baselines using survey-mode Global Positioning System methods from 1995 through 1999. We estimate the Salton Trough deformation field over a nearly 30-year period through combined analysis of baseline length time series from these two datasets. Our primary result is that strain accumulation has been steady over our observation span, at a resolution of about 0.05 ??strain/yr at 95% confidence, with no evidence for significant long-term strain transients despite the occurrence of seven large regional earthquakes during our observation period. Similar to earlier studies, we find that the regional strain field is consistent with 0.5 ?? 0.03 ??strain/yr total engineering shear strain along an axis oriented 311.6?? ?? 23?? east of north, approximately parallel to the strike of the major regional faults, the San Andreas and San Jacinto (all uncertainties in the text and tables are standard deviations unless otherwise noted). We also find that (1) the shear strain rate near the San Jacinto fault is at least as high as it is near the San Andreas fault, (2) the areal dilatation near the southeastern Salton Sea is significant, and (3) one station near the southeastern Salton Sea moved anomalously during the period 1987.95-1995.11.

  12. On combining data for estimating the frequency of low-probability events with application to sodium valve failure rates

    Probabilistic risk assessments are increasingly being used to quantify the public risks of operating potentially hazardous systems such as nuclear power reactors. Such assessments require the quantification of the frequencies of various low-probability events. In performing these analyses, the risk analyst is often confronted with the dual problem of the appropriate data to be used to estimate the required frequencies and the development of the corresponding estimates. Often the problem reduces to one of how to combine (or pool) a variety of more or less applicable existing data sources. A Bayes/empirical-Bayes procedure is developed for combining as many as five different types of pertinent data. The five data types can be grouped under analysis data, similar operating data, expert opinions, historical operating data, and generic data. Example illustrations of each of these data types are given. The procedure is used to estimate the combined hourly failure rate of small manually operated sodium valves, such as those typically found in liquid-metal fast breeder reactor shutdown heat removal systems. Pertinent data sources include operating data from sodium test loops (similar operating data), expert opinion, operating data from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, and seven generic failure rate estimates for similar valves in both U.K. and U.S. operating light water power reactors. A final posterior distribution is produced that reflects the combined influence of all of these data. This distribution provides the required estimates and corresponding uncertainty bounds

  13. The ALMR actinide burning system

    The advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) actinide burning system is being developed under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to bring its unique capabilities to fruition for deployment in the early 21st century. The system consists of four major parts: the reactor plant, the metal fuel and its recycle, the processing of light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel to extract the actinides, and the development of a residual waste package. This paper addresses the status and outlook for each of these four major elements. The ALMR is being developed by an industrial group under the leadership of General Electric (GE) in a cost-sharing arrangement with the US Department of Energy. This effort is nearing completion of the advanced conceptual design phase and will enter the preliminary design phase in 1994. The innovative modular reactor design stresses simplicity, economics, reliability, and availability. The design has evolved from GE's PRISM design initiative and has progressed to the final stages of a prelicensing review by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); a safety evaluation report is expected by the end of 1993. All the major issues identified during this review process have been technically resolved. The next design phases will focus on implementation of the basic safety philosophy of passive shutdown to a safe, stable condition, even without scram, and passive decay heat removal. Economic projections to date show that it will be competitive with non- nuclear and advanced LWR nuclear alternatives

  14. Estimation of Power Efficiency of Combined Heat Pumping Stations in Heat Power Supply Systems

    I. I. Matsko

    2010-01-01

    The paper considers realization of heat pumping technologies advantages at heat power generation for heat supply needs on the basis of combining electric drive heat pumping units with water heating boilers as a part of a combined heat pumping station.The possibility to save non-renewable energy resources due to the combined heat pumping stations utilization instead of water heating boiler houses is shown in the paper.The calculation methodology for power efficiency for introduction of combine...

  15. A literature review of actinide-carbonate mineral interactions

    Chemical retardation of actinides in groundwater systems is a potentially important mechanism for assessing the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility intended to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic waste. Rigorous estimation of chemical retardation during transport through the Culebra Dolomite, a water-bearing unit overlying the WIPP, requires a mechanistic understanding of chemical reactions between dissolved elements and mineral surfaces. This report represents a first step toward this goal by examining the literature for pertinent experimental studies of actinide-carbonate interactions. A summary of existing models is given, along with the types of experiments on which these models are based. Articles pertaining to research into actinide interactions with carbonate minerals are summarized. Select articles involving trace element-carbonate mineral interactions are also reviewed and may serve as templates for future research. A bibliography of related articles is included. Americium(III), and its nonradioactive analog neodymium(III), partition strongly from aqueous solutions into carbonate minerals. Recent thermodynamic, kinetic, and surface studies show that Nd is preferentially removed from solution, forming a Nd-Ca carbonate solid solution. Neptunium(V) is rapidly removed from solution by carbonates. Plutonium incorporation into carbonates is complicated by multiple oxidation states. Little research has been done on the radium(H) and thorium(IV) carbonate systems. Removal of uranyl ion from solution by calcite is limited to monolayer surface coverage

  16. Sensitivity analysis for actinide production and depletion in fast reactors

    In sensitivity analysis of the actinide production and depletion in fast reactors, a mathematical method of calculating sensitivity coefficients is improved and simplified by combining the time-dependent generalized perturbation technique with the eigenvalue method. Numerical calculations show that the eigenvalue method is well applicable in solving the nuclide chain equation and its adjoint equation and the cylic chains in the decay scheme of the actinides can be interpreted by means of complex eigenvalues. The sensitivity coefficients of actinide production and depletion in a 1000 MWe fast reactor are strongly dependent on the type of Pu fuel used, i.e. Pu fuel from BWR or Pu fuel from the blanket of FBR. The sensitivity coefficients due to variations of capture cross sections, σsub(n,2n) of 238U, lambda sub(β) of 241Pu and lambda sub(α) of 242Cm are especially large. Sensitivity analyses for the 1000 MWe fast reactors show that higher priorily should be given to decay constants of 241Pu and 242Cm, capture cross sections of 237Np, 241Am, 243Am and 242Pu, and fission cross sections of 237Np, 242Pu, 241Am and sup(242m)Am. (author)

  17. Molecular cluster theory of chemical bonding in actinide oxide

    The electronic structure of actinide monoxides AcO and dioxides AcO2, where Ac = Th, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm and Bk has been studied by molecular cluster methods based on the first-principles one-electron local density theory. Molecular orbitals for nearest neighbor clusters AcO10-6 and AcO12-8 representative of monoxide and dioxide lattices were obtained using non-relativistic spin-restricted and spin-polarized Hartree-Fock-Slater models for the entire series. Fully relativistic Dirac-Slater calculations were performed for ThO, UO and NpO in order to explore magnitude of spin-orbit splittings and level shifts in valence structure. Self-consistent iterations were carried out for NpO, in which the NpO6 cluster was embedded in the molecular field of the solid. Finally, a ''moment polarized'' model which combines both spin-polarization and relativistic effects in a consistent fashion was applied to the NpO system. Covalent mixing of oxygen 2p and Ac 5f orbitals was found to increase rapidly across the actinide series; metal s,p,d covalency was found to be nearly constant. Mulliken atomic population analysis of cluster eigenvectors shows that free-ion crystal field models are unreliable, except for the light actinides. X-ray photoelectron line shapes have been calculated and are found to compare rather well with experimental data on the dioxides

  18. Response of actinides to flux changes in high-flux systems

    When discussing the transmutation of actinides in accelerator-based transmutation of waste (ATW) systems, there has been some concern about the dynamics of the actinides under high transient fluxes. For a pure neptunium feed, it has been estimated that the 238Np/237Np ratio increase due to an increasing flux may lead to an unstable, positive reactivity growth. In this analysis, a perturbation method is used to calculate the response of the entire set of actinides in a general way that allows for more species than just neptunium. The time response of the system can be calculated; i.e., a plot of fuel composition and reactivity versus time after a change in flux can be made. The effects of fission products can also be included. The procedure is extremely accurate on short time scales (∼ 1000 s) for the flux levels we contemplate. Calculational results indicate that the reactivity insertions are always smaller than previously estimated

  19. Thermodynamic study on the complexation of Trivalent actinide and lanthanide cation by N-donor ligands in homogeneous conditions; Etude thermodynamique de la complexation des ions actinide (III) et lanthanide (III) par des ligands polyazotes en milieu homogene

    Miguirditchian, M

    2004-07-01

    Polydentate N-donor ligands, alone or combined with a synergic acid, may selectively extract minor actinides(III) from lanthanide(III) ions, allowing to develop separation processes of long-live radioelements. The aim of the researches carried out during this thesis was to better understand the chemical mechanisms of the complexation of f-elements by Adptz, a tridentate N-donor ligand, in homogeneous conditions. A thermodynamic approach was retained in order to estimate, from an energetic point of view, the influence of the different contributions to the reaction, and to acquire a complete set of thermodynamic data on this reaction. First, the influence of the nature of the cation on the thermodynamics was considered. The stability constants of the 1/1 complexes were systematically determined by UV-visible spectrophotometry for every lanthanide ion (except promethium) and for yttrium in a mixed solvent methanol/water in volume proportions 75/25%. The thermodynamic parameters ({delta}H{sup 0} {delta}{sup S}) of complexation were estimated by the van't Hoff method and by micro-calorimetry. The trends of the variations across the lanthanide series are compared with similar studies. The same methods were applied to the study of three actinide(III) cations: plutonium, americium and curium. The comparison of these values with those obtained for the lanthanides highlights the increase of stability of these complexes by a factor of 20 in favor of the actinide cations. This gap is explained by a more exothermic reaction and is associated, in the data interpretation, to a higher covalency of the actinide(III)-nitrogen bond. Then, the influence of the change of solvent composition on the thermodynamic of complexation was studied. The thermodynamic parameters of the complexation of europium(III) by Adptz were determined for several fractions of methanol. The stability of the complex formed increases with the percentage of methanol in the mixed solvent, owing to an

  20. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of actinides

    The study of the actinide series shows the change between transition metal behavior and lanthanide behavior, between constant weak paramagnetism for thorium and strong Curie-Weiss paramagnetism for curium. Curium is shown to be the first metal of the actinide series to be magnetically ordered, its Neel temperature being 52K. The magnetic properties of the actinides depending on all the peripheral electrons, their electronic structure was studied and an attempt was made to determine it by means of a phenomenological model. Attempts were also made to interrelate the different physical properties which depend on the outer electronic structure

  2. Actinide chemistry in the far field

    The environmental chemistry of the actinides is complicated due both to the extensive redox and coordination chemistry of the elements and also to the complexity of the reactive phases encountered in natural environments. In the far field, interactions with reactive surfaces, coatings and colloidal particles will play a crucial role in controlling actinide mobility. By virtue of both their abundance and reactivity; clays and other layer aluminosilicate minerals, hydrous oxides and organic matter (humic substances) are all identified as having the potential to react with actinide ions and some possible modes of interaction are described, together with experimental evidence for their occurrence. (author)

  3. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Spin and orbital moments in actinide compounds

    Lebech, B.; Wulff, M.; Lander, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    -electron band-structure calculations, is that the orbital moments of the actinide 5f electrons are considerably reduced from the values anticipated by a simple application of Hund's rules. To test these ideas, and thus to obtain a measure of the hybridization, we have performed a series of neutron scattering...... experiments designed to determine the magnetic moments at the actinide and transition-metal sublattice sites in compounds such as UFe2, NpCo2, and PuFe2 and to separate the spin and orbital components at the actinide sites. The results show, indeed, that the ratio of the orbital to spin moment is reduced as...

  5. Endohedral Fullerenes with Actinide-Actinide Bonds: Unwilling Bonding in U2@C80

    Foroutan-Nejad, C.; Patzschke, M.; Straka, Michal

    Opole: -, 2014. [MMNB 2014. Polish-Taiwanese Conference. From Molecular Modeling to Nano- and Biotechnology . 04.09.2014-06.09.2014, Opole] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03564S Grant ostatní: European Social Fund(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.009 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : endohedral actinide fullerene * U-U bonding * actinide-actinide bonding Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  6. Gastrointestinal absorption of actinides: a review with special reference to primate data

    Large scale geological burial of transuranic wastes from fission power production may expose segments of future generations to trace amounts of actinides in water and food, which, via gastrointestinal absorption, could result in internal doses of alpha radiation. Gastrointestinal absorption of actinide elements is a poorly understood process. Experimental studies, primarily using rodents, often produce ambiguous results with order of magnitude fluctuations in estimates of GI absorption. Since experimental conditions like the chemical form of the fed actinides or reducing and complexing capacity of the stomach content, influence the GI transfer factor in seemingly unpredictable ways, only a better understanding of events at the molecular level will enable more reliable predictions to be made of the organ burdens resulting from actinides passing through the digestive tract. From a review of the existing literature it is apparent that in vitro research data in the area of GI uptake mechanisms (i.e. transport mediated by ion carriers in body fluids and across cell membranes) are virtually non-existant. In view of the uncertainties linked to in vivo uptake experiment, models which approximate man, i.e. derived from non-human primate studies, should be the best choice of experimental systems in which to determine reliable estimates for gastrointestinal transfer factors of actinide elements. (Auth.)

  7. PF-4 actinide disposition strategy

    The dwindling amount of Security Category I processing and storage space across the DOE Complex has driven the need for more effective storage of nuclear materials at LANL's Plutonium Facility's (PF-4's) vault. An effort was begun in 2009 to create a strategy, a roadmap, to identify all accountable nuclear material and determine their disposition paths, the PF-4 Actinide Disposition Strategy (PADS). Approximately seventy bins of nuclear materials with similar characteristics - in terms of isotope, chemical form, impurities, disposition location, etc. - were established in a database. The ultimate disposition paths include the material to remain at LANL, disposition to other DOE sites, and disposition to waste. If all the actions described in the document were taken, over half of the containers currently in the PF-4 vault would been eliminated. The actual amount of projected vault space will depend on budget and competing mission requirements, however, clearly a significant portion of the current LANL inventory can be either dispositioned or consolidated.

  8. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    We demonstrated a new process for recovering plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste. The method is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, or acidity that eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flow chart concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 62- from high-chloride low-acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with lN HNO3-4.8M NaCl. After elution, plutonium is recovered by hydroxide precipitation, and americium is recovered by NaHCO3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process can be discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are in progress for MSE residues. Flow charts for actinide recovery from electro-refining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  9. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms. Implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, the way how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides is assessed. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. The way how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility is described. Why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions is explained. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. Development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions is described. Throughout, the key research needs are identified. (author)

  10. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures.

    Banaszak, J.E.; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-02-12

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs.

  11. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs

  12. A combined vision-inertial fusion approach for 6-DoF object pose estimation

    Li, Juan; Bernardos Barbolla, Ana M.; Tarrío Alonso, Paula; Casar Corredera, Jose Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The estimation of the 3D position and orientation of moving objects (‘pose’ estimation) is a critical process for many applications in robotics, computer vision or mobile services. Although major research efforts have been carried out to design accurate, fast and robust indoor pose estimation systems, it remains as an open challenge to provide a low-cost, easy to deploy and reliable solution. Addressing this issue, this paper describes a hybrid approach for 6 degrees of freedom (6-DoF) pose e...

  13. Improving Weather Radar Precipitation Estimates by Combining two Types of Radars

    Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a demonstration of how Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) X-band measurements can be combined with meteorological C–band measurements into a single radar product. For this purpose, a blending method has been developed which combines the strengths of the two radar systems. Combini...

  14. An adaptive Kalman filtering based State of Charge combined estimator for electric vehicle battery pack

    Ah counting is not a satisfactory method for the estimation of the State of Charge (SOC) of a battery, as the initial SOC and coulombic efficiency are difficult to measure. To address this issue, a new SOC estimation method, denoted as 'AEKFAh', is proposed. This method uses the adaptive Kalman filtering method which can avoid filtering divergence resulting from uncertainty to correct for the initial value used in the Ah counting method. A Ni/MH battery test procedure, consisting of 8.08 continuous Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) cycles, is carried out to verify the method. The SOC estimation error is 2.4% when compared with the real SOC obtained from a discharge test. This compares favorably with an estimation error of 11.4% when using Ah counting.

  15. Profiling and annotation combined method for multimedia application specific MPSoC performance estimation

    Kai HUANG; Xiao-xu ZHANG; Si-wen XIU; Dan-dan ZHENG; Min YU; De MA; Kai HUANG; Gang CHEN; Xiao-lang YAN

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and fast performance estimation is necessary to drive design space exploration and thus support important design decisions. Current techniques are either time consuming or not accurate enough. In this paper, we solve these problems by presenting a hybrid method for multimedia multiprocessor system-on-chip (MPSoC) performance estimation. A general coverage analysis tool GNU gcov is employed to profi le the execution statistics during the native simulation. To tackle the complexity and keep the analysis and simulation manageable, the orthogonalization of communication and computation parts is adopted. The estimation result of the computation part is annotated to a transaction accurate model for further analysis, by which a gradual refi nement of MPSoC performance estimation is supported. The implementation and its experimental results prove the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  16. Simulation with Ideal Switch Models Combined with Measured Loss Data Provides a Good Estimate of Power Loss

    StigMunk-Nielsen; Lucian; N; Tutelea; Ulrik; Jager

    2007-01-01

    Ideally, converter losses should be determined without using an excessive amount of simulation time. State-of-the-art power semiconductor models provide good accuracy,unfortunately they often require a very long simulation time. This paper describes how to estimate power losses from simulation using ideal switches combined with measured power loss data. The semiconductor behavior is put into a look-up table,which replaces the advanced semiconductor models and shortens the simulation time.To extract switching and conduction losses, a converter is simulated and the semiconductor power losses are estimated. Measurement results on a laboratory converter are compared with the estimated losses and a good agreement is shown. Using the ideal switch simulation and the post processing power estimation program,a ten to twenty fold increase in simulation speed is obtained,compared to simulations using advanced models of semiconductors.

  17. Combining four dimensional variational data assimilation and particle filtering for estimating volcanic ash emissions

    Franke, Philipp; Elbern, Hendrik

    2016-04-01

    Estimating volcanic ash emissions is a very challenging task due to limited monitoring capacities of the ash plume and nonlinear processes in the atmosphere, which renders application of source strength and injection height estimations difficult. Most models, which estimate volcanic ash emissions, make strong simplifications of the dispersion of volcanic ash and corresponding atmospheric processes. The objective of this work is to estimate volcanic ash emissions and simulate the ensuing dispersion applying a full chemistry transport model in a hybrid approach by using its adjoint as well as an ensemble of model runs to quantify forecast uncertainties. Therefore, the four dimensional variational data assimilation version of the EURAD-IM chemistry transport model is extended to include a Sequential Importance Resampling Smoother (SIRS), introducing novel weighting and resampling strategies. In the main SIRS step the ensemble members exchange high rated emission patterns while rejecting emission patterns with low value for the forecast. The emission profiles of the ensemble members are perturbed afterwards to guarantee different emissions for all ensemble members. First identical twin experiments show the ability of the system to estimate the temporal and vertical distribution of volcanic ash emissions. The 4D-var data assimilation algorithm of the new system additionally provides quantitative emission estimation.

  18. Preparation of actinide targets by electrodeposition

    Trautmann, N.; Folger, H.

    1989-10-01

    Actinide targets with varying thicknesses on different substrates have been prepared by electrodeposition either from aqueous solutions or from solutions of their nitrates in isopropyl alcohol. With these techniques the actinides can be deposited almost quantitatively on various backing materials within 15 to 30 min. Targets of thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium and californium with areal densities from almost carrier-free up to 1.4 mg/cm 2 on thin beryllium, carbon, titanium, tantalum and platinum foils have been prepared. In most cases, prior to the deposition, the actinides had to be purified chemically and for some of them, due to the limited amount of material available, recycling procedures were required. Applications of actinide targets in heavy-ion reactions are briefly discussed.

  19. Actinide research to solve some practical problems

    The following topics are discussed: generation of plutonium inventories by nuclear power plants; resettlement of the Marshallese Islanders into an actinide contaminated environment; high radiation background areas of the world; and radiation hazards to uranium miners

  20. Overview of actinide chemistry in the WIPP

    Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The year 2009 celebrates 10 years of safe operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the only nuclear waste repository designated to dispose defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste in the United States. Many elements contributed to the success of this one-of-the-kind facility. One of the most important of these is the chemistry of the actinides under WIPP repository conditions. A reliable understanding of the potential release of actinides from the site to the accessible environment is important to the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The environmental chemistry of the major actinides disposed at the WIPP continues to be investigated as part of the ongoing recertification efforts of the WIPP project. This presentation provides an overview of the actinide chemistry for the WIPP repository conditions. The WIPP is a salt-based repository; therefore, the inflow of brine into the repository is minimized, due to the natural tendency of excavated salt to re-seal. Reducing anoxic conditions are expected in WIPP because of microbial activity and metal corrosion processes that consume the oxygen initially present. Should brine be introduced through an intrusion scenario, these same processes will re-establish reducing conditions. In the case of an intrusion scenario involving brine, the solubilization of actinides in brine is considered as a potential source of release to the accessible environment. The following key factors establish the concentrations of dissolved actinides under subsurface conditions: (1) Redox chemistry - The solubility of reduced actinides (III and IV oxidation states) is known to be significantly lower than the oxidized forms (V and/or VI oxidation states). In this context, the reducing conditions in the WIPP and the strong coupling of the chemistry for reduced metals and microbiological processes with actinides are important. (2) Complexation - For the anoxic, reducing and mildly basic brine systems in the WIPP, the most important

  1. PWRs potentialities for minor actinides burning

    In the frame of the SPIN program at CEA, the impacts of the Minor Actinides (MA) incineration in PWRs are analysed. The aim is to reduce the mass and the potential radiotoxicity level. This study is done separately one on the Plutonium recycling. But the plutonium is essential. Thus, the recycling of all Actinide elements is evaluated in a PWR nuclear yard. A sensitivity study is done to evaluate the incineration for each Minor Actinide element. This gives us the most efficient way of incineration for each MA element in a PWR and help us to design a PWR burner. This burner is disposed in a PWR nuclear system in which the Actinides are recycled until equilibrium. (authors). 2 refs

  2. Electronic structure and correlation effects in actinides

    Albers, R.C.

    1998-12-01

    This report consists of the vugraphs given at a conference on electronic structure. Topics discussed are electronic structure, f-bonding, crystal structure, and crystal structure stability of the actinides and how they are inter-related.

  3. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Clark, Sue; Meier, G Patrick; Alexandratos, Spiro; Paine, Robert; Hancock, Robert; Ensor, Dale

    2012-03-21

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of spent nuclear fuel is the need to isolate transuranium elements from fission product lanthanides. This project expanded the scope of earlier investigations of americium (Am) partitioning from the lanthanides with the synthesis of new separations materials and a centralized focus on radiochemical characterization of the separation systems that could be developed based on these new materials. The primary objective of this program was to explore alternative materials for actinide separations and to link the design of new reagents for actinide separations to characterizations based on actinide chemistry. In the predominant trivalent oxidation state, the chemistry of lanthanides overlaps substantially with that of the trivalent actinides and their mutual separation is quite challenging.

  4. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  5. New molecules to separate actinides: the picolinamides

    The reprocessing of spent fuel is made with the Purex process, funded on liquid-liquid extraction of uranium nitrates(VI) and plutonium nitrates(IV) by the BTP (tributyl phosphate). To improve this proceeding, we look for extractants which allow, beyond U and Pu extractions, these of actinides (II) and allow separation of the whole actinides from the fission products, which have an important fraction of lanthanides. A new family seems to give good results: the picolinamides

  6. Superconductivity in rare earth and actinide compounds

    Rare earth and actinide compounds and the extraordinary superconducting and magnetic phenomena they exhibit are surveyed. The rare earth and actinide compounds described belong to three classes of novel superconducting materials: high temperature, high field superconductors (intermetallics and layered cuprates); superconductors containing localized magnetic moments; heavy fermion superconductors. Recent experiments on the resistive upper critical field of high Tc cuprate superconductors and the peak effect in the critical current density of the f-electron superconductor CeRu2 are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Lattice effects in the light actinides

    The light actinides show a variety of lattice effects that do not normally appear in other regions of the periodic table. The article will cover the crystal structures of the light actinides, their atomic volumes, their thermal expansion behavior, and their elastic behavior as reflected in recent thermal vibration measurements made by neutron diffraction. A discussion of the melting points will be given in terms of the thermal vibration measurements. Pressure effects will be only briefly indicated

  8. Estimation of Sea Ice Thickness Distributions through the Combination of Snow Depth and Satellite Laser Altimetry Data

    Kurtz, Nathan T.; Markus, Thorsten; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Sparling, Lynn C.; Krabill, William B.; Gasiewski, Albin J.; Sonntag, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Combinations of sea ice freeboard and snow depth measurements from satellite data have the potential to provide a means to derive global sea ice thickness values. However, large differences in spatial coverage and resolution between the measurements lead to uncertainties when combining the data. High resolution airborne laser altimeter retrievals of snow-ice freeboard and passive microwave retrievals of snow depth taken in March 2006 provide insight into the spatial variability of these quantities as well as optimal methods for combining high resolution satellite altimeter measurements with low resolution snow depth data. The aircraft measurements show a relationship between freeboard and snow depth for thin ice allowing the development of a method for estimating sea ice thickness from satellite laser altimetry data at their full spatial resolution. This method is used to estimate snow and ice thicknesses for the Arctic basin through the combination of freeboard data from ICESat, snow depth data over first-year ice from AMSR-E, and snow depth over multiyear ice from climatological data. Due to the non-linear dependence of heat flux on ice thickness, the impact on heat flux calculations when maintaining the full resolution of the ICESat data for ice thickness estimates is explored for typical winter conditions. Calculations of the basin-wide mean heat flux and ice growth rate using snow and ice thickness values at the 70 m spatial resolution of ICESat are found to be approximately one-third higher than those calculated from 25 km mean ice thickness values.

  9. Molecular structure of actinides in biochemistry

    In case of internal contamination, drugs used for decorporation are scarce and do not act very specifically. For instance the sole de-corporating drug recommended for plutonium decontamination is a water-soluble ligand named DTPA (Diethylene-Triamino-Pentaacetate). The transport of DTPA to its organ-target and its bio-availability on the spot are not satisfactorily understood. The conventional method to develop new ligands is based on molecular approaches but it is not sufficient. A new method that combines methods from structural biochemistry with methods of bio-inorganic chemistry and with methods from physico-chemistry (particularly X-ray absorption spectroscopy) is so far the best way to understand molecular speciation and to detail the local arrangement of atoms around a cation for instance, which are valuable information to understand the behaviour of a ligand. EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine structure Spectroscopy) measurements suggest that during the formation of a complex involving an actinide (An) and a ligand, the inter-atomic distance An-O decreases when the atomic number of the cation increases while it is the reverse in the case of An-N

  10. Estimation of Power Efficiency of Combined Heat Pumping Stations in Heat Power Supply Systems

    I. I. Matsko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers realization of heat pumping technologies advantages at heat power generation for heat supply needs on the basis of combining electric drive heat pumping units with water heating boilers as a part of a combined heat pumping station.The possibility to save non-renewable energy resources due to the combined heat pumping stations utilization instead of water heating boiler houses is shown in the paper.The calculation methodology for power efficiency for introduction of combined heat pumping stations has been developed. The seasonal heat needs depending on heating system temperature schedule, a low potential heat source temperature and regional weather parameters are taken into account in the calculations.

  11. A Combined State of Charge Estimation Method for Lithium-Ion Batteries Used in a Wide Ambient Temperature Range

    Fei Feng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ambient temperature is a significant factor that influences the characteristics of lithium-ion batteries, which can produce adverse effects on state of charge (SOC estimation. In this paper, an integrated SOC algorithm that combines an advanced ampere-hour counting (Adv Ah method and multistate open-circuit voltage (multi OCV method, denoted as “Adv Ah + multi OCV”, is proposed. Ah counting is a simple and general method for estimating SOC. However, the available capacity and coulombic efficiency in this method are influenced by the operating states of batteries, such as temperature and current, thereby causing SOC estimation errors. To address this problem, an enhanced Ah counting method that can alter the available capacity and coulombic efficiency according to temperature is proposed during the SOC calculation. Moreover, the battery SOCs between different temperatures can be mutually converted in accordance with the capacity loss. To compensate for the accumulating errors in Ah counting caused by the low precision of current sensors and lack of accurate initial SOC, the OCV method is used for calibration and as a complement. Given the variation of available capacities at different temperatures, rated/non-rated OCV–SOCs are established to estimate the initial SOCs in accordance with the Ah counting SOCs. Two dynamic tests, namely, constant- and alternated-temperature tests, are employed to verify the combined method at different temperatures. The results indicate that our method can provide effective and accurate SOC estimation at different ambient temperatures.

  12. Evaluation of actinide partitioning and transmutation

    After a few centuries of radioactive decay the long-lived actinides, the elements of atomic numbers 89-103, may constitute the main potential radiological health hazard in nuclear wastes. This is because all but a very few fission products (principally technetium-99 and iodine-129) have by then undergone radioactive decay to insignificant levels, leaving the actinides as the principal radionuclides remaining. It was therefore at first sight an attractive concept to recycle the actinides to nuclear reactors, so as to eliminate them by nuclear fission. Thus, investigations of the feasibility and potential benefits and hazards of the concept of 'actinide partitioning and transmutation' were started in numerous countries in the mid-1970s. This final report summarizes the results and conclusions of technical studies performed in connection with a four-year IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme, started in 1976, on the ''Environmental Evaluation and Hazard Assessment of the Separation of Actinides from Nuclear Wastes followed by either Transmutation or Separate Disposal''. Although many related studies are still continuing, e.g. on waste disposal, long-term safety assessments, and waste actinide management (particularly for low and intermediate-level wastes), some firm conclusions on the overall concept were drawn by the programme participants, which are reflected in this report

  13. Recent progress in actinide borate chemistry.

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2011-10-21

    The use of molten boric acid as a reactive flux for synthesizing actinide borates has been developed in the past two years providing access to a remarkable array of exotic materials with both unusual structures and unprecedented properties. [ThB(5)O(6)(OH)(6)][BO(OH)(2)]·2.5H(2)O possesses a cationic supertetrahedral structure and displays remarkable anion exchange properties with high selectivity for TcO(4)(-). Uranyl borates form noncentrosymmetric structures with extraordinarily rich topological relationships. Neptunium borates are often mixed-valent and yield rare examples of compounds with one metal in three different oxidation states. Plutonium borates display new coordination chemistry for trivalent actinides. Finally, americium borates show a dramatic departure from plutonium borates, and there are scant examples of families of actinides compounds that extend past plutonium to examine the bonding of later actinides. There are several grand challenges that this work addresses. The foremost of these challenges is the development of structure-property relationships in transuranium materials. A deep understanding of the materials chemistry of actinides will likely lead to the development of advanced waste forms for radionuclides present in nuclear waste that prevent their transport in the environment. This work may have also uncovered the solubility-limiting phases of actinides in some repositories, and allows for measurements on the stability of these materials. PMID:21915396

  14. Advanced processes for minor actinides recycling: studies towards potential industrialization

    In June 2006, a new act on sustainable management of radioactive waste was voted by the French parliament with a national plan on radioactive materials and radioactive waste management (PNG-MDR). Concerning partitioning and transmutation, the program is connected to 4. generation reactors, in which transmutation of minor actinides could be operated. In this frame, the next important milestone is 2012, with the assessment of the possible transmutation roads, which are either homogeneous recycling of the minor actinides in the whole reactor fleet, with a low content of M.A (∼3%) in all fuel assemblies, or heterogeneous recycling of the minor actinides in about one third of the reactor park, with a higher content of M.A. (∼20%) in dedicated targets dispatched in the periphery of the reactor. Advanced processes for the recycling of minor actinides are being developed to address the challenges of these various management options. An important part of the program consists in getting closer to process implementation conditions. The processes based on liquid-liquid extraction benefit from the experience gained by operating the PUREX process at the La Hague plant. In the field of extracting apparatus, a large experience is available. In the field of extracting apparatus, a large experience is already available. Nevertheless, the processes present specificities which have to be considered more precisely. They have been classified in the following fields: - Evolution of the simulation codes, including phenomenological representations: with such a simulation tool, it will be possible to assess operating tolerances, lead sensitivity studies and calculate transient states; - Definition of the implementation conditions in continuous contactors (such as pulse columns), according to the extractant physico-chemical characteristics; - Scale-up of new extractants, such as malonamides used in the DIAMEX process, facing purity specifications and costs estimation; - Solvent clean

  15. Combining Front Vehicle Detection with 3D Pose Estimation for a Better Driver Assistance

    Yu Peng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Driver assistant systems enhance traffic safety and efficiency. The accurate 3D pose of a front vehicle can help a driver to make the right decision on the road. We propose a novel real‐time system to estimate the 3D pose of the front vehicle. This system consists of two parallel threads: vehicle rear tracking and mapping. The vehicle rear is first identified in the video captured by an onboard camera, after license plate localization and foreground extraction. The 3D pose estimation technique is then employed with respect to the extracted vehicle rear. Most current 3D pose estimation techniques need prior models or a stereo initialization with user cooperation. It is extremely difficult to obtain prior models due to the varying appearance of vehicles’ rears. Moreover, it is unsafe to ask for drivers’ cooperation when a vehicle is running. In our system, two initial keyframes for stereo algorithms are automatically extracted by vehicle rear detection and tracking. Map points are defined as a collection of point features extracted from the vehicle’s rear with their 3D information. These map points are inferences that relate the 2D features detected in following vehicles’ rears with the 3D world. The relative 3D pose of the onboard camera to the front vehicle rear is then estimated through matching the map points with point features detected on the front vehicle rear. We demonstrate the capabilities of our system by testing on real‐time and synthesized videos. In order to make the experimental analysis visible, we demonstrated an estimated 3D pose through augmented reality, which needs accurate and real‐time 3D pose estimation.

  16. A combined vision-inertial fusion approach for 6-DoF object pose estimation

    Li, Juan; Bernardos, Ana M.; Tarrío, Paula; Casar, José R.

    2015-02-01

    The estimation of the 3D position and orientation of moving objects (`pose' estimation) is a critical process for many applications in robotics, computer vision or mobile services. Although major research efforts have been carried out to design accurate, fast and robust indoor pose estimation systems, it remains as an open challenge to provide a low-cost, easy to deploy and reliable solution. Addressing this issue, this paper describes a hybrid approach for 6 degrees of freedom (6-DoF) pose estimation that fuses acceleration data and stereo vision to overcome the respective weaknesses of single technology approaches. The system relies on COTS technologies (standard webcams, accelerometers) and printable colored markers. It uses a set of infrastructure cameras, located to have the object to be tracked visible most of the operation time; the target object has to include an embedded accelerometer and be tagged with a fiducial marker. This simple marker has been designed for easy detection and segmentation and it may be adapted to different service scenarios (in shape and colors). Experimental results show that the proposed system provides high accuracy, while satisfactorily dealing with the real-time constraints.

  17. Combining Propensity Score Methods and Complex Survey Data to Estimate Population Treatment Effects

    Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Dong, Nianbo; Lenis, David

    2016-01-01

    Complex surveys are often used to estimate causal effects regarding the effects of interventions or exposures of interest. Propensity scores (Rosenbaum & Rubin, 1983) have emerged as one popular and effective tool for causal inference in non-experimental studies, as they can help ensure that groups being compared are similar with respect to a…

  18. Sensitivity of ICP-MS, PERALS and alpha spectrometry for the determination of actinides

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of the three most popular techniques for the determination of minor actinides at environmental levels: ICP-MS, PERALS and solid state alpha spectrometry. For each method the limit of detection and the resolution were estimated in order to study the content and isotopic composition of the actinides. The sensitivities of the three determination techniques were compared. Two international reference materials, IAEA-135 (Irish Sea sediment) and IAEA-300 (Baltic Sea sediment) were analyzed for activity concentrations of 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu and 241Am. (authors)

  19. Surface energy and work function of the light actinides

    Kollár, J.; Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1994-01-01

    We have calculated the surface energy and work function of the light actinides Fr, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, and Pu by means of a Green's-function technique based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method within the tight-binding representation. In these calculations we apply an energy functional which...... combines the kinetic energy calculated within the atomic-sphere approximation with Coulomb- and exchange-correlation-energy terms calculated by means of the complete nonspherically symmetric charge density derived from the atomic-sphere potential within nonoverlapping and space-filling cells. The...... calculated surface energies and work functions are in good agreement with the limited experimental data....

  20. Physical mechanism analysis of burnup actinide composition in light water reactor MOX fuel and its application to uncertainty evaluation

    Highlights: • We discuss physical mechanisms for burnup actinide compositions in LWR’s MOX fuel. • Mechanisms of 244Cm and 238Pu productions are analyzed in detail with sensitivity. • We can evaluate the indirect effect on actinide productions by nuclear reactions. • Burnup sensitivity is applied to uncertainty evaluation of nuclide production. • Actinides can be categorized into patterns according to a burnup sensitivity trend. - Abstract: In designing radioactive waste management and decommissioning facilities, understanding the physical mechanisms for burnup actinide composition is indispensable to satisfy requirements for its validity and reliability. Therefore, the uncertainty associated with physical quantities, such as nuclear data, needs to be quantitatively analyzed. The present paper illustrates an analysis methodology to investigate the physical mechanisms of burnup actinide composition with nuclear-data sensitivity based on the generalized depletion perturbation theory. The target in this paper is the MOX fuel of the light water reactor. We start with the discussion of the basic physical mechanisms for burnup actinide compositions using the reaction-rate flow chart on the burnup chain. After that, the physical mechanisms of the productions of Cm-244 and Pu-238 are analyzed in detail with burnup sensitivity calculation. Conclusively, we can identify the source of actinide productions and evaluate the indirect influence of the nuclear reactions if the physical mechanisms of burnup actinide composition are analyzed using the reaction-rate flow chart on the burnup chain and burnup sensitivity calculation. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of the burnup sensitivity coefficients in an application to determine the priority of accuracy improvement in nuclear data in combination with the covariance of the nuclear data. In addition, the target actinides and reactions are categorized into patterns according to a sensitivity trend

  1. Estimation of evaporation over the upper Blue Nile basin by combining observations from satellites and river flow gauges

    Allam, Mariam M.; Jain Figueroa, Anjuli; McLaughlin, Dennis B.; Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.

    2016-02-01

    Reliable estimates of regional evapotranspiration are necessary to improve water resources management and planning. However, direct measurements of evaporation are expensive and difficult to obtain. Some of the difficulties are illustrated in a comparison of several satellite-based estimates of evapotranspiration for the Upper Blue Nile (UBN) basin in Ethiopia. These estimates disagree both temporally and spatially. All the available data products underestimate evapotranspiration leading to basin-scale mass balance errors on the order of 35 percent of the mean annual rainfall. This paper presents a methodology that combines satellite observations of rainfall, terrestrial water storage as well as river-flow gauge measurements to estimate actual evapotranspiration over the UBN basin. The estimates derived from these inputs are constrained using a one-layer soil water balance and routing model. Our results describe physically consistent long-term spatial and temporal distributions of key hydrologic variables, including rainfall, evapotranspiration, and river-flow. We estimate an annual evapotranspiration over the UBN basin of about 2.55 mm per day. Spatial and temporal evapotranspiration trends are revealed by dividing the basin into smaller subbasins. The methodology described here is applicable to other basins with limited observational coverage that are facing similar future challenges of water scarcity and climate change.

  2. Combination of supervised and semi-supervised regression models for improved unbiased estimation

    Arenas-Garía, Jeronimo; Moriana-Varo, Carlos; Larsen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the steady-state performance of semisupervised regression models adjusted using a modified RLS-like algorithm, identifying the situations where the new algorithm is expected to outperform standard RLS. By using an adaptive combination of the supervised and semisupervi......In this paper we investigate the steady-state performance of semisupervised regression models adjusted using a modified RLS-like algorithm, identifying the situations where the new algorithm is expected to outperform standard RLS. By using an adaptive combination of the supervised and...

  3. Phosphonates as alternative to tributyl phosphate for the separation of actinides from fission products

    The present work investigates the role of increase in the basicity of organophosphorus extractant (dialkylalkyl phosphonates) on the uptake of actinides and fission products vis-a-vis tributyl phosphate (TBP), currently employed as a universal extractant. Two dialkylalkyl phosphonates viz. dibutylpropyl phosphonate (DBPrP) and dibutylpentyl phosphonate (DBPeP) were synthesized, characterized and evaluated for their solvent extraction behavior towards U(VI), Th(IV), Eu(III) and Tc(VII) in nitric acid medium ranging from 0.01-6 M. It was observed that increasing the basicity of the phosphoryl oxygen enhanced the uptake of the actinides and the distribution coefficient values were significantly larger as compared to TBP. The limiting organic concentration (LOC) value was estimated for Th(IV) for these extractants and compared with the TBP system. The separation factors of actinides with phosphonates over Tc(VII) are distinctly better than that with TBP.

  4. The uncertainty analysis of a liquid metal reactor for burning minor actinides from light water reactors

    Choi, Hang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The neutronics analysis of a liquid metal reactor for burning minor actinides has shown that uncertainties in the nuclear data of several key minor actinide isotopes can introduce large uncertainties in the predicted performance of the core. A comprehensive sensitivity and uncertainty analysis was performed on a 1200 MWth actinide burner designed for a low burnup reactivity swing, negative doppler coefficient, and low sodium void worth. Sensitivities were generated using depletion perturbation methods for the equilibrium cycle of the reactor and covariance data was taken ENDF-B/V and other published sources. The relative uncertainties in the burnup swing, doppler coefficient, and void worth were conservatively estimated to be 180%, 97%, and 46%, respectively. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs. (Author)

  5. Phosphonates as alternative to tributyl phosphate for the separation of actinides from fission products

    Vyas, Chirag K.; Joshirao, Pranav M.; Manchanda, Vijay K. [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Energy Science; Rao, C.V.S. Brahmmananda; Jayalakshmi, S. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2015-06-01

    The present work investigates the role of increase in the basicity of organophosphorus extractant (dialkylalkyl phosphonates) on the uptake of actinides and fission products vis-a-vis tributyl phosphate (TBP), currently employed as a universal extractant. Two dialkylalkyl phosphonates viz. dibutylpropyl phosphonate (DBPrP) and dibutylpentyl phosphonate (DBPeP) were synthesized, characterized and evaluated for their solvent extraction behavior towards U(VI), Th(IV), Eu(III) and Tc(VII) in nitric acid medium ranging from 0.01-6 M. It was observed that increasing the basicity of the phosphoryl oxygen enhanced the uptake of the actinides and the distribution coefficient values were significantly larger as compared to TBP. The limiting organic concentration (LOC) value was estimated for Th(IV) for these extractants and compared with the TBP system. The separation factors of actinides with phosphonates over Tc(VII) are distinctly better than that with TBP.

  6. Studies on fluoride complexing of hexavalent actinides using a fluoride ion selective electrode

    Complex formation between actinide(VI) and fluoride ions in aqueous solutions was investigated using a fluoride ion selective electrode (F-ISE). As fairly high acidity used to suppress hydrolysis of the actinide(VI) ions, significant liquid junction potentials (Esub(j)) existed in the system. An iterative procedure was developed for computing free hydrogen ion concentration [Hsup(+)] as it colud not be measured directly, using data obtained with F-ISE. Esub(j) values were estimated from known [Hsup(+)] and the stability constants of fluoride complexes of actinide(VI) ions were calculated following King and Gallagher's method using a computer program. The stability constants were found to follow the order U(VI)>Np(VI)>Pu(VI). (author)

  7. Estimating Net Primary Production of Swedish Forest Landscapes by Combining Mechanistic Modeling and Remote Sensing

    Tagesson, Håkan Torbern; Smith, Benjamin; Løfgren, Anders;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a combination of satellite images of leaf area index (LAI) with processbased vegetation modeling for the accurate assessment of the carbon balances of Swedish forest ecosystems at the scale of a landscape. Monthly climatologic data were used as inputs in a...

  8. RP-HPLC estimation of tizanidine HCl and valdecoxib in combined dosage forms

    Bhavsar A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography method was developed for simultaneous estimation of tizanidine HCl and valdecoxib in tablet formulation. The separation was achieved by Luna C 18 column and acetonitrile: phosphate buffer pH 3.5 (50:50 v/v as eluent, at a flow rate of 0.5 ml/min. Detection was carried out at 227 nm. Etoricoxib was used as an internal standard. The retention time of tizanidine and valdecoxib was found to be 4.43 and 16.60 min, respectively. The method was validated for linearity, accuracy and precision. Linearity for tizanidine and valdecoxib were in the range 0.4-2.0 µg/ml and 4-20 µg/ml, respectively. The developed method was found to be accurate, precise and selective for simultaneous estimation of tizanidine and valdecoxib in tablets.

  9. RP-HPLC estimation of paracetamol and valdecoxib in combined dosage form

    Bhavsar A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography method was developed for simultaneous estimation of paracetamol and valdecoxib in tablet formulation. The separation was achieved by Luna C 18 column and methanol: phosphate buffer pH 3.5 (60:40 v/v as eluent, at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min. Detection was carried out at 242 nm. Etoricoxib was used as an internal standard. The retention time of PAR and VAL was found to be 3.01 and 8.51 min, respectively. The method was validated for linearity, accuracy and precision. Linearity for paracetamol and valdecoxib were in the range 25-150 µg/ml and 1-6 µg/ml, respectively. The developed method was found to be accurate, precise, and selective for simultaneous estimation of paracetamol and valdecoxib in tablets.

  10. GM-PHD Filter Combined with Track-Estimate Association and Numerical Interpolation

    Jinguang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the standard Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD filter, the number of targets can be overestimated if the clutter rate is too high or underestimated if the detection rate is too low. These problems seriously affect the accuracy of multitarget tracking for the number and the value of measurements and clutters cannot be distinguished and recognized. Therefore, we proposed an improved GM-PHD filter to tackle these problems. Firstly, a track-estimate association was implemented in the filtering process to detect and remove false-alarm targets. Secondly, a numerical interpolation technique was used to compensate the missing targets caused by low detection rate. At the end of this paper, simulation results were presented to demonstrate the proposed GM-PHD algorithm is more effective in estimating the number and state of targets than the previous ones.

  11. Estimating and comparing incidence and prevalence of chronic diseases by combining GP registry data: the role of uncertainty

    van den Dungen Catharina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimates of disease incidence and prevalence are core indicators of public health. The manner in which these indicators stand out against each other provide guidance as to which diseases are most common and what health problems deserve priority. Our aim was to investigate how routinely collected data from different general practitioner registration networks (GPRNs can be combined to estimate incidence and prevalence of chronic diseases and to explore the role of uncertainty when comparing diseases. Methods Incidence and prevalence counts, specified by gender and age, of 18 chronic diseases from 5 GPRNs in the Netherlands from the year 2007 were used as input. Generalized linear mixed models were fitted with the GPRN identifier acting as random intercept, and age and gender as explanatory variables. Using predictions of the regression models we estimated the incidence and prevalence for 18 chronic diseases and calculated a stochastic ranking of diseases in terms of incidence and prevalence per 1,000. Results Incidence was highest for coronary heart disease and prevalence was highest for diabetes if we looked at the point estimates. The between GPRN variance in general was higher for incidence than for prevalence. Since uncertainty intervals were wide for some diseases and overlapped, the ranking of diseases was subject to uncertainty. For incidence shifts in rank of up to twelve positions were observed. For prevalence, most diseases shifted maximally three or four places in rank. Conclusion Estimates of incidence and prevalence can be obtained by combining data from GPRNs. Uncertainty in the estimates of absolute figures may lead to different rankings of diseases and, hence, should be taken into consideration when comparing disease incidences and prevalences.

  12. Estimation of Psychological Stress in Humans: A Combination of Theory and Practice

    Sood, Parul; Priyadarshini, Sushri; Aich, Palok

    2013-01-01

    Stress has long been known to increase susceptibility to health disorders. In 2009, American Psychological Association further established association of stress to serious health problems. However, a quantitative and accurate way to evaluate and estimate stress status of individuals is still a big challenge. It has been shown, in large animal models using cattle, that psychological stress can be quantified as well as disease susceptibility could be predicted through biomarker discovery. Takin...

  13. Combining MODIS and Landsat imagery to estimate and map boreal forest cover loss

    Potapov, P.; Hansen, M.C.; Stehman, S.V.; Loveland, T.R.; Pittman, K.

    2008-01-01

    Estimation of forest cover change is important for boreal forests, one of the most extensive forested biomes, due to its unique role in global timber stock, carbon sequestration and deposition, and high vulnerability to the effects of global climate change. We used time-series data from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to produce annual forest cover loss hotspot maps. These maps were used to assign all blocks (18.5 by 18.5??km) partitioning the boreal biome into strata of high, medium and low likelihood of forest cover loss. A stratified random sample of 118 blocks was interpreted for forest cover and forest cover loss using high spatial resolution Landsat imagery from 2000 and 2005. Area of forest cover gross loss from 2000 to 2005 within the boreal biome is estimated to be 1.63% (standard error 0.10%) of the total biome area, and represents a 4.02% reduction in year 2000 forest cover. The proportion of identified forest cover loss relative to regional forest area is much higher in North America than in Eurasia (5.63% to 3.00%). Of the total forest cover loss identified, 58.9% is attributable to wildfires. The MODIS pan-boreal change hotspot estimates reveal significant increases in forest cover loss due to wildfires in 2002 and 2003, with 2003 being the peak year of loss within the 5-year study period. Overall, the precision of the aggregate forest cover loss estimates derived from the Landsat data and the value of the MODIS-derived map displaying the spatial and temporal patterns of forest loss demonstrate the efficacy of this protocol for operational, cost-effective, and timely biome-wide monitoring of gross forest cover loss. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  14. Algorithm combining point and interval detector data to estimate highway travel times

    Pirc, Jure

    2015-01-01

    The dissertation is divided into three interconnected parts. The first part presents a link travel time estimation algorithm that is based on the use of robust statistic able to exclude the impact of outliers. Outliers in travel time measurements are vehicles whose shortened or extended travel times are not caused by the traffic conditions, but are the result of individual behavior of such vehicle. As the adequate information on travel times is the one of personal cars, the influence of other...

  15. Innovative travel time estimation for toll motorways by combining detectors and ETC data

    DE MOUZON, O; EL-FAOUZI, NE

    2006-01-01

    The main goal of this work is to prove the benefits of making use of toll collection data for travel time purposes. This data is easily available but the travel time information it carries is almost never used. This report proposes a methodology for highway travel time estimation and short-term prediction using both traffic data measured by conventional detectors and data from toll collection systems. It shows that it is possible to regularly make corrections to the classical cumulative traff...

  16. Statistical estimation of stratospheric particle size distribution by combining optical modelling and lidar scattering measurements

    J. Jumelet; S. Bekki; David, C.; P. Keckhut

    2008-01-01

    A method for estimating the stratospheric particle size distribution from multiwavelength lidar measurements is presented. It is based on matching measured and model-simulated backscatter coefficients. The lidar backscatter coefficients measured at the three commonly used wavelengths 355, 532 and 1064 nm are compared to a precomputed look-up table of model-calculated values. The optical model assumes that particles are spherical and that their size distribution is unimodal. ...

  17. Hydration properties and ionic radii of actinide(III) ions in aqueous solution

    Ionic radii of actinide(III) cations (from U(III) to Cf(III)) in aqueous solution have been derived for the first time starting from accurate experimental determination of the ion-water distances obtained by combining extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) results and molecular dynamics (MD) structural data. A strong analogy has been found between the lanthanide and actinide series concerning hydration properties. The existence of a contraction of the An-O distance along the series has been highlighted, while no decrease of the hydration number is evident up to Cf(III). (authors)

  18. Radioecology of the actinide elements

    Research progress is reported in sections entitled: scope of studies supported by the Department of Energy; oxidation state diagrams are a potential tool for studying the redox chemistry of Pu in natural waters; studies are initiated to investigate the effect of pH and organic matter on the distribution coefficients of Cm with natural sediments; the relative distributions of resuspended and direct deposited Pu in a corn canopy are quantified; the retention of Pu surface contamination by corn plants is being studied; Pu concentrations in tobacco are being determined; concentrations of Pu per unit mass and per unit surface area are compared for subterranean crops; models of Pu behavior in agricultural crops are being validated; distribution of aerially released Pu in loblolly pine plantations is independent of deposition rate; investigation of the effects of chelate and redox potential of the uptake of Pu and Cm by rice is underway; studies of Cm cycling in a floodplain forest have been initiated; the effects of unusually large Pu deposition onto a wheat ecosystem are being studied using computer simulations; long-term kinetic models of Pu behavior in plant-soil systems are being developed; scope of studies supported by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission; growth form of broadleaf crop may affect Pu contents; root uptake of Pu and Cm measured for rice root uptake of Pu and Cm measured for rice; long-term actinide uptake study is continuing at SREL; and uranium cycling in major southeastern agricultural crops being studied

  19. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    An optimization method is developed to maximize the burning capability of the ALMR while complying with all constraints imposed on the design for reliability and safety. This method leads to a maximal transuranics enrichment, which is being limited by constraints on reactivity. The enrichment can be raised by using the neutrons less efficiently by increasing leakage from the fuel. With the developed optimization method, a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR were optimized. Both reactors perform equally well considering the burning of transuranics. However, metallic fuel has a much higher heat conductivity coefficient, which in general leads to better safety characteristics. In search of a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed. A MSR operates on a liquid fuel salt which makes continuous refueling possible, eliminating the issue of the burnup reactivity loss. Also, a prompt negative reactivity feedback is possible for an overmoderated reactor design, even when the Doppler coefficient is positive, due to the fuel expansion with fuel temperature increase. Furthermore, the molten salt fuel can be reprocessed based on a reduction process which is not sensitive to the short-lived spontaneously fissioning actinides. (orig./HP)

  20. An introduction to the Advanced Testing Line for Actinide Separations (ATLAS)

    Pope, N.G.; Yarbro, S.L.; Schreiber, S.B.; Day, R.S.

    1992-03-01

    The Advanced Testing Line for Actinide Separations (ATLAS) will evaluate promising plutonium recovery process modifications and new technologies. It combines advances in process chemistry, process control, process analytical chemistry, and process engineering. ATLAS has a processing capability equal to other recovery systems but without the pressure to achieve predetermined recovery quotas.

  1. An introduction to the Advanced Testing Line for Actinide Separations (ATLAS)

    The Advanced Testing Line for Actinide Separations (ATLAS) will evaluate promising plutonium recovery process modifications and new technologies. It combines advances in process chemistry, process control, process analytical chemistry, and process engineering. ATLAS has a processing capability equal to other recovery systems but without the pressure to achieve predetermined recovery quotas

  2. Evaluation of chelation concentration and cation separation of actinides at ultra-trace levels in urine matrix

    The feasibility of measuring picogram levels of actinides in a urine matrix using ion chromatography coupled on-line to an inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometer (IC-Q-ICPMS) was investigated. A chelation column for separation of matrix ions and preconcentration of the actinides was combined with a cation-exchange column for separation of the actinides. Sample preparation required simple addition of ammonium acetate to adjust the pH of the urine matrix. Spike solutions containing 232Th, 237Np, 238U, 239Pu, and 241Am were added to undiluted urine, diluted urine (1 : 9) and water. This approach enhanced the signal sensitivities of all the tested actinides over two orders of magnitude in the water matrix, while certain elements (especially Am) can still be effectively concentrated in undiluted urine. (author)

  3. ESTIMATED COSTS OF SOLDIER AND COMBINE SUGARCANE HARVESTING SYSTEMS IN LOUISIANA

    Salassi, Michael E.; Champagne, Lonnie P.

    1996-01-01

    Soldier (wholestalk) harvesting of sugarcane has been the predominant method of harvesting sugarcane in Louisiana for many years. With the short harvesting season and frequently wet harvesting conditions found in the state, this type of harvesting system has proven to be a very flexible and suitable system. Combine (billet) harvesters have the ability to recover more of the sugarcane in the field, compared to soldier harvesters, particularly in fields with lodged sugarcane. This report quanti...

  4. Estimation of Heterosis, Combining ability and Gene action in Pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.

    Yamanura,, *Lokesha R., Dharmaraj, P.S., Muniswamy, S. and Diwan, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Eight cytoplasmic-genetic male sterile lines with A2 (Cajanus scarabaeoides) and A4 (Cajanus cajanifolius) cytoplasm were crossed with 10 testers in a line × tester design. Resultant 80 experimental hybrids were evaluated along with parents and check (Maruti) in lattice design with two replications. Combining ability analysis evinced predominance of non-additive gene effects for 10 characters indicating relevance of heterosis breeding for improving yield attributes. The gca effects of parents...

  5. Simultaneous spectrophotometric estimation of hydrochlorothiazide and bisoprolol fumarate in combined dosage forms

    Sahu R; Patel Vandana

    2006-01-01

    Rapid, precise, accurate, and specific ratiospectra derivative spectrophotometry and a simple UV spectrophotometry using simultaneous equation methods are developed for the simultaneous determination of bisoprolol fumarate and hydrochlorothiazide from combined pharmaceutical dosage forms. For ratiospectra derivative spectrophotometry, the amplitudes were measured at 202.6 nm for bisoprolol fumarate and the difference in amplitudes at 212.6 and 230 nm were measured for the determination of hyd...

  6. Absorbance correction method for estimation of telmisartan and metoprolol succinate in combined tablet dosage forms

    Patel, Komal; Patel, Amit; Dave, Jayant; Patel, Chaganbhai

    2012-01-01

    Aim and Background: The present manuscript describes simple, sensitive, rapid, accurate, precise and economical spectrophotometric method for the simultaneous determination of telmisartan and metoprolol succinate in combined tablet dosage form. Materials and Methods: The method is based on the absorbance correction equations for analysis of both the drugs using methanol as solvent. Telmisartan has absorbance maxima at 296 nm and metoprolol succinate has absorbance maxima at 223 nm in methanol...

  7. LINE X TESTER ANALYSIS IN COMBINING ABILITIES ESTIMATION OF SUNFLOWER OIL CONTENT

    Ivica Liović; Miroslav Krizmanić; Anto Mijić; Miroslav Bilandžić; Antonela Markulj; Radovan Marinković; Drena Gadžo

    2012-01-01

    Results of line x tester analysis for 15 sunflower genotypes of the Agricultural Institute Osijek are presented in this paper. Three A lines (cms) and three Rf testers with different oil content level (low, medium, high) in all combinations (nine crosses) were crossed in 2010. In 2011, the lines, testers and their crosses were sown in field trials at two locations (Karanac and Osijek). The oil content was determined after harvesting, whereas line x tester analysis was conducted based on the o...

  8. LINE X TESTER ANALYSIS IN COMBINING ABILITIES ESTIMATION OF SUNFLOWER OIL CONTENT

    Ivica Liović

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of line x tester analysis for 15 sunflower genotypes of the Agricultural Institute Osijek are presented in this paper. Three A lines (cms and three Rf testers with different oil content level (low, medium, high in all combinations (nine crosses were crossed in 2010. In 2011, the lines, testers and their crosses were sown in field trials at two locations (Karanac and Osijek. The oil content was determined after harvesting, whereas line x tester analysis was conducted based on the obtained results. Variance of lines and testers, which refers to the general combining ability (GCA was much higher than the variance of line x tester, related to specific combining ability (SCA. It showed on dominant role of the additive component of genetic variance in the inheritance of oil content. Statistically significant differences were not determined between the GCA and SCA effects. The highest values of GCA for oil content had line 2 (medium oil content and tester 6 (high oil content at both locations. The largest contribution for oil content had lines (57.81 and 51.28 % followed by testers (28.88 and 26.27 % and the lowest accounts for interaction (13.31 and 22.45 % at both locations (Karanac and Osijek.

  9. Combining regional estimation and historical floods: A multivariate semiparametric peaks-over-threshold model with censored data

    Sabourin, Anne; Renard, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    The estimation of extreme flood quantiles is challenging due to the relative scarcity of extreme data compared to typical target return periods. Several approaches have been developed over the years to face this challenge, including regional estimation and the use of historical flood data. This paper investigates the combination of both approaches using a multivariate peaks-over-threshold model that allows estimating altogether the intersite dependence structure and the marginal distributions at each site. The joint distribution of extremes at several sites is constructed using a semiparametric Dirichlet Mixture model. The existence of partially missing and censored observations (historical data) is accounted for within a data augmentation scheme. This model is applied to a case study involving four catchments in Southern France, for which historical data are available since 1604. The comparison of marginal estimates from four versions of the model (with or without regionalizing the shape parameter; using or ignoring historical floods) highlights significant differences in terms of return level estimates. Moreover, the availability of historical data on several nearby catchments allows investigating the asymptotic dependence properties of extreme floods. Catchments display a significant amount of asymptotic dependence, calling for adapted multivariate statistical models.

  10. DYNAMIC PARAMETER ESTIMATION BASED ON MINIMUM CROSS-ENTROPY METHOD FOR COMBINING INFORMATION SOURCES

    Sečkárová, Vladimíra

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 5 (2015), s. 181-188. ISSN 0204-9805. [XVI-th International Summer Conference on Probability and Statistics (ISCPS-2014). Pomorie, 21.6.-29.6.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13502S Grant ostatní: GA UK(CZ) SVV 260225/2015 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : minimum cross-entropy principle * Kullback-Leibler divergence * dynamic diffusion estimation Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics , Operational Research http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/AS/seckarova-0445817.pdf

  11. Estimating Forest Aboveground Biomass by Combining Optical and SAR Data: A Case Study in Genhe, Inner Mongolia, China.

    Shao, Zhenfeng; Zhang, Linjing

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of forest aboveground biomass is critical for regional carbon policies and sustainable forest management. Passive optical remote sensing and active microwave remote sensing both play an important role in the monitoring of forest biomass. However, optical spectral reflectance is saturated in relatively dense vegetation areas, and microwave backscattering is significantly influenced by the underlying soil when the vegetation coverage is low. Both of these conditions decrease the estimation accuracy of forest biomass. A new optical and microwave integrated vegetation index (VI) was proposed based on observations from both field experiments and satellite (Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) and RADARSAT-2) data. According to the difference in interaction between the multispectral reflectance and microwave backscattering signatures with biomass, the combined VI (COVI) was designed using the weighted optical optimized soil-adjusted vegetation index (OSAVI) and microwave horizontally transmitted and vertically received signal (HV) to overcome the disadvantages of both data types. The performance of the COVI was evaluated by comparison with those of the sole optical data, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data, and the simple combination of independent optical and SAR variables. The most accurate performance was obtained by the models based on the COVI and optical and microwave optimal variables excluding OSAVI and HV, in combination with a random forest algorithm and the largest number of reference samples. The results also revealed that the predictive accuracy depended highly on the statistical method and the number of sample units. The validation indicated that this integrated method of determining the new VI is a good synergistic way to combine both optical and microwave information for the accurate estimation of forest biomass. PMID:27338378

  12. HTGR actinide burner feasibility studies: Calculation scheme related considerations

    At the CEA, the actinides burner version of the prismatic block-type reactor is currently investigated, including studies about the design proposed by General Atomics. The purpose of this paper is essentially to evaluate the capability of the deterministic methods to calculate a wide range of core configurations. In the first part of the paper, the analysis is carried out on the 'Deep Burner' fuel element geometry. The fuel element calculations are performed with both Transport code APOLLO2 and Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI4. This preliminary analysis shows the reliability of the deterministic code APOLLO2 to calculate heterogeneous fuel element configurations (fuel element loaded with plutonium and minor actinides). In the second part, the analysis deals with the core geometry in order to estimate the impact of some physical assumptions on the fine fuel isotopic depletion. Due to the strong spectrum transient in the core, it turns out that the transuranic mass balances in a GT-MHR cannot be estimated easily from fuel element calculations but rather need the use of a core modeling approach taking into account the presence of the graphite reflectors. Two different methods based on a fine core Diffusion calculation in CRONOS2 and a simplified Transport calculation in APOLLO2 are investigated in this paper. (authors)

  13. Derivative Spectrophotometric Method for Estimation of Antiretroviral Drugs in Fixed Dose Combinations

    Mohite P.B.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Lamivudine is cytosine and zidovudine is cytidine and is used as an antiretroviral agents. Both drugs are available in tablet dosage forms with a dose of 150 mg for LAM and 300 mg ZID respectively. Method: The method employed is based on first order derivative spectroscopy. Wavelengths 279 nm and 300 nm were selected for the estimation of the Lamovudine and Zidovudine respectively by taking the first order derivative spectra. The conc. of both drugs was determined by proposed method. The results of analysis have been validated statistically and by recovery studies as per ICH guidelines. Result: Both the drugs obey Beer’s law in the concentration range 10-50 μg mL-1,for LAM and ZID; with regression 0.9998 and 0.9999, intercept – 0.0677 and – 0.0043 and slope 0.0457 and 0.0391 for LAM and ZID, respectively.The accuracy and reproducibility results are close to 100% with 2% RSD. Conclusion: A simple, accurate, precise, sensitive and economical procedures for simultaneous estimation of Lamovudine and Zidovudine in tablet dosage form have been developed.

  14. Quantifying enzymatic lysis: estimating the combined effects of chemistry, physiology and physics

    The number of microbial pathogens resistant to antibiotics continues to increase even as the rate of discovery and approval of new antibiotic therapeutics steadily decreases. Many researchers have begun to investigate the therapeutic potential of naturally occurring lytic enzymes as an alternative to traditional antibiotics. However, direct characterization of lytic enzymes using techniques based on synthetic substrates is often difficult because lytic enzymes bind to the complex superstructure of intact cell walls. Here we present a new standard for the analysis of lytic enzymes based on turbidity assays which allow us to probe the dynamics of lysis without preparing a synthetic substrate. The challenge in the analysis of these assays is to infer the microscopic details of lysis from macroscopic turbidity data. We propose a model of enzymatic lysis that integrates the chemistry responsible for bond cleavage with the physical mechanisms leading to cell wall failure. We then present a solution to an inverse problem in which we estimate reaction rate constants and the heterogeneous susceptibility to lysis among target cells. We validate our model given simulated and experimental turbidity assays. The ability to estimate reaction rate constants for lytic enzymes will facilitate their biochemical characterization and development as antimicrobial therapeutics

  15. Solubility of actinide surrogates in nuclear glasses

    This paper discusses the results of a study of actinide surrogates in a nuclear borosilicate glass to understand the effect of processing conditions (temperature and oxidizing versus reducing conditions) on the solubility limits of these elements. The incorporation of cerium oxide, hafnium oxide, and neodymium oxide in this borosilicate glass was investigated. Cerium is a possible surrogate for tetravalent and trivalent actinides, hafnium for tetravalent actinides, and neodymium for trivalent actinides. The material homogeneity was studied by optical, scanning electron microscopy. Cerium LIII XANES spectroscopy showed that the Ce3+/Cetotal ratio increased from about 0.5 to 0.9 as the processing temperature increased from 1100 to 1400 deg. C. Cerium LIII XANES spectroscopy also confirmed that the increased Ce solubility in glasses melted under reducing conditions was due to complete reduction of all the cerium in the glass. The most significant results pointed out in the current study are that the solubility limits of the actinide surrogates increases with the processing temperature and that Ce3+ is shown to be more soluble than Ce4+ in this borosilicate glass

  16. Waste disposal aspects of actinide separation

    Two recent NRPB reports are summarized (Camplin, W.C., Grimwood, P.D. and White, I.F., The effects of actinide separation on the radiological consequences of disposal of high-level radioactive waste on the ocean bed, Harwell, National Radiological Protection Board, NRPB-R94 (1980), London, HMSO; Hill, M.D., White, I.F. and Fleishman, A.B., The effects of actinide separation on the radiological consequences of geologic disposal of high-level waste. Harwell, National Radiological Protection Board, NRPB-R95 (1980), London, HMSO). They describe preliminary environmental assessments relevant to waste arising from the reprocessing of PWR fuel. Details are given of the modelling of transport of radionuclides to man, and of the methodology for calculating effective dose equivalents in man. Emphasis has been placed on the interaction between actinide separation and the disposal options rather than comparison of disposal options. The reports show that the effects of actinide separation do depend on the disposal method. Conditions are outlined where the required substantial further research and development work on actinide separation and recycle would be justified. Toxicity indices or 'toxic potentials' can be misleading and should not be used to guide research and development. (U.K.)

  17. Use of fast reactors for actinide transmutation

    The management of radioactive waste is one of the key issues in today's discussions on nuclear energy, especially the long term disposal of high level radioactive wastes. The recycling of plutonium in liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) would allow 'burning' of the associated extremely long life transuranic waste, particularly actinides, thus reducing the required isolation time for high level waste from tens of thousands of years to hundreds of years for fission products only. The International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) decided to include the topic of actinide transmutation in liquid metal fast breeder reactors in its programme. The IAEA organized the Specialists Meeting on Use of Fast Breeder Reactors for Actinide Transmutation in Obninsk, Russian Federation, from 22 to 24 September 1992. The specialists agree that future progress in solving transmutation problems could be achieved by improvements in: Radiochemical partitioning and extraction of the actinides from the spent fuel (at least 98% for Np and Cm and 99.9% for Pu and Am isotopes); technological research and development on the design, fabrication and irradiation of the minor actinides (MAs) containing fuels; nuclear constants measurement and evaluation (selective cross-sections, fission fragments yields, delayed neutron parameters) especially for MA burners; demonstration of the feasibility of the safe and economic MA burner cores; knowledge of the impact of maximum tolerable amount of rare earths in americium containing fuels. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC METHODS FOR SIMULTANEOUS ESTIMATION OF METOPROLOL SUCCINATE AND TELMISARTAN IN COMBINED PHARMACEUTICAL FORMULATION

    Mayur Modi*, Rikin Shah and R.C. Mashru

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Four simple, rapid, precise, economical and accurate spectrophotometric methods have been developed for simultaneous analysis of Metoprolol succinate and Telmisartan in their combined dosage form. Method 1, First derivative simultaneous equation method (Vierodt’s method. It employs formation and solving of simultaneous equation using two wavelengths 230.2 nm (λmax of Metoprolol succinate and 237 nm (λmax of Telmisartan in first derivative spectra. Method 2, First derivative Q-Absorbance equation method. It involves, formation of Q-absorbance equation at 231.8 nm (isoabsorptive point and 237 nm (λmax of Telmisartan in first derivative spectra. Method 3, Absorbance correction method, involves measurement of absorbance at 296.6 nm for estimation of TEL and measurement of corrected absorbance at 223 nm for estimation of MET. Method 4, Combination of First derivative dual wavelength ,which uses the difference in absorbance at 282.4 nm and 284.6 nm for estimation of MET and zero crossing first derivative spectrophotometry involves measurement of amplitudes at 330 nm for estimation of TEL in first derivative spectra. Developed methods were validated according to ICH guidelines. The calibration graph follows Beer’s law in the range of 3-20 µg/ml for MET and 4-16 µg/ml for TEL with R square value greater than 0.999. Accuracy of all methods was determined by recovery studies and showed % recovery between 99 to 101%. Intraday and interday precision was checked for all methods and mean %RSD was found to be less than 2 for all the methods. The methods were successfully applied for estimation of MET and TEL in marketed formulation.

  19. Estimating Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Using Combined Passive and Active L-Band Microwave Observations

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2012-01-01

    Several L-band microwave radiometer and radar missions have been, or will be, operating in space for land and ocean observations. These include the NASA Aquarius mission and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, both of which use combined passive/ active L-band instruments. Aquarius s passive/active L-band microwave sensor has been designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. SMAP s primary objectives are for soil moisture and freeze/thaw detection, but it will operate continuously over the ocean, and hence will have significant potential for ocean surface research. In this innovation, an algorithm has been developed to retrieve simultaneously ocean surface salinity and wind from combined passive/active L-band microwave observations of sea surfaces. The algorithm takes advantage of the differing response of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter to salinity, wind speed, and direction, thus minimizing the least squares error (LSE) measure, which signifies the difference between measurements and model functions of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter. The algorithm uses the conjugate gradient method to search for the local minima of the LSE. Three LSE measures with different measurement combinations have been tested. The first LSE measure uses passive microwave data only with retrieval errors reaching 1 to 2 psu (practical salinity units) for salinity, and 1 to 2 m/s for wind speed. The second LSE measure uses both passive and active microwave data for vertical and horizontal polarizations. The addition of active microwave data significantly improves the retrieval accuracy by about a factor of five. To mitigate the impact of Faraday rotation on satellite observations, the third LSE measure uses measurement combinations invariant under the Faraday rotation. For Aquarius, the expected RMS SSS (sea surface salinity) error will be less than about 0.2 psu for low winds, and increases to 0.3 psu at 25 m/s wind speed

  20. New reagents for actinide-lanthanide group separations

    Organic extractants which possess nitrogen or sulfur donor atoms preferentially complex the trivalent actinide. They are potential reagents for actinide lanthanide group separations, which can be performed at low pH without the addition of inorganic salts

  1. Combined evaluation of optical and microwave satellite dataset for soil moisture deficit estimation

    Srivastava, Prashant K.; Han, Dawei; Islam, Tanvir; Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Gupta, Manika; Gupta, Dileep Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable responsible for water and energy exchanges from land surface to the atmosphere (Srivastava et al., 2014). On the other hand, Soil Moisture Deficit (or SMD) can help regulating the proper use of water at specified time to avoid any agricultural losses (Srivastava et al., 2013b) and could help in preventing natural disasters, e.g. flood and drought (Srivastava et al., 2013a). In this study, evaluation of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) and soil moisture from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites are attempted for prediction of Soil Moisture Deficit (SMD). Sophisticated algorithm like Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) is used for prediction of SMD using the MODIS and SMOS dataset. The benchmark SMD estimated from Probability Distributed Model (PDM) over the Brue catchment, Southwest of England, U.K. is used for all the validation. The performances are assessed in terms of Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency, Root Mean Square Error and the percentage of bias between ANFIS simulated SMD and the benchmark. The performance statistics revealed a good agreement between benchmark and the ANFIS estimated SMD using the MODIS dataset. The assessment of the products with respect to this peculiar evidence is an important step for successful development of hydro-meteorological model and forecasting system. The analysis of the satellite products (viz. SMOS soil moisture and MODIS LST) towards SMD prediction is a crucial step for successful hydrological modelling, agriculture and water resource management, and can provide important assistance in policy and decision making. Keywords: Land Surface Temperature, MODIS, SMOS, Soil Moisture Deficit, Fuzzy Logic System References: Srivastava, P.K., Han, D., Ramirez, M.A., Islam, T., 2013a. Appraisal of SMOS soil moisture at a catchment scale in a temperate maritime climate. Journal of Hydrology 498, 292-304. Srivastava, P.K., Han, D., Rico

  2. Combined motion estimation and motion-compensated FBP for cardiac CT

    The image quality in cardiac computed tomography (CT) is still limited by motion artifacts due to insufficient temporal resolution of even the fastest commercially available scanners. At the same time, current protocols for retrospectively gated cardiac CT expose patients to a relatively large radiation dose. Motion-compensated image reconstruction has the potential to solve these problems. We present a 4D approach (3D + time) that first estimates cardiac motion from reconstructed 3D images and then incorporates 4D motion information into an FDK-type image reconstruction algorithm with motion tracking. We observe increased sharpness of clinically relevant anatomical landmarks such as coronary arteries. Additionally, the ability of motion-compensated reconstruction to improve the effective temporal resolution allows to increase the cardiac gating window, using a projection data range significantly larger than that of the typical short-scan. By utilizing more of the available data, the image noise can be reduced. (orig.)

  3. Statistical estimation of stratospheric particle size distribution by combining optical modelling and lidar scattering measurements

    C. David

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A method for estimating the stratospheric particle size distribution from multiwavelength lidar measurements is presented. It is based on matching measured and model-simulated backscatter coefficients. The lidar backscatter coefficients measured at the three commonly used wavelengths 355, 532 and 1064 nm are compared to a precomputed look-up table of model-calculated values. The optical model assumes that particles are spherical and that their size distribution is unimodal. This inverse problem is not trivial because the optical model is highly non-linear with a strong sensitivity to the size distribution parameters in some cases. The errors in the lidar backscatter coefficients are explicitly taken into account in the estimation. The method takes advantage of the statistical properties of the possible solution cluster to identify the most probable size distribution parameters. In order to discard model-simulated outliers resulting from the strong non-linearity of the model, solutions farther than one standard deviation of the median values of the solution cluster are filtered out, because the most probable solution is expected to be in the densest part of the cluster. Within the filtered solution cluster, the estimation algorithm minimizes a cost function of the misfit between measurements and model simulations.

    Two validation cases are presented on Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC events detected above the ALOMAR observatory (69° N – Norway. A first validation is performed against optical particle counter measurements carried out in January 1996. In non-depolarizing regions of the cloud (i.e. spherical particles, the parameters of an unimodal size distribution and those of the optically dominant mode of a bimodal size distribution are quite successfully retrieved, especially for the median radius and the geometrical standard deviation. As expected, the algorithm performs poorly when solid particles drive the backscatter coefficient

  4. Statistical estimation of stratospheric particle size distribution by combining optical modelling and lidar scattering measurements

    J. Jumelet

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A method for estimating the stratospheric particle size distribution from multiwavelength lidar measurements is presented. It is based on matching measured and model-simulated backscatter coefficients. The lidar backscatter coefficients measured at the three commonly used wavelengths 355, 532 and 1064 nm are compared to a precomputed look-up table of model-calculated values. The optical model assumes that particles are spherical and that their size distribution is unimodal. This inverse problem is not trivial because the optical model is highly non-linear with a strong sensitivity to the size distribution parameters in some cases. The errors in the lidar backscatter coefficients are explicitly taken into account in the estimation. The method takes advantage of the statistical properties of the possible solution cluster to identify the most probable size distribution parameters. In order to discard model-simulated outliers resulting from the strong non-linearity of the model, a 1σ-filter is applied to the solution cluster. Within the filtered solution cluster, the estimation algorithm minimizes a cost function of the misfit between measurements and model simulations.

    Two validation cases are presented on Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC events detected above the ALOMAR observatory (69° N – Norway. A first validation is performed against optical particle counter measurements carried out in January 1996. In non-depolarizing regions of the cloud (i.e. spherical particles, the parameters of an unimodal size distribution and those of the optically dominant mode of a bimodal size distribution are quite successfully retrieved, especially for the mode radius and the geometrical standard deviation. As expected, the algorithm performs poorly when solid particles drive the backscatter coefficient. A small bias is identified in modelling the refractive index when compared to previous works that inferred PSC type Ib refractive indices. The accuracy

  5. New estimates of the Martian landers and rovers coordinates by combining Doppler data and topography model

    Le Maistre, Sebastien

    2015-11-01

    We propose here a new method to determine the three coordinates of a spacecraft landed on Mars with a high accuracy as early as the very beginning of the mission. The method consists of determining first the in-equatorial plane coordinates with Doppler data only and then inferring the Z-coordinate (along the polar axis) using the MOLA topography model. The method is applied to several landed missions, providing good estimate of the Z-coordinate of Viking lander 1, Pathfinder and Spirit, but failing to improve the Z of Opportunity and Viking lander 2. Finally, the method is applied in the InSight landing ellipse showing the high probability to get InSight’s Z coordinate with a precision better than 10m after only a couple of days of observations.

  6. A fuzzy neural network combining wavelet denoising and PCA for sensor signal estimation

    In this work, a fuzzy neural network is used to estimate the relevant sensor signal using other sensor signals. Noise components in input signals into the fuzzy neural network are removed through the wavelet denoising technique. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used to reduce the dimension of an input space without losing a significant amount of information. A lower dimensional input space will also usually reduce the time necessary to train a fuzzy-neural network. Also, the principal component analysis makes easy the selection of the input signals into the fuzzy neural network. The fuzzy neural network parameters are optimized by two learning methods. A genetic algorithm is used to optimize the antecedent parameters of the fuzzy neural network and a least-squares algorithm is used to solve the consequent parameters. The proposed algorithm was verified through the application to the pressurizer water level and the hot-leg flowrate measurements in pressurized water reactors

  7. Estimation of daily Snow Cover Area combining MODIS and LANDSAT information by using cellular automata

    Pardo-Iguzquiza, Eulogio; Juan Collados Lara, Antonio; Pulido-Velazquez, David

    2016-04-01

    The snow availability in Alpine catchments is essential for the economy of these areas. It plays an important role in tourist development but also in the management of the Water Resources Snow is an important water resource in many river basins with mountains in the catchment area. The determination of the snow water equivalent requires the estimation of the evolution of the snow pack (cover area, thickness and snow density) along the time. Although there are complex physical models of the dynamics of the snow pack, sometimes the data available are scarce and a stochastic model like the cellular automata (CA) can be of great practical interest. CA can be used to model the dynamics of growth and wane of the snow pack. The CA is calibrated with historical data. This requires the determination of transition rules that are capable of modeling the evolution of the spatial pattern of snow cover area. Furthermore, CA requires the definition of states and neighborhoods. We have included topographical variables and climatological variables in order to define the state of each pixel. The evolution of snow cover in a pixel depends on its state, the state of the neighboring pixels and the transition rules. The calibration of the CA is done using daily MODIS data, available for the period 24/02/2002 to present with a spatial resolution of 500 m, and the LANDSAT information available with a sixteen-day periodicity from 1984 to the present and with spatial resolution of 30 m. The methodology has been applied to estimation of the snow cover area of Sierra Nevada mountain range in the Southern of Spain to obtain snow cover area daily information with 500 m spatial resolution for the period 1980-2014. Acknowledgments: This research has been partially supported by the GESINHIMPADAPT project (CGL2013-48424-C2-2-R) with Spanish MINECO funds. We would also like to thank NASA DAAC and LANDSAT project for the data provided for this study.

  8. Daily GPP estimates in Mediterranean ecosystems by combining remote sensing and meteorological data

    Gilabert, M. A.; Moreno, A.; Maselli, F.; Martínez, B.; Chiesi, M.; Sánchez-Ruiz, S.; García-Haro, F. J.; Pérez-Hoyos, A.; Campos-Taberner, M.; Pérez-Priego, O.; Serrano-Ortiz, P.; Carrara, A.

    2015-04-01

    The accurate representation of terrestrial CO2 uptake (GPP) using Monteith's approach requires a frequent and site-specific parameterization of the model inputs. In this work, an optimization of this approach has been carried out by adjusting the inputs (fAPAR, PAR and ε) for the study area, peninsular Spain, a typical Mediterranean region. The daily GPP images have been calculated for 2008 and 2011 with a 1-km spatial resolution and validated by comparison with in situ GPP estimates from the eddy covariance data (direct validation) and by inter-comparison with the MODIS GPP product. The direct validation has evidenced an excellent agreement with correlations up to 0.98 in 2008 and 0.92 in 2011 in some sites. The inter-comparison has shown that the two GPP products are consistent temporally. However, a slightly decrease of the correlation has been observed in some areas. The validation has also shown that our optimized GPP product accounts better for the water stress than the MODIS product. The analysis of the explanatory power of the model in terms of its inputs shows, as expected, that PAR and fAPAR are the most relevant inputs. The fAPAR plays a major role on GPP estimation when the vegetation phenology maximum is not reached during solar solstice. Finally, it has been shown that the influence of the water stress, associated with the water shortage typical of Mediterranean landscapes, has to be evaluated accurately in order to explain the GPP inter-annual variability.

  9. Correlation of retention of lanthanide and actinide complexes with stability constants and their speciation

    Datta, A.; Sivaraman, N.; Viswanathan, K.S.; Ghosh, Suddhasattwa; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Chemistry Group

    2013-03-01

    The present study describes a correlation that is developed from retention of lanthanide and actinide complexes with the stability constant. In these studies, an ion-pairing reagent, camphor-10-sulphonic acid (CSA) was used as the modifier and organic acids such as {alpha}-hydroxy isobutyric acid ({alpha}-HIBA), mandelic acid, lactic acid and tartaric acid were used as complexing reagent for elution. From these studies, a correlation has been established between capacity factor of a metal ion, concentration of ion-pairing reagent and complexing agent with the stability constant of metal complex. Based on these studies, it has been shown that the stability constant of lanthanide and actinide complexes can be estimated using a single lanthanide calibrant. Validation of the method was carried out with the complexing agents such as {alpha}-HIBA and lactic acid. It was also demonstrated that data from a single chromatogram can be used for estimation of stability constant at various ionic strengths. These studies also demonstrated that the method can be applied for estimation of stability constant of actinides with a ligand whose value is not reported yet, e.g., ligands of importance in the lanthanide-actinide separations, chelation therapy etc. The chromatographic separation method is fast and the estimation of stability constant can be done in a very short time, which is a significant advantage especially in dealing with radioactive elements. The stability constant data was used to derive speciation data of plutonium in different oxidation states as well as that of americium with {alpha}-HIBA. The elution behavior of actinides such as Pu and Am from reversed phase chromatographic technique could be explained based on these studies. (orig.)

  10. Combining ability and heritability estimates of main agronomic characters in rapeseed breeding lines using line × tester analysis

    Rameeh Valiollah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the general and specific combining ability (GCA and SCA effects of plant height, yield components, seed yield and oil content, three testers and six lines of spring type of rapeseed varieties were crossed using line × tester fashion. Significant mean squares of parents and crosses for all the traits indicated significant genetic variation among the parents and their F1 crosses. Significant mean squares of parents vs crosses revealed significant average heterosis for all the traits except seeds per pod, 1000-seed weight and oil content. High narrow-sense heritability estimates for all the traits except seeds per pod, indicating the importance of additive genetic effects for these traits. Due to more importance of additive genetic effects for most of the traits, only a few of the crosses exhibited significant SCA effects. A significant positive correlation between seed yield and some of yield components including pods on main axis, pods per plant and 1000-seed weight indicates that these traits can be used as suitable selection criteria for improving of seed yield. The crosses including Opt × R01, RG06 × R01, RG06 × R08 and RGS3 × R08 with 3241.91, 3213.68, 3334.28 and 3237.45 kg ha-1 of seed yield detected as prior combinations for improving of this trait and all of these combinations had also positive SCA effect for this trait.

  11. Chemometric simultaneous estimation of clopidogrel bisulphate and aspirin from combined dosage form

    Rajput S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Two chemometric methods, inverse least square and classical least square, were applied to simultaneous assay of clopidogrel bisulphate and aspirin in their combined dosage tablet formulation. Twelve mixed solutions were prepared for the chemometric calibration as training set and 10 mixed solutions were prepared as validation set. The absorbance data matrix was obtained by measuring the absorbance at 16 wavelength points, from 220 to 250 nm with the interval of 2 nm (Dl= 2 nm. The developed calibrations were successfully tested for laboratory mixtures as well as commercial tablet formulation for their clopidogrel bisulphate and aspirin concentration. Mean recoveries for clopidogrel bisulphate and aspirin were found to be in good agreement with the label claim.

  12. Simultaneous spectrophotometric estimation of hydrochlorothiazide and bisoprolol fumarate in combined dosage forms

    Sahu R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid, precise, accurate, and specific ratiospectra derivative spectrophotometry and a simple UV spectrophotometry using simultaneous equation methods are developed for the simultaneous determination of bisoprolol fumarate and hydrochlorothiazide from combined pharmaceutical dosage forms. For ratiospectra derivative spectrophotometry, the amplitudes were measured at 202.6 nm for bisoprolol fumarate and the difference in amplitudes at 212.6 and 230 nm were measured for the determination of hydrochlorothiazide. In the simultaneous equation method, the signals were measured at 223 nm and 271.6 nm. Concentration of each drug was obtained by using the absorptivity values calculated for the drugs at two wavelengths, 223 and 271.6 nm. Commercial tablet formulations were successfully analyzed using the developed methods.

  13. Combining C- and X-band Weather Radars for Improving Precipitation Estimates over Urban Areas

    Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk

    area of interest, the radar measurements can be used in the process of predicting the near future loads and state of the urban drainage system. Such information is a necessity for real-time control decision support. The action possibilities within real-time control rely greatly on accurate prediction...... precipitation measurements from the two radar systems into a single radar data product, which utilises strengths and compensates for weaknesses of the individual radar system. The core of the research has thereby been to investigate the consequences of the differences of the two radar systems in order to...... understand the strengths and weaknesses for the best possible combination strategy. The project has resulted in developments and methods, which improve the radar based precipitation measurements from both radar systems. Moreover, a better understanding has been gained on how the radar measurement represents...

  14. Method for Constructing Composite Response Surfaces by Combining Neural Networks with Polynominal Interpolation or Estimation Techniques

    Rai, Man Mohan (Inventor); Madavan, Nateri K. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method and system for data modeling that incorporates the advantages of both traditional response surface methodology (RSM) and neural networks is disclosed. The invention partitions the parameters into a first set of s simple parameters, where observable data are expressible as low order polynomials, and c complex parameters that reflect more complicated variation of the observed data. Variation of the data with the simple parameters is modeled using polynomials; and variation of the data with the complex parameters at each vertex is analyzed using a neural network. Variations with the simple parameters and with the complex parameters are expressed using a first sequence of shape functions and a second sequence of neural network functions. The first and second sequences are multiplicatively combined to form a composite response surface, dependent upon the parameter values, that can be used to identify an accurate mode

  15. Minior Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment

    Nolan E. Hertel; Dwayne Blaylock

    2008-04-10

    The "Minor Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment" was a Department of Energy (DOE) U-NERI funded project intended to assess the viability of using either the FLATTOP or the COMET critical assembly to measure high temperature Doppler coefficients. The goal of the project was to calculate using the MCNP5 code the gram amounts of Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-241, AM-241, AM-242m, Am-243, and CM-244 needed to produce a 1E-5 in reactivity for a change in operating temperature 800C to 1000C. After determining the viability of using the assemblies and calculating the amounts of each actinide an experiment will be designed to verify the calculated results. The calculations and any doncuted experiments are designed to support the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative in conducting safety analysis of advanced fast reactor or acceoerator-driven transmutation systems with fuel containing high minor actinide content.

  16. Separation of actinides with alkylpyridinium salts

    Various f-elements are separated as anionic complexes from both acidic and alkaline solutions by precipitation with alkylpyridinium salts. The precipitates are also cationic surfactants where the simple counter-ion (e.g. nitrate or chloride) is replaced by the negatively charged complex anion of an actinide or lanthanide. The low solubility of these precipitates is explained by a strong affinity of divalent complex counter-ions of f-elements to the quaternary nitrogen. Precipitations in solutions of nitric acid allow to separate tetravalent f-elements from other metals, in alkaline carbonate solutions tetravalent and hexavalent actinides are precipitated simultaneously. The last procedure yields precipitates, which are very intimate mixtures of hexavalent and tetravalent actinides. This allows to prepare mixed oxides in a simple way. (author) 6 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  17. Neutron scattering studies of the actinides

    The electronic structure of actinide materials presents a unique example of the interplay between localized and band electrons. Together with a variety of other techniques, especially magnetization and the Mossbauer effect, neutron studies have helped us to understand the systematics of many actinide compounds that order magnetically. A direct consequence of the localization of 5f electrons is the spin-orbit coupling and subsequent spin-lattice interaction that often leads to strongly anisotropic behavior. The unusual phase transition in UO2, for example, arises from interactions between quadrupole moments. On the other hand, in the monopnictides and monochalcogenides, the anisotropy is more difficult to understand, but probably involves an interaction between actinide and anion wave functions. A variety of neutron experiments, including form-factor studies, critical scattering and measurements of the elementary excitations have now been performed, and the conceptual picture emerging from these studies will be discussed

  18. Coordination chemistry for new actinide separation processes

    The amount of wastes and the number of chemical steps can be decreased by replacing the PUREX process extractant (TBP) by, N.N- dialkylamides (RCONR'2). Large amounts of deep underground storable wastes can be stored into sub-surface disposals if the long lived actinide isotopes are removed. Spent nuclear fuels reprocessing including the partitioning of the minor actinides Np, Am, Cm and their transmutation into short half lives fission products is appealing to the public who is not favorable to the deep underground storage of large amounts of long half lived actinide isotopes. In this paper coordination chemistry problems related to improved chemical separations by solvent extraction are presented. 2 tabs.; 4 refs

  19. Research on Actinides in Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    The electrochemical/spectroscopic integrated measurement system was designed and set up for spectro-electrochemical measurements of lanthanide and actinide ions in high temperature molten salt media. A compact electrochemical cell and electrode system was also developed for the minimization of reactants, and consequently minimization of radioactive waste generation. By applying these equipment, oxidation and reduction behavior of lanthanide and actinide ions in molten salt media have been made. Also, thermodynamic parameter values are determined by interpreting the results obtained from electrochemical measurements. Several lanthanide ions exhibited fluorescence properties in molten salt. Also, UV-VIS measurement provided the detailed information regarding the oxidation states of lanthanide and actinide ions in high temperature molten salt media

  20. Implementation of PSA models to estimate the probabilities associated with external event combination

    This note endeavors to address some significant issues revealed by the Fukushima accident in Japan in 2011, such as the analysis of various dependency aspects arisen in the light of the external event PSA framework, as the treatment of the correlated hazards. To this aim some foundational notions to implement the PSA models related to specific aspects, like the external hazard combination, e.g., earthquake and tsunami as at the Fukushima accident, and the external hazard-caused internal events, e.g., seismic induced fire, are proposed and discussed to be incorporated within the risk assessment structure. Risk assessment of external hazards is required and utilized as an integrated part of PRA for operating and new reactor units. In the light of the Fukushima accident, of special interest are correlated events, whose modelling is proposed in the present study, in the form of some theoretical concepts, which lay the foundations for the PSA framework implementation. An applicative example is presented for illustrative purposes, since the analysis is carried out on the basis of generic numerical values assigned to an oversimplified model and results are achieved without any baseline comparison. Obviously the first step aimed at the process endorsement is the analysis of all available information in order to determine the level of applicability of the observed specific plant site events to the envisaged model and the statistical correlation analysis for event occurrence data that can be used as part of this process. Despite these drawbacks that actually do not qualify the achieved results, the present work represents an exploratory study aimed at resolving current open issues to be resolved in the PSA, like topics related to unanticipated scenarios: the combined external hazards of the earthquake and tsunami in Fukushima, external hazards causing internal events, such as seismic induced fire. These topics are to be resolved among the other ones as emerging from the

  1. Estimating the alcohol-breast cancer association: a comparison of diet diaries, FFQs and combined measurements.

    Keogh, Ruth H; Park, Jin Young; White, Ian R; Lentjes, Marleen A H; McTaggart, Alison; Bhaniani, Amit; Cairns, Benjamin J; Key, Timothy J; Greenwood, Darren C; Burley, Victoria J; Cade, Janet E; Dahm, Christina C; Pot, Gerda K; Stephen, Alison M; Masset, Gabriel; Brunner, Eric J; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2012-07-01

    The alcohol-breast cancer association has been established using alcohol intake measurements from Food Frequency Questionnaires (FFQ). For some nutrients diet diary measurements are more highly correlated with true intake compared with FFQ measurements, but it is unknown whether this is true for alcohol. A case-control study (656 breast cancer cases, 1905 matched controls) was sampled from four cohorts in the UK Dietary Cohort Consortium. Alcohol intake was measured prospectively using FFQs and 4- or 7-day diet diaries. Both relied on fixed portion sizes allocated to given beverage types, but those used to obtain FFQ measurements were lower. FFQ measurements were therefore on average lower and to enable fair comparison the FFQ was "calibrated" using diet diary portion sizes. Diet diaries gave more zero measurements, demonstrating the challenge of distinguishing never-from episodic-consumers using short term instruments. To use all information, two combined measurements were calculated. The first is an average of the two measurements with special treatment of zeros. The second is the expected true intake given both measurements, calculated using a measurement error model. After confounder adjustment the odds ratio (OR) per 10 g/day of alcohol intake was 1.05 (95 % CI 0.98, 1.13) using diet diaries, and 1.13 (1.02, 1.24) using FFQs. The calibrated FFQ measurement and combined measurements 1 and 2 gave ORs 1.10 (1.03, 1.18), 1.09 (1.01, 1.18), 1.09 (0.99,1.20), respectively. The association was modified by HRT use, being stronger among users versus non-users. In summary, using an alcohol measurement from a diet diary at one time point gave attenuated associations compared with FFQ. PMID:22644108

  2. Pyrochlore as nuclear waste form. Actinide uptake and chemical stability

    -pyrochlores were synthesised. To this end, a wet chemical synthesis route was developed. Characterisation by XRD, SEM and EDX indicates a homogeneous structural uptake of Pu- 239 into pyrochlore. Extensive dissolution studies were carried out on Nd2O3 - ZrO2 pyrochlores using static and dynamic experimental setups including variations of pH, temperature and chemical composition. Typical for all experiments is an initial incongruent dissolution with a preferential Nd release. The higher initial rates decreased with time until a steady state was reached oftentimes approaching a congruent dissolution of Nd and Zr. The steady state of the Zr release was reached after 10 - 20 days in experiments at 110 C and c(H+) = 0.1 mol/L. Differences in the Zr-O and Nd-O bonding strengths may be partly responsible for the higher initial release rate of Nd. The activation energy Ea (Zr-based pyrochlore) = 47 kJ/mol and Ea = 28 kJ/mol for the defect fluorite indicated a surface controlled dissolution mechanism. A rough estimation for a Nd2Zr2O7 pyrochlore leads to a dissolution rate in the order of 10-10 gm-2d-1 under repository relevant conditions, demonstrating its ability to serve as a highly durable nuclear waste form. Complementary to the macroscopic approach microscopic observations were made to gain a more detailed view into the dissolution. SEM and vertical scanning interferometry provided new insights into the dissolution kinetics at grain boundaries and the surface retreat of individual grains. These microscopic methods indicate a temporal evolution of the surface reactivity. The combination of macroscopic and microscopic dissolution studies allowed first insights into the dissolution mechanism of a ZrO2 - Nd2O3 pyrochlore series which is essential for a profound understanding of the chemical stability of a nuclear waste form.

  3. Pyrochlore as nuclear waste form. Actinide uptake and chemical stability

    Finkeldei, Sarah Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    imitate a realistic waste form 5 mol% and 10 mol% Pu-pyrochlores were synthesised. To this end, a wet chemical synthesis route was developed. Characterisation by XRD, SEM and EDX indicates a homogeneous structural uptake of Pu- 239 into pyrochlore. Extensive dissolution studies were carried out on Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} - ZrO{sub 2} pyrochlores using static and dynamic experimental setups including variations of pH, temperature and chemical composition. Typical for all experiments is an initial incongruent dissolution with a preferential Nd release. The higher initial rates decreased with time until a steady state was reached oftentimes approaching a congruent dissolution of Nd and Zr. The steady state of the Zr release was reached after 10 - 20 days in experiments at 110 C and c(H{sup +}) = 0.1 mol/L. Differences in the Zr-O and Nd-O bonding strengths may be partly responsible for the higher initial release rate of Nd. The activation energy E{sub a} (Zr-based pyrochlore) = 47 kJ/mol and E{sub a} = 28 kJ/mol for the defect fluorite indicated a surface controlled dissolution mechanism. A rough estimation for a Nd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} pyrochlore leads to a dissolution rate in the order of 10{sup -10} gm{sup -2}d{sup -1} under repository relevant conditions, demonstrating its ability to serve as a highly durable nuclear waste form. Complementary to the macroscopic approach microscopic observations were made to gain a more detailed view into the dissolution. SEM and vertical scanning interferometry provided new insights into the dissolution kinetics at grain boundaries and the surface retreat of individual grains. These microscopic methods indicate a temporal evolution of the surface reactivity. The combination of macroscopic and microscopic dissolution studies allowed first insights into the dissolution mechanism of a ZrO{sub 2} - Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} pyrochlore series which is essential for a profound understanding of the chemical stability of a nuclear waste form.

  4. Global Estimates of Fine Particulate Matter Using a Combined Geophysical-Statistical Method with Information from Satellites, Models, and Monitors

    Van Donkelaar, Aaron; Martin, Randall V.; Brauer, Michael; Hsu, N. Christina; Kahn, Ralph A.; Levy, Robert C.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Sayer, Andrew M.; Winker, David M.

    2016-01-01

    We estimated global fine particulate matter (PM(sub 2.5)) concentrations using information from satellite-, simulation- and monitor-based sources by applying a Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) to global geophysically-based satellite-derived PM(sub 2.5) estimates. Aerosol optical depth from multiple satellite products (MISR, MODIS Dark Target, MODIS and SeaWiFS Deep Blue, and MODIS MAIAC) was combined with simulation (GEOS-Chem) based upon their relative uncertainties as determined using ground-based sun photometer (AERONET) observations for 1998-2014. The GWR predictors included simulated aerosol composition and land use information. The resultant PM(sub 2.5) estimates were highly consistent (R(sup 2) equals 0.81) with out-of-sample cross-validated PM(sub 2.5) concentrations from monitors. The global population-weighted annual average PM(sub 2.5) concentrations were 3-fold higher than the 10 micrograms per cubic meter WHO guideline, driven by exposures in Asian and African regions. Estimates in regions with high contributions from mineral dust were associated with higher uncertainty, resulting from both sparse ground-based monitoring, and challenging conditions for retrieval and simulation. This approach demonstrates that the addition of even sparse ground-based measurements to more globally continuous PM(sub 2.5) data sources can yield valuable improvements to PM(sub 2.5) characterization on a global scale.

  5. Blood oxygen flux estimation with a combined photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasound microscopy system: a phantom study

    Jiang, Yan; Forbrich, Alex; Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-03-01

    The metabolic rate of oxygen consumption, an important indicator of tissue metabolism, can be expressed as the change of net blood oxygen flux into and out of a tissue region per 100 g of tissue. In this work, we propose a photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound method for imaging local blood oxygen flux of a single vessel. An imaging system for combined photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasound microscopy is presented. This system uses a swept-scan 25-MHz ultrasound transducer with confocal dark-field laser illumination optics. A pulse-sequencer enables ultrasonic and laser pulses to be interlaced so that photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound images are co-registered. Since the mean flow speed can be measured by color Doppler ultrasound, the vessel cross-sectional area can be measured by power Doppler or structural photoacoustic imaging, and multi-wavelength photoacoustic methods can be used to estimate oxygen saturation (sO2) and total concentration of haemoglobin (CHb), all of the parameters necessary for oxygen flux estimation can be provided. The accuracy of the flow speed and sO2 estimation has been investigated. In vitro sheep blood phantom experiments have been performed at different sO2 levels and mean flow speeds. Blood oxygen flux has been estimated, and the uncertainty of the measurement has been quantified.

  6. COMBINING FEATURE SCALING ESTIMATION WITH SVM CLASSIFIER DESIGN USING GA APPROACH

    2005-01-01

    This letter adopts a GA (Genetic Algorithm) approach to assist in learning scaling of features that are most favorable to SVM (Support Vector Machines) classifier, which is named as GA-SVM. The relevant coefficients of various features to the classification task, measured by real-valued scaling, are estimated efficiently by using GA. And GA exploits heavy-bias operator to promote sparsity in the scaling of features. There are many potential benefits of this method:Feature selection is performed by eliminating irrelevant features whose scaling is zero, an SVM classifier that has enhanced generalization ability can be learned simultaneously. Experimental comparisons using original SVM and GA-SVM demonstrate both economical feature selection and excellent classification accuracy on junk e-mail recognition problem and Internet ad recognition problem. The experimental results show that comparing with original SVM classifier, the number of support vector decreases significantly and better classification results are achieved based on GA-SVM. It also demonstrates that GA can provide a simple, general, and powerful framework for tuning parameters in optimal problem, which directly improves the recognition performance and recognition rate of SVM.

  7. A new model for estimating subsurface ice content based on combined electrical and seismic data sets

    C. Hauck

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Detailed knowledge of the material properties and internal structures of frozen ground is one of the prerequisites in many permafrost studies. In the absence of direct evidence, such as in-situ borehole measurements, geophysical methods are an increasingly interesting option for obtaining subsurface information on various spatial and temporal scales. The indirect nature of geophysical soundings requires a relation between the measured variables (e.g. electrical resistivity, seismic velocity and the actual subsurface constituents (rock, water, air, ice. In this work, we present a model which provides estimates of the volumetric fractions of these four constituents from tomographic electrical and seismic images. The model is tested using geophysical data sets from two rock glaciers in the Swiss Alps, where ground truth information in form of borehole data is available. First results confirm the applicability of the so-called 4-phase model, which allows to quantify the contributions of ice-, water- and air within permafrost areas as well as detecting solid bedrock. Apart from a similarly thick active layer with enhanced air content for both rock glaciers, the two case studies revealed a heterogeneous distribution of ice and unfrozen water within Muragl rock glacier, where bedrock was detected at depths of 20–25 m, but a comparatively homogeneous ice body with only minor heterogeneities within Murtèl rock glacier.

  8. Towards the Improvement of Blue Water Evapotranspiration Estimates by Combining Remote Sensing and Model Simulation

    Mireia Romaguera

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of evapotranspiration of blue water (ETb from farmlands, due to irrigation, is crucial to improve water management, especially in regions where water resources are scarce. Large scale ETb was previously obtained, based on the differences between remote sensing derived actual ET and values simulated from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS. In this paper, we improve on the previous approach by enhancing the classification scheme employed so that it represents regions with common hydrometeorological conditions. Bias between the two data sets for reference areas (non-irrigated croplands were identified per class, and used to adjust the remote sensing products. Different classifiers were compared and evaluated based on the generated bias curves per class and their variability. The results in Europe show that the k-means classifier was better suited to identify the bias curves per class, capturing the dynamic range of these curves and minimizing their variability within each corresponding class. The method was applied in Africa and the classification and bias results were consistent with the findings in Europe. The ETb results were compared with existing literature and provided differences up to 50 mm/year in Europe, while the comparison in Africa was found to be highly influenced by the assigned cover type and the heterogeneity of the pixel. Although further research is needed to fully understand the ETb values found, this paper shows a more robust approach to classify and characterize the bias between the two sets of ET data.

  9. Actinide elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: water-sediment interactions of U, Pu, Am, and Cm; relative availability of actinide elements from abiotic to aquatic biota; comparative uptake of transuranic elements by biota bordering Pond 3513; metabolic reduction of 239Np from Np(V) to Np(IV) in cotton rats; evaluation of hazards associated with transuranium releases to the biosphere; predicting Pu in bone; adsorption--solubility--complexation phenomena in actinide partitioning between sorbents and solution; comparative soil extraction data; and comparative plant uptake data

  10. Sequential analysis of selected actinides in urine

    The monitoring of personnel by urinalysis for suspected contamination by actinides necessitated the development and implementation of an analytical scheme that will separate and identify alpha emitting radionuclides of these elements. The present work deals with Pu, Am, and Th. These elements are separated from an ashed urine sample by means of coprecipitation and ion exchange techniques. The final analysis is carried out by electroplating the actinides and counting in a α-spectrometer. Mean recoveries of these elements from urine are: Pu 64%, Am 74% and Th 69%. (auth)

  11. Spin-Orbit Coupling in Actinide Cations

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Martin, Richard L.; Jensen, Hans Jorgen A.; Knecht, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    The limiting case of Russell-Saunders coupling, which leads to a maximum spin alignment for the open shell electrons, usually explains the properties of high spin ionic crystals with transition metals. For actinide compounds, the spin-orbit splitting is large enough to cause a significantly reduced spin alignment. Novel concepts are used to explain the dependence of the spin alignment on the 5f shell occupation. We present evidence that the XPS of ionic actinide materials may provide direct information about the angular momentum coupling within the 5f shell.

  12. Spin-orbit coupling in actinide cations

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Martin, Richard L.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa.; Knecht, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    The limiting case of Russell-Saunders coupling, which leads to a maximum spin alignment for the open shell electrons, usually explains the properties of high spin ionic crystals with transition metals. For actinide compounds, the spin-orbit splitting is large enough to cause a significantly reduced spin alignment. Novel concepts are used to explain the dependence of the spin alignment on the 5f shell occupation. We present evidence that the XPS of ionic actinide materials may provide direct information about the angular momentum coupling within the 5f shell.

  13. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    The second international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois United States, on 11-13 November 1992. The proceedings are presented in four sessions: Current strategic system of actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, progress in R and D on partitioning processes wet and dry, progress in R and D on transmutation and refinements of neutronic and other data, development of the fuel cycle processes fuel types and targets. (A.L.B.)

  14. Actinide phosphonate complexes in aqueous solutions

    Complexes formed by actinides with carboxylic acids, polycarboxylic acids, and aminopolycarboxylic acids play a central role in both the basic and process chemistry of the actinides. Recent studies of f-element complexes with phosphonic acid ligands indicate that new ligands incorporating doubly ionizable phosphonate groups (-PO3H2) have many properties which are unique chemically, and promise more efficient separation processes for waste cleanup and environmental restoration. Simple diphosphonate ligands form much stronger complexes than isostructural carboxylates, often exhibiting higher solubility as well. In this manuscript recent studies of the thermodynamics and kinetics of f-element complexation by 1,1 and 1,2 diphosphonic acid ligands are described

  15. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    The second international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois United States, on 11-13 November 1992. The proceedings are presented in four sessions: Current strategic system of actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, progress in R and D on partitioning processes wet and dry, progress in R and D on transmutation and refinements of neutronic and other data, development of the fuel cycle processes fuel types and targets. (A.L.B.)

  16. Mean and Seasonal Circulation of the South Indian Ocean Estimated by Combining Satellite Altimetry and Surface Drifter Observations

    N. Peter Benny; Daisuke Ambe; K. Rayaroth Mridula; Sahrum Ses; Kamaludin Mohd Omar; and Mohd Razali Mahmud

    2014-01-01

    The mean velocity field of south Indian Ocean has been derived by combining high resolution maps of sea level anomalies and the surface drifter data from the Global Drifter program from 1993 to 2012 with a resolution of 1/3 _ 1/3 degrees in latitude and longitude. The estimated mean velocity field exhibits strong western boundary currents, zonal currents and eastern boundary currents. The Agulhas Current shows a velocity of above 1.5 m s-1 at around _ The distribution of energy associated wit...

  17. Combining sap flow meas- urement-based canopy stomatal conductance and 13C discrimination to estimate forest carbon assimilation

    ZHAO Ping; LU Ping; MA Ling; SUN Guchou; RAO Xingquan; CAI Xian; ZENG Xiaoping

    2005-01-01

    The available methods for studying C uptake of forest and their problems in practices are reviewed, and a new approach to combining sap flow and 13C techniques is proposed in this paper. This approach, obtained through strict mathematic derivation, combines sap flow measurement-based canopy stomatal conductance and 13C discrimination to estimate instantaneous carbon assimilation rate of a forest. Namely the mean canopy stomatal conductance (gc) acquired from accurate measurement of sap flux density is integrated with the relationship between 13C discrimination (() and Ci/Ca (intercellular/ambient CO2 concentrations) and with that between Anet (net photosynthetic rate) and gCO2 (stomatal conductance for CO2) so that a new relation between forest C uptake and ( as well as gc is established. It is a new method of such kind for studying the C exchange between forest and atmosphere based on experimental ecology.

  18. Condition number estimates for combined potential integral operators in acoustics and their boundary element discretisation

    Betcke, Timo; Graham, Ivan G; Langdon, Stephen; Lindner, Marko

    2010-01-01

    We consider the classical coupled, combined-field integral equation formulations for time-harmonic acoustic scattering by a sound soft bounded obstacle. In recent work, we have proved lower and upper bounds on the $L^2$ condition numbers for these formulations, and also on the norms of the classical acoustic single- and double-layer potential operators. These bounds to some extent make explicit the dependence of condition numbers on the wave number $k$, the geometry of the scatterer, and the coupling parameter. For example, with the usual choice of coupling parameter they show that, while the condition number grows like $k^{1/3}$ as $k\\to\\infty$, when the scatterer is a circle or sphere, it can grow as fast as $k^{7/5}$ for a class of `trapping' obstacles. In this paper we prove further bounds, sharpening and extending our previous results. In particular we show that there exist trapping obstacles for which the condition numbers grow as fast as $\\exp(\\gamma k)$, for some $\\gamma>0$, as $k\\to\\infty$ through so...

  19. Assessment of diffuse trace metal inputs into surface waters - Combining empirical estimates with process based simulations

    Schindewolf, Marcus; Steinz, André; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    As a result of mining activities since the 13th century, surface waters of the German Mulde catchment suffer from deleterious dissolved and sediment attached lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) inputs. The leaching rate of trace metals with drainage water is a significant criterion for assessing trace metal concentrations of soils and associated risks of ground water pollution. However, the vertical transport rates of trace metals in soils are difficult to quantify. Monitoring is restricted to small lysimeter plots, which limits the transferability of results. Additionally the solid-liquid-transfer conditions in soils are highly variable, primarily due to the fluctuating retention time of percolating soil water. In contrast, lateral sediment attached trace metal inputs are mostly associated with soil erosion and resulting sediment inputs into surface waters. Since soil erosion by water is related to rare single events, monitoring and empirical estimates reveal visible shortcomings. This gap in knowledge can only be closed by process based model calculations. Concerning these calculations it has to be considered, that Pb and Zn are predominantly attached to the fine-grained soil particles (leaching rates from contaminated top soils for standardised transfer conditions and a process based modelling approach for sediment attached trace metal inputs into surface waters. Pb and Zn leaching rates amounts to 20 Mg ha-1 yr-1 resp. 114 Mg ha-1 yr-1. Deviations to observed dissolved trace metal yields at the Bad Düben gauging station are caused by plant uptake and subsoil retention. Sediment attached Pb and Zn input rates amounts to 114 Mg ha-1 yr-1 and 173 Mg ha-1 yr-1 ,which increase measurements by 10 to 25 times. This can only be caused by an inappropriate sampling regime. Routine sampling seems to reflect base load of trace metals rather than total trace metal loads.

  20. Implications of postmortem human tissue analysis on biokinetic models for actinides

    Changes and refinements to original biokinetic models, based on postmortem radiochemical measurements of the concentration and distribution of actinides in tissues obtained from volunteer donors with known occupational experience with actinides, are discussed with emphasis on applications to operational health physics. Analysis of five whole body donations to the United States Transuranium Registry indicates that the 239Pu model put forth in ICRP Publication 30 is generally applicable, although there is a significant fraction missing from the model that is retained in the muscle. For 241Am, the more recent model put forth in ICRP Publication 48 fits the autopsy data better than the model in Publication 30, although the observed retention half-time in the liver is on the order of two to three years rather than 20 years proposed by the model. An estimated 20% of the initial systemic deposition for 241Am goes to the muscle, where it has a residence half-time estimated at ten years. For both Pu and Am, less than 5% of the skeletal actinide in the skeleton is found in the marrow. The highest concentrations appear to be associated with the periosteum and endosteum. A significantly greater fraction of inhaled Pu and Am is retained in the lungs than is predicted by current models. Differences in the actinide distribution between lung and the associated lymph nodes are observed in smokers as compared with non-smokers. (author) 30 refs.; 1 tab

  1. Overall assessment of actinide partitioning and transmutation for waste management purposes

    A program to establish the technical feasibility and incentives for partitioning (i.e., recovering) actinides from fuel cycle wastes and then transmuting them in power reactors to shorter-lived or stable nuclides has recently been concluded at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The feasibility was established by experimentally investigating the reduction that can be practicably achieved in the actinide content of the wastes sent to a geologic repository, and the incentives for implementing this concept were defined by determining the incremental costs, risks, and benefits. Eight US Department of Energy laboratories and three private companies participated in the program over its 3-year duration. A reference fuel cycle was chosen based on a self-generated plutonium recycle PWR, and chemical flowsheets based on solvent extraction and ion-exchange techniques were generated that have the potential to reduce actinides in fuel fabrication and reprocessing plant wastes to less than 0.25% of those in the spent fuel. Waste treatment facilities utilizing these flowsheets were designed conceptually, and their costs were estimated. Finally, the short-term (contemporary) risks from fuel cycle operations and long-term (future) risks from deep geologic disposal of the wastes were estimated for cases with and without partitioning and transmutation. It was concluded that, while both actinide partitioning from wastes and transmutation in power reactors appear to be feasible using currently identified and studied technology, implementation of this concept cannot be justified because of the small long-term benefits and substantially increased costs of the concept

  2. The efficacy of combining satellite water storage and soil moisture observations as constraints on water balance estimation

    Tian, Siyuan; van Dijk, Albert; Renzullo, Luigi; Tregoning, Paul; Walker, Jeffrey; Pauwels, Valentijn

    2016-04-01

    The ability to accurately estimate terrestrial water storage (TWS) and its components (e.g. soil moisture, groundwater, surface water and snow) is of considerable value to water resources assessment. Due to the imperfection of both model predictions and observations, data assimilation methods have been widely applied to hydrological problems for optimal combination of model and observations. Recent studies on the assimilation of TWS data have shown its capability to improve simulated groundwater storages, but the assimilation of TWS only does not guarantee accurate estimation of surface soil moisture (SSM). We investigated the efficiency of data assimilation combining TWS change estimates, derived from temporal changes in Earth's gravity field measured by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), with SSM, retrieved from emitted microwave radiation at L-band observed by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. The global World Wide Water (W3) water balance model was used. The specific satellite data products used were the SMOS CATDS level 3 daily SSM product and the JPL mascon monthly GRACE product. Both the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and smoother (EnKS) were implemented to determine the best option for the assimilation of SSM observations only and the joint assimilation of SSM and TWS. The observation models, which map model states into observation space, are the top-layer soil relative wetness and monthly average TWS (i.e. aggregated daily top-, shallow-, deep-layer soil water storage, ground- and surface water storages). Three assimilation experiments were conducted with each method: a) assimilation of SSM data only; b) assimilation of TWS data only; c) joint assimilation of SSM and TWS data. Results were compared against in-situ soil moisture and groundwater observations, and the performance assessed with respect to open-loop results. Results for the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia demonstrate that the assimilation of SSM data only

  3. Combining unsaturated and saturated hydraulic observations to understand and estimate groundwater recharge through glacial till

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Mackay, R.; Tellam, J. H.; Thatcher, K. E.

    2010-09-01

    SummaryAlthough there has been much previous research into various aspects of the flow mechanisms through glacial till, an integrated analysis of the flow system from the ground surface to the aquifer is lacking. This paper describes such an approach with reference to a detailed field study of the hydraulic processes controlling groundwater recharge through lodgement till in Shropshire, UK. A fieldsite was instrumented with tensiometers and piezometers at a range of depths through the profile, and the geology investigated in detail through field and laboratory testing. The median matrix hydraulic conductivity of the 6 m thick till is found to be around 2 × 10 -10 m/s on the basis of laboratory measurements. Using the barometric efficiency of the till derived from on-site pressure responses, the specific storage for the till is found to be in the range 2 × 10 -6-6 × 10 -6 m -1 and approximately 3 × 10 -6 m -1 for the underlying Permo-Triassic sandstone, the regional aquifer. The hydraulic data indicate that till water table responses to rainfall occur during the summer period even when large tensions are present higher in the profile. This is thought to be due to preferential flow through hydraulically active fractures in the till, which were observed in a test pit dug on-site. The field evidence indicates that the fractures are usually infilled with a variety of materials derived and transported from clasts within the till. The bulk hydraulic conductivity of the till seems to be greatly enhanced by these features and it is shown on the basis of hydraulic testing and numerical modelling that the bulk hydraulic conductivity of the till is orders of magnitude greater than that of the till matrix and reduces with depth below ground surface. The paper furthers understanding of the hydraulic processes contributing to recharge through till and makes the link between the detail of these processes and simplified models of recharge estimation, which may be needed for

  4. Actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    Beaman, S.L.

    1979-08-21

    A strategy of actinide burnup in fast reactor systems has been investigated as an approach for reducing the long term hazards and storage requirements of the actinide waste elements and their decay daughters. The actinide recycle studies also included plutonium burnup studies in the event that plutonium is no longer required as a fuel. Particular emphasis was placed upon the timing of the recycle program, the requirements for separability of the waste materials, and the impact of the actinides on the reactor operations and performance. It is concluded that actinide recycle and plutonium burnout are attractive alternative waste management concepts. 25 refs., 14 figs., 34 tabs.

  5. Actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    A strategy of actinide burnup in fast reactor systems has been investigated as an approach for reducing the long term hazards and storage requirements of the actinide waste elements and their decay daughters. The actinide recycle studies also included plutonium burnup studies in the event that plutonium is no longer required as a fuel. Particular emphasis was placed upon the timing of the recycle program, the requirements for separability of the waste materials, and the impact of the actinides on the reactor operations and performance. It is concluded that actinide recycle and plutonium burnout are attractive alternative waste management concepts. 25 refs., 14 figs., 34 tabs

  6. Advanced Recycling Reactor with Minor Actinide Fuel

    The Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) with minor actinide fuel has been studied. This paper presents the pre-conceptual design of the ARR proposed by the International Nuclear Recycling Alliance (INRA) for FOA study sponsored by DOE of the United States of America (U.S.). Although the basic reactor concept is technically mature, it is not suitable for commercial use due to the need to reduce capital costs. As a result of INRA's extensive experience, it is anticipated that a non-commercial ARR1 will be viable and meet U.S. requirements by 2025. Commercial Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) operations are expected to be feasible in competition with LWRs by 2050, based on construction of ARR2 in 2035. The ARR based on the Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) is a loop-typed sodium cooled reactor with MOX fuel that is selected because of much experience of SFRs in the world. Major features of key technology enhancements incorporated into the ARR are the following: Decay heat can be removed by natural circulation to improve safety. The primary cooling system consists of two-loop system and the integrated IHX/Pump to improve economics. The steam generator with the straight double-walled tube is used to improve reliability. The reactor core of the ARR1 is 70 cm high and the volume fraction of fuel is 31.6%. The conversion ratio of fissile is set up less than 0.65 and the amount of burned TRU is 45-51 kg/TWeh. According to survey of more effective TRU burning core, the oxide fuel core containing high TRU (MA 15%, Pu 35% average) with moderate pins of 12% arranged driver fuel assemblies can decrease TRU conversion ratio to 0.33 and improve TRU burning capability to 67 kg/TWeh. The moderator can enhance TRU burning, while increasing the Doppler effect and reducing the positive sodium void effect. High TRU fraction promotes TRU burning by curbing plutonium production. High Am fraction and Am blanket promote Am transmutation. The ARR1 consists of a reactor building (including

  7. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC METHOD FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS ESTIMATION OF SALBUTAMOL SULPHATE AND CETIRIZINE HYDROCHLORIDE IN COMBINED DOSAGE FORM

    Sharma Deepak

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Salbutamol Sulphate (SAL and Cetirizine HCl (CET is used for the treatment of asthma and allergy. A simple, economical, accurate and precise method for simultaneous estimation of Salbutamol Sulphate (SAL and Cetirizine HCl (CET in combined dosage form has been developed. Simultaneous equation method based on measurement of absorbance at two wavelengths 276 nm and 230 nm, λmax of Salbutamol Sulphate (SAL and Cetirizine HCl (CET in 6.8 pH phosphate buffer. Both these drugs obeyed Beer Lambert’s law in the concentration range of 10-100 µg/ml for SAL and 2-20 µg/ml for CET. The high values of correlation coefficient (R2 indicated good linearity of calibration curve for both the drugs. The accuracy and precision of method was determined and the method validated stastically. Result of percentage recovery study confirms the accuracy of proposed method. The results of validation parameters indicates the accuracy of proposed methods for estimation of SAL and CET. Simultaneous equation method can be employed for routine analysis of SAL and CET in combined dosage form.

  8. Multiconfigurational quantum chemistry for actinide containing systems: from isolated molecules to condensed phase

    Complete text of publication follows: Ab initio quantum chemistry is a mature science that allows the study of molecular species containing any of the atoms in the periodic system. In this lecture I will describe our latest achievements in the prediction of novel chemical bonds and chemical species, including the multiple bond in the early-di-actinide series [1] and some novel inorganic compounds containing the di-uranium moiety [2]. In nature most of actinide chemistry occurs in solution. We try to combine ab initio quantum chemistry with classical molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the behavior of highly charged ions in solution. Our recent studies of uranyl [3] and Cm(III) [4] in water will be presented. References: [1] B. O. Roos, P.-A. Malmqvist and L. Gagliardi, Exploring the actinide-actinide bond: Theoretical studies of the chemical bond in Ac2, Th2, Pa2, and U2 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 17000-17006 (2006) [2] G. La Macchia, M. Brynda, and L. Gagliardi, Quantum chemical calculations predict the diphenyl di-uranium compound, PhUUPh, to have a stable 1Ag ground state Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 45, 6210-6213 (2006); [3] D. Hagberg, G. Karlstrom, B .O. Roos and L. Gagliardi, The coordination of uranyl in water: a combined quantum chemical and molecular simulation study J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 14250-14256 (2005); [4] E. Bednarz, D. Hagberg, L. Gagliardi in preparation

  9. Diamond for Actinide Traces Detection and Spectrometry in Liquids

    We describe here a new approach for the detection and identification of actinides (Am, Pu, Cm etc) at very low activity levels in aqueous solution. The measurement consists at first in the electro-precipitation of the actinides ions as insoluble hydroxides directly onto a boron doped nanocrystalline diamond (BNCD) electrode deposited on an α-particle detector (Si or Si-PIN diode), followed by α-particles detection using front-end nuclear electronics. After α-particles counting, spectrometry, the detector can be easily decontaminated using anodization in aqueous solution to be able to be reused at once. The detection limit of the described prototype system can be estimated as low as a few mBq=L (for one day counting) to several mBq=L for 5 h counting and currently achieved energy resolution amounts to ΔEFW HM/Eα = 2.3% for pulse height spectra of 5.486 MeV α-particles emitted by 241Am, measured directly in water. (authors)

  10. Combining optogenetic stimulation and fMRI to validate a multivariate dynamical systems model for estimating causal brain interactions.

    Ryali, Srikanth; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Chen, Tianwen; Kochalka, John; Albaugh, Daniel; Fang, Zhongnan; Supekar, Kaustubh; Lee, Jin Hyung; Menon, Vinod

    2016-05-15

    MRI. More generally, our study demonstrates that the combined use of optogenetics and fMRI provides a powerful new tool for evaluating computational methods designed to estimate causal interactions between distributed brain regions. PMID:26934644

  11. All-weather estimates of the land surface skin temperatures from combined analyses of microwave and infrared satellite observations

    Jimenez, C.; Aires, F.; Prigent, C.; Catherinot, J.; Rossow, W. B.

    2011-12-01

    The surface skin temperature (Ts) is a key parameter at the land-atmosphere interface. Global datasets of Ts are traditionally estimated from satellite infrared radiance observations, under clear sky conditions. First, the inter-comparison of different IR land surface temperature satellite datasets (ISCCP, MODIS, and AIRS) is presented, along with an evaluation with in situ measurements at selected stations archived during CEOP (Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period). The objective is to assess the accuracy of the Ts estimates, and to evidence the major error sources in the retrieval. Results show that the major sources of differences between the different satellite products come from instrument calibration differences, especially for high Ts, followed by the impact of the water vapor treatment in the algorithm, and the differences in surface emissivities. The main limitation of satellite infrared measurements of Ts is their inability to penetrate clouds, limiting them to clear conditions. Microwave wavelengths, being much less affected by clouds than the infrared, are an attractive alternative in cloudy regions as they can be used to derive an all-sky skin Ts product. A neural network inversion scheme has been developed to retrieve surface Ts along with atmospheric water vapor, cloud liquid water, and surface emissivities over land from a combined analysis of Special Sensor Microwave /Imager (SSM/I) and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) data. In the absence of routine in situ Ts measurements, retrieved all-weather Ts values are first evaluated globally by comparison to the surface air temperature (Tair) measured by the meteorological station network. The Ts-Tair difference from the global comparisons showed all the expected variations with solar flux, soil characteristics, and cloudiness. This evaluation has been recently extended locally at a few sites by using the Ts in-situ measurements from several CEOP stations representing different

  12. Combining remote sensing and GIS climate modelling to estimate daily forest evapotranspiration in a Mediterranean mountain area

    J. Cristóbal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration monitoring allows us to assess the environmental stress on forest and agricultural ecosystems. Nowadays, Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS are the main techniques used for calculating evapotranspiration at catchment and regional scales. In this study we present a methodology, based on the energy balance equation (B-method, that combines remote sensing imagery with GIS climate modelling to estimate daily evapotranspiration (ETd for several dates between 2003 and 2005. The three main variables needed to compute ETd were obtained as follows: (i Land surface temperature by means of the Landsat-5 TM and Landsat-7 ETM+ thermal band, (ii air temperature by means of multiple regression analysis and spatial interpolation from meteorological ground stations data at satellite pass, and (iii net radiation by means of the radiative balance. We calculated ETd using remote sensing data at different spatial and temporal scales (TERRA/AQUA MODIS and Landsat-5 TM/Landsat-7 ETM+ and combining three different approaches to calculate the B parameter. We then compared these estimates with sap flow measurements from a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. stand in a Mediterranean mountain area. This procedure allowed us to better understand the limitations of ETd modelling and how it needs to be improved, especially in heterogeneous forest areas. The method using Landsat data resulted in a good agreement, with a mean RMSE value of about 0.6 mm day−1 and an estimation error of ±30%. The poor agreement obtained using MODIS data reveals that ETd retrieval from coarse resolution remote sensing data is troublesome in these heterogeneous areas, and therefore further research is necessary on this issue.

  13. A hierarchical model combining distance sampling and time removal to estimate detection probability during avian point counts

    Amundson, Courtney L.; Royle, J. Andrew; Handel, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Imperfect detection during animal surveys biases estimates of abundance and can lead to improper conclusions regarding distribution and population trends. Farnsworth et al. (2005) developed a combined distance-sampling and time-removal model for point-transect surveys that addresses both availability (the probability that an animal is available for detection; e.g., that a bird sings) and perceptibility (the probability that an observer detects an animal, given that it is available for detection). We developed a hierarchical extension of the combined model that provides an integrated analysis framework for a collection of survey points at which both distance from the observer and time of initial detection are recorded. Implemented in a Bayesian framework, this extension facilitates evaluating covariates on abundance and detection probability, incorporating excess zero counts (i.e. zero-inflation), accounting for spatial autocorrelation, and estimating population density. Species-specific characteristics, such as behavioral displays and territorial dispersion, may lead to different patterns of availability and perceptibility, which may, in turn, influence the performance of such hierarchical models. Therefore, we first test our proposed model using simulated data under different scenarios of availability and perceptibility. We then illustrate its performance with empirical point-transect data for a songbird that consistently produces loud, frequent, primarily auditory signals, the Golden-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla); and for 2 ptarmigan species (Lagopus spp.) that produce more intermittent, subtle, and primarily visual cues. Data were collected by multiple observers along point transects across a broad landscape in southwest Alaska, so we evaluated point-level covariates on perceptibility (observer and habitat), availability (date within season and time of day), and abundance (habitat, elevation, and slope), and included a nested point

  14. Treatment of actinide-containing organic waste

    A method has been developed for reducing the volume of organic wastes and recovering the actinide elements. The waste, together with gaseous oxygen (air) is introduced into a molten salt, preferably an alkali metal carbonate such as sodium carbonate. The bath is kept at 7500 - 10000C and 0.5 - 10 atm to thermally decompose and partially oxidize the waste, while substantially reducing its volume. The gaseous effluent, mainly carbon dioxide and water vapour, is vented to the atmosphere through a series of filters to remove trace amounts of actinide elements or particulate alkali metal salts. The remaining combustion products are entrained in the molten salt. Part of the molten salt-combustion product mixture is withdrawn and mixed with an aqueous medium. Insoluble combustion products are then removed from the aqueous medium and are leached with a mixture of hydrofluoric and nitric acids to solubilize the actinide elements. The actinide elements are easily recovered from the acid solution using conventional techniques. (DN)

  15. Actinide measurements by AMS using fluoride matrices

    Cornett, R. J.; Kazi, Z. H.; Zhao, X.-L.; Chartrand, M. G.; Charles, R. J.; Kieser, W. E.

    2015-10-01

    Actinides can be measured by alpha spectroscopy (AS), mass spectroscopy or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We tested a simple method to separate Pu and Am isotopes from the sample matrix using a single extraction chromatography column. The actinides in the column eluent were then measured by AS or AMS using a fluoride target matrix. Pu and Am were coprecipitated with NdF3. The strongest AMS beams of Pu and Am were produced when there was a large excess of fluoride donor atoms in the target and the NdF3 precipitates were diluted about 6-8 fold with PbF2. The measured concentrations of 239,240Pu and 241Am agreed with the concentrations in standards of known activity and with two IAEA certified reference materials. Measurements of 239,240Pu and 241Am made at A.E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory agree, within their statistical uncertainty, with independent measurements made using the IsoTrace AMS system. This work demonstrated that fluoride targets can produce reliable beams of actinide anions and that the measurement of actinides using fluorides agree with published values in certified reference materials.

  16. Trends in actinide processing at Hanford

    In 1989, the mission at the Hanford Site began a dramatic and sometimes painful transition. The days of production--as we used to know it--are over. Our mission officially has become waste management and environmental cleanup. This mission change didn't eliminate many jobs--in fact, budgets have grown dramatically to support the new mission. Most all of the same skilled crafts, engineers, and scientists are still required for the new mission. This change has not eliminated the need for actinide processing, but it has certainly changed the focus that our actinide chemists and process engineers have. The focus used to be on such things as increasing capacity, improving separations efficiency, and product purity. Minimizing waste had become a more important theme in recent years and it is still a very important concept in the waste management and environmental cleanup arena. However, at Hanford, a new set of words dominates the actinide process scene as we work to deal with actinides that still reside in a variety of forms at the Hanford Site. These words are repackage, stabilize, remove, store and dispose. Some key activities in each of these areas are described in this report

  17. Electronic Structure of the Actinide Metals

    Johansson, B.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1982-01-01

    itinerant to localized 5f electron behaviour calculated to take place between plutonium and americium. From experimental data it is shown that the screening of deep core-holes is due to 5f electrons for the lighter actinide elements and 6d electrons for the heavier elements. A simplified model for the full...

  18. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    The third international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Cadarache France, on 12-14 December 1994. The proceedings are presented in six sessions : an introduction session, the major programmes and international cooperation, the systems studies, the reactors fuels and targets, the chemistry and a last discussions session. (A.L.B.)

  19. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The third international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Cadarache France, on 12-14 December 1994. The proceedings are presented in six sessions : an introduction session, the major programmes and international cooperation, the systems studies, the reactors fuels and targets, the chemistry and a last discussions session. (A.L.B.)

  20. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis. If a radiological dispersive device, improvised nuclear device or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean-up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organics present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well. (author)

  1. Placental transfer of plutonium and other actinides

    The report is based on an extensive literature search. All data available from studies on placental transfer of plutonium and other actinides in man and animals have been collected and analysed, and the report presents the significant results as well as unresolved questions and knowledge gaps which may serve as a waypost to future research work. (orig./MG)

  2. ENDF/B-5 Actinides (Rev. 86)

    This document summarizes the contents of the Actinides part of the ENDF/B-5 nuclear data library released by the US National Nuclear Data Center. This library or selective retrievals of it, are available costfree from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section upon request. The present version of the library is the Revision of 1986. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  3. Spin–orbit coupling in actinide cations

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Martin, Richard L.;

    2012-01-01

    The limiting case of Russell–Saunders coupling, which leads to a maximum spin alignment for the open shell electrons, usually explains the properties of high spin ionic crystals with transition metals. For actinide compounds, the spin–orbit splitting is large enough to cause a significantly reduced...

  4. Combined Use of Airborne Lidar and DBInSAR Data to Estimate LAI in Temperate Mixed Forests

    Ross F. Nelson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine whether leaf area index (LAI in temperate mixed forests is best estimated using multiple-return airborne laser scanning (lidar data or dual-band, single-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar data (from GeoSAR alone, or both in combination. In situ measurements of LAI were made using the LiCor LAI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyzer on 61 plots (21 hardwood, 36 pine, 4 mixed pine hardwood; stand age ranging from 12-164 years; mean height ranging from 0.4 to 41.2 m in the Appomattox-Buckingham State Forest, Virginia, USA. Lidar distributional metrics were calculated for all returns and for ten one meter deep crown density slices (a new metric, five above and five below the mode of the vegetation returns for each plot. GeoSAR metrics were calculated from the X-band backscatter coefficients (four looks as well as both X- and P-band interferometric heights and magnitudes for each plot. Lidar metrics alone explained 69% of the variability in LAI, while GeoSAR metrics alone explained 52%. However, combining the lidar and GeoSAR metrics increased the R2 to 0.77 with a CV-RMSE of 0.42. This study indicates the clear potential for X-band backscatter and interferometric height (both now available from spaceborne sensors, when combined with small-footprint lidar data, to improve LAI estimation in temperate mixed forests.

  5. ACTINET: a European Network for Actinide Sciences

    Full text of publication follows: The research in Actinide sciences appear as a strategic issue for the future of nuclear systems. Sustainability issues are clearly in connection with the way actinide elements are managed (either addressing saving natural resource, or decreasing the radiotoxicity of the waste). The recent developments in the field of minor actinide P and T offer convincing indications of what could be possible options, possible future processes for the selective recovery of minor actinides. But they point out, too, some lacks in the basic understanding of key-issues (such as for instance the control An versus Ln selectivity, or solvation phenomena in organic phases). Such lacks could be real obstacles for an optimization of future processes, with new fuel compounds and facing new recycling strategies. This is why a large and sustainable work appears necessary, here in the field of basic actinide separative chemistry. And similar examples could be taken from other aspects of An science, for various applications (nuclear fuel or transmutation targets design, or migration issues,): future developments need a strong, enlarged, scientific basis. The Network ACTINET, established with the support of the European Commission, has the following objectives: - significantly improve the accessibility of the major actinide facilities to the European scientific community, and form a set of pooled facilities, as the corner-stone of a progressive integration process, - improve mobility between the member organisations, in particular between Academic Institutions and National Laboratories holding the pooled facilities, - merge part of the research programs conducted by the member institutions, and optimise the research programs and infrastructure policy via joint management procedures, - strengthen European excellence through a selection process of joint proposals, and reduce the fragmentation of the community by putting critical mass of resources and expertise on

  6. Physical chemistry and modelling of the sintering of actinide oxides

    This report gives a synthesis of the work I have carried out or to which I have numerically contributed to from 1996 up to 2012 in the Department of Plutonium Uranium and minor Actinides in Cadarache CEA Center. Their main goal is the study and the modeling of the sintering process of nuclear fuels which is the unifying thread of this document. Both in order to take into account the physical and chemical features of the actinide bearing oxide material and in order to combine the different transport phenomena leading to sintering, a sub-granular scale model is under development. Extension to a varying chemical composition as well as exchanges with the gaseous phase are foreseen. A simulation on a larger scale (pellet scale) is ongoing in the framework of a PhD thesis. Validation means have been tested with (U,Pu)O2 material on the scale of the pellet (Small Angle Neutron Diffusion), on the scale of powder granules (X-Ray High Resolution Micro-Tomography) and with CeO2 at the 'Institut de Chimie Separative' in Marcoule on a single crystal scale (Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope). The required microstructure homogeneity for nuclear fuels has led to a campaign of experimental studies about the role of Cr2O3 as a sintering aid. Whole of these studies improve our understanding of fuel sintering and hence leads to an improved mastering of this process. (author)

  7. Spectrophotometric method development and validatio n for simultaneous estimation of salbutamol sulphate and Ambroxol Hydrochloride in combined dosage Forms

    Sharma Deepak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Salbutamol Sulphate and Ambroxol Hydrochloride is usedfor the treatment of bronchitis, cough and asthma. A simple, economical, accurate and precise method for simultaneous estimation of Salbutamol Sulphate and Ambroxol Hydrochloride in combined dosage form has been developed. Simultaneous equation method based on measurement of absorbance at two wavelengths i.e. 244 nm and 276 nm, λmaxof Ambroxol Hydrochloride and Salbutamol Sulphate in 6.8 pH phosphate buffer. Both these drugs obeyed Beer Lambert’s law in the concentration range of 2-18 μg/ml for Ambroxol Hydrochloride and 10-100 μg/ml for Salbutamol Sulphate. The high values of correlation coefficient (R2 indicated good linearity of calibration curve for both the drugs. The accuracy and precision of method was determined and the method validated statistically. Result of percentage recovery study confirms the accuracy of proposed method. As per the ICH guidelines, the method validation parameters checked were linearity, accuracy, precision and assay of drug formulation. Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that the proposed UV-Spectrophotometric methods for simultaneous determination of Salbutamol Sulphate and Ambroxol Hydrochloride is rapid, economical, accurate, precise and reproducible. Hence, the proposed method can be employed for quantitative determination ofSalbutamol Sulphate and Ambroxol Hydrochloride in combined dose tablet formulation. Simultaneous equation method can be used to carry out dissolution study in combination tablet formulation of these drugs.

  8. Combining the soilwater balance and water-level fluctuation methods to estimate natural groundwater recharge: Practical aspects

    Sophocleous, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A relatively simple and practical approach for calculating groundwater recharge in semiarid plain environments with a relatively shallow water table, such as the Kansas Prairies, is outlined. Major uncertainties in the Darcian, water balance, and groundwater fluctuation analysis approaches are outlined, and a combination methodology for reducing some of the uncertainties is proposed. By combining a storm-based soilwater balance (lasting several days) with the resulting water table rise, effective storativity values of the region near the water table are obtained. This combination method is termed the 'hybrid water-fluctuation method'. Using a simple average of several such estimates results in a site-calibrated effective storativity value that can be used to translate each major water-table rise tied to a specific storm period into a corresponding amount of groundwater recharge. Examples of soilwater balance and water-level fluctuation analyses based on field-measured data from Kansas show that the proposed methodology gives better and more reliable results than either of the two well-established approaches used singly. ?? 1991.

  9. Ternary phase equilibria in the systems actinide-transition metal-carbon and actinide metal-nitrogen

    Isothermal sections in the ternary phase diagrams of actinide-transition metal-carbon and actinide-transition metal-nitrogen systems are compiled on the basis of new phase studies, using thermodynamic data of carbides and nitrides, and considering the structure and lattice parameters of binary compounds. The lack of experimental results is compensated by estimating the solution behaviour and the phase stabilities. Phase diagrams are given for the systems: Th-(U or Pu)-C, U-(Th or Pu)-N, (Th or U or Pu)-Y-C, (Th or U or Pu)-Ce-C, (Th or U or Pu)-Y-N, (Th or U or Pu)-Ce-N, U-(La or Ce or Pr or Nd)-N, (Th or U or Pu)-Ti-C, (Th or U or Pu)-Zr-C, (Th or U or Pu)-Nb-C, (Th or U or Pu)-Mo-C, U-(Ti or Zr or Hf or Mo)-N, (Th or Pu)-Zr-N, (Th or U or Pu)-Cr-N and (Th or U or Pu)-(Ru or Rh or Pd)-C. Of particular interest is the occurrence of ternary carbides and nitrides. (orig.)

  10. Library of Recommended Actinide Decay Data, 2011

    A major objective of the nuclear data programme within the IAEA is to devise and promote improvements in the quality of nuclear data used in science and technology. Work of this nature was performed by participants in an IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) formulated in 2005 to produce an updated decay data library of important actinides recommended for adoption in various nuclear applications. The specific objectives of this project were to improve the accuracy of heavy element and actinide decay data in order to: determine more accurately the effects of these recommended data on fission reactor fuel cycles; aid in improved assessments of nuclear waste management procedures; provide more reliable decay data for nuclear safeguards; assess with greater confidence the environmental impact of specific actinides and other heavy element radionuclides generated through their decay chains; and extend the scientific knowledge of actinide decay characteristics for nuclear physics research and non-energy applications. Some CRP participants were able to perform a number of highly precise measurements, based on the availability of suitable source materials, and systematic in depth evaluations of the requested decay data. These requested data consisted primarily of half-lives, and α, β-, EC/β+, Auger electron, conversion electron, X ray and γ ray energies and emission probabilities, all with uncertainties expressed at the 1σ confidence level. The IAEA established a CRP entitled Updated Decay Data Library for Actinides in mid-2005. During the course of discussions at the coordinated research meetings, the participants agreed to undertake work programmes of measurements and evaluations, to be completed by the end of 2010. The results of the evaluation studies undertaken by the CRP are presented in Annex I. Annexes II-V include descriptions of the sources of the evaluated decay data and each individual evaluation process in detail, as well as data files in the Evaluated

  11. Chromatographic development of validated analytical method for the estimation of tapentadol and paracetamol in combined dosage form

    Manoj S. Charde; Ashwini A. Patil; Jitendra Kumar; A. S. Welankiwar; R. D. Chakole

    2014-01-01

    A simple, sensitive an isocratic RP-HPLC method for the estimation of  TAP (Tapentadol) and PARA (Paracetamol) in combined dosage form using Inertsil ODS C-18 column (250×4.6 mm, 5 µ) in an isocratic mode with mobile phase comprising  Buffer (1mL TEA) :  ACN : MeOH in the ratio of (75:20:5 v/v/v). The flow rate was 1.2 mL/ min and effluent was monitored at 220 nm. The retention times were found to be 6.88 min for TAP and 3.78 min for PARA. The assay exhibited a linear dynamic range of 11.89- ...

  12. Chromatographic development of validated analytical method for the estimation of tapentadol and paracetamol in combined dosage form

    Manoj S. Charde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, sensitive an isocratic RP-HPLC method for the estimation of  TAP (Tapentadol and PARA (Paracetamol in combined dosage form using Inertsil ODS C-18 column (250×4.6 mm, 5 µ in an isocratic mode with mobile phase comprising  Buffer (1mL TEA :  ACN : MeOH in the ratio of (75:20:5 v/v/v. The flow rate was 1.2 mL/ min and effluent was monitored at 220 nm. The retention times were found to be 6.88 min for TAP and 3.78 min for PARA. The assay exhibited a linear dynamic range of 11.89- 28.55 µg/mL for TAP and 64.95- 155.90 µg/mL for PARA.

  13. Mean and Seasonal Circulation of the South Indian Ocean Estimated by Combining Satellite Altimetry and Surface Drifter Observations

    N. Peter Benny

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mean velocity field of south Indian Ocean has been derived by combining high resolution maps of sea level anomalies and the surface drifter data from the Global Drifter program from 1993 to 2012 with a resolution of 1/3 _ 1/3 degrees in latitude and longitude. The estimated mean velocity field exhibits strong western boundary currents, zonal currents and eastern boundary currents. The Agulhas Current shows a velocity of above 1.5 m s-1 at around _ The distribution of energy associated with the fluctuating motion and the mean flow illustrates that mesoscale variability are particularly relevant in the Mozambique Channel, south of Java and around _ Advection of mesoscale features along the western boundary is evident in the distribution of eddy fluxes. The long-term average monthly surface velocity field exhibits large variations in surface currents. The most change is observed in the South Equatorial Current which shows spatial and temporal variations.

  14. Estimation of Regional Forest Aboveground Biomass Combining Icesat-Glas Waveforms and HJ-1A/HSI Hyperspectral Imageries

    Xing, Yanqiu; Qiu, Sai; Ding, Jianhua; Tian, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Estimation of forest aboveground biomass (AGB) is a critical challenge for understanding the global carbon cycle because it dominates the dynamics of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) system has a unique capability for estimating accurately forest canopy height, which has a direct relationship and can provide better understanding to the forest AGB. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) onboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) is the first polarorbiting LiDAR instrument for global observations of Earth, and it has been widely used for extracting forest AGB with footprints of nominally 70 m in diameter on the earth's surface. However, the GLAS footprints are discrete geographically, and thus it has been restricted to produce the regional full coverage of forest AGB. To overcome the limit of discontinuity, the Hyper Spectral Imager (HSI) of HJ-1A with 115 bands was combined with GLAS waveforms to predict the regional forest AGB in the study. Corresponding with the field investigation in Wangqing of Changbai Mountain, China, the GLAS waveform metrics were derived and employed to establish the AGB model, which was used further for estimating the AGB within GLAS footprints. For HSI imagery, the Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF) method was used to decrease noise and reduce the dimensionality of spectral bands, and consequently the first three of MNF were able to offer almost 98% spectral information and qualified to regress with the GLAS estimated AGB. Afterwards, the support vector regression (SVR) method was employed in the study to establish the relationship between GLAS estimated AGB and three of HSI MNF (i.e. MNF1, MNF2 and MNF3), and accordingly the full covered regional forest AGB map was produced. The results showed that the adj.R2 and RMSE of SVR-AGB models were 0.75 and 4.68 t hm-2 for broadleaf forests, 0.73 and 5.39 t hm-2 for coniferous forests and 0.71 and 6.15 t hm-2 for mixed forests respectively. The

  15. Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides

    Van Der Sluys, William G.; Burns, Carol J.; Smith, David C.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

  16. Adventures in Actinide Chemistry: A Year of Exploring Uranium and Thorium in Los Alamos

    Pagano, Justin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-08

    The first part of this collection of slides is concerned with considerations when working with actinides. The topics discussed in the document as a whole are the following: Actinide chemistry vs. transition metal chemistry--tools we can use; New synthetic methods to obtain actinide hydrides; Actinide metallacycles: synthesis, structure, and properties; and Reactivity of actinide metallacycles.

  17. Adventures in Actinide Chemistry: A Year of Exploring Uranium and Thorium in Los Alamos

    The first part of this collection of slides is concerned with considerations when working with actinides. The topics discussed in the document as a whole are the following: Actinide chemistry vs. transition metal chemistry--tools we can use; New synthetic methods to obtain actinide hydrides; Actinide metallacycles: synthesis, structure, and properties; and Reactivity of actinide metallacycles.

  18. Distributed Least-Squares Estimation of a Remote Chemical Source via Convex Combination in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Meng-Li Cao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the problem of locating a continuous chemical source using the concentration measurements provided by a wireless sensor network (WSN. Such a problem exists in various applications: eliminating explosives or drugs, detecting the leakage of noxious chemicals, etc. The limited power and bandwidth of WSNs have motivated collaborative in-network processing which is the focus of this paper. We propose a novel distributed least-squares estimation (DLSE method to solve the chemical source localization (CSL problem using a WSN. The DLSE method is realized by iteratively conducting convex combination of the locally estimated chemical source locations in a distributed manner. Performance assessments of our method are conducted using both simulations and real experiments. In the experiments, we propose a fitting method to identify both the release rate and the eddy diffusivity. The results show that the proposed DLSE method can overcome the negative interference of local minima and saddle points of the objective function, which would hinder the convergence of local search methods, especially in the case of locating a remote chemical source.

  19. Status of advanced reprocessing and minor actinide partitioning research in the United Kingdom

    The UK has a long track record in research and development (R and D) related to nuclear fuel reprocessing and in particular the PUREX process. Over the last two decades R and D has been focused towards supporting the continued operations of the two reprocessing plants at the Sellafield site, reprocessing uranium metal Magnox and uranium oxide fuels, and the development of advanced PUREX processes for future fuel cycles. Specifically, the development of single cycle reprocessing flowsheets aimed at co-processing uranium, neptunium and plutonium has been a major target. More recently, mainly through participation in European framework projects, there has been significant growth in industrial (national laboratory) and academic (university) research in minor actinide partitioning and pyrochemical processing. Some significant highlights from these European collaborations include the synthesis of a range of soft donor ligands which show extraordinary selectivity for trivalent actinides over the trivalent lanthanides and the development of a new grouped actinide extraction (GANEX) process using a combination of TODGA and DMDOHEMA ligands in the organic phase. Additional recent highlights are the UK-based MBASE and REFINE projects, focusing respectively on probing the molecular basis of aqueous separations and networking groups interested in pyrochemical actinide separations. (authors)

  20. Selective extraction of trivalent actinides from lanthanides using dicyclohexyldithiophosphinic acid and tributylphosphate

    In a previous study we showed that the three dithiophosphinic acids: dicyclohexyldithio-phosphinic acid (HDCHDTP), diphenyldithiophosphinic acid (HDPhDTP), and bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)-dithiophosphinic acid (Cyanex trademark 301) in combination with the synergist tributylphosphate (TBP) could selectively extract trivalent actinides (represented by 241Am) from lanthanides (represented by 152Eu). This study was based on the premise that actinides form more stable complexes with ligands containing soft donor atoms than lanthanides due to a slightly greater covalent bonding component for the actinide ions. However, due to the difference in the radii of Am(III) (1.07 Angstrom) and Eu(III) (0.95 Angstrom), it was necessary to extend the study to include a wider variety of lanthanides to show that the ion radius size was not an important factor in these extractions. In this study the most promising of the three dithiophosphinic acids, HDCHDTP, was used along with the synergist TBP to selectively extract 241Am-from 152Eu, 141Ce, and 88Y (acting as a pseudolanthanide). Large separation factors (up to 540 to 980 depending on the Ln) between the extraction of the actinides over the lanthanides were still observed proving that ionic radius was not the important factor in these extractions

  1. Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Law, Beverly E.; Litvak, Marcy; Ma, Siyan; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Noormets, Asko; Oechel, Walter C.; Oren, Ram; Richardson, Andrew D.; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Starr, Gregory; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.; Paw, Kyaw; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2008-10-01

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a modified regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using eddy flux NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE well (r = 0.73, p < 0.001). We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day interval in 2005 using spatially explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE as determined from measurements and the literature. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets over large areas.

  2. Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous UnitedStates by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Law, Beverly E.; Richardson, Andrew D.; Chen, Jiquan; Oren, Ram; Starr, Gregory; Noormets, Asko; Ma, Siyan; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Falk, Matthias; Fischer, Marc L.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Litvak, Marcy; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Oechel, Walter C.; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2009-03-06

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely-sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board NASA's Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE reasonably well at the site level. We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day period in 2005 using spatially-explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets for large areas.

  3. Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    Xiao, Jingfeng [ORNL; Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Richardson, Andrew D [ORNL; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Oren, Ram [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale.We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a modified regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using eddy flux NEE data over the periods 2000 2004 and 2005 2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE well (r = 0.73, p < 0.001). We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day interval in 2005 using spatially explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE as determined from measurements and the literature. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets over large areas.

  4. Actinide-only burnup credit for spent fuel transport

    A conservative methodology is described that would allow taking credit for burn up in the criticality safety analysis of spent nuclear fuel packages. Requirements for its implementation include isotopic and criticality validation, generation of package loading criteria using limiting parameters, and assembly burn up verification by measurement. The method allows credit for the changes in the 234U, 235U, 236U, 238U, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, and 241Am concentrations with burnup. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. Analyses are included regarding the methodology's financial benefits and conservative margin. It is estimated that the proposed actinide-only burnup credit methodology would save 20% of the transport costs. Nevertheless, the methodology includes a substantial margin. Conservatism due to the isotopic correction factors, limiting modelling parameters, limiting axial profiles and exclusion of the fission products ranges from 10 to 25% k. (author)

  5. Use of Bayesian Networks to Combine USGS Surface Water Observations with Hydraulic Geometry Models towards Riverine Discharge Estimation

    Holland, K. T.; Palmsten, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a probabilistic framework for riverine discharge estimation that describes more than 725,000 average daily streamflow observations from the U.S. Geological Survey's Surface Water Field Measurement Program at 1999 sites located throughout the continental United States and collected since 2000. These data, combined with geomorphic parameter information obtained from the National Hydrography Dataset and the National Elevation Dataset, were used to train Bayesian Networks consisting of 9-15 parameters. Hydraulic geometry relationships were used to constrain power law coefficients such that observed time series representing the measured daily discharge could be correlated with synthetic time series governing hydraulic width, depth and velocity at each site. This approach allows the training set to represent natural flow conditions and not the somewhat irregular timing of the field surveys. Sensitivity analysis of network is presented, along with over 500 worldwide validation cases to demonstrate network accuracy when confidently constrained. Making discharge predictions that combine field data with empirical relations though the use of a probabilistic framework is advantageous in that it explicitly accounts for uncertainty in the interpretation of results. This allows objective assessment of the predictive performance when applied to qualitative decisions relevant to environmental managers.

  6. Quantitative microbial risk assessment combined with hydrodynamic modelling to estimate the public health risk associated with bathing after rainfall events.

    Eregno, Fasil Ejigu; Tryland, Ingun; Tjomsland, Torulv; Myrmel, Mette; Robertson, Lucy; Heistad, Arve

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the public health risk from exposure to infectious microorganisms at Sandvika recreational beaches, Norway and dose-response relationships by combining hydrodynamic modelling with Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA). Meteorological and hydrological data were collected to produce a calibrated hydrodynamic model using Escherichia coli as an indicator of faecal contamination. Based on average concentrations of reference pathogens (norovirus, Campylobacter, Salmonella, Giardia and Cryptosporidium) relative to E. coli in Norwegian sewage from previous studies, the hydrodynamic model was used for simulating the concentrations of pathogens at the local beaches during and after a heavy rainfall event, using three different decay rates. The simulated concentrations were used as input for QMRA and the public health risk was estimated as probability of infection from a single exposure of bathers during the three consecutive days after the rainfall event. The level of risk on the first day after the rainfall event was acceptable for the bacterial and parasitic reference pathogens, but high for the viral reference pathogen at all beaches, and severe at Kalvøya-small and Kalvøya-big beaches, supporting the advice of avoiding swimming in the day(s) after heavy rainfall. The study demonstrates the potential of combining discharge-based hydrodynamic modelling with QMRA in the context of bathing water as a tool to evaluate public health risk and support beach management decisions. PMID:26802355

  7. Actinides in silicate glasses and melts and on mineral surfaces: information on local co-ordination environments from XAFS spectroscopy and bond valence theory

    The impact of actinides on the environment is mitigated by their interaction with particle surfaces and by incorporation into suitable waste forms. In both cases, a fundamental knowledge of the local co-ordination environment of actinide ions is essential for understanding their stability in various near-surface environments under a range of conditions. When actinide ions are sorbed on mineral surfaces, the extent to which the ions are immobilised depends on the type of surface complex or solid precipitate that forms. When incorporated into a glass or crystalline waste form, the stability of the actinide will depend in part on its redox state and local co-ordination environment. In both cases, XAFS spectroscopy can provide unique information on the number and types of first and, in certain cases, more distant neighbours, and their geometric arrangement (including inter-atomic distances and a measure of their disorder). When this structural information from XAFS spectroscopy is combined with Pauling bond valence theory and modem bond valences corrected for bond length variations, it is also possible to develop plausible models for their medium-range co-ordination environments (out to ≅ 4 Angstrom radial distance around the actinide) for both sorbed actinide ions and those present in a silicate glass or melt. We discuss results from several XAFS studies of the naturally occurring actinides uranium and thorium in sorption samples, silicate glasses and silicate melts at high temperature. (authors)

  8. Estimation of Heterosis and Combining Ability in F1 Hybrids of Upland Cotton for Yield and Fiber Traits

    The experimental research was conducted so as to determine the general combining ability (GCA) and specific combining ability (SCA) estimates and heterotic effects for seed cotton yield and fibre traits in 5 x 5 half diallel crosses of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). The parental genotypes studied were; CRIS-134, IR-3701, IR-1524, FH-113 and MG-6. The characters such as bolls/plant, sympodial branches/plant, boll weight (g), plant height (cm), fibre length (mm), seed cotton yield/plant (g), seed index (g) and ginning out turn percentage were studied. The experiment was laid-out in a randomized complete block design with four replications at experimental field of the Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, Sindh Agriculture University Tandojam, Pakistan during 2013. The results revealed that, parents and hybrids differed significantly for their mean performance regarding all the traits studied. The importance of heterotic effects was evident from the significance of parents vs. hybrids performance. The variances due to GCA and SCA were significant for all the traits except that GCA was non-significant for boll weight only whereas, SCA was non-significant for boll weight, seed index and ginning out turn percentage. The significance of GCA indicated the importance of additive genes advocating the traits while, the involvement of non-additive genes was evident from the significance of SCA variances. The GCA variances were greater than SCA for bolls per plant, plant height, seed cotton yield and lint percentage while, SCA variances were higher than GCA for sympodial branches/plant and fibre length. Parents IR-3701, FH-113 and MG-6 displayed higher positive GCA effects for bolls/plant, sympodial branches/plant, fibre length, seed cotton yield, seed index and ginning out turn percentage. The per se performance of these three parents was exactly reflected in their GCA effects and such happenings are exceptional. Such results suggested that, all three parents were

  9. Rapid construction of pinhole SPECT system matrices by distance-weighted Gaussian interpolation method combined with geometric parameter estimations

    Lee, Ming-Wei; Chen, Yi-Chun, E-mail: ycchen@dop.ncu.edu.tw

    2014-02-11

    In pinhole SPECT applied to small-animal studies, it is essential to have an accurate imaging system matrix, called H matrix, for high-spatial-resolution image reconstructions. Generally, an H matrix can be obtained by various methods, such as measurements, simulations or some combinations of both methods. In this study, a distance-weighted Gaussian interpolation method combined with geometric parameter estimations (DW-GIMGPE) is proposed. It utilizes a simplified grid-scan experiment on selected voxels and parameterizes the measured point response functions (PRFs) into 2D Gaussians. The PRFs of missing voxels are interpolated by the relations between the Gaussian coefficients and the geometric parameters of the imaging system with distance-weighting factors. The weighting factors are related to the projected centroids of voxels on the detector plane. A full H matrix is constructed by combining the measured and interpolated PRFs of all voxels. The PRFs estimated by DW-GIMGPE showed similar profiles as the measured PRFs. OSEM reconstructed images of a hot-rod phantom and normal rat myocardium demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method. The detectability of a SKE/BKE task on a synthetic spherical test object verified that the constructed H matrix provided comparable detectability to that of the H matrix acquired by a full 3D grid-scan experiment. The reduction in the acquisition time of a full 1.0-mm grid H matrix was about 15.2 and 62.2 times with the simplified grid pattern on 2.0-mm and 4.0-mm grid, respectively. A finer-grid H matrix down to 0.5-mm spacing interpolated by the proposed method would shorten the acquisition time by 8 times, additionally. -- Highlights: • A rapid interpolation method of system matrices (H) is proposed, named DW-GIMGPE. • Reduce H acquisition time by 15.2× with simplified grid scan and 2× interpolation. • Reconstructions of a hot-rod phantom with measured and DW-GIMGPE H were similar. • The imaging study of normal

  10. Minor actinide transmutation on PWR burnable poison rods

    Highlights: • Key issues associated with MA transmutation are the appropriate loading pattern. • Commercial PWRs are the only choice to transmute MAs in large scale currently. • Considerable amount of MA can be loaded to PWR without disturbing keff markedly. • Loading MA to PWR burnable poison rods for transmutation is an optimal loading pattern. - Abstract: Minor actinides are the primary contributors to long term radiotoxicity in spent fuel. The majority of commercial reactors in operation in the world are PWRs, so to study the minor actinide transmutation characteristics in the PWRs and ultimately realize the successful minor actinide transmutation in PWRs are crucial problem in the area of the nuclear waste disposal. The key issues associated with the minor actinide transmutation are the appropriate loading patterns when introducing minor actinides to the PWR core. We study two different minor actinide transmutation materials loading patterns on the PWR burnable poison rods, one is to coat a thin layer of minor actinide in the water gap between the zircaloy cladding and the stainless steel which is filled with water, another one is that minor actinides substitute for burnable poison directly within burnable poison rods. Simulation calculation indicates that the two loading patterns can load approximately equivalent to 5–6 PWR annual minor actinide yields without disturbing the PWR keff markedly. The PWR keff can return criticality again by slightly reducing the boric acid concentration in the coolant of PWR or removing some burnable poison rods without coating the minor actinide transmutation materials from PWR core. In other words, loading minor actinide transmutation material to PWR does not consume extra neutron, minor actinide just consumes the neutrons which absorbed by the removed control poisons. Both minor actinide loading patterns are technically feasible; most importantly do not need to modify the configuration of the PWR core and

  11. Advanced techniques in actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2014). Abstract book

    In 2012, The Institute of Resource Ecology at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf organized the first international workshop of Advanced Techniques in Actinide Spectroscopy (ATAS). A very positive feedback and the wish for a continuation of the workshop were communicated from several participants to the scientific committee during the workshop and beyond. Today, the ATAS workshop has been obviously established as an international forum for the exchange of progress and new experiences on advanced spectroscopic techniques for international actinide and lanthanide research. In comparison to already established workshops and conferences on the field of radioecology, one main focus of ATAS is to generate synergistic effects and to improve the scientific discussion between spectroscopic experimentalists and theoreticians. The exchange of ideas in particular between experimental and theoretical applications in spectroscopy and the presentation of new analytical techniques are of special interest for many research institutions working on the improvement of transport models of toxic elements in the environment and the food chain as well as on reprocessing technologies of nuclear and non-nuclear waste. Spectroscopic studies in combination with theoretical modelling comprise the exploration of molecular mechanisms of complexation processes in aqueous or organic phases and of sorption reactions of the contaminants on mineral surfaces to obtain better process understanding on a molecular level. As a consequence, predictions of contaminant's migration behaviour will become more reliable and precise. This can improve the monitoring and removal of hazardous elements from the environment and hence, will assist strategies for remediation technologies and risk assessment. Particular emphasis is placed on the results of the first inter-laboratory Round-Robin test on actinide spectroscopy (RRT). The main goal of RRT is the comprehensive molecular analysis of the actinide complex

  12. Towards a mechanistic understanding of actinide retention by cementitious materials

    Full text of publication follows. Calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) are considered to be the most important constituent of hardened cement paste (HCP) with respect to their abundance and the diversity of structural sites exposed for cation and anion binding. Furthermore, C-S-H phases may control the long term release of radionuclides due to their stability during the evolution of the cementitious near field. The retention of Nd (III) by crystalline C-S-H phases has been studied by combined use of wet chemical methods, synchrotron based spectroscopic, laboratory-based X-ray diffraction techniques and an appropriate theoretical approach. The investigations enable us to propose a mechanistic model for the immobilisation of trivalent lanthanides and actinides in crystalline C-S-H phases. (authors)

  13. Actinides in Solution: Disproportionation, Strong Correlations, and Emergence

    Marston, Brad; Horowitz, Steven

    2010-03-01

    Plutonium in acid solutions can be found in oxidation states III through VI. There is a striking near perfect degeneracy of the reduction-oxidation (redox) potentials, each being about 1 volt. Neptunium is the only other element that approaches this degree of degeneracy. One consequence of the redox degeneracy is a marked tendency of plutonium ions to disproportionate; up to four different oxidation states can coexist simultaneously in the same solution, greatly complicating the environmental chemistry of the element. While the degeneracy could simply be a coincidence, it could also be the manifestation of a higher-level organizing principle at work. Other systems that exhibit disproportionation raise the possibility of an emergent negative-U attractive interaction. The hypothesis is tested by combining first-principles relativistic density-functional calculations using the Amsterdam Density Functional (ADF) package with exact diagonalizations of Hubbard-like models of the strong correlations between the actinide 5f electrons.

  14. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    NONE

    1991-07-01

    The first international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Mito in Japan, on 6-8 November 1990. It starts with a number of general overview papers to give us some broad perspectives. Following that it takes a look at some basic facts about physics and about the quantities of materials it is talking about. Then it proceeds to some specific aspects of partitioning, starting with evolution from today commercially applied processes and going on to other possibilities. At the end of the third session it takes a look at the significance of partitioning and transmutation of actinides before it embarks on two sessions on transmutation, first in reactors and second in accelerators. The last session is designed to throw back into the discussion the main points which need to be looked at when considering future work in this area. (A.L.B.)

  15. Interaction of actinide cations with synthetic polyelectrolytes

    The binding of Am+3, Th+4 and UO2+2 to polymaleic acid, polyethylenemaleic acid and polymethylvinylethermaleic acid has been measured by a solvent extraction technique at 250C and either 0.02 or 0.10 M ionic strength. The solutions were buffered over a pH range such that the percent of carboxylate groups ionized ranged from 25 to 74%. The binding was described by two constants, β1 and β2, which were evaluated after correction for complexation of the actinide cations by acetate and hydrolysis. For comparable degrees of ionization, all three polyelectrolytes showed similar binding strengths. In general, these results indicated that the binding of actinides to these synthetic polyelectrolytes is basically similar to that of natural polyelectrolytes such as humic and fulvic acids. (orig.)

  16. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    The first international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Mito in Japan, on 6-8 November 1990. It starts with a number of general overview papers to give us some broad perspectives. Following that it takes a look at some basic facts about physics and about the quantities of materials it is talking about. Then it proceeds to some specific aspects of partitioning, starting with evolution from today commercially applied processes and going on to other possibilities. At the end of the third session it takes a look at the significance of partitioning and transmutation of actinides before it embarks on two sessions on transmutation, first in reactors and second in accelerators. The last session is designed to throw back into the discussion the main points which need to be looked at when considering future work in this area. (A.L.B.)

  17. Method to determine actinide pollution in water

    This patent describes a process for measuring small amounts, of actinide pollution in fluidic samples by use of solid state track recording devices. It comprises: containing a sample to be tested, containing small amounts of less than 3E-12 Curies per cubic centimeter of actinide pollution, in a sample cell defining an internal chamber and having means for ingress and egress and means for establishing a fluidic sample therein, the sample cell being substantially transparent to thermal neutron radiation and the internal chamber defined therein being configured to constitute a fluidic sample therein as an asymptotic fluid fission source; positioning a solid state track recorder within the internal chamber defined by the sample cell, so that the solid state track recorder has a radiation viewing window through an asymptotic thickness of a fluidic sample contained in the sample cell; capturing at least an asymptotic amount of fluidic sample in the sample cell

  18. Microbial Transformations of Actinides and Other Radionuclides

    Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C. J.

    2009-01-07

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides and other radionuclides released from nuclear fuel cycle and from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution in the environment and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes and biochemical mechanisms which affect the stability and mobility of radionuclides. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, the fission products and other radionuclides such as Ra, Tc, I, Cs, Sr, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

  19. Actinides: from heavy fermions to plutonium metallurgy

    The actinide elements mark the emergence of 5f electrons. The f electrons possess sufficiently unusual characteristics that their participation in atomic binding often result in dramatic changes in properties. This provides an excellent opportunity to study the question of localization of electrons; a question that is paramount in predicting the physical and chemical properties of d and f electron transition metals. The transition region between localized (magnetic) and itinerant (often superconducting) behavior provides for many interesting phenomena such as structural instabilities (polymorphism), spin fluctuations, mixed valences, charge density waves, exceptional catalytic activity and hydrogen storage. This region offers most interesting behavior such as that exhibited by the actinide compounds UBe13 and UPt3. Both compounds are heavy-fermion superconductors in which both magnetic and superconducting behavior exist in the same electrons. The consequences of f-electron bonding (which appears greatest at Plutonium) show dramatic effects on phase stability, alloying behavior, phase transformations and mechanical behavior

  20. Actinide co-ordination and discrimination by human transferrin

    The design and evaluation of synthetic chelating agents which are specific for the actinide(IV) ions are described. The initial approach has been based on the biological and chemical similarities of Pu(IV) and Fe(III). In particular, using a philosophy influenced by naturally occurring ferric ion chelating agents, tetracatechoylamide ligands have been developed for the actinides. The test of the degree to which there was an actinide-specific complexing agent has been based on studies using Pu4+ as a biological contaminant. For a chelating agent to be able to sequester actinides effectively, it must remove actinides from actinide(IV)-protein complexes. The complexation chemistry of Th(IV)-transferrin system is described. The evidence suggests that, based on a size criterion, Th(IV) may be a poor biological model for Pu(IV) in some cases, with U(IV) being a somewhat better model. (author)

  1. Actinides reduction by recycling in a thermal reactor

    This work is directed towards the evaluation of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle in which radioactive actinides could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material; firstly a production reference of actinides in standard nuclear fuel of uranium at the end of its burning in a BWR reactor is established, after a fuel containing plutonium is modeled to also calculate the actinides production in MOX fuel type. Also it proposes a design of fuel rod containing 6% of actinides in a matrix of uranium from the tails of enrichment, then four standard uranium fuel rods are replaced by actinides rods to evaluate the production and transmutation thereof, the same procedure was performed in the fuel type MOX and the end actinide reduction in the fuel was evaluated. (Author)

  2. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The fourth international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Mito City in Japan, on 111-13 September 1996. The proceedings are presented in six sessions: the major programmes and international cooperation, the partitioning and transmutation programs, feasibility studies, particular separation processes, the accelerator driven transmutation, and the chemistry of the fuel cycle. (A.L.B.)

  3. The actinide waste problem in perspective

    The long lived alpha emitting actinide waste nuclides of transplutonium elements such as Np, Am, Cm etc (also called Byproduct Actinides or BPA for short) which are proposed to be disposed of as part of High Active Waste (HAW) in deep underground geological repositories has been a persistent source of concern to opponents and critics of nuclear fission energy. In this context the recent finding of the authors that each and every transuranium nuclide, without exception, can independently support a self sustaining chain reaction raises the important philosophical question: Is it justified to continue to refer to these nuclides as nuclear waste ? Our computations have revealed that the Ksub(eff) of an assembly of each of these nuclides increases linearly with the fissility parameter (Z2/A), its threshold value for Ksub(eff) to exceed unity being 34.1 for fissile (odd neutron) nuclides and 34.9 for fissible (even neutron) nuclides. In other words higher the (Z2/A) better is its performance as a fission reactor fuel. This finding suggests that the long lived actinide waste problem can be solved by separating all the actinide nuclides from the High Active Waste stream and recycling them back into any hard spectrum fission reactor. The studies strongly support the concept of partitioning-transmutation (p-t) revived with great enthusiasm in Japan under the banner of the OMEGA proposal. However it is found that there is no need to resort to any exotic devices such as proton accelerators or fusion reactor blankets for nuclear incineration. In the context of the 232Th/233U fuel cycle it is worth noting that the quantum of transuranium nuclides generated per se is smaller by several orders of magnitude as compared to that arising from 235U/238U bearing fuels. Thus on the whole it appears that in the thorium fuel cycle partitioning and recycle of byproduct nuclides would be a less cumbersome undertaking. (author). 26 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    The fourth international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Mito City in Japan, on 111-13 September 1996. The proceedings are presented in six sessions: the major programmes and international cooperation, the partitioning and transmutation programs, feasibility studies, particular separation processes, the accelerator driven transmutation, and the chemistry of the fuel cycle. (A.L.B.)

  5. SPECIFIC SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR THE ACTINIDES

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Smith, William L.; Weitl, Frederick L.; Durbin, Patricia W.; Jones, E.Sarah; Abu-Dari, Kamal; Sofen, Stephen R.; Cooper, Stephen R.

    1979-09-01

    This paper summarizes the current status of a continuing project directed toward the synthesis and characterization of chelating agents which are specific for actinide ions - especially Pu(IV) - using a biomimetic approach that relies on the observation that Pu(IV) and Fe(III) has marked similarities that include their biological transport and distribution in mammals. Since the naturally-occurring Fe(III) sequestering agents produced by microbes commonly contain hydroxamate and catecholate functional groups, these groups should complex the actinides very strongly and macrocyclic ligands incorporating these moieties are being prepared. We have reported the isolation and structure analysis of an isostructural series of tetrakis(catecholato) complexes with the general stoichiometry Na{sub 4}[M(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}){sub 4}] • 21 H{sub 2}O (M = Th, U, Ce, Hf). These complexes are structural archetypes for the cavity that must be formed if an actinide-specific sequestering agent is to conform ideally to the coordination requirements of the central metal ion. The [M(cat){sub 4}]{sup 4-} complexes have the D{sub 2d} symmetry of the trigonal-faced dodecahedron.. The complexes Th [R'C(0)N(O)R]{sub 4} have been prepared where R = isopropyl and R' = t-butyl or neopentyl. The neopentyl derivative is also relatively close to an idealized D{sub 2d} dodecahedron, while the sterically more hindered t-butyl compound is distorted toward a cubic geometry. The synthesis of a series of 2, 3-dihydroxy-benzoyl amide derivatives of linear and cyclic tetraaza- and diazaalkanes is reported. Sulfonation of these compounds improves the metal complexation and in vivo removal of plutonium from test animals. These results substantially exceed the capabilities of compounds presently used for the therapeutic treatment of actinide contamination.

  6. The electrochemical properties of actinide amalgams

    Standard potentials are selected for actinides (An) and their amalgams. From the obtained results, energy characteristics are calculated and analyzed for alloy formation in An-Hg systems. It is found that solutions of the f-elements in mercury are very close in properties to amalgams of the alkali and alkaline-earth metals, except that, for the active Group III metals, the ion skeletons have a greater number of realizable charged states in the condensed phase

  7. In vitro removal of actinide (IV) ions

    Weitl, Frederick L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    1982-01-01

    A compound of the formula: ##STR1## wherein X is hydrogen or a conventional electron-withdrawing group, particularly --SO.sub.3 H or a salt thereof; n is 2, 3, or 4; m is 2, 3, or 4; and p is 2 or 3. The present compounds are useful as specific sequestering agents for actinide (IV) ions. Also described is a method for the 2,3-dihydroxybenzamidation of azaalkanes.

  8. Strength of Coriolis alignment in actinide nuclei

    Analysis of aligned angular momenta i/sub α/(ω) in different rotational bands extracted from experimental data with a linear spin term approx.BI in the formulas for E/sub rot/(I) reveal that, in actinide nuclei in the levels with modest spin I< or =23, i/sub α/(ω) usually is very small (< or approx. =0.7), i.e., is much smaller than in rare earth nuclei

  9. Thermodynamics and biogeochemistry of lanthanides and actinides

    Periodicity of changes in specific values of heat capacity and entropy of chemical elements, lanthanides, actinides, separating or transition elements, first of all, depending on their ordinal number, was considered. It is shown that entropy minima separate the chemical elements into light-weight and more heavy ones. The universal separation is fundamental, as it dictates the difference of the chemical elements not only in terms of thermodynamic, but also metallogenic, biogeochemical and physical properties, as well

  10. Thermal properties of minor actinide targets

    Staicu, Dragos; Somers, Joseph; FERNANDEZ CARRETERO Asuncion; KONINGS Rudy

    2014-01-01

    The thermal properties of minor actinides targets for the management of high level and long lived radioactive waste are investigated. The microstructure, thermal diffusivity and specific heat of (Pu,Am)O2, (Zr,Pu,Am)O2, (Zr,Y,Am)O2, (Zr,Y,Pu,Am)O2 and CERMETS with Mo matrix are characterised in order to assess the safety limits of these materials.

  11. Sigma Team for Advanced Actinide Recycle FY2015 Accomplishments and Directions

    Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Recycle (STAAR) has made notable progress in FY 2015 toward the overarching goal to develop more efficient separation methods for actinides in support of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) objective of sustainable fuel cycles. Research in STAAR has been emphasizing the separation of americium and other minor actinides (MAs) to enable closed nuclear fuel recycle options mainly within the paradigm of aqueous reprocessing of used oxide nuclear fuel dissolved in nitric acid. Its major scientific challenge concerns achieving selectivity for trivalent actinides vs lanthanides. Not only is this challenge yielding to research advances, but technology concepts such as ALSEP (Actinide Lanthanide Separation) are maturing toward demonstration readiness. Efforts are organized in five task areas: 1) combining bifunctional neutral extractants with an acidic extractant to form a single process solvent, developing a process flowsheet, and demonstrating it at bench scale; 2) oxidation of Am(III) to Am(VI) and subsequent separation with other multivalent actinides; 3) developing an effective soft-donor solvent system for An(III) selective extraction using mixed N,O-donor or all-N donor extractants such as triazinyl pyridine compounds; 4) testing of inorganic and hybrid-type ion exchange materials for MA separations; and 5) computer-aided molecular design to identify altogether new extractants and complexants and theory-based experimental data interpretation. Within these tasks, two strategies are employed, one involving oxidation of americium to its pentavalent or hexavalent state and one that seeks to selectively complex trivalent americium either in the aqueous phase or the solvent phase. Solvent extraction represents the primary separation method employed, though ion exchange and crystallization play an important role. Highlights of accomplishments include: Confirmation of the first-ever electrolytic oxidation of Am(III) in a

  12. Actinide behavior in a freshwater pond

    Long-term investigations of solution chemistry in an alkaline freshwater pond have revealed that actinide oxidation state behavior, particularly that of plutonium, is complex. The Pu(V,VI) fraction was predominant in solution, but it varied over the entire range reported from other natural aquatic environments, in this case, as a result of intrinsic biological and chemical cycles (redox and pH-dependent phenomena). A strong positive correlation between plutonium (Pu), but not uranium (U), and hydroxyl ion over the observation period, especially when both were known to be in higher oxidation states, was particularly notable. Coupled with other examples of divergent U and Pu behavior, this result suggests that Pu(V), or perhaps a mixture of Pu(V,VI), was the prevalent oxidation state in solution. Observations of trivalent actinide sorption behavior during an algal bloom, coupled with the association with a high-molecular weight (nominally 6000 to 10,000 mol wt) organic fraction in solution, indicate that solution-detritus cycling of organic carbon, in turn, may be the primary mechanism in amercium-curium (Am-Cm) cycling. Sorption by sedimentary materials appears to predominate over other factors controlling effective actinide solubility and may explain, at least partially, the absence of an expected strong positive correlation between carbonate and dissolved U. 49 references, 6 figures, 12 tables

  13. Nuclear data for plutonium and minor actinides

    Some experience in the usage of different evaluations of neutron constants for plutonium isotopes and minor actinides (MA) is described. That experience was obtained under designing the ABBN-93 group data set which nowadays is used widely for neutronics calculations of different cores with different spectrum and shielding. Under testing of the ABBN-93 data set through different integral and macroscopic experiments the main attention was paid to fuel nuclides and cross sections for MA practically did not verify. That gave an opportunity to change MA nuclear data for more modern without verification of the hole system. This desire appeared with new data libraries JENDL-3.2, JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-6.2, which was not accessible under designing the ABBN-93. At the same time with the reevaluation of the basic MA nuclear data the ABBN-93 and the library FOND-2 of evaluated nuclear data files, which used as the basis for retrieving of the ABBN-93 data, were added with not very important MA data. So the FOND-2 library nowadays contents nuclear data files for all actinides with the half-life time more 1 day and also those MA which produce long-life actinides

  14. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs). A top-level objective of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis program element of the DOE NERI program is to investigate spent fuel treatment and recycling options for current light water reactors (LWRs). Accordingly, this project targets to expand the traditional scope of nuclear fuel management optimization into the following two complementary specific objectives: (1) To develop a direct coupling between the pin-by-pin within-bundle loading control variables and core-wide (bundle-by-bundle) optimization objectives, (2) to extend the methodology developed to explicitly encompass control variables, objectives, and constraints designed to maximize minor actinide incineration in BWR bundles and cycles. The first specific objective is projected to 'uncover' dormant thermal margin made available by employing additional degrees of freedom within the optimization process, while the addition of minor actinides is expected to 'consume' some of the uncovered thermal margin. Therefore, a key underlying goal of this project is to effectively invest some of the uncovered thermal margin into achieving the primary objective.

  15. Ground-state electronic structure of actinide monocarbides and mononitrides

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z.;

    2009-01-01

    The self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation is used to investigate the ground-state valency configuration of the actinide ions in the actinide monocarbides, AC (A=U,Np,Pu,Am,Cm), and the actinide mononitrides, AN. The electronic structure is characterized by a gradually...... the localization transition. The calculated valence electron densities of states are in good agreement with photoemission data....

  16. Successive change regularity of actinide properties with atomic number

    The development and achievements on chemistry of actinide elements are summarised. The relations of properties of actinides to their electronic configurations of valence electronic shells are discussed. Some anomalies of solid properties, the radius contraction, the stable state effect of f7n-orbits (n = 0, 1, 2) and the tetrad effect of oxidation states, etc., with atomic number (Z) are described. 31 figures appended show directly the successive change regularity of actinide properties with Z

  17. Study on remain actinides recovery in pyro reprocessing

    The spent fuel reprocessing by dry process called pyro reprocessing have been studied. Most of U, Pu and MA (minor actinides) from the spent fuel will be recovered and be fed back to the reactor as new fuel. Accumulation of remain actinides will be separated by extraction process with liquid cadmium solvent. The research was conducted by computer simulation to calculate the stage number required. The calculation's results showed on the 20 stages extractor more than 99% actinides can be separated. (author)

  18. Spatial distribution of forest aboveground biomass in China: estimation through combination of spaceborne lidar, optical imagery, and forest inventory data

    Xue, B. L.; Su, Y.; Guo, Q.; Hu, T.; Alvarez, O.; Tao, S.; Fang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The global forest ecosystem, which acts as a large carbon sink, plays an important role in modeling the global carbon balance. An accurate estimation of the total forest carbon stock in the aboveground biomass (AGB) is therefore necessary to improve our understanding of carbon dynamics, especially against the background of global climate change. The forest area of China is among the top five globally. However, because of limitations in forest AGB mapping methods and the availability of ground inventory data, there is still a lack in nationwide wall-to-wall forest AGB estimation map for China. In this study, we collected over 8000 ground inventory data from the literature, and developed an AGB mapping method using a combination of these ground inventory data, Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS)/Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) data, optical imagery, climate surfaces, and topographic data. An uncertainty field model was introduced into the forest AGB mapping model to minimize the influence of plot locality uncertainty. Our nationwide wall-to-wall forest AGB mapping results show that the forest AGB density in China is 120 Mg/ha on average, with a standard deviation of 61 Mg/ha. Evaluation with an independent ground inventory dataset showed that our proposed method can accurately map wall-to-wall forest AGB across a large landscape. The coefficient of determination (R2) and root-mean-square error between our predicted results and the validation dataset were 0.75 and 42.39 Mg/ha, respectively. This new method and the resulting nationwide wall-to-wall AGB map will help to improve the accuracy of carbon dynamic predictions in China.

  19. Pyrometallurgical process of actinide metal

    Major subject on pyrometallurgical partitioning technology is to separate transmutation elements (TRU) from rare earth elements(RE). Distribution coefficients of TRU and RE between molten chloride and liquid cadmium were measured for reductive extraction, and TRU were separated from RE in simplified molten chloride system by electrorefining. And separation efficiency between TRU and RE were estimated by using thermodynamics data. The results indicate that uranium, neptunium and plutonium are easy to separate from RE but some amount of RE accompany americium, and that processes have to be optimized to attain good separation efficiency of TRU. (author)

  20. Pyrometallurgical process of actinide metal

    Yoo, Jae Hyung; Kang, Young Ho; Woo, Mun Sik; Hwang, Sung Chan

    1999-06-01

    Major subject on pyrometallurgical partitioning technology is to separate transmutation elements (TRU) from rare earth elements(RE). Distribution coefficients of TRU and RE between molten chloride and liquid cadmium were measured for reductive extraction, and TRU were separated from RE in simplified molten chloride system by electrorefining. And separation efficiency between TRU and RE were estimated by using thermodynamics data. The results indicate that uranium, neptunium and plutonium are easy to separate from RE but some amount of RE accompany americium, and that processes have to be optimized to attain good separation efficiency of TRU. (author)

  1. Bidentate organophosphorus solvent extraction process for actinide recovery and partition

    Schulz, Wallace W.

    1976-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction process for the recovery and partitioning of actinide values from acidic nuclear waste aqueous solutions, the actinide values including trivalent, tetravalent and hexavalent oxidation states is provided and includes the steps of contacting the aqueous solution with a bidentate organophosphorous extractant to extract essentially all of the actinide values into the organic phase. Thereafter the respective actinide fractions are selectively partitioned into separate aqueous solutions by contact with dilute nitric or nitric-hydrofluoric acid solutions. The hexavalent uranium is finally removed from the organic phase by contact with a dilute sodium carbonate solution.

  2. The 'granite encapsulation' route to the safe disposal of Pu and other actinide

    Gibb, F.G.F.; Taylor, K. J.; Burakov, B.E.

    2008-01-01

    Waste actinides, including plutonium, present a long-term management problem and a serious security issue. Immobilisation in mineral or ceramic waste forms for interim storage is a widely proposed first step. The safest, most secure geological disposal for Pu is in very deep boreholes and we propose that the key step to combination of these immobilisation and disposal concepts is encapsulation of the waste form in cylinders of recrystallized granite. We discuss the underpinning science, focus...

  3. Estimating Hantavirus Risk in Southern Argentina: A GIS-Based Approach Combining Human Cases and Host Distribution

    Veronica Andreo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We use a Species Distribution Modeling (SDM approach along with Geographic Information Systems (GIS techniques to examine the potential distribution of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS caused by Andes virus (ANDV in southern Argentina and, more precisely, define and estimate the area with the highest infection probability for humans, through the combination with the distribution map for the competent rodent host (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus. Sites with confirmed cases of HPS in the period 1995–2009 were mostly concentrated in a narrow strip (~90 km × 900 km along the Andes range from northern Neuquén to central Chubut province. This area is characterized by high mean annual precipitation (~1,000 mm on average, but dry summers (less than 100 mm, very low percentages of bare soil (~10% on average and low temperatures in the coldest month (minimum average temperature −1.5 °C, as compared to the HPS-free areas, features that coincide with sub-Antarctic forests and shrublands (especially those dominated by the invasive plant Rosa rubiginosa, where rodent host abundances and ANDV prevalences are known to be the highest. Through the combination of predictive distribution maps of the reservoir host and disease cases, we found that the area with the highest probability for HPS to occur overlaps only 28% with the most suitable habitat for O. longicaudatus. With this approach, we made a step forward in the understanding of the risk factors that need to be considered in the forecasting and mapping of risk at the regional/national scale. We propose the implementation and use of thematic maps, such as the one built here, as a basic tool allowing public health authorities to focus surveillance efforts and normally scarce resources for prevention and control actions in vast areas like southern Argentina.

  4. FY2011 Annual Report for the Actinide Isomer Detection Project

    Warren, Glen A.; Francy, Christopher J.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Erikson, Luke E.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Hatarik, R.

    2011-10-01

    This project seeks to identify a new signature for actinide element detection in active interrogation. This technique works by exciting and identifying long-lived nuclear excited states (isomers) in the actinide isotopes and/or primary fission products. Observation of isomers in the fission products will provide a signature for fissile material. For the actinide isomers, the decay time and energy of the isomeric state is unique to a particular isotope, providing an unambiguous signature for SNM. This project entails isomer identification and characterization and neutron population studies. This document summarizes activities from its third year - completion of the isomer identification characterization experiments and initialization of the neutron population experiments. The population and decay of the isomeric state in 235U remain elusive, although a number of candidate gamma rays have been identified. In the course of the experiments, a number of fission fragment isomers were populated and measured [Ressler 2010]. The decays from these isomers may also provide a suitable signature for the presence of fissile material. Several measurements were conducted throughout this project. This report focuses on the results of an experiment conducted collaboratively by PNNL, LLNL and LBNL in December 2010 at LBNL. The measurement involved measuring the gamma-rays emitted from an HEU target when bombarded with 11 MeV neutrons. This report discussed the analysis and resulting conclusions from those measurements. There was one strong candidate, at 1204 keV, of an isomeric signature of 235U. The half-life of the state is estimated to be 9.3 {mu}s. The measured time dependence fits the decay time structure very well. Other possible explanations for the 1204-keV state were investigated, but they could not explain the gamma ray. Unfortunately, the relatively limited statistics of the measurement limit, and the lack of understanding of some of the systematic of the experiment, limit

  5. A measurement of actinide neutron transmutations with accelerator mass spectrometry in order to infer neutron capture cross sections

    Bauder, William K.

    Improved neutron capture cross section data for transuranic and minor actinides are essential for assessing possibilities for next generation reactors and advanced fuel cycles. The Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAnsmutation (MANTRA) project aims to make a comprehensive set of energy integrated neutron capture cross section measurements for all relevant isotopes from Th to Cf. The ability to extract these cross sections relies on the use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to analyze isotopic concentrations in samples irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The AMS measurements were performed at the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS) and required a number of key technical developments to the ion source, accelerator, and detector setup. In particular, a laser ablation material injection system was developed at the electron cyclotron resonance ion source. This system provides a more effective method to produce ion beams from samples containing only 1% actinide material and offers some benefits for reducing cross talk in the source. A series of four actinide measurements are described in this dissertation. These measurements represent the most substantial AMS work attempted at ATLAS and the first results of the MANTRA project. Isotopic ratios for one and two neutron captures were measured in each sample with total uncertainties around 10%. These results can be combined with a MCNP model for the neutron fluence to infer actinide neutron capture cross sections.

  6. Minor Actinide Burning in Thermal Reactors. A Report by the Working Party on Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems

    The actinides (or actinoids) are those elements in the periodic table from actinium upwards. Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) are two of the principal elements in nuclear fuel that could be classed as major actinides. The minor actinides are normally taken to be the triad of neptunium (Np), americium (Am) and curium (Cm). The combined masses of the remaining actinides (i.e. actinium, thorium, protactinium, berkelium, californium, einsteinium and fermium) are small enough to be regarded as very minor trace contaminants in nuclear fuel. Those elements above uranium in the periodic table are known collectively as the transuranics (TRUs). The operation of a nuclear reactor produces large quantities of irradiated fuel (sometimes referred to as spent fuel), which is either stored prior to eventual deep geological disposal or reprocessed to enable actinide recycling. A modern light water reactor (LWR) of 1 GWe capacity will typically discharge about 20-25 tonnes of irradiated fuel per year of operation. About 93-94% of the mass of uranium oxide irradiated fuel is comprised of uranium (mostly 238U), with about 4-5% fission products and ∼1% plutonium. About 0.1-0.2% of the mass is comprised of neptunium, americium and curium. These latter elements accumulate in nuclear fuel because of neutron captures, and they contribute significantly to decay heat loading and neutron output, as well as to the overall radio-toxic hazard of spent fuel. Although the total minor actinide mass is relatively small - approximately 20-25 kg per year from a 1 GWe LWR - it has a disproportionate impact on spent fuel disposal, and thus the longstanding interest in transmuting these actinides either by fission (to fission products) or neutron capture in order to reduce their impact on the back end of the fuel cycle. The combined masses of the trace actinides actinium, thorium, protactinium, berkelium and californium in irradiated LWR fuel are only about 2 parts per billion, which is far too low for

  7. Estimation of higher order modes of INDUS-2 RF cavity using combined electromagnetic-thermal-structural simulations

    Higher order modes (HOMs) are one of the reasons for beam current limitations and beam lifetime in synchrotron light sources such as INDUS-2. At higher beam current, the HOMs of the RF cavity may resonate with the beam frequencies (in the beam spectrum) leading to beam instability. Therefore, knowledge of the HOMs of an RF cavity is a necessary part of operations for any synchrotron source. INDUS-2 synchrotron source has 4 elliptically shaped RF cavities, which are operated at a fundamental frequency of 505.812 MHz. The RF cavity HOM spectrum is very sensitive to its conducting surface, which is affected mainly by the thermal loading and tuner movement. An accurate estimation of the cavity frequency spectrum with realistic boundary conditions is possible by a combined (coupled) electromagnetic-thermal-structural analysis. The methodology adopted for this coupled simulation is explained in this paper. The HOM spectrum and electromagnetic parameters of INDUS-2 cavity are simulated using 3D electromagnetic high frequency finite element method in ANSYS. The simulated data sets are compared with the cold model test data of the RF cavities for validation of the numerical simulations. Further, the observed spectra of the INDUS-2 electron beam at various stored beam currents and energies are also studied to find parasitic HOMs. Indicative HOM observations and the simulation data results can be used for shifting the harmful modes.

  8. Development and Validation of UV Spectrophotometric Method for Simultaneous Estimation of Cefixime and Linezolid in Combined Dosage Form

    Patel Devang P

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cefixime(CEF is a cephalosporin class of antibiotic drug and Linezolid(LIN is a oxazolidinone class of antibiotic drug. This combination of drug is useful in many bacterial diseases. Accurate, precise, rapid and economical method was developed for the simultaneous estimation of Cefixime(CEF and Linezolid(LIN in tablet dosage form. Method is based on the simultaneous equations and wavelengths selected for analysis were 289.0nm (λmax of Cefixime and 257.0 nm (λmax of Linezolid respectively, in methanol. The linearity was obtained in the concentration range of 5-40μg/ml for Cefixime and 10-30μg/ml for Linezolid. The correlation coefficient of Cefixime and Linezolid were found to be 0.9998 and 0.9998 respectively. The proposed procedure was successfully applied for the simultaneous determination of both drugs in commercial tablet preparation. The results of the analysis have been validated statistically and by recovery studies have confirmed the accuracy of proposed method.

  9. Programme and Abstracts. 38. Journees des Actinides together with the 7. School on the Physics and Chemistry of the Actinides

    Journees des Actinides (JdA) is a traditional informal actinide forum, including physics, chemistry, and materials research. It regularly brings together experts from fields involved, taking place in a very informal way, emphasizing exchanges and discussions on current issues in actinide science. At the 38th JdA (10-15 April 2008; Wroclaw, Poland) scientific communications on the following topics on physics and chemistry of the actinides were presented: (a) inorganic and organometallic chemistry; (b) strongly correlated behaviour, superconductivity, quantum criticality; (c) materials science; (d) theory, electronic structure; (e) nuclear fuel cycle, environment

  10. Trace analysis of actinides in the environment using resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    In this work the resonant ionization of neutral atoms using laser radiation was applied and optimized for ultra-trace analysis of the actinides thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium. The sensitive detection of these actinides is a challange for the monitoring and quantification of radioactive releases from nuclear facilities. Using resonance ionization spectroscopy combined with a newly developed quadrupole-mass-spectrometer, numerous energy levels in the atomic structure of these actinides could be identified. With this knowledge efficient excitation schemes for the mentioned actinides could be identified and characterised. The applied in-source-ionization ensures for a high detection efficiency due to the good overlap of laser radiation with the atomic beam and allows therefore for a low sample consumption which is required for the analysis of radio nuclides. The selective excitation processes in the resonant ionization method supresses unwanted contaminations and was optimized for analytical detection of ultra-trace amounts in environmental samples as well as for determination of isotopic compositions. The efficient in-source-ionization combined with high power pulsed laser radiation allows for detections efficiency up to 1%. For plutonium detection limits in the range of 104-105 atoms could be demonstrated for synthetic samples as well as for first environmental samples. The usage of narrow bandwidth continuous wave lasers in combination with a transversal overlap of the laser radiation and the free propagating atomic beam enable for resolving individual isotopic shifts of the resonant transitions. This results in a high selectivity against dominant neighboring isotopes but with a significant loss in detection efficiency. For the ultra-trace isotope 236U a detection limit down to 10-9 for the isotope ratio N (236U)/N (238U) could be determined.

  11. COMBINING LIDAR ESTIMATES OF BIOMASS AND LANDSAT ESTIMATES OF STAND AGE FOR SPATIALLY EXTENSIVE VALIDATION OF MODELED FOREST PRODUCTIVITY. (R828309)

    Extensive estimates of forest productivity are required to understand the relationships between shifting land use, changing climate and carbon storage and fluxes. Aboveground net primary production of wood (NPPAw) is a major component of total NPP and...

  12. Estimation of regurgitant volume and orifice in aortic regurgitation combining c.w. Doppler and parameter estimation in a Windkessel-like model

    A method for noninvasive estimation of regurgitant orifice and volume in aortic regurgitation is proposed and tested in anaesthesized open chested pigs. The method can be used with noninvasive measurement of regurgitant jet volocity with continous wave ultrasound Doppler measurements together with cuff measurement of systolic and diastolic systemic pressure in the arm. These measurements are then used for parameter estimation in a Windkessel-like model which include the regurgitant orifice as a parameter. The aortic volume compliance and the perpheral resistance are also included as parameters and estimated in the same process. For the test of the method, invasive measurements in the open chest pigs are used. Electromagentic flow measurements in the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery are used for control, and a correlation between regurgitant volume obtained from parameters estimation and elctromagnetic flow measurements of 0·95 over a range from 2·1 to 17·8 mL is obtained. 10 refs., 6 figs

  13. Actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): FY94 results

    This document contains six reports on actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These reports, completed in FY94, are relevant to the estimation of the potential dissolved actinide concentrations in WIPP brines under repository breach scenarios. Estimates of potential dissolved actinide concentrations are necessary for WIPP performance assessment calculations. The specific topics covered within this document are: the complexation of oxalate with Th(IV) and U(VI); the stability of Pu(VI) in one WIPP-specific brine environment both with and without carbonate present; the solubility of Nd(III) in a WIPP Salado brine surrogate as a function of hydrogen ion concentration; the steady-state dissolved plutonium concentrations in a synthetic WIPP Culebra brine surrogate; the development of a model for Nd(III) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate solutions; and the development of a model for Np(V) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium Perchlorate, sodium carbonate, and sodium chloride media

  14. Study of the actinide-lanthanide separation from nuclear waste by a new pyrochemical process

    The theoretical extraction and separation of platinoids, actinides and lanthanides is allowed by thermodynamic using two adapted reducing agents: zinc and magnesium. Thereby, a pyrochemical method for the nuclear waste processing has been devised. The high temperature handling of the elements in fluoride forms and their processing by a reactive metallic phase required special precautions. The study of the behavior of matter in exploratory systems allowed the development of an experimental technology for the treatment and contacting of phases. The thermodynamical analysis of the experimental results shows the feasibility of the process. A model was developed to predict the distribution coefficients of zirconium, uranium and lanthanum as a function of the system composition. An estimation method was proposed in order to evaluate the distribution coefficients in diluted solution of all the actinides and lanthanides existing in the fission products between LiF CaF2 and Zn-Mg at 720 deg C. Coupled with the experimental results, the estimates results may be extrapolated to concentrated solutions allowing predictions of the separation of all actinides and lanthanides. The rapidity of element transfer is induced by a thermal effect caused by the high exothermicity of the reduction by magnesium. The kinetic coefficients have been linked with the reduction enthalpy of each element. Moreover, the kinetics seem limited by chemical reaction and not by mass transfer. (author)

  15. Actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): FY94 results

    Novak, C.F. [ed.

    1995-08-01

    This document contains six reports on actinide chemistry research supporting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These reports, completed in FY94, are relevant to the estimation of the potential dissolved actinide concentrations in WIPP brines under repository breach scenarios. Estimates of potential dissolved actinide concentrations are necessary for WIPP performance assessment calculations. The specific topics covered within this document are: the complexation of oxalate with Th(IV) and U(VI); the stability of Pu(VI) in one WIPP-specific brine environment both with and without carbonate present; the solubility of Nd(III) in a WIPP Salado brine surrogate as a function of hydrogen ion concentration; the steady-state dissolved plutonium concentrations in a synthetic WIPP Culebra brine surrogate; the development of a model for Nd(III) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate solutions; and the development of a model for Np(V) solubility and speciation in dilute to concentrated sodium Perchlorate, sodium carbonate, and sodium chloride media.

  16. Formal oxidation potentials of actinide couples in K10P2W17O61 solutions

    The formal oxidation potentials of the M(VI)/M(V), M(V)/M(IV), and M(IV)/M(III) couples for actinides from U to No and of the M(IV)/M(III) couples for some actinides in 1 M H+ or 1 M Na+ (pH ∼5-5.5) solutions containing K10P2W17O61 were calculated from the data on stability of complexes of f element ions with the unsaturated heteropolytungstate anion P2W17O 6110-. In some cases, the previously accepted values were subjected to major revision, especially the potentials of the An(V)/An(IV) couples. Problems arising in measuring the potentials of the couples involving Np(III) and Pu(III) which react with the heteropolyanion to form a heteropoly blue are discussed. The potentials of some M(III)/M(II) couples are estimated

  17. Build-Up Of Actinides In Irradiated Fuel Rods Of The ETRR-1 Reactor

    The content concentrations of actinides are calculated as a function of operating reactor regime and cooling time at different percentage of fuel burn-up. The build-up transmutation equations of actinides content in an irradiated fuel are solved numerically .A computer code BAC was written to operate on PC computer to provide the required calculations. The fuel element of 10% 235U enrichment of ETRR-1 reactor was taken as an example for calculations using BAC code. The results are compared with other calculations for the ETRR-1 fuel rod. An estimation of fissile build-up content of a proposed new fuel of 20% '235U enrichment for ETRR-1 reactor is given. The sensitivity coefficients of build-up plutonium concentrations as a function of cross-section data uncertainties are also calculated

  18. An improved radiochemical method for the isolation of uranium from other actinides in urine

    The Bioassay Laboratory at CRNL estimates uranium in urine by extraction with TBP (tributyl phosphate) and alpha counting. Studies performed on this method revealed several disadvantages: other actinides follow uranium and the overall recovery of uranium is not high. Cross-contamination studies showed that plutonium-239, neptunium-237, thorium-natural and curium-244 were all present in the final uranium source (Pu-239, 60 percent; Np-237, 48 percent; Th-nat, 40 percent; Cm-244, 15 percent). The overall uranium recovery was about 60 percent. The method has since been modified to improve the uranium recovery to 85 +- 5 percent and completely eliminate actinide cross-contamination by the inclusion of some selective co-precipitation steps after the TBP extractions have been carried out

  19. Build up of actinides in burnt fuel rods of the ET-RR-1 reactor

    The content concentrations of actinides are calculated as a function of operating reactor regime and cooling time at different percentage of fuel burn-up. The build-up transmutation equations of actinides content in an irradiated fuel are solved numerically .A computer code BAC was written to operate on a PC computer to provide the required calculations. The fuel element of 10% 235U enrichment of ET-RR-1 reactor was taken as an example for calculations using the BAC code. The results are compared with other calculations for the ET-RR-1 fuel rod. An estimation of fissile build-up content of a proposed new fuel of 20% 235U enrichment for ET-RR-1 reactor is given. The sensitivity coefficients of build-up plutonium concentrations as a function of cross-section data uncertainties are also calculated. (author)

  20. MEDOR, a didactic tool to support interpretation of bioassay data after internal contamination by actinides

    A didactic software, Methodes Dosimetriques de Reference (MEDOR), is being developed to provide help in the interpretation of biological data. Its main purpose is to evaluate the pertinence of the application of different models. This paper describes its first version that is focused on inhalation exposure to actinide aerosols. With this tool, sensitivity analysis on different parameters of the ICRP models can be easily done for aerosol deposition, in terms of activity and particle number, actinide biokinetics and doses. The user can analyse different inhalation cases showing either that dose per unit intake cannot be applied if the aerosol contains a low number of particles or that an inhibition of the late pulmonary clearance by particle transport can occur which contributes to a 3-4 fold increase in effective dose as compared with application of default parameters. This underlines the need to estimate systematically the number of deposited particles, as well as to do chest monitoring as long as possible. (authors)

  1. Extraction of actinides and lanthanides by calixarenes CMPO. Possibility to separate actinides from lanthanides (Calixpart project)

    The CALIXPART project accepted by the European Community within the framework of the 5 PCRD, relates to the 'selective extraction of minor actinides from H.A. liquid waste by organized matrices'. The objective of this new project is the selective extraction in only one step of minor actinides from a solution of fission products including lanthanides. This separation will be investigated through two strategies: - In the first one, macrocycles will be grafted with ligands containing nitrogen or sulphur which are able to discriminate actinides from lanthanides, but generally present very low distribution coefficients in strongly acidic solutions. Following the example of calixarenes CMPO, the grafting of these ligands on macrocyclic supports should increase the distribution coefficients, and thus allow to use these extractants at nitric acid concentrations up to 3 M. The nitrogen or sulphur ligands are not necessarily selective with respect to the other fission products, and the macrocyclic structure should also afford this necessary selectivity if one wishes to operate in a single step. Once americium and curium separated, the difference in size between both cations is undoubtedly sufficient to make it possible to separate them at the stripping stage. - The second strategy considered is the introduction of two types of ligands (hard and soft) on a macrocyclic structure, the first ensuring the extraction of lanthanides and trivalent actinides, the seconds bringing discrimination between these two groups of cations. (author)

  2. Estimated radiation pneumonitis risk after photon versus proton therapy alone or combined with chemotherapy for lung cancer

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Aznar, Marianne C. (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital (Denmark)), e-mail: vogelius@gmail.com; Westerly, David C.; Cannon, George M.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Bentzen, Soeren M. (Dept. of Human Oncology, Univ. of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison (United States)); Korreman, Stine S. (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital (Denmark); Dept. of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde Univ., Roskilde (Denmark)); Mehta, Minesh P. (Northwestern Univ., Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago (United States))

    2011-08-15

    Background. Traditionally, radiation therapy plans are optimized without consideration of chemotherapy. Here, we model the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in the presence of a possible interaction between chemotherapy and radiation dose distribution. Material and methods. Three alternative treatment plans are compared in 18 non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy; the tomotherapy plan, an intensity modulated proton therapy plan (IMPT) and a three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan. All plans are optimized without consideration of the chemotherapy effect. The effect of chemotherapy is modeled as an independent cell killing process using a uniform chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose (CERD) added to the entire organ at risk. We estimate the risk of grade 3 or higher RP (G3RP) using the critical volume model. Results. The mean risk of clinical G3RP at zero CERD is 5% for tomotherapy (range: 1-18 %) and 14% for 3D-CRT (range 2-49%). When the CERD exceeds 9 Gy, however, the risk of RP with the tomotherapy plans become higher than the 3D-CRT plans. The IMPT plans are less toxic both at zero CERD (mean 2%, range 1-5%) and at CERD = 10 Gy (mean 7%, range 1-28%). Tomotherapy yields a lower risk of RP than 3D-CRT for 17/18 patients at zero CERD, but only for 7/18 patients at CERD = 10 Gy. IMPT gives the lowest risk of all plans for 17/18 patients at zero CERD and for all patients with CERD = 10 Gy. Conclusions. The low dose bath from highly conformal photon techniques may become relevant for lung toxicity when radiation is combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy as shown here. Proton therapy allows highly conformal delivery while minimizing the low dose bath potentially interacting with chemotherapy. Thus, intensive drug-radiation combinations could be an interesting indication for selecting patients for proton therapy. It is likely that the IMRT plans would perform better if the CERD was accounted for during

  3. Estimated radiation pneumonitis risk after photon versus proton therapy alone or combined with chemotherapy for lung cancer

    Background. Traditionally, radiation therapy plans are optimized without consideration of chemotherapy. Here, we model the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in the presence of a possible interaction between chemotherapy and radiation dose distribution. Material and methods. Three alternative treatment plans are compared in 18 non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy; the tomotherapy plan, an intensity modulated proton therapy plan (IMPT) and a three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan. All plans are optimized without consideration of the chemotherapy effect. The effect of chemotherapy is modeled as an independent cell killing process using a uniform chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose (CERD) added to the entire organ at risk. We estimate the risk of grade 3 or higher RP (G3RP) using the critical volume model. Results. The mean risk of clinical G3RP at zero CERD is 5% for tomotherapy (range: 1-18 %) and 14% for 3D-CRT (range 2-49%). When the CERD exceeds 9 Gy, however, the risk of RP with the tomotherapy plans become higher than the 3D-CRT plans. The IMPT plans are less toxic both at zero CERD (mean 2%, range 1-5%) and at CERD = 10 Gy (mean 7%, range 1-28%). Tomotherapy yields a lower risk of RP than 3D-CRT for 17/18 patients at zero CERD, but only for 7/18 patients at CERD = 10 Gy. IMPT gives the lowest risk of all plans for 17/18 patients at zero CERD and for all patients with CERD = 10 Gy. Conclusions. The low dose bath from highly conformal photon techniques may become relevant for lung toxicity when radiation is combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy as shown here. Proton therapy allows highly conformal delivery while minimizing the low dose bath potentially interacting with chemotherapy. Thus, intensive drug-radiation combinations could be an interesting indication for selecting patients for proton therapy. It is likely that the IMRT plans would perform better if the CERD was accounted for during

  4. Solubility of actinides and surrogates in nuclear glasses

    The nuclear wastes are currently incorporated in borosilicate glass matrices. The resulting glass must be perfectly homogeneous. The work discussed here is a study of actinide (thorium and plutonium) solubility in borosilicate glass, undertaken to assess the extent of actinide solubility in the glass and to understand the mechanisms controlling actinide solubilization. Glass specimens containing; actinide surrogates were used to prepare and optimize the fabrication of radioactive glass samples. These preliminary studies revealed that actinide Surrogates solubility in the glass was enhanced by controlling the processing temperature, the dissolution kinetic of the surrogate precursors, the glass composition and the oxidizing versus reducing conditions. The actinide solubility was investigated in the borosilicate glass. The evolution of thorium solubility in borosilicate glass was determined for temperatures ranging from 1200 deg C to 1400 deg C.Borosilicate glass specimens containing plutonium were fabricated. The experimental result showed that the plutonium solubility limit ranged from 1 to 2.5 wt% PuO2 at 1200 deg C. A structural approach based on the determination of the local structure around actinides and their surrogates by EXAFS spectroscopy was used to determine their structural role in the glass and the nature of their bonding with the vitreous network. This approach revealed a correlation between the length of these bonds and the solubility of the actinides and their surrogates. (author)

  5. Transmutation of minor actinide using thorium fueled BWR core

    One of the methods to conduct transmutation of minor actinide is the use of BWR with thorium fuel. Thorium fuel has a specific behaviour of producing a little secondary minor actinides. Transmutation of minor actinide is done by loading it in the BWR with thorium fuel through two methods, namely close recycle and accumulation recycle. The calculation of minor actinide composition produced, weigh of minor actinide transmuted, and percentage of reminder transmutation was carried SRAC. The calculations were done to equivalent cell modeling from one fuel rod of BWR. The results show that minor actinide transmutation is more effective using thorium fuel than uranium fuel, through both close recycle and accumulation recycle. Minor actinide transmutation weight show that the same value for those recycle for 5th recycle. And most of all minor actinide produced from 5 unit BWR uranium fuel can transmuted in the 6th of close recycle. And, the minimal value of excess reactivity of the core is 12,15 % Δk/k, that is possible value for core operation

  6. Research needs in metabolism and dosimetry of the actinides

    The following topics are discussed: uranium mine and mill tailings; environmental standards; recommendations of NCRP and ICRP; metabolic models and health effects; life-time exposures to actinides and other alpha emitters; high-specific-activity actinide isotopes versus naturally occurring isotopic mixtures of uranium isotopes; adequacy of the n factor; and metabolism and dosimetry;

  7. Separations chemistry for actinide elements: Recent developments and historical perspective

    With the end of the cold war, the principal mission in actinide separations has changed from production of plutonium to cleanup of the immense volume of moderately radioactive mixed wastes which resulted from fifty years of processing activities. In order to approach the cleanup task from a proper perspective, it is necessary to understand how the wastes were generated. Most of the key separations techniques central to actinide production were developed in the 40's and 50's for the identification and production of actinide elements. Total actinide recovery, lanthanide/actinide separations, and selective partitioning of actinides from inert constituents are currently of primary concern. To respond to the modern world of actinide separations, new techniques are being developed for separations ranging from analytical methods to detect ultra-trace concentrations (for bioassay and environmental monitoring) to large-scale waste treatment procedures. In this report, the history of actinide separations, both the basic science and production aspects, is examined and evaluated in terms of contemporary priorities

  8. Advantages of numerical atmospheric dispersion calculations for estimating dispersal and combination effects of stack releases from the nuclear industry

    An estimation of environmental pollution calculated using the idealized Gaussian distribution model to describe processes of atmospheric diffusion suffers from restrictions in the model, i.e. it assumes stationary homogeneous conditions in the atmosphere, a parallel mean wind flow with no (or at most linear) velocity shear, and constant turbulence characteristics within the plume. These assumptions are oversimplifications: for instance topographic effects, wind shear, time-dependent wind variations and the case of strong local interactions of the pollutant with other components in the atmosphere (e.g. fog, smog, rain, or other pollutant plumes) are ignored. Previous attempts to overcome the disadvantages using a purely numerical evaluation of the differential equations describing the transport, diffusion and any reactions of the pollutants in the atmosphere were unsuccessful, since 'artificial diffusion' effects were observed that led to unacceptable errors when great distances or long times were considered. At present, the best method of solving this problem appears to be the use of a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian numerical approach, called the particle-in-cell method, which was developed in the USA. The method has been tested successfully by making comparisons with typical Gaussian calculations over long time intervals or large distances: it was also applied to several actual transport problems involving complex topographies with wind variations in time, and to the effects of chemical reactions and local rainfall. This method, avoiding the undue simplification of the Gaussian calculation and the inherent fictitious diffusion patterns of the purely numerical evaluation seems to be particularly suited to solving atmospheric pollution transport problems under complex conditions that may occur in the neighbourhood of large nuclear power stations. (author)

  9. Combining regional climate and national human development scenarios to estimate future vulnerability to extreme climate and weather events

    Patt, A.; Nussbaumer, P.

    2009-04-01

    Extreme climate and weather events such as droughts, floods, and tropical cyclones account for over 60% of the loss of life, and over 90% of total impacts, from natural disasters. Both observed trends and global climate models (GCMs) suggest that the frequency and intensity of extreme events is increasing, and will continue to increase as a result of climate change. Among planners and policy-makers at both national and international levels there is thus concern that this rise in extreme events will lead to greater losses in the future. Since low levels of development are associated with greater numbers of people killed and needing emergency assistance from natural disasters, the concern is most pronounced for least developed countries. If, however, these countries make substantial improvements in their levels of human development, as leading forecasters suggest may be the case over the coming decades, then their vulnerability to extreme events may fall. In this study, we examine the potential combined effects of increased extreme event frequency and improved levels of human development, to generate scenarios of risk levels into the second half of the century. It is the African continent for which these results may be the most relevant, since it is widely viewed as most vulnerable to increased risks from climate change; we focus on the particular country of Mozambique, which has experienced high losses from droughts, floods, and tropical cyclones in recent decades, and stands out as being among the most vulnerable in Africa. To assess the change in risk levels from the present until 2060, we pull together three pieces of analysis. The first is a statistical analysis of the losses from 1990-2007 from climate-related disasters, using national level data from the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED) and the United Nations. From this analysis, we establish statistical relationships between several drivers of vulnerability—including country size

  10. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    Ohki, Shigeo

    2015-12-01

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GWey if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel.

  11. Actinide removal from nitric acid waste streams

    Actinide separations research at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) has found ways to significantly improve plutonium secondary recovery and americium removal from nitric acid waste streams generated by plutonium purification operations. Capacity and breakthrough studies show anion exchange with Dowex 1x4 (50 to 100 mesh) to be superior for secondary recovery of plutonium. Extraction chromatography with TOPO(tri-n-octyl-phosphine oxide) on XAD-4 removes the final traces of plutonium, including hydrolytic polymer. Partial neutralization and solid supported liquid membrane transfer removes americium for sorption on discardable inorganic ion exchangers, potentially allowing for non-TRU waste disposal

  12. Prediction of some fission properties of actinides

    The 2 Z-N correlations are indications for the deuteron-triton clusters structure to most of the nuclei. For N=Z nuclei this approach indicates deuteron clusters only. The space dependence Schroedinger equation for neutron and proton in the same shell for N=Z nuclei shows that part of the time these particles behave like single particles and part of the time as deuteron clusters. The 2 Z-N correlations are used to predict some fission properties of some actinides. (author). 13 refs., 6 Tabs

  13. Calculated Bulk Properties of the Actinide Metals

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Self-consistent relativistic calculations of the electronic properties for seven actinides (Ac-Am) have been performed using the linear muffin-tin orbitals method within the atomic-sphere approximation. Exchange and correlation were included in the local spin-density scheme. The theory explains t...... the variation of the atomic volume and the bulk modulus through the 5f series in terms of an increasing 5f binding up to plutonium followed by a sudden localisation (through complete spin polarisation) in americium...

  14. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GWey if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel

  15. The electrochemical properties of actinide amalgams

    Selection of the values of standard potentials of An actinides and their amalgams was made. On the basis of the data obtained energy characteristics of alloy formation processes in the systems An-Hg were calculated and analyzed. It is ascertained that the properties of f-element solutions in mercury are similar to those of alkali and alkaline-earth metal amalgams with the only difference, i.e. in case of active metals of group 3 the number of realized charge value of ionic frames in condensed phase increases

  16. Status of nuclear data for actinides

    Guzhovskii, B.Y.; Gorelov, V.P.; Grebennikov, A.N. [Russia Federal Nuclear Centre, Arzamas (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear data required for transmutation problem include many actinide nuclei. In present paper the analysis of neutron fission, capture, (n,2n) and (n,3n) reaction cross sections at energy region from thermal point to 14 MeV was carried out for Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm isotops using modern evaluated nuclear data libraries and handbooks of recommended nuclear data. Comparison of these data indicates on substantial discrepancies in different versions of files, that connect with quality and completeness of original experimental data.

  17. Fission cross section measurements for minor actinides

    Fursov, B. [IPPE, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The main task of this work is the measurement of fast neutron induced fission cross section for minor actinides of {sup 238}Pu, {sup 242m}Am, {sup 243,244,245,246,247,248}Cm. The task of the work is to increase the accuracy of data in MeV energy region. Basic experimental method, fissile samples, fission detectors and electronics, track detectors, alpha counting, neutron generation, fission rate measurement, corrections to the data and error analysis are presented in this paper. (author)

  18. Supercritical fluid extraction studies on actinides

    Uranyl nitrate and plutonium in its Pu (III) as well Pu (IV) form loaded onto a tissue paper was extracted completed from paper, glass, stainless steel as well as teflon matrices using modified SC-CO2. A further investigation on recovery of actinides independent of their drying period is expected to culminate into developing an universal procedure to handle Pu bearing waste for its recovery irrespective of its drying history and oxidation states. Such endeavors ultimately lead to the potential utility of the SFE technology for efficient nuclear waste management

  19. Compilation of actinide neutron nuclear data

    The Swedish nuclear data committee has compiled a selected set of neutron cross section data for the 16 most important actinide isotopes. The aim of the report is to present available data in a comprehensible way to allow a comparison between different evaluated libraries and to judge about the reliability of these libraries from the experimental data. The data are given in graphical form below about 1 ev and above about 10 keV shile the 2200 m/s cross sections and resonance integrals are given in numerical form. (G.B.)

  20. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    Ohki, Shigeo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, O-arai-machi, Higashi-Ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GW{sub e}y if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel.

  1. Recent progress in actinide borate chemistry

    Wang, S.; Alekseev, E .V.; Depmeier, W.; Albrecht-Schmitt, T.E.

    2011-01-01

    The use of molten boric acid as a reactive flux for synthesizing actinide borates has been developed in the past two years providing access to a remarkable array of exotic materials with both unusual structures and unprecedented properties. [ThB(5)O(6)(OH)(6)][BO(OH)(2)]·2.5H(2)O possesses a cationic supertetrahedral structure and displays remarkable anion exchange properties with high selectivity for TcO(4)(-). Uranyl borates form noncentrosymmetric structures with extraordinarily rich topol...

  2. Nanoscale membrane-based technology for the separation of actinides and other elements

    The separation of elements, in particular actinides, in the aqueous homogeneous phase using polymer reagents is presented and outlined in view of membrane-based separation technologies. The concept of separation based on the retention of polymer complexes in aqueous solution, which are separated according to their molecular size, is explained. These hybrid processes are combining the complexing agents with the method of ultra- or nanofiltration. The fundamentals of the element interaction in relation to the separation procedures are discussed, and the role of the polymer reagent is assessed. Typical examples are discussed and the major factors influencing the processes are investigated. In addition, recent developments for actinides using this method are also described. (author)

  3. The ‘granite encapsulation’ route to the safe disposal of Pu and other actinides

    Gibb, F. G. F.; Taylor, K. J.; Burakov, B. E.

    2008-03-01

    Waste actinides, including plutonium, present a long-term management problem and a serious security issue. Immobilisation in mineral or ceramic waste forms for interim storage is a widely proposed first step. The safest, most secure geological disposal for Pu is in very deep boreholes and we propose that the key step to combination of these immobilisation and disposal concepts is encapsulation of the waste form in cylinders of recrystallized granite. We discuss the underpinning science, focusing on experimental work, and consider implementation. Finally, we present and discuss analyses of zircon, UO 2 and Ce-doped cubic zirconia from high pressure and temperature experiments in granitic melts that demonstrate the viability of this solution and that actinides can be isolated from the environment for millions, maybe hundreds of millions, of years.

  4. Speciation, Mobility and Fate of Actinides in the Groundwater at the Hanford Site

    Plutonium and other actinides represent important contaminants in the groundwater and vadose zone at Hanford and other DOE sites. The distribution and migration of these actinides in groundwater must be understood so that these sites can be carefully monitored and effectively cleaned up, thereby minimizing risks to the public. The objective of this project was to obtain field data on the chemical and physical forms of plutonium in groundwater at the Hanford site. We focused on the 100-k and 100-n areas near the Columbia River, where prior reactor operations and waste storage was in close proximity to the river. In particular, a unique set of technical approaches were combined to look at the details of Pu speciation in groundwater, as thus its chemical affinity for soil surfaces and solubility in groundwater, as these impact directly the migration rates off site and possible mitigation possibilities one might undertake to control, or at least better monitor these releases

  5. The electronic structure of the lanthanides and actinides, a comparison

    Full text: Optical spectra of the two f-element series (the lanthanides and actinides) are comparable in many respects. For the trivalent ions isolated in single crystals, both series exhibit rich, narrow line spectra. These data can be analysed in terms of a parametric model based on a free-ion Hamiltonian plus the addition of a crystal field Hamiltonian. For most systems the agreement between the calculated and experimental energy levels is quite good. In the actinide series there appears to be a correlation between the magnitude of the crystal field and the inadequacy of the fits. The early actinides exhibit multiple oxidation states for which there is no precedent in the lanthanide series. The parametric model mentioned earlier has been utilized for some tetravalent actinide systems with reasonably good results. A selective survey of results describing the similarities and differences of various lanthanide and actinide systems will be given

  6. Actinide coordination chemistry: towards the limits of the periodic table

    Actinide elements represent a distinct chemical family at the bottom of the periodic table. Among the major characteristics of this 14 element family is their high atomic numbers and their radioactivity. Actinide chemistry finds its roots in the history of the 20. century and plays a very important role in our contemporary world. Energetic as well as technical challenges are facing the development of nuclear energy. In this pedagogical introduction to actinide chemistry, the authors draw a comparison between the actinides family and the chemistry of two other families, lanthanides and transition metals. This article focuses on molecular and aqueous chemistry. It has been based on class notes aiming to present an overview of the chemical diversity of actinides, and its future challenges for modern science. (authors)

  7. Actinide Solubility and Speciation in the WIPP

    Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-11-02

    The presentation begins with the role and need for nuclear repositories (overall concept, international updates (Sweden, Finland, France, China), US approach and current status), then moves on to the WIPP TRU repository concept (design, current status--safety incidents of February 5 and 14, 2014, path forward), and finally considers the WIPP safety case: dissolved actinide concentrations (overall approach, oxidation state distribution and redox control, solubility of actinides, colloidal contribution and microbial effects). The following conclusions are set forth: (1) International programs are moving forward, but at a very slow and somewhat sporadic pace. (2) In the United States, the Salt repository concept, from the perspective of the long-term safety case, remains a viable option for nuclear waste management despite the current operational issues/concerns. (3) Current model/PA prediction (WIPP example) are built on redundant conservatisms. These conservatisms are being addressed in the ongoing and future research to fill existing data gaps--redox control of plutonium by Fe(0, II), thorium (analog) solubility studies in simulated brine, contribution of intrinsic and biocolloids to the mobile concentration, and clarification of microbial ecology and effects.

  8. Electronic structure of the actinide dioxides

    The electronic properties of the fluorite structured actinide dioxides have been investigated using the linear muffin tin orbital method in the atomic sphere approximation. CaF2 with the same structure was also studied because of the relative simplicity of its electronic structure and the greater amount of experimental data available. Band structures were calculated both non self consistently and self consistently. In the non self consistent calculations the effect of changing the approximation to the exchange-correlation potential and the starting atomic configurations was examined. Using the concepts of canonical bands the effects of hybridization were investigated. In particular the 5f electrons included in the band picture were found to mix more strongly into the valence band than indicated by experiment. On this basis the 5f electrons were not included in self consistent calculations which in the density functional formalism are capable of yielding ground state properties. Because of the non participation of the f electrons in the bonding UO2 only was considered as representative of the actinide dioxides. For comparison CaF2 was also examined. Using Pettifor's pressure formula to determine the equilibrium condition the lattice constants were calculated to be 0.5% and 5% respectively below the experimental values. (author)

  9. Fusion-Fission Burner for Transuranic Actinides

    Choi, Chan

    2013-10-01

    The 14-MeV DT fusion neutron spectrum from mirror confinement fusion can provide a unique capability to transmute the transuranic isotopes from light water reactors (LWR). The transuranic (TRU) actinides, high-level radioactive wastes, from spent LWR fuel pose serious worldwide problem with long-term decay heat and radiotoxicity. However, ``transmuted'' TRU actinides can not only reduce the inventory of the TRU in the spent fuel repository but also generate additional energy. Typical commercial LWR fuel assemblies for BWR (boiling water reactor) and PWR (pressurized water reactor) measure its assembly lengths with 4.470 m and 4.059 m, respectively, while its corresponding fuel rod lengths are 4.064 m and 3.851 m. Mirror-based fusion reactor has inherently simple geometry for transmutation blanket with steady-state reactor operation. Recent development of gas-dynamic mirror configuration has additional attractive feature with reduced size in central plasma chamber, thus providing a unique capability for incorporating the spent fuel assemblies into transmutation blanket designs. The system parameters for the gas-dynamic mirror-based hybrid burner will be discussed.

  10. Cancer risk estimates from the combined Japanese A-bomb and Hodgkin cohorts for doses relevant to radiotherapy.

    Schneider, Uwe; Walsh, Linda

    2008-04-01

    Most information on the dose-response of radiation-induced cancer is derived from data on the A-bomb survivors who were exposed to gamma-rays and neutrons. Since, for radiation protection purposes, the dose span of main interest is between 0 and 1 Gy, the analysis of the A-bomb survivors is usually focused on this range. However, estimates of cancer risk for doses above 1 Gy are becoming more important for radiotherapy patients and for long-term manned missions in space research. Therefore in this work, emphasis is placed on doses relevant for radiotherapy with respect to radiation-induced solid cancer. The analysis of the A-bomb survivor's data was extended by including two extra high-dose categories (4-6 Sv and 6-13 Sv) and by an attempted combination with cancer data on patients receiving radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. In addition, since there are some recent indications for a high neutron dose contribution, the data were fitted separately for three different values for the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the neutrons (10, 35 and 100) and a variable RBE as a function of dose. The data were fitted using a linear, a linear-exponential and a plateau-dose-response relationship. Best agreement was found for the plateau model with a dose-varying RBE. It can be concluded that for doses above 1 Gy there is a tendency for a nonlinear dose-response curve. In addition, there is evidence of a neutron RBE greater than 10 for the A-bomb survivor data. Many problems and uncertainties are involved in combing these two datasets. However, since very little is currently known about the shape of dose-response relationships for radiation-induced cancer in the radiotherapy dose range, this approach could be regarded as a first attempt to acquire more information on this area. The work presented here also provides the first direct evidence that the bending over of the solid cancer excess risk dose response curve for the A-bomb survivors, generally observed above 2 Gy

  11. Predicting dermal penetration for ToxCast chemicals using in silico estimates for diffusion in combination with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling.

    Predicting dermal penetration for ToxCast chemicals using in silico estimates for diffusion in combination with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling.Evans, M.V., Sawyer, M.E., Isaacs, K.K, and Wambaugh, J.With the development of efficient high-throughput (HT) in ...

  12. New combined models for estimating daily global solar radiation from measured air temperature in semi-arid climates: Application in Ghardaïa, Algeria

    Highlights: • New combined models been introduced for estimating daily global solar radiation. • The BNN is the most accurate model compared with combined models. • Results indicate that the new calibrated models are able to estimate the global solar. - Abstract: In this paper, combined empirical models and a Bayesian neural network (BNN) model have been developed to estimate daily global solar radiation (GSR) on a horizontal surface in Ghardaïa, Algeria. An experimental database of daily GSR, maximum and minimum air temperatures of the year 2006 has been used to estimate the coefficients of the empirical models, as well as to train the BNN model. Six months of the year 2007 (summer period: May, June, July, and winter period: October, November, December) have been used to test the calibrated models, while six months of the year 2012 (from 1st February to 31th July) have been used to check generalisation capability of the developed models as well as the BNN model. Results indicate that the new calibrated models are able to estimate the global solar radiation with an excellent accuracy in this location. Calibrated models are also compared with the developed BNN model to show their effectiveness

  13. A method to combine non-probability sample data with probability sample data in estimating spatial means of environmental variables

    Brus, D.J.; Gruijter, de J.J.

    2003-01-01

    In estimating spatial means of environmental variables of a region from data collected by convenience or purposive sampling, validity of the results can be ensured by collecting additional data through probability sampling. The precision of the pi estimator that uses the probability sample can be in

  14. Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation: PNNL FY 2011 Status Report

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.

    2011-08-13

    This report summarizes work conducted in FY 2011 at PNNL to investigate new methods of separating the minor actinide elements (Am and Cm) from the trivalent lanthanide elements, and separation of Am from Cm. For the former, work focused on a solvent extraction system combining an acidic extractant (HDEHP) with a neutral extractant (CMPO) to form a hybrid solvent extraction system referred to as TRUSPEAK (combining the TRUEX and TALSPEAK processes). For the latter, ligands that strongly bing uranyl ion were investigated for stabilizing corresponding americyl ion.

  15. Separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel: A review.

    Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica

    2016-11-15

    This review summarises the methods currently available to extract radioactive actinide elements from solutions of spent nuclear fuel. This separation of actinides reduces the hazards associated with spent nuclear fuel, such as its radiotoxicity, volume and the amount of time required for its' radioactivity to return to naturally occurring levels. Separation of actinides from environmental water systems is also briefly discussed. The actinide elements typically found in spent nuclear fuel include uranium, plutonium and the minor actinides (americium, neptunium and curium). Separation methods for uranium and plutonium are reasonably well established. On the other hand separation of the minor actinides from lanthanide fission products also present in spent nuclear fuel is an ongoing challenge and an area of active research. Several separation methods for selective removal of these actinides from spent nuclear fuel will be described. These separation methods include solvent extraction, which is the most commonly used method for radiochemical separations, as well as the less developed but promising use of adsorption and ion-exchange materials. PMID:27427893

  16. Gas core reactors for actinide transmutation. [uranium hexafluoride

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.; Wan, P. T.; Chow, S.

    1979-01-01

    The preliminary design of a uranium hexafluoride actinide transmutation reactor to convert long-lived actinide wastes to shorter-lived fission product wastes was analyzed. It is shown that externally moderated gas core reactors are ideal radiators. They provide an abundant supply of thermal neutrons and are insensitive to composition changes in the blanket. For the present reactor, an initial load of 6 metric tons of actinides is loaded. This is equivalent to the quantity produced by 300 LWR-years of operation. At the beginning, the core produces 2000 MWt while the blanket generates only 239 MWt. After four years of irradiation, the actinide mass is reduced to 3.9 metric tonnes. During this time, the blanket is becoming more fissile and its power rapidly approaches 1600 MWt. At the end of four years, continuous refueling of actinides is carried out and the actinide mass is held constant. Equilibrium is essentially achieved at the end of eight years. At equilibrium, the core is producing 1400 MWt and the blanket 1600 MWt. At this power level, the actinide destruction rate is equal to the production rate from 32 LWRs.

  17. Actinide separation chemistry in nuclear waste streams and materials

    The separation of actinide elements from various waste materials, produced either in nuclear fuel cycles or in past nuclear weapons production, represents a significant issue facing developed countries. Improvements in the efficiencies of the separation processes can be expected to occur as a result of better knowledge of the elements in these complex matrices. The Nuclear Science Committee of the OECD/NEA has established a task force of experts in actinide separation chemistry to review current and developing separation techniques and chemical processes. The report consist of eight chapters. In Chapter 1 the importance of actinide separation chemistry in the fields of waste management and its background are summarized.In Chapter 2 the types of waste streams are classified according to their relative importance, by physical form and by source of actinides. The basic data of actinide chemical thermodynamics, such as oxidation states, hydrolysis, complexation, sorption, Gibbs energies of formation, and volatility, were collected and are presented in Chapter 3. Actinide analyses related to separation processes are also mentioned in this chapter. The state of the art of actinide separation chemistry is classified in three groups, including hydrometallurgy, pyrochemical process and process based on fields, and is described in Chapter 4 along with the relationship of kinetics to separations. In Chapter 5 basic chemistry research needs and the inherent limitation on separation processes are discussed. Prioritization of research and development is discussed in Chapter 6 in the context of several attributes of waste management problems. These attributes include: mass or volume of waste; concentration of the actinide in the waste; expected difficulty of treating the wastes; short-term hazard of the waste; long-term hazard of the waste; projected cost of treatment; amount of secondary waste. Based on the priority, recommendations were made for the direction of future research

  18. Use of animal studies for assessing intakes of inhaled actinide-bearing dusts

    This paper reviews the methodology used in the execution and interpretation of animal studies (mostly conducted at NRPB) designed to provide guidance on limits of intake and the effectiveness of chest monitoring for persons exposed to various uranium, plutonium, americium, and thorium bearing dusts. The lung retention and transportability characteristics of the actinides in humans have been predicted by combining the absorption rates into blood calculated from the animal studies with particle transport rates from the alveolar region of the human lung. This approach is compatible with the application of the new ICRP respiratory tract model. The results of the animal experiments demonstrate the diversity of the absorption rates for the different chemical forms of the actinides and their disparity from the default values proposed by ICRP for Type F, M, and S compounds in the absence of specific data. The predicted lung retention kinetics of the actinides in humans provide the basis for assessing the validity of chest monitoring; for this purpose the most recent ICRP values for doses per unit intake and deposition in the alveolar region of the lungs have been taken into account. The results show that for some dusts, the data can be interpreted with confidence, while for others the method is impracticable or has considerable uncertainty. Overall, the results support the ICRP recommendation that material specific information is to be preferred for setting limits on intake and interpreting monitoring data. The paper concludes with suggestions for further work. (author). 44 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties and the solar heating rate estimated by combining sky radiometer and lidar measurements

    Kudo, Rei; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Aoyagi, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    The SKYLIDAR algorithm was developed to estimate vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties from sky radiometer (SKYNET) and lidar (AD-Net) measurements. The solar heating rate was also estimated from the SKYLIDAR retrievals. The algorithm consists of two retrieval steps: (1) columnar properties are retrieved from the sky radiometer measurements and the vertically mean depolarization ratio obtained from the lidar measurements, and (2) vertical profiles are retrieved from the lidar measur...

  20. Report of the panel on practical problems in actinide biology

    Practical problems are classified as the need to make operational decisions, the need for regulatory assessment either of individual facilities or of generic actions, and the overt appearance of radiobiological effects in man or radioactivity in man or the environment. Topics discussed are as follows: simulated reactor accident; long term effects of low doses; effects of repeated exposures to actinides; inhaled uranium mine air contaminants; metabolism and dosimetry; environmental equilibrium models; patterns of alpha dosimetry; internal dose calculations; interfaces between actinide biology and environmental studies; removal of actinides deposited in the body; and research needs related to uranium isotopes

  1. Status report on actinide and fission product transmutation studies

    The management of radioactive waste is one of the key issues in today's political and public discussions on nuclear energy. One of the fields that looks into the future possibilities of nuclear technology is the neutronic transmutation of actinides and of some most important fission products. Studies on transmutation of actinides are carried out in various countries and at an international level. This status report which gives an up-to-date general overview of current and planned research on transmutation of actinides and fission products in non-OECD countries, has been prepared by a Technical Committee meeting organized by the IAEA in September 1995. 168 refs, 16 figs, 34 tabs

  2. The speciation of actinide ions in concentrated salt solutions

    Many separations of actinide ions involve concentrated solutions. There is additional interest in actinide behavior in brine solutions in the WIPP salt repository. Unfortunately, little understanding exists on the speciation of actinides in concentrated solutions. The author has studied the extraction distribution of Am(III) as a function of concentration of NX salts (N-, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+ and X = ClO4-, Cl-, NO3-). Analyses of the distribution curves are discussed in terms of hydration, complexation, etc. effects on the Am(III). The variation of the calculated stability constants with ionic strength is compared with the expected variation using Specific-Ion Interaction Theory (SIT)

  3. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  4. Actinide interactions at microbial interfaces: an interdisciplinary challenge

    An overview on the current state of knowledge of microbial actinide interaction processes is presented. Several detailed examples of the interaction of aerobic soil bacteria (Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Deinococcus strains) with uranium and plutonium are discussed. Details of the nature of the bacterial functional groups involved in the interfacial actinide interaction process are reported. Based on time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) studies, molecular-level mechanistic details of the different interaction processes are discussed. Areas of this emerging field in actinide research are outlined where additional information and integrated interdisciplinary research is required

  5. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    Albiol, Thierry [CEA Cadarache, St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  6. Separating the Minor Actinides Through Advances in Selective Coordination Chemistry

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Braley, Jenifer C.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Carter, Jennifer C.

    2012-08-22

    This report describes work conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 under the auspices of the Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy. Researchers at PNNL and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are investigating a simplified solvent extraction system for providing a single-step process to separate the minor actinide elements from acidic high-level liquid waste (HLW), including separating the minor actinides from the lanthanide fission products.

  7. Electronic structure and ionicity of actinide oxides from first principles

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z.;

    2010-01-01

    The ground-state electronic structures of the actinide oxides AO, A2O3, and AO2 (A=U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, and Cf) are determined from first-principles calculations, using the self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation. Emphasis is put on the degree of f-electron localization, which...... actinide dioxides is discussed, and it is found that the dioxide is the most stable oxide for the actinides from Np onward. Our study reveals a strong link between preferred oxidation number and degree of localization which is confirmed by comparing to the ground-state configurations of the corresponding...

  8. Human factors and safety issues associated with actinide retrieval from spent light water reactor fuel assemblies

    A major problem in environmental restoration and waste management is the disposition of used fuel assemblies from the many light water reactors in the United States, which present a radiation hazard to those whose job is to dispose of them, with a similar threat to the general environment associated with long-term storage in fuel repositories around the country. Actinides resident in the fuel pins as a result of their use in reactor cores constitute a significant component of this hazard. Recently, the Department of Energy has initiated an Actinide Recycle Program to study the feasibility of using pyrochemical (molten salt) processes to recover actinides from the spent fuel assemblies of commercial reactors. This project concerns the application of robotics technology to the operation and maintenance functions of a plant whose objective is to recover actinides from spent fuel assemblies, and to dispose of the resulting hardware and chemical components from this process. Such a procedure involves a number of safety and human factors issues. The purpose of the project is to explore the use of robotics and artificial intelligence to facilitate accomplishment of the program goals while maintaining the safety of the humans doing the work and the integrity of the environment. This project will result in a graphic simulation on a Silicon Graphics workstation as a proof of principle demonstration of the feasibility of using robotics along with an intelligent operator interface. A major component of the operator-system interface is a hybrid artificial intelligence system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which combines artificial neural networks and an expert system into a hybrid, self-improving computer-based system interface. 10 refs

  9. Determination of actinides by alpha spectrometric methods

    The submitted thesis in its first part concern with content determination of plutonium, americium, uranium, thorium radionuclides, like the most significant representatives of actinides in environmental patterns, where by the primary consideration is a focusing on content of these actinides in samples of superior mycotic organisms - mushrooms. Following the published studies the mushrooms were monitored as organisms that could verify most of attributes putted on bioindicators in term of observation of substantial radionuclides in living environment. There were analyzed two groups of samples that came from two chosen locations, one of them is situated in Eastern Slovakia and the second one in West Slovakia. Except for mushrooms samples the examined radionuclides volumes were determined even in specimens of soil sub-base and some plants from chosen localities. The liquid - liquid extraction methods were used for determination of mass activities of actinides in samples for radiochemical separation of monitored radionuclides. The obtained results of plutonium and americium mass activities determination's lead us to carry out experiments that proved abilities of superior mycotic organisms to absorb and accumulate alpha radionuclides in their textures. We choose the oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) species as an experimental object. Sporocarps of this mushroom were cultivated on substratum which is commercially exploited to cultivate it whereby this substratum was purposely contaminated by known activities of 239Pu and 241Am. We prepared five autonomous samples together. The values of mass activities of 239Pu and 241Am obtained by following analysis of prepared samples showed the ability of mushrooms to absorb observed actinides in their texture structures. On the basis of obtained mass activities it was possible to evaluate and numerically determine a transmitting factor's attributes of monitored radionuclides in sporocarps and in sub-base. Accordingly we defined

  10. Role of actinide behavior in waste management

    For purposes of assessing the safety of repositories of radioactive wastes placed in geologic isolation, actinide behavior in the environment has been interpreted in terms of five steps of prediction: analysis of repository stability; geosphere transport; the geosphere-biosphere interface; biosphere transport; and biosphere consequences. Each step in the analysis requires models of nuclide behavior and data on the physical and chemical properties of the radioactivity. The scope of information required in order to make reliable safety assessments has been outlined. All steps in the assessment process are coupled; reliable models and data are therefore needed for each step. The prediction phase of safety assessment is also coupled to activities concerned with waste treatment, selection of the final form of the waste, and selection of repository sites and designs. Results of the predictions can impact these activities

  11. Solidification of simulated actinides by natural zircon

    YANG Jian-Wen; LUO Shang-Geng

    2004-01-01

    Natural zircon was used as precursor material to produce a zircon waste form bearing 20wt% simulated actinides (Nd2O3 and UO2) through a solid state reaction by a typical synroc fabrication process. The fabricated zircon waste form has relatively good physical properties (density 5.09g/cm3, open porosity 4.0%, Vickers hardness 715kg/mm2). The XRD, SEM/EDS and TEM/EDS analyses indicate that there are zircon phases containing waste elements formed through the reaction. The chemical durability and radiation stability are determined by the MCC-1method and heavy ion irradiation; the results show that the zircon waste form is highly leach resistance and relatively stable under irradiation (amorphous dose 0.7dpa). From this study, the method of using a natural mineral to solidify radioactive waste has proven to be feasible.

  12. Actinide elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    Progress is reported in terrestrial ecology studies with regard to plutonium in biota from the White Oak Creek forest; comparative distribution of plutonium in two forest ecosystems; an ecosystem model of plutonium dynamics; actinide element metabolism in cotton rats; and crayfish studies. Progress is reported in aquatic studies with regard to transuranics in surface waters, frogs, benthic algae, and invertebrates from pond 3513; and radioecology of transuranic elements in cotton rats bordering waste pond 3513. Progress is also reported in stability of trivalent plutonium in White Oak Lake water; chemistry of plutonium, americium, curium, and uranium in pond water; uranium, thorium, and plutonium in small mammals; and effect of soil pretreatment on the distribution of plutonium

  13. Studies of actinides in a superanoxic fjord

    Water column and sediment profiles of Pu, Am, Th and U have been obtained in the superanoxic Framvaren fjord, southern Norway. The concentration of bomb test fallout Pu, Am as well as 'dissolved' Th in the bottom water are the highest recorded in the marine environment. The behaviour of the actinides in the anoxic water mass is to a large extent governed by the behaviour of the colloidal material. Ultrafiltration reveals that 40-60% of the actinides are associated to the large colloids, surprisingly this is valid also for U. The sediment acts as a source for Pu, Am, and Th to the water column but primarily as a sink for U. The remobilization of Pu, Am and Th is evident from the water column profiles which have similar diffusion shape profiles as other constituents originating from the sediments. The vertical eddy diffusion coefficient calculated from the Pu profile is in the same order of magnitude as reported from the H2S profile. Decreased bottom water concentrations (but a constant water column inventory) between 1989 and 1995 as well as pore water Pu concentrations nearly identical to the overlaying bottom water indicates that the present Pu flux from the sediments are low. Contrary to Pu and Am, the water column Th inventory (232Th and 230Th) continues to increase. The flux of 232Th from the sediments was determined from changes in water column inventory between 1989 and 1995 and from a pore water profile to be in the order of 2-8 Bq/m2/y. 208 refs

  14. Archetypes for actinide-specific chelating agents

    The complexes of uranium and thorium with monomeric hydroxamic acids can serve as archetypes for an optimized macrochelate designed for tetravalent actinides. The eight-coordinate complexes, Th(i-PrN(O)C(O)R)4, where R = tert-butyl or R = neopentyl, have been synthesized and their structures have been determined by x-ray diffraction. The bulky alkyl substituents impart remarkable volatility and hydrocarbon solubility to these complexes, and the steric interactions of these substituents largely determine the structures. When R = tert-butyl, the substituents occupy the corners of a tetrahedron and force the complex into a distorted cubic geometry with crystallographic S4 symmetry. Insertion of a methylene group between the carbonyl carbon and the tert-butyl group relaxes the steric requirements, and the coordination polyhedron of the neopentyl derivative is close to the mmmm isomer of the trigonal-faced dodecahedron. Uranium tetrachloride was quantitatively oxidized via an oxygen transfer reaction with two equivalents of N-phenylbenzohydroxamic acid anion (PBHA) in tetrahydrofuran (THF) to form UO2 Cl(PBHA)(THF)2 and benzanilide. The structure of the uranyl complex has been determined from x-ray diffraction data; the linear uranyl ion is surrounded by a planar pentagonal array composed of two hydroxamate oxygen atoms, a chloride ion and two THF oxygens, such that the chloride ion is opposite the hydroxamate group. That the THF and phenyl rings are twisted from this equatorial plane limits the molecular geometry to that of the C1 point group. Some aspects of the chemistry of hydroxamic acids and of their incorporation into molecules that may serve as precursors of tetravalent actinide specific sequestering agents have also been investigated

  15. Radiochemical studies of neutron deficient actinide isotopes

    The production of neutron deficient actinide isotopes in heavy ion reactions was studied using alpha, gamma, x-ray, and spontaneous fission detection systems. A new isotope of berkelium, 242Bk, was produced with a cross-section of approximately 10 μb in reactions of boron on uranium and nitrogen on thorium. It decays by electron capture with a half-life of 7.0 +- 1.3 minutes. The alpha-branching ratio for this isotope is less than 1% and the spontaneous fission ratio is less than 0.03%. Studies of (Heavy Ion, pxn) and (Heavy Ion, αxn) transfer reactions in comparison with (Heavy ion, xn) compound nucleus reactions revealed transfer reaction cross-sections equal to or greater than the compound nucleus yields. The data show that in some cases the yield of an isotope produced via a (H.I.,pxn) or (H.I.,αxn) reaction may be higher than its production via an xn compound nucleus reaction. These results have dire consequences for proponents of the ''Z1 + Z2 = Z/sub 1+2/'' philosophy. It is no longer acceptable to assume that (H.I.,pxn) and (H.I.,αxn) product yields are of no consequence when studying compound nucleus reactions. No evidence for spontaneous fission decay of 228Pu, 230Pu, 232Cm, or 238Cf was observed indicating that strictly empirical extrapolations of spontaneous fission half-life data is inadequate for predictions of half-lives for unknown neutron deficient actinide isotopes

  16. Pyrometallurgical processes for recovery of actinide elements

    Battles, J.E.; Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C.; Miller, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    A metallic fuel alloy, nominally U-20-Pu-lOZr, is the key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Metallic fuel permits the use of an innovative, simple pyrometallurgical process, known as pyroprocessing, (the subject of this report), which features fused salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Electrorefining separates the actinide elements from fission products, without producing a separate stream of plutonium. The plutonium-bearing product is contaminated with higher actinides and with a minor amount of rare earth fission products, making it diversion resistant while still suitable as a fuel material in the fast spectrum of the IFR core. The engineering-scale demonstration of this process will be conducted in the refurbished EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility, which has entered the start-up phase. An additional pyrometallurgical process is under development for extracting transuranic (TRU) elements from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel in a form suitable for use as a feed to the IFR fuel cycle. Four candidate extraction processes have been investigated and shown to be chemically feasible. The main steps in each process are oxide reduction with calcium or lithium, regeneration of the reductant and recycle of the salt, and separation of the TRU product from the bulk uranium. Two processes, referred to as the lithium and salt transport (calcium reductant) processes, have been selected for engineering-scale demonstration, which is expected to start in late 1993. An integral part of pyroprocessing development is the treatment and packaging of high-level waste materials arising from the operations, along with the qualification of these waste forms for disposal in a geologic repository.

  17. Studies of actinides in a superanoxic fjord

    Roos, P.

    1997-04-01

    Water column and sediment profiles of Pu, Am, Th and U have been obtained in the superanoxic Framvaren fjord, southern Norway. The concentration of bomb test fallout Pu, Am as well as `dissolved` Th in the bottom water are the highest recorded in the marine environment. The behaviour of the actinides in the anoxic water mass is to a large extent governed by the behaviour of the colloidal material. Ultrafiltration reveals that 40-60% of the actinides are associated to the large colloids, surprisingly this is valid also for U. The sediment acts as a source for Pu, Am, and Th to the water column but primarily as a sink for U. The remobilization of Pu, Am and Th is evident from the water column profiles which have similar diffusion shape profiles as other constituents originating from the sediments. The vertical eddy diffusion coefficient calculated from the Pu profile is in the same order of magnitude as reported from the H{sub 2}S profile. Decreased bottom water concentrations (but a constant water column inventory) between 1989 and 1995 as well as pore water Pu concentrations nearly identical to the overlaying bottom water indicates that the present Pu flux from the sediments are low. Contrary to Pu and Am, the water column Th inventory ({sup 232}Th and {sup 230}Th) continues to increase. The flux of {sup 232}Th from the sediments was determined from changes in water column inventory between 1989 and 1995 and from a pore water profile to be in the order of 2-8 Bq/m{sup 2}/y. 208 refs.

  18. Radiochemical studies of neutron deficient actinide isotopes

    Williams, K.E.

    1978-04-01

    The production of neutron deficient actinide isotopes in heavy ion reactions was studied using alpha, gamma, x-ray, and spontaneous fission detection systems. A new isotope of berkelium, /sup 242/Bk, was produced with a cross-section of approximately 10 ..mu..b in reactions of boron on uranium and nitrogen on thorium. It decays by electron capture with a half-life of 7.0 +- 1.3 minutes. The alpha-branching ratio for this isotope is less than 1% and the spontaneous fission ratio is less than 0.03%. Studies of (Heavy Ion, pxn) and (Heavy Ion, ..cap alpha..xn) transfer reactions in comparison with (Heavy ion, xn) compound nucleus reactions revealed transfer reaction cross-sections equal to or greater than the compound nucleus yields. The data show that in some cases the yield of an isotope produced via a (H.I.,pxn) or (H.I.,..cap alpha..xn) reaction may be higher than its production via an xn compound nucleus reaction. These results have dire consequences for proponents of the ''Z/sub 1/ + Z/sub 2/ = Z/sub 1+2/'' philosophy. It is no longer acceptable to assume that (H.I.,pxn) and (H.I.,..cap alpha..xn) product yields are of no consequence when studying compound nucleus reactions. No evidence for spontaneous fission decay of /sup 228/Pu, /sup 230/Pu, /sup 232/Cm, or /sup 238/Cf was observed indicating that strictly empirical extrapolations of spontaneous fission half-life data is inadequate for predictions of half-lives for unknown neutron deficient actinide isotopes.

  19. Pyrometallurgical processes for recovery of actinide elements

    A metallic fuel alloy, nominally U-20-Pu-lOZr, is the key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Metallic fuel permits the use of an innovative, simple pyrometallurgical process, known as pyroprocessing, (the subject of this report), which features fused salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Electrorefining separates the actinide elements from fission products, without producing a separate stream of plutonium. The plutonium-bearing product is contaminated with higher actinides and with a minor amount of rare earth fission products, making it diversion resistant while still suitable as a fuel material in the fast spectrum of the IFR core. The engineering-scale demonstration of this process will be conducted in the refurbished EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility, which has entered the start-up phase. An additional pyrometallurgical process is under development for extracting transuranic (TRU) elements from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel in a form suitable for use as a feed to the IFR fuel cycle. Four candidate extraction processes have been investigated and shown to be chemically feasible. The main steps in each process are oxide reduction with calcium or lithium, regeneration of the reductant and recycle of the salt, and separation of the TRU product from the bulk uranium. Two processes, referred to as the lithium and salt transport (calcium reductant) processes, have been selected for engineering-scale demonstration, which is expected to start in late 1993. An integral part of pyroprocessing development is the treatment and packaging of high-level waste materials arising from the operations, along with the qualification of these waste forms for disposal in a geologic repository

  20. Real-time temperature estimation and monitoring of HIFU ablation through a combined modeling and passive acoustic mapping approach

    Jensen, C. R.; Cleveland, R. O.; Coussios, C. C.

    2013-09-01

    Passive acoustic mapping (PAM) has been recently demonstrated as a method of monitoring focused ultrasound therapy by reconstructing the emissions created by inertially cavitating bubbles (Jensen et al 2012 Radiology 262 252-61). The published method sums energy emitted by cavitation from the focal region within the tissue and uses a threshold to determine when sufficient energy has been delivered for ablation. The present work builds on this approach to provide a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring software that displays both real-time temperature maps and a prediction of the ablated tissue region. This is achieved by determining heat deposition from two sources: (i) acoustic absorption of the primary HIFU beam which is calculated via a nonlinear model, and (ii) absorption of energy from bubble acoustic emissions which is estimated from measurements. The two sources of heat are used as inputs to the bioheat equation that gives an estimate of the temperature of the tissue as well as estimates of tissue ablation. The method has been applied to ex vivo ox liver samples and the estimated temperature is compared to the measured temperature and shows good agreement, capturing the effect of cavitation-enhanced heating on temperature evolution. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by using PAM and predictions of heating it is possible to produce an evolving estimate of cell death during exposure in order to guide treatment for monitoring ablative HIFU therapy. Portions presented at the 13th International Symposium on Therapeutic Ultrasound, Heidelberg, Germany (2012).

  1. Real-time temperature estimation and monitoring of HIFU ablation through a combined modeling and passive acoustic mapping approach

    Passive acoustic mapping (PAM) has been recently demonstrated as a method of monitoring focused ultrasound therapy by reconstructing the emissions created by inertially cavitating bubbles (Jensen et al 2012 Radiology 262 252–61). The published method sums energy emitted by cavitation from the focal region within the tissue and uses a threshold to determine when sufficient energy has been delivered for ablation. The present work builds on this approach to provide a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring software that displays both real-time temperature maps and a prediction of the ablated tissue region. This is achieved by determining heat deposition from two sources: (i) acoustic absorption of the primary HIFU beam which is calculated via a nonlinear model, and (ii) absorption of energy from bubble acoustic emissions which is estimated from measurements. The two sources of heat are used as inputs to the bioheat equation that gives an estimate of the temperature of the tissue as well as estimates of tissue ablation. The method has been applied to ex vivo ox liver samples and the estimated temperature is compared to the measured temperature and shows good agreement, capturing the effect of cavitation-enhanced heating on temperature evolution. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by using PAM and predictions of heating it is possible to produce an evolving estimate of cell death during exposure in order to guide treatment for monitoring ablative HIFU therapy. (paper)

  2. A combined numerical and experimental technique for estimation of the forces and moments in the lumbar intervertebral disc

    Wang, Shaobai; Park, Won Man; Gadikota, Hemanth R.; Miao, Jun; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Wood, Kirkham B.; Li, Guoan

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of the loads on the lumbar intervertebral discs is critically important since it is closely related to spine biomechanics, pathology and prosthesis design. Non-invasive estimation of the loads in the discs remains a challenge. In this study we proposed a new technique to estimate in-vivo loads in the IVD using a subject-specific finite element model of the disc and the kinematics of the disc endplates as input boundary conditions. The technique was validated by comparing the forces...

  3. Element Partitioning in Glass-Ceramic Designed for Actinides Immobilization

    2008-01-01

    <正>Glass-ceramics were designed for immobilization of actinides. In order to immobilizing more wastes in the matrix and to develop the optimum formulation for the glass-ceramic, it is necessary to study the

  4. An atomic beam source for actinide elements: concept and realization

    For ultratrace analysis of actinide elements and studies of their atomic properties with resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS), efficient and stable sources of actinide atomic beams are required. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the evaporation of actinide elements and oxides from a variety of metals were considered, including diffusion, desorption, and associative desorption. On this basis various sandwich-type filaments were studied. The most promising system was found to consist of tantalum as the backing material, an electrolytically deposited actinide hydroxide as the source of the element, and a titanium covering layer for its reduction to the metal. Such sandwich sources were experimentally proven to be well suited for the production of atomic beams of plutonium, curium, berkelium and californium at relatively low operating temperatures and with high and reproducible yields. (orig.)

  5. Advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012). Abstract book

    The abstract book of the International workshop on advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012) include contributions concerning the following issues: environmental applications, NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and theory, technical application: separation processes, emission spectroscopy.

  6. Solvent extraction process for partitioning actinides from HLLW

    A description and review of the solvent extraction process for partitioning actinides from HLLW is presented. TRUEX process, DIDPA process, DIAMEX process, TRPO process as well as related An (III)/Ln(III) separation process are briefly discussed

  7. Actinide targets for the synthesis of super-heavy elements

    Roberto, J. B.; Alexander, C. W.; Boll, R. A.; Burns, J. D.; Ezold, J. G.; Felker, L. K.; Hogle, S. L.; Rykaczewski, K. P.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2000, six new super-heavy elements with atomic numbers 113 through 118 have been synthesized in hot fusion reactions of 48Ca beams on actinide targets. These target materials, including 242Pu, 244Pu, 243Am, 245Cm, 248Cm, 249Cf, and 249Bk, are available in very limited quantities and require specialized production and processing facilities resident in only a few research centers worldwide. This report describes the production and chemical processing of heavy actinide materials for super-heavy element research, current availabilities of these materials, and related target fabrication techniques. The impact of actinide materials in super-heavy element discovery is reviewed, and strategies for enhancing the production of rare actinides including 249Bk, 251Cf, and 254Es are described.

  8. Distribution of actinide elements in sediments: leaching studies

    Previous investigations have shown that Fe and Mn oxides and organic matter can significantly influence the behavior of Pu and other actinides in the environment. A sequential leaching procedure has been developed in order to investigate the solid phase distribution of the actinides in riverine and marine sediments. Seven different sedimentary fractions are defined by this leaching experiment: an exchangeable metals fraction, an organic fraction, a carbonate fraction, a Mn oxide fraction, an amorphous Fe fraction, a crystalline Fe oxide fraction and a lattice-held or residual fraction. There is also the option of including a metal sufide fraction. A preliminary experiment, analyzing only the metals and not the actinide elements, indicates that this leaching procedure (with some modifications) is a viable procedure. The subsequent data should result in information concerning the geochemical history and behavior of these actinide elements in the environment

  9. Advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012). Abstract book

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Mueller, Katharina; Steudtner, Robin (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    The abstract book of the International workshop on advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012) include contributions concerning the following issues: environmental applications, NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and theory, technical application: separation processes, emission spectroscopy.

  10. Use of fast-spectrum reactors for actinide burning

    Finally, Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) pyroprocessing has been developed only in recent years and it appears to have potential as a relatively uncomplicated, effective actinide recovery process. In fact, actinide recycling occurs naturally in the IFR fuel cycle. Although still very much developmental, the entire IFR fuel cycle will be demonstrated on prototype-scale in conjunction with the EBR-II and its refurbished Fuel Cycle Facility starting in late 1991. A logical extension to this work, therefore, is to establish whether this IFR pyrochemical processing can be applied to extracting actinides from LWR spent fuel. This paper summarizes current thinking on the rationale for actinide recycle, its ramifications on the geologic repository and the current high-level waste management plans, and the necessary development programs. 4 figs., 4 tabs

  11. In-situ mineralization of actinides with phytic acid

    A new approach to the remediation of actinide contamination is described. A hydrolytically unstable organophosphorus compound, phytic acid, is introduced into the contaminated environment. In the short term (up to several hundred years), phytate acts as a cation exchanger to absorb mobile actinide ions from ground waters. Ultimately, phytate decomposes to release phosphate and promote the formation of insoluble phosphate mineral phases, considered an ideal medium to immobilize actinides, as it forms compounds with the lowest solubility of any candidate mineral species. This overview will discuss the rate of hydrolysis of phytic acid, the formation of lanthanide/actinide phosphate mineral forms, the cation exchange behavior of insoluble phytate, and results from laboratory demonstration of the application to soils from the Fernald site

  12. Recovery of actinides from spent nuclear fuel by pyrochemical reprocessing

    The Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) strategy is based on reduction of the long-term radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel by recovery and recycling of plutonium and minor actinides, i.e. Np, Am and Cm. Regardless if transmutation of actinides is conceived by a heterogeneous accelerator driven system, fast reactor concept or as integrated waste burning with a homogenous recycling of all actinides, the reprocessed fuels used are likely to be significantly different from the commercial fuels of today. Because of the fuel type and the high burn-up reached, traditional hydrometallurgical reprocessing such as used today might not be the most adequate method. The main reasons are the low solubility of some fuel materials in acidic aqueous solutions and the limited radiation stability of the organic solvents used in extraction processes. Therefore, pyrochemical separation techniques are under development worldwide, usually based on electrochemical methods, reductive extraction in a high temperature molten salt solvent or fluoride volatility techniques. The pyrochemical reprocessing developed in ITU is based on electrorefining of metallic fuel in molten LiCl-KCl using solid aluminium cathodes. This is followed by a chlorination process for the recovery of actinides from formed actinide-aluminium alloys, and exhaustive electrolysis is proposed for the clean-up of salt from the remaining actinides. In this paper, the main achievements in the electrorefining process are summarised together with results of the most recent experimental studies on characterisation of actinides-aluminium intermetallic compounds. U, Np and Pu alloys were investigated by electrochemical techniques using solid aluminium electrodes and the alloys formed by electrodeposition of the individual actinides were analysed by XRD and SEM-EDX. Some thermodynamic properties were determined from the measurements (standard electrode potentials, Gibbs energy, enthalpy and entropy of formation) as well as

  13. Leaching of actinides from nuclear waste glass: French experience

    The activity concentration versus time of a typical LWR glass shows that after 300 years most of the activity is attributable to three actinides (Np, Pu and Am) and to 99Tc. This activity decreases slowly, and some 50.000 years are necessary before the activity concentration drops to the level of the richest natural ores. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge concerning the kinetics of actinide release from glass subjected to aqueous leaching

  14. Electronic structure and properties of rare earth and actinide intermetallics

    There are 188 contributions, experimental and theoretical, a few on rare earth and actinide elements but mostly on rare earth and actinide intermetallic compounds and alloys. The properties dealt with include 1) crystal structure, 2) magnetic properties and magnetic structure, 3) magnetic phase transformations and valence fluctuations, 4) electrical properties and superconductivity and their temperature, pressure and magnetic field dependence. A few papers deal with crystal growth and novel measuring methods. (G.Q.)

  15. Quantitative estimation of the combined effect of external γ-radiation and incorporated α-radiation (239Pu) by the biochemical indices of rat immune system

    The combined effect of external γ-radiation (137Cs, 103-26 mC/kg) and incorporated α-radiation (239Pu nitrate, 93-9.3 kBq/kg body mass) was estimated by changes in the nucleic acid metabolism and the number of cells in rat thymus, spleen and bone marrow. The data obtained were processed using a model of multiplicate action of the factors which is equivalent, in the case of low effects, to a traditional model of additive effects. The results of the combined action of the two factors may be estimated by the coefficient of the interaction and the coefficient of the enhancement of the effects

  16. Combined line-transect and cue-count estimate of sperm whale abundance in the North Atlantic, from Icelandic NASS-2001 shipboard survey

    Thorvaldur Gunnlaugsson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus pose a particular problem to shipboard surveys as they dive for extended periods and are therefore likely to be missed (not available even if they are right under the track line. To address these problems the NAMMCO planning committee for the NASS 2001 survey drew up guidelines to be followed when sperm whales were sighted. This required every deep dive to be recorded and considered to be a cue, from which a cue-count estimate is calculated if the cue rate is known. For those whales that did not dive before coming abeam, a conventional line-transect estimate is calculated, which gives an instantaneous surface estimate from which a total estimate can be obtained if the proportion of the time spent at the surface is known. These estimates are compared and combined. Precise dive cycle information is missing for the mostly single all male sperm whales in this area but a preliminary estimate of 11,185 (cv 0.34 is obtained for the surveyed area with an assumed surface time of 20% and two deep dives per hour.

  17. Structure of early actinides(V) in acidic solutions

    Di Giandomenico, M.V.; Le Naour, C.; Simoni, E. [CNRS/Univ. Paris-Sud, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay (France); Guillaumont, D.; Moisy, P.; Den Auwer, C. [CEA Marcoule, DHN/DRCP/SCPS, Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Hennig, C. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Conradson, S.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Protactinium occupies a key position in the actinide series between thorium and uranium. In aqueous acidic solution, it is stable at oxidation state (V), occurring either as an oxocation or as a naked ion, depending on the media. Very few structural information on the hydration sphere of Pa(V) in acidic medium is available, in particular in hydrofluoric acid. Combined EXAFS and theoretical calculations have been used in this work to characterize the protactinium coordination sphere at various HF concentrations. The correlation of the XAFS data with quantum chemical calculations provides complementary structural and electronic models from ab initio techniques. At HF concentrations from 0.5 to 0.05 M, both theoretical calculations and EXAFS data suggest that the protactinium coordination sphere is mainly composed of fluoride ions. At the lowest HF concentration, the occurrence of a monooxo bond is observed with EXAFS, in agreement with the literature. A comparison of these data with related neptunium(V) and plutonium(V) diooxocations in perchloric acid is also presented. (orig.)

  18. Structure of early actinides(V) in acidic solutions

    Protactinium occupies a key position in the actinide series between thorium and uranium. In aqueous acidic solution, it is stable at oxidation state (V), occurring either as an oxocation or as a naked ion, depending on the media. Very few structural information on the hydration sphere of Pa(V) in acidic medium is available, in particular in hydrofluoric acid. Combined EXAFS and theoretical calculations have been used in this work to characterize the protactinium coordination sphere at various HF concentrations. The correlation of the XAFS data with quantum chemical calculations provides complementary structural and electronic models from ab initio techniques. At HF concentrations from 0.5 to 0.05 M, both theoretical calculations and EXAFS data suggest that the protactinium coordination sphere is mainly composed of fluoride ions. At the lowest HF concentration, the occurrence of a monooxo bond is observed with EXAFS, in agreement with the literature. A comparison of these data with related neptunium(V) and plutonium(V) diooxocations in perchloric acid is also presented. (orig.)

  19. Potential Geophysical Field Transformations and Combined 3D Modelling for Estimation the Seismic Site Effects on Example of Israel

    Eppelbaum, Lev; Meirova, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    It is well-known that the local seismic site effects may have a significant contribution to the intensity of damage and destruction (e.g., Hough et al., 1990; Regnier et al., 2000; Bonnefoy-Claudet et al., 2006; Haase et al., 2010). The thicknesses of sediments, which play a large role in amplification, usually are derived from seismic velocities. At the same time, thickness of sediments may be determined (or defined) on the basis of 3D combined gravity-magnetic modeling joined with available geological materials, seismic data and borehole section examination. Final result of such investigation is a 3D physical-geological model (PGM) reflecting main geological peculiarities of the area under study. Such a combined study needs in application of a reliable 3D mathematical algorithm of computation together with advanced methodology of 3D modeling. For this analysis the developed GSFC software was selected. The GSFC (Geological Space Field Calculation) program was developed for solving a direct 3-D gravity and magnetic prospecting problem under complex geological conditions (Khesin et al., 1996; Eppelbaum and Khesin, 2004). This program has been designed for computing the field of Δg (Bouguer, free-air or observed value anomalies), ΔZ, ΔX, ΔY , ΔT , as well as second derivatives of the gravitational potential under conditions of rugged relief and inclined magnetization. The geological space can be approximated by (1) three-dimensional, (2) semi-infinite bodies and (3) those infinite along the strike closed, L.H. non-closed, R.H. on-closed and open). Geological bodies are approximated by horizontal polygonal prisms. The program has the following main advantages (besides abovementioned ones): (1) Simultaneous computing of gravity and magnetic fields; (2) Description of the terrain relief by irregularly placed characteristic points; (3) Computation of the effect of the earth-air boundary by the method of selection directly in the process of interpretation; (4

  20. The use of a single technique for the separation and determination of actinides in biological materials

    For the radiotoxicological survey of workers exposed to different types of alpha-emitting contaminants, a procedure was developed which permits the estimate of Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm in biological samples with a single technique. The radionuclides are extracted on a column by tri-n-octylphosphine oxide and separated by elution at different pH values. Afterwards, the quantitative determinations are done by physical methods (alpha counting or spectrometry). In the case of an accident it is possible to use a simplification of the procedure (extraction in a beaker) for checks. A procedure for the rapid determination of actinides in faeces and in nasal secretions is described