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Sample records for actinide nitrides phosphides

  1. Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides

    Van Der Sluys, William G.; Burns, Carol J.; Smith, David C.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

  2. Properties of minor actinide nitrides

    The present status of the research on properties of minor actinide nitrides for the development of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle based on nitride fuel and pyrochemical reprocessing is described. Some thermal stabilities of Am-based nitrides such as AmN and (Am, Zr)N were mainly investigated. Stabilization effect of ZrN was cleary confirmed for the vaporization and hydrolytic behaviors. New experimental equipments for measuring thermal properties of minor actinide nitrides were also introduced. (author)

  3. Method of synthesizing bulk transition metal carbide, nitride and phosphide catalysts

    Choi, Jae Soon; Armstrong, Beth L; Schwartz, Viviane

    2015-04-21

    A method for synthesizing catalyst beads of bulk transmission metal carbides, nitrides and phosphides is provided. The method includes providing an aqueous suspension of transition metal oxide particles in a gel forming base, dropping the suspension into an aqueous solution to form a gel bead matrix, heating the bead to remove the binder, and carburizing, nitriding or phosphiding the bead to form a transition metal carbide, nitride, or phosphide catalyst bead. The method can be tuned for control of porosity, mechanical strength, and dopant content of the beads. The produced catalyst beads are catalytically active, mechanically robust, and suitable for packed-bed reactor applications. The produced catalyst beads are suitable for biomass conversion, petrochemistry, petroleum refining, electrocatalysis, and other applications.

  4. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  5. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    Albiol, Thierry [CEA Cadarache, St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  6. Structural stability and mutual transformations of molybdenum carbide, nitride and phosphide

    Graphical abstract: Both Mo2C and Mo2N can be transformed to MoP, whereas the reverse changes are inviable, which is used to develop a promising and practical pathway for preparing MoP nanoparticles. Highlights: → Mo carbide, nitride and phosphide are prepared. → The structural stability increases in the order of Mo2N 2C 2C and Mo2N can be transformed to MoP, whereas the reverse changes are inviable. → This study develops a promising and practical pathway for preparing MoP nanoparticles. -- Abstract: The structural stability and transformations of Mo carbide, nitride and phosphide were investigated under various atmosphere conditions by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results indicated that the order of structural stability of these Mo-based compounds was as follows: Mo2N 2C 2C and Mo2N can be transformed to MoP, whereas the reverse transformations did not occur. Noticeably, compared with those Mo sources containing oxygen, the use of Mo2C/Mo2N as Mo-source can produce finely dispersed MoP nanoparticles by the temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) method. The result was probably due to the fact that lower-levels H2O generated during synthesis process can avoid strong hydrothermal sintering. The influence of formation energy had been considered and was found to relate to the structural stability and transformations of these Mo-based compounds.

  7. Crystallo-chemistry of actinide nitrides (U1-yPuy)N and effect of impurities

    Investigations on actinide nitrides has been done in our Laboratories for Fast Breeder Reactors since the seventies and some properties are reported to show the interest for these fuels. Today, the actinide nitrides are reconsidered as possible fuels for the future fission reactors (GFR and LMFR selected by the international forum Generation IV). The results of new investigations on crystal structure of mixed mono-nitrides (U,Pu)N, and the effects of oxygen and carbon contaminations on this structure are presented. The cubic 'NaCl-fcc' type structure of actinide nitrides AnN with space group O5/h-Fm3m does not respect the 'Vegard law' model for the mixed nitrides (U1-yPuy)N. These nitrides are usually considered with strong metallic character associated with partial ionic bonding, but the ionic contribution in the An-N bonding determined in this work is very important and near 41.6% for UN and PuN. From results published on resistivity of mixed nitrides, the data on bonding must be also modified for partial covalence. This is in good agreement with the experimental lattice parameters which are not compatible with dominant metallic bonding. The numbers of bonding electrons in the nitrides (U1-yPuy)N are reevaluated and the low values proposed comparatively with those previously published confirm the strong ionic character with high concentration of An3+ ions. The solubility of oxygen and carbon in actinide nitrides (U1-yPuy)N are discussed from measurements on volume concentration of actinide oxide phase, total oxygen and carbon contents, and lattice parameter of nitrides. The oxygen solubility limit in UN is near 1000 ppm, with a lightly higher value of 1200 ppm for the mixed nitride (U0.8Pu0.2)N. The effects of oxygen or carbon atoms in the lattice of (U1-yPuy)N are analysed

  8. Synthesis and Optimization of the Sintering Kinetics of Actinide Nitrides

    Drryl P. Butt; Brian Jaques

    2009-03-31

    Research conducted for this NERI project has advanced the understanding and feasibility of nitride nuclear fuel processing. In order to perform this research, necessary laboratory infrastructure was developed; including basic facilities and experimental equipment. Notable accomplishments from this project include: the synthesis of uranium, dysprosium, and cerium nitrides using a novel, low-cost mechanical method at room temperature; the synthesis of phase pure UN, DyN, and CeN using thermal methods; and the sintering of UN and (Ux, Dy1-x)N (0.7 ≤ X ≤ 1) pellets from phase pure powder that was synthesized in the Advanced Materials Laboratory at Boise State University.

  9. Synthesis and Optimization of the Sintering Kinetics of Actinide Nitrides

    Research conducted for this NERI project has advanced the understanding and feasibility of nitride nuclear fuel processing. In order to perform this research, necessary laboratory infrastructure was developed; including basic facilities and experimental equipment. Notable accomplishments from this project include: the synthesis of uranium, dysprosium, and cerium nitrides using a novel, low-cost mechanical method at room temperature; the synthesis of phase pure UN, DyN, and CeN using thermal methods; and the sintering of UN and (Ux, Dy1-x)N (0.7 (le) X (le) 1) pellets from phase pure powder that was synthesized in the Advanced Materials Laboratory at Boise State University.

  10. Electrochemical behavior of actinides and actinide nitrides in LiCl-KCl eutectic melts

    The redox potentials of the U3+/U, Np3+/Np and Pu3+/Pu couples at Mo, Cd and Bi electrodes in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt containing UCl3, NpCl3 and PuCl3, respectively, were evaluated by electrochemical measurements at the temperature range between 723 and 823K. The standard potentials of the U3+/U, Np3+/Np and Pu3+/Pu couples versus the Ag+/Ag (1wt.% AgCl) reference electrode were given by the following equations: EU3+/U0=-1.8647+0.000798xT, ENp3+/Np0=-2.0298+0.000706xT and EPu3+/Pu0=-2.232+0.00094xT, where E values are in volts, T in kelvin. The differences between the redox potentials at Mo electrode and those at liquid metal electrodes were attributable to the lowering in the activities of U, Pu and Np in liquid metal phases according to the alloy formation. Similarly, the anodic dissolutions of UN, NpN and PuN were observed at about 0.7V more positive potential than those of U, Np and Pu, respectively, since the stabilization of U, Np and Pu by nitriding lowered the activities of U, Np and Pu, respectively, in the solid phase

  11. A comparative study on carbon, boron-nitride, boron-phosphide and silicon-carbide nanotubes based on surface electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies.

    Esrafili, Mehdi D; Behzadi, Hadi

    2013-06-01

    A density functional theory study was carried out to predict the electrostatic potentials as well as average local ionization energies on both the outer and the inner surfaces of carbon, boron-nitride (BN), boron-phosphide (BP) and silicon-carbide (SiC) single-walled nanotubes. For each nanotube, the effect of tube radius on the surface potentials and calculated average local ionization energies was investigated. It is found that SiC and BN nanotubes have much stronger and more variable surface potentials than do carbon and BP nanotubes. For the SiC, BN and BP nanotubes, there are characteristic patterns of positive and negative sites on the outer lateral surfaces. On the other hand, a general feature of all of the systems studied is that stronger potentials are associated with regions of higher curvature. According to the evaluated surface electrostatic potentials, it is concluded that, for the narrowest tubes, the water solubility of BN tubes is slightly greater than that of SiC followed by carbon and BP nanotubes. PMID:23408252

  12. Effect of sintering conditions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of ZrN as a surrogate for actinide nitride fuels

    Pellets of sintered ZrN were studied to optimize the mechanical properties and microstructures needed in nitride fuel pellets, using ZrN as a surrogate for actinide nitrides and as potential component in low fertile and inert matrix fuels. Samples were prepared via sintering in either Ar or N2 (with and without 6% H2) and at 1300 oC or 1600 oC. A significant difference in the hardness was measured ranging from 1000 (Kg/mm2) in samples sintered at 1600 oC in argon to 100 (Kg/mm2) in samples sintered at 1300 oC in nitrogen. Samples with 6% hydrogen added to the sintering environment experienced a decrease in hardness, as well as an increase in intergranular cracking as compared to samples sintered without hydrogen, suggesting hydrogen embrittlement. Grain size was more uniform in samples sintered in pure Ar as compared to Ar-H2, while the latter had a larger fraction of high angle grain boundaries than the former. Cracking around indents had a clear tendency to follow high angle boundaries, which were found to be intrinsically weak in ZrN

  13. Zinc Phosphide Poisoning

    Erdal Doğan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc phosphide has been used widely as a rodenticide. Upon ingestion, it gets converted to phosphine gas in the body, which is subsequently absorbed into the bloodstream through the stomach and the intestines and gets captured by the liver and the lungs. Phosphine gas produces various metabolic and nonmetabolic toxic effects. Clinical symptoms are circulatory collapse, hypotension, shock symptoms, myocarditis, pericarditis, acute pulmonary edema, and congestive heart failure. In this case presentation, we aim to present the intensive care process and treatment resistance of a patient who ingested zinc phosphide for suicide purposes.

  14. Zinc Phosphide Poisoning

    Erdal Doğan; Abdulmenap Güzel; Taner Çiftçi; İlker Aycan; Feyzi Çelik; Bedri Çetin; Gönül Ölmez Kavak

    2014-01-01

    Zinc phosphide has been used widely as a rodenticide. Upon ingestion, it gets converted to phosphine gas in the body, which is subsequently absorbed into the bloodstream through the stomach and the intestines and gets captured by the liver and the lungs. Phosphine gas produces various metabolic and nonmetabolic toxic effects. Clinical symptoms are circulatory collapse, hypotension, shock symptoms, myocarditis, pericarditis, acute pulmonary edema, and congestive heart failure. In this case pre...

  15. Gold phosphide complexes

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of gold complexes with five group-element donor ligands contain tertiary phosphines, although compounds with amine, arsine or stibine ligands are also known. Although phosphide ligands, which are formed by deprotonation of non-tertiary phosphines, are closely related to the former, they have been employed to a lesser extent, mainly due to their lower stability. Thus, the chemistry of phosphido-bridged derivatives of the main group elements1-3 or transition metals4-6 has been...

  16. Fabrication of actinide mononitride fuel

    Fabrication of actinide mononitride fuel in JAERI is summarized. Actinide mononitride and their solid solutions were fabricated by carbothermic reduction of the oxides in N2 or N2-H2 mixed gas stream. Sintering study was also performed for the preparation of pellets for the property measurements and irradiation tests. The products were characterized to be high-purity mononitride with a single phase of NaCl-type structure. Moreover, fuel pins containing uranium-plutonium mixed nitride pellets were fabricated for the irradiation tests in JMTR and JOYO. (author)

  17. Actinides-1981

    1981-09-01

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry.

  18. Actinides-1981

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry

  19. Fabrication of boron-phosphide neutron detectors

    Boron phosphide is a potentially viable candidate for high neutron flux neutron detectors. The authors have explored chemical vapor deposition methods to produce such detectors and have not been able to produce good boron phosphide coatings on silicon carbide substrates. However, semi-conducting quality films have been produced. Further testing is required

  20. Research and development of nitride fuel cycle for TRU burning

    Susuki, Y.; Ogawa, T.; Osugi, T.; Arai, Y.; Mukaiyama, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    The present status of the research and development of nitride fuel cycle for burning transuranium elements in actinide burner reactors and fast reactors at JAERI is described, especially focusing on the progress in the recent two years. The research and development cover fuel fabrication technology, property measurements such as thermal conductivity, basic irradiation tests at Japan Materials Testing Reactors(JMTR), electrorefining of actinide nitrides in fused salts, and the evaluation of mass balance in the reprocessing process of nitride fuel. (authors)

  1. Can Ni phosphides become viable hydroprocessing catalysts?

    Soled, S.; Miseo, S.; Baumgartner, J.; Guzman, J.; Bolin, T.; Meyer, R.

    2015-05-15

    We prepared higher surface area nickel phosphides than are normally found by reducing nickel phosphate. To do this, we hydrothermally synthesized Ni hydroxy phosphite precursors with low levels of molybdenum substitution. The molybdenum substitution increases the surface area of these precursors. During pretreatment in a sulfiding atmosphere (such as H2S/H2) dispersed islands of MoS2 segregate from the precursor and provide a pathway for H2 dissociation that allows reduction of the phosphite precursor to nickel phosphide at substantially lower temperatures than in the absence of MoS2. The results reported here show that to create nickel phosphides with comparable activity to conventional supported sulfide catalysts, one would have to synthesize the phosphide with surface areas exceeding 400 m2/g (i.e. with nanoparticles less than 30 Å in lateral dimension).

  2. Actinide recycle

    A multitude of studies and assessments of actinide partitioning and transmutation were carried out in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Probably the most comprehensive of these was a study coordinated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conclusions of this study were that only rather weak economic and safety incentives existed for partitioning and transmuting the actinides for waste management purposes, due to the facts that (1) partitioning processes were complicated and expensive, and (2) the geologic repository was assumed to contain actinides for hundreds of thousands of years. Much has changed in the few years since then. A variety of developments now combine to warrant a renewed assessment of the actinide recycle. First of all, it has become increasingly difficult to provide to all parties the necessary assurance that the repository will contain essentially all radioactive materials until they have decayed. Assurance can almost certainly be provided to regulatory agencies by sound technical arguments, but it is difficult to convince the general public that the behavior of wastes stored in the ground can be modeled and predicted for even a few thousand years. From this point of view alone there would seem to be a clear benefit in reducing the long-term toxicity of the high-level wastes placed in the repository

  3. Property database of TRU nitride fuel

    西 剛史; 荒井 康夫; 高野 公秀; 倉田 正輝

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to prepare a property database of nitride fuel needed for the fuel design of accelerator-driven system (ADS) for transmutation of minor actinide (MA). Nitride fuel of ADS is characterized by high content of Pu and MA as principal components, and addition of a diluent material such as ZrN. Experimental data or evaluated values from the raw data on properties Pu and MA nitrides, and nitride solid solutions containing ZrN are collected and summarized, which cover the...

  4. A successful management of aluminum phosphide intoxication

    Moazezi, Zoleika; Abedi, Seyed Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Aluminum Phosphide or rice tablet is one of the most common pesticides which leads to accidental or intentional acute intoxication and finally death. In this paper, we describe a successful management of intoxication with rice tablet in a young girl.

  5. Progress in molecular uranium-nitride chemistry

    King, David M.; Liddle, Stephen T

    2014-01-01

    The coordination, organometallic, and materials chemistry of uranium nitride has long been an important facet of actinide chemistry. Following matrix isolation experiments and computational characterisation, molecular, solution-based uranium chemistry has developed significantly in the last decade or so culminating most recently in the isolation of the first examples of long-sought terminal uranium nitride linkages. Herein, the field is reviewed with an emphasis on well-defined molecular spec...

  6. InP (Indium Phosphide): Into the future

    Major industry is beginning to be devoted to indium phosphide and its potential applications. Key to these applications are high speed and radiation tolerance; however the high cost of indium phosphide may be an inhibitor to progress. The broad applicability of indium phosphide to many devices will be discussed with an emphasis on photovoltaics. Major attention is devoted to radiation tolerance and means of reducing cost of devices. Some of the approaches applicable to solar cells may also be relevant to other devices. The intent is to display the impact of visionary leadership in the field and enable the directions and broad applicability of indium phosphide

  7. Efficient water reduction with gallium phosphide nanowires

    Standing, Anthony; Assali, Simone; Gao, Lu; Verheijen, Marcel A.; van Dam, Dick; Cui, Yingchao; Notten, Peter H. L.; Haverkort, Jos E. M.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from solar energy and water offers a clean and sustainable fuel option for the future. Planar III/V material systems have shown the highest efficiencies, but are expensive. By moving to the nanowire regime the demand on material quantity is reduced, and new materials can be uncovered, such as wurtzite gallium phosphide, featuring a direct bandgap. This is one of the few materials combining large solar light absorption and (close to) ideal band-edge positions for full water splitting. Here we report the photoelectrochemical reduction of water, on a p-type wurtzite gallium phosphide nanowire photocathode. By modifying geometry to reduce electrical resistance and enhance optical absorption, and modifying the surface with a multistep platinum deposition, high current densities and open circuit potentials were achieved. Our results demonstrate the capabilities of this material, even when used in such low quantities, as in nanowires.

  8. Aluminium phosphide poising: a case report

    This paper reports the case of a family in which three children were presented at Emergency Room (ER) with poisoning after the use of a pesticide at home. Initially, the cases were managed as routine cases of organophosphorus poisoning; however, the death of two children made the health team members realise that the poison's effects were delayed and devastating. Later, the compound was identified as Aluminium Phosphide (ALP), and the life of the last surviving child in the family was saved. (author)

  9. Comment on " An update on toxicology of aluminum phosphide "

    Omid Mehrpour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available I read with interest the recent published article by Dr Moghadamnia titled "An update on toxicology of aluminum phosphide". Since aluminum phosphide (AlP poisoning is an important medical concern in Iran, I have had the opportunities to work and publish many papers in this regard. I would like to comment on that paper.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and properties of hollow nickel phosphide nanospheres

    Ni Yonghong; Tao Ali; Hu Guangzhi; Cao Xiaofeng; Wei Xianwen; Yang Zhousheng [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)

    2006-10-14

    Nickel phosphide (Ni{sub 12}P{sub 5}) hollow nanospheres with a mean diameter of 100 nm and a shell thickness of 15-20 nm have been successfully prepared by a hydrothermal-microemulsion route, using NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2} as a phosphorus source. XRD, EDS (HR)TEM, SEM and the SAED pattern were used to characterize the final product. Experiments showed that the as-prepared nickel phosphide hollow nanospheres could selectively catalytically degrade some organic dyes such as methyl red and Safranine T under 254 nm UV light irradiation. At the same time, the nickel phosphide hollow nanospheres showed a stronger ability to promote electron transfer between the glass-carbon electrode and adrenalin than nickel phosphide honeycomb-like particles prepared by a simple hydrothermal route. A possible formation process for nickel phosphide hollow nanospheres was suggested based on the experimental results.

  11. Electrochemistry of actinide and lanthanide in molten salt system

    In the partition and transmutation processes of reprocessing of spent fuel or radioactive waste in nuclear power plant, the dry type reprocessing method using molten salt and liquid metal as a solvent is studied. Most especially researches on the electrolysis of the actinide nitride in the molten salts corresponding to reprocessing of nitride fuel cannot be found. This report is a research result about the electro-chemical behavior of actinide and lanthanide on the electrode in molten LiCL-KCL eutectic system. When anode potential was less than -0.4V in recovery of U metal by the molten salt electrolysis of UN, the electrolysis efficiency of the recovery is not influenced by the generation of UNCL and the oxidation-reduction reaction of U4+/U3+. Moreover, generation of a chlorination nitride was not seen in the case where PuN and NpN are used. (H. Katsuta)

  12. The lanthanides and actinides

    This paper relates the chemical properties of the actinides to their position in the Mendeleev periodic system. The changes in the oxidation states of the actinides with increasing atomic number are similar to those of the 3d elements. Monovalent and divalent actinides are very similar to alkaline and alkaline earth elements; in the 3+ and 4+ oxidation states they resemble d elements in the respective oxidation states. However, in their highest oxidation states the actinides display their individual properties with only a slight resemblance to d elements. Finally, there is a profound similarity between the second half of the actinides and the first half of the lanthanides

  13. A systematic review of aluminium phosphide poisoning.

    Mehrpour, Omid; Jafarzadeh, Mostafa; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2012-03-01

    Every year, about 300,000 people die because of pesticide poisoning worldwide. The most common pesticide agents are organophosphates and phosphides, aluminium phosphide (AlP) in particular. AlP is known as a suicide poison that can easily be bought and has no effective antidote. Its toxicity results from the release of phosphine gas as the tablet gets into contact with moisture. Phosphine gas primarily affects the heart, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and kidneys. Poisoning signs and symptoms include nausea, vomiting, restlessness, abdominal pain, palpitation, refractory shock, cardiac arrhythmias, pulmonary oedema, dyspnoea, cyanosis, and sensory alterations. Diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion, positive silver nitrate paper test to phosphine, and gastric aspirate and viscera biochemistry. Treatment includes early gastric lavage with potassium permanganate or a combination with coconut oil and sodium bicarbonate, administration of charcoal, and palliative care. Specific therapy includes intravenous magnesium sulphate and oral coconut oil. Moreover, acidosis can be treated with early intravenous administration of sodium bicarbonate, cardiogenic shock with fluid, vasopresor, and refractory cardiogenic shock with intra-aortic baloon pump or digoxin. Trimetazidine may also have a useful role in the treatment, because it can stop ventricular ectopic beats and bigeminy and preserve oxidative metabolism. This article reviews the epidemiological, toxicological, and clinical/pathological aspects of AlP poisoning and its management. PMID:22450207

  14. Actinide environmental chemistry

    In order to predict release and transport rates, as well as design cleanup and containment methods, it is essential to understand the chemical reactions and forms of the actinides under aqueous environmental conditions. Four important processes that can occur with the actinide cations are: precipitation, complexation, sorption and colloid formation. Precipitation of a solid phase will limit the amount of actinide in solution near the solid phase and have a retarding effect on release and transport rates. Complexation increases the amount of actinide in solution and tends to increase release and migration rates. Actinides can sorb on to mineral or rock surfaces which tends to retard migration. Actinide ions can form or become associated with colloidal sized particles which can, depending on the nature of the colloid and the solution conditions, enhance or retard migration of the actinide. The degree to which these four processes progress is strongly dependent on the oxidation state of the actinide and tends to be similar for actinides in the same oxidation state. In order to obtain information on the speciation of actinides in solution, i.e., oxidation state, complexation form, dissolved or colloidal forms, the use of absorption spectroscopy has become a method of choice. The advent of the ultrasensitive, laser induced photothermal and fluorescence spectroscopies has made possible the detection and study of actinide ions at the parts per billion level. With the availability of third generation synchrotrons and the development of new fluorescence detectors, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is becoming a powerful technique to study the speciation of actinides in the environment, particularly for reactions at the solid/solution interfaces. (orig.)

  15. Chemical vapour deposition of metal oxides and phosphides.

    Binions, R.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis investigates the deposition of thin films of main group metal phosphide and main group metal oxide compounds on glass substrates by the use of dual source atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition. Binary phosphide systems with tin, germanium, silicon, antimony, copper or boron have been examined. Binary oxide systems of gallium, antimony, tin or niobium have also been investigated. Additionally these systems were deposited on gas sensor substrates and evaluated as metal oxi...

  16. Irradiation test of U-free nitride fuel and progress of pyro chemistry in JAERI

    JAERI has proposed the double-strata fuel cycle for transmutation of long-lived minor actinides (MAs). The transmutation system is a Pb-Bi cooled subcritical accelerator-driven system (ADS) with MAs nitride fuel. Nitride fuel has the advantage of accommodating various MAs with a wide range of composition besides superior thermal and neutronic properties. This paper concerns the status of the irradiation test of U-free nitride fuel and recent progress of pyrochemical process for nitride fuel in JAERI. Typical characteristics of nitride fuel for the irradiation test and the present schedule are described in addition to recent experimental results relating to pyro-chemistry. (author)

  17. A Clinical Study of aluminium Phosphide Poisoning

    S.K. Gupta,Annil Mahajan,Ajay Gupta

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Thc present prospectiYe study 01'56 cases ofAlwniniwn Phosphide (ALP poisoning in Gov!. MedicalCollcge Hospital Jammu. found out the prevalence of Deliberate self-poisoning self (DSP andaccidental ingestion in young population in age group of 16-30 years. Male-female ratio ",as 1.03: 1.00;ha' ing marital discord and family quarrels as prominent predisposing factors. The majority of patientshad gastrointestinal (GIT symptoms (73.2%, cardiac arrthymias (62.5% and shock (53.3%. Thccommoncst clectrocardiographic (ECG abnormalities were tachycardia (96%, atrial fibrillation(58% and venticular-ectopic (VE beats (59%. The management was supportive in the fonn ofstomach wash, intra"enous (IN fluids. dopamine, hydrocortisone, sodabicarbonate and assisted"entilation in intensiYe care unit (lCU setting

  18. Cavity optomechanics in gallium phosphide microdisks

    Mitchell, Matthew; Barclay, Paul E

    2013-01-01

    Gallium phosphide microdisk optical microcavities with intrinsic quality factors > 280,000 and mode volumes < (10 lambda/n)^3 are demonstrated, and their nonlinear and optomechanical properties are studied. For optical intensities up to 350,000 intracavity photons, optical loss within the microcavity is observed to decrease with increasing intensity, indicating that saturable absorption sites are present in the GaP material, and that two photon absorption is not significant. Optomechanical coupling between several mechanical resonances and the optical modes of the microdisk is observed, and an optical spring effect consistent with a theoretically predicted optomechanical coupling rate g_0~80 kHz is measured for the 488 MHz mechanical fundamental radial breathing mode.

  19. Successful management of zinc phosphide poisoning.

    Shakoori, Vahid; Agahi, Mahsa; Vasheghani-Farahani, Maryam; Marashi, Sayed Mahdi

    2016-06-01

    Zinc phosphide (Zn2P3) rodenticide, is generally misused intentionally for suicidal purpose in Iran. For many years, scientists believe that liberation of phosphine (PH3) on contact with acidic content of the stomach is responsible for clinical presentations. However, relatively long time interval between ingestion of Zn2P3 and presentation of its systemic toxicity, and progression of acute liver failure could not be explained by the current opinion. Hence, an innovative theory intended that phosphonium, as an intermediate product will create and pass through the stomach, which then will reduce to produce PH3in the luminal tract. Here, we present a case of massive Zn2P3 poisoning. In our case, we used repeated doses of castor oil to induce bowel movement with an aim of removing unabsorbed toxin, which was proved by radiography. Interestingly, the patient presents only mild symptoms of toxicity such as transient metabolic acidosis and hepatic dysfunction. PMID:27390464

  20. Research in actinide chemistry

    This research studies the behavior of the actinide elements in aqueous solution. The high radioactivity of the transuranium actinides limits the concentrations which can be studied and, consequently, limits the experimental techniques. However, oxidation state analogs (trivalent lanthanides, tetravalent thorium, and hexavalent uranium) do not suffer from these limitations. Behavior of actinides in the environment are a major USDOE concern, whether in connection with long-term releases from a repository, releases from stored defense wastes or accidental releases in reprocessing, etc. Principal goal of our research was expand the thermodynamic data base on complexation of actinides by natural ligands (e.g., OH-, CO32-, PO43-, humates). The research undertakes fundamental studies of actinide complexes which can increase understanding of the environmental behavior of these elements

  1. Materials Development for Boron Phosphide Based Neutron Detectors: Final Technical Report

    Edgar, James Howard [Ksnsas State University

    2014-09-12

    The project goal was to improve the quality of boron phosphide (BP) by optimizing its epitaxial growth on single crystal substrates and by producing bulk BP single crystals with low dislocation densities. BP is potentially a good semiconductor for high efficiency solid state neutron detectors by combining neutron capture and charge creation within the same volume. The project strategy was to use newly available single crystal substrates, silicon carbide and aluminum nitride, engineered to produce the best film properties. Substrate variables included the SiC polytype, crystallographic planes, misorientation of the substrate surface (tilt direction and magnitude) from the major crystallographic plane, and surface polarity (Si and C). The best films were (111)BP on silicon-face (0001) 4H-SiC misoriented 4° in the [1-100] direction, and BP on (100) and (111) 3C-SiC/Si; these substrates resulted in films that were free of in-plane twin defects, as determined by x-ray topography. The impact of the deposition temperature was also assessed: increasing the temperature from 1000 °C to 1200 °C produced films that were more ordered and more uniform, and the size of individual grains increased by more than a factor of twenty. The BP films were free of other compounds such as icosahedral boron phosphide (B12P2) over the entire temperature range, as established by Raman spectroscopy. The roughness of the BP films was reduced by increasing the phosphine to diborane ratio from 50 to 200. Bulk crystals were grown by reacting boron dissolved in nickel with phosphorus vapor to precipitate BP. Crystals with dimensions up to 2 mm were produced.

  2. Research in actinide chemistry

    1991-01-01

    This report contains research results on studies of inorganic and organic complexes of actinide and lanthanide elements. Special attention is given to complexes of humic acids and to spectroscopic studies.

  3. Controlled synthesis and magnetic properties of nickel phosphide and bimetallic iron-nickel phosphide nanorods

    Singh, Bhupendra; Ho, Chia-Ling [National Cheng Kung University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Yuan-Chieh [National Chiao Tung University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiwan (China); Lo, Chieh-Tsung, E-mail: tsunglo@mail.ncku.edu.tw [National Cheng Kung University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Taiwan (China)

    2012-02-15

    Nickel phosphide (Ni{sub 2}P) and bimetallic iron-nickel phosphides [(Fe{sub x}Ni{sub y}){sub 2}P] nanorods were fabricated by a seeded growth strategy. This strategy utilized pre-synthesized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles as seeds and the thermal decomposition of metal precursors by multiple injections in a solution containing trioctylphosphine and didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB). The nanorods were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and magnetic measurements were carried out using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The rod length was tunable, ranging from 10 to 110 nm depending on the number of injections, whereas the diameter of the rods was nearly 6 nm. It was found that the rod size increased with the number of injections under the constant total injection concentration and reaction time. In addition, the effect of the DDAB quantity used as a co-surfactant was studied, which showed that an optimum quantity was required to achieve uniform nanorods. Magnetic characterizations were performed over the two kinds of nanorods to identify their respective magnetic phases. The results demonstrated that the Ni{sub 2}P nanorods were defined as a Curie-Weiss paramagnet, whereas the (Fe{sub x}Ni{sub y}){sub 2}P nanorods exhibited superparamagnetic characteristics.

  4. Phosphine by bio-corrosion of phosphide-rich iron.

    Glindemann, D; Eismann, F; Bergmann, A; Kuschk, P; Stottmeister, U

    1998-01-01

    Phosphine is a toxic agent and part of the phosphorus cycle. A hitherto unknown formation mechanism for phosphine in the environment was investigated. When iron samples containing iron phosphide were incubated in corrosive aquatic media affected by microbial metabolites, phosphine was liberated and measured by gas chromatography. Iron liberates phosphine especially in anoxic aquatic media under the influence of sulfide and an acidic pH. A phosphine-forming mechanism is suggested: Phosphate, an impurity of iron containing minerals, is reduced abioticly to iron phosphide. When iron is exposed to the environment (e.g. as outdoor equipment, scrap, contamination in iron milled food or as iron meteorites) and corrodes, the iron phosphide present in the iron is suspended in the medium and can hydrolyze to phosphine. Phosphine can accumulate to measurable quantities in anoxic microbial media, accelerating corrosion and preserving the phosphine formed from oxidation. PMID:19005813

  5. An update on toxicology of aluminum phosphide

    Moghadamnia Ali

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aluminum phosphide (AlP is a cheap solid fumigant and a highly toxic pesticide which is commonly used for grain preservation. In Iran it is known as the “rice tablet”. AlP has currently aroused interest with increasing number of cases in the past four decades due to increased use in agricultural and non-agricultural purposesand also its easy availability in the markets has increased its misuse to commit suicide. Upon contact with moisture in the environment, AlP undergoes a chemical reaction yielding phosphine gas, which is the active pesticidal component. Phosphine inhibits cellular oxygen utilization and can induce lipid peroxidation. It was reported that AlP has a mortality rate more than 50% of intoxication cases. Poisoning with AlP has usually occurred in attempts to suicide. It is a more common case in adults rather than teen agers. In some eastern countries it is a very common agent with rapid action for suicide. Up to date, there is no effective antidote or treatment for its intoxication. Also, some experimental results suggest that magnesium sulfate, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, glutathione, vitamin C and E, beta-carotenes, coconut oil and melatonin may play an important role in reducing the oxidative outcomes of phosphine. This article reviews the experimental and clinical features of AlP intoxication and tries to suggest a way to encounter its poisoning.

  6. An Update on Toxicology of Aluminum Phosphide

    Ali Akbar Moghhadamnia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum phosphide (AlP is a cheap solid fumigant and a highly toxic pesticide which is commonly used for grain preservation. In Iran it is known as the "rice tablet". AlP has currently aroused interest with increasing number of cases in the past four decades due to increased use in agricultural and non-agricultural purposes and also its easy availability in the markets has increased its misuse to commit suicide. Upon contact with moisture in the environment, AlP undergoes a chemical reaction yielding phosphine gas, which is the active pesticidal component. Phosphine inhibits cellular oxygen utilization and can induce lipid peroxidation. It was reported that AlP has a mortality rate more than 50% of intoxication cases. Poisoning with AlP has usually occurred in attempts to suicide. It is a more common case in adults rather than teen agers. In some eastern countries it is a very common agent with rapid action for suicide. Up to date, there is no effective antidote or treatment for its intoxication. Also, some experimental results suggest that magnesium sulfate, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, glutathione, vitamin C and E, beta-carotenes, coconut oil and melatonin may play an important role in reducing the oxidative outcomes of phosphine. This article reviews the experimental and clinical features of AlP intoxication and tries to suggest a way to encounter its poisoning.

  7. Fabrication challenges for indium phosphide microsystems

    From the inception of III–V microsystems, monolithically integrated device designs have been the motivating drive for this field, bringing together the utility of single-chip microsystems and conventional fabrication techniques. Indium phosphide (InP) has a particular advantage of having a direct bandgap within the low loss telecommunication wavelength (1550 nm) range, able to support passive waveguiding and optical amplification, detection, and generation depending on the exact alloy of In, P, As, Ga, or Al materials. Utilizing epitaxy, one can envision the growth of a substrate that contains all of the components needed to establish a single-chip optical microsystem, containing detectors, sources, waveguides, and mechanical structures. A monolithic InP MEMS system has, to our knowledge, yet to be realized due to the significant difficulties encountered when fabricating the integrated devices. In this paper we present our own research and consolidate findings from other research groups across the world to give deeper insight into the practical aspects of InP monolithic microsystem development: epitaxial growth of InP-based alloys, etching techniques, common MEMS structures realized in InP, and future applications. We pay special attention to shedding light on considerations that must be taken when designing and fabricating a monolithic InP MEMS device. (topical review)

  8. Fabrication challenges for indium phosphide microsystems

    Siwak, N. P.; Fan, X. Z.; Ghodssi, R.

    2015-04-01

    From the inception of III-V microsystems, monolithically integrated device designs have been the motivating drive for this field, bringing together the utility of single-chip microsystems and conventional fabrication techniques. Indium phosphide (InP) has a particular advantage of having a direct bandgap within the low loss telecommunication wavelength (1550 nm) range, able to support passive waveguiding and optical amplification, detection, and generation depending on the exact alloy of In, P, As, Ga, or Al materials. Utilizing epitaxy, one can envision the growth of a substrate that contains all of the components needed to establish a single-chip optical microsystem, containing detectors, sources, waveguides, and mechanical structures. A monolithic InP MEMS system has, to our knowledge, yet to be realized due to the significant difficulties encountered when fabricating the integrated devices. In this paper we present our own research and consolidate findings from other research groups across the world to give deeper insight into the practical aspects of InP monolithic microsystem development: epitaxial growth of InP-based alloys, etching techniques, common MEMS structures realized in InP, and future applications. We pay special attention to shedding light on considerations that must be taken when designing and fabricating a monolithic InP MEMS device.

  9. Acute aluminium phosphide poisoning, what is new?

    Yatendra Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium phosphide (AlP is a cheap solid fumigant and a highly toxic pesticide that is commonly used for grain preservation. AlP has currently generated interest with increasing number of cases in the past four decades because of its increased use for agricultural and nonagricultural purposes, and also its easy availability in the markets has led to its increased misuse to commit suicide. Ingestion is usually suicidal in intent, uncommonly accidental and rarely homicidal. The poison affects all systems, shock, cardiac arrhythmias with varied ECG changes and gastrointestinal features being the most prominent. Diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical suspicion, a positive silver nitrate paper test to phosphine, and gastric aspirate and viscera biochemistry. Treatment includes early gastric lavage with potassium permanganate or a combination of coconut oil and sodium bicarbonate, administration of charcoal and palliative care. Specific therapy includes intravenous magnesium sulphate and oral coconut oil. Unfortunately, the lack of a specific antidote Results in very high mortality and the key to treatment lies in rapid decontamination and institution of resuscitative measures. This article aims to identify the salient features and mechanism of AlP poisoning along with its management strategies and prognostic variables.

  10. Subsurface Biogeochemistry of Actinides

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Univ. Relations and Science Education; Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst.

    2016-06-29

    A major scientific challenge in environmental sciences is to identify the dominant processes controlling actinide transport in the environment. It is estimated that currently, over 2200 metric tons of plutonium (Pu) have been deposited in the subsurface worldwide, a number that increases yearly with additional spent nuclear fuel (Ewing et al., 2010). Plutonium has been shown to migrate on the scale of kilometers, giving way to a critical concern that the fundamental biogeochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface are not well understood (Kersting et al., 1999; Novikov et al., 2006; Santschi et al., 2002). Neptunium (Np) is less prevalent in the environment; however, it is predicted to be a significant long-term dose contributor in high-level nuclear waste. Our focus on Np chemistry in this Science Plan is intended to help formulate a better understanding of Pu redox transformations in the environment and clarify the differences between the two long-lived actinides. The research approach of our Science Plan combines (1) Fundamental Mechanistic Studies that identify and quantify biogeochemical processes that control actinide behavior in solution and on solids, (2) Field Integration Studies that investigate the transport characteristics of Pu and test our conceptual understanding of actinide transport, and (3) Actinide Research Capabilities that allow us to achieve the objectives of this Scientific Focus Area (SFA and provide new opportunities for advancing actinide environmental chemistry. These three Research Thrusts form the basis of our SFA Science Program (Figure 1).

  11. Fuel selection criteria specific for double stratum minor actinide burners

    The scope of this presentation covers the following topics: Accelerator driven systems in the double strata fuel cycle; parametric studies of neutronic properties foe dedicated inert matrix fuels (solid solution oxides ZrO2, ThO; solid solution nitrides ZrN, HfN, YN; CERCER oxides MgO; CERMET oxides Cr, V, Mo, Mo-92, W). Fertile matrices do not improve neutronic performance of americium bearing fuels. High linear rating (high thermal conductivity + high melting temperature) improves neutronic performance as well. CERCER oxide in MgO matrix appears to be a reasonable reference fuel for Minor Actinide burning in LBE cooled ADS. Solid solution nitride in ZrN or CERMET oxide in Mo-92 matrix offer better performance, but high T stability (nitrides) and helium release (CERMET) issues need to be addressed. These fuels will be fabricated and irradiated in Phenix starting 2005

  12. A Suicide Attempt Using Zinc Phosphide (A Case Study

    Aysenur Sumer Coskun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Zinc phosphide is a toxin that is added to wheat for use in rodent control and is the active ingredient of rodenticide. A 17 year-old male attempted suicide by drinking pesticide [Zinc PHOSPHIDE (Zn3P2] and was subsequently admitted to the emergency department: the patient’s general condition was poor, he was unconscious and vomiting, the skin had a garlic odor and advanced acidosis was present. The patient was treated symptomatically, followed by mechanical ventilation, and was transferred to a psychiatric clinic on the fifth day.

  13. Carbon phosphide monolayers with superior carrier mobility

    Wang, Gaoxue; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P.

    2016-04-01

    Two dimensional (2D) materials with a finite band gap and high carrier mobility are sought after materials from both fundamental and technological perspectives. In this paper, we present the results based on the particle swarm optimization method and density functional theory which predict three geometrically different phases of the carbon phosphide (CP) monolayer consisting of sp2 hybridized C atoms and sp3 hybridized P atoms in hexagonal networks. Two of the phases, referred to as α-CP and β-CP with puckered or buckled surfaces are semiconducting with highly anisotropic electronic and mechanical properties. More remarkably, they have the lightest electrons and holes among the known 2D semiconductors, yielding superior carrier mobility. The γ-CP has a distorted hexagonal network and exhibits a semi-metallic behavior with Dirac cones. These theoretical findings suggest that the binary CP monolayer is a yet unexplored 2D material holding great promise for applications in high-performance electronics and optoelectronics.Two dimensional (2D) materials with a finite band gap and high carrier mobility are sought after materials from both fundamental and technological perspectives. In this paper, we present the results based on the particle swarm optimization method and density functional theory which predict three geometrically different phases of the carbon phosphide (CP) monolayer consisting of sp2 hybridized C atoms and sp3 hybridized P atoms in hexagonal networks. Two of the phases, referred to as α-CP and β-CP with puckered or buckled surfaces are semiconducting with highly anisotropic electronic and mechanical properties. More remarkably, they have the lightest electrons and holes among the known 2D semiconductors, yielding superior carrier mobility. The γ-CP has a distorted hexagonal network and exhibits a semi-metallic behavior with Dirac cones. These theoretical findings suggest that the binary CP monolayer is a yet unexplored 2D material holding great

  14. Actinide isotopic analysis systems

    This manual provides instructions and procedures for using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's two-detector actinide isotope analysis system to measure plutonium samples with other possible actinides (including uranium, americium, and neptunium) by gamma-ray spectrometry. The computer program that controls the system and analyzes the gamma-ray spectral data is driven by a menu of one-, two-, or three-letter options chosen by the operator. Provided in this manual are descriptions of these options and their functions, plus detailed instructions (operator dialog) for choosing among the options. Also provided are general instructions for calibrating the actinide isotropic analysis system and for monitoring its performance. The inventory measurement of a sample's total plutonium and other actinides content is determined by two nondestructive measurements. One is a calorimetry measurement of the sample's heat or power output, and the other is a gamma-ray spectrometry measurement of its relative isotopic abundances. The isotopic measurements needed to interpret the observed calorimetric power measurement are the relative abundances of various plutonium and uranium isotopes and americium-241. The actinide analysis system carries out these measurements. 8 figs

  15. Manganese phosphide thin films and nanorods grown on gallium phosphide and on glass substrates

    Nateghi, N.; Lambert-Milot, S.; Ménard, D.; Masut, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    We report a simple and fast route to grow ferromagnetic manganese phosphide polycrystalline films and nanorods on GaP and on glass substrates using metalorganic vapor phase deposition. Increasing the growth temperature (≥600 °C) and growth time (≥30 min) results in nucleation of secondary MnP crystals on the primary grains. The secondary crystals grow faster along a specific direction of orthorhombic MnP (c-axis) and form long rods (up to ~10 μm) whose diameters are in the nanoscale (20-100 nm). The nanorods can be easily detached from the glass substrate. The films exhibit ferromagnetic behavior with a range of transition temperatures, depending on the growth conditions.

  16. Ternary transition metal phosphides: High-temperature superconductors

    Barz, H.; Ku, H. C.; Meisner, G. P.; Fisk, Z.; Matthias, B. T.

    1980-01-01

    Two systems of ternary transition metal phosphides with the ordered Fe2P-type hexagonal structure are reported. They have the general formula MRuP and MOsP, in which M can be Ti, Zr, or Hf. An onset of the superconducting transition temperature as high as 13.0 K is reported for the ZrRuP compound.

  17. Radiochemistry and actinide chemistry

    The analysis of trace amounts of actinide elements by means of radiochemistry, is discussed. The similarities between radiochemistry and actinide chemistry, in the case of species amount by cubic cm below 1012, are explained. The parameters which allow to define what are the observable chemical reactions, are given. The classification of radionuclides in micro or macrocomponents is considered. The validity of the mass action law and the partition function in the definition of the average number of species for trace amounts, is investigated. Examples illustrating the results are given

  18. Fabrication of inert-matrix nitride fuel pins for the irradiation test at JMTR

    Nitride fuel pins containing inert matrix such as ZrN and TiN were fabricated for the irradiation test at JMTR, aiming at understanding irradiation behavior of nitride fuel for transmutation of minor actinides. Minor actinides are surrogated by plutonium in the present fuel pin. This report describes the preparation and characterization of fuel pellets, and fabrication of fuel pins. The irradiation for 11 cycles from May 2002 to November 2004 at JMTR was completed without any failure of fuel pins. (author)

  19. Actinide separative chemistry

    Actinide separative chemistry has focused very heavy work during the last decades. The main was nuclear spent fuel reprocessing: solvent extraction processes appeared quickly a suitable, an efficient way to recover major actinides (uranium and plutonium), and an extensive research, concerning both process chemistry and chemical engineering technologies, allowed the industrial development in this field. We can observe for about half a century a succession of Purex plants which, if based on the same initial discovery (i.e. the outstanding properties of a molecule, the famous TBP), present huge improvements at each step, for a large part due to an increased mastery of the mechanisms involved. And actinide separation should still focus R and D in the near future: there is a real, an important need for this, even if reprocessing may appear as a mature industry. We can present three main reasons for this. First, actinide recycling appear as a key-issue for future nuclear fuel cycles, both for waste management optimization and for conservation of natural resource; and the need concerns not only major actinide but also so-called minor ones, thus enlarging the scope of the investigation. Second, extraction processes are not well mastered at microscopic scale: there is a real, great lack in fundamental knowledge, useful or even necessary for process optimization (for instance, how to design the best extracting molecule, taken into account the several notifications and constraints, from selectivity to radiolytic resistivity?); and such a need for a real optimization is to be more accurate with the search of always cheaper, cleaner processes. And then, there is room too for exploratory research, on new concepts-perhaps for processing quite new fuels- which could appear attractive and justify further developments to be properly assessed: pyro-processes first, but also others, like chemistry in 'extreme' or 'unusual' conditions (supercritical solvents, sono-chemistry, could be

  20. The prospect of uranium nitride (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN) for pressurized water reactor

    Design study of small Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) core loaded with uranium nitride fuel (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN), Pa-231 as burnable poison, and Americium has been performed. Pa-231 known as actinide material, have large capture cross section and can be converted into fissile material that can be utilized to reduce excess reactivity. Americium is one of minor actinides with long half life. The objective of adding americium is to decrease nuclear spent fuel in the world. The neutronic analysis results show that mixed nitride fuel have k-inf greater than uranium nitride fuel. It is caused by the addition of Pu-239 in mixed nitride fuel. In fuel fraction analysis, for uranium nitride fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 45% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 45% moderator. In case of UN-PuN fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 30% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 60% coolant/ moderator. The addition of Pa-231 as burnable poison for UN fuel, enrichment U-235 5%, with Pa-231 1.6% has k-inf more than one and excess reactivity of 14.45%. And for mixed nitride fuel, the lowest value of reactivity swing is when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 8% with Pa-231 0.4%, the excess reactivity value 13,76%. The fuel pin analyze for the addition of Americium, the excess reactivity value is lower than before, because Americium absorb the neutron. For UN fuel, enrichment U-235 8%, Pa-231 1.6% and Am 0.5%, the excess reactivity is 4.86%. And for mixed nitride fuel, when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 13%, Pa-231 0.4% and Am 0.1%, the excess reactivity is 11.94%. For core configuration, it is better to use heterogeneous than homogeneous core configuration, because the radial power distribution is better

  1. The prospect of uranium nitride (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN) for pressurized water reactor

    Syarifah, Ratna Dewi, E-mail: syarifah.physics@gmail.com; Suud, Zaki, E-mail: szaki@fi.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Design study of small Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) core loaded with uranium nitride fuel (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN), Pa-231 as burnable poison, and Americium has been performed. Pa-231 known as actinide material, have large capture cross section and can be converted into fissile material that can be utilized to reduce excess reactivity. Americium is one of minor actinides with long half life. The objective of adding americium is to decrease nuclear spent fuel in the world. The neutronic analysis results show that mixed nitride fuel have k-inf greater than uranium nitride fuel. It is caused by the addition of Pu-239 in mixed nitride fuel. In fuel fraction analysis, for uranium nitride fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 45% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 45% moderator. In case of UN-PuN fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 30% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 60% coolant/ moderator. The addition of Pa-231 as burnable poison for UN fuel, enrichment U-235 5%, with Pa-231 1.6% has k-inf more than one and excess reactivity of 14.45%. And for mixed nitride fuel, the lowest value of reactivity swing is when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 8% with Pa-231 0.4%, the excess reactivity value 13,76%. The fuel pin analyze for the addition of Americium, the excess reactivity value is lower than before, because Americium absorb the neutron. For UN fuel, enrichment U-235 8%, Pa-231 1.6% and Am 0.5%, the excess reactivity is 4.86%. And for mixed nitride fuel, when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 13%, Pa-231 0.4% and Am 0.1%, the excess reactivity is 11.94%. For core configuration, it is better to use heterogeneous than homogeneous core configuration, because the radial power distribution is better.

  2. Acute Anterolateral Myocardial Infarction Due to Aluminum Phosphide Poisoning

    Bita Dadpour; Zohre Oghabian

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) is a highly effective rodenticide which is used as a suicide poison. Herein, a 24 year-old man who’d intentionally ingested about 1liter of alcohol and one tablet of AlP is reported. Acute myocardial infarction due to AlP poisoning has been occurred secondary to AIP poisoning. Cardiovascular complications are poor prognostic factors in AlP poisoning

  3. Acute Anterolateral Myocardial Infarction Due to Aluminum Phosphide Poisoning

    Bita Dadpour

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum phosphide (AlP is a highly effective rodenticide which is used as a suicide poison. Herein, a 24 year-old man who’d intentionally ingested about 1liter of alcohol and one tablet of AlP is reported. Acute myocardial infarction due to AlP poisoning has been occurred secondary to AIP poisoning. Cardiovascular complications are poor prognostic factors in AlP poisoning

  4. Photochemistry of the actinides

    It has been found that all three major actinides have a useful variety of photochemical reactions which could be used to achieve a separations process that requires fewer reagents. Several features merit enumerating: (1) Laser photochemistry is not now as uniquely important in fuel reprocessing as it is in isotopic enrichment. The photochemistry can be successfully accomplished with conventional light sources. (2) The easiest place to apply photo-reprocessing is on the three actinides U, Pu, and Np. The solutions are potentially cleaner and more amenable to photoreactions. (3) Organic-phase photoreactions are probably not worth much attention because of the troublesome solvent redox chemistry associated with the photochemical reaction. (4) Upstream process treatment on the raffinate (dissolver solution) may never be too attractive since the radiation intensity precludes the usage of many optical materials and the nature of the solution is such that light transmission into it might be totally impossible

  5. Recovering actinide values

    Actinide values are recovered from sodium carbonate scrub waste solutions containing these and other values along with organic compounds resulting from the radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation of neutral organophosphorus extractants such as tri-n butyl phosphate (TBP) and dihexyl-N, N-diethyl carbamylmethylene phosphonate (DHDECMP) which have been used in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear reactor fuels. The scrub waste solution is made acidic with mineral acid, to form a feed solution which is then contacted with a water-immiscible, highly polar organic extractant which selectively extracts the degradation products from the feed solution. The feed solution can then be processed to recover the actinides for storage or recycled back into the high-level waste process stream. The extractant can be recycled after stripping the degradation products with a neutral sodium carbonate solution. (author)

  6. Actinides: why are they important biologically

    The following topics are discussed: actinide elements in energy systems; biological hazards of the actinides; radiation protection standards; and purposes of actinide biological research with regard to toxicity, metabolism, and therapeutic regimens

  7. Photoelectron spectra of actinide compounds

    A brief overview of the application of photoelectron spectroscopy is presented for the study of actinide materials. Phenomenology as well as specific materials are discussed with illustrative examples

  8. Optical techniques for actinide research

    In recent years, substantial gains have been made in the development of spectroscopic techniques for electronic properties studies. These techniques have seen relatively small, but growing, application in the field of actinide research. Photoemission spectroscopies, reflectivity and absorption studies, and x-ray techniques will be discussed and illustrative examples of studies on actinide materials will be presented

  9. Synthesis of Indium Nitride Epitaxial Layers on a Substrate of Porous Indium Phosphide

    J.A. Suchikova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a technique to obtain InN films on porous InP substrates by radical-beam gettering epitaxy. According to the results of the Auger spectroscopy, InN film thickness ranged from 100 nm to 0.5 microns depending on the etching conditions.

  10. Study on Nitride Fuel Fabrication Process and Irradiation Test Results in Japan

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Song, Kee Chan; Lee, Jung Won; Kang, Kweon Ho; Jung, In Ha; Park, Chang Je; Lee, Jae Won; Lee, Young Woo

    2004-12-15

    Research on nitride fuels such as fabrication process and irradiation test proceeds actively in Japan by JAERI and JNC recently. To develop 'double strata' fuel cycle suggested by JAERI, fabrication of minor actinide containing nitride fuels and irradiation test in JOYO experimental fast reactor have been carried out for the development of future ADS target. Fabrication process and irradiation test on the nitride fuels in Japan is considered as the most advanced experimental achievement in the world. This state-of-the-art report summarizes research results of nitride fuels in Japan in order to obtain in-depth knowledge about fabrication process and in-pile behavior of nitride fuels.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and hydrotreating performance of supported tungsten phosphide catalysts

    2008-01-01

    Supported tungsten phosphide catalysts were prepared by temperature-programmed reduction of their precursors (supported phospho-tungstate catalysts) in H2 and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD),BET,temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH3-TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).The reduction-phosphiding processes of the precursors were investigated by thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and the suitable phosphiding temperatures were defined.The hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) activities of the catalysts were tested by using thiophene,pyridine,dibenzothiophene,carbazole and diesel oil as the feed-stock.The TiO2,γ-Al2O3 supports and the Ni,Co promoters could remarkably increase and stabilize active W species on the catalyst surface.A suitable amount of Ni (3%-5%),Co (5%-7%) and V (1%-3%) could increase dispersivity of the W species and the BET surface area of the WP/γ-Al2O3 catalyst.The WP/γ-Al2O3 catalyst possesses much higher thiophene HDS and carbazole HDN activities and the WP/TiO2 catalyst has much higher dibenzothiophene (DBT) HDS and pyridine HDN activities.The Ni,Co and V can obviously promote the HDS activity and inhibit the HDN activity of the WP/γ-Al2O3 catalyst.The G-Ni5 catalyst possesses a much higher diesel oil HDS activity than the sulphided industrial NiW/γ-Al2O3 catalyst.In general,a support or promoter in the WP/γ-Al2O3 catalyst which can increase the amount and dispersivity of the active W species can promote its HDS and HDN activities.

  12. Investigations of nitride fuels for fast reactors in Russia

    Nitride fuel allows to improve characteristics of fast power reactors in a part of physics, safety and economics. The researches of last years conducted at IPPE have shown that the following features could be achieved in an optimized fast reactor with sodium coolant and nitride fuel, what meets have the modern requirements to advanced nuclear installations: - zero reactivity excess per fuel burn-up ensuring any refueling interval; - zero value of sodium void reactivity effect (SVRE) at sodium loss; - possibility to use the special technology without separation of uranium, plutonium and minor actinides. The technology should improve fuel cycle economics and ensure proliferation resistance. The core basic design of the BN-800 reactor and the design proposals for the advanced BN-1800 reactor core have been developed. In both designs the mixed nitride fuel is supposed to be used: UPuN for first loading, UPuN + MA for next loadings. One of problem of advanced reactor designs is the problem of reliable nitride pins. At realization of researches the shortage of data on nitrides properties, on irradiation behavior of nitrides is felt. The domestic experience on irradiation behavior of nitride covers the followings: - Two loadings of the BR-10 reactor with UN (660 fuel pins and 590 fuel pins). All fuel pins are helium-bonded. Maximum burn-up ∼9 at%, maximum linear rating - 45 KW/m, maximum fuel temperature 1175 K, pellet density - 85-94%. - The BOR-60 reactor: 1) tens pins with UN, maximum burn-up more than 8 at%, maximum fuel temperature - 1775 K; 2) few pins with UPuN, maximum burn-up 4 at%, 8.95 at%, maximum fuel temperature - 2475 K, 1750K, accordingly, pellet density - 85-86 %. All pins are helium-bonded. At the moment 4 helium-bonded pins with mixed nitrides with increased Pu content (45 % and 60 %) are irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor within the frame of joint Russian-French experiment BORA-BORA. Planned maximum burn-up - 11 at%, maximum fuel temperature no more

  13. Experimental study on SPDT machining of Gallium Phosphide

    Václavík, Jan; Doleček, Roman; Lédl, Vít; Psota, Pavel

    Vol. 8884. Bellingham: The Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE), 2013 - (Bentley, J.; Pfaff, M.), 88842H-88842H. (SPIE. 8884). ISBN 978-0-8194-9747-5. ISSN 0277-786X. [SPIE Optifab 2013. Rochester (US), 14.10.2013-17.10.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OE10003 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : SPDT * precision machining * Gallium Phosphide * surface quality Subject RIV: JP - Industrial Processing http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2036139

  14. Amorphous Molybdenum Phosphide Nanoparticles for Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution

    McEnaney, Joshua M.; Crompton, J. Chance; Callejas, Juan F.; Popczun, Eric J.; Biacchi, Adam J.; Nathan S. Lewis; Schaak, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous molybdenum phosphide (MoP) nanoparticles have been synthesized and characterized as electrocatalysts for the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) in 0.50 M H_2SO_4 (pH 0.3). Amorphous MoP nanoparticles (having diameters of 4.2 ± 0.5 nm) formed upon heating Mo(CO)6 and trioctylphosphine in squalane at 320 °C, and the nanoparticles remained amorphous after heating at 450 °C in H_2(5%)/Ar(95%) to remove the surface ligands. At mass loadings of 1 mg cm^–2, MoP/Ti electrodes exhibited overp...

  15. Reprocessing of spent nitride fuel by chemical dissolution in molten salt: Results on plutonium nitride containing inert matrix materials

    Solid solutions of actinide mono-nitrides have been proposed as a candidate fuel of the accelerator-driven system (ADS) for transmutation of minor actinides (MA). The pyrochemical process has several advantages over the wet process such as PUREX in the case of treating spent nitride fuel with large decay heat and fast neutron emission, and recovering highly enriched 15N. In the present study, the chemical dissolution of PuN, (PuxZr1-x)N and PuN+TiN, with CdCl2 in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt were investigated to confirm the possibility of the chemical dissolution process of spent nitride fuel. The plutonium nitrides, PuN, (PuxZr1-x)N and PuN+TiN, were dissolved by the reaction with CdCl2 in LiCl- KCl eutectic melt at 823 K and most of Pu was recovered into the molten salt. On the other hand, most of ZrN and TiN were not dissolved and remained as undissolved residues. (authors)

  16. Ternary phase equilibria in the systems actinide-transition metal-carbon and actinide metal-nitrogen

    Isothermal sections in the ternary phase diagrams of actinide-transition metal-carbon and actinide-transition metal-nitrogen systems are compiled on the basis of new phase studies, using thermodynamic data of carbides and nitrides, and considering the structure and lattice parameters of binary compounds. The lack of experimental results is compensated by estimating the solution behaviour and the phase stabilities. Phase diagrams are given for the systems: Th-(U or Pu)-C, U-(Th or Pu)-N, (Th or U or Pu)-Y-C, (Th or U or Pu)-Ce-C, (Th or U or Pu)-Y-N, (Th or U or Pu)-Ce-N, U-(La or Ce or Pr or Nd)-N, (Th or U or Pu)-Ti-C, (Th or U or Pu)-Zr-C, (Th or U or Pu)-Nb-C, (Th or U or Pu)-Mo-C, U-(Ti or Zr or Hf or Mo)-N, (Th or Pu)-Zr-N, (Th or U or Pu)-Cr-N and (Th or U or Pu)-(Ru or Rh or Pd)-C. Of particular interest is the occurrence of ternary carbides and nitrides. (orig.)

  17. Semi-microdetermination of nitrogen in actinide compounds by Dumas method

    This report describes the application of the Dumas method for the semi-micro determination of nitrogen in actinide compounds and actinide complexes with organic ligands. The usual set up has been modified to make it adaptable for glove box operations. The carbon dioxide generator and nitrometer assemblies were located outside the glove box while the reaction tube and combustion furnaces were housed inside. The nitrogen gas collected in the nitrometer was read with the help of a travelling microscope with a vernier attachment fitted in front of the nitrometer burette. The set up was standardised using acetanilide and employed for the determination of nirtogen in various substances such as uranium nitride, and a variety of substituted quinoline and pyrazolone derivatives of actinides as well as some ternary uranium-PMBR-sulphoxide complexes. Full details of the technique and the analytical data obtained are contained in this report. (author)

  18. Managing Inventories of Heavy Actinides

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has stored a limited inventory of heavy actinides contained in irradiated targets, some partially processed, at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The 'heavy actinides' of interest include plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes; specifically 242Pu and 244Pu, 243Am, and 244/246/248Cm. No alternate supplies of these heavy actinides and no other capabilities for producing them are currently available. Some of these heavy actinide materials are important for use as feedstock for producing heavy isotopes and elements needed for research and commercial application. The rare isotope 244Pu is valuable for research, environmental safeguards, and nuclear forensics. Because the production of these heavy actinides was made possible only by the enormous investment of time and money associated with defense production efforts, the remaining inventories of these rare nuclear materials are an important part of the legacy of the Nuclear Weapons Program. Significant unique heavy actinide inventories reside in irradiated Mark-18A and Mark-42 targets at SRS and ORNL, with no plans to separate and store the isotopes for future use. Although the costs of preserving these heavy actinide materials would be considerable, for all practical purposes they are irreplaceable. The effort required to reproduce these heavy actinides today would likely cost billions of dollars and encompass a series of irradiation and chemical separation cycles for at least 50 years; thus, reproduction is virtually impossible. DOE has a limited window of opportunity to recover and preserve these heavy actinides before they are disposed of as waste. A path forward is presented to recover and manage these irreplaceable National Asset materials for future use in research, nuclear forensics, and other potential applications.

  19. Concentration of actinides in the food chain

    Considerable concern is now being expressed over the discharge of actinides into the environment. This report presents a brief review of the chemistry of the actinides and examines the evidence for interaction of the actinides with some naturally-occurring chelating agents and other factors which might stimulate actinide concentration in the food chain of man. This report also reviews the evidence for concentration of actinides in plants and for uptake through the gastrointestinal tract. (author)

  20. Calorimetric assay of minor actinides

    Rudy, C.; Bracken, D.; Cremers, T.; Foster, L.A.; Ensslin, N.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reviews the principles of calorimetric assay and evaluates its potential application to the minor actinides (U-232-4, Am-241, Am- 243, Cm-245, Np-237). We conclude that calorimetry and high- resolution gamma-ray isotopic analysis can be used for the assay of minor actinides by adapting existing methodologies for Pu/Am-241 mixtures. In some cases, mixtures of special nuclear materials and minor actinides may require the development of new methodologies that involve a combination of destructive and nondestructive assay techniques.

  1. Calorimetric assay of minor actinides

    This paper reviews the principles of calorimetric assay and evaluates its potential application to the minor actinides (U-232-4, Am-241, Am- 243, Cm-245, Np-237). We conclude that calorimetry and high- resolution gamma-ray isotopic analysis can be used for the assay of minor actinides by adapting existing methodologies for Pu/Am-241 mixtures. In some cases, mixtures of special nuclear materials and minor actinides may require the development of new methodologies that involve a combination of destructive and nondestructive assay techniques

  2. Actinides and the environment

    The book combines in one volume the opinions of experts regarding the interaction of radionuclides with the environment and possible ways to immobilize and dispose of nuclear waste. The relevant areas span the spectrum from pure science, such as the fundamental physics and chemistry of the actinides, geology, environmental transport mechanisms, to engineering issues such as reactor operation and the design of nuclear waste repositories. The cross-fertilization between these various areas means that the material in the book will be accessible to seasoned scientists who may wish to obtain an overview of the current state of the art in the field of environmental remediation of radionuclides, as well as to beginning scientists embarking on a career in this field. refs

  3. Environmental research on actinide elements

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers

  4. The role of Ar flow rates on synthesis of nano-structured zirconium nitride layer growth using plasma enhanced hot filament nitriding (PEHFN) technique

    Zirconium is an important material in nuclear industry and Zirconium nitride is considered as an imperative inert matrix in fast reactor fuels for incineration of minor actinides and plutonium. In this article the effects of nonreactive sputter gas (argon) flow rates on the surface properties of zirconium are investigated in argon-nitrogen admixture (60 sccm - standard cubic centimeters per minute) using direct current thermal plasma (dc plasma) enhanced hot filament nitriding (PEHFN) technique. The nitrided specimens are analyzed using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nano hardness tester to study their surface properties. Phase analysis (XRD) confirms the development of o-Zr3N4 phase for all exposure conditions. Crystallite size analysis using XRD and AFM morphology confirms the growth of nano-structured zirconium nitride layers. Considerable enhancement in hardness is found when the sample is treated for 40 sccm argon in the admixture Ar:N2 (60 sccm). (authors)

  5. Core-Shell Nanopillar Array Solar Cells using Cadmium Sulfide Coating on Indium Phosphide Nanopillars

    Tu, Bor-An Clayton

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents a new strategy to fabricate nanostructured indium phosphide and cadmium sulfide photovoltaics. The cells are formed by chemical bath deposition (electroless deposition) of cadmium sulfide onto indium phosphide nanopillar arrays grown by selective-area metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Characterizations through electrical and optical measurements show that the devices consisting of p-InP core and CdS shell have a conversion efficiency, open circuit voltage, short cir...

  6. Aluminum Phosphide; the Most Fatal Rodenticide and Fungicide

    Introduction: Aluminum phosphide (AP) is a fumigate agent, which is also used to control rodents and pests in grain storage facilities. This agent is commonly used in low income and agricultural communities. AP is easily available, cheap and highly toxic. Ingestion of even half a fresh tablet invariably results in death. Its suicidal or accidental poisoning is a medical emergency, while in some low income countries it reaches to more than two third of poisoning deaths. Methods: PubMed was systematically searched (December 2006) for articles related to aluminium phosphide poisoning. 24 articles were finally included. Mechanism of action; AP on exposure to moisture, liberates highly toxic gas, phosphine. In animal and human models AP rapidly inhibits cytochrome-c oxidase leading to inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and inhibits mitochondrial respiration and has cytotoxic action. Clinical Findings: Initial findings of intoxication may be nonspecific and transient. The symptoms may resolve within several hours after removal from exposure. It, however, produces phosphine gas, which is a mitochondrial poison. Its manufacturing and application pose risks of inhalation of phosphine. CNS; GCS is fine at the beginning. Biochemistry; Metabolic acidosis and liver dysfunction are reported. Shock is frequent. Respiratory Tract; Acute dyspnoea, hypotension, bradycardia and other signs of intoxication were also stated. Gastrointestinal; Reported short-segment esophageal strictures in the upper and mid esophagus, successfully managed by endoscopic dilatation. In sub-chronic use, degenerative changes in liver, heart and kidney of rabbits are reported. Cardiovascular; The ECG abnormalities are common and include hypotension, bradycardia, ST-T changes, Supraventricular tachycardia, ventricular ectopics, life threatening ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, atrial flutter/fibrillation, variable degrees of heart block and toxic myocarditis. Haematologic

  7. THERMODYNAMICS OF THE ACTINIDES

    Cunningham, Burris B.

    1962-04-01

    Recent work on the thermodynamic properties of the transplutonium elements is presented and discussed in relation to trends in thermodynamic properties of the actinide series. Accurate values are given for room temperature lattice parameters of two crystallographic forms, (facecentred cubic) fcc and dhcp (double-hexagonal closepacked), of americium metal and for the coefficients of thermal expansion between 157 and 878 deg K (dhcp) and 295 to 633 deg K (fcc). The meiting point of the metal, and its magnetic susceptibility between 77 and 823 deg K are reported and the latter compared with theoretical values for the tripositive ion calculated from spectroscopic data. Similar data (crystallography, meiting point and magnetic susceptibility) are given for metallic curium. A value for the heat of formation of americium monoxide is reported in conjunction with crystallographic data on the monoxide and mononitride. A revision is made in the current value for the heat of formation of Am/O/sub 2/ and for the potential of the Am(III)-Am(IV) couple. The crystal structures and lattice parameters are reported for the trichloride, oxychloride and oxides of californium. (auth)

  8. Band structures in silicene on monolayer gallium phosphide substrate

    Ren, Miaojuan; Li, Mingming; Zhang, Changwen; Yuan, Min; Li, Ping; Li, Feng; Ji, Weixiao; Chen, Xinlian

    2016-07-01

    Opening a sizable band gap in the zero-gap silicene is a key issue for its application in nanoelectronics. We design new 2D silicene and GaP heterobilayer (Si/GaP HBL) composed of silicene and monolayer (ML) GaP. Based on first-principles calculations, we find that the interaction energies are in the range of -295.5 to -297.5 meV per unit cell, indicating a weak interaction between silicene and gallium phosphide (GaP) monolayer. The band gap changes ranging from 0.06 to 0.44 eV in hybrid HBLs. An unexpected indirect-direct band gap crossover is also observed in HBLs, dependent on the stacking pattern. These provide a possible way to design effective FETs out of silicene on GaP monolayer.

  9. Indium Phosphide-Based Semiconductor Nanocrystals and Their Applications

    Paul Mushonga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs are nanometer-sized fluorescent materials with optical properties that can be fine-tuned by varying the core size or growing a shell around the core. They have recently found wide use in the biological field which has further enhanced their importance. This review focuses on the synthesis of indium phosphide (InP colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals. The two synthetic techniques, namely, the hot-injection and heating-up methods are discussed. Different types of the InP-based QDs involving their use as core, core/shell, alloyed, and doped systems are reviewed. The use of inorganic shells for surface passivation is also highlighted. The paper is concluded by some highlights of the applications of these systems in biological studies.

  10. Radiation-induced defect nature in indium phosphide

    The effect of implantation of phosphorus and argon ions, as well as annealing under different conditions on photoluminescence (PL) and photoconductivity (PC) spectra of indium phosphide monocrystals is investigated. Bands of PC with red boundaries at 0.82; 0.91; 1.16 and 1.30 eV are detected. The assumption is made on the relation of the PC bands with centres comprising intrinsic lattice defects. PC band with a red boundary at 1.30 eV is related to antistructural defect PIn. In luminescence spectra bands with the maxima at 1.08; 1.02 and 1.21 eV are detected, which are also related to intrinsic defects. The assumption is made on the relation of PL band with the maximum at 1.14 eV to the centre [SiIn FeIn]. 24 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Nanoimprinted DWDM laser arrays on indium phosphide substrates

    Smistrup, Kristian; Nørregaard, Jesper; Mironov, Andrej;

    2014-01-01

    Dense wavelength division multiplexing lasers play a major role in today's long-haul broadband communication. Typical distributed feedback laser cavities consist of long half-pitch gratings in InGaAsP on InP substrates with grating periods of around 240 nm. The lasers include a quarter wavelength...... shift in the grating, and are single mode with high side-mode suppression. Typically, such lasers are patterned using e-beam lithography (EBL). We present a fabrication method based on patterning by thermal nanoimprint lithography, which is potentially less costly and faster than EBL. Thermal...... nanoimprint lithography of laser gratings raises two types of challenges: (1) The imprint process itself is delicate due to the mechanical fragility of indium phosphide substrates and the thermal mismatch between the substrate and the silicon stamp. (2) The subsequent processing puts requirements on the...

  12. Elastic, Optoelectronic and Thermal Properties of Boron Phosphide

    S. Daoud

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elastic, mechanical, optoelectronic and some thermal properties of boron phosphide (BP in its structure zincblende phase has been performed using the pseudopotential combined with the plane wave method. The plane-wave pseudopotential approach to the density-functional theory within the local density approximation (LDA implemented in Abinit code is used. The elastic stiffness and compliance constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, zener anisotropy factor, young's modulus, internal strain parameter, poisson's ratio, sound velocity for directions within the important crystallographic planes, Debye temperature, melting point, refractive index, plasmon energy, force constants, lattice energy, band gap energy, homopolar energy, heteropolar energy, ionicity and dielectric constant are obtained and analyzed in comparison with the available data.

  13. Actinide burning and waste disposal

    Here we review technical and economic features of a new proposal for a synergistic waste-management system involving reprocessing the spent fuel otherwise destined for a U.S. high-level waste repository and transmuting the recovered actinides in a fast reactor. The proposal would require a U.S. fuel reprocessing plant, capable of recovering and recycling all actinides, including neptunium americium, and curium, from LWR spent fuel, at recoveries of 99.9% to 99.999%. The recovered transuranics would fuel the annual introduction of 14 GWe of actinide-burning liquid-metal fast reactors (ALMRs), beginning in the period 2005 to 2012. The new ALMRs would be accompanied by pyrochemical reprocessing facilities to recover and recycle all actinides from discharged ALMR fuel. By the year 2045 all of the LWR spent fuel now destined f a geologic repository would be reprocessed. Costs of constructing and operating these new reprocessing and reactor facilities would be borne by U.S. industry, from the sale of electrical energy produced. The ALMR program expects that ALMRs that burn actinides from LWR spent fuel will be more economical power producers than LWRs as early as 2005 to 2012, so that they can be prudently selected by electric utility companies for new construction of nuclear power plants in that era. Some leaders of DOE and its contractors argue that recovering actinides from spent fuel waste and burning them in fast reactors would reduce the life of the remaining waste to about 200-300 years, instead of 00,000 years. The waste could then be stored above ground until it dies out. Some argue that no geologic repositories would be needed. The current view expressed within the ALMR program is that actinide recycle technology would not replace the need for a geologic repository, but that removing actinides from the waste for even the first repository would simplify design and licensing of that repository. A second geologic repository would not be needed. Waste now planned

  14. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions

  15. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  16. Thermal-hydraulics of actinide burner reactors

    As a part of conceptual study of actinide burner reactors, core thermal-hydraulic analyses were conducted for two types of reactor concepts, namely (1) sodium-cooled actinide alloy fuel reactor, and (2) helium-cooled particle-bed reactor, to examine the feasibility of high power-density cores for efficient transmutation of actinides within the maximum allowable temperature limits of fuel and cladding. In addition, calculations were made on cooling of actinide fuel assembly. (author)

  17. Actinides and Life's Origins.

    Adam, Zachary

    2007-12-01

    There are growing indications that life began in a radioactive beach environment. A geologic framework for the origin or support of life in a Hadean heavy mineral placer beach has been developed, based on the unique chemical properties of the lower-electronic actinides, which act as nuclear fissile and fertile fuels, radiolytic energy sources, oligomer catalysts, and coordinating ions (along with mineralogically associated lanthanides) for prototypical prebiotic homonuclear and dinuclear metalloenzymes. A four-factor nuclear reactor model was constructed to estimate how much uranium would have been required to initiate a sustainable fission reaction within a placer beach sand 4.3 billion years ago. It was calculated that about 1-8 weight percent of the sand would have to have been uraninite, depending on the weight percent, uranium enrichment, and quantity of neutron poisons present within the remaining placer minerals. Radiolysis experiments were conducted with various solvents with the use of uraniumand thorium-rich minerals (metatorbernite and monazite, respectively) as proxies for radioactive beach sand in contact with different carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen reactants. Radiation bombardment ranged in duration of exposure from 3 weeks to 6 months. Low levels of acetonitrile (estimated to be on the order of parts per billion in concentration) were conclusively identified in 2 setups and tentatively indicated in a 3(rd) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These low levels have been interpreted within the context of a Hadean placer beach prebiotic framework to demonstrate the promise of investigating natural nuclear reactors as power production sites that might have assisted the origins of life on young rocky planets with a sufficiently differentiated crust/mantle structure. Future investigations are recommended to better quantify the complex relationships between energy release, radioactive grain size, fissionability, reactant phase, phosphorus

  18. ALMR potential for actinide consumption

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored fast reactor design based on the Power Reactor, Innovative Small Module (PRISM) concept originated by General Electric. This reactor combines a high degree of passive safety characteristics with a high level of modularity and factory fabrication to achieve attractive economics. The current reference design is a 471 MWt modular reactor fueled with ternary metal fuel. This paper discusses actinide transmutation core designs that fit the design envelope of the ALMR and utilize spent LWR fuel as startup material and for makeup. Actinide transmutation may be accomplished in the ALMR core by using either a breeding or burning configuration. Lifetime actinide mass consumption is calculated as well as changes in consumption behavior throughout the lifetime of the reactor. Impacts on system operational and safety performance are evaluated in a preliminary fashion. Waste disposal impacts are discussed. (author)

  19. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO2+) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO2+; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO2+ cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO2+·UO22+, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO2+ species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO2+ have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO2+ cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe3+ and Cr3+ and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO2+·UO22+, NpO2+·Th4+, PuO2+·UO22+, and PuO2+·Th4+ at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 ± 0.2, 1.8 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 1.5, and ∼0.8 M-1

  20. Molybdenum nitride nanotubes

    Molybdenum nitride nanotubes were prepared by depositing nitride film on anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) template by atomic layer deposition and then etching away the template with sodium hydroxide solution. The effect of deposition parameters on film growth and the properties of the nanotubes was investigated. The maximum depth of intrusion of the molybdenum nitride film into the AAO pores was found to be 20 μm, achieved with 7-second precursor pulses. Precursor diffusion into the AAO pores dominated over the intrusion. Three different architectures of molybdenum nitride nanotubes were isolated. Separated nanotubes were found when the template was etched in an ultrasonic bath, while bundling dominated when template etching was conducted without ultrasound. When the nitride-coated AAO template was mounted onto a steel plate before etching the nanotubes remained on the surface with the tips strongly intertwined

  1. Orbital effects in actinide systems

    Actinide magnetism presents a number of important challenges; in particular, the proximity of 5f band to the Fermi energy gives rise to strong interaction with both d and s like conduction electrons, and the extended nature of the 5f electrons means that they can interact with electron orbitals from neighboring atoms. Theory has recently addressed these problems. Often neglected, however, is the overwhelming evidence for large orbital contributions to the magnetic properties of actinides. Some experimental evidence for these effects are presented briefly in this paper. They point, clearly incorrectly, to a very localized picture for the 5f electrons. This dichotomy only enhances the nature of the challenge

  2. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    Michalski J; Burdyński K.; Wach P.; Łataś Z.

    2015-01-01

    Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dis...

  3. Influence of N-15 enrichment on neutronics, costs and C-14 production in nitride fuel cycle scenarios

    The C-14 production for different closed fuel cycle scenarios has been investigated. If nitride fuel is used in fast reactors and ADSs dedicated to management of plutonium and minor actinides, an N-15 enrichment level of about 99% is required for the nitride cores to produce the same amount of C-14 as the oxide cores in the power park. The corresponding cost penalty for fuel fabrication is estimated to be larger than 25%. If reprocessing is included in the costs for fuel operations, the penalty is of the order of 5-10%, provided that a closed gas cycle is implemented for the fabrication. If nitride fuels are used only for minor actinide management in ADS, the required enrichment level is about 93%, and the cost penalty is less than 10%. (author)

  4. Research on the chemical speciation of actinides

    A demand for the safe and effective management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plant draws increasing attention with the growth of nuclear power industry. The objective of this project is to establish the basis of research on the actinide chemistry by using advanced laser-based highly sensitive spectroscopic systems. Researches on the chemical speciation of actinides are prerequisite for the development of technologies related to nuclear fuel cycles, especially, such as the safe management of high level radioactive wastes and the chemical examination of irradiated nuclear fuels. For supporting these technologies, laser-based spectroscopies have been performed for the chemical speciation of actinide in an aqueous solutions and the quantitative analysis of actinide isotopes in spent nuclear fuels. In this report, results on the following subjects have been summarized. (1) Development of TRLFS technology for chemical speciation of actinides, (2) Development of LIBD technology for measuring solubility of actinides, (3) Chemical speciation of plutonium complexes by using a LWCC system, (4) Development of LIBS technology for the quantitative analysis of actinides, (5) Development of technology for the chemical speciation of actinides by CE, (6) Evaluation on the chemical reactions between actinides and humic substances, (7) Chemical speciation of actinides adsorbed on metal oxides surfaces, (8) Determination of actinide source terms of spent nuclear fuel

  5. Environmental research on actinide elements

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  6. ENDF/B-V actinides

    This document summarizes the contents of the actinides part of the ENDF/B-V nuclear data library released by the US National Nuclear Data Center. This library or selective retrievals of it, are available from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  7. Ab-initio Calculations of Electronic Properties of Boron Phosphide (BP)

    Ejembi, John; Franklin, Lashaunda; Malozovsky, Yuriy; Bagayoko, Diola

    2014-03-01

    We present results from ab-initio, self consistent local density approximation (LDA) calculations of electronic and related properties of zinc blende boron phosphide (BP). We employed a local density approximation (LDA) potential and implemented the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) formalism. This implementation followed the Bagayoko, Zhao, and Williams (BZW) method, as enhanced by Ekuma and Franklin (BZW-EF). We discuss our preliminary results for the indirect band gap, from Γ to X, of Boron Phosphide. We also report calculated electron and hole effective masses for Boron Phosphide and total (DOS) and partial (pDOS) density of states. Acknowledgments: This research is funded in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Louisiana Board of Regents, through LASiGMA [Award Nos. EPS- 1003897, NSF (2010-15)-RII-SUBR] and NSF HRD-1002541, the US Department of Energy - National, Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) (Award No. DE-NA0001861), LaSPACE, and LONI-SUBR.

  8. THE STUDY OF MOLYBDENUM PHOSPHIDE AS CATALYST FOR SIMULTANEOUS HDN,HDS AND HDY

    ZHAOTian-bo; LIFeng-yan; SUNGui-da; LICui-qing

    2003-01-01

    Transition-metal molybdenum phosphides were prepared by direct reduction of an amorphous phosphate precursor in hydrogen at relatively low temperature(650℃).XRD(X-ray diffraction analysis)measurements showed that pure molybdenum phosphide formed after the reduction with H2.The reactivity was determined in a continuous-flow microreactor at a H2 pressure of 3.0 MPa.A sample of prepared molybdenum phosphide catalyst diluted with γ-Al2O3(20% phosphate precursor)was used for simultaneuous HDN(Hydrodenitrogenation),HDS (Hydrodesulfurization and HDY)Hydrogenation of aromatics).The influences of space velocity,flow rate of hydrogen,reaction time and temperature on hydrotreating performance were studied.Pyridine,thiophene and cyclohexene were used as model compunds,their contents were respectively 5%,5% and 20%,Cyclohexane was used as the solvent.

  9. Density-functional investigation of gallium phosphide- silicon interface

    Steinbach, Gabi; Schreiber, Michael [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Gemming, Sibylle [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, HZ Dresden-Rossendorf, Postfach 51 01 19, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Doescher, Henning; Hannappel, Thomas [Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Gallium phosphide is an established compound semiconductor in the optoelectronic industry with an indirect band gap of 2.26 eV. Used as substrate for GaAsP LEDs or active LED material itself, GaP thin films on cheaper silicon substrates promise a high application potential for LED engineering. The present study addresses the material discontinuities occuring at the boundaries of a GaP thin functional layer on a silicon substrate. Density-functional calculations have been performed with the pseudopotential plane-wave code ABINIT. At the ideally flat GaP(001)Si(001) interface both the Ga-rich and the P-rich terminations of the GaP layer are studied along with partially Si-occupied boundary layers. Substantially negative values of the work of separation for all investigated interfaces indicate the high stability and the low remanent stresses at the GaP-Si interface. Extended studies contain steps along the <110> direction with the aim to distinguish point-defects and line-defects as origin of the experimentally observed anti-phase boundaries.

  10. V18P9C2. A complex phosphide carbide

    V18P9C2 crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pmma with the lattice parameters a = 17.044(3), b = 3.2219(7), and c = 13.030(2) Aa, Z = 2. The crystal structure is composed of 19 symmetry-independent atoms. The crystal structure is considered as a network formed by the transition metal atoms exhibiting cubic, trigonal prismatic, and octahedral voids centered by V, P, and C atoms, respectively. Vice versa, the V and P atoms form a three-dimensional network. The two CV6 octahedra are edge- and corner-connected to chains running parallel to [010]. The five unique P atoms are trigonal prismatically coordinated by V atoms with one to three faces capped again by a V atom. The V atoms have mainly cubic environments formed solely by V or by V and P atoms. V18P9C2 exhibits some structural relations to other compounds of the ternary system V-P-C as well as to other intermetallic phases. Despite the low carbon content, V18P9C2 is considered as a ternary compound rather than an interstitially stabilized (binary) phosphide in view of its special structural features.

  11. Optical Properties of Strained Wurtzite Gallium Phosphide Nanowires

    Greil, J.

    2016-06-08

    Wurtzite gallium phosphide (WZ GaP) has been predicted to exhibit a direct bandgap in the green spectral range. Optical transitions, however, are only weakly allowed by the symmetry of the bands. While efficient luminescence has been experimentally shown, the nature of the transitions is not yet clear. Here we apply tensile strain up to 6% and investigate the evolution of the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of WZ GaP nanowires (NWs). The pressure and polarization dependence of the emission together with a theoretical analysis of strain effects is employed to establish the nature and symmetry of the transitions. We identify the emission lines to be related to localized states with significant admixture of Γ7c symmetry and not exclusively related to the Γ8c conduction band minimum (CBM). The results emphasize the importance of strongly bound state-related emission in the pseudodirect semiconductor WZ GaP and contribute significantly to the understanding of the optoelectronic properties of this novel material.

  12. Boron nitride composites

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  13. Actinides recycling assessment in a thermal reactor

    Highlights: • Actinides recycling is assessed using BWR fuel assemblies. • Four fuel rods are substituted by minor actinides rods in a UO2 and in a MOX fuel assembly. • Performance of standard fuel assemblies and the ones with the substitution is compared. • Reduction of actinides is measured for the fuel assemblies containing minor actinides rods. • Thermal reactors can be used for actinides recycling. - Abstract: Actinides recycling have the potential to reduce the geological repository burden of the high-level radioactive waste that is produced in a nuclear power reactor. The core of a standard light water reactor is composed only by fuel assemblies and there are no specific positions to allocate any actinides blanket, in this assessment it is proposed to replace several fuel rods by actinides blankets inside some of the reactor core fuel assemblies. In the first part of this study, a single uranium standard fuel assembly is modeled and the amount of actinides generated during irradiation is quantified for use it as reference. Later, in the same fuel assembly four rods containing 6 w/o of minor actinides and using depleted uranium as matrix were replaced and depletion was simulated to obtain the net reduction of minor actinides. Other calculations were performed using MOX fuel lattices instead of uranium standard fuel to find out how much reduction is possible to obtain. Results show that a reduction of minor actinides is possible using thermal reactors and a higher reduction is obtained when the minor actinides are embedded in uranium fuel assemblies instead of MOX fuel assemblies

  14. Severe myocardial depression in a patient with aluminium phosphide poisoning: A clinical, electrocardiographical and histopathological correlation

    Shah Viral

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium phosphide poisoning is very common in India. It is one of the most fatal poisons. The clinical spectrum of poisoning varies depending upon the dosage and duration of consumption. The main effect of the poison is due to the release of phosphine which inhibits cytochrome oxidase and thereby hampers cellular oxygen utilization. Almost any organ can be affected by aluminium phosphide poisoning. We report a case where the heart was the predominantly affected organ. We describe the clinical symptoms and signs and their correlation with electrocardiographic and histopathological examinations.

  15. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    Michalski J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dissociated ammonia. The nitriding processes were accomplished in four series. The parameters selected in the particular processes were: process temperature (T, time (t, value of nitriding potential (KN, corresponding to known dissociation rate of the ammonia which dissociates during the nitriding process (α. Variable parameters were: nitrogen availability (mN2, composition of the ingoing atmosphere and flow rate of the ingoing atmosphere (FIn.

  16. Synergistic extraction of actinides : Part II. Tetra-and trivalent actinides

    A detailed discussion on the synergistic solvent extraction behaviour of tetra- and trivalent actinide ions is presented. Structural aspects of the natural donor adducts of the tetravalent actinide ion chelates involved in synergism are also discussed. (author)

  17. Spin Hamiltonians for actinide ions

    The breakdown of Russel Saunders coupling for correlated f-levels of actinide ions is due to both spin orbit coupling and the crystalline electric field (CEF). Experiments on curium, an S-state ion in the metal for which the CEF is weak indicate a g-factor close to the Russel-Saunders value. Spin-orbit coupling is therefore too weak to produce jj coupling. This suggests a model for magnetic actinide ions in which the CEF ground multiplet is well separated from higher levels, completely determining thermodynamic magnetic properties. On this basis simplified spin Hamiltonians are derived for GAMMA1-GAMMA5 ground states in order to interpret thermodynamic measurements and ordering phenomena. (author)

  18. Actinide chemistry in ionic liquids.

    Takao, Koichiro; Bell, Thomas James; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2013-04-01

    This Forum Article provides an overview of the reported studies on the actinide chemistry in ionic liquids (ILs) with a particular focus on several fundamental chemical aspects: (i) complex formation, (ii) electrochemistry, and (iii) extraction behavior. The majority of investigations have been dedicated to uranium, especially for the 6+ oxidation state (UO2(2+)), because the chemistry of uranium in ordinary solvents has been well investigated and uranium is the most abundant element in the actual nuclear fuel cycles. Other actinides such as thorium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curiumm, although less studied, are also of importance in fully understanding the nuclear fuel engineering process and the safe geological disposal of radioactive wastes. PMID:22873132

  19. Overview of activities on Pu and minor actinides fuel research in JAERI

    Arai, Yasuo; Yamashita, Toshiyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Recent activities on Pu and minor actinides fuel research in JAERI is summarized. For oxide fuel, the solid state chemistry on U-Np-Pu-O system has been investigated. Further, Pu rock-like fuel has been developed from the viewpoint of disposing excess plutonium. For nitride fuel, research on fuel fabrication, property measurements, irradiation behavior and application to pyrochemical reprocessing has been carried out. These studies aim at contributing to the development of advanced fuel cycle and innovative fuel cycle toward the 21st century. (author). 25 refs.

  20. Actinide recovery techniques utilizing electromechanical processes

    Under certain conditions, the separation of actinides using electromechanical techniques may be an effective means of residue processing. The separation of granular mixtures of actinides and other materials discussed in this report is based on appreciable differences in the magnetic and electrical properties of the actinide elements. In addition, the high density of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium, may render a simultaneous separation based on mutually complementary parameters. Both high intensity magnetic separation and electrostatic separation have been investigated for the concentration of an actinide waste stream. Waste stream constituents include an actinide metal alloy and broken quartz shards. The investigation of these techniques is in support of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept currently being developed at Argonne National Laboratory under the auspices of the Department of Energy

  1. Actinide Waste Forms and Radiation Effects

    Ewing, R. C.; Weber, W. J.

    Over the past few decades, many studies of actinides in glasses and ceramics have been conducted that have contributed substantially to the increased understanding of actinide incorporation in solids and radiation effects due to actinide decay. These studies have included fundamental research on actinides in solids and applied research and development related to the immobilization of the high level wastes (HLW) from commercial nuclear power plants and processing of nuclear weapons materials, environmental restoration in the nuclear weapons complex, and the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium as a result of disarmament activities. Thus, the immobilization of actinides has become a pressing issue for the twenty-first century (Ewing, 1999), and plutonium immobilization, in particular, has received considerable attention in the USA (Muller et al., 2002; Muller and Weber, 2001). The investigation of actinides and

  2. Anthropogenic Actinides in the Environment

    The use of nuclear energy and the testing of nuclear weapons have led to significant releases of anthropogenic isotopes, in particular a number of actinide isotopes generally not abundant in nature. Most prominent amongst these are 239Pu, 240Pu, and 236U. The study of these actinides in nature has been an active field of study ever since. Measurements of actinides are applied to nuclear safeguards, investigating the sources of contamination, and as a tracer for a number of erosion and hydrology studies. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is ideally suited for these studies and generally offers higher sensitivities than competing techniques, like ICP-MS or decay counting. Recent advances in AMS allow the study of “minor” plutonium isotopes (241Pu, 242Pu, and 244Pu). Furthermore, 236U can now be measured at the levels expected from the global stratospheric fall-out of the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests in the 1950s and 1960s. Even the pre-anthropogenic isotope ratios could be within reach. However, the distribution and abundance levels of these isotopes are not well known yet. I will present an overview of the field, and in detail two recent studies on minor plutonium isotopes and 236U, respectively.(author)

  3. Abnormal Nitride Morphologies upon Nitriding Iron-Based Substrates

    Meka, Sai Ramudu; Mittemeijer, Eric Jan

    2013-06-01

    Nitriding of iron-based components is a very well-known surface engineering method for bringing about great improvement of the mechanical and chemical properties. An overview is presented of the strikingly different nitride morphologies developing upon nitriding iron-based alloy substrates. Observed abnormal morphologies are the result of intricate interplay of the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints for the nucleation and growth of both alloying element nitride particles in the matrix and iron nitrides at the surface of the substrate. Alloying elements having strong Me-N interaction, such as Cr, V, and Ti, precipitate instantaneously as internal Me-nitrides, thus allowing the subsequent nucleation and growth of "normal" layer-type iron nitride. Alloying elements having weak Me-N interaction, such as Al, Si, and Mo, and simultaneously having low solubility in iron nitride, obstruct/delay the nucleation and growth of iron nitrides at the surface, thus leading to very high nitrogen supersaturation over an extended depth range from the surface. Eventually, the nucleation and growth of "abnormal" plate-type iron nitride occurs across the depth range of high nitrogen supersaturation. On this basis, strategies can be devised for tuned development of specific nitride morphologies at the surface of nitrided components.

  4. PWRs potentialities for minor actinides burning

    In the frame of the SPIN program at CEA, the impacts of the minor actinides (MA) incineration in PWRs are analysed. The aim is to reduce the mass, the potential radiotoxicity level. The recycling of all actinide elements is evaluated in a PWR nuclear yard. A sensitivity study is done to evaluate the incineration for each minor actinide element. This gives the most efficient way of incineration for each MA elements in a PWR and helps to design a PWR burner. This burner is disposed in a PWR nuclear system in which the actinides are recycled until equilibrium. (author)

  5. Research on the chemical speciation of actinides

    A demand for the safe and effective management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plant draws increasing attention with the growth of nuclear power industry. The objective of this project is to establish the basis of research on the actinide chemistry by using highly sensitive and advanced laser-based spectroscopic systems. Researches on the chemical speciation of actinides are prerequisite for the development of technologies related to nuclear fuel cycles, especially, such as the safe management of high level radioactive wastes and the chemical examination of irradiated nuclear fuels. For supporting these technologies, laser-based spectroscopies have been applied for the chemical speciation of actinide in aqueous solutions and the quantitative analysis of actinide isotopes in spent nuclear fuels. In this report, results on the following subjects have been summarized. Development of TRLFS technology for the chemical speciation of actinides, Development of laser-induced photo-acoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) system, Application of LIBD technology to investigate dynamic behaviors of actinides dissolution reactions, Development of nanoparticle analysis technology in groundwater using LIBD, Chemical speciation of plutonium complexes by using a LWCC system, Development of LIBS technology for the quantitative analysis of actinides, Evaluation on the chemical reactions between actinides and humic substances, Spectroscopic speciation of uranium-ligand complexes in aqueous solution, Chemical speciation of actinides adsorbed on metal oxides surfaces

  6. Long-term plant availability of actinides

    Environmental releases of actinide elements raise issues about which data are very limited. Quantitative information is required to assess the long-term behavior of actinides and their potential hazards resulting from the transport through food chains leading to man. Of special interest is the effect of time on the changes in the availability of actinide elements for uptake by plants from soil. This study provides valuable information on the effects of weathering and aging on the uptake of actinides from soil by range and crop plants grown under realistic field conditions

  7. Chemistry of actinides and fission products

    This task is concerned primarily with the fundamental chemistry of the actinide and fission product elements. Special efforts are made to develop research programs in collaboration with researchers at universities and in industry who have need of national laboratory facilities. Specific areas currently under investigation include: (1) spectroscopy and photochemistry of actinides in low-temperature matrices; (2) small-angle scattering studies of hydrous actinide and fission product polymers in aqueous and nonaqueous solvents; (3) kinetic and thermodynamic studies of complexation reactions in aqueous and nonaqueous solutions; and (4) the development of inorganic ion exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide separations. Recent results from work in these areas are summarized here

  8. Indium Phosphide Window Layers for Indium Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    Jain, Raj K.

    2005-01-01

    Window layers help in reducing the surface recombination at the emitter surface of the solar cells resulting in significant improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Indium gallium arsenide (In(x)Ga(1-x)As) and related materials based solar cells are quite promising for photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic applications. The flexibility of the change in the bandgap energy and the growth of InGaAs on different substrates make this material very attractive for multi-bandgap energy, multi-junction solar cell approaches. The high efficiency and better radiation performance of the solar cell structures based on InGaAs make them suitable for space power applications. This work investigates the suitability of indium phosphide (InP) window layers for lattice-matched In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As (bandgap energy 0.74 eV) solar cells. We present the first data on the effects of the p-type InP window layer on p-on-n lattice-matched InGaAs solar cells. The modeled quantum efficiency results show a significant improvement in the blue region with the InP window. The bare InGaAs solar cell performance suffers due to high surface recombination velocity (10(exp 7) cm/s). The large band discontinuity at the InP/InGaAs heterojunction offers a great potential barrier to minority carriers. The calculated results demonstrate that the InP window layer effectively passivates the solar cell front surface, hence resulting in reduced surface recombination and therefore, significantly improving the performance of the InGaAs solar cell.

  9. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan;

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  10. General Strategy for the Synthesis of Transition Metal Phosphide Films for Electrocatalytic Hydrogen and Oxygen Evolution.

    Read, Carlos G; Callejas, Juan F; Holder, Cameron F; Schaak, Raymond E

    2016-05-25

    Transition metal phosphides recently have been identified as promising Earth-abundant electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Here, we present a general and scalable strategy for the synthesis of transition metal phosphide electrodes based on the reaction of commercially available metal foils (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and NiFe) with various organophosphine reagents. The resulting phosphide electrodes were found to exhibit excellent electrocatalytic HER and OER performance. The most active electrodes required overpotentials of only -128 mV for the HER in acid (Ni2P), -183 mV for the HER in base (Ni2P), and 277 mV for the OER in base (NiFeP) to produce operationally relevant current densities of 10 mA cm(-2). Such HER and OER performance compares favorably with samples prepared using significantly more elaborate and costly procedures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the approach can also be utilized to obtain highly active and conformal metal phosphide coatings on photocathode materials, such as highly doped Si, that are relevant to solar fuels production. PMID:27156388

  11. Facile synthesis of iron phosphide nanorods for efficient and durable electrochemical oxygen evolution.

    Xiong, Dehua; Wang, Xiaoguang; Li, Wei; Liu, Lifeng

    2016-07-01

    Iron phosphide (FeP) nanorods have been fabricated by a facile hydrothermal synthesis of iron oxyhydroxide precursors, followed by a convenient phosphorization process. The FeP nanorods dispersed on carbon fiber paper current collectors exhibit outstanding catalytic activity and excellent long-term stability toward the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). PMID:27333123

  12. Calculated Atomic Volumes of the Actinide Metals

    Skriver, H.; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1979-01-01

    The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium.......The equilibrium atomic volume is calculated for the actinide metals. It is possible to account for the localization of the 5f electrons taking place in americium....

  13. Environmental chemistry of the actinide elements

    The environmental chemistry of the actinide elements is a new branch of science developing with the application of nuclear energy on a larger and larger scale. Various aspects of the environmental chemistry of the actinide elements are briefly reviewed in this paper, such as its significance in the nuclear waste disposal, its coverage of research fields and possible directions for future study

  14. PIE analysis for minor actinide

    Minor actinide (MA) is generated in nuclear fuel during the operation of power reactor. For fuel design, reactivity decrease due to it should be considered. Out of reactors, MA plays key role to define the property of spent fuel (SF) such as α-radioactivity, neutron emission rate, and criticality of SF. In order to evaluate the calculation codes and libraries for predicting the amount of MA, comparison between calculation results and experimentally obtained data has been conducted. In this report, we will present the status of PIE data of MA taken by post irradiation examinations (PIE) and several calculation results. (author)

  15. Actinide co-conversion by internal gelation

    Suitable microstructures and homogenous microspheres of actinide compounds are of interest for future nuclear fuel or transmutation target concepts to prevent the generation and dispersal of actinide powder. Sol-gel routes are being investigated as one of the possible solutions for producing these compounds. Preliminary work is described involving internal gelation to synthesize mixed compounds including minor actinides, particularly mixed actinide or mixed actinide-inert element compounds. A parameter study is discussed to highlight the importance of the initial broth composition for obtaining gel microspheres without major defects (cracks, craters, etc.). In particular, conditions are defined to produce gel beads from Zr(IV)/Y(III)/Ce(III) or Zr(IV)/An(III) systems. After gelation, the heat treatment of these microspheres is described for the purpose of better understanding the formation of cracks after calcination and verifying the effective synthesis of an oxide solid-solution. (authors)

  16. Actinides analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry

    At the ANTARES accelerator at ANSTO a new beamline has been commissioned, incorporating new magnetic and electrostatic analysers, to optimise the efficiency for Actinides detection by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The detection of Actinides, particularly the isotopic ratios of uranium and plutonium, provide unique signatures for nuclear safeguards purposes. We are currently engaged in a project to evaluate the application of AMS to the measurement of Actinides in environmental samples for nuclear safeguards. Levels of certain fission products, Actinides and other radioactive species can be used as indicators of undeclared nuclear facilities or activities, either on-going or in the past Other applications of ultra-sensitive detection of Actinides are also under consideration. neutron-attenuation images of a porous reservoir rock

  17. Actinide ion sensor for pyroprocess monitoring

    Jue, Jan-fong; Li, Shelly X.

    2014-06-03

    An apparatus for real-time, in-situ monitoring of actinide ion concentrations which comprises a working electrode, a reference electrode, a container, a working electrolyte, a separator, a reference electrolyte, and a voltmeter. The container holds the working electrolyte. The voltmeter is electrically connected to the working electrode and the reference electrode and measures the voltage between those electrodes. The working electrode contacts the working electrolyte. The working electrolyte comprises an actinide ion of interest. The reference electrode contacts the reference electrolyte. The reference electrolyte is separated from the working electrolyte by the separator. The separator contacts both the working electrolyte and the reference electrolyte. The separator is ionically conductive to the actinide ion of interest. The reference electrolyte comprises a known concentration of the actinide ion of interest. The separator comprises a beta double prime alumina exchanged with the actinide ion of interest.

  18. A concept of self-completed fuel cycle based on lead-cooled nitride-fuel fast reactors

    A concept of nuclear energy total system was studied based on the nitride fuel cycle and inherent safety lead-cooled fast reactors. In the nitride fuel reprocessing, a new concept for pyrochemical method was proposed due to reducing fuel cycle cost. The present designed lead-cooled fast reactors have higher safety, economics and minor actinide transmutation efficiency than those of MOX-fuel fast reactors. The construction of 1500 MWt plant is feasible as a result for technology studies for aseismic, steam-generator and reactor configuration systems. (author)

  19. Quantum dot infrared photodetectors based on indium phosphide

    The subject of this work is a systematic study of quantum dot infrared photodetectors based on indium-phosphide substrate by means of various spectroscopic and electronic measurement methods in order to understand the physical and technological processes. This enables a concise definition of strategies in order to realize next generation devices in this material system and to gain overall progress in the research field of quantum dot infrared photodetectors. The interpretation of the experimental results is supported by analytical and numerical simulations. The samples, grown by collaboration partners, were characterized using differential transmission and fast Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, with a special emphasis on the latter one. Therefore, samples both in wedged waveguide geometry and samples with gold coated mesa structures have been processed. A large part of the discussion is dedicated to the current voltage characteristic of the devices, due to its large importance for device optimization, i.e. the reduction of the dark current plays a crucial role in the research field of high temperature infrared photon-detection. Further, results of photoluminescence measurements, performed by collaboration partners, have been used in order to attain a more complete picture of the samples' electronic band structure and in order to obtain complementary information with respect to other measurement methods applied within the experimental work and the simulation of the structures. In agreement to the simulations, a photocurrent response was observed at 6 and at 12 μm up to a temperature of 80 K, depending on the samples' design. The principle of parameter scaling was applied to the samples, in order to assign physical effects either to details in the samples' design or to technological quality aspects, i.e. the doping level and the thickness of the capping layer was varied. In addition to that a quantum well was introduced within a series of samples in order to

  20. Electrocardiographic findings and cardiac manifestations in acute aluminum phosphide poisoning.

    Soltaninejad, Kambiz; Beyranvand, Mohammad-Reza; Momenzadeh, Seyed-Akbar; Shadnia, Shahin

    2012-07-01

    Aluminium phosphide (AlP) poisoning has a high mortality due to cardiovascular involvement. In this study, we evaluated the frequency of cardiac manifestations and electrocardiographic (ECG) findings in 20 patients with acute AlP poisoning, who were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in Tehran, Iran, over a period of 6 months (between October 2008 and April 2009). The sex, age, cause and manner of ingestion, number of ingested AlP tablets, cardiac and ECG manifestations, creatine phosphokinase (CPK), CPK-myocardial band (CPK-mb) and troponin-T (TnT) were extracted from the patients' files. All data were analysed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. The majority (60%) of patients were male. The mean age was 27 ± 8.7 years. The mortality rate was 40%. In all of the patients, the cause of poisoning was intentional suicide and ingestion was the route of exposure. The mean number of ingested AlP tablets per patient was 2.2 ± 1.1. The average time interval between admission and cardiovascular manifestations or ECG findings was 168.8 ± 116.2 min. The range of systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure was 60-130 mmHg and 40-70 mmHg, respectively. Dysrhythmia was observed in nine (45%) cases. Elevation of the ST segment was seen in nine cases (45%). Seven patients (35%) had prolonged QTc intervals. Bundle branch block (BBB) was observed in four (20%) patients. In nine (45%) patients, the serum cardiac TnT qualitative assay was positive. There were no significant differences between normal and abnormal ECG groups according to sex, age, number and manner of ingested AlP tablets and SBP. There was a significant correlation between cardiac manifestations and ECG findings and TnT-positive results with mortality in acute AlP poisoning. PMID:22687771

  1. Sintering silicon nitride

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Sanders, William A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Oxides having a composition of (Ba(1-x)Sr(x))O-Al2O3-2SiO2 are used as sintering aids for producing an improved silicon nitride ceramic material. The x must be greater than 0 to insure the formation of the stable monoclinic celsian glass phase.

  2. Hot pressing aluminum nitride

    Experiment was performed on the hot pressing of aluminum nitride, using three kinds of powder which are: a) made by electric arc method, b) made by nitrifying aluminum metal powder, and c) made from alumina and carbon in nitrogen atmosphere. The content of oxygen of these powders was analyzed by activation analysis using high energy neutron irradiation. The density of hot pressed samples was classified into two groups. The high density group contained oxygen more than 3 wt. %, and the low density group contained about 0.5 wt %. Typical density vs. temperature curves have a bending point near 1,5500C, and the sample contains iron impurity of 0.5 wt. %. Needle crystals were found to grow near 1,5500C by VLS mechanism, and molten iron acts a main part of mechanism as a liquid phase. According to the above-mentioned curve, the iron impurity in aluminum nitride prevents densification. The iron impurity accelerates crystal growth. Advance of densification may be expected by adding iron impurity, but in real case, the densification is delayed. Densification and crystal growth are greatly accelerated by oxygen impurity. In conclusion, more efforts must be made for the purification of aluminum nitride. In the present stage, the most pure nitride powder contains about 0.1 wt. % of oxygen, as compared with good silicon carbide crystals containing only 10-5 wt. % of nitrogen. (Iwakiri, K.)

  3. The ALMR actinide burning system

    The advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) actinide burning system is being developed under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to bring its unique capabilities to fruition for deployment in the early 21st century. The system consists of four major parts: the reactor plant, the metal fuel and its recycle, the processing of light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel to extract the actinides, and the development of a residual waste package. This paper addresses the status and outlook for each of these four major elements. The ALMR is being developed by an industrial group under the leadership of General Electric (GE) in a cost-sharing arrangement with the US Department of Energy. This effort is nearing completion of the advanced conceptual design phase and will enter the preliminary design phase in 1994. The innovative modular reactor design stresses simplicity, economics, reliability, and availability. The design has evolved from GE's PRISM design initiative and has progressed to the final stages of a prelicensing review by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); a safety evaluation report is expected by the end of 1993. All the major issues identified during this review process have been technically resolved. The next design phases will focus on implementation of the basic safety philosophy of passive shutdown to a safe, stable condition, even without scram, and passive decay heat removal. Economic projections to date show that it will be competitive with non- nuclear and advanced LWR nuclear alternatives

  4. Contact damage of silicon nitride whisker-silicon nitride composites

    The influence of β-silicon nitride whiskers content on Hertzian contact damage in silicon nitride matrix prepared by tape casting and gas pressure sintering (GPS) is discussed. Hertzian indentations with different loads were applied to follow the evolution of damage in these whisker-reinforced composites. The morphology of contact damage was investigated by using optical microscopy, as well as electron microscopy. With increasing β-silicon nitride whiskers content in α-silicon nitride, the porosity of materials increased and the micro structure of matrix became finer. With decreasing grain size, the subsurface contact damage increased by increasing crack length. The samples with 2 mass % β-silicon nitride addition had showed shallow ring crack and quasi-plastic deformation. On the other hand, for sample with 10 mass % β-silicon nitride whisker added sample and coarse microstructures subsurface deformation was not observed. Copyright (2002) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  5. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  6. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Spin and orbital moments in actinide compounds

    Lebech, B.; Wulff, M.; Lander, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    -electron band-structure calculations, is that the orbital moments of the actinide 5f electrons are considerably reduced from the values anticipated by a simple application of Hund's rules. To test these ideas, and thus to obtain a measure of the hybridization, we have performed a series of neutron scattering...... experiments designed to determine the magnetic moments at the actinide and transition-metal sublattice sites in compounds such as UFe2, NpCo2, and PuFe2 and to separate the spin and orbital components at the actinide sites. The results show, indeed, that the ratio of the orbital to spin moment is reduced as...

  8. Actinide chemistry in the far field

    The environmental chemistry of the actinides is complicated due both to the extensive redox and coordination chemistry of the elements and also to the complexity of the reactive phases encountered in natural environments. In the far field, interactions with reactive surfaces, coatings and colloidal particles will play a crucial role in controlling actinide mobility. By virtue of both their abundance and reactivity; clays and other layer aluminosilicate minerals, hydrous oxides and organic matter (humic substances) are all identified as having the potential to react with actinide ions and some possible modes of interaction are described, together with experimental evidence for their occurrence. (author)

  9. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of actinides

    The study of the actinide series shows the change between transition metal behavior and lanthanide behavior, between constant weak paramagnetism for thorium and strong Curie-Weiss paramagnetism for curium. Curium is shown to be the first metal of the actinide series to be magnetically ordered, its Neel temperature being 52K. The magnetic properties of the actinides depending on all the peripheral electrons, their electronic structure was studied and an attempt was made to determine it by means of a phenomenological model. Attempts were also made to interrelate the different physical properties which depend on the outer electronic structure

  10. Endohedral Fullerenes with Actinide-Actinide Bonds: Unwilling Bonding in U2@C80

    Foroutan-Nejad, C.; Patzschke, M.; Straka, Michal

    Opole: -, 2014. [MMNB 2014. Polish-Taiwanese Conference. From Molecular Modeling to Nano- and Biotechnology . 04.09.2014-06.09.2014, Opole] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03564S Grant ostatní: European Social Fund(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.009 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : endohedral actinide fullerene * U-U bonding * actinide-actinide bonding Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  11. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    We demonstrated a new process for recovering plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste. The method is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, or acidity that eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flow chart concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 62- from high-chloride low-acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with lN HNO3-4.8M NaCl. After elution, plutonium is recovered by hydroxide precipitation, and americium is recovered by NaHCO3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process can be discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are in progress for MSE residues. Flow charts for actinide recovery from electro-refining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  12. PF-4 actinide disposition strategy

    The dwindling amount of Security Category I processing and storage space across the DOE Complex has driven the need for more effective storage of nuclear materials at LANL's Plutonium Facility's (PF-4's) vault. An effort was begun in 2009 to create a strategy, a roadmap, to identify all accountable nuclear material and determine their disposition paths, the PF-4 Actinide Disposition Strategy (PADS). Approximately seventy bins of nuclear materials with similar characteristics - in terms of isotope, chemical form, impurities, disposition location, etc. - were established in a database. The ultimate disposition paths include the material to remain at LANL, disposition to other DOE sites, and disposition to waste. If all the actions described in the document were taken, over half of the containers currently in the PF-4 vault would been eliminated. The actual amount of projected vault space will depend on budget and competing mission requirements, however, clearly a significant portion of the current LANL inventory can be either dispositioned or consolidated.

  13. Compton scattering studies of the electron momentum distribution in indium phosphide

    Deb, A; Guin, R; Chatterjee, A K

    1999-01-01

    The electron momentum anisotropy of indium phosphide has been studied by measuring the directional Compton profiles of indium phosphide single crystals with the use of radiation from an sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am gamma source. Three different samples, cut along the [100], [110] and [111] planes, were used. The experimental anisotropy has been compared with the results based on the linear combination of Gaussian orbitals (LCGO) method. The agreement is very good with our theoretical results. It is found that the extrema appearing in the dependences on q of the anisotropies have an intimate connection with the bonding properties of the semiconductor. A self-consistent, all-electron, local density calculation for the partial density of states, total density of states and the charge analysis is also presented here.

  14. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms. Implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, the way how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides is assessed. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. The way how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility is described. Why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions is explained. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. Development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions is described. Throughout, the key research needs are identified. (author)

  15. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures.

    Banaszak, J.E.; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-02-12

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs.

  16. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs

  17. Achievements on oxide and nitride ADS fuels within the European project. EUROTRANS

    One major item in the assessment of the feasibility of Minor Actinide transmutation in ADS systems deals with the fuel, that can be described as highly innovative in comparison with fuels used in a critical core. Indeed, the fuel composition, with high concentrations of Minor Actinides and plutonium, results in significant production of helium during irradiation as well as high gamma, neutron emissions and heat in fabrication and handling stages. Studies on fuel development within the European project EUROTRANS, motivated by assessing the industrial practicability for actinides transmutation, have provided a wide range of results. CERamic-CERamic and CERamic-METallic composite fuels consisting of particles of (Pu,MA)O2 dispersed in a magnesia or molybdenum matrix were investigated as primary candidates. Fuel performance and safety of preliminary core designs for a prospective 400 MWth transmuter: the European Facility for Industrial Transmutation, were evaluated to support the project. Out-of-pile as well as in-pile experiments were carried out to gain essential knowledge on properties and behaviour under irradiation of these types of fuel. Nitride-based fuels were considered as a back-up solution, due to a limited know-how in Europe. Significant progress has nevertheless been made through a JAEA partnership and Post-Irradiation Examinations conducted on (Pu,Zr)N fuels irradiated at high linear power in the Petten High Flux Reactor. The current paper gives an overview of progress on both oxide and nitride fuels gained within the project. (author)

  18. Hepatotoxicity due to zinc phosphide poisoning in two patients: role of N-acetylcysteine.

    Oghabian, Zohreh; Afshar, Arefeh; Rahimi, Hamid Reza

    2016-08-01

    Zinc phosphide (Zn3P2/ZnP) is used as a rodenticide. The most common signs of toxicity are nausea, vomiting, hypotension, and metabolic acidosis; patients presenting such signs are referred to the emergency department (ED) of the hospitals. Therefore, this study aimed to report two cases of hepatotoxicity following accidental and intentional ZnP poisoning and successful management with N-acetylcysteine (NAC). PMID:27525081

  19. Phosphide residue exposure as the cause of serum vitamin depletion in female Wistar rats

    Ayobola Abolape Iyanda

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Synthetic chemical preservatives have received much negative publicity in recent time, some of which include insect resistance and misapplication of fumigants as well as a myriad of clinical conditions that have been associated with grain consumption. Aluminum phosphide is widely employed for the fumigation of grains meant for both international and local markets. Although its manufacturers have discouraged contamination of grains with spent or unspent phosphide residue, contamination still does occur especially among many illiterate cowpea merchants. The objective of this study is to determine the impact of phosphide residue contaminated cowpea on serum vitamin levels. Methods: Female Wistar rats were divided into 3 experimental groups with each group consisting of 6 rats. They were fed unfumigated (control, fumigated-contaminated (group 1 and fumigated but uncontaminated (group 2 cowpea. Results: Vitamin analysis using high performance liquid chromatography technique showed significant differences in the levels of niacin, folic acid, thiamine, riboflavin, and vitamins A, C, D and E; but pantothenic acid and pyridoxine were not significantly different in group 1 rats compared with control. Moreover, compared with control none of the vitamins were significantly different in rats in group 2. Conclusion: Cowpea is a source of many vitamins among the teeming poor in many part of the developing world; therefore there is need to ensure its proper fumigation. The results of this study suggest that although proper phosphide fumigation of cowpea may not alter serum vitamin levels but improper handling of the fumigation process may result in vitamin depletion. [J Exp Integr Med 2013; 3(2.000: 159-163

  20. Study of atomic hydrogen influence on oxygen diffusion in indium phosphide subsurface layers

    One introduces a technique enabling to apply layer-by-layer etching by inert gas ions to study the effect of the external conditions on the relative variation of diffusion factor of impurities from gaseous phase into the crystalline specimen body. Paper contains the results of technique application to study the influence of hydrogen atoms on oxygen diffusion from gaseous phase into single-crystal indium phosphide body

  1. Overview of actinide chemistry in the WIPP

    Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The year 2009 celebrates 10 years of safe operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the only nuclear waste repository designated to dispose defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste in the United States. Many elements contributed to the success of this one-of-the-kind facility. One of the most important of these is the chemistry of the actinides under WIPP repository conditions. A reliable understanding of the potential release of actinides from the site to the accessible environment is important to the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The environmental chemistry of the major actinides disposed at the WIPP continues to be investigated as part of the ongoing recertification efforts of the WIPP project. This presentation provides an overview of the actinide chemistry for the WIPP repository conditions. The WIPP is a salt-based repository; therefore, the inflow of brine into the repository is minimized, due to the natural tendency of excavated salt to re-seal. Reducing anoxic conditions are expected in WIPP because of microbial activity and metal corrosion processes that consume the oxygen initially present. Should brine be introduced through an intrusion scenario, these same processes will re-establish reducing conditions. In the case of an intrusion scenario involving brine, the solubilization of actinides in brine is considered as a potential source of release to the accessible environment. The following key factors establish the concentrations of dissolved actinides under subsurface conditions: (1) Redox chemistry - The solubility of reduced actinides (III and IV oxidation states) is known to be significantly lower than the oxidized forms (V and/or VI oxidation states). In this context, the reducing conditions in the WIPP and the strong coupling of the chemistry for reduced metals and microbiological processes with actinides are important. (2) Complexation - For the anoxic, reducing and mildly basic brine systems in the WIPP, the most important

  2. PWRs potentialities for minor actinides burning

    In the frame of the SPIN program at CEA, the impacts of the Minor Actinides (MA) incineration in PWRs are analysed. The aim is to reduce the mass and the potential radiotoxicity level. This study is done separately one on the Plutonium recycling. But the plutonium is essential. Thus, the recycling of all Actinide elements is evaluated in a PWR nuclear yard. A sensitivity study is done to evaluate the incineration for each Minor Actinide element. This gives us the most efficient way of incineration for each MA element in a PWR and help us to design a PWR burner. This burner is disposed in a PWR nuclear system in which the Actinides are recycled until equilibrium. (authors). 2 refs

  3. Electronic structure and correlation effects in actinides

    Albers, R.C.

    1998-12-01

    This report consists of the vugraphs given at a conference on electronic structure. Topics discussed are electronic structure, f-bonding, crystal structure, and crystal structure stability of the actinides and how they are inter-related.

  4. Preparation of actinide targets by electrodeposition

    Trautmann, N.; Folger, H.

    1989-10-01

    Actinide targets with varying thicknesses on different substrates have been prepared by electrodeposition either from aqueous solutions or from solutions of their nitrates in isopropyl alcohol. With these techniques the actinides can be deposited almost quantitatively on various backing materials within 15 to 30 min. Targets of thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium and californium with areal densities from almost carrier-free up to 1.4 mg/cm 2 on thin beryllium, carbon, titanium, tantalum and platinum foils have been prepared. In most cases, prior to the deposition, the actinides had to be purified chemically and for some of them, due to the limited amount of material available, recycling procedures were required. Applications of actinide targets in heavy-ion reactions are briefly discussed.

  5. Actinide research to solve some practical problems

    The following topics are discussed: generation of plutonium inventories by nuclear power plants; resettlement of the Marshallese Islanders into an actinide contaminated environment; high radiation background areas of the world; and radiation hazards to uranium miners

  6. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Clark, Sue; Meier, G Patrick; Alexandratos, Spiro; Paine, Robert; Hancock, Robert; Ensor, Dale

    2012-03-21

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of spent nuclear fuel is the need to isolate transuranium elements from fission product lanthanides. This project expanded the scope of earlier investigations of americium (Am) partitioning from the lanthanides with the synthesis of new separations materials and a centralized focus on radiochemical characterization of the separation systems that could be developed based on these new materials. The primary objective of this program was to explore alternative materials for actinide separations and to link the design of new reagents for actinide separations to characterizations based on actinide chemistry. In the predominant trivalent oxidation state, the chemistry of lanthanides overlaps substantially with that of the trivalent actinides and their mutual separation is quite challenging.

  7. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  8. Acetaminophen and zinc phosphide for lethal management of invasive lizards Ctenosaura similis

    Michael L. AVERY; John D. EISEMANN; Kandy L. KEACHER; Peter J. SAVARIE

    2011-01-01

    Reducing populations of invasive lizards through trapping and shooting is feasible in many cases but effective integrated management relies on a variety of tools,including toxicants.In Florida,using wild-caught non-native black spiny-tailed iguanas Ctenosaura similis,we screened acetaminophen and zinc phosphide to determine their suitability for effective population management of this prolific invasive species.Of the animals that received acetaminophen,none died except at the highest test dose,240 mg per lizard,which is not practical for field use.Zinc phosphide produced 100% mortality at dose levels as little as 25 mg per lizard,equivalent to about 0.5% in bait which is lower than currently used in commercial baits for eommensal rodent control.We conclude that zinc phosphide has potential as a useful tool for reducing populations of invasive lizards such as the black spiny-tailed iguana provided target-selective delivery methods are developed [Current Zoology 57 (5):625-629,2011].

  9. Acetaminophen and zinc phosphide for lethal management of invasive lizards Ctenosaura similis

    Michael L. AVERY, John D. EISEMANN, Kandy L. KEACHER,Peter J. SAVARIE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Reducing populations of invasive lizards through trapping and shooting is feasible in many cases but effective integrated management relies on a variety of tools, including toxicants. In Florida, using wild-caught non-native black spiny-tailed iguanas Ctenosaura similis, we screened acetaminophen and zinc phosphide to determine their suitability for effective population management of this prolific invasive species. Of the animals that received acetaminophen, none died except at the highest test dose, 240 mg per lizard, which is not practical for field use. Zinc phosphide produced 100% mortality at dose levels as little as 25 mg per lizard, equivalent to about 0.5% in bait which is lower than currently used in commercial baits for commensal rodent control. We conclude that zinc phosphide has potential as a useful tool for reducing populations of invasive lizards such as the black spiny-tailed iguana provided target-selective delivery methods are developed [Current Zoology 57 (5: 625–629, 2011].

  10. Plain abdominal radiography: A powerful tool to prognosticate outcome in patients with zinc phosphide poisoning

    Aim: To evaluate the clinical features of zinc phosphide poisoning and to investigate whether outcome could be prognosticated based on abdominal radiography on presentation. Materials and methods: All zinc phosphide-poisoned patients who were referred to Loghman-Hakim Hospital between March 2011 and September 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Data regarding patients' demographic characteristics, characteristics of the poisoning, abdominal radiography results, and patients' outcome were recorded. Results: In 102 patients, the most common presenting signs/symptoms were nausea and vomiting (60%). Four patients died and another seven had developed complications during their hospitalization (metabolic acidosis, liver abnormalities, or acute renal failure). Nineteen patients had radio-opaque abdominal radiographs, nine of whom had died or developed complications (p = 0.001). Plain abdominal radiography had a sensitivity and specificity of 81% and 89% in predicting the patients' death or further development of complications. The positive and negative predictive values were 47% and 97%, respectively. Conclusion: Plain abdominal radiography is a very good tool for prognostication in patients with zinc phosphide poisoning. Immediate abdominal radiography can help stratify patients into high- or low-risk groups and determine treatment strategies. - Highlights: • ZP poisoning may cause severe symptoms or death although less frequent compared to ALP. • ZP-poisoned patients may deteriorate within the first 72 hours post-ingestion. • Abdominal radiography is a good tool to predict death/complications in these patients

  11. Superconductivity in rare earth and actinide compounds

    Rare earth and actinide compounds and the extraordinary superconducting and magnetic phenomena they exhibit are surveyed. The rare earth and actinide compounds described belong to three classes of novel superconducting materials: high temperature, high field superconductors (intermetallics and layered cuprates); superconductors containing localized magnetic moments; heavy fermion superconductors. Recent experiments on the resistive upper critical field of high Tc cuprate superconductors and the peak effect in the critical current density of the f-electron superconductor CeRu2 are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Lanthanides and actinides in ionic liquids

    Binnemans, Koen

    2007-01-01

    This lecture gives an overview of the research possibilities offered by combining f-elements (lanthanides and actinides) with ionic liquids [1] Many ionic liquids are solvents with weakly coordinating anions. Solvation of lanthanide and actinide ions in these solvents is different from what is observed in conventional organic solvents and water. The poorly solvating behavior can also lead to the formation of coordination compounds with low coordination numbers. The solvation of f-elements can...

  13. New molecules to separate actinides: the picolinamides

    The reprocessing of spent fuel is made with the Purex process, funded on liquid-liquid extraction of uranium nitrates(VI) and plutonium nitrates(IV) by the BTP (tributyl phosphate). To improve this proceeding, we look for extractants which allow, beyond U and Pu extractions, these of actinides (II) and allow separation of the whole actinides from the fission products, which have an important fraction of lanthanides. A new family seems to give good results: the picolinamides

  14. Lattice effects in the light actinides

    The light actinides show a variety of lattice effects that do not normally appear in other regions of the periodic table. The article will cover the crystal structures of the light actinides, their atomic volumes, their thermal expansion behavior, and their elastic behavior as reflected in recent thermal vibration measurements made by neutron diffraction. A discussion of the melting points will be given in terms of the thermal vibration measurements. Pressure effects will be only briefly indicated

  15. Recent progress in actinide borate chemistry.

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2011-10-21

    The use of molten boric acid as a reactive flux for synthesizing actinide borates has been developed in the past two years providing access to a remarkable array of exotic materials with both unusual structures and unprecedented properties. [ThB(5)O(6)(OH)(6)][BO(OH)(2)]·2.5H(2)O possesses a cationic supertetrahedral structure and displays remarkable anion exchange properties with high selectivity for TcO(4)(-). Uranyl borates form noncentrosymmetric structures with extraordinarily rich topological relationships. Neptunium borates are often mixed-valent and yield rare examples of compounds with one metal in three different oxidation states. Plutonium borates display new coordination chemistry for trivalent actinides. Finally, americium borates show a dramatic departure from plutonium borates, and there are scant examples of families of actinides compounds that extend past plutonium to examine the bonding of later actinides. There are several grand challenges that this work addresses. The foremost of these challenges is the development of structure-property relationships in transuranium materials. A deep understanding of the materials chemistry of actinides will likely lead to the development of advanced waste forms for radionuclides present in nuclear waste that prevent their transport in the environment. This work may have also uncovered the solubility-limiting phases of actinides in some repositories, and allows for measurements on the stability of these materials. PMID:21915396

  16. Evaluation of actinide partitioning and transmutation

    After a few centuries of radioactive decay the long-lived actinides, the elements of atomic numbers 89-103, may constitute the main potential radiological health hazard in nuclear wastes. This is because all but a very few fission products (principally technetium-99 and iodine-129) have by then undergone radioactive decay to insignificant levels, leaving the actinides as the principal radionuclides remaining. It was therefore at first sight an attractive concept to recycle the actinides to nuclear reactors, so as to eliminate them by nuclear fission. Thus, investigations of the feasibility and potential benefits and hazards of the concept of 'actinide partitioning and transmutation' were started in numerous countries in the mid-1970s. This final report summarizes the results and conclusions of technical studies performed in connection with a four-year IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme, started in 1976, on the ''Environmental Evaluation and Hazard Assessment of the Separation of Actinides from Nuclear Wastes followed by either Transmutation or Separate Disposal''. Although many related studies are still continuing, e.g. on waste disposal, long-term safety assessments, and waste actinide management (particularly for low and intermediate-level wastes), some firm conclusions on the overall concept were drawn by the programme participants, which are reflected in this report

  17. Optical characterization of gallium nitride

    Kirilyuk, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Group III-nitrides have been considered a promising system for semiconductor devices since a few decades, first for blue- and UV-light emitting diodes, later also for high-frequency/high-power applications. Due to the lack of native substrates, heteroepitaxially grown III-nitride layers are usually

  18. Radioecology of the actinide elements

    Research progress is reported in sections entitled: scope of studies supported by the Department of Energy; oxidation state diagrams are a potential tool for studying the redox chemistry of Pu in natural waters; studies are initiated to investigate the effect of pH and organic matter on the distribution coefficients of Cm with natural sediments; the relative distributions of resuspended and direct deposited Pu in a corn canopy are quantified; the retention of Pu surface contamination by corn plants is being studied; Pu concentrations in tobacco are being determined; concentrations of Pu per unit mass and per unit surface area are compared for subterranean crops; models of Pu behavior in agricultural crops are being validated; distribution of aerially released Pu in loblolly pine plantations is independent of deposition rate; investigation of the effects of chelate and redox potential of the uptake of Pu and Cm by rice is underway; studies of Cm cycling in a floodplain forest have been initiated; the effects of unusually large Pu deposition onto a wheat ecosystem are being studied using computer simulations; long-term kinetic models of Pu behavior in plant-soil systems are being developed; scope of studies supported by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission; growth form of broadleaf crop may affect Pu contents; root uptake of Pu and Cm measured for rice root uptake of Pu and Cm measured for rice; long-term actinide uptake study is continuing at SREL; and uranium cycling in major southeastern agricultural crops being studied

  19. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    An optimization method is developed to maximize the burning capability of the ALMR while complying with all constraints imposed on the design for reliability and safety. This method leads to a maximal transuranics enrichment, which is being limited by constraints on reactivity. The enrichment can be raised by using the neutrons less efficiently by increasing leakage from the fuel. With the developed optimization method, a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR were optimized. Both reactors perform equally well considering the burning of transuranics. However, metallic fuel has a much higher heat conductivity coefficient, which in general leads to better safety characteristics. In search of a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed. A MSR operates on a liquid fuel salt which makes continuous refueling possible, eliminating the issue of the burnup reactivity loss. Also, a prompt negative reactivity feedback is possible for an overmoderated reactor design, even when the Doppler coefficient is positive, due to the fuel expansion with fuel temperature increase. Furthermore, the molten salt fuel can be reprocessed based on a reduction process which is not sensitive to the short-lived spontaneously fissioning actinides. (orig./HP)

  20. Glow-discharge nitriding of gears

    The method of glow-discharge nitriding of gear parts made of 30Kh2NMFA steel is introduced. The diffusion saturation is carried out in the atmosphere of dissociated ammonia at the temperature of 520-540 deg C and 200-800 Pa pressure for 16-40 h depending on the required thickness of the nitrided layer (0.2-0.5 mm). The structure of the nitrided metal is a layer of nitride compounds of the Fe4N type and diffusion zone enriched with nitrides. Glow-discharge nitrided parts with 600-650 HV strength retain certain wear resistance and fatigue strength as compared with gas nitriding

  1. Use of fast reactors for actinide transmutation

    The management of radioactive waste is one of the key issues in today's discussions on nuclear energy, especially the long term disposal of high level radioactive wastes. The recycling of plutonium in liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) would allow 'burning' of the associated extremely long life transuranic waste, particularly actinides, thus reducing the required isolation time for high level waste from tens of thousands of years to hundreds of years for fission products only. The International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) decided to include the topic of actinide transmutation in liquid metal fast breeder reactors in its programme. The IAEA organized the Specialists Meeting on Use of Fast Breeder Reactors for Actinide Transmutation in Obninsk, Russian Federation, from 22 to 24 September 1992. The specialists agree that future progress in solving transmutation problems could be achieved by improvements in: Radiochemical partitioning and extraction of the actinides from the spent fuel (at least 98% for Np and Cm and 99.9% for Pu and Am isotopes); technological research and development on the design, fabrication and irradiation of the minor actinides (MAs) containing fuels; nuclear constants measurement and evaluation (selective cross-sections, fission fragments yields, delayed neutron parameters) especially for MA burners; demonstration of the feasibility of the safe and economic MA burner cores; knowledge of the impact of maximum tolerable amount of rare earths in americium containing fuels. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Waste disposal aspects of actinide separation

    Two recent NRPB reports are summarized (Camplin, W.C., Grimwood, P.D. and White, I.F., The effects of actinide separation on the radiological consequences of disposal of high-level radioactive waste on the ocean bed, Harwell, National Radiological Protection Board, NRPB-R94 (1980), London, HMSO; Hill, M.D., White, I.F. and Fleishman, A.B., The effects of actinide separation on the radiological consequences of geologic disposal of high-level waste. Harwell, National Radiological Protection Board, NRPB-R95 (1980), London, HMSO). They describe preliminary environmental assessments relevant to waste arising from the reprocessing of PWR fuel. Details are given of the modelling of transport of radionuclides to man, and of the methodology for calculating effective dose equivalents in man. Emphasis has been placed on the interaction between actinide separation and the disposal options rather than comparison of disposal options. The reports show that the effects of actinide separation do depend on the disposal method. Conditions are outlined where the required substantial further research and development work on actinide separation and recycle would be justified. Toxicity indices or 'toxic potentials' can be misleading and should not be used to guide research and development. (U.K.)

  3. Solubility of actinide surrogates in nuclear glasses

    This paper discusses the results of a study of actinide surrogates in a nuclear borosilicate glass to understand the effect of processing conditions (temperature and oxidizing versus reducing conditions) on the solubility limits of these elements. The incorporation of cerium oxide, hafnium oxide, and neodymium oxide in this borosilicate glass was investigated. Cerium is a possible surrogate for tetravalent and trivalent actinides, hafnium for tetravalent actinides, and neodymium for trivalent actinides. The material homogeneity was studied by optical, scanning electron microscopy. Cerium LIII XANES spectroscopy showed that the Ce3+/Cetotal ratio increased from about 0.5 to 0.9 as the processing temperature increased from 1100 to 1400 deg. C. Cerium LIII XANES spectroscopy also confirmed that the increased Ce solubility in glasses melted under reducing conditions was due to complete reduction of all the cerium in the glass. The most significant results pointed out in the current study are that the solubility limits of the actinide surrogates increases with the processing temperature and that Ce3+ is shown to be more soluble than Ce4+ in this borosilicate glass

  4. TUCS/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    Nash, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This program has as its objective the development of a new technology that combines cation exchange and mineralization to reduce the concentration of heavy metals (in particular actinides) in groundwaters. The treatment regimen must be compatible with the groundwater and soil, potentially using groundwater/soil components to aid in the immobilization process. The delivery system (probably a water-soluble chelating agent) should first concentrate the radionuclides then release the precipitating anion, which forms thermodynamically stable mineral phases, either with the target metal ions alone or in combination with matrix cations. This approach should generate thermodynamically stable mineral phases resistant to weathering. The chelating agent should decompose spontaneously with time, release the mineralizing agent, and leave a residue that does not interfere with mineral formation. For the actinides, the ideal compound probably will release phosphate, as actinide phosphate mineral phases are among the least soluble species for these metals. The most promising means of delivering the precipitant would be to use a water-soluble, hydrolytically unstable complexant that functions in the initial stages as a cation exchanger to concentrate the metal ions. As it decomposes, the chelating agent releases phosphate to foster formation of crystalline mineral phases. Because it involves only the application of inexpensive reagents, the method of phosphate mineralization promises to be an economical alternative for in situ immobilization of radionuclides (actinides in particular). The method relies on the inherent (thermodynamic) stability of actinide mineral phases.

  5. New reagents for actinide-lanthanide group separations

    Organic extractants which possess nitrogen or sulfur donor atoms preferentially complex the trivalent actinide. They are potential reagents for actinide lanthanide group separations, which can be performed at low pH without the addition of inorganic salts

  6. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH3 flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  7. Engineering absorption and blackbody radiation in the far-infrared with surface phonon polaritons on gallium phosphide

    Streyer, W.; Law, S.; Rosenberg, A.; Wasserman, D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Roberts, C.; Podolskiy, V. A. [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Hoffman, A. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    We demonstrate excitation of surface phonon polaritons on patterned gallium phosphide surfaces. Control over the light-polariton coupling frequencies is demonstrated by changing the pattern periodicity and used to experimentally determine the gallium phosphide surface phonon polariton dispersion curve. Selective emission via out-coupling of thermally excited surface phonon polaritons is experimentally demonstrated. Samples are characterized experimentally by Fourier transform infrared reflection and emission spectroscopy, and modeled using finite element techniques and rigorous coupled wave analysis. The use of phonon resonances for control of emissivity and excitation of bound surface waves offers a potential tool for the exploration of long-wavelength Reststrahlen band frequencies.

  8. Nitride fuel development in Japan

    Nitride fuel for ADS has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) under a double strata fuel cycle concept. In this case the nitride fuel contains MA elements as a principal component and is diluted by inert materials in place of U, which is totally different from the fuel for power reactors. So the fuel fabrication manner, fuel properties and irradiation behaviour have to be investigated in detail as well as the treatment of spent fuel. Through the experimental R&D, technical feasibility of nitride fuel cycle for the transmutation of MA will be demonstrated

  9. Nitriding iron at lower temperatures.

    Tong, W P; Tao, N R; Wang, Z B; Lu, J; Lu, K

    2003-01-31

    The microstructure in the surface layer of a pure iron plate was refined at the nanometer scale by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment that generates repetitive severe plastic deformation of the surface layer. The subsequent nitriding kinetics of the treated iron with the nanostructured surface layer were greatly enhanced, so that the nitriding temperature could be as low as 300 degrees C, which is much lower than conventional nitriding temperatures (above 500 degrees C). This enhanced processing method demonstrates the technological significance of nanomaterials in improving traditional processing techniques and provides a new approach for selective surface reactions in solids. PMID:12560546

  10. Separation of actinides with alkylpyridinium salts

    Various f-elements are separated as anionic complexes from both acidic and alkaline solutions by precipitation with alkylpyridinium salts. The precipitates are also cationic surfactants where the simple counter-ion (e.g. nitrate or chloride) is replaced by the negatively charged complex anion of an actinide or lanthanide. The low solubility of these precipitates is explained by a strong affinity of divalent complex counter-ions of f-elements to the quaternary nitrogen. Precipitations in solutions of nitric acid allow to separate tetravalent f-elements from other metals, in alkaline carbonate solutions tetravalent and hexavalent actinides are precipitated simultaneously. The last procedure yields precipitates, which are very intimate mixtures of hexavalent and tetravalent actinides. This allows to prepare mixed oxides in a simple way. (author) 6 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  11. Minior Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment

    Nolan E. Hertel; Dwayne Blaylock

    2008-04-10

    The "Minor Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment" was a Department of Energy (DOE) U-NERI funded project intended to assess the viability of using either the FLATTOP or the COMET critical assembly to measure high temperature Doppler coefficients. The goal of the project was to calculate using the MCNP5 code the gram amounts of Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-241, AM-241, AM-242m, Am-243, and CM-244 needed to produce a 1E-5 in reactivity for a change in operating temperature 800C to 1000C. After determining the viability of using the assemblies and calculating the amounts of each actinide an experiment will be designed to verify the calculated results. The calculations and any doncuted experiments are designed to support the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative in conducting safety analysis of advanced fast reactor or acceoerator-driven transmutation systems with fuel containing high minor actinide content.

  12. Research on Actinides in Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    The electrochemical/spectroscopic integrated measurement system was designed and set up for spectro-electrochemical measurements of lanthanide and actinide ions in high temperature molten salt media. A compact electrochemical cell and electrode system was also developed for the minimization of reactants, and consequently minimization of radioactive waste generation. By applying these equipment, oxidation and reduction behavior of lanthanide and actinide ions in molten salt media have been made. Also, thermodynamic parameter values are determined by interpreting the results obtained from electrochemical measurements. Several lanthanide ions exhibited fluorescence properties in molten salt. Also, UV-VIS measurement provided the detailed information regarding the oxidation states of lanthanide and actinide ions in high temperature molten salt media

  13. Neutron scattering studies of the actinides

    The electronic structure of actinide materials presents a unique example of the interplay between localized and band electrons. Together with a variety of other techniques, especially magnetization and the Mossbauer effect, neutron studies have helped us to understand the systematics of many actinide compounds that order magnetically. A direct consequence of the localization of 5f electrons is the spin-orbit coupling and subsequent spin-lattice interaction that often leads to strongly anisotropic behavior. The unusual phase transition in UO2, for example, arises from interactions between quadrupole moments. On the other hand, in the monopnictides and monochalcogenides, the anisotropy is more difficult to understand, but probably involves an interaction between actinide and anion wave functions. A variety of neutron experiments, including form-factor studies, critical scattering and measurements of the elementary excitations have now been performed, and the conceptual picture emerging from these studies will be discussed

  14. Coordination chemistry for new actinide separation processes

    The amount of wastes and the number of chemical steps can be decreased by replacing the PUREX process extractant (TBP) by, N.N- dialkylamides (RCONR'2). Large amounts of deep underground storable wastes can be stored into sub-surface disposals if the long lived actinide isotopes are removed. Spent nuclear fuels reprocessing including the partitioning of the minor actinides Np, Am, Cm and their transmutation into short half lives fission products is appealing to the public who is not favorable to the deep underground storage of large amounts of long half lived actinide isotopes. In this paper coordination chemistry problems related to improved chemical separations by solvent extraction are presented. 2 tabs.; 4 refs

  15. Spin-Orbit Coupling in Actinide Cations

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Martin, Richard L.; Jensen, Hans Jorgen A.; Knecht, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    The limiting case of Russell-Saunders coupling, which leads to a maximum spin alignment for the open shell electrons, usually explains the properties of high spin ionic crystals with transition metals. For actinide compounds, the spin-orbit splitting is large enough to cause a significantly reduced spin alignment. Novel concepts are used to explain the dependence of the spin alignment on the 5f shell occupation. We present evidence that the XPS of ionic actinide materials may provide direct information about the angular momentum coupling within the 5f shell.

  16. Spin-orbit coupling in actinide cations

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Martin, Richard L.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa.; Knecht, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    The limiting case of Russell-Saunders coupling, which leads to a maximum spin alignment for the open shell electrons, usually explains the properties of high spin ionic crystals with transition metals. For actinide compounds, the spin-orbit splitting is large enough to cause a significantly reduced spin alignment. Novel concepts are used to explain the dependence of the spin alignment on the 5f shell occupation. We present evidence that the XPS of ionic actinide materials may provide direct information about the angular momentum coupling within the 5f shell.

  17. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    The second international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois United States, on 11-13 November 1992. The proceedings are presented in four sessions: Current strategic system of actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, progress in R and D on partitioning processes wet and dry, progress in R and D on transmutation and refinements of neutronic and other data, development of the fuel cycle processes fuel types and targets. (A.L.B.)

  18. Actinide phosphonate complexes in aqueous solutions

    Complexes formed by actinides with carboxylic acids, polycarboxylic acids, and aminopolycarboxylic acids play a central role in both the basic and process chemistry of the actinides. Recent studies of f-element complexes with phosphonic acid ligands indicate that new ligands incorporating doubly ionizable phosphonate groups (-PO3H2) have many properties which are unique chemically, and promise more efficient separation processes for waste cleanup and environmental restoration. Simple diphosphonate ligands form much stronger complexes than isostructural carboxylates, often exhibiting higher solubility as well. In this manuscript recent studies of the thermodynamics and kinetics of f-element complexation by 1,1 and 1,2 diphosphonic acid ligands are described

  19. Actinide elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: water-sediment interactions of U, Pu, Am, and Cm; relative availability of actinide elements from abiotic to aquatic biota; comparative uptake of transuranic elements by biota bordering Pond 3513; metabolic reduction of 239Np from Np(V) to Np(IV) in cotton rats; evaluation of hazards associated with transuranium releases to the biosphere; predicting Pu in bone; adsorption--solubility--complexation phenomena in actinide partitioning between sorbents and solution; comparative soil extraction data; and comparative plant uptake data

  20. Sequential analysis of selected actinides in urine

    The monitoring of personnel by urinalysis for suspected contamination by actinides necessitated the development and implementation of an analytical scheme that will separate and identify alpha emitting radionuclides of these elements. The present work deals with Pu, Am, and Th. These elements are separated from an ashed urine sample by means of coprecipitation and ion exchange techniques. The final analysis is carried out by electroplating the actinides and counting in a α-spectrometer. Mean recoveries of these elements from urine are: Pu 64%, Am 74% and Th 69%. (auth)

  1. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    The second international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois United States, on 11-13 November 1992. The proceedings are presented in four sessions: Current strategic system of actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, progress in R and D on partitioning processes wet and dry, progress in R and D on transmutation and refinements of neutronic and other data, development of the fuel cycle processes fuel types and targets. (A.L.B.)

  2. Efficient telecom to visible wavelength conversion in doubly resonant gallium phosphide microdisks

    Lake, David P.; Mitchell, Matthew; Jayakumar, Harishankar; dos Santos, Laís Fujii; Curic, Davor; Barclay, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant second harmonic generation between 1550 nm and 775 nm with normalized outside efficiency > 3.8 × 10 - 4 mW - 1 is demonstrated in a gallium phosphide microdisk supporting high-Q modes at visible ( Q ˜ 10 4 ) and infrared ( Q ˜ 10 5 ) wavelengths. The double resonance condition is satisfied for a specific pump power through intracavity photothermal temperature tuning using ˜ 360 μ W of 1550 nm light input to a fiber taper and coupled to a microdisk resonance. Power dependent efficiency consistent with a simple model for thermal tuning of the double resonance condition is observed.

  3. Infrared reflection spectra in contactless nondestructive measurements of the electron density and mobility in indium phosphide

    Il' in, M.A.; Karasev, P.Yu.; Denisova, N.A.; Rezvov, A.V.; Tyurina, S.V.

    1988-07-01

    On the basis of numerical calculations and experimental studies we analyze the possibilities of measuring the electrophysical parameters of indium phosphide by means of infrared reflection spectra at wavelengths ranging from 5 to 200 /mu/m. We demonstrate that contactless nondestructive measurements of the electron density in the range 10/sup 16/-10/sup 20/ cm/sup /minus/3/ can be made with a relative error not exceeding 15%, and of mobility with a relative error not exceeding 25%. A nomogram method is presented for rapid conversion of data form infrared reflection spectra into the parameters being measured.

  4. Solution-based synthesis and purification of zinc tin phosphide nanowires

    Sheets, Erik J.; Balow, Robert B.; Yang, Wei-Chang; Stach, Eric A.; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-11-01

    The solution-based synthesis of nanoscale earth-abundant semiconductors has the potential to unlock simple, scalable, and tunable material processes which currently constrain development of novel compounds for alternative energy devices. One such promising semiconductor is zinc tin phosphide (ZnSnP2). We report the synthesis of ZnSnP2 nanowires via a solution-liquid-solid mechanism utilizing metallic zinc and tin in decomposing trioctylphosphine (TOP). Dried films of the reaction product are purified of binary phosphide phases by annealing at 345 °C. Tin is removed using a 0.1 M nitric acid treatment leaving pure ZnSnP2 nanowires. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy indicates ZnSnP2 has a direct bandgap energy of 1.24 eV which is optimal for solar cell applications. Using a photoelectrochemical cell, we demonstrate cathodic photocurrent generation at open circuit conditions from the ZnSnP2 nanowires upon solar simulated illumination confirming p-type conductivity.The solution-based synthesis of nanoscale earth-abundant semiconductors has the potential to unlock simple, scalable, and tunable material processes which currently constrain development of novel compounds for alternative energy devices. One such promising semiconductor is zinc tin phosphide (ZnSnP2). We report the synthesis of ZnSnP2 nanowires via a solution-liquid-solid mechanism utilizing metallic zinc and tin in decomposing trioctylphosphine (TOP). Dried films of the reaction product are purified of binary phosphide phases by annealing at 345 °C. Tin is removed using a 0.1 M nitric acid treatment leaving pure ZnSnP2 nanowires. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy indicates ZnSnP2 has a direct bandgap energy of 1.24 eV which is optimal for solar cell applications. Using a photoelectrochemical cell, we demonstrate cathodic photocurrent generation at open circuit conditions from the ZnSnP2 nanowires upon solar simulated illumination confirming p-type conductivity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  5. A Flexible Electrode Based on Iron Phosphide Nanotubes for Overall Water Splitting.

    Yan, Ya; Xia, Bao Yu; Ge, Xiaoming; Liu, Zhaolin; Fisher, Adrian; Wang, Xin

    2015-12-01

    The design of cheap and efficient water splitting systems for sustainable hydrogen production has attracted increasing attention. A flexible electrode, based on carbon cloth substrate and iron phosphide nanotubes coated with an iron oxide/phosphate layer, is shown to catalyze overall water splitting. The as-prepared flexible electrode demonstrates remarkable electrocatalytic activity for both the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) at modest overpotentials. The surface iron oxide/phosphate, which is formed in situ, is proposed to improve the HER activity by facilitating the water-dissociation step and serves directly as the catalytically-active component for the OER process. PMID:26493157

  6. Theoretical investigations on the elastic and thermodynamic properties of rhenium phosphide

    Wei, Qun; Zhu, Xuanmin; Lin, Zhengzhe; Yao, Ronghui [Xidian Univ., Xi' an (China). School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering; Yan, Haiyan [Baoji Univ. of Arts and Sciences (China). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    2016-04-01

    Structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of orthorhombic rhenium phosphide (Re{sub 2}P) are systematically investigated by using first principles calculations. The elastic constants and anisotropy of elastic properties are obtained. The metallic character of Re{sub 2}P is demonstrated by density of state calculations. The quasi-harmonic Debye model is applied to the study of the thermodynamic properties. The thermal expansion, heat capacities, and Grueneisen parameter on the temperature and pressure have been determined as a function of temperature and pressure in the pressure range from 0 to 100 GPa and the temperature range from 0 to 1600 K.

  7. An efficient bifunctional electrocatalyst for water splitting based on cobalt phosphide

    Yang, Libin; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao; Sun, Xuping

    2016-06-01

    The development of highly efficient electrocatalysts for water splitting is critical for various renewable-energy technologies. In this letter, we demonstrate a cobalt phosphide nanowire array grown on a Ti mesh (CoP/TM) behaving as a bifunctional electrocatalyst for water splitting. The CoP/TM electrode delivers 10 mA cm‑2 at an overpotential of 72 mV for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and 310 mV for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in 1.0 M KOH. Furthermore, its corresponding two-electrode alkaline electrolyzer displays 10 mA cm‑2 at 1.64 V.

  8. Study of the Active Screen Plasma Nitriding

    Zhao Cheng; C. X. Li; H. Dong; T. Bell

    2004-01-01

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a novel nitriding process, which overcomes many of the practical problems associated with the conventional DC plasma nitriding (DCPN). Experimental results showed that the metallurgical characteristics and hardening effect of 722M24 steel nitrided by ASPN at both floating potential and anodic (zero) potential were similar to those nitrided by DCPN. XRD and high-resolution SEM analysis indicated that iron nitride particles with sizes in sub-micron scale were deposited on the specimen surface in AS plasma nitriding. These indicate that the neutral iron nitride particles, which are sputtered from the active screen and transferred through plasma to specimen surface, are considered to be the dominant nitrogen carder in ASPN. The OES results show that NH could not be a critical species in plasma nitriding.

  9. Reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    Reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has been characterized. The oxidation behaviour in air up to 15000C and 3000 h and the effects of static and cyclic oxidation on room-temperature strength have been studied. (orig./IHOE)

  10. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  11. Actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    Beaman, S.L.

    1979-08-21

    A strategy of actinide burnup in fast reactor systems has been investigated as an approach for reducing the long term hazards and storage requirements of the actinide waste elements and their decay daughters. The actinide recycle studies also included plutonium burnup studies in the event that plutonium is no longer required as a fuel. Particular emphasis was placed upon the timing of the recycle program, the requirements for separability of the waste materials, and the impact of the actinides on the reactor operations and performance. It is concluded that actinide recycle and plutonium burnout are attractive alternative waste management concepts. 25 refs., 14 figs., 34 tabs.

  12. Chemical compatibility of HLW borosilicate glasses with actinides

    During liquid storage of HLLW the formation of actinide enriched sludges is being expected. Also during melting of HLW glasses an increase of top-to-bottom actinide concentrations can take place. Both effects have been studied. Besides, the vitrification of plutonium enriched wastes from Pu fuel element fabrication plants has been investigated with respect to an isolated vitrification process or a combined one with the HLLW. It is shown that the solidification of actinides from HLLW and actinide waste concentrates will set no principal problems. The leaching of actinides has been measured in salt brine at 230C and 1150C. (orig.)

  13. Actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    A strategy of actinide burnup in fast reactor systems has been investigated as an approach for reducing the long term hazards and storage requirements of the actinide waste elements and their decay daughters. The actinide recycle studies also included plutonium burnup studies in the event that plutonium is no longer required as a fuel. Particular emphasis was placed upon the timing of the recycle program, the requirements for separability of the waste materials, and the impact of the actinides on the reactor operations and performance. It is concluded that actinide recycle and plutonium burnout are attractive alternative waste management concepts. 25 refs., 14 figs., 34 tabs

  14. 3 and 4 oxidation state element solubilities in borosilicate glasses. Implement to actinides in nuclear glasses; Solubilite des elements aux degres d'oxydation (3) et (4) dans les verres de borosilicate. Application aux actinides dans les verres nucleaires

    Cachia, J.N

    2005-12-15

    In order to ensure optimal radionuclides containment, the knowledge of the actinide loading limits in nuclear waste glasses and also the comprehension of the solubilization mechanisms of these elements are essential. A first part of this manuscript deals with the study of the differences in solubility of the tri and tetravalent elements (actinides and surrogates) particularly in function of the melting temperature. The results obtained indicate that trivalent elements (La, Gd, Nd, Am, Cm) exhibit a higher solubility than tetravalent elements (Hf, Th, Pu). Consequently, it was planned to reduce plutonium at the oxidation state (III), the later being essentially tetravalent in borosilicate glasses. An innovating reduction process of multi-valent elements (cerium, plutonium) using silicon nitride has been developed in a second part of this work. Reduced plutonium-bearing glasses synthesized by Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} addition made it possible to double the plutonium solubility from 2 to 4 wt% at 1200 deg C. A structural approach to investigate the differences between tri and tetravalent elements was finally undertaken. These investigations were carried out by X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (EXAFS) and NMR. Trivalent rare earth and actinide elements seem to behave as network modifiers while tetravalent elements rather present true intermediaries' behaviour. (author)

  15. Placental transfer of plutonium and other actinides

    The report is based on an extensive literature search. All data available from studies on placental transfer of plutonium and other actinides in man and animals have been collected and analysed, and the report presents the significant results as well as unresolved questions and knowledge gaps which may serve as a waypost to future research work. (orig./MG)

  16. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    The third international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Cadarache France, on 12-14 December 1994. The proceedings are presented in six sessions : an introduction session, the major programmes and international cooperation, the systems studies, the reactors fuels and targets, the chemistry and a last discussions session. (A.L.B.)

  17. Actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The third international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product partitioning and transmutation, took place in Cadarache France, on 12-14 December 1994. The proceedings are presented in six sessions : an introduction session, the major programmes and international cooperation, the systems studies, the reactors fuels and targets, the chemistry and a last discussions session. (A.L.B.)

  18. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis. If a radiological dispersive device, improvised nuclear device or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean-up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organics present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well. (author)

  19. Treatment of actinide-containing organic waste

    A method has been developed for reducing the volume of organic wastes and recovering the actinide elements. The waste, together with gaseous oxygen (air) is introduced into a molten salt, preferably an alkali metal carbonate such as sodium carbonate. The bath is kept at 7500 - 10000C and 0.5 - 10 atm to thermally decompose and partially oxidize the waste, while substantially reducing its volume. The gaseous effluent, mainly carbon dioxide and water vapour, is vented to the atmosphere through a series of filters to remove trace amounts of actinide elements or particulate alkali metal salts. The remaining combustion products are entrained in the molten salt. Part of the molten salt-combustion product mixture is withdrawn and mixed with an aqueous medium. Insoluble combustion products are then removed from the aqueous medium and are leached with a mixture of hydrofluoric and nitric acids to solubilize the actinide elements. The actinide elements are easily recovered from the acid solution using conventional techniques. (DN)

  20. Actinide measurements by AMS using fluoride matrices

    Cornett, R. J.; Kazi, Z. H.; Zhao, X.-L.; Chartrand, M. G.; Charles, R. J.; Kieser, W. E.

    2015-10-01

    Actinides can be measured by alpha spectroscopy (AS), mass spectroscopy or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We tested a simple method to separate Pu and Am isotopes from the sample matrix using a single extraction chromatography column. The actinides in the column eluent were then measured by AS or AMS using a fluoride target matrix. Pu and Am were coprecipitated with NdF3. The strongest AMS beams of Pu and Am were produced when there was a large excess of fluoride donor atoms in the target and the NdF3 precipitates were diluted about 6-8 fold with PbF2. The measured concentrations of 239,240Pu and 241Am agreed with the concentrations in standards of known activity and with two IAEA certified reference materials. Measurements of 239,240Pu and 241Am made at A.E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory agree, within their statistical uncertainty, with independent measurements made using the IsoTrace AMS system. This work demonstrated that fluoride targets can produce reliable beams of actinide anions and that the measurement of actinides using fluorides agree with published values in certified reference materials.

  1. Trends in actinide processing at Hanford

    In 1989, the mission at the Hanford Site began a dramatic and sometimes painful transition. The days of production--as we used to know it--are over. Our mission officially has become waste management and environmental cleanup. This mission change didn't eliminate many jobs--in fact, budgets have grown dramatically to support the new mission. Most all of the same skilled crafts, engineers, and scientists are still required for the new mission. This change has not eliminated the need for actinide processing, but it has certainly changed the focus that our actinide chemists and process engineers have. The focus used to be on such things as increasing capacity, improving separations efficiency, and product purity. Minimizing waste had become a more important theme in recent years and it is still a very important concept in the waste management and environmental cleanup arena. However, at Hanford, a new set of words dominates the actinide process scene as we work to deal with actinides that still reside in a variety of forms at the Hanford Site. These words are repackage, stabilize, remove, store and dispose. Some key activities in each of these areas are described in this report

  2. Report of the panel on inhaled actinides

    Some topics discussed are as follows: assessment of risks to man of inhaling actinides; use of estimates for developing protection standards; epidemiology of lung cancer in exposed human populations; development of respiratory tract models; and effects in animals: dose- and effect-modifying factors

  3. Electronic Structure of the Actinide Metals

    Johansson, B.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1982-01-01

    itinerant to localized 5f electron behaviour calculated to take place between plutonium and americium. From experimental data it is shown that the screening of deep core-holes is due to 5f electrons for the lighter actinide elements and 6d electrons for the heavier elements. A simplified model for the full...

  4. Spin–orbit coupling in actinide cations

    Bagus, Paul S.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Martin, Richard L.;

    2012-01-01

    The limiting case of Russell–Saunders coupling, which leads to a maximum spin alignment for the open shell electrons, usually explains the properties of high spin ionic crystals with transition metals. For actinide compounds, the spin–orbit splitting is large enough to cause a significantly reduced...

  5. ENDF/B-5 Actinides (Rev. 86)

    This document summarizes the contents of the Actinides part of the ENDF/B-5 nuclear data library released by the US National Nuclear Data Center. This library or selective retrievals of it, are available costfree from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section upon request. The present version of the library is the Revision of 1986. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Silicon nanowire arrays coupled with cobalt phosphide spheres as low-cost photocathodes for efficient solar hydrogen evolution.

    Bao, Xiao-Qing; Fatima Cerqueira, M; Alpuim, Pedro; Liu, Lifeng

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the first example of silicon nanowire array photocathodes coupled with hollow spheres of the emerging earth-abundant cobalt phosphide catalysts. Compared to bare silicon nanowire arrays, the hybrid electrodes exhibit significantly improved photoelectrochemical performance toward the solar-driven H2 evolution reaction. PMID:26050844

  7. Silicon nanowire arrays coupled with cobalt phosphide spheres as low-cost photocathodes for efficient solar hydrogen evolution

    Bao, Xiao-Qing; Cerqueira, M. F.; Alpuim, P.; Liu, Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the first example of silicon nanowire array photocathodes coupled with hollow spheres of the emerging earth-abundant cobalt phosphide catalysts. Compared to bare silicon nanowire arrays, the hybrid electrodes exhibit significantly improved photoelectrochemical performance toward the solar-driven H2 evolution reaction.

  8. ACTINET: a European Network for Actinide Sciences

    Full text of publication follows: The research in Actinide sciences appear as a strategic issue for the future of nuclear systems. Sustainability issues are clearly in connection with the way actinide elements are managed (either addressing saving natural resource, or decreasing the radiotoxicity of the waste). The recent developments in the field of minor actinide P and T offer convincing indications of what could be possible options, possible future processes for the selective recovery of minor actinides. But they point out, too, some lacks in the basic understanding of key-issues (such as for instance the control An versus Ln selectivity, or solvation phenomena in organic phases). Such lacks could be real obstacles for an optimization of future processes, with new fuel compounds and facing new recycling strategies. This is why a large and sustainable work appears necessary, here in the field of basic actinide separative chemistry. And similar examples could be taken from other aspects of An science, for various applications (nuclear fuel or transmutation targets design, or migration issues,): future developments need a strong, enlarged, scientific basis. The Network ACTINET, established with the support of the European Commission, has the following objectives: - significantly improve the accessibility of the major actinide facilities to the European scientific community, and form a set of pooled facilities, as the corner-stone of a progressive integration process, - improve mobility between the member organisations, in particular between Academic Institutions and National Laboratories holding the pooled facilities, - merge part of the research programs conducted by the member institutions, and optimise the research programs and infrastructure policy via joint management procedures, - strengthen European excellence through a selection process of joint proposals, and reduce the fragmentation of the community by putting critical mass of resources and expertise on

  9. Structure characterization and strain relief analysis in CVD growth of boron phosphide on silicon carbide

    Highlights: • Crystalline boron phosphide was grown on vicinal 4H (0 0 0 1)-SiC surfaces. • The microstructure evolution of defects generated at the interface was characterized by transmission electron microscopy. • The evolution of lattice distortion and strain are determined. - Abstract: Boron phosphide (BP) is a material of interest for development of a high-efficiency solid-state thermal neutron detector. For a thick film-based device, microstructure evolution is key to the engineering of material synthesis. Here, we report epitaxial BP films grown on silicon carbide with vicinal steps and provide a detailed analysis of the microstructure evolution and strain relief. The BP film is epitaxial in the near-interface region but deviates from epitaxial growth as the film develops. Defects such as coherent and incoherent twin boundaries, dislocation loops, stacking faults concentrate in the near-interface region and segment this region into small domains. The formation of defects in this region do not fully release the strain originated from the lattice mismatch. Large grains emerge above the near-interface region and grain boundaries become the main defects in the upper part of the BP film

  10. Solution-based synthesis and purification of zinc tin phosphide nanowires.

    Sheets, Erik J; Balow, Robert B; Yang, Wei-Chang; Stach, Eric A; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-12-01

    The solution-based synthesis of nanoscale earth-abundant semiconductors has the potential to unlock simple, scalable, and tunable material processes which currently constrain development of novel compounds for alternative energy devices. One such promising semiconductor is zinc tin phosphide (ZnSnP2). We report the synthesis of ZnSnP2 nanowires via a solution-liquid-solid mechanism utilizing metallic zinc and tin in decomposing trioctylphosphine (TOP). Dried films of the reaction product are purified of binary phosphide phases by annealing at 345 °C. Tin is removed using a 0.1 M nitric acid treatment leaving pure ZnSnP2 nanowires. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy indicates ZnSnP2 has a direct bandgap energy of 1.24 eV which is optimal for solar cell applications. Using a photoelectrochemical cell, we demonstrate cathodic photocurrent generation at open circuit conditions from the ZnSnP2 nanowires upon solar simulated illumination confirming p-type conductivity. PMID:26530669

  11. Three-dimensional interconnected nickel phosphide networks with hollow microstructures and desulfurization performance

    Graphical abstract: Three-dimensional interconnected nickel phosphide networks with hollow microstructures and desulfurization performance. - Highlights: • Three-dimensional Ni2P has been prepared using foam nickel as a template. • The microstructures interconnected and formed sponge-like porous networks. • Three-dimensional Ni2P shows superior hydrodesulfurization activity. - Abstract: Three-dimensional microstructured nickel phosphide (Ni2P) was fabricated by the reaction between foam nickel (Ni) and phosphorus red. The as-prepared Ni2P samples, as interconnected networks, maintained the original mesh structure of foamed nickel. The crystal structure and morphology of the as-synthesized Ni2P were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, automatic mercury porosimetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The SEM study showed adjacent hollow branches were mutually interconnected to form sponge-like networks. The investigation on pore structure provided detailed information for the hollow microstructures. The growth mechanism for the three-dimensionally structured Ni2P was postulated and discussed in detail. To investigate its catalytic properties, SiO2 supported three-dimensional Ni2P was prepared successfully and evaluated for the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT). DBT molecules were mostly hydrogenated and then desulfurized by Ni2P/SiO2

  12. Structure characterization and strain relief analysis in CVD growth of boron phosphide on silicon carbide

    Li, Guoliang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Abbott, Julia K.C.; Brasfield, John D. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Liu, Peizhi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Dale, Alexis [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Duscher, Gerd [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Rack, Philip D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Feigerle, Charles S., E-mail: cfeigerl@tennessee.edu [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • Crystalline boron phosphide was grown on vicinal 4H (0 0 0 1)-SiC surfaces. • The microstructure evolution of defects generated at the interface was characterized by transmission electron microscopy. • The evolution of lattice distortion and strain are determined. - Abstract: Boron phosphide (BP) is a material of interest for development of a high-efficiency solid-state thermal neutron detector. For a thick film-based device, microstructure evolution is key to the engineering of material synthesis. Here, we report epitaxial BP films grown on silicon carbide with vicinal steps and provide a detailed analysis of the microstructure evolution and strain relief. The BP film is epitaxial in the near-interface region but deviates from epitaxial growth as the film develops. Defects such as coherent and incoherent twin boundaries, dislocation loops, stacking faults concentrate in the near-interface region and segment this region into small domains. The formation of defects in this region do not fully release the strain originated from the lattice mismatch. Large grains emerge above the near-interface region and grain boundaries become the main defects in the upper part of the BP film.

  13. Three-dimensional interconnected nickel phosphide networks with hollow microstructures and desulfurization performance

    Zhang, Shuna, E-mail: zhangshujuan@tust.edu.cn [College of Textile Engineering, Zhejiang Industry Polytechnic College, Shaoxing 312000 (China); Zhang, Shujuan [College of Science, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Song, Limin, E-mail: tjpu2012@sohu.com [College of Environment and Chemical Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Hollow-Fiber Membrane Materials and Membrane Processes, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Wu, Xiaoqing [Institute of Composite Materials and Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Composite Materials, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Fang, Sheng, E-mail: songlmnk@sohu.com [College of Environment and Chemical Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Hollow-Fiber Membrane Materials and Membrane Processes, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: Three-dimensional interconnected nickel phosphide networks with hollow microstructures and desulfurization performance. - Highlights: • Three-dimensional Ni{sub 2}P has been prepared using foam nickel as a template. • The microstructures interconnected and formed sponge-like porous networks. • Three-dimensional Ni{sub 2}P shows superior hydrodesulfurization activity. - Abstract: Three-dimensional microstructured nickel phosphide (Ni{sub 2}P) was fabricated by the reaction between foam nickel (Ni) and phosphorus red. The as-prepared Ni{sub 2}P samples, as interconnected networks, maintained the original mesh structure of foamed nickel. The crystal structure and morphology of the as-synthesized Ni{sub 2}P were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, automatic mercury porosimetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The SEM study showed adjacent hollow branches were mutually interconnected to form sponge-like networks. The investigation on pore structure provided detailed information for the hollow microstructures. The growth mechanism for the three-dimensionally structured Ni{sub 2}P was postulated and discussed in detail. To investigate its catalytic properties, SiO{sub 2} supported three-dimensional Ni{sub 2}P was prepared successfully and evaluated for the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT). DBT molecules were mostly hydrogenated and then desulfurized by Ni{sub 2}P/SiO{sub 2}.

  14. New Developments in Actinides Burning with Symbiotic LWR-HTR-GCFR Fuel Cycles

    GCFR fuel (carbides or nitrides) for actinide burning is shown. (authors)

  15. New Developments in Actinides Burning with Symbiotic LWR-HTR-GCFR Fuel Cycles

    Bomboni, Eleonora [Department of Mechanical, Nuclear and Production Engineering (DIMNP), Via Diotisalvi 2 - 56100 Pisa (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    forms of GCFR fuel (carbides or nitrides) for actinide burning is shown. (authors)

  16. Library of Recommended Actinide Decay Data, 2011

    A major objective of the nuclear data programme within the IAEA is to devise and promote improvements in the quality of nuclear data used in science and technology. Work of this nature was performed by participants in an IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) formulated in 2005 to produce an updated decay data library of important actinides recommended for adoption in various nuclear applications. The specific objectives of this project were to improve the accuracy of heavy element and actinide decay data in order to: determine more accurately the effects of these recommended data on fission reactor fuel cycles; aid in improved assessments of nuclear waste management procedures; provide more reliable decay data for nuclear safeguards; assess with greater confidence the environmental impact of specific actinides and other heavy element radionuclides generated through their decay chains; and extend the scientific knowledge of actinide decay characteristics for nuclear physics research and non-energy applications. Some CRP participants were able to perform a number of highly precise measurements, based on the availability of suitable source materials, and systematic in depth evaluations of the requested decay data. These requested data consisted primarily of half-lives, and α, β-, EC/β+, Auger electron, conversion electron, X ray and γ ray energies and emission probabilities, all with uncertainties expressed at the 1σ confidence level. The IAEA established a CRP entitled Updated Decay Data Library for Actinides in mid-2005. During the course of discussions at the coordinated research meetings, the participants agreed to undertake work programmes of measurements and evaluations, to be completed by the end of 2010. The results of the evaluation studies undertaken by the CRP are presented in Annex I. Annexes II-V include descriptions of the sources of the evaluated decay data and each individual evaluation process in detail, as well as data files in the Evaluated

  17. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    de Sousa, R. R. M.; de Araújo, F. O.; da Costa, J. A. P.; A. de S. Brandim; de Brito, R. A.; Alves, C

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN), in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and...

  18. Adventures in Actinide Chemistry: A Year of Exploring Uranium and Thorium in Los Alamos

    The first part of this collection of slides is concerned with considerations when working with actinides. The topics discussed in the document as a whole are the following: Actinide chemistry vs. transition metal chemistry--tools we can use; New synthetic methods to obtain actinide hydrides; Actinide metallacycles: synthesis, structure, and properties; and Reactivity of actinide metallacycles.

  19. Adventures in Actinide Chemistry: A Year of Exploring Uranium and Thorium in Los Alamos

    Pagano, Justin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-08

    The first part of this collection of slides is concerned with considerations when working with actinides. The topics discussed in the document as a whole are the following: Actinide chemistry vs. transition metal chemistry--tools we can use; New synthetic methods to obtain actinide hydrides; Actinide metallacycles: synthesis, structure, and properties; and Reactivity of actinide metallacycles.

  20. Corrosion of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steels

    The corrosion behaviour of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel grades AISI 304, 316 and 321 was studied at various temperatures. Certain plasma nitriding cycles included a post-oxidation treatment. The corrosion rates were measured using linear polarisation technique. Results showed that corrosion rate increased with the plasma nitriding temperature. Minimum deterioration occurred at 653K. (author). 2 tabs., 4 figs., 10 refs

  1. Ion nitridation - physical and technological aspects

    Ion nitridation, is a technique which allows the formation of a controlled thickness of nitrides in the surface of the material, using this material as the cathode in a low pressure glow discharge, which presents many advantages over the conventional method. A brief review of the ion nitriding technique, the physical fenomena involved, and we discuss technological aspects of this method, are presented. (Author)

  2. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  3. Minor actinide transmutation on PWR burnable poison rods

    Highlights: • Key issues associated with MA transmutation are the appropriate loading pattern. • Commercial PWRs are the only choice to transmute MAs in large scale currently. • Considerable amount of MA can be loaded to PWR without disturbing keff markedly. • Loading MA to PWR burnable poison rods for transmutation is an optimal loading pattern. - Abstract: Minor actinides are the primary contributors to long term radiotoxicity in spent fuel. The majority of commercial reactors in operation in the world are PWRs, so to study the minor actinide transmutation characteristics in the PWRs and ultimately realize the successful minor actinide transmutation in PWRs are crucial problem in the area of the nuclear waste disposal. The key issues associated with the minor actinide transmutation are the appropriate loading patterns when introducing minor actinides to the PWR core. We study two different minor actinide transmutation materials loading patterns on the PWR burnable poison rods, one is to coat a thin layer of minor actinide in the water gap between the zircaloy cladding and the stainless steel which is filled with water, another one is that minor actinides substitute for burnable poison directly within burnable poison rods. Simulation calculation indicates that the two loading patterns can load approximately equivalent to 5–6 PWR annual minor actinide yields without disturbing the PWR keff markedly. The PWR keff can return criticality again by slightly reducing the boric acid concentration in the coolant of PWR or removing some burnable poison rods without coating the minor actinide transmutation materials from PWR core. In other words, loading minor actinide transmutation material to PWR does not consume extra neutron, minor actinide just consumes the neutrons which absorbed by the removed control poisons. Both minor actinide loading patterns are technically feasible; most importantly do not need to modify the configuration of the PWR core and

  4. Mathematical Modelling of Nitride Layer Growth of Low Temperature Gas and Plasma Nitriding of AISI 316L

    Triwiyanto A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper present mathematical model which developed to predict the nitrided layer thickness (case depth of gas nitrided and plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel according to Fick’s first law for pure iron by adapting and manipulating the Hosseini’s model to fit the diffusion mechanism where nitrided structure formed by nitrided AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel. The mathematical model later tested against various actual gas nitriding and plasma nitriding experimental results with varying nitriding temperature and nitriding duration to see whether the model managed to successfully predict the nitrided layer thickness. This model predicted the coexistence of ε-Fe2-3N and γ΄-Fe4N under the present nitriding process parameters. After the validation process, it is proven that the mathematical model managed to predict the nitrided layer growth of the gas nitrided and plasma nitrided of AISI 316L SS up to high degree of accuracy.

  5. Method to determine actinide pollution in water

    This patent describes a process for measuring small amounts, of actinide pollution in fluidic samples by use of solid state track recording devices. It comprises: containing a sample to be tested, containing small amounts of less than 3E-12 Curies per cubic centimeter of actinide pollution, in a sample cell defining an internal chamber and having means for ingress and egress and means for establishing a fluidic sample therein, the sample cell being substantially transparent to thermal neutron radiation and the internal chamber defined therein being configured to constitute a fluidic sample therein as an asymptotic fluid fission source; positioning a solid state track recorder within the internal chamber defined by the sample cell, so that the solid state track recorder has a radiation viewing window through an asymptotic thickness of a fluidic sample contained in the sample cell; capturing at least an asymptotic amount of fluidic sample in the sample cell

  6. Microbial Transformations of Actinides and Other Radionuclides

    Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C. J.

    2009-01-07

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides and other radionuclides released from nuclear fuel cycle and from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution in the environment and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes and biochemical mechanisms which affect the stability and mobility of radionuclides. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, the fission products and other radionuclides such as Ra, Tc, I, Cs, Sr, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

  7. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    NONE

    1991-07-01

    The first international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Mito in Japan, on 6-8 November 1990. It starts with a number of general overview papers to give us some broad perspectives. Following that it takes a look at some basic facts about physics and about the quantities of materials it is talking about. Then it proceeds to some specific aspects of partitioning, starting with evolution from today commercially applied processes and going on to other possibilities. At the end of the third session it takes a look at the significance of partitioning and transmutation of actinides before it embarks on two sessions on transmutation, first in reactors and second in accelerators. The last session is designed to throw back into the discussion the main points which need to be looked at when considering future work in this area. (A.L.B.)

  8. Interaction of actinide cations with synthetic polyelectrolytes

    The binding of Am+3, Th+4 and UO2+2 to polymaleic acid, polyethylenemaleic acid and polymethylvinylethermaleic acid has been measured by a solvent extraction technique at 250C and either 0.02 or 0.10 M ionic strength. The solutions were buffered over a pH range such that the percent of carboxylate groups ionized ranged from 25 to 74%. The binding was described by two constants, β1 and β2, which were evaluated after correction for complexation of the actinide cations by acetate and hydrolysis. For comparable degrees of ionization, all three polyelectrolytes showed similar binding strengths. In general, these results indicated that the binding of actinides to these synthetic polyelectrolytes is basically similar to that of natural polyelectrolytes such as humic and fulvic acids. (orig.)

  9. Actinide and fission product separation and transmutation

    The first international information exchange meeting on actinide and fission product separation and transmutation, took place in Mito in Japan, on 6-8 November 1990. It starts with a number of general overview papers to give us some broad perspectives. Following that it takes a look at some basic facts about physics and about the quantities of materials it is talking about. Then it proceeds to some specific aspects of partitioning, starting with evolution from today commercially applied processes and going on to other possibilities. At the end of the third session it takes a look at the significance of partitioning and transmutation of actinides before it embarks on two sessions on transmutation, first in reactors and second in accelerators. The last session is designed to throw back into the discussion the main points which need to be looked at when considering future work in this area. (A.L.B.)

  10. Actinides: from heavy fermions to plutonium metallurgy

    The actinide elements mark the emergence of 5f electrons. The f electrons possess sufficiently unusual characteristics that their participation in atomic binding often result in dramatic changes in properties. This provides an excellent opportunity to study the question of localization of electrons; a question that is paramount in predicting the physical and chemical properties of d and f electron transition metals. The transition region between localized (magnetic) and itinerant (often superconducting) behavior provides for many interesting phenomena such as structural instabilities (polymorphism), spin fluctuations, mixed valences, charge density waves, exceptional catalytic activity and hydrogen storage. This region offers most interesting behavior such as that exhibited by the actinide compounds UBe13 and UPt3. Both compounds are heavy-fermion superconductors in which both magnetic and superconducting behavior exist in the same electrons. The consequences of f-electron bonding (which appears greatest at Plutonium) show dramatic effects on phase stability, alloying behavior, phase transformations and mechanical behavior