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Sample records for actin-bound myosin heads

  1. The Conformation of Myosin Heads in Relaxed Skeletal Muscle: Implications for Myosin-Based Regulation.

    Fusi, Luca; Huang, Zhe; Irving, Malcolm

    2015-08-18

    In isolated thick filaments from many types of muscle, the two head domains of each myosin molecule are folded back against the filament backbone in a conformation called the interacting heads motif (IHM) in which actin interaction is inhibited. This conformation is present in resting skeletal muscle, but it is not known how exit from the IHM state is achieved during muscle activation. Here, we investigated this by measuring the in situ conformation of the light chain domain of the myosin heads in relaxed demembranated fibers from rabbit psoas muscle using fluorescence polarization from bifunctional rhodamine probes at four sites on the C-terminal lobe of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC). The order parameter 〈P2〉 describing probe orientation with respect to the filament axis had a roughly sigmoidal dependence on temperature in relaxing conditions, with a half-maximal change at ∼19°C. Either lattice compression by 5% dextran T500 or addition of 25 μM blebbistatin decreased the transition temperature to ∼14°C. Maximum entropy analysis revealed three preferred orientations of the myosin RLC region at 25°C and above, two with its long axis roughly parallel to the filament axis and one roughly perpendicular. The parallel orientations are similar to those of the so-called blocked and free heads in the IHM and are stabilized by either lattice compression or blebbistatin. In relaxed skeletal muscle at near-physiological temperature and myofilament lattice spacing, the majority of the myosin heads have their light chain domains in IHM-like conformations, with a minority in a distinct conformation with their RLC regions roughly perpendicular to the filament axis. None of these three orientation populations were present during active contraction. These results are consistent with a regulatory transition of the thick filament in skeletal muscle associated with a conformational equilibrium of the myosin heads. PMID:26287630

  2. Detection of fluorescently labeled actin-bound cross-bridges in actively contracting myofibrils.

    Cooper, W C; Chrin, L R; Berger, C L

    2000-01-01

    Myosin subfragment 1 (S1) can be specifically modified at Lys-553 with the fluorescent probe FHS (6-[fluorescein-5(and 6)-carboxamido]hexanoic acid succinimidyl ester) (Bertrand, R., J. Derancourt, and R. Kassab. 1995. Biochemistry. 34:9500-9507), and solvent quenching of FHS-S1 with iodide has been shown to be sensitive to actin binding at low ionic strength (MacLean, Chrin, and Berger, 2000. Biophys. J. 000-000). In order to extend these results and examine the fraction of actin-bound myosi...

  3. The energetics of allosteric regulation of ADP release from myosin heads.

    Jackson, Del R; Baker, Josh E

    2009-06-28

    Myosin molecules are involved in a wide range of transport and contractile activities in cells. A single myosin head functions through its ATPase reaction as a force generator and as a mechanosensor, and when two or more myosin heads work together in moving along an actin filament, the interplay between these mechanisms contributes to collective myosin behaviors. For example, the interplay between force-generating and force-sensing mechanisms coordinates the two heads of a myosin V molecule in its hand-over-hand processive stepping along an actin filament. In muscle, it contributes to the Fenn effect and smooth muscle latch. In both examples, a key force-sensing mechanism is the regulation of ADP release via interhead forces that are generated upon actin-myosin binding. Here we present a model describing the mechanism of allosteric regulation of ADP release from myosin heads as a change, DeltaDeltaG(-D), in the standard free energy for ADP release that results from the work, Deltamicro(mech), performed by that myosin head upon ADP release, or DeltaDeltaG(-D) = Deltamicro(mech). We show that this model is consistent with previous measurements for strain-dependent kinetics of ADP release in both myosin V and muscle myosin II. The model makes explicit the energetic cost of accelerating ADP release, showing that acceleration of ADP release during myosin V processivity requires approximately 4 kT of energy whereas the energetic cost for accelerating ADP release in a myosin II-based actin motility assay is only approximately 0.4 kT. The model also predicts that the acceleration of ADP release involves a dissipation of interhead forces. To test this prediction, we use an in vitro motility assay to show that the acceleration of ADP release from both smooth and skeletal muscle myosin II correlates with a decrease in interhead force. Our analyses provide clear energetic constraints for models of the allosteric regulation of ADP release and provide novel, testable insights

  4. Strong Binding of Myosin Heads Stretches and Twists the Actin Helix

    Tsaturyan, Andrey K.; Koubassova, Natalia; Ferenczi, Michael A.; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Roessle, Manfred; Bershitsky, Sergey Y.

    2004-01-01

    Calculation of the size of the power stroke of the myosin motor in contracting muscle requires knowledge of the compliance of the myofilaments. Current estimates of actin compliance vary significantly introducing uncertainty in the mechanical parameters of the motor. Using x-ray diffraction on small bundles of permeabilized fibers from rabbit muscle we show that strong binding of myosin heads changes directly the actin helix. The spacing of the 2.73-nm meridional x-ray reflection increased by...

  5. Head-head interactions of resting myosin crossbridges in intact frog skeletal muscles, revealed by synchrotron x-ray fiber diffraction.

    Kanji Oshima

    Full Text Available The intensities of the myosin-based layer lines in the x-ray diffraction patterns from live resting frog skeletal muscles with full thick-thin filament overlap from which partial lattice sampling effects had been removed were analyzed to elucidate the configurations of myosin crossbridges around the thick filament backbone to nanometer resolution. The repeat of myosin binding protein C (C-protein molecules on the thick filaments was determined to be 45.33 nm, slightly longer than that of myosin crossbridges. With the inclusion of structural information for C-proteins and a pre-powerstroke head shape, modeling in terms of a mixed population of regular and perturbed regions of myosin crown repeats along the filament revealed that the myosin filament had azimuthal perturbations of crossbridges in addition to axial perturbations in the perturbed region, producing pseudo-six-fold rotational symmetry in the structure projected down the filament axis. Myosin crossbridges had a different organization about the filament axis in each of the regular and perturbed regions. In the regular region that lacks C-proteins, there were inter-molecular interactions between the myosin heads in axially adjacent crown levels. In the perturbed region that contains C-proteins, in addition to inter-molecular interactions between the myosin heads in the closest adjacent crown levels, there were also intra-molecular interactions between the paired heads on the same crown level. Common features of the interactions in both regions were interactions between a portion of the 50-kDa-domain and part of the converter domain of the myosin heads, similar to those found in the phosphorylation-regulated invertebrate myosin. These interactions are primarily electrostatic and the converter domain is responsible for the head-head interactions. Thus multiple head-head interactions of myosin crossbridges also characterize the switched-off state and have an important role in the regulation

  6. Myosin head orientation: a structural determinant for the Frank-Starling relationship

    Farman, Gerrie P.; Gore, David; Allen, Edward; Schoenfelt, Kelly; Irving, Thomas C.; de Tombe, Pieter P. (IIT); (UIC)

    2011-09-06

    The cellular mechanism underlying the Frank-Starling law of the heart is myofilament length-dependent activation. The mechanism(s) whereby sarcomeres detect changes in length and translate this into increased sensitivity to activating calcium has been elusive. Small-angle X-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the intact myofilament lattice undergoes numerous structural changes upon an increase in sarcomere length (SL): lattice spacing and the I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0} intensity ratio decreases, whereas the M3 meridional reflection intensity (I{sub M3}) increases, concomitant with increases in diastolic and systolic force. Using a short ({approx}10 ms) X-ray exposure just before electrical stimulation, we were able to obtain detailed structural information regarding the effects of external osmotic compression (with mannitol) and obtain SL on thin intact electrically stimulated isolated rat right ventricular trabeculae. We show that over the same incremental increases in SL, the relative changes in systolic force track more closely to the relative changes in myosin head orientation (as reported by IM3) than to the relative changes in lattice spacing. We conclude that myosin head orientation before activation determines myocardial sarcomere activation levels and that this may be the dominant mechanism for length-dependent activation.

  7. Conserved Intramolecular Interactions Maintain Myosin Interacting-Heads Motifs Explaining Tarantula Muscle Super-Relaxed State Structural Basis.

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Qi, Dan; Wriggers, Willy; Pinto, Antonio; Zhu, Jingui; Bilbao, Aivett; Gillilan, Richard E; Hu, Songnian; Padrón, Raúl

    2016-03-27

    Tarantula striated muscle is an outstanding system for understanding the molecular organization of myosin filaments. Three-dimensional reconstruction based on cryo-electron microscopy images and single-particle image processing revealed that, in a relaxed state, myosin molecules undergo intramolecular head-head interactions, explaining why head activity switches off. The filament model obtained by rigidly docking a chicken smooth muscle myosin structure to the reconstruction was improved by flexibly fitting an atomic model built by mixing structures from different species to a tilt-corrected 2-nm three-dimensional map of frozen-hydrated tarantula thick filament. We used heavy and light chain sequences from tarantula myosin to build a single-species homology model of two heavy meromyosin interacting-heads motifs (IHMs). The flexibly fitted model includes previously missing loops and shows five intramolecular and five intermolecular interactions that keep the IHM in a compact off structure, forming four helical tracks of IHMs around the backbone. The residues involved in these interactions are oppositely charged, and their sequence conservation suggests that IHM is present across animal species. The new model, PDB 3JBH, explains the structural origin of the ATP turnover rates detected in relaxed tarantula muscle by ascribing the very slow rate to docked unphosphorylated heads, the slow rate to phosphorylated docked heads, and the fast rate to phosphorylated undocked heads. The conservation of intramolecular interactions across animal species and the presence of IHM in bilaterians suggest that a super-relaxed state should be maintained, as it plays a role in saving ATP in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscles. PMID:26851071

  8. Head-neck domain of Arabidopsis myosin XI, MYA2, fused with GFP produces F-actin patterns that coincide with fast organelle streaming in different plant cells

    Holweg Carola L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytoskeletal mechanisms that underlie organelle transport in plants are intimately linked to acto-myosin function. This function is mediated by the attachment of myosin heads to F-actin and the binding of cargo to the tails. Acto-myosin also powers vigorous cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. Class XI myosins exhibit strikingly fast velocities and may have extraordinary roles in cellular motility. Studies of the structural basis of organelle transport have focused on the cargo-binding tails of myosin XI, revealing a close relationship with the transport of peroxisomes, mitochondria, and Golgi-vesicles. Links between myosin heads and F-actin-based motility have been less investigated. To address this function, we performed localization studies using the head-neck domain of AtMYA2, a myosin XI from Arabidopsis. Results We expressed the GFP-fused head-neck domain of MYA2 in epidermal cells of various plant species and found that it associated with F-actin. By comparison to other markers such as fimbrin and talin, we revealed that the myosin-labeled F-actin was of a lower quality and absent from the fine microfilament arrays at the cell cortex. However, it colocalized with cytoplasmic (transvacuolar F-actin in areas coinciding with the tracks of fast organelles. This observation correlates well with the proposed function of myosin XI in organelle trafficking. The fact that organelle streaming was reduced in cells expressing the GFP-MYA2-head6IQ indicated that the functionless motor protein inhibits endogenous myosins. Furthermore, co-expression of the GFP-MYA2-head6IQ with other F-actin markers disrupted its attachment to F-actin. In nuclei, the GFP-myosin associated with short bundles of F-actin. Conclusion The localization of the head of MYA2 in living plant cells, as investigated here for the first time, suggests a close linkage between this myosin XI and cytoplasmic microfilaments that support the rapid streaming of

  9. A Restrictive Cardiomyopathy Mutation in an Invariant Proline at the Myosin Head/Rod Junction Enhances Head Flexibility and Function, Yielding Muscle Defects in Drosophila.

    Achal, Madhulika; Trujillo, Adriana S; Melkani, Girish C; Farman, Gerrie P; Ocorr, Karen; Viswanathan, Meera C; Kaushik, Gaurav; Newhard, Christopher S; Glasheen, Bernadette M; Melkani, Anju; Suggs, Jennifer A; Moore, Jeffrey R; Swank, Douglas M; Bodmer, Rolf; Cammarato, Anthony; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2016-06-01

    An "invariant proline" separates the myosin S1 head from its S2 tail and is proposed to be critical for orienting S1 during its interaction with actin, a process that leads to muscle contraction. Mutation of the invariant proline to leucine (P838L) caused dominant restrictive cardiomyopathy in a pediatric patient (Karam et al., Congenit. Heart Dis. 3:138-43, 2008). Here, we use Drosophila melanogaster to model this mutation and dissect its effects on the biochemical and biophysical properties of myosin, as well as on the structure and physiology of skeletal and cardiac muscles. P838L mutant myosin isolated from indirect flight muscles of transgenic Drosophila showed elevated ATPase and actin sliding velocity in vitro. Furthermore, the mutant heads exhibited increased rotational flexibility, and there was an increase in the average angle between the two heads. Indirect flight muscle myofibril assembly was minimally affected in mutant homozygotes, and isolated fibers displayed normal mechanical properties. However, myofibrils degraded during aging, correlating with reduced flight abilities. In contrast, hearts from homozygotes and heterozygotes showed normal morphology, myofibrillar arrays, and contractile parameters. When P838L was placed in trans to Mhc(5), an allele known to cause cardiac restriction in flies, it did not yield the constricted phenotype. Overall, our studies suggest that increased rotational flexibility of myosin S1 enhances myosin ATPase and actin sliding. Moreover, instability of P838L myofibrils leads to decreased function during aging of Drosophila skeletal muscle, but not cardiac muscle, despite the strong evolutionary conservation of the P838 residue. PMID:27107639

  10. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    Venkaiah eBetapudi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  11. Tarantula myosin free head regulatory light chain phosphorylation stiffens N-terminal extension, releasing it and blocking its docking back.

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D; Lehman, William; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of smooth and striated muscle myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) showed that diphosphorylation induces a disorder-to-order transition. Our goal here was to further explore the effects of mono- and diphosphorylation on the straightening and rigidification of the tarantula myosin RLC NTE. For that we used MD simulations followed by persistence length analysis to explore the consequences of secondary and tertiary structure changes occurring on RLC NTE following phosphorylation. Static and dynamic persistence length analysis of tarantula RLC NTE peptides suggest that diphosphorylation produces an important 24-fold straightening and a 16-fold rigidification of the RLC NTE, while monophosphorylation has a less profound effect. This new information on myosin structural mechanics, not fully revealed by previous EM and MD studies, add support to a cooperative phosphorylation-dependent activation mechanism as proposed for the tarantula thick filament. Our results suggest that the RLC NTE straightening and rigidification after Ser45 phosphorylation leads to a release of the constitutively Ser35 monophosphorylated free head swaying away from the thick filament shaft. This is so because the stiffened diphosphorylated RLC NTE would hinder the docking back of the free head after swaying away, becoming released and mobile and unable to recover its original interacting position on activation. PMID:26038302

  12. Cooperation between the two heads of smooth muscle myosin is essential for full activation of the motor function by phosphorylation.

    Ma, Rong-Na; Mabuchi, Katsuhide; Li, Jing; Lu, Zekuan; Wang, Chih-Lueh Albert; Li, Xiang-dong

    2013-09-10

    The motor function of smooth muscle myosin (SmM) is regulated by phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) bound to the neck region of the SmM heavy chain. It is generally accepted that unphosphorylated RLC induces interactions between the two heads and between the head and the tail, thus inhibiting the motor activity of SmM, whereas phosphorylation of RLC interrupts those interactions, thus reversing the inhibition and restoring the motor activity to the maximal value. One assumption of this model is that single-headed SmM is fully active regardless of phosphorylation. To re-evaluate this model, we produced a number of SmM constructs with coiled coils of various lengths and examined their structure and regulation. With these constructs we identified the segment in the coiled-coil key for the formation of a stable double-headed structure. In agreement with the current model, we found that the actin-activated ATPase activity of unphosphorylated SmM increased with shortening of the coiled-coil. However, contrary to the current model, we found that the actin-activated ATPase activity of phosphorylated SmM decreased with shortening coiled-coil and only the stable double-headed SmM was fully activated by phosphorylation. These results indicate that single-headed SmM is neither fully active nor fully inhibited. Based on our findings, we propose that cooperation between the two heads is essential, not only for the inhibition of unphosphorylated SmM, but also for the activation of phosphorylated SmM. PMID:23947723

  13. Phosphorylation and the N-terminal extension of the regulatory light chain help orient and align the myosin heads in Drosophila flight muscle

    Farman, Gerrie P.; Miller, Mark S.; Reedy, Mary C.; Soto-Adames, Felipe N.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.; Maughan, David W.; Irving, Thomas C.; (IIT); (Vermont); (Duke)

    2010-02-02

    X-ray diffraction of the indirect flight muscle (IFM) in living Drosophila at rest and electron microscopy of intact and glycerinated IFM was used to compare the effects of mutations in the regulatory light chain (RLC) on sarcomeric structure. Truncation of the RLC N-terminal extension (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46}) or disruption of the phosphorylation sites by substituting alanines (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}) decreased the equatorial intensity ratio (I{sub 20}/I{sub 10}), indicating decreased myosin mass associated with the thin filaments. Phosphorylation site disruption (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}), but not N-terminal extension truncation (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46}), decreased the 14.5 nm reflection intensity, indicating a spread of the axial distribution of the myosin heads. The arrangement of thick filaments and myosin heads in electron micrographs of the phosphorylation mutant (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}) appeared normal in the relaxed and rigor states, but when calcium activated, fewer myosin heads formed cross-bridges. In transgenic flies with both alterations to the RLC (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46; S66A, S67A}), the effects of the dual mutation were additive. The results suggest that the RLC N-terminal extension serves as a 'tether' to help pre-position the myosin heads for attachment to actin, while phosphorylation of the RLC promotes head orientations that allow optimal interactions with the thin filament.

  14. Effect of ADP on the orientation of spin-labeled myosin heads in muscle fibers: A high-resolution study with deuterated spin labels

    We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to determine the effects of ADP on the orientational distribution of nitroxide spin labels attached to myosin heads in skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers. To maximize the specificity of labeling, we spin-labeled isolated myosin heads (subfragment 1) on a single reactive thiol (SH1) and diffused them into unlabeled muscle fibers. To maximize spectral and orientational resolution, we used perdeuterated spin labels, 2H-MSL and 2H-IASL, eliminating superhyperfine broadening and thus narrowing the line widths. Two different spin labels were used, with different orientation relative to the myosin head, to ensure that the results are not affected by unfavorable probe orientation. In rigor, a very narrow three-line spectrum was observed for both spin labels, indicating a narrow orientational distribution, as reported previously. ADP induced very slight changes in the spectrum, corresponding to very slight (but significant) changes in the orientational distribution. These changes were quantified by a digital analysis of the spectra, using a two-step simplex fitting procedure. First, the magnetic tensor values and line widths were determined by fitting the spectrum of a randomly oriented sample. Then the spectrum of oriented fibers was fit to a model by assuming a Gaussian distribution of the tilt angle (theta) and twist angle (phi) of the nitroxide principal axes relative to the fiber axis. A single-Gaussian distribution resulted in inadequate fits, but a two-component model gave excellent results. ADP induces a small (less than 5 degrees) rotation of the major components for both spin labels, along with a similarly small increase of disorder about the average positions

  15. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Tarantula Myosin Filaments Suggests How Phosphorylation May Regulate Myosin Activity

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Wriggers, Willy; Pinto, Antonio; Bártoli, Fulvia; Salazar, Leiría; Zhao, Fa-Qing; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2008-01-01

    Muscle contraction involves the interaction of the myosin heads of the thick filaments with actin subunits of the thin filaments. Relaxation occurs when this interaction is blocked by molecular switches on these filaments. In many muscles, myosin-linked regulation involves phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chains (RLC). Electron microscopy of vertebrate smooth muscle myosin molecules (regulated by phosphorylation) has provided insight into the relaxed structure, revealing that my...

  16. Myosin II Dynamics during Embryo Morphogenesis

    Kasza, Karen

    2013-03-01

    During embryonic morphogenesis, the myosin II motor protein generates forces that help to shape tissues, organs, and the overall body form. In one dramatic example in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, the epithelial tissue that will give rise to the body of the adult animal elongates more than two-fold along the head-to-tail axis in less than an hour. This elongation is accomplished primarily through directional rearrangements of cells within the plane of the tissue. Just prior to elongation, polarized assemblies of myosin II accumulate perpendicular to the elongation axis. The contractile forces generated by myosin activity orient cell movements along a common axis, promoting local cell rearrangements that contribute to global tissue elongation. The molecular and mechanical mechanisms by which myosin drives this massive change in embryo shape are poorly understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we generated a collection of transgenic flies expressing variants of myosin II with altered motor function and regulation. We found that variants that are predicted to have increased myosin activity cause defects in tissue elongation. Using biophysical approaches, we found that these myosin variants also have decreased turnover dynamics within cells. To explore the mechanisms by which molecular-level myosin dynamics are translated into tissue-level elongation, we are using time-lapse confocal imaging to observe cell movements in embryos with altered myosin activity. We are utilizing computational approaches to quantify the dynamics and directionality of myosin localization and cell rearrangements. These studies will help elucidate how myosin-generated forces control cell movements within tissues. This work is in collaboration with J. Zallen at the Sloan-Kettering Institute.

  17. Expression of non-muscle type myosin heavy polypeptide 9 (MYH9 in mammalian cells

    T Takubo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Myosin is a functional protein associated with cellular movement, cell division, muscle contraction and other functions. Members of the myosin super-family are distinguished from the myosin heavy chains that play crucial roles in cellular processes. Although there are many studies of myosin heavy chains in this family, there are fewer on non-muscle myosin heavy chains than of muscle myosin heavy chains. Myosin is classified as type I (myosin I or type II (myosin II. Myosin I, called unconventional myosin or mini-myosin, has one head, while myosin II, called conventional myosin, has two heads. We transfected myosin heavy polypeptide 9 (MYH9 into HeLa cells as a fusion protein with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP and analyzed the localization and distribution of MYH9 in parallel with those of actin and tubulin. The results indicate that MYH9 colocalizes with actin stress fibers. Since it has recently been shown by genetic analysis that autosomal dominant giant platelet syndromes are MYH9-related disorders, our development of transfected EGFP-MYH9 might be useful for predicting the associations between the function of actin polymerization, the MYH9 motor domain, and these disorders.

  18. Enhanced force generation by smooth muscle myosin in vitro.

    VanBuren, P; Work, S S; Warshaw, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    To determine whether the apparent enhanced force-generating capabilities of smooth muscle relative to skeletal muscle are inherent to the myosin cross-bridge, the isometric steady-state force produced by myosin in the in vitro motility assay was measured. In this assay, myosin adhered to a glass surface pulls on an actin filament that is attached to an ultracompliant (50-200 nm/pN) glass microneedle. The number of myosin cross-bridge heads able to interact with a length of actin filament was ...

  19. Phosphorylation and the N-terminal Extension of the Regulatory Light Chain Help Orient and Align the Myosin Heads in Drosophila Flight Muscle

    Farman, Gerrie P.; Miller, Mark S.; Reedy, Mary C.; Soto-Adames, Felipe N.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.; Maughan, David W.; Irving, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray diffraction of the indirect flight muscle (IFM) in living Drosophila at rest and electron microscopy of intact and glycerinated IFM was used to compare the effects of mutations in the regulatory light chain (RLC) on sarcomeric structure. Truncation of the RLC N-terminal extension (Dmlc2Δ2-46) or disruption of the phosphorylation sites by substituting alanines (Dmlc2S66A, S67A) decreased the equatorial intensity ratio (I20/I10), indicating decreased myosin mass associated with the thin f...

  20. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity

    Winkelmann, Donald A.; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T.; Stock, Ann M.

    2015-08-01

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin.

  1. Reverse actin sliding triggers strong myosin binding that moves tropomyosin

    Bekyarova, T. I.; Reedy, M C; Baumann, B. A. J.; Tregear, R T; Ward, A; Krzic, U.; Prince, K.M.; Perz-Edwards, R. J.; Reconditi, M.; Gore, D.; Irving, T C; Reedy, M K

    2008-01-01

    Actin/myosin interactions in vertebrate striated muscles are believed to be regulated by the “steric blocking” mechanism whereby the binding of calcium to the troponin complex allows tropomyosin (TM) to change position on actin, acting as a molecular switch that blocks or allows myosin heads to interact with actin. Movement of TM during activation is initiated by interaction of Ca2+ with troponin, then completed by further displacement by strong binding cross-bridges. We report x-ray evidence...

  2. Structural Basis of Cargo Recognition by Unconventional Myosins in Cellular Trafficking.

    Li, Jianchao; Lu, Qing; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-08-01

    Unconventional myosins are a superfamily of actin-based molecular motors playing diverse roles including cellular trafficking, mechanical supports, force sensing and transmission, etc. The variable neck and tail domains of unconventional myosins function to bind to specific cargoes including proteins and lipid vesicles and thus are largely responsible for the diverse cellular functions of myosins in vivo. In addition, the tail regions, together with their cognate cargoes, can regulate activities of the motor heads. This review outlines the advances made in recent years on cargo recognition and cargo binding-induced regulation of the activity of several unconventional myosins including myosin-I, V, VI and X in cellular trafficking. We approach this topic by describing a series of high-resolution structures of the neck and tail domains of these unconventional myosins either alone or in complex with their specific cargoes, and by discussing potential implications of these structural studies on cellular trafficking of these myosin motors. PMID:26842936

  3. Effects of proteolysis on the adenosinetriphosphatase activities of thymus myosin

    Vu, N.D.; Wagner, P.D.

    1987-07-28

    Limited proteolysis was used to identify regions on the heavy chains of calf thymus myosin which may be involved in ATP and actin binding. Assignments of the various proteolytic fragments to different parts of the myosin heavy chain were based on solubility, gel filtration, electron microscopy, and binding of /sup 32/P-labeled regulatory light chains. Chymotrypsin rapidly cleaved within the head of thymus myosin to give a 70,000-dalton N-terminal fragment and a 140,000-dalton C-terminal fragment. These two fragments did not dissociate under nondenaturing conditions. Cleavage within the myosin tail to give heavy meromyosin occurred more slowly. Cleavage at the site 70,000 daltons from the N-terminus of the heavy chain caused about a 30-fold decrease in the actin concentration required to achieve half-maximal stimulation of the magnesium-adenosinetriphosphatase (Mg-ATPase) activity of unphosphorylated thymus myosin. The actin-activated ATPase activity of this digested myosin was only slightly affected by light chain phosphorylation. Actin inhibited the cleavage at this site by chymotrypsin. In the presence of ATP, chymotrypsin rapidly cleaved the thymus myosin heavy chain at an additional site about 4000 daltons from the N-terminus. Cleavage at this site caused a 2-fold increase in the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-ATPase activity and 3-fold decreases in the Ca/sup 2 +/- and Mg-ATPase activities of thymus myosin. Thus, cleavage at the N-terminus of thymus myosin was affected by ATP, and this cleavage altered ATPase activity. Papain cleaved the thymus myosin heavy chain about 94,000 daltons from the N-terminus to give subfragment 1. Although this subfragment 1 contained intact light chains, its actin-activated ATPase activity was not affected by light chain phosphorylation.

  4. Cryo-atomic force microscopy of smooth muscle myosin.

    Y. Zhang; Shao, Z; Somlyo, A. P.; Somlyo, A V

    1997-01-01

    The motor and regulatory domains of the head and the 14-nm pitch of the alpha-helical coiled-coil of the tail of extended (6S) smooth-muscle myosin molecules were imaged with cryo atomic force microscopy at 80-85 K, and the effects of thiophosphorylation of the regulatory light chain were examined. The tail was 4 nm shorter in thiophosphorylated than in nonphosphorylated myosin. The first major bend was invariant, at approximately 51 nm from the head-tail junction (H-T), coincident with low p...

  5. Different subcellular localizations and functions of Arabidopsis myosin VIII

    Belausov Eduard

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosins are actin-activated ATPases that use energy to generate force and move along actin filaments, dragging with their tails different cargos. Plant myosins belong to the group of unconventional myosins and Arabidopsis myosin VIII gene family contains four members: ATM1, ATM2, myosin VIIIA and myosin VIIIB. Results In transgenic plants expressing GFP fusions with ATM1 (IQ-tail truncation, lacking the head domain, fluorescence was differentially distributed: while in epidermis cells at the root cap GFP-ATM1 equally distributed all over the cell, in epidermal cells right above this region it accumulated in dots. Further up, in cells of the elongation zone, GFP-ATM1 was preferentially positioned at the sides of transversal cell walls. Interestingly, the punctate pattern was insensitive to brefeldin A (BFA while in some cells closer to the root cap, ATM1 was found in BFA bodies. With the use of different markers and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, it was found that myosin VIII co-localized to the plasmodesmata and ER, colocalized with internalized FM4-64, and partially overlapped with the endosomal markers ARA6, and rarely with ARA7 and FYVE. Motility of ARA6 labeled organelles was inhibited whenever associated with truncated ATM1 but motility of FYVE labeled organelles was inhibited only when associated with large excess of ATM1. Furthermore, GFP-ATM1 and RFP-ATM2 (IQ-tail domain co-localized to the same spots on the plasma membrane, indicating a specific composition at these sites for myosin binding. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggest that myosin VIII functions differently in different root cells and can be involved in different steps of endocytosis, BFA-sensitive and insensitive pathways, ER tethering and plasmodesmatal activity.

  6. Native myosin from adult rabbit skeletal muscle: isoenzymes and states of aggregation.

    Morel, J E; D'hahan, N; Taouil, K; Francin, M; Aguilar, A; Dalbiez, J P; Merah, Z; Grussaute, H; Hilbert, B; Ollagnon, F; Selva, G; Piot, F

    1998-04-21

    The globular heads of skeletal muscle myosin have been shown to exist as isoenzymes S1 (A1) and S1 (A2), and there are also isoforms of the heavy chains. Using capillary electrophoresis, we found two dominant isoenzymes of the whole native myosin molecule, in agreement with what has previously been found by various techniques for native and nondenatured myosin from adult rabbits. Findings about possible states of aggregation of myosin and its heads are contradictory. By analytical ultracentrifugation, we confirmed the existence of a tail-tail dimer. By laser light scattering, we found a head-head dimer in the presence of MgATP. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with analytical ultracentrifugation and laser light scattering led us to refine these results. We found tail-tail dimers in a conventional buffer. We found tail-tail and head-head dimers in the presence of 0.5 mM MgATP and pure head-head dimers in the presence of 6 mM MgATP. All the dimers were homodimers. Naming the dominant isoenzymes of myosin a and b, we observed tail-tail dimers with isoenzyme a (TaTa) and with isoenzyme b (TbTb) and also head-head dimers with isoenzyme a (HaHa) and with isoenzyme b (HbHb). PMID:9548927

  7. Mammalian myosin-18A, a highly divergent myosin.

    Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Heissler, Sarah M; Billington, Neil; Takagi, Yasuharu; Yang, Yi; Knight, Peter J; Homsher, Earl; Sellers, James R

    2013-03-29

    The Mus musculus myosin-18A gene is expressed as two alternatively spliced isoforms, α and β, with reported roles in Golgi localization, in maintenance of cytoskeleton, and as receptors for immunological surfactant proteins. Both myosin-18A isoforms feature a myosin motor domain, a single predicted IQ motif, and a long coiled-coil reminiscent of myosin-2. The myosin-18Aα isoform, additionally, has an N-terminal PDZ domain. Recombinant heavy meromyosin- and subfragment-1 (S1)-like constructs for both myosin-18Aα and -18β species were purified from the baculovirus/Sf9 cell expression system. These constructs bound both essential and regulatory light chains, indicating an additional noncanonical light chain binding site in the neck. Myosin-18Aα-S1 and -18Aβ-S1 molecules bound actin weakly with Kd values of 4.9 and 54 μm, respectively. The actin binding data could be modeled by assuming an equilibrium between two myosin conformations, a competent and an incompetent form to bind actin. Actin binding was unchanged by presence of nucleotide. Both myosin-18A isoforms bound N-methylanthraniloyl-nucleotides, but the rate of ATP hydrolysis was very slow (motor domain, suggesting a pre-power stroke conformation regardless of the presence of ATP. These data lead us to conclude that myosin-18A does not operate as a traditional molecular motor in cells. PMID:23382379

  8. Fluorescent modification and orientation of myosin sulfhydryl 2 in skeletal muscle fibers

    The authors describe a protocol for the selective covalent labeling of the sulfhydryl 2 (SH2) on the myosin cross-bridge in glycerinated muscle fibers using the sulfhydryl-selective label 4-[N-[(iodoacetoxy)ethyl]-N-methylamino]-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (IANBD). The protocol promotes the specificity of IANBD by using the ability to protect sulfhydryl 1 (SH1) from modification by binding the cross-bridge to the actin filament and using cross-bridge-bound MgADP to promote the accessibility of SH2. They determined the specificity of the probe using fluorescence gel scanning of fiber-extracted proteins to isolate the probe on myosin subfragment 1 (S1), limited proteolysis of the purified S1 to isolate the probe on the 20-kilodalton fragment of S1, and titration of the free SH1's on purified S1 using the radiolabeled SH1-specific reagent [14C]iodoacetamide or enzymatic activity measurements. They characterized the angular distribution of the IANBD on cross-bridges in fibers when the fibers are in rigor, in relaxation, in the presence of MgADP, and in isometric contraction using wavelength-dependent fluorescence polarization. They find that the SH2 probe distinguishes the different states of the fiber such that rigor and MgADP are ordered and maintain a similar orientation throughout the excitation wavelength domain. The relaxed cross-bridge is ordered and has an orientation that is distinct from the orientation of the cross-bridge in rigor and MgADP over the entire wavelength domain. The active isometric cross-bridge is also oriented differently from the other states, suggesting the presence of a predominant actin-bound cross-bridge state that precedes the power stroke during muscle contraction

  9. Thermal Denaturation and Aggregation of Myosin Subfragment 1 Isoforms with Different Essential Light Chains

    Zubov, Eugene O.; Nikolaeva, Olga P.; Kurganov, Boris I.; Dmitrii I. Levitsky; Markov, Denis I.

    2010-01-01

    We compared thermally induced denaturation and aggregation of two isoforms of the isolated myosin head (myosin subfragment 1, S1) containing different “essential” (or “alkali”) light chains, A1 or A2. We applied differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate the domain structure of these two S1 isoforms. For this purpose, a special calorimetric approach was developed to analyze the DSC profiles of irreversibly denaturing multidomain proteins. Using this approach, we revealed two calor...

  10. Calcium and cargoes as regulators of myosin 5a activity

    Myosin 5a is a two-headed actin-dependent motor that transports various cargoes in cells. Its enzymology and mechanochemistry have been extensively studied in vitro. It is a processive motor that takes multiple 36 nm steps on actin. The enzymatic activity of myosin 5 is regulated by an intramolecular folding mechanism whereby its lever arms fold back against the coiled-coil tail such that the motor domains directly bind the globular tail domains. We show that the structure seen in individual folded molecules is consistent with electron density map of two-dimensional crystals of the molecule. In this compact state, the actin-activated MgATPase activity of the molecule is markedly inhibited and the molecule cannot move processively on surface bound actin filaments. The actin-activated MgATPase activity of myosin 5a is activated by increasing the calcium concentration or by binding of a cargo-receptor molecule, melanophilin, in vitro. However, calcium binding to the calmodulin light chains results in dissociation of some of the calmodulin which disrupts the ability of myosin 5a to move on actin filaments in vitro. Thus we propose that the physiologically relevant activation pathway in vivo involves binding of cargo-receptor proteins

  11. Genetics Home Reference: myosin storage myopathy

    ... myosin rod cause myosin storage myopathy via multiple mechanisms. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 Apr ... PubMed Tajsharghi H, Oldfors A. Myosinopathies: pathology and mechanisms. Acta Neuropathol. 2013 Jan;125(1):3-18. ...

  12. Myosin is involved in postmitotic cell spreading

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated a role for myosin in postmitotic Potoroo tridactylis kidney (PtK2) cell spreading by inhibitor studies, time- lapse video microscopy, and immunofluorescence. We have also determined the spatial organization and polarity of actin filaments in postmitotic spreading cells. We show that butanedione monoxime (BDM), a known inhibitor of muscle myosin II, inhibits nonmuscle myosin II and myosin V adenosine triphosphatases. BDM reversibly inhibits PtK2 postmitotic cell spreading....

  13. Myosin molecule packing within the vertebrate skeletal muscle thick filaments. A complete bipolar model.

    Skubiszak, Ludmila; Kowalczyk, Leszek

    2002-01-01

    Computer modelling related to the real dimensions of both the whole filament and the myosin molecule subfragments has revealed two alternative modes for myosin molecule packing which lead to the head disposition similar to that observed by EM on the surface of the cross-bridge zone of the relaxed vertebrate skeletal muscle thick filaments. One of the modes has been known for three decades and is usually incorporated into the so-called three-stranded model. The new mode differs from the former one in two aspects: (1) myosin heads are grouped into asymmetrical cross-bridge crowns instead of symmetrical ones; (2) not the whole myosin tail, but only a 43-nm C-terminus of each of them is straightened and near-parallel to the filament axis, the rest of the tail is twisted. Concurrent exploration of these alternative modes has revealed their influence on the filament features. The parameter values for the filament models as well as for the building units depicting the myosin molecule subfragments are verified by experimental data found in the literature. On the basis of the new mode for myosin molecule packing a complete bipolar structure of the thick filament is created. PMID:12545190

  14. Reverse actin sliding triggers strong myosin binding that moves tropomyosin

    Bekyarova, T.I.; Reedy, M.C.; Baumann, B.A.J.; Tregear, R.T.; Ward, A.; Krzic, U.; Prince, K.M.; Perz-Edwards, R.J.; Reconditi, M.; Gore, D.; Irving, T.C.; Reedy, M.K. (IIT); (EMBL); (Scripps); (Duke); (Prince); (FSU); (MRC); (U. Florence)

    2008-09-03

    Actin/myosin interactions in vertebrate striated muscles are believed to be regulated by the 'steric blocking' mechanism whereby the binding of calcium to the troponin complex allows tropomyosin (TM) to change position on actin, acting as a molecular switch that blocks or allows myosin heads to interact with actin. Movement of TM during activation is initiated by interaction of Ca{sup 2+} with troponin, then completed by further displacement by strong binding cross-bridges. We report x-ray evidence that TM in insect flight muscle (IFM) moves in a manner consistent with the steric blocking mechanism. We find that both isometric contraction, at high [Ca{sup 2+}], and stretch activation, at lower [Ca{sup 2+}], develop similarly high x-ray intensities on the IFM fourth actin layer line because of TM movement, coinciding with x-ray signals of strong-binding cross-bridge attachment to helically favored 'actin target zones.' Vanadate (Vi), a phosphate analog that inhibits active cross-bridge cycling, abolishes all active force in IFM, allowing high [Ca{sup 2+}] to elicit initial TM movement without cross-bridge attachment or other changes from relaxed structure. However, when stretched in high [Ca{sup 2+}], Vi-'paralyzed' fibers produce force substantially above passive response at pCa {approx} 9, concurrent with full conversion from resting to active x-ray pattern, including x-ray signals of cross-bridge strong-binding and TM movement. This argues that myosin heads can be recruited as strong-binding 'brakes' by backward-sliding, calcium-activated thin filaments, and are as effective in moving TM as actively force-producing cross-bridges. Such recruitment of myosin as brakes may be the major mechanism resisting extension during lengthening contractions.

  15. Twirling motion of actin filaments in gliding assays with non-processive myosin motors

    Vilfan, Andrej

    2009-01-01

    We present a model study of gliding assays in which actin filaments are moved by non-processive myosin motors. We show that even if the power stroke of the motor protein has no lateral component, the filaments will rotate around their axis while moving over the surface. Notably, the handedness of this twirling motion is opposite from that of the actin filament structure. It stems from the fact that the gliding actin filament has "target zones" where its subunits point towards the surface and are therefore more accessible for myosin heads. Each myosin head has a higher binding probability before it reaches the center of the target zone than afterwards, which results in a left-handed twirling. We present a stochastic simulation and an approximative analytical solution. The calculated pitch of the twirling motion depends on the filament velocity (ATP concentration). It reaches about 400nm for low speeds and increases with higher speeds.

  16. Revisiting Myosin Families Through Large-scale Sequence Searches Leads to the Discovery of New Myosins.

    Pasha, Shaik Naseer; Meenakshi, Iyer; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Myosins are actin-based motor proteins involved in many cellular movements. It is interesting to study the evolutionary patterns and the functional attributes of various types of myosins. Computational search algorithms were performed to identify putative myosin members by phylogenetic analysis, sequence motifs, and coexisting domains. This study is aimed at understanding the distribution and the likely biological functions of myosins encoded in various taxa and available eukaryotic genomes. We report here a phylogenetic analysis of around 4,064 myosin motor domains, built entirely from complete or near-complete myosin repertoires incorporating many unclassified, uncharacterized sequences and new myosin classes, with emphasis on myosins from Fungi, Haptophyta, and other Stramenopiles, Alveolates, and Rhizaria (SAR). The identification of large classes of myosins in Oomycetes, Cellular slime molds, Choanoflagellates, Pelagophytes, Eustigmatophyceae, Fonticula, Eucoccidiorida, and Apicomplexans with novel myosin motif variants that are conserved and thus presumably functional extends our knowledge of this important family of motor proteins. This work provides insights into the distribution and probable function of myosins including newly identified myosin classes. PMID:27597808

  17. Multidimensional structure-function relationships in human β-cardiac myosin from population-scale genetic variation.

    Homburger, Julian R; Green, Eric M; Caleshu, Colleen; Sunitha, Margaret S; Taylor, Rebecca E; Ruppel, Kathleen M; Metpally, Raghu Prasad Rao; Colan, Steven D; Michels, Michelle; Day, Sharlene M; Olivotto, Iacopo; Bustamante, Carlos D; Dewey, Frederick E; Ho, Carolyn Y; Spudich, James A; Ashley, Euan A

    2016-06-14

    Myosin motors are the fundamental force-generating elements of muscle contraction. Variation in the human β-cardiac myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) can lead to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a heritable disease characterized by cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. How specific myosin variants alter motor function or clinical expression of disease remains incompletely understood. Here, we combine structural models of myosin from multiple stages of its chemomechanical cycle, exome sequencing data from two population cohorts of 60,706 and 42,930 individuals, and genetic and phenotypic data from 2,913 patients with HCM to identify regions of disease enrichment within β-cardiac myosin. We first developed computational models of the human β-cardiac myosin protein before and after the myosin power stroke. Then, using a spatial scan statistic modified to analyze genetic variation in protein 3D space, we found significant enrichment of disease-associated variants in the converter, a kinetic domain that transduces force from the catalytic domain to the lever arm to accomplish the power stroke. Focusing our analysis on surface-exposed residues, we identified a larger region significantly enriched for disease-associated variants that contains both the converter domain and residues on a single flat surface on the myosin head described as the myosin mesa. Notably, patients with HCM with variants in the enriched regions have earlier disease onset than patients who have HCM with variants elsewhere. Our study provides a model for integrating protein structure, large-scale genetic sequencing, and detailed phenotypic data to reveal insight into time-shifted protein structures and genetic disease. PMID:27247418

  18. Fitting of atomic coordinates of myosin S1 into the envelope of the 3-D reconstruction of muscle thick filaments

    Recently atomic coordinates of myosin S1of hen pectoral muscle have been reported (Rayment et al. Science 261: 50-58, 1993), allowing to know the precise position of the Regulatory Light Chain (RLC), the Essential Light Chain (ELC), as well as the interlacing places of ATP and actin. By means of the use of the Program of Advanced Three-dimensional Visualization AVS (Advanced Visual Systems, Inc., Waltham, M A, USA) we have been able to obtain the surface of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the thick filaments of tarantula muscle (Crowther et al. J. Mol. Biol. 184: 429-439, 1985) which shows a topographical detail associated to each myosin head (subfragment S1) non previously seen, and confirmed in a very evident way the antiparallel arrangement of both heads of a same myosin molecule. In view of the above-mentioned we have carried out an approximate adjustment of reported atomic coordinates of sub fragment S1 to the surface of one myosin head of the three-dimensional reconstruction. This adjustment allows to locate the approximate position of the Light Chains RLC and ELC, as well as the interlacing place of ATP and actin. The precise determination of the position of RLC and its phosphoryl able serine in the three-dimensional reconstruction can be important in terms of the molecular regulation mechanism of the muscular contraction bounded to the myosin that happens through the phosphorylation of RLC

  19. X-ray diffraction analysis of the effects of myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation and butanedione monoxime on skinned skeletal muscle fibers.

    Yamaguchi, Maki; Kimura, Masako; Li, Zhao-Bo; Ohno, Tetsuo; Takemori, Shigeru; Hoh, Joseph F Y; Yagi, Naoto

    2016-04-15

    The phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) is an important modulator of skeletal muscle performance and plays a key role in posttetanic potentiation and staircase potentiation of twitch contractions. The structural basis for these phenomena within the filament lattice has not been thoroughly investigated. Using a synchrotron radiation source at SPring8, we obtained X-ray diffraction patterns from skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers before and after phosphorylation of myosin RLC in the presence of myosin light chain kinase, calmodulin, and calcium at a concentration below the threshold for tension development ([Ca(2+)] = 10(-6.8)M). After phosphorylation, the first myosin layer line slightly decreased in intensity at ∼0.05 nm(-1)along the equatorial axis, indicating a partial loss of the helical order of myosin heads along the thick filament. Concomitantly, the (1,1/1,0) intensity ratio of the equatorial reflections increased. These results provide a firm structural basis for the hypothesis that phosphorylation of myosin RLC caused the myosin heads to move away from the thick filaments towards the thin filaments, thereby enhancing the probability of interaction with actin. In contrast, 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), known to inhibit contraction by impeding phosphate release from myosin, had exactly the opposite effects on meridional and equatorial reflections to those of phosphorylation. We hypothesize that these antagonistic effects are due to the acceleration of phosphate release from myosin by phosphorylation and its inhibition by BDM, the consequent shifts in crossbridge equilibria leading to opposite changes in abundance of the myosin-ADP-inorganic phosphate complex state associated with helical order of thick filaments. PMID:26911280

  20. Myosin motor isoforms direct specification of actomyosin function by tropomyosins

    Clayton, Joseph E.; Pollard, Luther W.; Murray, George G.; Lord, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Myosins and tropomyosins represent two cytoskeletal proteins that often work together with actin filaments in contractile and motile cellular processes. While the specialized role of tropomyosin in striated muscle myosin-II regulation is well characterized, its role in non-muscle myosin regulation is poorly understood. We previously showed that fission yeast tropomyosin (Cdc8p) positively regulates myosin-II (Myo2p) and myosin-V (Myo52p) motors. To understand the broader implications of this ...

  1. Different Head Environments in Tarantula Thick Filaments Support a Cooperative Activation Process

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Biasutto, Antonio; Alamo, Lorenzo; Riggs, Claire; Pinto, Antonio; Méndez, Franklin; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Myosin filaments from many muscles are activated by phosphorylation of their regulatory light chains (RLCs). Structural analysis of relaxed tarantula thick filaments shows that the RLCs of the interacting free and blocked myosin heads are in different environments. This and other data suggested a phosphorylation mechanism in which Ser-35 of the free head is exposed and constitutively phosphorylated by protein kinase C, whereas the blocked head is hidden and unphosphorylated; on activation, my...

  2. Selective expression of myosin IC Isoform A in mouse and human cell lines and mouse prostate cancer tissues.

    Ivanna Ihnatovych

    Full Text Available Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily. We recently identified a novel isoform and showed that the MYOIC gene in mammalian cells encodes three isoforms (isoforms A, B, and C. Furthermore, we demonstrated that myosin IC isoform A but not isoform B exhibits a tissue specific expression pattern. In this study, we extended our analysis of myosin IC isoform expression patterns by analyzing the protein and mRNA expression in various mammalian cell lines and in various prostate specimens and tumor tissues from the transgenic mouse prostate (TRAMP model by immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and by indirect immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded prostate specimen. Analysis of a panel of mammalian cell lines showed an increased mRNA and protein expression of specifically myosin IC isoform A in a panel of human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines but not in non-cancer prostate or other (non-prostate- cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myosin IC isoform A expression is significantly increased in TRAMP mouse prostate samples with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN lesions and in distant site metastases in lung and liver when compared to matched normal tissues. Our observations demonstrate specific changes in the expression of myosin IC isoform A that are concurrent with the occurrence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse prostate cancer model that closely mimics clinical prostate cancer. These data suggest that elevated levels of myosin IC isoform A may be a potential marker for the detection of prostate cancer.

  3. Thiol groups of gizzard myosin heavy chains

    Bailin, G.

    1986-05-01

    Proteolysis of phosphorylated and /sup 3/H-labeled dinitrophenylated chicken gizzard myosin with trypsin released major fragments of M/sub r/ 25,000, 50,000 and 66,000 in a 1:1 ratio. They contained 57% of the dinitrophenyl (N/sub 2/ph) group bound to thiols of the heavy chains; 28% of the label was bound to the light chains. The fragments of M/sub r/ 25,000 and M/sub r/ 66,000 were dinitrophenylated predominantly when the K/sup +/-ATPase activity was inhibited. Thiolysis of phosphorylated and dinitrophenylated myosin with 2-mercaptoethanol removed 60% and 25% of the N/sub 2/ph group from the N-terminal and M/sub r/ 66,000 fragments of the heavy chain, respectively, when 48% of the K/sup +/-ATPase activity was restored. Papain proteolysis of the tryptic digest of modified myosin released a C-terminal segment from the fragment of M/sub r/ 66,000 and it contained most of the remaining label. Proteolysis of /sup 3/H-labeled dinitrophenylated myosin alone resulted in the same digestion pattern but less of the label was bound to the heavy chain fragments. In this case, restoration of enzymic activity occurred in thiolyzed dinitrophenylated myosin when the N/sub 2/ph group was removed from the light chains, predominantly. Conformational changes in gizzard myosin, mediated by phosphorylation, altered the reactivity of the thiols in specific fragments of the heavy chain. Thiol groups of the N- and C-terminal heavy chain regions are involved in maintaining the ATPase activity of myosin.

  4. Sequential myosin phosphorylation activates tarantula thick filament via a disorder-order transition.

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-08-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) activates myosin in thick filaments. RLC phosphorylation plays a primary regulatory role in smooth muscles and a secondary (modulatory) role in striated muscles, which is regulated by Ca(2+)via TnC/TM on the thin filament. Tarantula striated muscle exhibits both regulatory systems: one switches on/off contraction through thin filament regulation, and another through PKC constitutively Ser35 phosphorylated swaying free heads in the thick filaments that produces quick force on twitches regulated from 0 to 50% and modulation is accomplished recruiting additional force-potentiating free and blocked heads via Ca(2+)4-CaM-MLCK Ser45 phosphorylation. We have used microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tarantula RLC NTE to understand the structural basis for phosphorylation-based regulation in tarantula thick filament activation. Trajectory analysis revealed that an inter-domain salt bridge network (R39/E58,E61) facilitates the formation of a stable helix-coil-helix (HCH) motif formed by helices P and A in the unphosphorylated NTE of both myosin heads. Phosphorylation of the blocked head on Ser45 does not induce any substantial structural changes. However, phosphorylation of the free head on Ser35 disrupts this salt bridge network and induces a partial extension of helix P along RLC helix A. While not directly participating in the HCH folding, phosphorylation of Ser35 unlocks a compact structure and allows the NTE to spontaneously undergo coil-helix transitions. The modest structural change induced by the subsequent Ser45 diphosphorylation monophosphorylated Ser35 free head facilitates full helix P extension into a single structurally stable α-helix through a network of intra-domain salt bridges (pS35/R38,R39,R42). We conclude that tarantula thick filament activation is controlled by sequential Ser35-Ser45 phosphorylation via a conserved disorder-to-order transition. PMID

  5. Preparation of human cardiac anti-myosin: a review

    The present communication is a review of the physicochemical characterization and immunological properties of myosin isolated from the cardiac muscle, the production of monoclonal antibody anti-myosin, the radiolabeling of this antibody and its applications as radiopharmaceuticals to imaging myocardial infarcts. The classical example of radioimmunologic diagnosis of non malignant tissues is the detection of myocardial infarction by radiolabeled antibodies to myosin. (author)

  6. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase efficiently phosphorylates serine 15 of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain

    Josephson, Matthew P.; Sikkink, Laura A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Penheiter, Alan R. [Molecular Medicine Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Burghardt, Thomas P., E-mail: burghardt@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Ajtai, Katalin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) is phosphorylated at S15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is a widely believed that MYL2 is a poor substrate for smMLCK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In fact, smMLCK efficiently and rapidly phosphorylates S15 in MYL2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation kinetics measured by novel fluorescence method without radioactivity. -- Abstract: Specific phosphorylation of the human ventricular cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) modifies the protein at S15. This modification affects MYL2 secondary structure and modulates the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of contraction in cardiac tissue. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase prevalent in uterus and present in other contracting tissues including cardiac muscle. The recombinant 130 kDa (short) smMLCK phosphorylated S15 in MYL2 in vitro. Specific modification of S15 was verified using the direct detection of the phospho group on S15 with mass spectrometry. SmMLCK also specifically phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain S15 in porcine ventricular myosin and chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (S20 in smooth muscle) but failed to phosphorylate the myosin regulatory light chain in rabbit skeletal myosin. Phosphorylation kinetics, measured using a novel fluorescence method eliminating the use of radioactive isotopes, indicates similar Michaelis-Menten V{sub max} and K{sub M} for regulatory light chain S15 phosphorylation rates in MYL2, porcine ventricular myosin, and chicken gizzard myosin. These data demonstrate that smMLCK is a specific and efficient kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of MYL2, cardiac, and smooth muscle myosin. Whether smMLCK plays a role in cardiac muscle regulation or response to a disease causing stimulus is unclear but it should be considered a potentially significant

  7. The Intensity Of The 2.7nm Reflection As A Constraint For Models Of Myosin Docking To Actin

    Previous workers have proposed high resolution models for the docking of the myosin heads on actin on the basis of combined crystallographic and electron microscopy data (Mendelson and Morris, 1997 PNAS 94:8533; Holmes et al. 2003 Nature 425:423). We have used data from small angle X-ray fiber diffraction from living muscle to check the predictions of these models. Whole sartorius muscles from Rana pipiens were mounted in a chamber containing Ringer's solution at 10 C and at rest length at the BioCAT beamline (18 ID, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, IL-U.S.A.). The muscles were activated by electrical stimulation and the force was recorded with a muscle lever system type 300B (Aurora Scientific). X-ray patterns were collected with 1s total exposures at rest and during isometric contraction out to 0.5 nm-1 in reciprocal space, as the higher angle reflections are expected to be more sensitive to the arrangement of myosin heads on actin. We observed that during isometric contraction the meridional reflection originating from the 2.73nm repeat of the actin monomers along the actin filament increases its intensity by a factor 2.1 ± 0.2 relative to rest. Among the models tested, Holmes et al. fits the data when the actin filament is decorated with 30-40% the total available myosin heads, a fraction similar to that estimated with fast single fiber mechanics by Piazzesi et al. (2007, Cell 131:784). However, when the mismatch between the periodicities of actin and myosin filaments is taken into account, none of the models can reproduce the fiber diffraction data. We suggest that the fiber diffraction data should be used as a further constraint on new high resolution models for the docking of the myosin heads on actin.

  8. The Intensity Of The 2.7nm Reflection As A Constraint For Models Of Myosin Docking To Actin

    Reconditi, Massimo; Irving, Tom C.; (IIT); (U.Florence)

    2009-03-16

    Previous workers have proposed high resolution models for the docking of the myosin heads on actin on the basis of combined crystallographic and electron microscopy data (Mendelson and Morris, 1997 PNAS 94:8533; Holmes et al. 2003 Nature 425:423). We have used data from small angle X-ray fiber diffraction from living muscle to check the predictions of these models. Whole sartorius muscles from Rana pipiens were mounted in a chamber containing Ringer's solution at 10 C and at rest length at the BioCAT beamline (18 ID, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, IL-U.S.A.). The muscles were activated by electrical stimulation and the force was recorded with a muscle lever system type 300B (Aurora Scientific). X-ray patterns were collected with 1s total exposures at rest and during isometric contraction out to 0.5 nm{sup -1} in reciprocal space, as the higher angle reflections are expected to be more sensitive to the arrangement of myosin heads on actin. We observed that during isometric contraction the meridional reflection originating from the 2.73nm repeat of the actin monomers along the actin filament increases its intensity by a factor 2.1 {+-} 0.2 relative to rest. Among the models tested, Holmes et al. fits the data when the actin filament is decorated with 30-40% the total available myosin heads, a fraction similar to that estimated with fast single fiber mechanics by Piazzesi et al. (2007, Cell 131:784). However, when the mismatch between the periodicities of actin and myosin filaments is taken into account, none of the models can reproduce the fiber diffraction data. We suggest that the fiber diffraction data should be used as a further constraint on new high resolution models for the docking of the myosin heads on actin.

  9. Myosin light chain phosphorylation enhances contraction of heart muscle via structural changes in both thick and thin filaments.

    Kampourakis, Thomas; Sun, Yin-Biao; Irving, Malcolm

    2016-05-24

    Contraction of heart muscle is triggered by calcium binding to the actin-containing thin filaments but modulated by structural changes in the myosin-containing thick filaments. We used phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (cRLC) by the cardiac isoform of its specific kinase to elucidate mechanisms of thick filament-mediated contractile regulation in demembranated trabeculae from the rat right ventricle. cRLC phosphorylation enhanced active force and its calcium sensitivity and altered thick filament structure as reported by bifunctional rhodamine probes on the cRLC: the myosin head domains became more perpendicular to the filament axis. The effects of cRLC phosphorylation on thick filament structure and its calcium sensitivity were mimicked by increasing sarcomere length or by deleting the N terminus of the cRLC. Changes in thick filament structure were highly cooperative with respect to either calcium concentration or extent of cRLC phosphorylation. Probes on unphosphorylated myosin heads reported similar structural changes when neighboring heads were phosphorylated, directly demonstrating signaling between myosin heads. Moreover probes on troponin showed that calcium sensitization by cRLC phosphorylation is mediated by the thin filament, revealing a signaling pathway between thick and thin filaments that is still present when active force is blocked by Blebbistatin. These results show that coordinated and cooperative structural changes in the thick and thin filaments are fundamental to the physiological regulation of contractility in the heart. This integrated dual-filament concept of contractile regulation may aid understanding of functional effects of mutations in the protein components of both filaments associated with heart disease. PMID:27162358

  10. Thermal Denaturation and Aggregation of Myosin Subfragment 1 Isoforms with Different Essential Light Chains

    Eugene O. Zubov

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared thermally induced denaturation and aggregation of two isoforms of the isolated myosin head (myosin subfragment 1, S1 containing different “essential” (or “alkali” light chains, A1 or A2. We applied differential scanning calorimetry (DSC to investigate the domain structure of these two S1 isoforms. For this purpose, a special calorimetric approach was developed to analyze the DSC profiles of irreversibly denaturing multidomain proteins. Using this approach, we revealed two calorimetric domains in  the S1 molecule, the more thermostable domain denaturing in two steps. Comparing the DSC data with temperature dependences of intrinsic fluorescence parameters and S1 ATPase inactivation, we have identified these two calorimetric domains as motor domain and regulatory domain of the myosin head, the motor domain being more thermostable. Some difference between the two S1 isoforms was only revealed by DSC in thermal denaturation of the regulatory domain. We also applied dynamic light scattering (DLS to analyze the aggregation of S1 isoforms induced by their thermal denaturation. We have found no appreciable difference between these S1 isoforms in their aggregation properties under ionic strength conditions close to those in the muscle fiber (in the presence of 100 mM KCl. Under these conditions kinetics of this process was independent of protein concentration, and the aggregation rate was limited by irreversible denaturation of the S1 motor domain.

  11. Purification and characterization of myosin from wheat mitochondria

    2002-01-01

    Myosin was purified from wheat mitochondria using DE-52 anion exchange chromatography and Sephacryl S-300 gel ffitration. The molecular weight of its heavy chain is about 210 ku, similar to that of muscle myosin Ⅱ (205 ku),and it could be recognized by the polyclonal antibodies against human skeletal muscle myosin Ⅱ. The ATPase activity of the mitochondrial myosin stimulated by F-actin from chicken muscle is 202.5 nmoles Pi/min @ mg. The mitochondrial myosin could be activated by Ca2+ and was not inhibited by Ca2+ at high concentration. The results demonstrate that the myosin of wheat mitochondria shares some similarities with the skeletal muscle myosin Ⅱ.

  12. Antiparallel coiled-coil-mediated dimerization of myosin X.

    Lu, Qing; Ye, Fei; Wei, Zhiyi; Wen, Zilong; Zhang, Mingjie

    2012-10-23

    Processive movements of unconventional myosins on actin filaments generally require motor dimerization. A commonly accepted myosin dimerization mechanism is via formation of a parallel coiled-coil dimer by a stretch of amino acid residues immediately carboxyl-terminal to the motor's lever-arm domain. Here, we discover that the predicted coiled-coil region of myosin X forms a highly stable, antiparallel coiled-coil dimer (anti-CC). Disruption of the anti-CC either by single-point mutations or by replacement of the anti-CC with a parallel coiled coil with a similar length compromised the filopodial induction activity of myosin X. We further show that the anti-CC and the single α-helical domain of myosin X are connected by a semirigid helical linker. The anti-CC-mediated dimerization may enable myosin X to walk on both single and bundled actin filaments. PMID:23012428

  13. Nuclear myosin I regulates cell membrane tension

    Venit, Tomáš; Kalendová, Alžběta; Petr, Martin; Dzijak, Rastislav; Pastorek, Lukáš; Rohožková, Jana; Malohlava, Jakub; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane tension is an important feature that determines the cell shape and influences processes such as cell motility, spreading, endocytosis and exocytosis. Unconventional class 1 myosins are potent regulators of plasma membrane tension because they physically link the plasma membrane with adjacent cytoskeleton. We identified nuclear myosin 1 (NM1) - a putative nuclear isoform of myosin 1c (Myo1c) - as a new player in the field. Although having specific nuclear functions, NM1 localizes predominantly to the plasma membrane. Deletion of NM1 causes more than a 50% increase in the elasticity of the plasma membrane around the actin cytoskeleton as measured by atomic force microscopy. This higher elasticity of NM1 knock-out cells leads to 25% higher resistance to short-term hypotonic environment and rapid cell swelling. In contrast, overexpression of NM1 in wild type cells leads to an additional 30% reduction of their survival. We have shown that NM1 has a direct functional role in the cytoplasm as a dynamic linker between the cell membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, regulating the degree of effective plasma membrane tension. PMID:27480647

  14. Calmodulin binding to recombinant myosin-1c and myosin-1c IQ peptides

    Cyr Janet L

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bullfrog myosin-1c contains three previously recognized calmodulin-binding IQ domains (IQ1, IQ2, and IQ3 in its neck region; we identified a fourth IQ domain (IQ4, located immediately adjacent to IQ3. How calmodulin binds to these IQ domains is the subject of this report. Results In the presence of EGTA, calmodulin bound to synthetic peptides corresponding to IQ1, IQ2, and IQ3 with Kd values of 2–4 μM at normal ionic strength; the interaction with an IQ4 peptide was much weaker. Ca2+ substantially weakened the calmodulin-peptide affinity for all of the IQ peptides except IQ3. To reveal how calmodulin bound to the linearly arranged IQ domains of the myosin-1c neck, we used hydrodynamic measurements to determine the stoichiometry of complexes of calmodulin and myosin-1c. Purified myosin-1c and T701-Myo1c (a myosin-1c fragment with all four IQ domains and the C-terminal tail each bound 2–3 calmodulin molecules. At a physiologically relevant temperature (25°C and under low-Ca2+ conditions, T701-Myo1c bound two calmodulins in the absence and three calmodulins in the presence of 5 μM free calmodulin. Ca2+ dissociated nearly all calmodulins from T701-Myo1c at 25°C; one calmodulin was retained if 5 μM free calmodulin was present. Conclusions We inferred from these data that at 25°C and normal cellular concentrations of calmodulin, calmodulin is bound to IQ1, IQ2, and IQ3 of myosin-1c when Ca2+ is low. The calmodulin bound to one of these IQ domains, probably IQ2, is only weakly associated. Upon Ca2+ elevation, all calmodulin except that bound to IQ3 should dissociate.

  15. Phosphorylation of caldesmon by myosin light chain kinase increases its binding affinity for phosphorylated myosin filaments

    Sobieszek, Apolinary; Sarg, Bettina; Seow, Chun Y.; Lindner, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is essential for smooth muscle contraction. In this study we show that caldesmon (CaD) is also phosphorylated in vitro by MLCK. The phosphorylation is calcium- and calmodulin (CaM)-dependent and requires a MLCK concentration close to that found in vivo. On average, approximately 2 mol Pi per mol of CaD are incorporated at Thr-626 and Thr-693, with additional partial phosphorylation at Ser-658 and Ser-702. The phosphorylation rate f...

  16. Localization of myosin IC and myosin II in Acanthamoeba castellanii by indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy

    1990-01-01

    Polyclonal antisera have been raised against purified Acanthamoeba myosin II and to a synthetic 26 amino acid peptide that corresponds in sequence to the phosphorylation site of Acanthamoeba myosin IC. These antisera are specific for their respective antigens as determined by immunoblotting after SDS-PAGE of total cell lysates. By using the antisera, localization studies were performed by indirect immunofluorescence and by immunogold electron microscopy. Myosin II occurred in the cell cytopla...

  17. Myosin rods are a source of second harmonic generation signals in skeletal muscle

    Schürmann, Sebastian; Weber, Cornelia; Fink, Rainer H. A.; Vogel, Martin

    2007-02-01

    Intrinsic second harmonic generation (SHG) signals can be used to visualize the three-dimensional structure of cardiac and skeletal muscle with high spatial resolution. Fluorescence labeling of complementary sarcomeric proteins, e.g. actin, indicates that the observed SHG signals arise from the myosin filaments. Recently, the myosin rod domain or LMM - light meromyosin - has been reported to be the dominant source of this SHG signal. However, to date, mostly negative and indirect evidence has been presented to support this assumption. Here, we show, to our knowledge, the first direct evidences that strong SHG signals can be obtained from synthetic paracrystals. These rod shaped filaments are formed from purified LMM. SDS-PAGE protein analysis confirmed that the LMM crystals lack myosin head domains. Some regions of the LMM paracrystals produce a strong SHG signal whereas others did not. The SHG signals were recorded with a laser-scanning microscope (Leica SP2). A ps laser tuned to 880 nm was used to excite the sample through an 63x objective of 1.2 NA. In order to visualize the synthetic filaments - in addition to SHG imaging -, the LMM was labeled with the fluorescent marker 5-IAF. We were able to observe filaments of 1 to 50 μm in length and of up to 5 μm in diameter. In conclusion, we can show that the myosin rod domain (LMM) is a dominant source for intrinsic SHG signals. There seems, however, a signal dependence on the paracrystals' morphology. This dependence is being investigated.

  18. Masticatory (;superfast') myosin heavy chain and embryonic/atrial myosin light chain 1 in rodent jaw-closing muscles.

    Reiser, Peter J; Bicer, Sabahattin; Chen, Qun; Zhu, Ling; Quan, Ning

    2009-08-01

    Masticatory myosin is widely expressed among several vertebrate classes. Generally, the expression of masticatory myosin has been associated with high bite force for a carnivorous feeding style (including capturing/restraining live prey), breaking down tough plant material and defensive biting in different species. Masticatory myosin expression in the largest mammalian order, Rodentia, has not been reported. Several members of Rodentia consume large numbers of tree nuts that are encased in very hard shells, presumably requiring large forces to access the nutmeat. We, therefore, tested whether some rodent species express masticatory myosin in jaw-closing muscles. Myosin isoform expression in six Sciuridae species was examined, using protein gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, mass spectrometry and RNA analysis. The results indicate that masticatory myosin is expressed in some Sciuridae species but not in other closely related species with similar diets but having different nut-opening strategies. We also discovered that the myosin light chain 1 isoform associated with masticatory myosin heavy chain, in the same four Sciuridae species, is the embryonic/atrial isoform. We conclude that rodent speciation did not completely eliminate masticatory myosin and that its persistent expression in some rodent species might be related to not only diet but also to feeding style. PMID:19648394

  19. Effects of myosin light chain phosphorylation on length-dependent myosin kinetics in skinned rat myocardium.

    Pulcastro, Hannah C; Awinda, Peter O; Breithaupt, Jason J; Tanner, Bertrand C W

    2016-07-01

    Myosin force production is Ca(2+)-regulated by thin-filament proteins and sarcomere length, which together determine the number of cross-bridge interactions throughout a heartbeat. Ventricular myosin regulatory light chain-2 (RLC) binds to the neck of myosin and modulates contraction via its phosphorylation state. Previous studies reported regional variations in RLC phosphorylation across the left ventricle wall, suggesting that RLC phosphorylation could alter myosin behavior throughout the heart. We found that RLC phosphorylation varied across the left ventricle wall and that RLC phosphorylation was greater in the right vs. left ventricle. We also assessed functional consequences of RLC phosphorylation on Ca(2+)-regulated contractility as sarcomere length varied in skinned rat papillary muscle strips. Increases in RLC phosphorylation and sarcomere length both led to increased Ca(2+)-sensitivity of the force-pCa relationship, and both slowed cross-bridge detachment rate. RLC-phosphorylation slowed cross-bridge rates of MgADP release (∼30%) and MgATP binding (∼50%) at 1.9 μm sarcomere length, whereas RLC phosphorylation only slowed cross-bridge MgATP binding rate (∼55%) at 2.2 μm sarcomere length. These findings suggest that RLC phosphorylation influences cross-bridge kinetics differently as sarcomere length varies and support the idea that RLC phosphorylation could vary throughout the heart to meet different contractile demands between the left and right ventricles. PMID:26763941

  20. Heads Up

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  1. Analysis of the myosins encoded in the recently completed Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence

    Reddy, A. S.; Day, I. S.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three types of molecular motors play an important role in the organization, dynamics and transport processes associated with the cytoskeleton. The myosin family of molecular motors move cargo on actin filaments, whereas kinesin and dynein motors move cargo along microtubules. These motors have been highly characterized in non-plant systems and information is becoming available about plant motors. The actin cytoskeleton in plants has been shown to be involved in processes such as transportation, signaling, cell division, cytoplasmic streaming and morphogenesis. The role of myosin in these processes has been established in a few cases but many questions remain to be answered about the number, types and roles of myosins in plants. RESULTS: Using the motor domain of an Arabidopsis myosin we identified 17 myosin sequences in the Arabidopsis genome. Phylogenetic analysis of the Arabidopsis myosins with non-plant and plant myosins revealed that all the Arabidopsis myosins and other plant myosins fall into two groups - class VIII and class XI. These groups contain exclusively plant or algal myosins with no animal or fungal myosins. Exon/intron data suggest that the myosins are highly conserved and that some may be a result of gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS: Plant myosins are unlike myosins from any other organisms except algae. As a percentage of the total gene number, the number of myosins is small overall in Arabidopsis compared with the other sequenced eukaryotic genomes. There are, however, a large number of class XI myosins. The function of each myosin has yet to be determined.

  2. Myosins and cell dynamics in cellular slime molds.

    Yumura, Shigehiko; Uyeda, Taro Q P

    2003-01-01

    Myosin is a mechanochemical transducer and serves as a motor for various motile activities such as cell migration, cytokinesis, maintenance of cell shape, phagocytosis, and morphogenesis. Nonmuscle myosin in vivo does not either stay static at specific subcellular regions or construct highly organized structures, such as sarcomere in skeletal muscle cells. The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is an ideal "model organism" for the investigation of cell movement and cytokinesis. The advantages of this organism prompted researchers to carry out pioneering cell biological, biochemical, and molecular genetic studies on myosin II, which resulted in elucidation of many fundamental features of function and regulation of this most abundant molecular motor. Furthermore, recent molecular biological research has revealed that many unconventional myosins play various functions in vivo. In this article, how myosins are organized and regulated in a dynamic manner in Dictyostelium cells is reviewed and discussed. PMID:12722951

  3. Myosin-I Isozymes in Neonatal Rodent Auditory and Vestibular Epithelia

    Dumont, Rachel A.; Zhao, Yi-Dong; Holt, Jeffrey R.; Bähler, Martin; Gillespie, Peter G.

    2002-01-01

    Myosin isozymes are essential for hair cells, the sensory cells of the inner ear. Because a myosin-I subfamily member may mediate adaptation of mechanoelectrical transduction, we examined expression of all eight myosin-I isozymes in rodent auditory and vestibular epithelia. Using RT-PCR, we found prominent expression of three isozymes, Myo1b (also known as myosin-Ia or myr 1), Myo1c (myosin-Ib or myr 2), and Myo1e (myr 3). By contrast, Myo1a (brush-border myosin-I), Myo1d (myosin lg or myr 4)...

  4. Antiparallel coiled-coil–mediated dimerization of myosin X

    Lu, Qing; Ye, Fei; Wei, Zhiyi; Wen, Zilong; Zhang, Mingjie

    2012-01-01

    Processive movements of unconventional myosins on actin filaments generally require motor dimerization. A commonly accepted myosin dimerization mechanism is via formation of a parallel coiled-coil dimer by a stretch of amino acid residues immediately carboxyl-terminal to the motor’s lever-arm domain. Here, we discover that the predicted coiled-coil region of myosin X forms a highly stable, antiparallel coiled-coil dimer (anti-CC). Disruption of the anti-CC either by single-point mutations or ...

  5. Rod phosphorylation favors folding in a catch muscle myosin.

    Castellani, L; Cohen, C

    1987-01-01

    Myosin from a molluscan catch muscle is unusual in being phosphorylated in the rod by an endogenous heavy chain kinase. The overall structure of the molecule resembles that of other muscle myosins, although the tail is somewhat longer (approximately equal to 1700 A). At low ionic strength the unphosphorylated molecules associate in filaments that display a striking axial repeat of 145 A. Phosphorylation of the rod enhances myosin solubility in the range of NaCl between 0.05 and 0.15 M. Depend...

  6. Mouse nuclear myosin I knock-out shows interchangeability and redundancy of myosin isoforms in the cell nucleus

    Venit, Tomáš; Dzijak, Rastislav; Rohožková, Jana; Kalendová, Alžběta; Hozák, Pavel

    Debrecen : University of Debrecen, 2013. s. 45-45. [Wilhelm Bernard Workshop on the cell nucleus /23./. 19.08.2013-24.08.2013, Debrecen] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk LH12143 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * cell membrane * myosin 1C * NM1 * nuclear myosin I * myosin knock-out Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  7. Arginylation of Myosin Heavy Chain Regulates Skeletal Muscle Strength

    Anabelle S. Cornachione

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein arginylation is a posttranslational modification with an emerging global role in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. To test the role of arginylation in the skeletal muscle, we generated a mouse model with Ate1 deletion driven by the skeletal muscle-specific creatine kinase (Ckmm promoter. Ckmm-Ate1 mice were viable and outwardly normal; however, their skeletal muscle strength was significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Mass spectrometry of isolated skeletal myofibrils showed a limited set of proteins, including myosin heavy chain, arginylated on specific sites. Atomic force microscopy measurements of contractile strength in individual myofibrils and isolated myosin filaments from these mice showed a significant reduction of contractile forces, which, in the case of myosin filaments, could be fully rescued by rearginylation with purified Ate1. Our results demonstrate that arginylation regulates force production in muscle and exerts a direct effect on muscle strength through arginylation of myosin.

  8. Still and rotating myosin clusters determine cytokinetic ring constriction.

    Wollrab, Viktoria; Thiagarajan, Raghavan; Wald, Anne; Kruse, Karsten; Riveline, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The cytokinetic ring is essential for separating daughter cells during division. It consists of actin filaments and myosin motors that are generally assumed to organize as sarcomeres similar to skeletal muscles. However, direct evidence is lacking. Here we show that the internal organization and dynamics of rings are different from sarcomeres and distinct in different cell types. Using micro-cavities to orient rings in single focal planes, we find in mammalian cells a transition from a homogeneous distribution to a periodic pattern of myosin clusters at the onset of constriction. In contrast, in fission yeast, myosin clusters rotate prior to and during constriction. Theoretical analysis indicates that both patterns result from acto-myosin self-organization and reveals differences in the respective stresses. These findings suggest distinct functional roles for rings: contraction in mammalian cells and transport in fission yeast. Thus self-organization under different conditions may be a generic feature for regulating morphogenesis in vivo. PMID:27363521

  9. Internal Motility in Stiffening Actin-Myosin Networks

    Uhde, Joerg; Keller, Manfred; Sackmann, Erich; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Frey, Erwin

    2003-01-01

    We present a study on filamentous actin solutions containing heavy meromyosin subfragments of myosin II motor molecules. We focus on the viscoelastic phase behavior and internal dynamics of such networks during ATP depletion. Upon simultaneously using micro-rheology and fluorescence microscopy as complementary experimental tools, we find a sol-gel transition accompanied by a sudden onset of directed filament motion. We interpret the sol-gel transition in terms of myosin II enzymology, and sug...

  10. Myosin phosphorylation triggers actin polymerization in vascular smooth muscle

    Chen, Xuesong; Pavlish, Kristin; Benoit, Joseph N.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of contractile stimuli increases actin polymerization, which is essential for smooth muscle contraction. However, the mechanism(s) of actin polymerization associated with smooth muscle contraction is not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that phosphorylated myosin triggers actin polymerization. The present study was conducted in isolated intact or β-escin-permeabilized rat small mesenteric arteries. Reductions in the 20-kDa myosin regulatory light chain (MLC20) phosphorylat...

  11. Structural changes accompanying phosphorylation of tarantula muscle myosin filaments

    1987-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to study the structural changes that occur in the myosin filaments of tarantula striated muscle when they are phosphorylated. Myosin filaments in muscle homogenates maintained in relaxing conditions (ATP, EGTA) are found to have nonphosphorylated regulatory light chains as shown by urea/glycerol gel electrophoresis and [32P]phosphate autoradiography. Negative staining reveals an ordered, helical arrangement of crossbridges in these filaments, in which the hea...

  12. Oxidation of myosin by haem proteins generates myosin radicals and protein cross-links

    Lametsch, Marianne Lund; Luxford, Catherine; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    result of the reaction with activated haem proteins (horseradish peroxidase/H2O2) and met-myoglobin/H2O2) has been investigated by EPR spectroscopy and amino-acid consumption, product formation has been characterized by HPLC, and changes in protein integrity have been determined by SDS/PAGE. Multiple...... thiyl and tyrosyl radicals is consistent with the observed consumption of cysteine and tyrosine residues, the detection of di-tyrosine by HPLC and the detection of both reducible (disulfide bond) and non-reducible cross-links between myosin molecules by SDS/PAGE. The time course of radical formation on...

  13. Calmodulin binding to recombinant myosin-1c and myosin-1c IQ peptides

    Cyr Janet L; Gillespie Peter G

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Bullfrog myosin-1c contains three previously recognized calmodulin-binding IQ domains (IQ1, IQ2, and IQ3) in its neck region; we identified a fourth IQ domain (IQ4), located immediately adjacent to IQ3. How calmodulin binds to these IQ domains is the subject of this report. Results In the presence of EGTA, calmodulin bound to synthetic peptides corresponding to IQ1, IQ2, and IQ3 with Kd values of 2–4 μM at normal ionic strength; the interaction with an IQ4 peptide was much...

  14. Load-dependent modulation of non-muscle myosin-2A function by tropomyosin 4.2.

    Hundt, Nikolas; Steffen, Walter; Pathan-Chhatbar, Salma; Taft, Manuel H; Manstein, Dietmar J

    2016-01-01

    Tropomyosin isoforms play an important role in the organisation of cytoplasmic actomyosin complexes in regard to function and cellular localisation. In particular, Tpm4.2 is upregulated in rapidly migrating cells and responsible for the specific recruitment of the cytoplasmic class-2 myosin NM-2A to actin filaments during the formation of stress fibres. Here, we investigate how the decoration of F-actin with Tpm4.2 affects the motor properties of NM-2A under conditions of low and high load. In the absence of external forces, decoration of actin filaments with Tpm4.2 does not affect the gated release of ADP from NM-2A and the transition from strong to weak actin-binding states. In the presence of resisting loads, our results reveal a marked increase in the mechanosensitive gating between the leading and trailing myosin head. Thereby, the processive behaviour of NM-2A is enhanced in the presence of resisting loads. The load- and Tpm4.2-induced changes in the functional behaviour of NM-2A are in good agreement with the role of this myosin in the context of stress fibres and the maintenance of cellular tension. PMID:26847712

  15. Two Regions of the Tail Are Necessary for the Isoform-specific Functions of Nonmuscle Myosin IIB

    Sato, Masaaki K.; Takahashi, Masayuki; Yazawa, Michio

    2007-01-01

    To function in the cell, nonmuscle myosin II molecules assemble into filaments through their C-terminal tails. Because myosin II isoforms most likely assemble into homo-filaments in vivo, it seems that some self-recognition mechanisms of individual myosin II isoforms should exist. Exogenous expression of myosin IIB rod fragment is thus expected to prevent the function of myosin IIB specifically. We expected to reveal some self-recognition sites of myosin IIB from the phenotype by expressing a...

  16. Involvement of myosin in intracellular motility and cytomorphogenesis in Micrasterias.

    Oertel, Anke; Holzinger, Andreas; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2003-01-01

    Myosin was detected on Western blots of Micrasterias denticulata extracts by use of antibodies from different sources. Inhibitors with different targets of the actomyosin system, such as the myosin ATPase-blockers N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), or the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor 1-(5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexhydro-1,4-diazapine (ML7), had similar effects on intracellular motility during cell development in the green alga Micrasterias, thus pointing towards a participation of myosin in these processes. The drugs markedly altered the mode of postmitotic nuclear migration, slowed down cytoplasmic streaming, changed cell pattern development and prevented normal chloroplast distribution and spreading into the growing semicell. In addition, an increase and dilatations in ER cisternae and marked morphological changes of the Golgi system were observed by transmission electron microscopy after exposure of growing cells to BDM. Neither BDM nor ML7 exhibited any effect on the distribution or arrangement of the cortical F-actin network nor on the F-actin basket around the nucleus, characteristic of untreated growing Micrasterias cells (J Cell Sci 107 (1994) 1929). This is particularly interesting since BDM caused disintegration of the microtubule system co-localized to the F-actin cage during normal nuclear migration. Together with the fact that other microtubules not connected to the F-actin system remained uninfluenced by BDM, this observation is evidence of an integrative function of myosin between the cytoskeleton elements. PMID:14642529

  17. Association of six YFP-myosin XI-tail fusions with mobile plant cell organelles

    Hanson Maureen R

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosins are molecular motors that carry cargo on actin filaments in eukaryotic cells. Seventeen myosin genes have been identified in the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis. The myosin genes can be divided into two plant-specific subfamilies, class VIII with four members and class XI with 13 members. Class XI myosins are related to animal and fungal myosin class V that are responsible for movement of particular vesicles and organelles. Organelle localization of only one of the 13 Arabidopsis myosin XI (myosin XI-6; At MYA2, which is found on peroxisomes, has so far been reported. Little information is available concerning the remaining 12 class XI myosins. Results We investigated 6 of the 13 class XI Arabidopsis myosins. cDNAs corresponding to the tail region of 6 myosin genes were generated and incorporated into a vector to encode YFP-myosin tail fusion proteins lacking the motor domain. Chimeric genes incorporating tail regions of myosin XI-5 (At MYA1, myosin XI-6 (At MYA2, myosin XI-8 (At XI-B, myosin XI-15 (At XI-I, myosin XI-16 (At XI-J and myosin XI-17 (At XI-K were expressed transiently. All YFP-myosin-tail fusion proteins were targeted to small organelles ranging in size from 0.5 to 3.0 μm. Despite the absence of a motor domain, the fluorescently-labeled organelles were motile in most cells. Tail cropping experiments demonstrated that the coiled-coil region was required for specific localization and shorter tail regions were inadequate for targeting. Myosin XI-6 (At MYA2, previously reported to localize to peroxisomes by immunofluorescence, labeled both peroxisomes and vesicles when expressed as a YFP-tail fusion. None of the 6 YFP-myosin tail fusions interacted with chloroplasts, and only one YFP-tail fusion appeared to sometimes co-localize with fluorescent proteins targeted to Golgi and mitochondria. Conclusion 6 myosin XI tails, extending from the coiled-coil region to the C-terminus, label specific vesicles and

  18. Photocleavage of myosin subfragment 1 by vanadate

    The heavy chain of myosin's subfragment 1 (S1) was cleaved at two distinct sites (termed V1 and V2) after irradiation with UV light in the presence of millimolar concentrations of vanadate and in the absence of nucleotides or divalent metals. The V1 site cleavage appeared to be identical with the previously described active site cleavage at serine-180, which is effected by irradiation of a photomodified form of the S1-MgADP-Vi complex. The V2 site was cleaved specifically, without cleavage at the V1 site, first by formation of the light-stable S1-Co2+ADP-Vi complex at the active site and then by irradiation in the presence of millimolar vanadate. By gel electrophoresis, the V2 site was localized to a region about 20 kDa from the COOH terminus of the S1 heavy chain. From the results of tryptic digestion experiments, the COOH-terminal V2 cleavage peptide appeared to contain lysine-636 in the linker region between the 50- and 20-kDa tryptic peptides of the heavy chain. This site appeared to be the same site cleaved by irradiation of S1 (not complexed with Co2+ADP-Vi) in the presence of millimolar vanadate as previously described. Cleavage at the V2 site was inhibited by Co2+ but was not significantly affected by the presence of nucleotides or Mg2+ ions. Tris buffer significantly inhibited V2 cleavage. From the results of UV-visible absorption, 51V NMR, and frozen-solution EPR spectral experiments, it was concluded that irradiation with UV light reduced vanadate +5 to the +4 oxidation state, which was then protected from rapid reoxidation by O2 by complexation with the Tris buffer. The relatively stable reduced form or forms of vanadium were not competent to cleave S1 at either the V1 or the V2 site

  19. Calmodulin regulates dimerization, motility, and lipid binding of Leishmania myosin XXI

    Batters, Christopher; Ellrich, Heike; Helbig, Constanze; Woodall, Katy Anna; Hundschell, Christian; Brack, Dario; Veigel, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Myosin XXI is the only myosin isoform expressed in the Leishmania parasite. The myosin-XXI homozygous knockout is lethal, and a reduction in expression levels leads to loss of endocytosis and affects other intracellular trafficking processes. In this paper we show that myosin XXI can adopt a monomeric or dimeric state. The states are determined by calmodulin binding to an IQ motif that, when bound, prevents dimerization of a coiled-coil motif. In the monomeric state the motor binds phospholip...

  20. Heavy and light roles: myosin in the morphogenesis of the heart

    England, Jennifer; Loughna, Siobhan

    2013-01-01

    Myosin is an essential component of cardiac muscle, from the onset of cardiogenesis through to the adult heart. Although traditionally known for its role in energy transduction and force development, recent studies suggest that both myosin heavy-chain and myosin lightchain proteins are required for a correctly formed heart. Myosins are structural proteins that are not only expressed from early stages of heart development, but when mutated in humans they may give rise to congeni...

  1. Review: The ATPase mechanism of myosin and actomyosin.

    Geeves, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    Myosins are a large family of molecular motors that use the common P-loop, Switch 1 and Switch 2 nucleotide binding motifs to recognize ATP, to create a catalytic site than can efficiently hydrolyze ATP and to communicate the state of the nucleotide pocket to other allosteric binding sites on myosin. The energy of ATP hydrolysis is used to do work against an external load. In this short review I will outline current thinking on the mechanism of ATP hydrolysis and how the energy of ATP hydrolysis is coupled to a series of protein conformational changes that allow a myosin, with the cytoskeleton track actin, to operate as a molecular motor of distinct types; fast movers, processive motors or strain sensors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 483-491, 2016. PMID:27061920

  2. Myosin IIA deficient cells migrate efficiently despite reduced traction forces at cell periphery

    Melissa H. Jorrisch

    2013-02-01

    Cell motility is a cornerstone of embryogenesis, tissue remodeling and repair, and cancer cell invasion. It is generally thought that migrating cells grab and exert traction force onto the extracellular matrix in order to pull the cell body forward. While previous studies have shown that myosin II deficient cells migrate efficiently, whether these cells exert traction forces during cell migration in the absence of the major contractile machinery is currently unknown. Using an array of micron-sized pillars as a force sensor and shRNA specific to each myosin II isoform (A and B, we analyzed how myosin IIA and IIB individually regulate cell migration and traction force generation. Myosin IIA and IIB localized preferentially to the leading edge where traction force was greatest, and the trailing edge, respectively. When individual myosin II isoforms were depleted by shRNA, myosin IIA deficient cells lost actin stress fibers and focal adhesions, whereas myosin IIB deficient cells maintained similar actin organization and focal adhesions as wild-type cells. Interestingly, myosin IIA deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells on both a rigid surface and a pillar array, yet myosin IIA deficient cells exerted significantly less traction force at the leading edge than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells. These results suggest that, in the absence of myosin IIA mediated force-generating machinery, cells move with minimal traction forces at the cell periphery, thus demonstrating the remarkable ability of cells to adapt and migrate.

  3. Nonmuscle myosin dependent synthesis of type I collagen

    Cai, Le; Fritz, Dillon; Stefanovic, Lela; Stefanovic, Branko

    2010-01-01

    Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in human body synthesized in all tissues as the heterotrimer of two α1(I) and one α2(I) polypeptides. Here we show that intact nonmuscle myosin filaments are required for synthesis of heterotrimeric type I collagen. Conserved 5′ stem-loop in collagen α1(I) and α2(I) mRNAs binds RNA binding protein LARP6. LARP6 interacts with nonmuscle myosin through its C-terminal domain and associates collagen mRNAs with the filaments. Dissociation of nonmuscle my...

  4. Internal Motility in Stiffening Actin-Myosin Networks

    Uhde, J; Sackmann, E; Parmeggiani, A; Frey, E; Uhde, Joerg; Keller, Manfred; Sackmann, Erich; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Frey, Erwin

    2003-01-01

    We present a study on filamentous actin solutions containing heavy meromyosin subfragments of myosin II motor molecules. We focus on the viscoelastic phase behavior and internal dynamics of such networks during ATP depletion. Upon simultaneously using micro-rheology and fluorescence microscopy as complementary experimental tools, we find a sol-gel transition accompanied by a sudden onset of directed filament motion. We interpret the sol-gel transition in terms of myosin II enzymology, and suggest a "zipping" mechanism to explain the filament motion in the vicinity of the sol-gel transition.

  5. The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Myosin Mutation R453C Alters ATP Binding and Hydrolysis of Human Cardiac β-Myosin*

    Bloemink, Marieke; Deacon, John; Langer, Stephen; Vera, Carlos; Combs, Ariana; Leinwand, Leslie; Geeves, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation R453C results in one of the more severe forms of the myopathy. Arg-453 is found in a conserved surface loop of the upper 50-kDa domain of the myosin motor domain and lies between the nucleotide binding pocket and the actin binding site. It connects to the cardiomyopathy loop via a long α-helix, helix O, and to Switch-2 via the fifth strand of the central β-sheet. The mutation is, therefore, in a position to perturb a wide range of myosin molecula...

  6. Mouse nuclear myosin I knock-out shows interchangeability and redundancy of myosin isoforms in the cell nucleus

    Venit, Tomáš; Dzijak, Rastislav; Kalendová, Alžběta; Kahle, Michal; Rohožková, Jana; Schmidt, V.; Rülicke, T.; Rathkolb, B.; Hans, W.; Bohla, A.; Eickelberg, O.; Stoeger, T.; Wolf, E.; Yildirim, A.Ö.; Gailus-Durner, V.; Fuchs, H.; de Angelis, M.H.; Hozák, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013), e61406. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020022; GA MŠk LH12143; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : nuclear myosin * myosin isoforms * cell nucleus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  7. Transportation of Nanoscale Cargoes by Myosin Propelled Actin Filaments

    Persson, Malin; Gullberg, Maria; Tolf, Conny; Lindberg, A. Michael; Mansson, Alf; Kocer, Armagan

    2013-01-01

    Myosin II propelled actin filaments move ten times faster than kinesin driven microtubules and are thus attractive candidates as cargo-transporting shuttles in motor driven lab-on-a-chip devices. In addition, actomyosin-based transportation of nanoparticles is useful in various fundamental studies.

  8. Myosins VIII and XI play distinct roles in reproduction and transport of tobacco mosaic virus.

    Khalid Amari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are obligatory parasites that depend on host cellular factors for their replication as well as for their local and systemic movement to establish infection. Although myosin motors are thought to contribute to plant virus infection, their exact roles in the specific infection steps have not been addressed. Here we investigated the replication, cell-to-cell and systemic spread of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV using dominant negative inhibition of myosin activity. We found that interference with the functions of three class VIII myosins and two class XI myosins significantly reduced the local and long-distance transport of the virus. We further determined that the inactivation of myosins XI-2 and XI-K affected the structure and dynamic behavior of the ER leading to aggregation of the viral movement protein (MP and to a delay in the MP accumulation in plasmodesmata (PD. The inactivation of myosin XI-2 but not of myosin XI-K affected the localization pattern of the 126k replicase subunit and the level of TMV accumulation. The inhibition of myosins VIII-1, VIII-2 and VIII-B abolished MP localization to PD and caused its retention at the plasma membrane. These results suggest that class XI myosins contribute to the viral propagation and intracellular trafficking, whereas myosins VIII are specifically required for the MP targeting to and virus movement through the PD. Thus, TMV appears to recruit distinct myosins for different steps in the cell-to-cell spread of the infection.

  9. Model of Rho-Mediated Myosin Recruitment to the Cleavage Furrow during Cytokinesis

    Veksler, Alexander; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2010-03-01

    The formation and constriction of the contractile ring during cytokinesis, the final step of cell division, depends on the recruitment of motor protein myosin to the cell's equatorial region. During cytokinesis, the myosin attached to the cell's cortex progressively disassembles at the flanking regions and concentrates in the equator [1]. This recruitment depends on myosin motor activity and activation by Rho proteins. Central spindle and astral microtubules establish a spatial pattern of differential Rho activity [2]. We propose a reaction-diffusion model for the dynamics of myosin and Rho proteins during cytokinesis. In the model, the mitotic spindle activates Rho at the equator. Active Rho promotes, in a switch-like manner, myosin assembly into cortical minifilaments. Mechanical stress by cortical myosin causes disassembly of myosin minifilaments and deactivates Rho. Our results explain both the recruitment of myosin to the cleavage furrow and the observed damped myosin oscillations in the cell's flanking regions [1]. Spatial extent, period and decay rate of myosin oscillations are calculated. Various regimes of myosin recruitment are predicted. [1] Zhou & Wang, Mol. Biol. Cell 19:318 (2008) [2] Murthy & Wadsworth, J. Cell Sci. 121:2350 (2008)

  10. Slit and Netrin-1 guide cranial motor axon pathfinding via Rho-kinase, myosin light chain kinase and myosin II

    Drescher Uwe

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the developing hindbrain, cranial motor axon guidance depends on diffusible repellent factors produced by the floor plate. Our previous studies have suggested that candidate molecules for mediating this effect are Slits, Netrin-1 and Semaphorin3A (Sema3A. It is unknown to what extent these factors contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of motor axons, and the downstream signalling pathways are largely unclear. Results In this study, we have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify the components of floor plate chemorepulsion and their downstream signalling pathways. Using in vitro motor axon deflection assays, we demonstrate that Slits and Netrin-1, but not Sema3A, contribute to floor plate repulsion. We also find that the axon pathways of dorsally projecting branchiomotor neurons are disrupted in Netrin-1 mutant mice and in chick embryos expressing dominant-negative Unc5a receptors, indicating an in vivo role for Netrin-1. We further demonstrate that Slit and Netrin-1 signalling are mediated by Rho-kinase (ROCK and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK, which regulate myosin II activity, controlling actin retrograde flow in the growth cone. We show that MLCK, ROCK and myosin II are required for Slit and Netrin-1-mediated growth cone collapse of cranial motor axons. Inhibition of these molecules in explant cultures, or genetic manipulation of RhoA or myosin II function in vivo causes characteristic cranial motor axon pathfinding errors, including the inability to exit the midline, and loss of turning towards exit points. Conclusions Our findings suggest that both Slits and Netrin-1 contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of cranial motor axons. They further indicate that RhoA/ROCK, MLCK and myosin II are components of Slit and Netrin-1 signalling pathways, and suggest that these pathways are of key importance in cranial motor axon navigation.

  11. Quantitative determination of type I myosin heavy chain in bovine muscle with anti myosin monoclonal antibodies.

    Picard, B; Leger, J; Robelin, J

    1994-01-01

    Bovine type I muscle fibers were characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a monoclonal antibody specific for slow myosin heavy chains (MHC 1). Two bovine muscles, the Masseter and Cutaneus trunci, were analyzed by different complementary techniques: electrophoresis, immunoblotting and immunohistiology. The results showed that the two muscles have extreme characteristics. The Masseter contains only slow MHC and the Cutaneus trunci is composed solely of rapid MHC (MHC 2a and 2b). A standard for this ELISA was obtained by mixing the two muscles and was used as a reference in the determination of the percentage of MHC 1 in a given muscle. In this study, the Longissimus thoracis of 27 Charolais cattle were examined. The different conditions under which assays were carried out were described and the accuracy of the measurement was calculated. In view of the results, ELISA was chosen for the analysis of muscle fiber types in large numbers of animal specimens. This technique could be used in several research projects to study the muscle characteristics that determine beef quality. PMID:22061628

  12. Head injury.

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  13. Head Injuries

    ... Aid: Falls First Aid: Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Getting Help: Know the Numbers Concussions Stay Safe: ... Tips: Inline Skating Safety Tips: Skateboarding Dealing With Sports Injuries Concussions: What to Do Contact Us Print Resources ...

  14. Head Tilt

    ... node infection, or, very uncommonly, a brain tumor. Congenital Muscular Torticollis By far the most common cause of head ... also may be ordered, as some children with congenital muscular torticollis also have an abnormality known as developmental dysplasia ...

  15. Head MRI

    ... the brain ( arteriovenous malformations of the head ) Acoustic neuroma Bleeding in the brain Brain abscess Brain aneurysms ... 2014:chap 5. Read More Absence seizure Acoustic neuroma Alzheimer disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Aneurysm in the ...

  16. Mode coupling points to functionally important residues in myosin II.

    Varol, Onur; Yüret, Deniz; Erman, Burak; Kabakçıoğlu, Alkan

    2015-01-01

    Relevance of mode coupling to energy/information transfer during protein function, particularly in the context of allosteric interactions is widely accepted. However, existing evidence in favor of this hypothesis comes essentially from model systems. We here report a novel formal analysis of the near-native dynamics of myosin II, which allows us to explore the impact of the interaction between possibly non-Gaussian vibrational modes on fluctutational dynamics. We show that an information-theo...

  17. "Slow" myosins in vertebrate skeletal muscle. An immunofluorescence study

    1980-01-01

    Specific antisera were raised in rabbits against column-purified myosins from a slow avian muscle, the chicken anterior latissimus dorsi (ALD), and a slow-twitch mammalian muscle, the guinea pig soleus (SOL). The antisera were labeled with fluorescein and applied to sections of muscles from various vertebrae species. Two distinct categories of the slow fibers were identified on the basis of their differential reactivity with the two antisera. Fibers stained by anti-ALD appear to correspond in...

  18. The IQ domain drives nuclear translocation of Nuclear myosin I

    Dzijak, Rastislav; Kahle, Michal; Přidalová, Jarmila; Moško, Tibor; Hozák, Pavel

    St Andrews : Wilhelm Bernhard Workshop, 2007. ---. [Wilhelm Bernhard Workshop on the Cell Nucleus /20./. 27.08.2007-31.08.2007, St. Andrews] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1592; GA ČR GD204/05/H023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : nucleus * nuclear myosin * calmodulin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  19. Smooth muscle myosin: a high force-generating molecular motor.

    VanBuren, P; Guilford, W. H.; Kennedy, G.; Wu, J.; Warshaw, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    Smooth muscle generates as much force per cross sectional area of muscle as skeletal muscle with only one-fifth the myosin content. Although this apparent difference could be explained at the tissue or cellular level, it is possible that at the molecular level smooth muscle cross-bridges generate greater average force than skeletal muscle cross-bridges. To test this hypothesis, we used an in vitro motility assay (VanBuren et al., 1994) in which either chicken thiophosphorylated gizzard smooth...

  20. Cardiac myosin heavy chain transition under altered thyroid status

    Arnoštová, Petra; Jedelský, P.; Soukup, Tomáš; Žurmanová, Jitka

    Geneva: Swiss Society for Neuroscience, 2008. s. 125.3-125.3. ISBN 92-990014-3-X. [FENS. Forum of European Neuroscience /6./. 12.07.2008-16.07.2008, Geneva] Grant ostatní: Myores(XE) 511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : spo2 * cardiac myosin heavy chain * transition * thyroid status Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  1. Covalent immobilization of myosin for in-vitro motility of actin

    Ellis Bagga; Sunita Kumari; Rajesh Kumar; Rakesh Kumar; R P Bajpai; Lalit M Bharadwaj

    2005-11-01

    The present study reports the covalent immobilization of myosin on glass surface and in-vitro motility of actin-myosin biomolecular motor. Myosin was immobilized on poly-L-lysine coated glass using heterobifunctional cross linker EDC and characterized by AFM. The in-vitro motility of actin was carried out on the immobilized myosin. It was observed that velocity of actin over myosin increases with increasing actin concentration (0.4-1.0 mg/ml) and was found in the range of 0.40-3.25 m/s. The motility of actin-myosin motor on artificial surfaces is of immense importance for developing nanodevices for healthcare and engineering applications.

  2. Stretch activates myosin light chain kinase in arterial smooth muscle

    Stretching of porcine carotid arterial muscle increased the phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin light chain from 0.23 to 0.68 mol [32P]phosphate/mol light chain, whereas stretching of phorbol dibutyrate treated muscle increased the phosphorylation from 0.30 to 0.91 mol/mol. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping was used to identify the enzyme involved in the stretch-induced phosphorylation. Quantitation of the [32P]phosphate content of the peptides revealed considerable light chain phosphorylation by protein kinase C only in the phorbol dibutyrate treated arterial muscle, whereas most of the light chain phosphorylation was attributable to myosin light chain kinase. Upon stretch of either the untreated or treated muscle, the total increment in [32P]phosphate incorporation into the light chain could be accounted for by peptides characteristic for myosin light chain kinase catalyzed phosphorylation, demonstrating that the stretch-induced phosphorylation is caused by this enzyme exclusively

  3. Stretch activates myosin light chain kinase in arterial smooth muscle

    Barany, K.; Rokolya, A.; Barany, M. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (USA))

    1990-11-30

    Stretching of porcine carotid arterial muscle increased the phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin light chain from 0.23 to 0.68 mol (32P)phosphate/mol light chain, whereas stretching of phorbol dibutyrate treated muscle increased the phosphorylation from 0.30 to 0.91 mol/mol. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping was used to identify the enzyme involved in the stretch-induced phosphorylation. Quantitation of the (32P)phosphate content of the peptides revealed considerable light chain phosphorylation by protein kinase C only in the phorbol dibutyrate treated arterial muscle, whereas most of the light chain phosphorylation was attributable to myosin light chain kinase. Upon stretch of either the untreated or treated muscle, the total increment in (32P)phosphate incorporation into the light chain could be accounted for by peptides characteristic for myosin light chain kinase catalyzed phosphorylation, demonstrating that the stretch-induced phosphorylation is caused by this enzyme exclusively.

  4. Structural basis for myopathic defects engendered by alterations in the myosin rod

    Cammarato, Anthony; Li, Xiaochuan; Reedy, Mary C.; Lee, Chi F.; Lehman, William; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2011-01-01

    While mutations in the myosin S1 motor domain can directly disrupt the generation and transmission of force along myofibrils and lead to myopathy, the mechanism whereby mutations in the myosin rod influence mechanical function is less clear. Here, we used a combination of various imaging techniques and molecular dynamics simulations to test the hypothesis that perturbations in the myosin rod can disturb normal sarcomeric uniformity and, like motor domain lesions, would influence force product...

  5. Myosin 5a controls insulin granule recruitment during late-phase secretion.

    Ivarsson, Rosita; Jing, Xing-Jun; Waselle, Laurent; Regazzi, Romano; Renström, Erik

    2005-01-01

    We have examined the importance of the actin-based molecular motor myosin 5a for insulin granule transport and insulin secretion. Expression of myosin 5a was downregulated in clonal INS-1E cells using RNAinterference. Stimulated hormone secretion was reduced by 46% and single-cell exocytosis, measured by capacitance recordings, was inhibited by 42% after silencing. Silencing of Slac-2c/MYRIP, which links insulin granules to myosin 5a, resulted in similar inhibition of single-cell exocytosis. ...

  6. Myosin light chain kinase and Src control membrane dynamics in volume recovery from cell swelling

    Barfod, Elisabeth T.; Moore, Ann L.; Van de Graaf, Benjamin G.; Steven D Lidofsky

    2011-01-01

     The expansion of the plasma membrane, which occurs during osmotic swelling of epithelia, must be retrieved for volume recovery, but the mechanisms are unknown. Here we have identified myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) as a regulator of membrane internalization in response to osmotic swelling in a model liver cell line. On hypotonic exposure, we found that there was time-dependent phosphorylation of the MLCK substrate myosin II regulatory light chain. At the sides of the cell, MLCK and myosin ...

  7. Monomeric myosin V uses two binding regions for the assembly of stable translocation complexes

    Heuck, Alexander; Du, Tung-Gia; Jellbauer, Stephan; Richter, Klaus; Kruse, Claudia; Jaklin, Sigrun; Müller, Marisa; Buchner, Johannes; Jansen, Ralf-Peter; Niessing, Dierk

    2007-01-01

    Myosin-motors are conserved from yeast to human and transport a great variety of cargoes. Most plus-end directed myosins, which constitute the vast majority of all myosin motors, form stable dimers and interact constitutively with their cargo complexes. To date, little is known about regulatory mechanisms for cargo-complex assembly. In this study, we show that the type V myosin Myo4p binds to its cargo via two distinct binding regions, the C-terminal tail and a coiled-coil domain-containing f...

  8. Arabidopsis myosin XI-K localizes to the motile endomembrane vesicles associated with F-actin

    Valera V. Peremyslov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant myosins XI were implicated in cell growth, F-actin organization, and organelle transport, with myosin XI-K being a critical contributor to each of these processes. However, subcellular localization of myosins and the identity of their principal cargoes remain poorly understood. Here, we generated a functionally competent, fluorescent protein-tagged, myosin XI-K, and investigated its spatial distribution within Arabidopsis cells. This myosin was found to associate primarily not with larger organelles (e.g., Golgi as was broadly assumed, but with endomembrane vesicles trafficking along F-actin. Subcellular localization and fractionation experiments indicated that the nature of myosin-associated vesicles is organ- and cell type-specific. In leaves, a large proportion of these vesicles aligned and co-fractionated with a motile ER subdomain. In roots, non-ER vesicles were a dominant myosin cargo. Myosin XI-K showed a striking polar localization at the tips of growing, but not mature, root hairs. These results strongly suggest that a major mechanism whereby myosins contribute to plant cell physiology is vesicle transport, and that this activity can be regulated depending on the growth phase of a cell.

  9. Differential patterns of myosin Va expression during the ontogenesis of the rat hippocampus

    L.S. Brinn

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Myosin Va is an actin-based, processive molecular motor protein highly enriched in the nervous tissue of vertebrates. It has been associated with processes of cellular motility, which include organelle transport and neurite outgrowth. The in vivo expression of myosin Va protein in the developing nervous system of mammals has not yet been reported. We describe here the immunolocalization of myosin Va in the developing rat hippocampus. Coronal sections of the embryonic and postnatal rat hippocampus were probed with an affinity-purified, polyclonal anti-myosin Va antibody. Myosin Va was localized in the cytoplasm of granule cells in the dentate gyrus and of pyramidal cells in Ammon's horn formation. Myosin Va expression changed during development, being higher in differentiating rather than already differentiated granule and pyramidal cells. Some of these cells presented a typical migratory profile, while others resembled neurons that were in the process of differentiation. Myosin Va was also transiently expressed in fibers present in the fimbria. Myosin Va was not detected in germinative matrices of the hippocampus proper or of the dentate gyrus. In conclusion, myosin Va expression in both granule and pyramidal cells showed both position and time dependency during hippocampal development, indicating that this motor protein is under developmental regulation.

  10. Mechanical coordination in motor ensembles revealed using engineered artificial myosin filaments

    Hariadi, R. F.; Sommese, R. F.; Adhikari, A. S.; Taylor, R. E.; Sutton, S.; Spudich, J. A.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.

    2015-08-01

    The sarcomere of muscle is composed of tens of thousands of myosin motors that self-assemble into thick filaments and interact with surrounding actin-based thin filaments in a dense, near-crystalline hexagonal lattice. Together, these actin-myosin interactions enable large-scale movement and force generation, two primary attributes of muscle. Research on isolated fibres has provided considerable insight into the collective properties of muscle, but how actin-myosin interactions are coordinated in an ensemble remains poorly understood. Here, we show that artificial myosin filaments, engineered using a DNA nanotube scaffold, provide precise control over motor number, type and spacing. Using both dimeric myosin V- and myosin VI-labelled nanotubes, we find that neither myosin density nor spacing has a significant effect on the gliding speed of actin filaments. This observation supports a simple model of myosin ensembles as energy reservoirs that buffer individual stochastic events to bring about smooth, continuous motion. Furthermore, gliding speed increases with cross-bridge compliance, but is limited by Brownian effects. As a first step to reconstituting muscle motility, we demonstrate human β-cardiac myosin-driven gliding of actin filaments on DNA nanotubes.

  11. Myosin individualized: single nucleotide polymorphisms in energy transduction

    Wieben Eric D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin performs ATP free energy transduction into mechanical work in the motor domain of the myosin heavy chain (MHC. Energy transduction is the definitive systemic feature of the myosin motor performed by coordinating in a time ordered sequence: ATP hydrolysis at the active site, actin affinity modulation at the actin binding site, and the lever-arm rotation of the power stroke. These functions are carried out by several conserved sub-domains within the motor domain. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs affect the MHC sequence of many isoforms expressed in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and non-muscle tissue. The purpose of this work is to provide a rationale for using SNPs as a functional genomics tool to investigate structurefunction relationships in myosin. In particular, to discover SNP distribution over the conserved sub-domains and surmise what it implies about sub-domain stability and criticality in the energy transduction mechanism. Results An automated routine identifying human nonsynonymous SNP amino acid missense substitutions for any MHC gene mined the NCBI SNP data base. The routine tested 22 MHC genes coding muscle and non-muscle isoforms and identified 89 missense mutation positions in the motor domain with 10 already implicated in heart disease and another 8 lacking sequence homology with a skeletal MHC isoform for which a crystallographic model is available. The remaining 71 SNP substitutions were found to be distributed over MHC with 22 falling outside identified functional sub-domains and 49 in or very near to myosin sub-domains assigned specific crucial functions in energy transduction. The latter includes the active site, the actin binding site, the rigid lever-arm, and regions facilitating their communication. Most MHC isoforms contained SNPs somewhere in the motor domain. Conclusions Several functional-crucial sub-domains are infiltrated by a large number of SNP substitution sites suggesting these

  12. Myosin Va is developmentally regulated and expressed in the human cerebellum from birth to old age

    C.C.R. Souza

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Myosin Va functions as a processive, actin-based motor molecule highly enriched in the nervous system, which transports and/or tethers organelles, vesicles, and mRNA and protein translation machinery. Mutation of myosin Va leads to Griscelli disease that is associated with severe neurological deficits and a short life span. Despite playing a critical role in development, the expression of myosin Va in the central nervous system throughout the human life span has not been reported. To address this issue, the cerebellar expression of myosin Va from newborns to elderly humans was studied by immunohistochemistry using an affinity-purified anti-myosin Va antibody. Myosin Va was expressed at all ages from the 10th postnatal day to the 98th year of life, in molecular, Purkinje and granular cerebellar layers. Cerebellar myosin Va expression did not differ essentially in localization or intensity from childhood to old age, except during the postnatal developmental period. Structures resembling granules and climbing fibers in Purkinje cells were deeply stained. In dentate neurons, long processes were deeply stained by anti-myosin Va, as were punctate nuclear structures. During the first postnatal year, myosin Va was differentially expressed in the external granular layer (EGL. In the EGL, proliferating prospective granule cells were not stained by anti-myosin Va antibody. In contrast, premigratory granule cells in the EGL stained moderately. Granule cells exhibiting a migratory profile in the molecular layer were also moderately stained. In conclusion, neuronal myosin Va is developmentally regulated, and appears to be required for cerebellar function from early postnatal life to senescence.

  13. Direct photoaffinity labeling by nucleotides of the apparent catalytic site on the heavy chains of smooth muscle and Acanthamoeba myosins

    The heavy chains of Acanthamoeba myosins, IA, IB and II, turkey gizzard myosin, and rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1 were specifically labeled by radioactive ATP, ADP, and UTP, each of which is a substrate or product of myosin ATPase activity, when irradiated with uv light at 00C. With UTP, as much as 0.45 mol/mol of Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and 1 mol/mol of turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain was incorporated. Evidence that the ligands were associated with the catalytic site included the observations that reaction occurred only with nucleotides that are substrates or products of the ATPase activity; that the reaction was blocked by pyrophosphate which is an inhibitor of the ATPase activity; that ATP was bound as ADP; and that label was probably restricted to a single peptide following limited subtilisin proteolysis of labeled Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and extensive cleavage with CNBr and trypsin of labeled turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain

  14. Head Lice

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  15. Flexural Stiffness of Myosin Va Subdomains as Measured from Tethered Particle Motion.

    Michalek, Arthur J; Kennedy, Guy G; Warshaw, David M; Ali, M Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Myosin Va (MyoVa) is a processive molecular motor involved in intracellular cargo transport on the actin cytoskeleton. The motor's processivity and ability to navigate actin intersections are believed to be governed by the stiffness of various parts of the motor's structure. Specifically, changes in calcium may regulate motor processivity by altering the motor's lever arm stiffness and thus its interhead communication. In order to measure the flexural stiffness of MyoVa subdomains, we use tethered particle microscopy, which relates the Brownian motion of fluorescent quantum dots, which are attached to various single- and double-headed MyoVa constructs bound to actin in rigor, to the motor's flexural stiffness. Based on these measurements, the MyoVa lever arm and coiled-coil rod domain have comparable flexural stiffness (0.034 pN/nm). Upon addition of calcium, the lever arm stiffness is reduced 40% as a result of calmodulins potentially dissociating from the lever arm. In addition, the flexural stiffness of the full-length MyoVa construct is an order of magnitude less stiff than both a single lever arm and the coiled-coil rod. This suggests that the MyoVa lever arm-rod junction provides a flexible hinge that would allow the motor to maneuver cargo through the complex intracellular actin network. PMID:26770194

  16. Missense mutation of the {beta}-cardiac myosin heavy-chain gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Arai, Shoichi; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Hirayama, Kenji; Sakurai, Hisanao [Heart Inst. of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-11

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy occurs as an autosomal dominant familial disorder or as a sporadic disease without familial involvement. We describe a missense mutation of the {beta}-cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene, a G to T transversion (741 Gly{r_arrow}Trp) identified by direct sequencing of exon 20 in four individuals affected with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Three individuals with sporadic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, whose parents are clinically and genetically unaffected, had sequence variations of exon 34 of the {alpha}-cardiac MHC gene (a C to T transversion, 1658 Asp{r_arrow}Asp, resulting in FokI site polymorphism), of intron 33 of the {alpha}-cardiac MHC gene (a G to A and an A to T transversion), and also of intron 14 of the {beta}-cardiac MHC gene (a C to T transversion in a patient with Noonan syndrome). Including our case, 30 missense mutations of the {beta}-cardiac MHC gene in 49 families have been reported thus far worldwide. Almost all are located in the region of the gene coding for the globular head of the molecule, and only one mutation was found in both Caucasian and Japanese families. Missense mutations of the {Beta}-cardiac MHC gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may therefore differ according to race. 29 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Dynamics of the Coiled-Coil Unfolding Transition of Myosin Rod Probed by Dissipation Force Spectrum

    Taniguchi, Yukinori; Khatri, Bhavin S.; Brockwell, David J.; Paci, Emanuele; Kawakami, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    The motor protein myosin II plays a crucial role in muscle contraction. The mechanical properties of its coiled-coil region, the myosin rod, are important for effective force transduction during muscle function. Previous studies have investigated the static elastic response of the myosin rod. However, analogous to the study of macroscopic complex fluids, how myosin will respond to physiological time-dependent loads can only be understood from its viscoelastic response. Here, we apply atomic f...

  18. Laing early onset distal myopathy: slow myosin defect with variable abnormalities on muscle biopsy

    P.J. Lamont; B. Udd; F.L. Mastaglia; M. de Visser; P. Hedera; T. Voit; L.R. Bridges; V. Fabian; A. Rozemuller; N.G. Laing

    2006-01-01

    Background: Laing early onset distal myopathy (MPD1) is an autosomal dominant myopathy caused by mutations within the slow skeletal muscle fibre myosin heavy chain gene, MYH7 It is allelic with myosin storage myopathy, with the commonest form of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and with one for

  19. Localization of Myosin and Actin in the Pelage and Whisker Hair Follicles of Rat

    The combined effects of myosin II and actin enable muscle and nonmuscle cells to generate forces required for muscle contraction, cell division, cell migration, cellular morphological changes, the maintenance of cellular tension and polarity, and so on. However, except for the case of muscle contraction, the details are poorly understood. We focus on nonmuscle myosin and actin in the formation and maintenance of hair and skin, which include highly active processes in mammalian life with respect to the cellular proliferation, differentiation, and movement. The localization of nonmuscle myosin II and actin in neonatal rat dorsal skin, mystacial pad, hair follicles, and vibrissal follicles was studied by immunohistochemical technique to provide the basis for the elucidation of the roles of these proteins. Specificities of the antibodies were verified by using samples from the relevant tissues and subjecting them to immunoblotting test prior to morphological analyses. The myosin and actin were abundant and colocalized in the spinous and granular layers but scarce in the basal layer of the dorsal and mystacial epidermis. In hair and vibrissal follicles, nonmuscle myosin and actin were colocalized in the outer root sheath and some hair matrix cells adjoining dermal papillae. In contrast, most areas of the inner root sheath and hair matrix appeared to comprise very small amounts of myosin and actin. Hair shaft may comprise significant myosin during the course of its keratinization. These results suggest that the actin-myosin system plays a part in cell movement, differentiation, protection and other key functions of skin and hair cells

  20. My oh my(osin): Insights into how auditory hair cells count, measure, and shape

    Pollock, Lana M.; Chou, Shih-Wei; McDermott, Brian M., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying mechanosensory hair bundle formation in auditory sensory cells are largely mysterious. In this issue, Lelli et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201509017) reveal that a pair of molecular motors, myosin IIIa and myosin IIIb, is involved in the hair bundle’s morphology and hearing.

  1. Intra-axonal myosin and actin in nerve regeneration.

    McQuarrie, Irvine G; Lund, Linda M

    2009-10-01

    A focused review of sciatic nerve regeneration in the rat model, based on research conducted by the authors, is presented. We examine structural proteins carried distally in the axon by energy-requiring motor enzymes, using protein chemistry and molecular biology techniques in combination with immunohistochemistry. Relevant findings from other laboratories are cited and discussed. The general conclusion is that relatively large amounts of actin and tubulin are required to construct a regenerating axon and that these materials mainly originate in the parent axon. The motor enzymes that carry these proteins forward as macromolecules include kinesin and dynein but probably also include myosin. PMID:19927086

  2. Molecular regulation of skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms

    Brown, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Research investigating the regulation of muscle fibre type has traditionally been conducted in vivo, analyzing global changes at a whole muscle level. Broadly, this thesis aimed to explore more “molecular” approaches, utilizing molecular and cell biology to understand the expression and regulation of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms as an indicator of muscle fibre composition. The mRNA expression profile of six MyHC isoform genes during C2C12 myogenesis was elucidated to reveal that the...

  3. Myosin heavy chain gene expression in human heart failure.

    Nakao, K; Minobe, W.; Roden, R; Bristow, M R; Leinwand, L A

    1997-01-01

    Two isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MyHC), alpha and beta, exist in the mammalian ventricular myocardium, and their relative expression is correlated with the contractile velocity of cardiac muscle. Several pathologic stimuli can cause a shift in the MyHC composition of the rodent ventricle from alpha- to beta-MyHC. Given the potential physiological consequences of cardiac MyHC isoform shifts, we determined MyHC gene expression in human heart failure where cardiac contractility is impaired si...

  4. Heat-induced formation of myosin oligomer-soluble filament complex in high-salt solution.

    Shimada, Masato; Takai, Eisuke; Ejima, Daisuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2015-02-01

    Heat-induced aggregation of myosin into an elastic gel plays an important role in the water-holding capacity and texture of meat products. Here, we investigated thermal aggregation of porcine myosin in high-salt solution over a wide temperature range by dynamic light scattering experiments. The myosin samples were readily dissolved in 1.0 M NaCl at 25 °C followed by dilution into various salt concentrations. The diluted solutions consistently contained both myosin monomers and soluble filaments. The filament size decreased with increasing salt concentration and temperature. High temperatures above Tm led to at least partial dissociation of soluble filaments and thermal unfolding, resulting in the formation of soluble oligomers and binding to the persistently present soluble filaments. Such a complex formation between the oligomers and filaments has never been observed. Our results provide new insight into the heat-induced myosin gelation in high-salt solution. PMID:25445683

  5. Double heterozygosity for mutations in the β-myosin heavy chain and in the cardiac myosin binding protein C genes in a family with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Richard, P.; Isnard, R.; Carrier, L.; Dubourg, O.; Donatien, Y.; Mathieu, B.; Bonne, G.; Gary, F; Charron, P; HAGEGE, A.; Komajda, M; Schwartz, K.; Hainque, B

    1999-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal dominant disease, caused by mutations in several sarcomeric protein genes. So far, seven genes have been shown to be associated with the disease with the β-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) and the cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) genes being the most frequently involved.
We performed electrocardiography (ECG) and echocardiography in 15 subjects with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from a French Caribbean family. Genet...

  6. Canine cardiac myosin with special referrence to pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy. I. Subunit composition.

    Siemankowski, R F; Dreizen, P

    1978-12-10

    In studies of myosin from left and right ventricles of normal hearts and hypertrophic hearts at 5 weeks and 13 weeks after aortic banding, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows intermediate molecular weight components which derive from heavy chains fragmented in the presence of dodecyl sulfate. The proportion of degraded heavy chains is greater in myosin from hypertrophic hearts than normal hearts, with comparable degradation in left and right ventricle myosin. The observed fragmentation of myosin results from proteolysis due to contaminant proteases or a thermally activated, heat-stable nonenzymatic process, or both. The susceptibility of heavy chains to crude myofibrillar proteases differs in normal and hypertrophic cardiac myosin; however, the kinetics of tryptic digestion are identical for both myosins. With precautions to minimize proteolytic artifacts on dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, preparations of myosin from left and right ventricles of normal and hypertrophic hearts exhibit comparable subunit composition, with approximately molar ratios of heavy chains, light chain L1, and light chain L2. Comparable stoichiometry for the light chain fraction is determined by high speed sedimentation equilibrium at pH 11 and direct fractionation of the different cardiac myosins. We do not confirm reports (e.g. Wikman-Coffelt, J., Fenner, C., Smith, A., and Mason, D. T. (1975) J. Biol. Chem. 250, 1257-1262) of different proportions of light chains in left and right ventricle myosin of normal and hypertrophic canine hearts. The light chains display microheterogeneity, with L1 generating two isoelectric variants and L2 generating two major and two minor variants, but identical mobilities and isoelectric values are obtained in the different myosin preparations. PMID:152317

  7. Mutations of the Drosophila myosin heavy-chain gene: effects on transcription, myosin accumulation, and muscle function.

    Mogami, K; O'Donnell, P T; Bernstein, S I; Wright, T.R.; Emerson, C P

    1986-01-01

    Mutations of the myosin heavy-chain (MHC) gene of Drosophila melanogaster were identified among a group of dominant flightless and recessive lethal mutants (map position 2-52, 36A8-B1,2). One mutation is a 0.1-kilobase deletion in the 5' region of the MHC gene and reduces MHC protein in the leg and thoracic muscles of heterozygotes to levels found in 36AC haploids. Three mutations are insertions of 8-to 10-kilobase DNA elements within the MHC gene and produce truncated MHC transcripts. Hetero...

  8. Minimum energy reaction profiles for ATP hydrolysis in myosin.

    Grigorenko, Bella L; Kaliman, Ilya A; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2011-11-01

    The minimum energy reaction profiles corresponding to two possible reaction mechanisms of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis in myosin are computed in this work within the framework of the quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method by using the same partitioning of the model system to the QM and MM parts and the same computational protocol. On the first reaction route, one water molecule performs nucleophilic attack at the phosphorus center P(γ) from ATP while the second water molecule in the closed protein cleft serves as a catalytic base assisted by the Glu residue from the myosin salt bridge. According to the present QM/MM calculations consistent with the results of kinetic studies this reaction pathway is characterized by a low activation energy barrier about 10 kcal/mol. The computed activation energy barrier for the second mechanism, which assumes the penta-coordinated oxyphosphorane transition state upon involvement of single water molecule in the reaction, is considerably higher than that for the two-water mechanism. PMID:21839658

  9. Is HEADS in our heads?

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Hertz, Pernille Grarup; Blix, Charlotte;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Outpatient clinic visits are a window of opportunity to address health risk behaviors and promote a healthier lifestyle among young people. The HEADS (Home, Education, Eating, Activities, Drugs [i.e. substance use including tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs], Sexuality [including...... contraception], Safety, Self-harm) interview is a feasible way of exploring health risk behaviors and resilience. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate how often HEADS topics were addressed according to young patients and staff in pediatric and adult outpatient clinics. METHODS: We conducted...... a questionnaire survey among young patients and health care professionals at a tertiary university hospital. Young patients reported on their cumulative experience and staff reported on their usual practice. RESULTS: A total of 290 young patients aged 12-22 years (78% having a chronic condition) and 97 health...

  10. Dynamics of myosin II organization into contractile networks and fibers at the medial cell cortex

    Nie, Wei

    The cellular morphology of adhered cells depends crucially on the formation of a contractile meshwork of parallel and cross-linked stress fibers along the contacting surface. The motor activity and mini-filament assembly of non-muscle myosin II is an important component of cell-level cytoskeletal remodeling during mechanosensing. To monitor the dynamics of non-muscle myosin II, we used confocal microscopy to image cultured HeLa cells that stably express myosin regulatory light chain tagged with GFP (MRLC-GFP). MRLC-GFP was monitored in time-lapse movies at steady state and during the response of cells to varying concentrations of blebbistatin (which disrupts actomyosin stress fibers). Using image correlation spectroscopy analysis, we quantified the kinetics of disassembly and reassembly of actomyosin networks and compared to studies by other groups. This analysis suggested the following processes: myosin minifilament assembly and disassembly; aligning and contraction; myosin filament stabilization upon increasing contractile tension. Numerical simulations that include those processes capture some of the main features observed in the experiments. This study provides a framework to help interpret how different cortical myosin remodeling kinetics may contribute to different cell shape and rigidity depending on substrate stiffness. We discuss methods to monitor myosin reorganization using non-linear imaging methods.

  11. Molecular biological approaches to study myosin functions in cytokinesis of Dictyostelium.

    Uyeda, T Q; Yumura, S

    2000-04-15

    The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is amenable to biochemical, cell biological, and molecular genetic analyses, and offers a unique opportunity for multifaceted approaches to dissect the mechanism of cytokinesis. One of the important questions that are currently under investigation using Dictyostelium is to understand how cleavage furrows or contractile rings are assembled in the equatorial region. Contractile rings consist of a number of components including parallel filaments of actin and myosin II. Phenotypic analyses and in vivo localization studies of cells expressing mutant myosin IIs have demonstrated that myosin II's transport to and localization at the equatorial region does not require regulation by phosphorylation of myosin II, specific amino acid sequences of myosin II, or the motor activity of myosin II. Rather, the transport appears to depend on a myosin II-independent flow of cortical cytoskeleton. What drives the flow of cortical cytoskeleton is still elusive. However, a growing number of mutants that affect assembly of contractile rings have been accumulated. Analyses of these mutations, identification of more cytokinesis-specific genes, and information deriving from other experimental systems, should allow us to understand the mechanism of contractile ring formation and other aspects of cytokinesis. PMID:10816252

  12. Approaches to myosin modelling in a two-phase flow model for cell motility

    Kimpton, L. S.; Whiteley, J. P.; Waters, S. L.; Oliver, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    A wide range of biological processes rely on the ability of cells to move through their environment. Mathematical models have been developed to improve our understanding of how cells achieve motion. Here we develop models that explicitly track the cell's distribution of myosin within a two-phase flow framework. Myosin is a small motor protein which is important for contracting the cell's actin cytoskeleton and enabling cell motion. The two phases represent the actin network and the cytosol in the cell. We start from a fairly general description of myosin kinetics, advection and diffusion in the two-phase flow framework, then identify a number of sub-limits of the model that may be relevant in practice, two of which we investigate further via linear stability analyses and numerical simulations. We demonstrate that myosin-driven contraction of the actin network destabilizes a stationary steady state leading to cell motion, but that rapid diffusion of myosin and rapid unbinding of myosin from the actin network are stabilizing. We use numerical simulation to investigate travelling-wave solutions relevant to a steadily gliding cell and we consider a reduction of the model in which the cell adheres strongly to the substrate on which it is crawling. This work demonstrates that a number of existing models for the effect of myosin on cell motility can be understood as different sub-limits of our two-phase flow model.

  13. Involvement of myosin light-chain kinase in endothelial cell retraction

    Wysolmerski, R.B.; Lagunoff, D. (Saint Louis Univ. School of Medicine, MO (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Permeabilized bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers were used to investigate the mechanism of endothelial cell retraction. Postconfluent endothelial cells permeabilized with saponin retracted upon exposure to ATP and Ca{sup 2+}. Retraction was accompanied by thiophosphorylation of 19,000-Da myosin light chains when adenosine 5'-(gamma-({sup 35}S)thio)triphosphate was included in the medium. Both retraction and thiophosphorylation of myosin light chains exhibited a graded quantitative dependence on Ca{sup 2+}. When permeabilized monolayers were extracted in buffer D containing 100 mM KCl and 30 mM MgCl2 for 30 min, the cells failed to retract upon exposure to ATP and Ca{sup 2+}, and no thiophosphorylation of myosin light chains occurred. The ability both to retract and to thiophosphorylate myosin light chains was restored by the addition to the permeabilized, extracted cells of myosin light-chain kinase and calmodulin together but not by either alone. These studies indicate that endothelial cell retraction, as does smooth muscle contraction, depends on myosin light-chain kinase phosphorylation of myosin light chains.

  14. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel molecular motor, Leishmania myosin-XXI.

    Batters, Christopher; Woodall, Katy A; Toseland, Christopher P; Hundschell, Christian; Veigel, Claudia

    2012-08-10

    The genome of the Leishmania parasite contains two classes of myosin. Myosin-XXI, seemingly the only myosin isoform expressed in the protozoan parasite, has been detected in both the promastigote and amastigote stages of the Leishmania life cycle. It has been suggested to perform a variety of functions, including roles in membrane anchorage, but also long-range directed movements of cargo. However, nothing is known about the biochemical or mechanical properties of this motor. Here we designed and expressed various myosin-XXI constructs using a baculovirus expression system. Both full-length (amino acids 1-1051) and minimal motor domain constructs (amino acids 1-800) featured actin-activated ATPase activity. Myosin-XXI was soluble when expressed either with or without calmodulin. In the presence of calcium (pCa 4.1) the full-length motor could bind a single calmodulin at its neck domain (probably amino acids 809-823). Calmodulin binding was required for motility but not for ATPase activity. Once bound, calmodulin remained stably attached independent of calcium concentration (pCa 3-7). In gliding filament assays, myosin-XXI moved actin filaments at ∼15 nm/s, insensitive to both salt (25-1000 mm KCl) and calcium concentrations (pCa 3-7). Calmodulin binding to the neck domain might be involved in regulating the motility of the myosin-XXI motor for its various cellular functions in the different stages of the Leishmania parasite life cycle. PMID:22718767

  15. Quantitation of the distribution and flux of myosin-II during cytokinesis

    Cavet Guy

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During cytokinesis, the cell's equator contracts against the cell's global stiffness. Identifying the biochemical basis for these mechanical parameters is essential for understanding how cells divide. To achieve this goal, the distribution and flux of the cell division machinery must be quantified. Here we report the first quantitative analysis of the distribution and flux of myosin-II, an essential element of the contractile ring. Results The fluxes of myosin-II in the furrow cortex, the polar cortex, and the cytoplasm were examined using ratio imaging of GFP fusion proteins expressed in Dictyostelium. The peak concentration of GFP-myosin-II in the furrow cortex is 1.8-fold higher than in the polar cortex and 2.0-fold higher than in the cytoplasm. The myosin-II in the furrow cortex, however, represents only 10% of the total cellular myosin-II. An estimate of the minimal amount of this motor needed to produce the required force for cell cleavage fits well with this 10% value. The cell may, therefore, regulate the amount of myosin-II sent to the furrow cortex in accordance with the amount needed there. Quantitation of the distribution and flux of a mutant myosin-II that is defective in phosphorylation-dependent thick filament disassembly confirms that heavy chain phosphorylation regulates normal recruitment to the furrow cortex. Conclusion The analysis indicates that myosin-II flux through the cleavage furrow cortex is regulated by thick filament phosphorylation. Further, the amount of myosin-II observed in the furrow cortex is in close agreement with the amount predicted to be required from a simple theoretical analysis.

  16. Thermodynamic evidence of non-muscle myosin II-lipid-membrane interaction

    A unique feature of protein networks in living cells is that they can generate their own force. Proteins such as non-muscle myosin II are an integral part of the cytoskeleton and have the capacity to convert the energy of ATP hydrolysis into directional movement. Non-muscle myosin II can move actin filaments against each other, and depending on the orientation of the filaments and the way in which they are linked together, it can produce contraction, bending, extension, and stiffening. Our measurements with differential scanning calorimetry showed that non-muscle myosin II inserts into negatively charged phospholipid membranes. Using lipid vesicles made of DMPG/DMPC at a molar ratio of 1:1 at 10 mg/ml in the presence of different non-muscle myosin II concentrations showed a variation of the main phase transition of the lipid vesicle at around 23 deg. C. With increasing concentrations of non-muscle myosin II the thermotropic properties of the lipid vesicle changed, which is indicative of protein-lipid interaction/insertion. We hypothesize that myosin tail binds to acidic phospholipids through an electrostatic interaction using the basic side groups of positive residues; the flexible, amphipathic helix then may partially penetrate into the bilayer to form an anchor. Using the stopped-flow method, we determined the binding affinity of non-muscle myosin II when anchored to lipid vesicles with actin, which was similar to a pure actin-non-muscle myosin II system. Insertion of myosin tail into the hydrophobic region of lipid membranes, a model known as the lever arm mechanism, might explain how its interaction with actin generates cellular movement

  17. The SAH domain extends the functional length of the myosin lever

    Baboolal, TG; Sakamoto, T.; Forgacs, E; White, HD; Jackson, SM; Takagi, Y.; Farrow, RE; Molloy, JE; Knight, PJ; Sellers, JS; Peckham, M.

    2009-01-01

    Stable, single alpha-helix (SAH) domains are widely distributed in the proteome, including in myosins, but their functions are unknown. To test whether SAH domains can act as levers, we replaced four of the six calmodulin-binding IQ motifs in the levers of mouse myosin 5a (Myo5) with the putative SAH domain of Dictyostelium myosin MyoM of similar length. The SAH domain was inserted between the IQ motifs and the coiled coil in a Myo5 HMM construct in which the levers were truncated from six to...

  18. Melanophilin and myosin Va track the microtubule plus end on EB1

    Wu, Xufeng S.; Tsan, Grace L.; Hammer, John A.

    2005-01-01

    In mouse melanocytes, myosin Va is recruited onto the surface of melanosomes by a receptor complex containing Rab27a that is present in the melanosome membrane and melanophilin (Mlp), which links myosin Va to Rab27a. In this study, we show that Mlp is also a microtubule plus end–tracking protein or +TIP. Moreover, myosin Va tracks the plus end in a Mlp-dependent manner. Data showing that overexpression and short inhibitory RNA knockdown of the +TIP EB1 have opposite effects on Mlp–microtubule...

  19. D-loop of Actin Differently Regulates the Motor Function of Myosins II and V*

    Kubota, Hiroaki; Mikhailenko, Sergey V; Okabe, Harumi; Taguchi, Hideki; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2009-01-01

    To gain more information on the manner of actin-myosin interaction, we examined how the motile properties of myosins II and V are affected by the modifications of the DNase I binding loop (D-loop) of actin, performed in two different ways, namely, the proteolytic digestion with subtilisin and the M47A point mutation. In an in vitro motility assay, both modifications significantly decreased the gliding velocity on myosin II-heavy meromyosin due to a weaker generated force but increased it on m...

  20. Cooperative folding of muscle myosins: I. Mechanical model

    Caruel, Matthieu; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2013-01-01

    Mechanically induced folding of passive cross-linkers is a fundamental biological phenomenon. A typical example is a conformational change in myosin II responsible for the power-stroke in skeletal muscles. In this paper we present an athermal perspective on such folding by analyzing the simplest purely mechanical prototype: a parallel bundle of bi-stable units attached to a common backbone. We show that in this analytically transparent model, characterized by a rugged energy landscape, the ground states are always highly coherent, single-phase configurations. We argue that such cooperative behavior, ensuring collective conformational change, is due to the dominance of long- range interactions making the system non-additive. The detailed predictions of our model are in agreement with experimentally observed non-equivalence of fast force recovery in skeletal muscles loaded in soft and hard devices. Some features displayed by the model are also recognizable in the behavior of other biological systems with passiv...

  1. Myosin Vc Is Specialized for Transport on a Secretory Superhighway.

    Sladewski, Thomas E; Krementsova, Elena B; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2016-08-22

    A hallmark of the well-studied vertebrate class Va myosin is its ability to take multiple steps on actin as a single molecule without dissociating, a feature called "processivity." Therefore, it was surprising when kinetic and single-molecule assays showed that human myosin Vc (MyoVc) was not processive on single-actin filaments [1-3]. We explored the possibility that MyoVc is processive only under conditions that resemble its biological context. Recently, it was shown that zymogen vesicles are transported on actin "superhighways" composed of parallel actin cables nucleated by formins from the plasma membrane [4]. Loss of these cables compromises orderly apical targeting of vesicles. MyoVc has been implicated in transporting secretory vesicles to the apical membrane [5]. We hypothesized that actin cables regulate the processive properties of MyoVc. We show that MyoVc is unique in taking variable size steps, which are frequently in the backward direction. Results obtained with chimeric constructs implicate the lever arm/rod of MyoVc as being responsible for these properties. Actin bundles allow single MyoVc motors to move processively. Remarkably, even teams of MyoVc motors require actin bundles to move continuously at physiological ionic strength. The irregular stepping pattern of MyoVc, which may result from flexibility in the lever arm/rod of MyoVc, appears to be a unique structural adaptation that allows the actin track to spatially restrict the activity of MyoVc to specialized actin cables in order to co-ordinate and target the final stages of vesicle secretion. PMID:27498562

  2. Identification and characterization of the Bombyx mori myosin II essential light chain and its effect in BmNPV infection

    L Hao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Myosin, as a type of molecular motor, is mainly involved in muscle contraction. Recently, myosin research has made considerable progress. However, the function of Bombyx mori myosin remains unclear. In this study, we cloned the BmMyosin II essential light chain (BmMyosin II ELC gene from a cDNA library of silkworm, which had an open reading frame (ORF of 444 bp encoding 147 amino acids (about 16 kDa. After analyzing their sequences, BmMyosin II ELC was similar to the ELCs of 27 other Myosin II types, which contained EFh domain that bound Ca2+. In addition, 28 sequences had five motifs, motifs 1 and 3 were relatively conserved. We constructed two vectors with BmMyosin to transfect MGC803 or BmN, monolayer wound healing of cells indicated they can promote cell migration successfully. For three fifth instar silkworms, Bm306, BmNB, BmBC8, we mainly analyzed the change of BmMyosin II ELC from transcription and translation after infecting with nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV. We found that gene expression of resistant strains were higher than susceptible strains at 12 h, while the result of the translation level was opposite that of the transcription level. Through in vitro protein interactions, we found BmMyosin II ELC can interact with BmNPV ubiquitin.

  3. Two distinct myosin II populations coordinate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath in the Caenorhabditis elegans somatic gonad.

    Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-04-01

    The myoepithelial sheath in the somatic gonad of the nematodeCaenorhabditis eleganshas nonstriated contractile actomyosin networks that produce highly coordinated contractility for ovulation of mature oocytes. Two myosin heavy chains are expressed in the myoepithelial sheath, which are also expressed in the body-wall striated muscle. The troponin/tropomyosin system is also present and essential for ovulation. Therefore, although the myoepithelial sheath has smooth muscle-like contractile apparatuses, it has a striated muscle-like regulatory mechanism through troponin/tropomyosin. Here we report that the myoepithelial sheath has a distinct myosin population containing nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which is regulated by phosphorylation and essential for ovulation. MLC-4, a nonmuscle myosin regulatory light chain, localizes to small punctate structures and does not colocalize with large, needle-like myosin filaments containing MYO-3, a striated-muscle myosin isoform. RNA interference of MLC-4, as well as of its upstream regulators, LET-502 (Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase) and MEL-11 (a myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), impairs ovulation. Expression of a phosphomimetic MLC-4 mutant mimicking a constitutively active state also impairs ovulation. A striated-muscle myosin (UNC-54) appears to provide partially compensatory contractility. Thus the results indicate that the two spatially distinct myosin II populations coordinately regulate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath. PMID:26864628

  4. Functional, structural, and chemical changes in myosin associated with hydrogen peroxide treatment of skeletal muscle fibers

    Prochniewicz, Ewa; Lowe, Dawn A.; Spakowicz, Daniel J; Higgins, LeeAnn; O'Conor, Kate; Thompson, LaDora V.; Deborah A Ferrington; Thomas, David D.

    2007-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism of oxidation-induced inhibition of muscle contractility, we have studied the effects of hydrogen peroxide on permeabilized rabbit psoas muscle fibers, focusing on changes in myosin purified from these fibers. Oxidation by 5 mM peroxide decreased fiber contractility (isometric force and shortening velocity) without significant changes in the enzymatic activity of myofibrils and isolated myosin. The inhibitory effects were reversed by treating fibers with d...

  5. Sequential Myosin Phosphorylation Activates Tarantula Thick Filament via a Disorder-Order Transition

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D.; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) activates myosin in thick filaments. RLC phosphorylation plays a primary regulatory role in smooth muscle and a secondary (modulatory) role in striated muscle, which is regulated by Ca2+ via TnC/TM on the thin filament. Tarantula striated muscle exhibits both regulatory systems: one switches on/off contraction through thin filament regulation, and another through PKC constitutively Ser35 phosphorylated swaying f...

  6. Identification of recombinant phages containing sequences from different rat myosin heavy chain genes.

    Nudel, U.; Katcoff, D; Carmon, Y; Zevin-Sonkin, D; Levi, Z; Shaul, Y; Shani, M.; Yaffe, D.

    1980-01-01

    The construction and identification of a recombinant plasmid containing a cDNA insert which hybridizes specifically to myosin heavy chain mRNA is described. The plasmid was used as a probe to screen a rat genomic library for recombinant phages containing myosin heavy chain sequences. Six clones with approximately 15 k bp inserts each were isolated. Digestion with several restriction enzymes and hybridization of the fractionated DNA with the plasmid probe showed that the clones contained 3 dif...

  7. Targeting a Dynamic Protein–Protein Interaction: Fragment Screening against the Malaria Myosin A Motor Complex

    Douse, Christopher H; Vrielink, Nina; Wenlin, Zhang; Cota, Ernesto; Tate, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Motility is a vital feature of the complex life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum, the apicomplexan parasite that causes human malaria. Processes such as host cell invasion are thought to be powered by a conserved actomyosin motor (containing myosin A or myoA), correct localization of which is dependent on a tight interaction with myosin A tail domain interacting protein (MTIP) at the inner membrane of the parasite. Although disruption of this protein–protein interaction represents an attractive...

  8. UNLOADED SHORTENING VELOCITY AND MYOSIN HEAVY CHAIN VARIATIONS IN HUMAN LARYNGEAL MUSCLE FIBERS

    Sciote, James J.; Morris, Terence J.; Horton, Michael J.; Brandon, Carla A.; Rosen, Clark

    2002-01-01

    Myosin description in human laryngeal muscles is incomplete, but evidence suggests the presence of type I, IIA, IIX, and tonic myosin heavy chain (MHC) fibers. This study describes the unloaded shortening velocity (V0) of chemically skinned laryngeal muscle fibers measured by the slack test method in relation to MHC content. Skeletal fibers from human laryngeal and limb muscle biopsy specimens were obtained for determination of V0, and subsequently, glycerol–sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylam...

  9. Changes in myosin S1 orientation and force induced by a temperature increase

    Griffiths, Peter J.; Bagni, Maria A; Colombini, Barbara; Amenitsch, Heinz; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Ashley, Christopher C.; Cecchi, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    Force generation in myosin-based motile systems is thought to result from an angular displacement of the myosin subfragment 1 (S1) tail domain with respect to the actin filament axis. In muscle, raised temperature increases the force generated by S1, implying a greater change in tail domain angular displacement. We used time-resolved x-ray diffraction to investigate the structural corollary of this force increase by measuring M3 meridional reflection intensity during sinu...

  10. Contraction due to microtubule disruption is associated with increased phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain.

    Kolodney, M S; Elson, E L

    1995-01-01

    Microtubules have been proposed to function as rigid struts which oppose cellular contraction. Consistent with this hypothesis, microtubule disruption strengthens the contractile force exerted by many cell types. We have investigated alternative explanation for the mechanical effects of microtubule disruption: that microtubules modulate the mechanochemical activity of myosin by influencing phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (LC20). We measured the force produced by a populat...

  11. Atomic force microscopy reveals differences in cell membrane properties in nuclear myosin I mutant

    Venit, Tomáš; Rohožková, Jana; Kalendová, Alžběta; Hozák, Pavel

    Praha : ČSMS, 2013. s. 25-25. [Mikroskopie 2013. 13.05.2013-14.05.2013, Lednice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk LH12143 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * cell membrane * myosin 1C * NM1 * nuclear myosin I

  12. Nucleotide Dependent Intrinsic Fluorescence Changes of W29 and W36 in Smooth Muscle Myosin

    van Duffelen, Marilyn; Chrin, Lynn R.; Berger, Christopher L.

    2004-01-01

    The intrinsic fluorescence of smooth muscle myosin is sensitive to both nucleotide binding and hydrolysis. We have examined this relationship by making MDE mutants containing a single tryptophan residue at each of the seven positions found in the wild-type molecule. Previously, we have demonstrated that a conserved tryptophan residue (W512) is a major contributor to nucleotide-dependent changes of intrinsic fluorescence in smooth muscle myosin. In this study, an MDE containing all the endogen...

  13. Actin-myosin network is required for proper assembly of influenza virus particles

    Kumakura, Michiko; Kawaguchi, Atsushi, E-mail: ats-kawaguchi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Nagata, Kyosuke, E-mail: knagata@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2015-02-15

    Actin filaments are known to play a central role in cellular dynamics. After polymerization of actin, various actin-crosslinking proteins including non-muscle myosin II facilitate the formation of spatially organized actin filament networks. The actin-myosin network is highly expanded beneath plasma membrane. The genome of influenza virus (vRNA) replicates in the cell nucleus. Then, newly synthesized vRNAs are nuclear-exported to the cytoplasm as ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), followed by transport to the beneath plasma membrane where virus particles assemble. Here, we found that, by inhibiting actin-myosin network formation, the virus titer tends to be reduced and HA viral spike protein is aggregated on the plasma membrane. These results indicate that the actin-myosin network plays an important role in the virus formation. - Highlights: • Actin-myosin network is important for the influenza virus production. • HA forms aggregations at the plasma membrane in the presence of blebbistatin. • M1 is recruited to the budding site through the actin-myosin network.

  14. Nonmuscle Myosin II helps regulate synaptic vesicle mobility at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    Qiu Xinping

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the mechanistic details of the vesicle transport process from the cell body to the nerve terminal are well described, the mechanisms underlying vesicle traffic within nerve terminal boutons is relatively unknown. The actin cytoskeleton has been implicated but exactly how actin or actin-binding proteins participate in vesicle movement is not clear. Results In the present study we have identified Nonmuscle Myosin II as a candidate molecule important for synaptic vesicle traffic within Drosophila larval neuromuscular boutons. Nonmuscle Myosin II was found to be localized at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction; genetics and pharmacology combined with the time-lapse imaging technique FRAP were used to reveal a contribution of Nonmuscle Myosin II to synaptic vesicle movement. FRAP analysis showed that vesicle dynamics were highly dependent on the expression level of Nonmuscle Myosin II. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that Nonmuscle Myosin II is present presynaptically, is important for synaptic vesicle mobility and suggests a role for Nonmuscle Myosin II in shuttling vesicles at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. This work begins to reveal the process by which synaptic vesicles traverse within the bouton.

  15. Actin-myosin network is required for proper assembly of influenza virus particles

    Actin filaments are known to play a central role in cellular dynamics. After polymerization of actin, various actin-crosslinking proteins including non-muscle myosin II facilitate the formation of spatially organized actin filament networks. The actin-myosin network is highly expanded beneath plasma membrane. The genome of influenza virus (vRNA) replicates in the cell nucleus. Then, newly synthesized vRNAs are nuclear-exported to the cytoplasm as ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), followed by transport to the beneath plasma membrane where virus particles assemble. Here, we found that, by inhibiting actin-myosin network formation, the virus titer tends to be reduced and HA viral spike protein is aggregated on the plasma membrane. These results indicate that the actin-myosin network plays an important role in the virus formation. - Highlights: • Actin-myosin network is important for the influenza virus production. • HA forms aggregations at the plasma membrane in the presence of blebbistatin. • M1 is recruited to the budding site through the actin-myosin network

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... CT scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than ... head is typically used to detect: bleeding, brain injury and skull fractures in patients with head injuries. ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head What is CT Scanning of the ... Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  18. Head Lice (Pediculosis Capitis)

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Head Lice (Pediculosis Capitis) A parent's guide to condition and treatment ... hair shaft are seen in this person with head lice. Overview Head lice (pediculosis capitis) is a common, ...

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    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

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  1. Why muscle is an efficient shock absorber.

    Michael A Ferenczi

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscles power body movement by converting free energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work. During the landing phase of running or jumping some activated skeletal muscles are subjected to stretch. Upon stretch they absorb body energy quickly and effectively thus protecting joints and bones from impact damage. This is achieved because during lengthening, skeletal muscle bears higher force and has higher instantaneous stiffness than during isometric contraction, and yet consumes very little ATP. We wish to understand how the actomyosin molecules change their structure and interaction to implement these physiologically useful mechanical and thermodynamical properties. We monitored changes in the low angle x-ray diffraction pattern of rabbit skeletal muscle fibers during ramp stretch compared to those during isometric contraction at physiological temperature using synchrotron radiation. The intensities of the off-meridional layer lines and fine interference structure of the meridional M3 myosin x-ray reflection were resolved. Mechanical and structural data show that upon stretch the fraction of actin-bound myosin heads is higher than during isometric contraction. On the other hand, the intensities of the actin layer lines are lower than during isometric contraction. Taken together, these results suggest that during stretch, a significant fraction of actin-bound heads is bound non-stereo-specifically, i.e. they are disordered azimuthally although stiff axially. As the strong or stereo-specific myosin binding to actin is necessary for actin activation of the myosin ATPase, this finding explains the low metabolic cost of energy absorption by muscle during the landing phase of locomotion.

  2. Head Impact Laboratory (HIL)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HIL uses testing devices to evaluate vehicle interior energy attenuating (EA) technologies for mitigating head injuries resulting from head impacts during mine/...

  3. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  4. Modelling the effect of myosin X motors on filopodia growth

    Wolff, Katrin; Evans, Martin R; Goryachev, Andrew B; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2014-01-01

    We present a numerical simulation study of the dynamics of filopodial growth in the presence of active transport by myosin X motors. We employ both a microscopic agent-based model, which captures the stochasticity of the growth process, and a continuum mean-field theory which neglects fluctuations. We show that in the absence of motors, filopodia growth is overestimated by the continuum mean-field theory. Thus fluctuations slow down the growth, especially when the protrusions are driven by a small number (10 or less) of F-actin fibres, and when the force opposing growth (coming from membrane elasticity) is large enough. We also show that, with typical parameter values for eukaryotic cells, motors are unlikely to provide an actin transport mechanism which enhances filopodial size significantly, unless the G-actin concentration within the filopodium greatly exceeds that of the cytosol bulk. We explain these observations in terms of order-of-magnitude estimates of diffusion-induced and advection-induced growth o...

  5. Modelling the effect of myosin X motors on filopodia growth

    We present a numerical simulation study of the dynamics of filopodial growth in the presence of active transport by myosin X motors. We employ both a microscopic agent-based model, which captures the stochasticity of the growth process, and a continuum mean-field theory which neglects fluctuations. We show that in the absence of motors, filopodia growth is overestimated by the continuum mean-field theory. Thus fluctuations slow down the growth, especially when the protrusions are driven by a small number (10 or less) of F-actin fibres, and when the force opposing growth (coming from membrane elasticity) is large enough. We also show that, with typical parameter values for eukaryotic cells, motors are unlikely to provide an actin transport mechanism which enhances filopodial size significantly, unless the G-actin concentration within the filopodium greatly exceeds that of the cytosol bulk. We explain these observations in terms of order-of-magnitude estimates of diffusion-induced and advection-induced growth of a bundle of Brownian ratchets. (paper)

  6. Absence of platelet phenotype in mice lacking the motor protein myosin Va.

    Matthew T Harper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The motor protein myosin Va plays an important role in the trafficking of intracellular vesicles. Mutation of the Myo5a gene causes Griscelli syndrome type 1 in humans and the dilute phenotype in mice, which are both characterised by pigment dilution and neurological defects as a result of impaired vesicle transport in melanocytes and neuroendocrine cells. The role of myosin Va in platelets is currently unknown. Rab27 has been shown to be associated with myosin Va cargo vesicles and is known to be important in platelet dense granule biogenesis and secretion, a crucial event in thrombus formation. Therefore, we hypothesised that myosin Va may regulate granule secretion or formation in platelets. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Platelet function was studied in vitro using a novel Myo5a gene deletion mouse model. Myo5a(-/- platelets were devoid of myosin Va, as determined by immunoblotting, and exhibited normal expression of surface markers. We assessed dense granule, α-granule and lysosomal secretion, integrin α(IIbβ(3 activation, Ca(2+ signalling, and spreading on fibrinogen in response to collagen-related peptide or the PAR4 agonist, AYPGKF in washed mouse platelets lacking myosin Va or wild-type platelets. Surprisingly, Myo5a(-/- platelets showed no significant functional defects in these responses, or in the numbers of dense and α-granules expressed. CONCLUSION: Despite the importance of myosin Va in vesicle transport in other cells, our data demonstrate this motor protein has no non-redundant role in the secretion of dense and α-granules or other functional responses in platelets.

  7. Increased Association of Dynamin Ⅱ with Myosin Ⅱ in Ras Transformed NIH3T3 Cells

    Soon-Jeong JEONG; Su-Gwan KIM; Jiyun YOO; Mi-Young HAN; Joo-Cheol PARK; Heung-Joong KIM; Seong Soo KANG; Baik-Dong CHOI; Moon-Jin JEONG

    2006-01-01

    Dynamin has been implicated in the formation of nascent vesicles through both endocytic and secretory pathways. However, dynamin has recently been implicated in altering the cell membrane shape during cell migration associated with cytoskeleton-related proteins. Myosin Ⅱ has been implicated in maintaining cell morphology and in cellular movement. Therefore, reciprocal immunoprecipitation was carried out to identify the potential relationship between dynamin Ⅱ and myosin Ⅱ. The dynamin Ⅱ expression level was higher when co-expressed with myosin Ⅱ in Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells than in normal NIH3T3 cells.Confocal microscopy also confirmed the interaction between these two proteins. Interestingly, exposing the NIH3T3 cells to platelet-derived growth factor altered the interaction and localization of these two proteins.The platelet-derived growth factor treatment induced lamellipodia and cell migration, and dynamin Ⅱ interacted with myosin Ⅱ. Grb2, a 24 kDa adaptor protein and an essential element of the Ras signaling pathway,was found to be associated with dynamin Ⅱ and myosin Ⅱ gene expression in the Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells. These results suggest that dynamin Ⅱ acts as an intermediate messenger in the Ras signal transduction pathway leading to membrane ruffling and cell migration.

  8. The Role of Dietary Protein Intake and Resistance Training on Myosin Heavy Chain Expression

    Willoughby Darryn S

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During resistance training the muscle undergoes many changes. Possibly the most profound and significant changes are those that occur in the muscles contractile proteins. Increases in these contractile proteins are one of the primary factors contributing to myofibrillar hypertrophy. The most abundant muscle protein is myosin, which comprises 25% of the total muscle protein. Due to the large amount of skeletal muscle that is composed of myosin, changes in this fiber may have profound effects on skeletal muscle size and strength. The myosin molecule is made up of 6 subunits, 2 very large heavy chains, and 4 smaller light chains. The myosin heavy chain (MHC accounts for 25–30% of all muscle proteins making its size an important factor in skeletal muscle growth. In conjunction with resistance training, dietary protein intake must be adequate to illicit positive adaptations. Although many studies have evaluated the role of dietary protein intake on skeletal muscle changes, few have evaluated the MHC specifically. Research has clearly defined the need for dietary protein and resistance training to facilitate positive changes in skeletal muscle. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the current literature on the effects of dietary protein and resistance training on the expression of the myosin heavy chain.

  9. Internal dynamics of F-actin and myosin subfragment-1 studied by quasielastic neutron scattering

    Various biological functions related to cell motility are driven by the interaction between the partner proteins, actin and myosin. To obtain insights into how this interaction occurs, the internal dynamics of F-actin and myosin subfragment-1 (S1) were characterized by the quasielastic neutron scattering measurements on the solution samples of F-actin and S1. Contributions of the internal motions of the proteins to the scattering spectra were separated from those of the global macromolecular diffusion. Analysis of the spectra arising from the internal dynamics showed that the correlation times of the atomic motions were about two times shorter for F-actin than for S1, suggesting that F-actin fluctuates more rapidly than S1. It was also shown that the fraction of the immobile atoms is larger for S1 than for F-actin. These results suggest that F-actin actively facilitates the binding of myosin by utilizing the more frequent conformational fluctuations than those of S1. - Highlights: • We studied the internal dynamics of F-actin and myosin S1 by neutron scattering. • The correlation times of the atomic motions were smaller for F-actin than for S1. • The fraction of the immobile atoms was also smaller for F-actin than for S1. • Our results suggest that mobility of atoms in F-actin is higher than that in S1. • We propose that high flexibility of F-actin facilitates the binding of myosin

  10. Transportation of nanoscale cargoes by myosin propelled actin filaments.

    Malin Persson

    Full Text Available Myosin II propelled actin filaments move ten times faster than kinesin driven microtubules and are thus attractive candidates as cargo-transporting shuttles in motor driven lab-on-a-chip devices. In addition, actomyosin-based transportation of nanoparticles is useful in various fundamental studies. However, it is poorly understood how actomyosin function is affected by different number of nanoscale cargoes, by cargo size, and by the mode of cargo-attachment to the actin filament. This is studied here using biotin/fluorophores, streptavidin, streptavidin-coated quantum dots, and liposomes as model cargoes attached to monomers along the actin filaments ("side-attached" or to the trailing filament end via the plus end capping protein CapZ. Long-distance transportation (>100 µm could be seen for all cargoes independently of attachment mode but the fraction of motile filaments decreased with increasing number of side-attached cargoes, a reduction that occurred within a range of 10-50 streptavidin molecules, 1-10 quantum dots or with just 1 liposome. However, as observed by monitoring these motile filaments with the attached cargo, the velocity was little affected. This also applied for end-attached cargoes where the attachment was mediated by CapZ. The results with side-attached cargoes argue against certain models for chemomechanical energy transduction in actomyosin and give important insights of relevance for effective exploitation of actomyosin-based cargo-transportation in molecular diagnostics and other nanotechnological applications. The attachment of quantum dots via CapZ, without appreciable modulation of actomyosin function, is useful in fundamental studies as exemplified here by tracking with nanometer accuracy.

  11. Inverse interaction between tropomyosin and phosphorylated myosin in the presence or absence of caldesmon

    Ying Zhang; Houli Zhang; Zeyao Tang; Kazuhiro Kohama; Yuan Lin

    2013-01-01

    In the present study,co-sedimentation assay,intrinsic fluorescence intensity measurement,and Mg2+-ATPase activity analysis were carried out to investigate the direct effect of tropomyosin (TM) on unphosphorylated myosin (UM) or phosphorylated myosin (PM) in the presence or absence of caldesmon (CaD).Results showed that TM significantly decreased the sedimentation,intrinsic fluorescence intensity,and the Mg2+-ATPase activity of PM,but not UM.In the presence of CaD,TM also significantly decreased these parameters irrespective of myosin phosphorylation,suggesting that the interaction between TM and CaD abolished the effects of TM on PM or UM and that there was an inverse interaction between TM and PM,characterized by the decreased PM sedimentation and intrinsic fluorescence intensity.

  12. Metastasis-associated protein Mts1 (S100A4) inhibits CK2-mediated phosphorylation and self-assembly of the heavy chain of nonmuscle myosin

    Kriajevska, M; Bronstein, I B; Scott, D J; Tarabykina, S; Fischer-Larsen, M; Issinger, O; Lukanidin, E

    A role for EF-hand calcium-binding protein Mts1 (S100A4) in the phosphorylation and the assembly of myosin filaments was studied. The nonmuscle myosin molecules form bipolar filaments, which interact with actin filaments to produce a contractile force. Phosphorylation of the myosin plays a regula...

  13. Electron tomography of cryofixed, isometrically contracting insect flight muscle reveals novel actin-myosin interactions.

    Shenping Wu

    Full Text Available Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ.We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the "target zone", situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77°/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127° range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening.We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very

  14. Myosin light chain kinase facilitates endocytosis of synaptic vesicles at hippocampal boutons.

    Li, Lin; Wu, Xiaomei; Yue, Hai-Yuan; Zhu, Yong-Chuan; Xu, Jianhua

    2016-07-01

    At nerve terminals, endocytosis efficiently recycles vesicle membrane to maintain synaptic transmission under different levels of neuronal activity. Ca(2+) and its downstream signal pathways are critical for the activity-dependent regulation of endocytosis. An activity- and Ca(2+) -dependent kinase, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) has been reported to regulate vesicle mobilization, vesicle cycling, and motility in different synapses, but whether it has a general contribution to regulation of endocytosis at nerve terminals remains unknown. We investigated this issue at rat hippocampal boutons by imaging vesicle endocytosis as the real-time retrieval of vesicular synaptophysin tagged with a pH-sensitive green fluorescence protein. We found that endocytosis induced by 200 action potentials (5-40 Hz) was slowed by acute inhibition of MLCK and down-regulation of MLCK with RNA interference, while the total amount of vesicle exocytosis and somatic Ca(2+) channel current did not change with MLCK down-regulation. Acute inhibition of myosin II similarly impaired endocytosis. Furthermore, down-regulation of MLCK prevented depolarization-induced phosphorylation of myosin light chain, an effect shared by blockers of Ca(2+) channels and calmodulin. These results suggest that MLCK facilitates vesicle endocytosis through activity-dependent phosphorylation of myosin downstream of Ca(2+) /calmodulin, probably as a widely existing mechanism among synapses. Our study suggests that MLCK is an important activity-dependent regulator of vesicle recycling in hippocampal neurons, which are critical for learning and memory. The kinetics of vesicle membrane endocytosis at nerve terminals has long been known to depend on activity and Ca(2+) . This study provides evidence suggesting that myosin light chain kinase increases endocytosis efficiency at hippocampal neurons by mediating Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of myosin. The authors propose that this signal cascade may serve as

  15. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development

    Peremyslov, Valera V.; Cole, Rex A.; Fowler, John E.; Dolja, Valerian V.

    2015-01-01

    Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI), cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors) and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6–1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development. PMID:26426395

  16. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development.

    Valera V Peremyslov

    Full Text Available Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI, cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6-1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development.

  17. BMP-2 Overexpression Augments Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Motility by Upregulating Myosin Va via Erk Signaling

    Ming Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The disruption of physiologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC migration initiates atherosclerosis development. The biochemical mechanisms leading to dysfunctional VSMC motility remain unknown. Recently, cytokine BMP-2 has been implicated in various vascular physiologic and pathologic processes. However, whether BMP-2 has any effect upon VSMC motility, or by what manner, has never been investigated. Methods. VSMCs were adenovirally transfected to genetically overexpress BMP-2. VSMC motility was detected by modified Boyden chamber assay, confocal time-lapse video assay, and a colony wounding assay. Gene chip array and RT-PCR were employed to identify genes potentially regulated by BMP-2. Western blot and real-time PCR detected the expression of myosin Va and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (Erk1/2. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed myosin Va expression locale. Intracellular Ca2+ oscillations were recorded. Results. VSMC migration was augmented in VSMCs overexpressing BMP-2 in a dose-dependent manner. siRNA-mediated knockdown of myosin Va inhibited VSMC motility. Both myosin Va mRNA and protein expression significantly increased after BMP-2 administration and were inhibited by Erk1/2 inhibitor U0126. BMP-2 induced Ca2+ oscillations, generated largely by a “cytosolic oscillator”. Conclusion. BMP-2 significantly increased VSMCs migration and myosin Va expression, via the Erk signaling pathway and intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. We provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, and inhibition of BMP-2-induced myosin Va expression may represent a potential therapeutic strategy.

  18. Preparation of monoclonal antibodies against cardiac myosin and some radiolabelling studies

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against myosin, a specific indicator of myocardial infarction and labelled with 125I and 99mTc. Human cardiac myosin was isolated from normal human heart and was used for raising the monoclonal antibodies by the hybridoma technique. Antibody producing clones were identified by ELISA and cloning was done by the limiting dilution technique. Of the 13 clones obtained, 4 were deemed suitable for further studies. The antibodies were grown in ascites, purified, isotyped and their cross reactions with other forms of myosin were estimated. All the clones showed negligible cross reaction with rabbit myosin, but reacted to different extents with bovine skeletal myosin. The most avid antibody Mab-4G4 was chosen for further labelling studies. Mab-4G4 was labelled with 125I using different oxidising agents such as iodogen, chloramine-T and lactoperoxidase. Purified radioiodinated antibody with radiochemical purity >95% could be obtained by gel filtration. Immunoreactivity was retained as tested by binding to myosin immobilised on a solid support. Mab-4G4 was also labelled with 99mTc using stannous tartrate as the reducing agent. Radiolabelling yield was ∼60%, the purity was >95% and the immunoreactivity was retained. Both the labelled preparations were tested for bio-distribution in normal and infarcted rats. The activity accumulation in the infarcted region was ∼ 1.5 and 3.5 times as that in normal heart muscle for 125I and 99mTc labelled Mab-4G4 respectively. The major problem with the iodinated antibody was the in vivo deiodination resulting in very high percentage of activity in the thyroid. Although the fraction of the total activity associated with the infarcted heart is not very impressive, the fact that the activities with the infarcted and normal hearths are significantly different is heartening. With further optimisation of labelling and use of F(ab)'2 fragments, better delineation of the infarct sites is aspired. (author)

  19. Statistical Thermodynamics for Actin-Myosin Binding: The Crucial Importance of Hydration Effects.

    Oshima, Hiraku; Hayashi, Tomohiko; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    Actomyosin is an important molecular motor, and the binding of actin and myosin is an essential research target in biophysics. Nevertheless, the physical factors driving or opposing the binding are still unclear. Here, we investigate the role of water in actin-myosin binding using the most reliable statistical-mechanical method currently available for assessing biomolecules immersed in water. This method is characterized as follows: water is treated not as a dielectric continuum but as an ensemble of molecules; the polyatomic structures of proteins are taken into consideration; and the binding free energy is decomposed into physically insightful entropic and energetic components by accounting for the hydration effect to its full extent. We find that the actin-myosin binding brings large gains of electrostatic and Lennard-Jones attractive interactions. However, these gains are accompanied by even larger losses of actin-water and myosin-water electrostatic and LJ attractive interactions. Although roughly half of the energy increase due to the losses is cancelled out by the energy decrease arising from structural reorganization of the water released upon binding, the remaining energy increase is still larger than the energy decrease brought by the gains mentioned above. Hence, the net change in system energy is positive, which opposes binding. Importantly, the binding is driven by a large gain of configurational entropy of water, which surpasses the positive change in system energy and the conformational entropy loss occurring for actin and myosin. The principal physical origin of the large water-entropy gain is as follows: the actin-myosin interface is closely packed with the achievement of high shape complementarity on the atomic level, leading to a large increase in the total volume available to the translational displacement of water molecules in the system and a resultant reduction of water crowding (i.e., entropic correlations among water molecules). PMID

  20. Radiation-induced myosin IIA expression stimulates collagen type I matrix reorganization

    Background and purpose: Extracellular matrix (ECM) reorganization critically contributes to breast cancer (BC) progression and radiotherapy response. We investigated the molecular background and functional consequences of collagen type I (col-I) reorganization by irradiated breast cancer cells (BCC). Materials and methods: Radiation-induced (RI) col-I reorganization was evaluated for MCF-7/6, MCF-7/AZ, T47D and SK-BR-3 BCC. Phase-contrast microscopy and a stressed matrix contraction assay were used for visualization and quantification of col-I reorganization. Cell–matrix interactions were assessed by the inhibition of β1 integrin (neutralizing antibody ‘P5D2’) or focal adhesion kinase (FAK; GSK22560098 small molecule kinase inhibitor). The role of the actomyosin cytoskeleton was explored by western blotting analysis of myosin II expression and activity; and by gene silencing of myosin IIA and pharmacological inhibition of the actomyosin system (blebbistatin, cytochalasin D). BCC death was evaluated by propidium iodide staining. Results: We observed a radiation dose-dependent increase of col-I reorganization by BCC. β1 Integrin/FAK-mediated cell–matrix interactions are essential for RI col-I reorganization. Irradiated BCC are characterized by increased myosin IIA expression and myosin IIA-dependent col-I reorganization. Moreover, RI col-I reorganization by BCC is associated with decreased BCC death, as suggested by pharmacological targeting of the β1 integrin/FAK/myosin IIA pathway. Conclusions: Our data indicate the role of myosin IIA in col-I reorganization by irradiated BCC and reciprocal BCC death

  1. Extensibility of the Extended Tail Domain of Processive and Nonprocessive Myosin V Molecules

    Nagy, Attila; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Sellers, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Myosin V is a single-molecule motor that moves organelles along actin. When myosin V pulls loads inside the cell in a highly viscous environment, the force on the motor is unlikely to be constant. We propose that the tether between the single-molecule motor and the cargo (i.e., the extended tail domain of the molecule) must be able to absorb the sudden mechanical motions of the motor and allow smooth relaxation of the motion of the cargo to a new position. To test this hypothesis, we compared...

  2. Involvement of headless myosin X in the motility of immortalized gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal cells

    WANG, JUN-JIE; Fu, Xiu-Qing; Guo, Yu-Guang; Yuan, Lin; Gao, Qian-Qian; Yu, Hua-Li; Shi, Heng-Liang; Wang, Xing-Zhi; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Zhu, Xiao-Juan

    2009-01-01

    Myosin X (Myo X), an unconventional myosin with a tail homology 4-band 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin (MyTH4-FERM) tail, is expressed ubiquitously in various mammalian tissues. In addition to the full-length Myo X (Myo X FL), a headless form is synthesized in the brain. So far, little is known about the function of this motor-less Myo X. In this study, the role of the headless Myo X was investigated in immortalized gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal cells, NLT. NLT cells overexpressing ...

  3. Opening the Arg-Glu salt bridge in myosin: computational study.

    Kaliman, Ilya; Grigorenko, Bella; Shadrina, Maria; Nemukhin, Alexander

    2009-06-28

    Opening the Arg-Glu salt bridge in myosin, which presumably succeeds the myosin-catalyzed hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate, was modeled computationally on the basis of the structures corresponding to the enzyme-substrate and enzyme-product complexes found in the quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics simulations. According to the calculations of the potential of mean force, opening the bridge is considerably facilitated upon termination of the chemical reaction, but does not promote egress of inorganic phosphate by the back-door mechanism. PMID:19506754

  4. Effect of trimetazidine and verapamil on the cardiomyopathic hamster myosin phenotype

    D'hahan, Nathalie; Taouil, Karima; Janmot, Chantal; Morel, Jean-Emile

    1998-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether long-term trimetazidine (anti-ischaemic drug) therapy alters the ventricular myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition in a model of cardiomyopathy.MHC isoforms were analysed in the native state by electrophoresis in a pyrophosphate buffer. Myosin isoform patterns were studied in cardiac muscle from cardiomyopathic hamsters (CMH) of the BIO 14 : 6 strain during the time course of the disease and compared with those of healthy golden hamsters (F1B). The...

  5. SLOW MYOSIN ATP TURNOVER IN THE SUPER-RELAXED STATE IN TARANTULA MUSCLE

    Naber, Nariman; Cooke, Roger; Pate, Edward

    2011-01-01

    We measured the nucleotide turnover rate of myosin in tarantula leg-muscle fibers by observing single turnovers of the fluorescent nucleotide analog, mantATP, as monitored by the decrease in fluorescence when mantATP is replaced by ATP in a chase experiment. We find a multi-exponential process, with approximately two-thirds of the myosin showing a very slow nucleotide turnover time constant, ~30 minutes. This slow-turnover state is termed the super-relaxed state (SRX). If fibers are incubated...

  6. The Rho kinases I and II regulate different aspects of myosin II activity

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John R

    2005-01-01

    The homologous mammalian rho kinases (ROCK I and II) are assumed to be functionally redundant, based largely on kinase construct overexpression. As downstream effectors of Rho GTPases, their major substrates are myosin light chain and myosin phosphatase. Both kinases are implicated in microfilament...... persistent ROCK II and guanine triphosphate-bound RhoA. In contrast, the microfilament cytoskeleton was enhanced by ROCK II down-regulation. Phagocytic uptake of fibronectin-coated beads was strongly down-regulated in ROCK II-depleted cells but not those lacking ROCK I. These effects originated in part from...

  7. Myosin Vc Is a Molecular Motor That Functions in Secretory Granule Trafficking

    Jacobs, Damon T.; Weigert, Roberto; Grode, Kyle D.; Donaldson, Julie G.; Cheney, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Class V myosins are actin-based motor proteins that have critical functions in organelle trafficking. Of the three class V myosins expressed in mammals, relatively little is known about Myo5c except that it is abundant in exocrine tissues. Here we use MCF-7 cells to identify the organelles that Myo5c associates with, image the dynamics of Myo5c in living cells, and test the functions of Myo5c. Endogenous Myo5c localizes to two distinct compartments: small puncta and slender tubules. Myo5c oft...

  8. Specific Myosins Control Actin Organization, Cell Morphology, and Migration in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Katarzyna A. Makowska; Ruth E. Hughes; Kathryn J. White; Claire M. Wells; Michelle Peckham

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the myosin expression profile in prostate cancer cell lines and found that Myo1b, Myo9b, Myo10, and Myo18a were expressed at higher levels in cells with high metastatic potential. Moreover, Myo1b and Myo10 were expressed at higher levels in metastatic tumors. Using an siRNA-based approach, we found that knockdown of each myosin resulted in distinct phenotypes. Myo10 knockdown ablated filopodia and decreased 2D migration speed. Myo18a knockdown increased circumferential non-mus...

  9. Atomic force microscopy reveals differences in cell membrane properties in nuclear myosin I mutant

    Venit, Tomáš; Kalendová, Alžběta; Petr, Martin; Rohožková, Jana; Hozák, Pavel

    Praha : Society for Histochemistry, 2013. [55th Symposium of the Society for Histochemistry. 11.06.2013-14.06.2013, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA MŠk LH12143 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * cell membrane * myosin 1C * NM1 * nuclear myosin I Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. Head injury - first aid

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000028.htm Head injury - first aid To use the sharing features on this page, ... a concussion can range from mild to severe. First Aid Learning to recognize a serious head injury and ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of ... the head is typically used to detect: bleeding, brain injury and skull fractures in patients with head ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  13. Myosin II Motor Activity in the Lateral Amygdala Is Required for Fear Memory Consolidation

    Gavin, Cristin F.; Rubio, Maria D.; Young, Erica; Miller, Courtney; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Learning induces dynamic changes to the actin cytoskeleton that are required to support memory formation. However, the molecular mechanisms that mediate filamentous actin (F-actin) dynamics during learning and memory are poorly understood. Myosin II motors are highly expressed in actin-rich growth structures including dendritic spines, and we have…

  14. Model of myosin recruitment to the cell equator for cytokinesis: feedback mechanisms and dynamical regimes

    Veksler, Alexander; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2011-03-01

    The formation and constriction of the contractile ring during cytokinesis, the final step of cell division, depends on the recruitment of motor protein myosin to the cell's equatorial region. During animal cell cytokinesis, cortical myosin filaments (MF) disassemble at the flanking regions and concentrate in the equator. This recruitment depends on myosin motor activity and the Rho proteins that regulate MF assembly and disassembly. Central spindle and astral microtubules help establish a spatial pattern of differential Rho activity. We propose a reaction-diffusion model for the dynamics of MF recruitment to the equatorial region. In the model, the central spindle and mechanical stress promote self-reinforcing MF assembly. Negative feedback is introduced by MF-induced recruitment of inhibitor myosin phosphatase. Our model yields various dynamical regimes and explains both the recruitment of MF to the cleavage furrow and the observed damped MF oscillations in the flanking regions, as well as steady MF assembly. Space and time parameters of MF oscillations are calculated. We predict oscillatory relaxation of cortical MF upon removal of locally-applied external stress.

  15. Transmembrane myosin chitin synthase involved in mollusc shell formation produced in Dictyostelium is active

    Schoenitzer, Veronika [INM - Leibniz Institute for New Materials, Biomineralisation Group, Campus D2.2, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Universitaet Regensburg, Biochemie I, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Eichner, Norbert [Universitaet Regensburg, Biochemie I, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke [Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstrasse 34, D-80335 Muenchen, Germany, and Center for NanoScience (CeNS), Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, D-80539 Muenchen (Germany); Weiss, Ingrid M., E-mail: ingrid.weiss@inm-gmbh.de [INM - Leibniz Institute for New Materials, Biomineralisation Group, Campus D2.2, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Universitaet Regensburg, Biochemie I, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dictyostelium produces the 264 kDa myosin chitin synthase of bivalve mollusc Atrina. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitin synthase activity releases chitin, partly associated with the cell surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Membrane extracts of transgenic slime molds produce radiolabeled chitin in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitin producing Dictyostelium cells can be characterized by atomic force microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This model system enables us to study initial processes of chitin biomineralization. -- Abstract: Several mollusc shells contain chitin, which is formed by a transmembrane myosin motor enzyme. This protein could be involved in sensing mechanical and structural changes of the forming, mineralizing extracellular matrix. Here we report the heterologous expression of the transmembrane myosin chitin synthase Ar-CS1 of the bivalve mollusc Atrina rigida (2286 amino acid residues, M.W. 264 kDa/monomer) in Dictyostelium discoideum, a model organism for myosin motor proteins. Confocal laser scanning immunofluorescence microscopy (CLSM), chitin binding GFP detection of chitin on cells and released to the cell culture medium, and a radiochemical activity assay of membrane extracts revealed expression and enzymatic activity of the mollusc chitin synthase in transgenic slime mold cells. First high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of Ar-CS1 transformed cellulose synthase deficient D. discoideumdcsA{sup -} cell lines are shown.

  16. Suppression of contractile force in muscle fibers by antibody to myosin subfragment 2.

    Lovell, S; Karr, T; Harrington, W F

    1988-01-01

    Polyclonal antibody directed against the subfragment-2 region of myosin was purified by affinity chromatography. Skinned muscle fibers that had been preincubated with antibody were able to sustain only 7% of the active isometric force generated by control fibers. The effect of antibody on force production could not be accounted for by inhibition of ATP turnover.

  17. Purification, Characterization and Analysis of the Allergenic Properties of Myosin Light Chain in Procambarus clarkia.

    Myosin light chain (MLC) plays a vital role in cell and muscle functions and has been identified as an allergen in close species. In this study, MLC with the molecular mass of 18kDa was purified from crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) muscle fibrils. Its physicochemical characterization showed that the...

  18. Brush border myosin Ia inactivation in gastric but not endometrial tumors

    Mazzolini, Rocco; Rodrigues, Paulo; Bazzocco, Sarah; Dopeso, Higinio; Ferreira, Ana M.; Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; Andretta, Elena; Woerner, Stefan M.; Alazzouzi, Hafid; Landolfi, Stefania; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Macaya, Irati; Suzuki, Hiromu; Ramon y Cajal, Santiago; Mooseker, Mark S.; Mariadason, John M.; Gebert, Johannes; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Reventos, Jaume; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Schwartz, Simo; Arango, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Brush border Myosin Ia (MYO1A) has been shown to be frequently mutated in colorectal tumors with microsatellite instability (MSI) and to have tumor suppressor activity in intestinal tumors. Here, we investigated the frequency of frameshift mutations in the A8 microsatellite in exon 28 of MYO1A in MS

  19. Increased expression of Myosin binding protein H in the skeletal muscle of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients

    Conti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe and fatal neurodegenerative disease of still unknown pathogenesis. Recent findings suggest that the skeletal muscle may play an active pathogenetic role. To investigate ALS\\'s pathogenesis and to seek diagnostic markers, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies with the differential expression proteomic approach. We studied skeletal muscle biopsies from healthy controls (CN), sporadic ALS (sALS), motor neuropathies (MN) and myopathies (M). Pre-eminently among several differentially expressed proteins, Myosin binding protein H (MyBP-H) expression in ALS samples was anomalously high. MyBP-H is a component of the thick filaments of the skeletal muscle and has strong affinity for myosin, but its function is still unclear. High MyBP-H expression level was associated with abnormal expression of Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2), LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) and cofilin2, that might affect the actin-myosin interaction. We propose that MyBP-H expression level serves, as a putative biomarker in the skeletal muscle, to discriminate ALS from motor neuropathies, and that it signals the onset of dysregulation in actin-myosin interaction; this in turn might contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Myosin concentration underlies cell size–dependent scalability of actomyosin ring constriction

    Wright, Graham D.; Leong, Fong Yew; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Chen, Yinxiao; Jedd, Gregory; Balasubramanian, Mohan K.

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes, cytokinesis is accomplished by an actomyosin-based contractile ring. Although in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos larger cells divide at a faster rate than smaller cells, it remains unknown whether a similar mode of scalability operates in other cells. We investigated cytokinesis in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, which exhibits a wide range of hyphal circumferences. We found that N. crassa cells divide using an actomyosin ring and larger rings constricted faster than smaller rings. However, unlike in C. elegans, the total amount of myosin remained constant throughout constriction, and there was a size-dependent increase in the starting concentration of myosin in the ring. We predict that the increased number of ring-associated myosin motors in larger rings leads to the increased constriction rate. Accordingly, reduction or inhibition of ring-associated myosin slows down the rate of constriction. Because the mechanical characteristics of contractile rings are conserved, we predict that these findings will be relevant to actomyosin ring constriction in other cell types. PMID:22123864

  1. Review: Ras GTPases and myosin: Qualitative conservation and quantitative diversification in signal and energy transduction.

    Mueller, Matthias P; Goody, Roger S

    2016-08-01

    Most GTPases and many ATPases belong to the P-loop class of proteins with significant structural and mechanistic similarities. Here we compare and contrast the basic properties of the Ras family GTPases and myosin, and conclude that there are fundamental similarities but also distinct differences related to their specific roles. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 422-430, 2016. PMID:27018658

  2. Force dependent biotinylation of myosin IIA by α-catenin tagged with a promiscuous biotin ligase.

    Shuji Ueda

    Full Text Available Tissues and organs undergo constant physical perturbations and individual cells must respond to mechanical forces to maintain tissue integrity. However, molecular interactions underlying mechano-transduction are not fully defined at cell-cell junctions. This is in part due to weak and transient interactions that are likely prevalent in force-induced protein complexes. Using in situ proximal biotinylation by the promiscuous biotin ligase BirA tagged to α-catenin and a substrate stretch cell chamber, we sought to identify force-dependent molecular interactions surrounding α-catenin, an actin regulator at the sites of cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion. While E-cadherin, β-catenin, vinculin and actin localize with α-catenin at cell-cell contacts in immuno-fluorescent staining, only β-catenin and plakoglobin were biotinylated, suggesting that this proximal biotinylation is limited to the molecules that are in the immediate vicinity of α-catenin. In mechanically stretched samples, increased biotinylation of non-muscle myosin IIA, but not myosin IIB, suggests close spatial proximity between α-catenin and myosin IIA during substrate stretching. This force-induced biotinylation diminished as myosin II activity was inhibited by blebbistatin. Taken together, this promising technique enables us to identify force sensitive complexes that may be essential for mechano-responses in force bearing cell adhesion.

  3. Force dependent biotinylation of myosin IIA by α-catenin tagged with a promiscuous biotin ligase.

    Ueda, Shuji; Blee, Alexandra M; Macway, Katherine G; Renner, Derrick J; Yamada, Soichiro

    2015-01-01

    Tissues and organs undergo constant physical perturbations and individual cells must respond to mechanical forces to maintain tissue integrity. However, molecular interactions underlying mechano-transduction are not fully defined at cell-cell junctions. This is in part due to weak and transient interactions that are likely prevalent in force-induced protein complexes. Using in situ proximal biotinylation by the promiscuous biotin ligase BirA tagged to α-catenin and a substrate stretch cell chamber, we sought to identify force-dependent molecular interactions surrounding α-catenin, an actin regulator at the sites of cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion. While E-cadherin, β-catenin, vinculin and actin localize with α-catenin at cell-cell contacts in immuno-fluorescent staining, only β-catenin and plakoglobin were biotinylated, suggesting that this proximal biotinylation is limited to the molecules that are in the immediate vicinity of α-catenin. In mechanically stretched samples, increased biotinylation of non-muscle myosin IIA, but not myosin IIB, suggests close spatial proximity between α-catenin and myosin IIA during substrate stretching. This force-induced biotinylation diminished as myosin II activity was inhibited by blebbistatin. Taken together, this promising technique enables us to identify force sensitive complexes that may be essential for mechano-responses in force bearing cell adhesion. PMID:25806963

  4. Myosin V and iNOS expression is enhanced in J774 murine macrophages treated with IFN-gamma

    D.S. Reis

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Actin-based motor protein requirements and nitric oxide (NO production are important features of macrophage activity during phagocytosis or microbicidal processes. Different classes of myosins contribute directly or indirectly to phagocytosis by providing mechanical force for phagosome closure or organelle movement. Recent data have shown the presence of myosins IC, II, V and IXb in phagosomes of bone marrow-derived murine macrophages. In our investigation we demonstrated the presence of different classes of myosins in J774 macrophages. We also analyzed the effect of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma, with or without calcium ionophore or cytochalasin B, on myosins as well as on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression and NO production. Myosins IC, II, Va, VI and IXb were identified in J774 macrophages. There was an increase of myosin V expression in IFN-gamma-treated cells. iNOS expression was increased by IFN-gamma treatment, while calcium ionophore and cytochalasin B had a negative influence on both myosin and iNOS expression, which was decreased. The increases in NO synthesis were reflected by increased iNOS expression. Macrophages activated by IFN-gamma released significant amounts of NO when compared to control groups. In contrast, NO production by calcium ionophore- and cytochalasin B-treated cells was similar to that of control cells. These results suggest that IFN-gamma is involved in macrophage activation by stimulating protein production to permit both phagocytosis and microbicidal activity.

  5. Solubilisation of myosin in a solution of low ionic strength L-histidine: Significance of the imidazole ring.

    Chen, Xing; Zou, Yufeng; Han, Minyi; Pan, Lihua; Xing, Tong; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-04-01

    Myosin, a major muscle protein, can be solubilised in a low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine (His). To elucidate which chemical constituents in His are responsible for this solubilisation, we investigated the effects of 5mM His, imidazole (Imi), L-α-alanine (Ala), 1-methyl-L-histidine (M-his) and L-carnosine (Car) on particle properties of myosin suspensions and conformational characteristics of soluble myosin at low ionic strength (1 mM KCl, pH 7.5). His, Imi and Car, each containing an imidazole ring, were able to induce a myosin suspension, which had small particle size species and high absolute zeta potential, thus increasing the solubility of myosin. His, Imi and Car affected the tertiary structure and decreased the α-helix content of soluble myosin. Therefore, the imidazole ring of His appeared to be the significant chemical constituent in solubilising myosin at low ionic strength solution, presumably by affecting its secondary structure. PMID:26593463

  6. Myosinome: a database of myosins from select eukaryotic genomes to facilitate analysis of sequence-structure-function relationships.

    Syamaladevi, Divya P; Sunitha, Margaret S; Kalaimathy, S; Reddy, Chandrashekar C; Iftekhar, Mohammed; Pasha, Shaik N; Sowdhamini, R

    2012-01-01

    Myosins are one of the largest protein superfamilies with 24 classes. They have conserved structural features and catalytic domains yet show huge variation at different domains resulting in a variety of functions. Myosins are molecules driving various kinds of cellular processes and motility until the level of organisms. These are ATPases that utilize the chemical energy released by ATP hydrolysis to bring about conformational changes leading to a motor function. Myosins are important as they are involved in almost all cellular activities ranging from cell division to transcriptional regulation. They are crucial due to their involvement in many congenital diseases symptomatized by muscular malfunctions, cardiac diseases, deafness, neural and immunological dysfunction, and so on, many of which lead to death at an early age. We present Myosinome, a database of selected myosin classes (myosin II, V, and VI) from five model organisms. This knowledge base provides the sequences, phylogenetic clustering, domain architectures of myosins and molecular models, structural analyses, and relevant literature of their coiled-coil domains. In the current version of Myosinome, information about 71 myosin sequences belonging to three myosin classes (myosin II, V, and VI) in five model organisms (Homo Sapiens, Mus musculus, D. melanogaster, C. elegans and S. cereviseae) identified using bioinformatics surveys are presented, and several of them are yet to be functionally characterized. As these proteins are involved in congenital diseases, such a database would be useful in short-listing candidates for gene therapy and drug development. The database can be accessed from http://caps.ncbs.res.in/myosinome. PMID:23189029

  7. Myosin light chain phosphorylation in 32P-labeled rabbit aorta stimulated by phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate and phenylephrine

    The mechanism(s) of force development in vascular smooth muscle following pharmacological activation of protein kinase C by phorbol esters are not known. In this study, we examined the myosin light chain phosphorylation response following stimulation by phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDB) or phenylephrine in rabbit aorta which had been incubated with 32PO4 in order to label ATP pools. Through tryptic phosphopeptide mapping of myosin light chain from intact tissue and comparison to controls using purified components, we inferred that Ca2+-dependent force stimulated by PDB was associated with small increases in serine-19 phosphorylation, consistent with a contractile mechanism involving indirect activation of myosin light chain kinase. Additional residues, consistent with the in vitro substrate specificity of protein kinase C, were also observed to be phosphorylated in response to PDB and represented proportionately a larger fraction of the total phosphorylated myosin light chain in Ca2+-depleted tissues. Stimulation by an alpha 1-adrenergic agonist (phenylephrine) resulted in phosphorylation of residues which were consistent with an activation mechanism involving myosin light chain kinase only. These results indicate that in rabbit aorta the contractile effects of PDB may be partially mediated by Ca2+-dependent activation of myosin light chain kinase. However, the data do not rule out a component of the PDB-stimulated contractile response which is independent of myosin light chain phosphorylation on the serine-19 residue. In addition, activation by a more physiological stimulus, phenylephrine, does not result in protein kinase C-mediated myosin light chain phosphorylation

  8. Association of a Myosin Immunoanalogue with Cell Envelopes of Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia and Its Participation in Swelling and Germination

    Esnault, Karine; el Moudni, Brahim; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Chabasse, Dominique; Tronchin, Guy

    1999-01-01

    A myosin immunoanalogue was identified in conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus by Western blotting, indirect immunofluorescence assay, and gold immunoelectron microscopy with two different antimyosin antibodies. The distribution pattern of this protein was followed during the early stages of germination. A single 180-kDa polypeptide, detected predominantly in a cell envelope extract, was found to cross-react with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies raised against vertebrate muscle myosin. Immuno...

  9. Simultaneous recordings of force and sliding movement between a myosin-coated glass microneedle and actin cables in vitro.

    Chaen, S; Oiwa, K; Shimmen, T; Iwamoto, H; Sugi, H

    1989-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanism of muscle contraction resulting from the ATP-dependent actin-myosin interaction, we constructed an assay system with which both the force and the movement produced by the actin-myosin interaction in vitro can be simultaneously recorded and analyzed. The assay system consisted of the giant internodal cells of an alga, Nitellopsis obtusa, which contain well-organized arrays of actin filaments (actin cables) running along the cell long axis, and a glass micro...

  10. Coiled-Coil–Mediated Dimerization Is Not Required for Myosin VI to Stabilize Actin during Spermatid Individualization in Drosophila melanogaster

    Noguchi, Tatsuhiko; Frank, Deborah J.; Isaji, Mamiko; Miller, Kathryn G.

    2009-01-01

    Myosin VI is a pointed-end–directed actin motor that is thought to function as both a transporter of cargoes and an anchor, capable of binding cellular components to actin for long periods. Dimerization via a predicted coiled coil was hypothesized to regulate activity and motor properties. However, the importance of the coiled-coil sequence has not been tested in vivo. We used myosin VI's well-defined role in actin stabilization during Drosophila spermatid individualization to test the import...

  11. Staining of Human Thyroarytenoid Muscle with Myosin Antibodies Reveals Some Unique Extrafusal Fibers, but no Muscle Spindles

    Brandon, Carla A.; Rosen, Clark; Georgelis, George; Horton, Michael J.; Mooney, Mark P.; Sciote, James J.

    2003-01-01

    This study describes the myosin composition of extrafusal and intrafusal muscle fibers found in the human thyroarytenoid (TA) and sternohyoid (control) muscles. We sought to determine the presence of muscle spindles in the TA muscle, and to identify unusual extrafusal fiber types, using the commonly accepted approach of tissue stainng with myosin isoform specific antibodies. Extrafusal fibers are organized into motor units, which subsequently produce muscle movement, whereas intrafusal fibers...

  12. Clinical study on the time courses of serum myosin light chain I levels in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    Changes of serum myosin light chain I (Myosin LCI) concentrations and creatine kinase (CK) activities were serially measured in 23 patients with acute myocardial infarction. Intracoronary thrombolysis was performed in 14 patients (ICT group) while the remaining 9 patients were treated in the conventional manner (non ICT group). The relationships between the maximum levels of serum Myosin LCI or CK and a myocardial infarct size index or left ventricular function were evaluated in 18 patients. The myocardial infarct size index was determined by 201Tl myocardial scintigrams performed in the chronic phase. Multiple peaks of Myosin LCI were observed in 64% (9/14) of the ICT group and the first peak in 6 of these patients appeared much earlier in the same time as CK peak than in the non-ICT group, while multiple peaks were seen only in one case in the non-ICT group. The infarct size index by 201Tl myocardial SPECT correlated with maximum Myosin LCI levels (r=0.88, p<0.001, n=10) and CK activities (r=0.67, p<0.05, n=10). These results indicate that the measurement of serum Myosin LCI is very useful for estimating the extent of myocardial damage and suggest that myocardial degeneration occurs at a very early phase of myocardial infarction. (author)

  13. Tubule-guided cell-to-cell movement of a plant virus requires class XI myosin motors.

    Khalid Amari

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell-to-cell movement of plant viruses occurs via plasmodesmata (PD, organelles that evolved to facilitate intercellular communications. Viral movement proteins (MP modify PD to allow passage of the virus particles or nucleoproteins. This passage occurs via several distinct mechanisms one of which is MP-dependent formation of the tubules that traverse PD and provide a conduit for virion translocation. The MP of tubule-forming viruses including Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV recruit the plant PD receptors called Plasmodesmata Located Proteins (PDLP to mediate tubule assembly and virus movement. Here we show that PDLP1 is transported to PD through a specific route within the secretory pathway in a myosin-dependent manner. This transport relies primarily on the class XI myosins XI-K and XI-2. Inactivation of these myosins using dominant negative inhibition results in mislocalization of PDLP and MP and suppression of GFLV movement. We also found that the proper targeting of specific markers of the Golgi apparatus, the plasma membrane, PD, lipid raft subdomains within the plasma membrane, and the tonoplast was not affected by myosin XI-K inhibition. However, the normal tonoplast dynamics required myosin XI-K activity. These results reveal a new pathway of the myosin-dependent protein trafficking to PD that is hijacked by GFLV to promote tubule-guided transport of this virus between plant cells.

  14. Correlation of dysfunction of nonmuscle myosin IIA with increased induction of Cyp1a1 in Hepa-1 cells.

    Ebina, Masayuki; Shibazaki, Masahiko; Kudo, Kyoko; Kasai, Shuya; Kikuchi, Hideaki

    2011-03-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is one of the best known ligand-activated transcription factors and it induces Cyp1a1 transcription by binding with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Recent focus has been on the relationship of AhR with signaling pathways that modulate cell shape and migration. In nonmuscle cells, nonmuscle myosin II is one of the key determinants of cell morphology, but it has not been investigated whether its function is related to Cyp1a1 induction. In this study, we observed that (-)-blebbistatin, which is a specific inhibitor of nonmuscle myosin II, increased the level of CYP1A1-mRNA in Hepa-1 cells. Comparison of (-)-blebbistatin with (+)-blebbistatin, which is an inactive enantiomer, indicated that the increase of CYP1A1-mRNA was due to nonmuscle myosin II inhibition. Subsequent knockdown experiments observed that reduction of nonmuscle myosin IIA, which is only an isoform of nonmuscle myosin II expressed in Hepa-1 cells, was related to the enhancement of TCDD-dependent Cyp1a1 induction. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicated that the increase of Cyp1a1 induction was the result of transcriptional activation due to increased binding of AhR and RNA polymerase II to the enhancer and proximal promoter regions of Cyp1a1, respectively. These findings provide a new insight into the correlation between the function of nonmuscle myosin II and gene induction. PMID:21216307

  15. Tyrosine phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of myosin II essential light chains of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites regulates their motility.

    Bonilla-Moreno, Raúl; Pérez-Yépez, Eloy-Andrés; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Morales, Fernando O; Meza, Isaura

    2016-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites dwell in the human intestine as comensals although under still unclear circumstances become invasive and destroy the host tissues. For these activities, trophozoites relay on remarkable motility provided by the cytoskeleton organization. Amebic actin and some of its actin-associated proteins are well known, while components of the myosin II molecule, although predicted from the E. histolytica genome, need biochemical and functional characterization. Recently, an amebic essential light myosin II chain, named EhMLCI, was identified and reported to be phosphorylated in tyrosines. The phosphorylated form of the protein was associated with the soluble assembly incompetent conformation of the heavy myosin chains, while the non-phosphorylated protein was identified with filamentous heavy chains, organized in an assembly competent conformation. It was postulated that EhMLCI tyrosine phosphorylation could act as a negative regulator of myosin II activity by its phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycles. To test this hypothesis, we constructed an expression vector containing an EhMLCI DNA sequence where two tyrosine residues, with strong probability of phosphorylation and fall within the single EF-hand domain that interacts with the N-terminus of myosin II heavy chains, were replaced by phenylalanines. Transfected trophozoites, expressing the mutant MutEhMLCI protein cannot process it, thereby not incorporated into the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycles required for myosin II activity, results in motility defective trophozoites. PMID:27318258

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head What is CT Scanning of the Head? What are some ...

  17. Head and Neck

    Højgaard, Liselotte; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Loft, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography with FDG of the head and neck region is mainly used for the diagnosis of head and neck cancer, for staging, treatment evaluation, relapse, and planning of surgery and radio therapy. This article is a practical guide of imaging techniques...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... the head is typically used to detect: bleeding, brain injury and skull fractures in patients with head injuries. bleeding caused by a ruptured or leaking aneurysm in a patient with a sudden severe headache. a blood clot or bleeding within the brain shortly after a patient exhibits symptoms of a ...

  20. American Head and Neck Society

    American Head & Neck Society Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education American Head & Neck Society | AHNS Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education About AHNS ... and Announcements Copyright ©2016 · American Head and Neck Society · Privacy and Return Policy Managed by BSC Management, ...

  1. A novel multitarget tracking algorithm for Myosin VI protein molecules on actin filaments in TIRFM sequences.

    Li, G; Sanchez, V; Nagaraj, P C S B; Khan, S; Rajpoot, N

    2015-12-01

    We propose a novel multitarget tracking framework for Myosin VI protein molecules in total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy sequences which integrates an extended Hungarian algorithm with an interacting multiple model filter. The extended Hungarian algorithm, which is a linear assignment problem based method, helps to solve measurement assignment and spot association problems commonly encountered when dealing with multiple targets, although a two-motion model interacting multiple model filter increases the tracking accuracy by modelling the nonlinear dynamics of Myosin VI protein molecules on actin filaments. The evaluation of our tracking framework is conducted on both real and synthetic total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy sequences. The results show that the framework achieves higher tracking accuracies compared to the state-of-the-art tracking methods, especially for sequences with high spot density. PMID:26259144

  2. Shrinkage insensitivity of NKCC1 in myosin II-depleted cytoplasts from Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    Hoffmann, Else K; Pedersen, Stine F

    2007-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and cytoskeletal reorganization regulate the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1) during osmotic shrinkage; however, the mechanisms involved are unclear. We show that in cytoplasts, plasma membrane vesicles detached from Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EATC......) by cytochalasin treatment, NKCC1 activity evaluated as bumetanide-sensitive (86)Rb influx was increased compared with the basal level in intact cells yet could not be further increased by osmotic shrinkage. Accordingly, cytoplasts exhibited no regulatory volume increase after shrinkage. In cytoplasts......, cortical F-actin organization was disrupted, and myosin II, which in shrunken EATC translocates to the cortical region, was absent. Moreover, NKCC1 activity was essentially insensitive to the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7, a potent blocker of shrinkage-induced NKCC1 activity in intact...

  3. Myosin Specific-T Lymphocytes Mediated Myocardial Inflammation in Adoptive Transferred Rats

    Jin Zhang; Yuhua Liao; Xiang Cheng; Jing Chen; Peng Chen; Xiang Gao; Zhengjenny Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Myosin specific-T lymphocytes might mediate myocardial inflammation and remodeling after AMI. Myosinactivated or unactivated T lymphocytes in vitro were transferred into naǐve syngeneic rats, respectively. T lymphocyte infiltration and myocyte apoptosis were explored by the H&E and TUNNEL. Proteins and mRNA levels of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in myocardium were determined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. T lymphocyte infiltration was evidently observed after one week of activated T cell transfer. The expressions of cytokines were elevated markedly one week later. The myocyte apoptosis occurred after T lymphocyte infiltration in myocardium. Our findings suggest that cardiac myosin activated-T lymphocytes may mediate myocardial inflammation and remodeling.

  4. Video imaging of walking myosin V by high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    Kodera, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Ryoki; Ando, Toshio

    2010-11-01

    The dynamic behaviour of myosin V molecules translocating along actin filaments has been mainly studied by optical microscopy. The processive hand-over-hand movement coupled with hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate was thereby demonstrated. However, the protein molecules themselves are invisible in the observations and have therefore been visualized by electron microscopy in the stationary states. The concomitant assessment of structure and dynamics has been unfeasible, a situation prevailing throughout biological research. Here we directly visualize myosin V molecules walking along actin tracks, using high-speed atomic force microscopy. The high-resolution movies not only provide corroborative 'visual evidence' for previously speculated or demonstrated molecular behaviours, including lever-arm swing, but also reveal more detailed behaviours of the molecules, leading to a comprehensive understanding of the motor mechanism. Our direct and dynamic high-resolution visualization is a powerful new approach to studying the structure and dynamics of biomolecules in action. PMID:20935627

  5. Myosin-II dependent cell contractility contributes to spontaneous nodule formation of mesothelioma cells

    Tárnoki-Zách, Julia; Méhes, Elod; Paku, Sándor; Neufeld, Zoltán; Hegedus, Balázs; Döme, Balázs; Czirok, Andras

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that characteristic nodules emerge in cultures of several malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cell lines. Instead of excessive local cell proliferation, the nodules arise by Myosin II-driven cell contractility. The aggregation process can be prevented or reversed by suitable pharmacological inhibitors of acto-myosin contractility. A cell-resolved elasto-plastic model of the multicellular patterning process indicates that the morphology and size of the nodules as well as the speed of their formation is determined by the mechanical tension cells exert on their neighbors, and the stability of cell-substrate adhesion complexes. A linear stability analysis of a homogenous, self-tensioned Maxwell fluid indicates the unconditional presence of a patterning instability.

  6. Myosin II Tailpiece Determines Its Paracrystal Structure, Filament Assembly Properties, and Cellular Localization

    Ronen, Daniel; Ravid, Shoshana

    2009-01-01

    Non muscle myosin II (NMII) is a major motor protein present in all cell types. The three known vertebrate NMII isoforms share high sequence homology but play different cellular roles. The main difference in sequence resides in the C-terminal non-helical tailpiece (tailpiece). In this study we demonstrate that the tailpiece is crucial for proper filament size, overcoming the intrinsic properties of the coiled-coil rod. Furthermore, we show that the tailpiece by itself determines the NMII fila...

  7. Lead reduces tension development and the myosin ATPase activity of the rat right ventricular myocardium

    D.V. Vassallo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb2+ poisoning causes hypertension, but little is known regarding its acute effects on cardiac contractility. To evaluate these effects, force was measured in right ventricular strips that were contracting isometrically in 45 male Wistar rats (250-300 g before and after the addition of increasing concentrations of lead acetate (3, 7, 10, 30, 70, 100, and 300 µM to the bath. Changes in rate of stimulation (0.1-1.5 Hz, relative potentiation after pauses of 15, 30, and 60 s, effect of Ca2+ concentration (0.62, 1.25, and 2.5 mM, and the effect of isoproterenol (20 ng/mL were determined before and after the addition of 100 µM Pb2+. Effects on contractile proteins were evaluated after caffeine treatment using tetanic stimulation (10 Hz and measuring the activity of the myosin ATPase. Pb2+ produced concentration-dependent force reduction, significant at concentrations greater than 30 µM. The force developed in response to increasing rates of stimulation became smaller at 0.5 and 0.8 Hz. Relative potentiation increased after 100 µM Pb2+ treatment. Extracellular Ca2+ increment and isoproterenol administration increased force development but after 100 µM Pb2+ treatment the force was significantly reduced suggesting an effect of the metal on the sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx. Concentration of 100 µM Pb2+ also reduced the peak and plateau force of tetanic contractions and reduced the activity of the myosin ATPase. Results showed that acute Pb2+ administration, although not affecting the sarcoplasmic reticulum activity, produces a concentration-dependent negative inotropic effect and reduces myosin ATPase activity. Results suggest that acute lead administration reduced myocardial contractility by reducing sarcolemmal calcium influx and the myosin ATPase activity. These results also suggest that lead exposure is hazardous and has toxicological consequences affecting cardiac muscle.

  8. Catch Force Links and the Low to High Force Transition of Myosin

    Thomas M. Butler; Mooers, Susan U.; Siegman, Marion J.

    2006-01-01

    Catch is characterized by maintenance of force with very low energy utilization in some invertebrate muscles. Catch is regulated by phosphorylation of the mini-titin, twitchin, and a catch component of force exists at all [Ca2+] except those resulting in maximum force. The mechanism responsible for catch force was characterized by determining how the effects of agents that inhibit the low to high force transition of the myosin cross-bridge (inorganic phosphate, butanedione monoxime, trifluope...

  9. Myosin heavy-chain isoforms in the flight and leg muscles of hummingbirds and zebra finches

    Velten, Brandy P.; Welch, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform complement is intimately related to a muscle's contractile properties, yet relatively little is known about avian MHC isoforms or how they may vary with fiber type and/or the contractile properties of a muscle. The rapid shortening of muscles necessary to power flight at the high wingbeat frequencies of ruby-throated hummingbirds and zebra finches (25–60 Hz), along with the varied morphology and use of the hummingbird hindlimb, provides a unique opportunity to...

  10. Acute response of airway muscle to extreme temperature includes disruption of actin-myosin interaction.

    Dyrda, Peter; Tazzeo, Tracy; DoHarris, Lindsay; Nilius, Berndt; Roman, Horia Nicolae; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Aziz, Tariq; Lukic, Dusan; Janssen, Luke J

    2011-02-01

    Despite the emerging use of bronchial thermoplasty in asthma therapy, the response of airway smooth muscle (ASM) to extreme temperatures is unknown. We investigated the immediate effects of exposing ASM to supraphysiologic temperatures. Isometric contractions were studied in bovine ASM before and after exposure to various thermal loads and/or pharmacologic interventions. Actin-myosin interactions were investigated using a standard in vitro motility assay. We found steep thermal sensitivity for isometric contractions evoked by acetylcholine, with threshold and complete inhibition at less than 50°C and greater than 55°C, respectively. Contractile responses to serotonin or KCl were similarly affected, whereas isometric relaxations evoked by the nitric oxide donor S-nitrosyl-N-acetylpenicillamine or the β-agonist isoproterenol were unaffected. This thermal sensitivity developed within 15 minutes, but did not evolve further over the course of several days (such a rapid time-course rules out heat shock proteins, apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis). Although heat-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRPV2) channels and the calmodulin-dependent (Cam) kinase-II-induced inactivation of myosin light chain kinase are both acutely thermally sensitive, with a temperature producing half-maximal effect (T(1/2)) of 52.5°C, the phenomenon we describe was not prevented by blockers of TRPV2 channels (e.g., ruthenium red, gadolinium, zero-Ca(2+) or zero-Na(+)/zero-Ca(2+) media, and cromakalim) or of Cam kinase-II (e.g., W7, trifluoperazine, and KN-93). However, direct measurements of actin-myosin interactions showed the same steep thermal profile. The functional changes preceded any histologic evidence of necrosis or apoptosis. We conclude that extreme temperatures (such as those used in bronchial thermoplasty) directly disrupt actin-myosin interactions, likely through a denaturation of the motor protein, leading to an immediate loss of ASM cell function. PMID:20395634

  11. Myosin VI in skeletal muscle: its localization in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, neuromuscular junction and muscle nuclei

    Karolczak, Justyna; Sobczak, Magdalena; Majewski, Łukasz; Yeghiazaryan, Marine; Jakubiec-Puka, Anna; Ehler, Elisabeth; Sławińska, Urszula; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M.; Rędowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2012-01-01

    Myosin VI (MVI) is a unique unconventional motor moving backwards on actin filaments. In non-muscle cells, it is involved in cell migration, endocytosis and intracellular trafficking, actin cytoskeleton dynamics, and possibly in gene transcription. An important role for MVI in striated muscle functioning was suggested in a report showing that a point mutation (H236R) within the MVI gene was associated with cardiomyopathy (Mohiddin et al., J Med Genet 41:309–314, 2004). Here, we have addressed...

  12. Expression and DNA sequence analysis of a human embryonic skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain gene.

    Karsch-Mizrachi, I; M. Travis; Blau, H; Leinwand, L A

    1989-01-01

    Vertebrate myosin heavy chains (MHC) are represented by multiple genes that are expressed in a spatially and temporally distinct pattern during development. In order to obtain molecular probes for developmentally regulated human MHC isoforms, we used monoclonal antibodies to screen an expression cDNA library constructed from primary human myotube cultures. A 3.4 kb cDNA was isolated that encodes one of the first MHCs to be transcribed in human skeletal muscle development. A portion of the cor...

  13. Clathrin regulates centrosome positioning by promoting acto-myosin cortical tension in C. elegans embryos.

    Spiró, Zoltán; Thyagarajan, Kalyani; De Simone, Alessandro; Träger, Sylvain; Afshar, Katayoun; Gönczy, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Regulation of centrosome and spindle positioning is crucial for spatial cell division control. The one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo has proven attractive for dissecting the mechanisms underlying centrosome and spindle positioning in a metazoan organism. Previous work revealed that these processes rely on an evolutionarily conserved force generator complex located at the cell cortex. This complex anchors the motor protein dynein, thus allowing cortical pulling forces to be exerted on astral microtubules emanating from microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). Here, we report that the clathrin heavy chain CHC-1 negatively regulates pulling forces acting on centrosomes during interphase and on spindle poles during mitosis in one-cell C. elegans embryos. We establish a similar role for the cytokinesis/apoptosis/RNA-binding protein CAR-1 and uncover that CAR-1 is needed to maintain proper levels of CHC-1. We demonstrate that CHC-1 is necessary for normal organization of the cortical acto-myosin network and for full cortical tension. Furthermore, we establish that the centrosome positioning phenotype of embryos depleted of CHC-1 is alleviated by stabilizing the acto-myosin network. Conversely, we demonstrate that slight perturbations of the acto-myosin network in otherwise wild-type embryos results in excess centrosome movements resembling those in chc-1(RNAi) embryos. We developed a 2D computational model to simulate cortical rigidity-dependent pulling forces, which recapitulates the experimental data and further demonstrates that excess centrosome movements are produced at medium cortical rigidity values. Overall, our findings lead us to propose that clathrin plays a critical role in centrosome positioning by promoting acto-myosin cortical tension. PMID:24961801

  14. Interactions between actin and myosin filaments in skeletal muscle visualized in frozen-hydrated thin sections.

    Trus, B L; Steven, A C; McDowall, A W; M. Unser; Dubochet, J; Podolsky, R J

    1989-01-01

    For the purpose of determining net interactions between actin and myosin filaments in muscle cells, perhaps the single most informative view of the myofilament lattice is its averaged axial projection. We have studied frozen-hydrated transverse thin sections with the goal of obtaining axial projections that are not subject to the limitations of conventional thin sectioning (suspect preservation of native structure) or of equatorial x-ray diffraction analysis (lack of experimental phases). In ...

  15. Distinct Pathways for the Early Recruitment of Myosin II and Actin to the Cytokinetic Furrow

    Zhou, Mian; Wang, Yu-li

    2008-01-01

    Equatorial organization of myosin II and actin has been recognized as a universal event in cytokinesis of animal cells. Current models for the formation of equatorial cortex favor either directional cortical transport toward the equator or localized de novo assembly. However, this process has never been analyzed directly in dividing mammalian cells at a high resolution. Here we applied total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRF-M), coupled with spatial temporal image correlation ...

  16. An IQ motif drives the nuclear translocation of nuclear myosin I

    Dzijak, Rastislav; Yildirim, Sukriye; Kahle, Michal; Hozák, Pavel

    Leeds : University of Leeds, 2008. s. 22-22. [Alternative Muscle Club /26th/. 23.07.2008-25.07.2008, Leeds] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1592; GA MŠk LC545 Grant ostatní: GAČR(CZ) GD204/05/H023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : nuclear myosin * IQ motif Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  17. Differential susceptibility on myosin heavy chain isoform following eccentric-induced muscle damage

    Choi, Seung Jun

    2014-01-01

    Based on myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform, human skeletal muscle fibers can be categorized into three fiber types, type I, IIa, IIx fibers, and each fiber type has different characteristics. Typical characteristics are difference in force production, shortening velocity, and fatigue resistance. When the muscle is contract and stretched by a force that is greater than the force generated by the muscle, contraction-induced muscle damage frequently occurs. Several experimental models involving b...

  18. Actin polymerization or myosin contraction: two ways to build up cortical tension for symmetry breaking.

    Carvalho, Kevin; Lemière, Joël; Faqir, Fahima; Manzi, John; Blanchoin, Laurent; Plastino, Julie; Betz, Timo; Sykes, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Cells use complex biochemical pathways to drive shape changes for polarization and movement. One of these pathways is the self-assembly of actin filaments and myosin motors that together produce the forces and tensions that drive cell shape changes. Whereas the role of actin and myosin motors in cell polarization is clear, the exact mechanism of how the cortex, a thin shell of actin that is underneath the plasma membrane, can drive cell shape changes is still an open question. Here, we address this issue using biomimetic systems: the actin cortex is reconstituted on liposome membranes, in an 'outside geometry'. The actin shell is either grown from an activator of actin polymerization immobilized at the membrane by a biotin-streptavidin link, or built by simple adsorption of biotinylated actin filaments to the membrane, in the presence or absence of myosin motors. We show that tension in the actin network can be induced either by active actin polymerization on the membrane via the Arp2/3 complex or by myosin II filament pulling activity. Symmetry breaking and spontaneous polarization occur above a critical tension that opens up a crack in the actin shell. We show that this critical tension is reached by growing branched networks, nucleated by the Arp2/3 complex, in a concentration window of capping protein that limits actin filament growth and by a sufficient number of motors that pull on actin filaments. Our study provides the groundwork to understanding the physical mechanisms at work during polarization prior to cell shape modifications. PMID:24062578

  19. Morphogenetic movements driving neural tube closure in Xenopus require myosin IIB

    Rolo, Ana; Skoglund, Paul; Keller, Ray

    2008-01-01

    Vertebrate neural tube formation involves two distinct morphogenetic events -convergent extension (CE) driven by medio-lateral cell intercalation, and bending of the neural plate driven largely by cellular apical constriction. However, the cellular and molecular biomechanics of these processes are not understood. Here, using tissue-targeting techniques, we show that the myosin IIB motor protein complex is essential for both these processes, as well as for conferring resistance to deformation ...

  20. Muscle Paralysis and Myosin Loss in a Patient with Cancer Cachexia

    Banduseela, V; Ochala, J.; Lamberg, K; Kalimo, H.; Larsson, L

    2007-01-01

    Cancer cachexia has a significant negative effect on quality of life, survival and the response to treatment. Recent in vitro and experimental animal studies have shown that myosin may be the primary target of the muscle wasting associated with cancer cachexia. In this study, we have extended these analyses to detailed studies of regulation of myofibrillar protein synthesis at the gene level, myofibrillar protein expression and regulation of muscle contraction at the muscle cell level in a 63...

  1. Differential Contributions of Nonmuscle Myosin II Isoforms and Functional Domains to Stress Fiber Mechanics

    Ching-Wei Chang; Sanjay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    While is widely acknowledged that nonmuscle myosin II (NMMII) enables stress fibers (SFs) to generate traction forces against the extracellular matrix, little is known about how specific NMMII isoforms and functional domains contribute to SF mechanics. Here we combine biophotonic and genetic approaches to address these open questions. First, we suppress the NMMII isoforms MIIA and MIIB and apply femtosecond laser nanosurgery to ablate and investigate the viscoelastic retraction of individual ...

  2. Doxorubicin-induced carbonylation and degradation of cardiac myosin binding protein C promote cardiotoxicity

    Aryal, Baikuntha; Jeong, Jinsook; Rao, V. Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin is one of the most successful anticancer agents. However, 10–30% of all treated patients experience a dose-limiting cardiac adverse event. Oxidative stress is partly responsible for the cardiotoxicity because the heart does not possess required antioxidant mechanisms. Protein oxidation by carbonylation is irreversible and marks proteins for loss of function and degradation. Using proteomics and MS, we identified and investigated cardiac myosin binding protein (MyBPC) as being sele...

  3. Human Masseter Muscle Fibers From the Elderly Express Less Neonatal Myosin Than Those of Young Adults

    Cvetko, E.; Karen, Petr; Janáček, Jiří; Kubínová, Lucie; Plasencia, A.L.; Eržen, I.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 295, č. 8 (2012), s. 1364-1372. ISSN 1932-8486 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA MŠk(CZ) MEB090910 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : aging * confocal microscopy * myosin heavy chain * immunohistochemistry * muscle fiber types Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.343, year: 2012

  4. Muscle Fiber Type Specific Induction of Slow Myosin Heavy Chain 2 Gene Expression by Electrical Stimulation

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechan...

  5. Characteristics of myosin profile in human vastus lateralis muscle in relation to training background.

    Zawadowska, B; Majerczak, J; Semik, D; Karasinski, J; Kolodziejski, L; Kilarski, W M; Duda, K; Zoladz, J A

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-four male volunteers (mean +/- SD: age 25.4+/-5.8 years, height 178.6+/-5.5 cm, body mass 72.1+/-7.7 kg) of different training background were investigated and classified into three groups according to their physical activity and sport discipline: untrained students (group A), national and sub-national level endurance athletes (group B, 7.8+/-2.9 years of specialised training) and sprint-power athletes (group C, 12.8+/-8.7 years of specialised training). Muscle biopsies of vastus lateralis were analysed histochemically for mATPase and SDH activities, immunohistochemically for fast and slow myosin, and electrophoretically followed by Western immunoblotting for myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition. Significant differences (Pmodern dance. Furthermore, the relative amount of the fastest MyHCIIX isoform in vastus lateralis muscle was significantly lower in the athletes from group C than in students (group A). We conclude that the myosin profile in the athletes belonging to group C was unfavourable for their sport disciplines. This could be the reason why those athletes did not reach international level despite of several years of training. PMID:15493580

  6. ER sheet persistence is coupled to myosin 1c–regulated dynamic actin filament arrays

    Joensuu, Merja; Belevich, Ilya; Rämö, Olli; Nevzorov, Ilya; Vihinen, Helena; Puhka, Maija; Witkos, Tomasz M.; Lowe, Martin; Vartiainen, Maria K.; Jokitalo, Eija

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) comprises a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) network with diverse structural and functional domains. Proper ER operation requires an intricate balance within and between dynamics, morphology, and functions, but how these processes are coupled in cells has been unclear. Using live-cell imaging and 3D electron microscopy, we identify a specific subset of actin filaments localizing to polygons defined by ER sheets and tubules and describe a role for these actin arrays in ER sheet persistence and, thereby, in maintenance of the characteristic network architecture by showing that actin depolymerization leads to increased sheet fluctuation and transformations and results in small and less abundant sheet remnants and a defective ER network distribution. Furthermore, we identify myosin 1c localizing to the ER-associated actin filament arrays and reveal a novel role for myosin 1c in regulating these actin structures, as myosin 1c manipulations lead to loss of the actin filaments and to similar ER phenotype as observed after actin depolymerization. We propose that ER-associated actin filaments have a role in ER sheet persistence regulation and thus support the maintenance of sheets as a stationary subdomain of the dynamic ER network. PMID:24523293

  7. ER sheet persistence is coupled to myosin 1c-regulated dynamic actin filament arrays.

    Joensuu, Merja; Belevich, Ilya; Rämö, Olli; Nevzorov, Ilya; Vihinen, Helena; Puhka, Maija; Witkos, Tomasz M; Lowe, Martin; Vartiainen, Maria K; Jokitalo, Eija

    2014-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) comprises a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) network with diverse structural and functional domains. Proper ER operation requires an intricate balance within and between dynamics, morphology, and functions, but how these processes are coupled in cells has been unclear. Using live-cell imaging and 3D electron microscopy, we identify a specific subset of actin filaments localizing to polygons defined by ER sheets and tubules and describe a role for these actin arrays in ER sheet persistence and, thereby, in maintenance of the characteristic network architecture by showing that actin depolymerization leads to increased sheet fluctuation and transformations and results in small and less abundant sheet remnants and a defective ER network distribution. Furthermore, we identify myosin 1c localizing to the ER-associated actin filament arrays and reveal a novel role for myosin 1c in regulating these actin structures, as myosin 1c manipulations lead to loss of the actin filaments and to similar ER phenotype as observed after actin depolymerization. We propose that ER-associated actin filaments have a role in ER sheet persistence regulation and thus support the maintenance of sheets as a stationary subdomain of the dynamic ER network. PMID:24523293

  8. Lack of replication for the myosin-18B association with mathematical ability in independent cohorts.

    Pettigrew, K A; Fajutrao Valles, S F; Moll, K; Northstone, K; Ring, S; Pennell, C; Wang, C; Leavett, R; Hayiou-Thomas, M E; Thompson, P; Simpson, N H; Fisher, S E; Whitehouse, A J O; Snowling, M J; Newbury, D F; Paracchini, S

    2015-04-01

    Twin studies indicate that dyscalculia (or mathematical disability) is caused partly by a genetic component, which is yet to be understood at the molecular level. Recently, a coding variant (rs133885) in the myosin-18B gene was shown to be associated with mathematical abilities with a specific effect among children with dyslexia. This association represents one of the most significant genetic associations reported to date for mathematical abilities and the only one reaching genome-wide statistical significance. We conducted a replication study in different cohorts to assess the effect of rs133885 maths-related measures. The study was conducted primarily using the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), (N = 3819). We tested additional cohorts including the York Cohort, the Specific Language Impairment Consortium (SLIC) cohort and the Raine Cohort, and stratified them for a definition of dyslexia whenever possible. We did not observe any associations between rs133885 in myosin-18B and mathematical abilities among individuals with dyslexia or in the general population. Our results suggest that the myosin-18B variant is unlikely to be a main factor contributing to mathematical abilities. PMID:25778778

  9. The On-off Switch in Regulated Myosins: Different Triggers but Related Mechanisms

    Himmel, D.; Mui, S; O& apos; Neall-Hennessey, E; Szent-Györgyi, A; Cohen, C

    2009-01-01

    In regulated myosin, motor and enzymatic activities are toggled between the on-state and off-state by a switch located on its lever arm domain, here called the regulatory domain (RD). This region consists of a long {alpha}-helical 'heavy chain' stabilized by a 'regulatory' light chain (RLC) and an 'essential' light chain (ELC). The on-state is activated by phosphorylation of the RLC of vertebrate smooth muscle RD or by direct binding of Ca{sup 2+} to the ELC of molluscan RD. Crystal structures are available only for the molluscan RD. To understand in more detail the pathway between the on-state and the off-state, we have now also determined the crystal structure of a molluscan (scallop) RD in the absence of Ca{sup 2+}. Our results indicate that loss of Ca{sup 2+} abolishes most of the interactions between the light chains and may increase the flexibility of the RD heavy chain. We propose that disruption of critical links with the C-lobe of the RLC is the key event initiating the off-state in both smooth muscle myosins and molluscan myosins.

  10. Intracellular photoactivation of caged cGMP induces myosin II and actin responses in motile cells.

    Pfannes, Eva K B; Anielski, Alexander; Gerhardt, Matthias; Beta, Carsten

    2013-12-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger in eukaryotic cells. It is assumed to regulate the association of myosin II with the cytoskeleton of motile cells. When cells of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum are exposed to chemoattractants or to increased osmotic stress, intracellular cGMP levels rise, preceding the accumulation of myosin II in the cell cortex. To directly investigate the impact of intracellular cGMP on cytoskeletal dynamics in a living cell, we released cGMP inside the cell by laser-induced photo-cleavage of a caged precursor. With this approach, we could directly show in a live cell experiment that an increase in intracellular cGMP indeed induces myosin II to accumulate in the cortex. Unexpectedly, we observed for the first time that also the amount of filamentous actin in the cell cortex increases upon a rise in the cGMP concentration, independently of cAMP receptor activation and signaling. We discuss our results in the light of recent work on the cGMP signaling pathway and suggest possible links between cGMP signaling and the actin system. PMID:24136144

  11. Myogenin, MyoD, and myosin expression after pharmacologically and surgically induced hypertrophy

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Greaser, M. L.; Schultz, E.

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between myogenin or MyoD expression and hypertrophy of the rat soleus produced either by clenbuterol and 3,3', 5-triiodo-L-thyronine (CT) treatment or by surgical overload was examined. Mature female rats were subjected to surgical overload of the right soleus with the left soleus serving as a control. Another group received the same surgical treatment but were administered CT. Soleus muscles were harvested 4 wk after surgical overload and weighed. Myosin heavy chain isoforms were separated by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis while myogenin and MyoD expression were evaluated by Northern analysis. CT and functional overload increased soleus muscle weight. CT treatment induced the appearance of the fast type IIX myosin heavy chain isoform, depressed myogenin expression, and induced MyoD expression. However, functional overload did not alter myogenin or MyoD expression in CT-treated or non-CT-treated rats. Thus pharmacologically and surgically induced hypertrophy have differing effects on myogenin and MyoD expression, because their levels were associated with changes in myosin heavy chain composition (especially type IIX) rather than changes in muscle mass.

  12. Myosin heavy chain-based fibre types in red cell hyper- and normovolaemic Standardbred trotters.

    Karlström, K; Essén-Gustavsson, B

    2002-09-01

    An assumed link between red cell hypervolaemia, an excessive amount of training and impaired performance of hypervolaemic horses has led to a theory that the muscle fibres could be affected. Myosin heavy chain (MHC)-based fibre type composition in gluteus medius muscle of red blood cell normo- (NV) and hypervolaemic (HV) Standardbred trotters was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Muscle biopsies were obtained from 13 NV and 16 HV horses. Serial transverse sections were cut and reacted with antibodies against different isoforms of the myosin heavy chains MHCI, MHCIIA and MHCIIX. Sections were also stained for myofibrillar ATPase pH 4,6 to identify types I, IIA and IIB, and NADH tetrazolium reductase to evaluate the oxidative capacity. The results show that types I and IIA fibres corresponded between staining methods, whereas IIB fibres in the ATPase stains were more numerous than pure MHCIIX fibres from immunohistochemistry. Many fibres identified histochemically as type IIB fibres contained both MHC isoforms IIA and IIX (MHCIIAX). Most fibres had a high oxidative capacity, but among the fibres within a section, the lowest was seen subjectively in pure MHCIIX fibres. Immunohistochemical stains make it possible to detect differences in fibre type composition that are not observed with myosin ATPase stainings, as it was found that HV horses had a lower percentage of MHCIIX fibres than NV horses. Immunohistochemical methods are, therefore, valuable for use in further research and clinical studies concerning muscle adaptations. PMID:12405701

  13. Modulation of Myosin Light-Chain Phosphorylation by p21-Activated Kinase 1 in Escherichia coli Invasion of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Rudrabhatla, Rajyalakshmi S.; Sukumaran, Sunil K.; Bokoch, Gary M.; Prasadarao, Nemani V.

    2003-01-01

    Cytoskeletal dynamics, modulated by actin-myosin interactions, play an important role in Escherichia coli K1 invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Herein, we show that inhibitors of myosin function, butanedione monoxide and ML-7, significantly blocked the E. coli invasion of HBMEC. The invasive E. coli induces myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation during the invasion process, which gets recruited to the site of actin condensation beneath the bacteria. We also sho...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... changes are present in the paranasal sinuses. plan radiation therapy for cancer of the brain or other tissues. ... of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular ... shortly after a patient exhibits symptoms of a stroke. a stroke, especially with a new technique called ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular radiographs (x- ... especially with a new technique called Perfusion CT. brain tumors. enlarged brain cavities (ventricles) in patients with hydrocephalus . ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Videos related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Please note ... you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... dose technique. top of page What are the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? A person ... CT scanner or may be over the weight limit—usually 450 pounds—for the moving table. Compared ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor ... scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than regular ...

  20. Overview of Head Injuries

    ... Children are admitted to the hospital for these reasons or if they were unconscious even briefly or had a seizure. Children are also admitted to the hospital if child abuse is suspected. Severe head injury If the injury ...

  1. Abnormal Head Position

    ... cause a head tilt. This is typically called congenital torticollis. A patch test in the office can also ... amblyopia) are other treatment alternatives. Physical therapy helps congenital torticollis from tight neck muscles. Updated 03/2015 Eye ...

  2. Foreign heading machines

    Kovtun, E.P.; Chernomaz, O.L.

    1983-12-01

    A general review is presented of heading machines currently produced, divided into pointed arm, drilling and impact types. Pointed arm machines described include models manufactured by Thyssen Titan, Dosco, Anderson Strathclyde and Anderson Meyvor (UK), Mannesman Demag, Eikchoff, Paurat and Westfalia-Luenen (FRG), Jeffrey Machinery, Joy Manufacturing, Lee Norse and National Mine Service (USA), Voest-Alpine (Austria and under licence in Poland), Kawasaki and Nippon Koki (Japan). Drilling heading machines include models manufactured by Atlas Copco-Jarva (USA-Sweden), Robbins (USA), Demag (FRG; TVM model) and others. Impact heading machines are described generally, giving basic parameter ranges, with mention of their advantages: such as light weight, low dust emission, small preliminary preparation requirements, etc. Further developments in and wider use of heading machines are predicted, and mention is made of research into cutting methods using very high pressure jets in combination with mechanical cutting (USA, FRG, Japan).

  3. Head Start Impact Study

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nationally representative, longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Head Start or community services as usual;direct...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, ... cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. ...

  6. Early Head Start Evaluation

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Longitudinal information from an evaluation where children were randomly assigned to Early Head Start or community services as usual;direct assessments and...

  7. Head and neck teratomas

    Shah, Ajaz; Latoo, Suhail; Ahmed, Irshad; Malik, Altaf H

    2009-01-01

    Teratomas are complex lesions composed of diverse tissues from all 3 germinal cell layers and may exhibit variable levels of maturity. Head and neck teratomas are most commonly cervical with the oropharynx (epignathus) being the second commonest location. In this article, clinical presentation, behaviour and associated significance of head and neck teratomas have been highlightened. Because of their obscure origin, bizarre microscopic appearance, unpredictable behaviour and often dramatic cli...

  8. Standard integrated head package

    An integrated head package for a standard-type nuclear reactor is described which consolidates many components and subassemblies of the upper reactor structure into a single unit which may be removed from the reactor vessel in a single lift. Included among the consolidated elements are a pressure vessel head, a cooling shroud, control rod drive mechanisms, a missile shield, a lifting rig, a hoist assembly, and a cable tray assembly. (author)

  9. Interaction of c-Cbl with myosin IIA regulates Bleb associated macropinocytosis of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    Mohanan Valiya Veettil

    Full Text Available KSHV is etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, an angioproliferative endothelial cell malignancy. Macropinocytosis is the predominant mode of in vitro entry of KSHV into its natural target cells, human dermal microvascular endothelial (HMVEC-d cells. Although macropinocytosis is known to be a major route of entry for many viruses, the molecule(s involved in the recruitment and integration of signaling early during macropinosome formation is less well studied. Here we demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of the adaptor protein c-Cbl is required for KSHV induced membrane blebbing and macropinocytosis. KSHV induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl as early as 1 min post-infection and was recruited to the sites of bleb formation. Infection also led to an increase in the interaction of c-Cbl with PI3-K p85 in a time dependent manner. c-Cbl shRNA decreased the formation of KSHV induced membrane blebs and macropinocytosis as well as virus entry. Immunoprecipitation of c-Cbl followed by mass spectrometry identified the interaction of c-Cbl with a novel molecular partner, non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (myosin IIA, in bleb associated macropinocytosis. Phosphorylated c-Cbl colocalized with phospho-myosin light chain II in the interior of blebs of infected cells and this interaction was abolished by c-Cbl shRNA. Studies with the myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin demonstrated that myosin IIA is a biologically significant component of the c-Cbl signaling pathway and c-Cbl plays a new role in the recruitment of myosin IIA to the blebs during KSHV infection. Myosin II associates with actin in KSHV induced blebs and the absence of actin and myosin ubiquitination in c-Cbl ShRNA cells suggested that c-Cbl is also responsible for the ubiquitination of these proteins in the infected cells. This is the first study demonstrating the role of c-Cbl in viral entry as well as macropinocytosis, and provides the evidence that a signaling complex

  10. Surrogate Head Forms for the Evaluation of Head Injury Risk

    MacAlister, Anna

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the use of surrogate head forms in biomechanical research pertaining to head injury and, more specifically, mild traumatic brain injury. Because cadavers are limited and controlled studies of brain injury using live human subjects would be unethical, surrogate head forms are used to study the response of the human head to impact. Different head forms have been developed and optimized for different purposes. The Hybrid III 50th percentile male crash test dummy was develop...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  14. Economics of head injuries

    Singh Manmohan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Head injuries account for significant proportion of neurosurgical admissions and bed occupancy. Patients with head injuries also consume significant proportions of neurosurgical resources. A prospective 6-month study has been carried out to evaluate the expenditure incurred on head injury patients in a modern neurosurgical center equipped with state of the art infrastructure. Costing areas included wages / salaries of health care personnel, cost of medicines / surgical items / crystalloids, general store items, stationary, all investigation charges, equipment cost, overhead building cost, maintenance cost, electricity and water charges and cost of medical gases, air conditioning and operation theatre expenses. Expenditure in each area was calculated and apportioned to each bed. The statistical analysis was done using X2 test. The cost of stay in ward was found to be Rs. 1062 / bed / day and in neurosurgical ICU Rs. 3082 / bed / day. The operation theatre cost for each surgery was Rs. 11948. The cost of hospital stay per day for minor, moderate and severe head injury group was found to be Rs. 1921, Rs. 2569 and Rs. 2713 respectively. The patients who developed complications, the cost of stay per day in the hospital were Rs. 2867. In the operative group, the cost of hospital stay per day was Rs. 3804. The total expenditure in minor head injury was Rs. 7800 per patient, in moderate head injury was Rs. 22172 per patient, whereas in severe head injury, it was found to be Rs. 32852 per patient. Patients who underwent surgery, the total cost incurred was Rs. 33100 per operated patient.

  15. Clinical assessment of serum myosin light chain I in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    Serum cardiac myosin light chain I (LCI) levels were quantitated using a radioimmunoassay kit in patients suspected of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). In this study, 55 patients were evaluated between 1986 and 1991. They were composed of 40 males and 15 females, and their age was 27-75 years (51±11 years). The patients with renal dysfunction were excluded due to their serum creatinine levels (>2.0 mg/dl). After cardiac catheterization, endomyocardial biopsy and echocardiography, 44 patients were diagnosed as DCM, 2 as ischemic heart disease, 2 as chronic myocarditis, 1 as restrictive cardiomyopathy, 1 as dilated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 1 as cardiac amyloidosis, 2 as myopathy, 1 as polymyositis and 1 as hypothyroidism. Only two patients with DCM had elevated LCI. Besides, two patients with myopathy or hypothyroidism had elevated LCI. In the follow-up, one patient died suddenly 6 months later and another showed normal value of LCI four years later. LCI elevation in DCM was not related to either the severity of heart failure or cardiac function and it showed no finding of 201Tl myocardial defect or elevated CPK. The mechanism for elevated LCI in myopathy is related to a crossreaction with myosin light chain in the skeletal muscle. In hypothyroidism, it may be related to decreased clearance of normal LCI concentration or increased myosin light chain from damaged skeletal muscle. In conclusion, it is evident that the measurement of LCI is not helpful in clinical assessment of patients with DCM, but may be useful in detection of secondary cardiomyopathy. (author)

  16. Anti-β2GPI antibodies stimulate endothelial cell microparticle release via a nonmuscle myosin II motor protein-dependent pathway

    Betapudi, Venkaiah; Lominadze, George; Hsi, Linda; Willard, Belinda; Wu, Meifang; McCrae, Keith R

    2013-01-01

    Activation of endothelial cells by anti-β2GPI antibodies causes myosin RLC phosphorylation, leading to actin-myosin association.In response to anti-β2GPI antibodies, release of endothelial microparticles, but not E-selectin expression, requires actomyosin assembly.

  17. Harmonic Force Spectroscopy Reveals a Force-Velocity Curve from a Single Human Beta Cardiac Myosin Motor

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Vestergaard, Christian L.; Mortensen, Kim; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Spudich, James

    2014-01-01

    in thin filaments in the sarcomere, cycling between a strongly bound state (force producing state) and a weakly bound state (relaxed state). Huxley and Simmons have previously proposed that the transition from the strong to the weak interaction can be modulated by an external load, i.e., the...... transition is slow under high load and fast under low load. We use a new, simple method we call "harmonic force spectroscopy" to extract a load-velocity relationship from a single human beta cardiac myosin II motor (S1). With a dual-beam optical trap, we hold an actin dumbbell over a single myosin molecule...... from a single human beta cardiac myosin S1. We also compare load-velocity curves for wild-type motors with load-velocity curves of mutant forms that cause hypertrophic or dilated-cardiomyopathy (HCM or DCM), in order to understand the effects of mutations on the contractile cycle at the single molecule...

  18. Characteristics of myosin profile in human vastus lateralis muscle in relation to training background.

    J A Zoladz

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four male volunteers (mean +/- SD: age 25.4+/-5.8 years, height 178.6+/-5.5 cm, body mass 72.1+/-7.7 kg of different training background were investigated and classified into three groups according to their physical activity and sport discipline: untrained students (group A, national and sub-national level endurance athletes (group B, 7.8+/-2.9 years of specialised training and sprint-power athletes (group C, 12.8+/-8.7 years of specialised training. Muscle biopsies of vastus lateralis were analysed histochemically for mATPase and SDH activities, immunohistochemically for fast and slow myosin, and electrophoretically followed by Western immunoblotting for myosin heavy chain (MyHC composition. Significant differences (P<0.05 regarding composition of muscle fibre types and myosin heavy chains were found only between groups A (41.7+/-1.6% of MyHCI, 40.8+/-4.0% of MyHCIIA and 17.5+/-4.0% of MyHCIIX and B (64.3+/-0.8% of MyHCI, 34.0+/-1.4% of MyHCIIA and 1.7+/-1.4% of MyHCIIX and groups A and C (59.6+/-1.6% of MyHCI, 37.2+/-1.3% of MyHCIIA and 3.2+/-1.3% of MyHCIIX. Unexpectedly, endurance athletes (group B such as long-distance runners, cyclists and cross country skiers, did not differ from the athletes representing short term, high power output sports (group C such as ice hockey, karate, ski-jumping, volleyball, soccer and modern dance. Furthermore, the relative amount of the fastest MyHCIIX isoform in vastus lateralis muscle was significantly lower in the athletes from group C than in students (group A. We conclude that the myosin profile in the athletes belonging to group C was unfavourable for their sport disciplines. This could be the reason why those athletes did not reach international level despite of several years of training.

  19. Flexural Stiffness of Myosin Va Subdomains as Measured from Tethered Particle Motion

    Michalek, Arthur J.; Kennedy, Guy G.; Warshaw, David M.; M. Yusuf Ali

    2015-01-01

    Myosin Va (MyoVa) is a processive molecular motor involved in intracellular cargo transport on the actin cytoskeleton. The motor’s processivity and ability to navigate actin intersections are believed to be governed by the stiffness of various parts of the motor’s structure. Specifically, changes in calcium may regulate motor processivity by altering the motor’s lever arm stiffness and thus its interhead communication. In order to measure the flexural stiffness of MyoVa subdomains, we use tet...

  20. Myosin Light-Chain Kinase Is Necessary for Membrane Homeostasis in Cochlear Inner Hair Cells

    Zhu, Guang-Jie; Wang, Fang; Chen, Chen; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Fan, Chi; PENG, YA-JING; Chen, Jie; He, Wei-Qi; Guo, Shi-Ying; Zuo, Jian; Gao, Xia; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    The structural homeostasis of the cochlear hair cell membrane is critical for all aspects of sensory transduction, but the regulation of its maintenance is not well understood. In this report, we analyzed the cochlear hair cells of mice with specific deletion of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in inner hair cells. MLCK-deficient mice showed impaired hearing, with a 5- to 14-dB rise in the auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds to clicks and tones of different frequencies and a signific...

  1. Effect of aerobic exercise on the contractile function of gastrocnemius myosin heavy chain

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of 4-6 weeks' treadmill training of male SD rats on the contractile function of their gastrocnemius myosin heavy chain (MHC). Methods Forty male SD rats were randomly divided into control group and training group. The treadmill training of the training group rats was incessantly performed for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of about 75% VO2max (18.5-24 m/min,gradient of 0°,each training session lasting 50 minutes,twice a day). The content of gastrocnemius MHC mRNA was tested by rever...

  2. Fiber size and myosin phenotypes of selected rhesus lower limb muscles after a 14-day spaceflight

    Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bodine, S. C.; Pierotti, D. J.; Talmadge, R. J.; Barkhoudarian, G.; Kim, J.; Fanton, J. W.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle biopsies were taken from the rhesus (Macaca mulatta) soleus (Sol, a slow ankle extensor), medial gastrocnemius (MG, a fast ankle extensor), tibialis anterior (TA, a fast ankle flexor), and vastus lateralis (VL, a fast knee extensor) muscles in vivarium controls (n=5) before and after either a 14-day spaceflight (Bion 11, n=2) or a 14-day ground-based flight simulation (n=3). Myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition (gel electrophoresis), fiber type distribution (immunohistochemistry), and fiber size were determined. Although there were no significant changes, each muscle showed trends towards adaptation.

  3. Myosin Isoforms and Contractile Properties of Single Fibers of Human Latissimus Dorsi Muscle

    Antonio Paoli; Pacelli, Quirico F.; Pasqua Cancellara; Luana Toniolo; Tatiana Moro; Marta Canato; Danilo Miotti; Carlo Reggiani

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate fiber type distribution and contractile characteristics of Latissimus Dorsi muscle (LDM). Samples were collected from 18 young healthy subjects (9 males and 9 females) through percutaneous fine needle muscle biopsy. The results showed a predominance of fast myosin heavy chain isoforms (MyHC) with 42% of MyHC 2A and 25% of MyHC 2X, while MyHC 1 represented only 33%. The unbalance toward fast isoforms was even greater in males (71%) than in females (64%...

  4. The IQ motif drives the nuclear translocation of nuclear myosin I

    Dzijak, Rastislav; Yildirim, Sukriye; Kahle, Michal; Hozák, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 275, č. 1 (2008), s. 67-67. E-ISSN 1742-4658. [FEBS Congress /33rd/, IUBMB conference /11th/. 28.06.2008-03.07.2008, Athens] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1592 Grant ostatní: GAČR(CZ) GD204/05/H023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : nuclear myosin * nuclear transport Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  5. The IQ motif drives the nuclear translocation of nuclear myosin I

    Dzijak, Rastislav; Kahle, Michal; Hozák, Pavel

    Awaji Island : The Society for Laser Microscopy, 2008. s. 182-182. [Focus on Microscopy 2008. 13.04.2008-16.04.2008, Awaji Island] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1592; GA ČR GD204/05/H023; GA MŠk LC545 Grant ostatní: MŠk LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : nuclear myosin * nuclear transport Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  6. Distribution of myosin heavy chain isoforms in muscular dystrophy: insights into disease pathology

    Beedle, Aaron M

    2016-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain isoforms are an important component defining fiber type specific properties in skeletal muscle, such as oxidative versus glycolytic metabolism, rate of contraction, and fatigability. While the molecular mechanisms that underlie specification of the different fiber types are becoming clearer, how this programming becomes disrupted in muscular dystrophy and the functional consequences of fiber type changes in disease are not fully resolved. Fiber type changes in disease, with specific focus on muscular dystrophies caused by defects in the dystrophin glycoprotein complex, are discussed. PMID:27430020

  7. Nuclear PIP2 and myosin I: new important players in DNA transcription

    Yildirim, Sukriye; Castano, Enrique; Philimonenko, Vlada; Dzijak, Rastislav; Sobol, Margaryta; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    Manchester : RMS, IFSM, 2012, 77-77. ISBN 978-0-9502463-7-6. [15th European Microscopy Congress . Manchester (GB), 16.09.2012-21.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk LC06063; GA MPO FR-TI3/588; GA ČR GD204/09/H084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Myosin * PIP2 * transcription Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  8. Nuclear myosin I is anchored in the nucleus via interactions with phosphatidylinositol -4,5- bisphosphate

    Yildirim, Sukriye; Sýkora, Jan; Kahle, Michal; Dzijak, Rastislav; Hof, Martin; Hozák, Pavel

    Gliwice : M. Curie-Sklodowska Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology , 2009. ---. [The Wilhelm Bernhard Workshop, International Workshop on the Cell Nucleus /21./. 31.08.09-04.09.09, Ustroń] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1592; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/05/H023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : nuclear myosin I * PIP2 * cell nucleus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  9. Adiabatic compressibility of myosin subfragment-1 and heavy meromyosin with or without nucleotide.

    Tamura, Y; Suzuki, N.; Mihashi, K

    1993-01-01

    The partial specific adiabatic compressibilities of myosin subfragment-1 (S1) and heavy meromyosin (HMM) of skeletal muscle in solution were determined by measuring the density and the sound velocity of the solution. The partial specific volumes of S1 and HMM were 0.713 and 0.711 cm3/g, respectively. The partial specific adiabatic compressibilities of S1 and HMM were 4.2 x 10(-12) and 2.9 x 10(-12) cm2/dyn, respectively. These values are in the same range as the most of globular proteins so f...

  10. Monitoring the Myosin ATPase Reaction Using a Sensitive Fluorescent Probe: Pyrene-Labeled ATP

    Hiratsuka, Toshiaki

    1997-01-01

    A pyrene-labeled ATP (Pyr-ATP) in which a pyrene fluorophore is linked to the ribose moiety of ATP with a butyryl chain has been synthesized, together with the corresponding analog of ADP. The spectroscopic properties of two fluorescent analogs were found to be similar to those of 1-pyrenebutyric acid, making them photostable and highly sensitive probes for detecting changes in conformations around the nucleotide binding sites of proteins. Binding of Pyr-ADP to myosin subfragment-1 (S-1) resu...

  11. Orthovanadate and Orthophosphate Inhibit Muscle Force via Two Different Pathways of the Myosin ATPase Cycle

    Caremani, M; Lehman, S.; Lombardi, V; Linari, M

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the half-sarcomere stiffness during activation of skinned fibers from rabbit psoas (sarcomere length 2.5 um, temperature 12°C) indicate that addition of 0.1 mM orthovanadate (Vi) to the solution produces a drop to ~1/2 in number of force-generating myosin motors, proportional to the drop in steady isometric force (T0), an effect similar to that produced by the addition of 10 mM phosphate (Pi). However, in contrast to Pi, Vi does not change the rate of isometric force developme...

  12. Dynamic light scattering study of the effect of Mg2+ and ATP on synthetic myosin filaments.

    Takayama, S.; Fujime, S

    1995-01-01

    The dynamic light scattering (DLS) method provides us with information about the apparent diffusion coefficient, Dapp, as well as the static scattering intensity, Is, of particles in solution. For long but thin rods with length L and diameter d, the dependence on L and d of Dapp is quite different from that of Is. By means of DLS we studied synthetic myosin filaments of rabbit skeletal muscle in solution at pH 8.3 and 10 degrees C. It appeared that Mg2+ ions induced thickening and lengthening...

  13. The role of the myosin ATPase activity in adaptive thermogenesis by skeletal muscle

    Cooke, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Resting skeletal muscle is a major contributor to adaptive thermogenesis, i.e., the thermogenesis that changes in response to exposure to cold or to overfeeding. The identification of the “furnace” that is responsible for increased heat generation in resting muscle has been the subject of a number of investigations. A new state of myosin, the super relaxed state (SRX), with a very slow ATP turnover rate has recently been observed in skeletal muscle (Stewart et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 10...

  14. Responses of Myosin Heavy Chain Phenotypes and Gene Expressions in Neck Muscle to Micro- an Hyper-Gravity in Mice

    Ohira, Tomotaka; Ohira, Takashi; Kawano, F.; Shibaguchi, T.; Okabe, H.; Ohno, Y.; Nakai, N.; Ochiai, T.; Goto, K.; Ohira, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Neck muscles are known to play important roles in the maintenance of head posture against gravity. However, it is not known how the properties of neck muscle are influenced by gravity. Therefore, the current study was performed to investigate the responses of neck muscle (rhomboideus capitis) in mice to inhibition of gravity and/or increase to 2-G for 3 months to test the hypothesis that the properties of neck muscles are regulated in response to the level of mechanical load applied by the gravitational load. Three male wild type C57BL/10J mice (8 weeks old) were launched by space shuttle Discovery (STS-128) and housed in Japanese Experimental Module “KIBO” on the International Space Station in mouse drawer system (MDS) project, which was organized by Italian Space Agency. Only 1 mouse returned to the Earth alive after 3 months by space shuttle Atlantis (STS-129). Neck muscles were sampled from both sides within 3 hours after landing. Cage and laboratory control experiments were also performed on the ground. Further, 3-month ground-based control experiments were performed with 6 groups, i.e. pre-experiment, 3-month hindlimb suspension, 2-G exposure by using animal centrifuge, and vivarium control (n=5 each group). Five mice were allowed to recover from hindlimb suspension (including 5 cage control) for 3 months in the cage. Neck muscles were sampled bilaterally before and after 3-month suspension and 2-G exposure, and at the end of 3-month ambulation recovery. Spaceflight-associated shift of myosin heavy chain phenotype from type I to II and atrophy of type I fibers were observed. In response to spaceflight, 17 genes were up-regulated and 13 genes were down-regulated vs. those in the laboratory control. Expression of 6 genes were up-regulated and that of 88 genes were down-regulated by 3-month exposure to 2-G vs. the age-matched cage control. In response to chronic hindlimb suspension, 4 and 20 genes were up- or down-regulated. Further, 98 genes responded

  15. Novel control of cardiac myofilament response to calcium by S-glutahionylation at specific sites of myosin binding protein C

    R.JohnSolaro

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies demonstrated a relation between glutathionylation of cardiac myosin binding protein C and diastolic dysfunction in a hypertensive mouse model stressed by treatment with salt, deoxycorticosterone acetate, and unilateral nephrectomy. Although these results strongly indicated an important role for S-glutathionylation of myosin binding protein C as a modifier of myofilament function, indirect effects of other post-translational modifications may have occurred. Moreover, we did not determine the sites of thiol modification by glutathionylation. To address these issues, we developed an in vitro method to mimic the in situ S-glutathionylation of myofilament proteins and determined direct functional effects and sites of oxidative modification employing Western blotting and mass spectrometry. We induced glutathionylation in vitro by treatment of isolated myofibrils and detergent extracted fiber bundles (skinned fibers with oxidized glutathione (GSSG. Immuno-blotting results revealed increased glutathionylation with GSSG treatment of a protein band around 140 kDa. Using tandem mass spectrometry, we identified the 140 kDa band as cardiac myosin binding protein C and determined the sites of glutathionylation to be at cysteines 655, 479, and 627. Determination of the relation between Ca2+-activation of myofibrillar acto-myosin ATPase rate demonstrated an increased Ca2+-sensitivity induced by the S-glutathionylation. Force generating skinned fiber bundles also showed an increase in Ca-sensitivity when treated with oxidized glutathione, which was reversed with the reducing agent, dithiothreitol. Our data demonstrate that a specific and direct effect of S-glutathionylation of myosin binding protein C is a significant increase in myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity. Our data also provide new insights into the functional significance of oxidative modification of myosin binding protein C and the potential role of domains not previously considered to

  16. Myosin Va plays a role in nitrergic smooth muscle relaxation in gastric fundus and corpora cavernosa of penis.

    Arun Chaudhury

    Full Text Available The intracellular motor protein myosin Va is involved in nitrergic neurotransmission possibly by trafficking of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS within the nerve terminals. In this study, we examined the role of myosin Va in the stomach and penis, proto-typical smooth muscle organs in which nitric oxide (NO mediated relaxation is critical for function. We used confocal microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation of tissue from the gastric fundus (GF and penile corpus cavernosum (CCP to localize myosin Va with nNOS and demonstrate their molecular interaction. We utilized in vitro mechanical studies to test whether smooth muscle relaxations during nitrergic neuromuscular neurotransmission is altered in DBA (dilute, brown, non-agouti mice which lack functional myosin Va. Myosin Va was localized in nNOS-positive nerve terminals and was co-immunoprecipitated with nNOS in both GF and CCP. In comparison to C57BL/6J wild type (WT mice, electrical field stimulation (EFS of precontracted smooth muscles of GF and CCP from DBA animals showed significant impairment of nitrergic relaxation. An NO donor, Sodium nitroprusside (SNP, caused comparable levels of relaxation in smooth muscles of WT and DBA mice. These normal postjunctional responses to SNP in DBA tissues suggest that impairment of smooth muscle relaxation resulted from inhibition of NO synthesis in prejunctional nerve terminals. Our results suggest that normal physiological processes of relaxation of gastric and cavernosal smooth muscles that facilitate food accommodation and penile erection, respectively, may be disrupted under conditions of myosin Va deficiency, resulting in complications like gastroparesis and erectile dysfunction.

  17. Head First Statistics

    Griffiths, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Wouldn't it be great if there were a statistics book that made histograms, probability distributions, and chi square analysis more enjoyable than going to the dentist? Head First Statistics brings this typically dry subject to life, teaching you everything you want and need to know about statistics through engaging, interactive, and thought-provoking material, full of puzzles, stories, quizzes, visual aids, and real-world examples. Whether you're a student, a professional, or just curious about statistical analysis, Head First's brain-friendly formula helps you get a firm grasp of statistics

  18. Determining the impact of oxidation on the motility of single muscle-fibres expressing different myosin isoforms

    Spanos, Dimitrios; Li, M.; Baron, Caroline P.; Larsson, L.

    the effect of myosin oxidation on motility and force. The MyHC isoform expression in the single muscle fibre was subsequently determined on silver-stained gel SDS-PAGE. Preliminary results indicate a decrease of directionality and speed of the in-vitro motility as a result of an oxidative environment......, and the successful use of the assay in determining fibre-specific responses to oxidation. Subsequent analyses will focus on the location of protein modifications on the myosin molecule and on how these modifications induce changes in speed and force....

  19. Strain-Dependent Kinetics of the Myosin Working Stroke, and How They Could Be Probed with Optical-Trap Experiments

    Smith, David; Sleep, John

    2006-01-01

    The strain-dependent kinetics of the myosin working stroke under load is derived from a flat-energy-landscape model for its untethered lever-arm, and compared with other scenarios in the literature. The “flat landscape” scenario is compatible with muscle-fiber experiments, but is more critically relevant to single-myosin experiments with an optically trapped actin filament. In such experiments, the strain dependence of stroke kinetics may be explored by comparing event-averaged and time-avera...

  20. Two distinct myosin light chain structures are induced by specific variations within the bound IQ motifs—functional implications

    Terrak, Mohammed; Wu, Guanming; Stafford, Walter F.; Lu, Renne C.; Dominguez, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    IQ motifs are widespread in nature. Mlc1p is a calmodulin-like myosin light chain that binds to IQ motifs of a class V myosin, Myo2p, and an IQGAP-related protein, Iqg1p, playing a role in polarized growth and cytokinesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The crystal structures of Mlc1p bound to IQ2 and IQ4 of Myo2p differ dramatically. When bound to IQ2, Mlc1p adopts a compact conformation in which both the N- and C-lobes interact with the IQ motif. However, in the complex with IQ4, the N-lobe no...

  1. Myosin-binding protein C displaces tropomyosin to activate cardiac thin filaments and governs their speed by an independent mechanism

    Mun, Ji Young; Previs, Michael J.; Yu, Hope Y.; Gulick, James; Tobacman, Larry S.; Beck Previs, Samantha; Robbins, Jeffrey; Warshaw, David M.; Craig, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Myosin-binding protein C (MyBP-C) is a component of myosin filaments, one of the two sets of contractile elements whose relative sliding is the basis of muscle contraction. In the heart, MyBP-C modulates contractility in response to cardiac stimulation; mutations in MyBP-C lead to cardiac disease. The mechanism by which MyBP-C modulates cardiac contraction is not understood. Using electron microscopy and a light microscopic assay for filament sliding, we demonstrate that MyBP-C binds to the o...

  2. Head CT scan

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial ... The x-rays produced by the CT scan are painless. Some people may ... hard table. Contrast given through a vein may cause a: Slight ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... with a new technique called Perfusion CT. brain tumors. enlarged brain cavities (ventricles) in patients with hydrocephalus . diseases or ... Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others ...

  4. EPL rikkus head ajakirjandustava

    2007-01-01

    Pressinõukogu leidis, et Eesti Päevaleht on rikkunud head ajakirjandustava, avaldades Kai Kalamehe ja Anneli Ammase art. "Reps nõuab trahviga ähvardades haridusministeeriumi ülistamist" 1. veebr. Eesti Päevalehes. Artikkel peab põhinema tõestataval ja tõenditega tagatud faktilisel infol

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ... CT exam to be stressful. The technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer ...

  6. Confinement Sensing and Signal Optimization via Piezo1/PKA and Myosin II Pathways.

    Hung, Wei-Chien; Yang, Jessica R; Yankaskas, Christopher L; Wong, Bin Sheng; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Pardo-Pastor, Carlos; Serra, Selma A; Chiang, Meng-Jung; Gu, Zhizhan; Wirtz, Denis; Valverde, Miguel A; Yang, Joy T; Zhang, Jin; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-05-17

    Cells adopt distinct signaling pathways to optimize cell locomotion in different physical microenvironments. However, the underlying mechanism that enables cells to sense and respond to physical confinement is unknown. Using microfabricated devices and substrate-printing methods along with FRET-based biosensors, we report that, as cells transition from unconfined to confined spaces, intracellular Ca(2+) level is increased, leading to phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1)-dependent suppression of PKA activity. This Ca(2+) elevation requires Piezo1, a stretch-activated cation channel. Moreover, differential regulation of PKA and cell stiffness in unconfined versus confined cells is abrogated by dual, but not individual, inhibition of Piezo1 and myosin II, indicating that these proteins can independently mediate confinement sensing. Signals activated by Piezo1 and myosin II in response to confinement both feed into a signaling circuit that optimizes cell motility. This study provides a mechanism by which confinement-induced signaling enables cells to sense and adapt to different physical microenvironments. PMID:27160899

  7. Myosin X Regulates Neuronal Radial Migration through Interacting with N-cadherin

    Mingming Lai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Proper brain function depends on correct neuronal migration during development, which is known to be regulated by cytoskeletal dynamics and cell-cell adhesion. Myosin X (Myo10, an uncharacteristic member of the myosin family, is an important regulator of cytoskeleton that modulates cell motilities in many different cellular contexts. We previously reported that Myo10 was required for neuronal migration in the developing cerebral cortex, but the underlying mechanism was still largely unknown. Here, we found that knockdown of Myo10 expression disturbed the adherence of migrating neurons to radial glial fibers through abolishing surface N-cadherin expression, thereby impaired neuronal migration in the developmental cortex. Next, we found Myo10 interacted with N-cadherin cellular domain through its FERM domain. Furthermore, we found knockdown of Myo10 disrupted N-cadherin subcellular distribution and led to localization of N-cadherin into Golgi apparatus and endosomal sorting vesicle. Taking together, these results reveal a novel mechanism of Myo10 interacting with N-cadherin and regulating its cell-surface expression, which is required for neuronal adhesion and migration.

  8. High resolution characterization of myosin IIC protein tailpiece and its effect on filament assembly.

    Rosenberg, Masha M; Ronen, Daniel; Lahav, Noa; Nazirov, Elvira; Ravid, Shoshana; Friedler, Assaf

    2013-04-01

    The motor protein nonmuscle myosin II (NMII) must undergo dynamic oligomerization into filaments to perform its cellular functions. A small nonhelical region at the tail of the long coiled-coil region (tailpiece) is a common feature of all dynamically assembling myosin II proteins. This tailpiece is a key regulatory domain affecting NMII filament assembly properties and is subject to phosphorylation in vivo. We previously demonstrated that the positively charged region of the tailpiece binds to assembly-incompetent NMII-C fragments, inducing filament assembly. In the current study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which the tailpiece regulates NMII-C self-assembly. Using alanine scan, we found that specific positive and aromatic residues within the positively charged region of the tailpiece are important for inducing NMII-C filament assembly and for filament elongation. Combining peptide arrays with deletion studies allowed us to identify the tailpiece binding sites in the coiled-coil rod. Elucidation of the mechanism by which the tailpiece induces filament assembly permitted us further investigation into the role of tailpiece phosphorylation. Sedimentation and CD spectroscopy identified that phosphorylation of Thr(1957) or Thr(1960) inhibited the ability of the tailpiece to bind the coiled-coil rod and to induce NMII-C filament formation. This study provides molecular insight into the role of specific residues within the NMII-C tailpiece that are responsible for shifting the oligomeric equilibrium of NMII-C toward filament assembly and determining its morphology. PMID:23426373

  9. Model of myosin node aggregation into a contractile ring: the effect of local alignment

    Ojkic, Nikola; Vavylonis, Dimitrios [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Wu Jianqiu, E-mail: vavylonis@lehigh.edu [Department of Molecular Genetics and Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-09-21

    Actomyosin bundles frequently form through aggregation of membrane-bound myosin clusters. One such example is the formation of the contractile ring in fission yeast from a broad band of cortical nodes. Nodes are macromolecular complexes containing several dozens of myosin-II molecules and a few formin dimers. The condensation of a broad band of nodes into the contractile ring has been previously described by a search, capture, pull and release (SCPR) model. In SCPR, a random search process mediated by actin filaments nucleated by formins leads to transient actomyosin connections among nodes that pull one another into a ring. The SCPR model reproduces the transport of nodes over long distances and predicts observed clump-formation instabilities in mutants. However, the model does not generate transient linear elements and meshwork structures as observed in some wild-type and mutant cells during ring assembly. As a minimal model of node alignment, we added short-range aligning forces to the SCPR model representing currently unresolved mechanisms that may involve structural components, cross-linking and bundling proteins. We studied the effect of the local node alignment mechanism on ring formation numerically. We varied the new parameters and found viable rings for a realistic range of values. Morphologically, transient structures that form during ring assembly resemble those observed in experiments with wild-type and cdc25-22 cells. Our work supports a hierarchical process of ring self-organization involving components drawn together from distant parts of the cell followed by progressive stabilization.

  10. Lentivirus-Mediated Knockdown of Myosin VI Inhibits Cell Proliferation of Breast Cancer Cell.

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Biyun; Zhu, Wei; Yang, Ziang

    2015-10-01

    Myosin VI (MYO6) is a unique member of the myosin superfamily, and almost no experimental studies link MYO6 to tumorigenesis of breast cancer. However, previous microarray data demonstrated that MYO6 was frequently overexpressed in breast cancer tissues. In this study, to further develop its role in breast cancer, endogenous expression of MYO6 was significantly inhibited in breast cancer ZR-75-30 and MDA-MB-231 cells using lentivirus-mediated RNA interference. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot were applied to detect the expression level of MYO6. Cell viability of both cell lines was measured by methylthiazol tetrazolium and colony formation assays. Besides, cell cycle assay was utilized to acquire the distribution information of cell phase. The results demonstrated that knockdown of MYO6 markedly reduced cell viability and colony formation, as well as suppressed cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. The results suggested that MYO6 played a vital role in breast cancer cells and might provide useful information for diagnosis and therapy of human breast cancer in future. PMID:26407123

  11. Ischemia/reperfusion-induced myosin light chain 1 phosphorylation increases its degradation by matrix metalloproteinase-2

    Cadete, Virgilio J. J.; Sawicka, Jolanta; Jaswal, Jagdip; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Schulz, Richard; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Sawicki, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    Summary Degradation of myosin light chain 1 (MLC1) by matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury has been established. However, the exact mechanisms controlling this process remain unknown. I/R increases the phosphorylation of MLC1, but the consequences of this modification are not known. We hypothesized that phosphorylation of MLC1 plays an important role in its degradation by MMP-2. To examine this, isolated perfused rat hearts were subjected to 20 min global ischemia followed by 30 min of aerobic reperfusion. I/R increased phosphorylation of MLC1 (as measured by mass spectrometry). If hearts were subjected to I/R in the presence of ML-7 (a myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor) or doxycycline (a MMP inhibitor) an improved recovery of contractile function was seen compared to aerobic hearts and MLC1 was protected from degradation. Enzyme kinetic studies revealed an increased affinity of MMP-2 for the phosphorylated form of MLC1 compared to non-phosphorylated MLC1. We conclude that MLC1 phosphorylation is important mechanism controlling the intracellular action of MMP-2 and promoting the degradation of MLC1. These results further support previous findings implicating posttranslational modifications of contractile proteins as a key factor in the pathology of cardiac dysfunction during and following ischemia. PMID:22564771

  12. Topography induces differential sensitivity on cancer cell proliferation via Rho-ROCK-Myosin contractility

    Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Pan, Catherine Qiurong; Low, Boon Chuan; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-01-01

    Although the role of stiffness on proliferative response of cancer cells has been well studied, little is known about the effect of topographic cues in guiding cancer cell proliferation. Here, we examined the effect of topographic cues on cancer cell proliferation using micron scale topographic features and observed that anisotropic features like microgratings at specific dimension could reduce proliferation of non-cancer breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) but not that for malignant breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7). However, isotropic features such as micropillars did not affect proliferation of MCF-10A, indicating that the anisotropic environmental cues are essential for this process. Interestingly, acto-myosin contraction inhibitory drugs, Y-27632 and blebbistatin prevented micrograting-mediated inhibition on proliferation. Here, we propose the concept of Mechanically-Induced Dormancy (MID) where topographic cues could activate Rho-ROCK-Myosin signaling to suppress non-cancerous cells proliferation whereas malignant cells are resistant to this inhibitory barrier and therefore continue uncontrolled proliferation. PMID:26795068

  13. Arv1 promotes cell division by recruiting IQGAP1 and myosin to the cleavage furrow.

    Sundvold, Hilde; Sundvold-Gjerstad, Vibeke; Malerød-Fjeld, Helle; Haglund, Kaisa; Stenmark, Harald; Malerød, Lene

    2016-03-01

    Cell division is strictly regulated by a diversity of proteins and lipids to ensure proper duplication and segregation of genetic material and organelles. Here we report a novel role of the putative lipid transporter ACAT-related protein required for viability 1 (Arv1) during telophase. We observed that the subcellular localization of Arv1 changes according to cell cycle progression and that Arv1 is recruited to the cleavage furrow in early telophase by epithelial protein lost in neoplasm (EPLIN). At the cleavage furrow Arv1 recruits myosin heavy chain 9 (MYH9) and myosin light chain 9 (MYL9) by interacting with IQ-motif-containing GTPase-activating protein (IQGAP1). Consequently the lack of Arv1 delayed telophase-progression, and a strongly increased incidence of furrow regression and formation of multinuclear cells was observed both in human cells in culture and in follicle epithelial cells of egg chambers of Drosophila melanogaster in vivo. Interestingly, the cholesterol-status at the cleavage furrow did not affect the recruitment of either IQGAP1, MYH9 or MYL. These results identify a novel function for Arv1 in regulation of cell division through promotion of the contractile actomyosin ring, which is independent of its lipid transporter activity. PMID:27104745

  14. The myosin chaperone UNC45B is involved in lens development and autosomal dominant juvenile cataract

    Hansen, Lars; Comyn, Sophie; Mang, Yuan;

    2014-01-01

    -type embryos resulted in development of a phenotype similar to the steif mutant. The p.Arg805Trp alteration in the mammalian UNC45B gene suggests that developmental cataract may be caused by a defect in non-muscle myosin assembly during maturation of the lens fiber cells.European Journal of Human Genetics...... in myosin assembly. The mutation changes p.Arg805 to Trp in the UCS domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved from yeast to human. UNC45B is strongly expressed in the heart and skeletal muscle tissue, but here we show expression in human embryo eye and zebrafish lens. The zebrafish mutant steif......, carrying an unc45b nonsense mutation, has smaller eyes than wild-type embryos and shows accumulation of nuclei in the lens. Injection of RNA encoding the human wild-type UNC45B protein into the steif homozygous embryo reduced the nuclei accumulation and injection of human mutant UNC45B cDNA in wild...

  15. Enzymatic changes in myosin regulatory proteins may explain vasoplegia in terminally ill patients with sepsis

    Zheng, Wentao; Kou, Yong; Gao, Feng-lan; Ouyang, Xiu-he

    2016-01-01

    The current study was conducted with the hypothesis that failure of maintenance of the vascular tone may be central to failure of the peripheral circulation and spiralling down of blood pressure in sepsis. Namely, we examined the balance between expression of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphatase and kinase, enzymes that regulate MLCs dephosphorylation and phosphorylation with a direct effect on pharmacomechanical coupling for smooth muscle relaxation and contraction respectively. Mechanical recordings and enzyme immunoassays of vascular smooth muscle lysates were used as the major methods to examine arterial biopsy samples from terminally ill sepsis patients. The results of the present study provide evidence that genomic alteration of expression of key regulatory proteins in vascular smooth muscles may be responsible for the relentless downhill course in sepsis. Down-regulation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and up-regulation of MLCK may explain the loss of tone and failure to mount contractile response in vivo during circulation. The mechanical studies demonstrated the inability of the arteries to develop tone when stimulated by phenylephrine in vitro. The results of our study provide indirect hint that control of inflammation is a major therapeutic approach in sepsis, and may facilitate to ameliorate the progressive cardiovascular collapse. PMID:26772992

  16. Indirect myosin immunocytochemistry for the identification of fibre types in equine skeletal muscle

    Sinha, A. K.; Rose, R. J.; Pozgaj, I.; Hoh, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    The histochemical ATPase method for muscle fibre typing was first described by Brooke and Kaiser in 1970. However, problems have been found with the subdivision of type II fibres using this technique. To determine whether indirect myosin immunocytochemistry using anti-slow (5-4D), anti-fast (1A10) and anti-fast red (5-2B) monoclonal antibodies with cross reactivity for type I, II and IIa fibres, respectively, in a number of species, could identify three fibre types in equine skeletal muscle, data on fibre type composition and fibre size obtained using the two different techniques were compared. Results indicate that different myosin heavy chains can coexist in single equine muscle fibres. Type I and type II fibres were identified by immunocytochemistry, but subdivision of type II fibres was not possible. Although the percentage of type I and type II fibres was not significantly different for the two techniques, a few fibres reacted with both the 1A10 and 5-4D antibodies.

  17. Recreation-Related Head Injuries

    Recreation-Related Head Injuries American Association of Neurological Surgeons 5550 Meadowbrook Drive, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-3852  ... and follow instructions on product packaging. Top 15 Recreation/Leisure-Related Head Injuries by Product Product Category ...

  18. Head Lice (Beyond the Basics)

    ... The head louse is a tiny, grayish-white insect. Female head lice typically live for about one ... you can use a nonprescription lice treatment (see 'Insecticides' below). Examine family members and close contacts at ...

  19. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    ... is the procedure performed? Head Ultrasound A head ultrasound is performed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at the infant's bedside. The infant is positioned lying face-up. A clear, water-based gel is applied ...

  20. Maintenance of muscle myosin levels in adult C. elegans requires both the double bromodomain protein BET-1 and sumoylation

    Kate Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Attenuation of RAS-mediated signalling is a conserved process essential to control cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Cooperative interactions between histone modifications such as acetylation, methylation and sumoylation are crucial for proper attenuation in C. elegans, implying that the proteins recognising these histone modifications could also play an important role in attenuation of RAS-mediated signalling. We sought to systematically identify these proteins and found BET-1. BET-1 is a conserved double bromodomain protein that recognises acetyl-lysines on histone tails and maintains the stable fate of various lineages. Unexpectedly, adults lacking both BET-1 and SUMO-1 are depleted of muscle myosin, an essential component of myofibrils. We also show that this muscle myosin depletion does not occur in all animals at a specific time, but rather that the penetrance of the phenotype increases with age. To gain mechanistic insights into this process, we sought to delay the occurrence of the muscle myosin depletion phenotype and found that it requires caspase activity and MEK-dependent signalling. We also performed transcription profiling on these mutants and found an up-regulation of the FGF receptor, egl-15, a tyrosine kinase receptor acting upstream of MEK. Consistent with a MEK requirement, we could delay the muscle phenotype by systemic or hypodermal knock down of egl-15. Thus, this work uncovered a caspase- and MEK-dependent mechanism that acts specifically on ageing adults to maintain the appropriate net level of muscle myosin.

  1. Position of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA) mutations predicts the natural history of MYH9-related disease

    Pecci, A.; Panza, E.; Pujol-Moix, N.;

    2008-01-01

    MYH9-related disease (MYH9-RD) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder caused by mutations in MYH9, the gene for the heavy chain of nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMMHC-IIA). All patients present from birth with macrothrombocytopenia, but in infancy or adult life, some of them develop sensorineural deafness...

  2. A Fetus with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, Restrictive and Single Ventricle Physiology, and a β-Myosin Heavy Chain Mutation

    Hinton,Robert B; Michelfelder, Erik C.; Bradley S. Marino; Bove, Kevin E; Ware, Stephanie M.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a significant clinical problem associated with sudden death. A molecular taxonomy is emerging that is refining the clinical classification system. We describe a patient with a pathogenic familial β-myosin heavy chain mutation who was prenatally diagnosed with left ventricular hypoplasia and restrictive diastolic physiology.

  3. Serine-324 of myosin's heavy chain is photoaffinity-labeled by 3'(2')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)adenosine triphosphate

    A portion of the active site of rabbit skeletal myosin near the ribose ring of ATP can be labeled by the photoaffinity analogue 3'(2')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)adenosine triphosphate (Bz2ATP). The specificity of the photolabeling was assured by first trapping [14C]Bz2ATP at the active site by use of thiol cross-linking agents. Five radioactive peptides were isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography after extensive trypsin and subtilisin digestion of photolabeled myosin subfragment 1. Four of these peptides were sequenced by Edman techniques, and all originated from a region with the sequence Gly-Glu-Ile-Thr-Val-Pro-Ser-Ile-Asp-Asp-Gln, which corresponds to rabbit myosin heavy chain residues 312-328. The fifth labeled peptide had an amino acid composition appropriate for residues 312-328. Amino acid composition, radiochemical analysis, and sequence data indicate that Ser-324 is the major amino acid residue photolabeled by Bz2ATP. Spectrophotometric evidence indicates that the benzophenone carbonyl group has inserted into a C-H bond from either the α- or β-carbon of serine. These results place Ser-324 at a distance of 6-7 angstrom from the 3'(2') ribose oxygens of ATP bound at the active site of myosin

  4. Graded effects of unregulated smooth muscle myosin on intestinal architecture, intestinal motility and vascular function in zebrafish.

    Abrams, Joshua; Einhorn, Zev; Seiler, Christoph; Zong, Alan B; Sweeney, H Lee; Pack, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Smooth muscle contraction is controlled by the regulated activity of the myosin heavy chain ATPase (Myh11). Myh11 mutations have diverse effects in the cardiovascular, digestive and genitourinary systems in humans and animal models. We previously reported a recessive missense mutation, meltdown (mlt), which converts a highly conserved tryptophan to arginine (W512R) in the rigid relay loop of zebrafish Myh11. The mlt mutation disrupts myosin regulation and non-autonomously induces invasive expansion of the intestinal epithelium. Here, we report two newly identified missense mutations in the switch-1 (S237Y) and coil-coiled (L1287M) domains of Myh11 that fail to complement mlt Cell invasion was not detected in either homozygous mutant but could be induced by oxidative stress and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways. The smooth muscle defect imparted by the mlt and S237Y mutations also delayed intestinal transit, and altered vascular function, as measured by blood flow in the dorsal aorta. The cell-invasion phenotype induced by the three myh11 mutants correlated with the degree of myosin deregulation. These findings suggest that the vertebrate intestinal epithelium is tuned to the physical state of the surrounding stroma, which, in turn, governs its response to physiologic and pathologic stimuli. Genetic variants that alter the regulation of smooth muscle myosin might be risk factors for diseases affecting the intestine, vasculature, and other tissues that contain smooth muscle or contractile cells that express smooth muscle proteins, particularly in the setting of redox stress. PMID:26893369

  5. An inducible mouse model for microvillus inclusion disease reveals a role for myosin Vb in apical and basolateral trafficking

    Schneeberger, Kerstin; Vogel, Georg F; Teunissen, Hans; van Ommen, Domenique D; Begthel, Harry; El Bouazzaoui, Layla; van Vugt, Anke H M; Beekman, Jeffrey M; Klumperman, Judith; Müller, Thomas; Janecke, Andreas; Gerner, Patrick; Huber, Lukas A; Hess, Michael W; Clevers, Hans; van Es, Johan H; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Middendorp, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) is a rare intestinal enteropathy with an onset within a few days to months after birth, resulting in persistent watery diarrhea. Mutations in the myosin Vb gene (MYO5B) have been identified in the majority of MVID patients. However, the exact pathophysiology of M

  6. Functional Analysis of Slow Myosin Heavy Chain 1 and Myomesin-3 in Sarcomere Organization in Zebrafish Embryonic Slow Muscles

    Jin Xu; Jie Gao; Junling Li; Liangyi Xue; Karl J. Clark; Stephen C. Ekker; Shao Jun Du

    2012-01-01

    Myofibrillogenesis,the process of sarcomere formation,requires close interactions of sarcomeric proteins and various components of sarcomere structures.The myosin thick filaments and M-lines are two key components of the sarcomere.It has been suggested that myomesin proteins of M-lines interact with myosin and titin proteins and keep the thick and titin filaments in order.However,the function of myomesin in myofibrillogenesis and sarcomere organization remained largely enigmatic.No knockout or knockdown animal models have been reported to elucidate the role of myomesin in sarcomere organization in vivo.In this study,by using the gene-specific knockdown approach in zebrafish embryos,we carried out a loss-of-function analysis of myomesin-3 and slow myosin heavy chain l (smyhcl) expressed specifically in slow muscles.We demonstrated that knockdown of smyhcl abolished the sarcomeric localization of myomesin-3 in slow muscles.In contrast,loss of myomesin-3 had no effect on the sarcomeric organization of thick and thin filaments as well as M- and Z-line structures.Together,these studies indicate that myosin thick filaments are required for M-line organization and M-line localization of myomesin-3.In contrast,myomesin-3 is dispensable for sarcomere organization in slow muscles.

  7. Myosin IIA participates in docking of Glut4 storage vesicles with the plasma membrane in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    In adipocytes and myocytes, insulin stimulation translocates glucose transporter 4 (Glut4) storage vesicles (GSVs) from their intracellular storage sites to the plasma membrane (PM) where they dock with the PM. Then, Glut4 is inserted into the PM and initiates glucose uptake into these cells. Previous studies using chemical inhibitors demonstrated that myosin II participates in fusion of GSVs and the PM and increase in the intrinsic activity of Glut4. In this study, the effect of myosin IIA on GSV trafficking was examined by knocking down myosin IIA expression. Myosin IIA knockdown decreased both glucose uptake and exposures of myc-tagged Glut4 to the cell surface in insulin-stimulated cells, but did not affect insulin signal transduction. Interestingly, myosin IIA knockdown failed to decrease insulin-dependent trafficking of Glut4 to the PM. Moreover, in myosin IIA knockdown cells, insulin-stimulated binding of GSV SNARE protein, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2) to PM SNARE protein, syntaxin 4 was inhibited. These data suggest that myosin IIA plays a role in insulin-stimulated docking of GSVs to the PM in 3T3-L1 adipocytes through SNARE complex formation.

  8. Characterization of the minimum domain required for targeting budding yeast myosin II to the site of cell division

    Tolliday Nicola J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All eukaryotes with the exception of plants use an actomyosin ring to generate a constriction force at the site of cell division (cleavage furrow during mitosis and meiosis. The structure and filament forming abilities located in the C-terminal or tail region of one of the main components, myosin II, are important for localising the molecule to the contractile ring (CR during cytokinesis. However, it remains poorly understood how myosin II is recruited to the site of cell division and how this recruitment relates to myosin filament assembly. Significant conservation between species of the components involved in cytokinesis, including those of the CR, allows the use of easily genetically manipulated organisms, such as budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the study of cytokinesis. Budding yeast has a single myosin II protein, named Myo1. Unlike most other class II myosins, the tail of Myo1 has an irregular coiled coil. In this report we use molecular genetics, biochemistry and live cell imaging to characterize the minimum localisation domain (MLD of budding yeast Myo1. Results We show that the MLD is a small region in the centre of the tail of Myo1 and that it is both necessary and sufficient for localisation of Myo1 to the yeast bud neck, the pre-determined site of cell division. Hydrodynamic measurements of the MLD, purified from bacteria or yeast, show that it is likely to exist as a trimer. We also examine the importance of a small region of low coiled coil forming probability within the MLD, which we call the hinge region. Removal of the hinge region prevents contraction of the CR. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, we show that GFP-tagged MLD is slightly more dynamic than the GFP-tagged full length molecule but less dynamic than the GFP-tagged Myo1 construct lacking the hinge region. Conclusion Our results define the intrinsic determinant for the localization of budding yeast myosin II and show

  9. "Head versus heart"

    Paul Rozin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Most American respondents give ``irrational,'' magical responses in a variety of situations that exemplify the sympathetic magical laws of similarity and contagion. In most of these cases, respondents are aware that their responses (usually rejections, as of fudge crafted to look like dog feces, or a food touched by a sterilized, dead cockroach are not ``scientifically'' justified, but they are willing to avow them. We interpret this, in some sense, as ``heart over head.'' We report in this study that American adults and undergraduates are substantially less likely to acknowledge magical effects when the judgments involve money (amount willing to pay to avoid an ``unpleasant'' magical contact than they are when using preference or rating measures. We conclude that in ``head-heart'' conflicts of this type, money tips the balance towards the former, or, in other words, that money makes the mind less magical.

  10. Sofic one head machines

    Gajardo, Anahi

    2008-01-01

    There are several systems consisting in an object that moves on the plane by following a given rule. It is frequently observed that these systems eventually fall into an unexplained repetitive movement. The general framework of k-dimensional Turing machines with only one head is adopted. A subshift is associated to each Turing machine, and its properties are studied. The subshift consists in the set of sequences of symbols that the machine reads together with the states that it has through ea...

  11. Where are we heading

    The present paper deals with different aspects connected to the global petroleum industry by discussing the way of heading. The aspects cover themes like new frontiers, new relationships, sanctions, global climate change, new alliances and new technology. New frontiers and relationships concern domestic policy affecting the industry, and sanctions are discussed in connection with trade. The author discusses the industry's participation in the global environmental policy and new alliances to provide greater opportunity for developing new technology

  12. Where are we heading

    Noto, L.A. [Mobil Corporation, (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The present paper deals with different aspects connected to the global petroleum industry by discussing the way of heading. The aspects cover themes like new frontiers, new relationships, sanctions, global climate change, new alliances and new technology. New frontiers and relationships concern domestic policy affecting the industry, and sanctions are discussed in connection with trade. The author discusses the industry`s participation in the global environmental policy and new alliances to provide greater opportunity for developing new technology

  13. Arabidopsis myosin XI sub-domains homologous to the yeast myo2p organelle inheritance sub-domain target subcellular structures in plant cells

    Amirali eSattarzadeh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Myosin XI motor proteins transport plant organelles on the actin cytoskeleton. The Arabidopsis gene family that encodes myosin XI has 13 members, 12 of which have sub-domains within the tail region that are homologous to well-characterized cargo-binding domains in the yeast myosin V myo2p. Little is presently known about the cargo-binding domains of plant myosin XIs. Prior experiments in which most or all of the tail regions of myosin XIs have been fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP and transiently expressed have often not resulted in fluorescent labeling of plant organelles. We identified 42 amino-acid regions within 12 Arabidopsis myosin XIs that are homologous to the yeast myo2p tail region known to be essential for vacuole and mitochondrial inheritance. A YFP fusion of the yeast region expressed in plants did not label tonoplasts or mitochondria. We investigated whether the homologous Arabidopsis regions, termed by us the PAL sub-domain, could associate with subcellular structures following transient expression of fusions with YFP in Nicotiana benthamiana. Seven YFP::PAL sub-domain fusions decorated Golgi and six were localized to mitochondria. In general, the myosin XI PAL sub-domains labeled organelles whose motility had previously been observed to be affected by mutagenesis or dominant negative assays with the respective myosins. Simultaneous transient expression of the PAL sub-domains of myosin XI-H, XI-I, and XI-K resulted in inhibition of movement of mitochondria and Golgi.

  14. [Bilateral caudate head infarcts].

    Kuriyama, N; Yamamoto, Y; Akiguchi, I; Oiwa, K; Nakajima, K

    1997-11-01

    We reported a 67-year-old woman with bilateral caudate head infarcts. She developed sudden mutism followed by abulia. She was admitted to our hospital 2 months after ictus for further examination. She showed prominent abulia and was inactive, slow and apathetic. Spontaneous activity and speech, immediate response to queries, spontaneous word recall and attention and persistence to complex programs were disturbed. Apparent motor disturbance, gait disturbance, motor aphasia, apraxia and remote memory disturbance were not identified. She seemed to be depressed but not sad. Brain CT and MRI revealed bilateral caudate head hemorrhagic infarcts including bilateral anterior internal capsules, in which the left lesion was more extensive than right one and involved the part of the left putamen. These infarct locations were thought to be supplied by the area around the medial striate artery including Heubner's arteries and the A1 perforator. Digital subtraction angiography showed asymptomatic right internal carotid artery occlusion. She bad had hypertension, diabetes mellitus and atrial fibrillation and also had a left atrium with a large diameter. The infarcts were thought to be caused by cardioembolic occlusion to the distal portion of the left internal carotid artery. Although some variations of vasculature at the anterior communicating artery might contribute to bilateral medial striate artery infarcts, we could not demonstrate such abnormalities by angiography. Bilateral caudate head infarcts involving the anterior internal capsule may cause prominent abulia. The patient did not improve by drug and rehabilitation therapy and died suddenly a year after discharge. PMID:9503974

  15. Zinc-induced cardiomyocyte relaxation in a rat model of hyperglycemia is independent of myosin isoform

    Yi Ting

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been reported previously that diabetic cardiomyopathy can be inhibited or reverted with chronic zinc supplementation. In the current study, we hypothesized that total cardiac calcium and zinc content is altered in early onset diabetes mellitus characterized in part as hyperglycemia (HG and that exposure of zinc ion (Zn2+ to isolated cardiomyocytes would enhance contraction-relaxation function in HG more so than in nonHG controls. To better control for differential cardiac myosin isoform expression as occurs in rodents after β-islet cell necrosis, hypothyroidism was induced in 16 rats resulting in 100% β-myosin heavy chain expression in the heart. β-Islet cell necrosis was induced in half of the rats by streptozocin administration. After 6 wks of HG, both HG and nonHG controls rats demonstrated similar myofilament performance measured as thin filament calcium sensitivity, native thin filament velocity in the myosin motility assay and contractile velocity and power. Extracellular Zn2+ reduced cardiomyocyte contractile function in both groups, but enhanced relaxation function significantly in the HG group compared to controls. Most notably, a reduction in diastolic sarcomere length with increasing pacing frequencies, i.e., incomplete relaxation, was more pronounced in the HG compared to controls, but was normalized with extracellular Zn2+ application. This is a novel finding implicating that the detrimental effect of HG on cardiomyocyte Ca2+ regulation can be amelioration by Zn2+. Among the many post-translational modifications examined, only phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor (RyR at S-2808 was significantly higher in HG compared to nonHG. We did not find in our hypothyroid rats any differentiating effects of HG on myofibrillar protein phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine and advanced glycated end-products, which are often implicated as complicating factors in cardiac performance due to HG. Our

  16. Role of LARP6 and nonmuscle myosin in partitioning of collagen mRNAs to the ER membrane.

    Hao Wang

    Full Text Available Type I collagen is extracellular matrix protein composed of two α1(I and one α2(I polypeptides that fold into triple helix. Collagen polypeptides are translated in coordination to synchronize the rate of triple helix folding to the rate of posttranslational modifications of individual polypeptides. This is especially important in conditions of high collagen production, like fibrosis. It has been assumed that collagen mRNAs are targeted to the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER after translation of the signal peptide and by signal peptide recognition particle (SRP. Here we show that collagen mRNAs associate with the ER membrane even when translation is inhibited. Knock down of LARP6, an RNA binding protein which binds 5' stem-loop of collagen mRNAs, releases a small amount of collagen mRNAs from the membrane. Depolimerization of nonmuscle myosin filaments has a similar, but stronger effect. In the absence of LARP6 or nonmuscle myosin filaments collagen polypeptides become hypermodified, are poorly secreted and accumulate in the cytosol. This indicates lack of coordination of their synthesis and retro-translocation due to hypermodifications and misfolding. Depolimerization of nonmuscle myosin does not alter the secretory pathway through ER and Golgi, suggesting that the role of nonmuscle myosin is primarily to partition collagen mRNAs to the ER membrane. We postulate that collagen mRNAs directly partition to the ER membrane prior to synthesis of the signal peptide and that LARP6 and nonmuscle myosin filaments mediate this process. This allows coordinated initiation of translation on the membrane bound collagen α1(I and α2(I mRNAs, a necessary step for proper synthesis of type I collagen.

  17. The roles of the actin-myosin interaction and proteolysis in tenderization during the aging of chicken muscle.

    Li, S; Xu, X; Zhou, G

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of the changes in the actin-myosin interaction and proteolysis on meat tenderization during postmortem storage. Following slaughter, chicken breast muscles were removed and stored at 4°C. Changes in the actin-myosin interaction over 48 h of aging were determined by monitoring the Mg(2+)- and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities. Shear force values, pH, protein degradation, calpain activities, and myofibrillar ultrastructures were also investigated. Results showed that the initial weak actin-myosin interaction strengthened at 12 h postmortem followed by a gradual weakening, which was supported by a decrease in Mg(2+)-ATPase activities and a lengthening of the sarcomeres. According to SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analyses, the 30-kDa troponin-T fragment could not be readily detected until 12 h, whereas, at the same time, desmin had been rapidly degraded. However, there was a gradual decline in μ-calpain activity, commencing after about 6 h. Meanwhile, the largest decline in shear force was observed between 12 and 24 h postmortem. These findings suggest that weakening of the strong actin-myosin interaction formed at rigor may play a large role in meat tenderization during the early period of storage. It is proposed that weakening of the actin-myosin interaction results in lengthening of the sarcomeres, and then activated calpains are more able to reach their targeted sites, enabling proteolysis. These 2 factors may be involved in the conversion of muscle to tender meat during postmortem storage. PMID:22184440

  18. Papaverine Prevents Vasospasm by Regulation of Myosin Light Chain Phosphorylation and Actin Polymerization in Human Saphenous Vein

    Hocking, Kyle M.; Putumbaka, Gowthami; Wise, Eric S.; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce; Brophy, Colleen M.; Komalavilas, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    Objective Papaverine is used to prevent vasospasm in human saphenous veins (HSV) during vein graft preparation prior to implantation as a bypass conduit. Papaverine is a nonspecific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases, leading to increases in both intracellular cGMP and cAMP. We hypothesized that papaverine reduces force by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and myosin light chain phosphorylation, and increasing actin depolymerization via regulation of actin regulatory protein phosphorylation. Approach and Results HSV was equilibrated in a muscle bath, pre-treated with 1 mM papaverine followed by 5 μM norepinephrine, and force along with [Ca2+]i levels were concurrently measured. Filamentous actin (F-actin) level was measured by an in vitro actin assay. Tissue was snap frozen to measure myosin light chain and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation. Pre-treatment with papaverine completely inhibited norepinephrine-induced force generation, blocked increases in [Ca2+]i and led to a decrease in the phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Papaverine pre-treatment also led to increased phosphorylation of the heat shock-related protein 20 (HSPB6) and the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), as well as decreased filamentous actin (F-actin) levels suggesting depolymerization of actin. Conclusions These results suggest that papaverine-induced force inhibition of HSV involves [Ca2+]i-mediated inhibition of myosin light chain phosphorylation and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation-mediated actin depolymerization. Thus, papaverine induces sustained inhibition of contraction of HSV by the modulation of both myosin cross-bridge formation and actin cytoskeletal dynamics and is a pharmacological alternative to high pressure distention to prevent vasospasm. PMID:27136356

  19. Possible interrelationship between changes in F-actin and myosin II, protein phosphorylation, and cell volume regulation in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    Pedersen, S F; Hoffmann, E K

    2002-01-01

    Osmotic shrinkage of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EATC) elicited translocation of myosin II from the cytosol to the cortical region, and swelling elicits concentration of myosin II in the Golgi region. Rho kinase and p38 both appeared to be involved in shrinkage-induced myosin II reorganization. In...... effects on F-actin. The subsequent F-actin depolymerization, however, appeared MLCK- and PKC-dependent, and the initial swelling-induced F-actin depolymerization was MLCK-dependent; both effects were apparently secondary to kinase-mediated effects on cell volume changes. NHE1 in EATC is activated both by...

  20. Myosin-cross-reactive antigens from four different lactic acid bacteria are fatty acid hydratases.

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Haiqin; Song, Yuanda; Chen, Yong Q; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The 67 kDa myosin-cross-reactive antigen (MCRA) is a member of the MCRA family of proteins present in a wide range of bacteria and was predicted to have fatty acid isomerase function. We have now characterised the catalytic activity of MCRAs from four LAB stains, including Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG, L. plantarum ST-III, L. acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12. MCRA genes from these strains were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein function was analysed with lipid profiles by GC-MS. The four MCRAs catalysed the conversion of linoleic acid and oleic acid to their respective 10-hydroxy derivatives, which suggests that MCRA proteins catalyse the first step in conjugated linoleic acid production. This is the first report of MCRA from L. rhamnosus with such catalytic function. PMID:22955678

  1. Actin- and Myosin-Dependent Vesicle Loading of Presynaptic Docking Sites Prior to Exocytosis.

    Miki, Takafumi; Malagon, Gerardo; Pulido, Camila; Llano, Isabel; Neher, Erwin; Marty, Alain

    2016-08-17

    Variance analysis of postsynaptic current amplitudes suggests the presence of distinct docking sites (also called release sites) where vesicles pause before exocytosis. Docked vesicles participate in the readily releasable pool (RRP), but the relation between docking site number and RRP size remains unclear. It is also unclear whether all vesicles of the RRP are equally release competent, and what cellular mechanisms underlie RRP renewal. We address here these questions at single glutamatergic synapses, counting released vesicles using deconvolution. We find a remarkably low variance of cumulative vesicle counts during action potential trains. This, combined with Monte Carlo simulations, indicates that vesicles transit through two successive states before exocytosis, so that the RRP is up to 2-fold higher than the docking site number. The transition to the second state has a very rapid rate constant, and is specifically inhibited by latrunculin B and blebbistatin, suggesting the involvement of actin and myosin. PMID:27537485

  2. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-06-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ~95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes.

  3. Direct Microtubule-Binding by Myosin-10 Orients Centrosomes toward Retraction Fibers and Subcortical Actin Clouds.

    Kwon, Mijung; Bagonis, Maria; Danuser, Gaudenz; Pellman, David

    2015-08-10

    Positioning of centrosomes is vital for cell division and development. In metazoan cells, spindle positioning is controlled by a dynamic pool of subcortical actin that organizes in response to the position of retraction fibers. These actin "clouds" are proposed to generate pulling forces on centrosomes and mediate spindle orientation. However, the motors that pull astral microtubules toward these actin structures are not known. Here, we report that the unconventional myosin, Myo10, couples actin-dependent forces from retraction fibers and subcortical actin clouds to centrosomes. Myo10-mediated centrosome positioning requires its direct microtubule binding. Computational image analysis of large microtubule populations reveals a direct effect of Myo10 on microtubule dynamics and microtubule-cortex interactions. Myo10's role in centrosome positioning is distinct from, but overlaps with, that of dynein. Thus, Myo10 plays a key role in integrating the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons to position centrosomes and mitotic spindles. PMID:26235048

  4. Harmonic force spectroscopy measures load-dependent kinetics of individual human β-cardiac myosin molecules

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Mortensen, Kim I.; Vestergaard, Christian L.; Sutton, Shirley; Ruppel, Kathleen; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Spudich, James A.

    2015-08-01

    Molecular motors are responsible for numerous cellular processes from cargo transport to heart contraction. Their interactions with other cellular components are often transient and exhibit kinetics that depend on load. Here, we measure such interactions using `harmonic force spectroscopy'. In this method, harmonic oscillation of the sample stage of a laser trap immediately, automatically and randomly applies sinusoidally varying loads to a single motor molecule interacting with a single track along which it moves. The experimental protocol and the data analysis are simple, fast and efficient. The protocol accumulates statistics fast enough to deliver single-molecule results from single-molecule experiments. We demonstrate the method's performance by measuring the force-dependent kinetics of individual human β-cardiac myosin molecules interacting with an actin filament at physiological ATP concentration. We show that a molecule's ADP release rate depends exponentially on the applied load, in qualitative agreement with cardiac muscle, which contracts with a velocity inversely proportional to external load.

  5. A high acceleration programmable centrifuge used in purification of myocardial and skeletal muscle myosins.

    Wikman-Coffelt, J; Coffelt, R J

    1981-02-01

    Protein purification can be improved by using high acceleration - deceleraton centrifugation. This study describes a high acceleration programmable centrifuge which reaches 5,000 x g in 3 sec and brakes from 5,000 to 0 x g in 4.3 sec. This study further describes the use of this centrifuge in myosin purification and thus demonstrates that protein purification can be improved by separating particles with a high acceleration - deceleration centrifuge for the following reasons: (1) biological and chemical equilibria are immediately terminated, (2) proteolysis is reduced, (3) working time is decreased, and (4) the native state of labile proteins are better preserved. Rapid acceleration and deceleration is advantageous in reducing centrifugation time for separation of particles because it decreases diffusion time of particles and non-desirable interactions. PMID:6452672

  6. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells.

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ∼95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes. PMID:27251117

  7. Podocyte-specific knockout of myosin 1e disrupts glomerular filtration.

    Chase, Sharon E; Encina, Christina V; Stolzenburg, Lindsay R; Tatum, Arthur H; Holzman, Lawrence B; Krendel, Mira

    2012-10-01

    Myosin 1e (myo1e) is an actin-dependent molecular motor that plays an important role in kidney functions. Complete knockout of myo1e in mice and Myo1E mutations in humans are associated with nephrotic syndrome and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that myo1e is necessary for normal functions of glomerular visceral epithelial cells (podocytes) using podocyte-targeted knockout of myo1e. Myo1e was selectively knocked out in podocytes using Cre-mediated recombination controlled by the podocin promoter. Myo1e loss from podocytes resulted in proteinuria, podocyte foot process effacement, and glomerular basement membrane disorganization. Our findings indicate that myo1e expression in podocytes is necessary for normal glomerular filtration and that podocyte defects are likely to represent the primary pathway leading to glomerular disease associated with Myo1E mutations. PMID:22811491

  8. Myosin heavy chain composition of single fibres from m. biceps brachii of male body builders

    Klitgaard, H; Zhou, M.-Y.; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    expression of MHC isoforms within histochemical type II fibres of human skeletal muscle with body building. Furthermore, in human skeletal muscle differences in expression of MHC isoforms may not always be reflected in the traditional histochemical classification of types I, IIa, IIb and IIc fibres.......The myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of single fibres from m. biceps brachii of young sedentary men (28 +/- 0.4 years, mean +/- SE, n = 4) and male body builders (25 +/- 2.0 years, n = 4) was analysed with a sensitive one-dimensional electrophoretic technique. Compared with sedentary men, the...... body builders had a higher proportion of fibres containing only MHC type IIa (36 +/- 4 vs 12 +/- 2%; P less than 0.05), but a lower proportion of fibres with a coexistence of MHC types IIa and IIb (16 +/- 3 vs 34 +/- 2%; P less than 0.05) and nearly no fibres containing only MHC type IIb (1 +/- 1 vs 12...

  9. Impact of resistance exercise during bed rest on skeletal muscle sarcopenia and myosin isoform distribution

    Bamman, M. M.; Clarke, M. S.; Feeback, D. L.; Talmadge, R. J.; Stevens, B. R.; Lieberman, S. A.; Greenisen, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Because resistance exercise (REx) and bed-rest unloading (BRU) are associated with opposing adaptations, our purpose was to test the efficacy of REx against the effects of 14 days of BRU on the knee-extensor muscle group. Sixteen healthy men were randomly assigned to no exercise (NoEx; n = 8) or REx (n = 8). REx performed five sets of leg press exercise with 80-85% of one repetition maximum (1 RM) every other day during BRU. Muscle samples were removed from the vastus lateralis muscle by percutaneous needle biopsy. Myofiber distribution was determined immunohistochemically with three monoclonal antibodies against myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms (I, IIa, IIx). MHC distribution was further assessed by quantitative gel electrophoresis. Dynamic 1-RM leg press and unilateral maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) were determined. Maximal neural activation (root mean squared electromyogram) and rate of torque development (RTD) were measured during MVC. Reductions (P exercise for astronauts in microgravity.

  10. The Intriguing Dual Lattices of the Myosin Filaments in Vertebrate Striated Muscles: Evolution and Advantage

    Pradeep K. Luther

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Myosin filaments in vertebrate striated muscle have a long roughly cylindrical backbone with cross-bridge projections on the surfaces of both halves except for a short central bare zone. In the middle of this central region the filaments are cross-linked by the M-band which holds them in a well-defined hexagonal lattice in the muscle A-band. During muscular contraction the M-band-defined rotation of the myosin filaments around their long axes influences the interactions that the cross-bridges can make with the neighbouring actin filaments. We can visualise this filament rotation by electron microscopy of thin cross-sections in the bare-region immediately adjacent to the M-band where the filament profiles are distinctly triangular. In the muscles of teleost fishes, the thick filament triangular profiles have a single orientation giving what we call the simple lattice. In other vertebrates, for example all the tetrapods, the thick filaments have one of two orientations where the triangles point in opposite directions (they are rotated by 60° or 180° according to set rules. Such a distribution cannot be developed in an ordered fashion across a large 2D lattice, but there are small domains of superlattice such that the next-nearest neighbouring thick filaments often have the same orientation. We believe that this difference in the lattice forms can lead to different contractile behaviours. Here we provide a historical review, and when appropriate cite recent work related to the emergence of the simple and superlattice forms by examining the muscles of several species ranging back to primitive vertebrates and we discuss the functional differences that the two lattice forms may have.

  11. Protective Effects of Clenbuterol against Dexamethasone-Induced Masseter Muscle Atrophy and Myosin Heavy Chain Transition.

    Daisuke Umeki

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid has a direct catabolic effect on skeletal muscle, leading to muscle atrophy, but no effective pharmacotherapy is available. We reported that clenbuterol (CB induced masseter muscle hypertrophy and slow-to-fast myosin heavy chain (MHC isoform transition through direct muscle β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus, we hypothesized that CB would antagonize glucocorticoid (dexamethasone; DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition.We examined the effect of CB on DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy by measuring masseter muscle weight, fiber diameter, cross-sectional area, and myosin heavy chain (MHC composition. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we used immunoblotting to study the effects of CB on muscle hypertrophic signaling (insulin growth factor 1 (IGF1 expression, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway, and calcineurin pathway and atrophic signaling (Akt/Forkhead box-O (FOXO pathway and myostatin expression in masseter muscle of rats treated with DEX and/or CB.Masseter muscle weight in the DEX-treated group was significantly lower than that in the Control group, as expected, but co-treatment with CB suppressed the DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy, concomitantly with inhibition of fast-to-slow MHC isoforms transition. Activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway in masseter muscle of the DEX-treated group was significantly inhibited compared to that of the Control group, and CB suppressed this inhibition. DEX also suppressed expression of IGF1 (positive regulator of muscle growth, and CB attenuated this inhibition. Myostatin protein expression was unchanged. CB had no effect on activation of the Akt/FOXO pathway. These results indicate that CB antagonizes DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition via modulation of Akt/mTOR activity and IGF1 expression. CB might be a useful pharmacological agent for treatment of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  12. Nonmuscle myosin IIB as a therapeutic target for the prevention of relapse to methamphetamine use.

    Young, E J; Blouin, A M; Briggs, S B; Sillivan, S E; Lin, L; Cameron, M D; Rumbaugh, G; Miller, C A

    2016-05-01

    Memories associated with drug use increase vulnerability to relapse in substance use disorder (SUD), and there are no pharmacotherapies for the prevention of relapse. Previously, we reported a promising finding that storage of memories associated with methamphetamine (METH), but not memories for fear or food reward, is vulnerable to disruption by actin depolymerization in the basolateral amygdala complex (BLC). However, actin is not a viable therapeutic target because of its numerous functions throughout the body. Here we report the discovery of a viable therapeutic target, nonmuscle myosin IIB (NMIIB), a molecular motor that supports memory by directly driving synaptic actin polymerization. A single intra-BLC treatment with Blebbistatin (Blebb), a small-molecule inhibitor of class II myosin isoforms, including NMIIB, produced a long-lasting disruption of context-induced drug seeking (at least 30 days). Further, postconsolidation genetic knockdown of Myh10, the heavy chain of the most highly expressed NMII in the BLC, was sufficient to produce METH-associated memory loss. Blebb was found to be highly brain penetrant. A single systemic injection of the compound selectively disrupted the storage of METH-associated memory and reversed the accompanying increase in BLC spine density. This effect was specific to METH-associated memory, as it had no effect on an auditory fear memory. The effect was also independent of retrieval, as METH-associated memory was disrupted 24 h after a single systemic injection of Blebb delivered in the home cage. Together, these results argue for the further development of small-molecule inhibitors of NMII as potential therapeutics for the prevention of SUD relapse triggered by drug associations. PMID:26239291

  13. Myosin isoform fiber type and fiber size in the tail of the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana).

    Hazimihalis, P J; Gorvet, M A; Butcher, M T

    2013-01-01

    Muscle fiber type is a well studied property in limb muscles, however, much less is understood about myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expression in caudal muscles of mammalian tails. Didelphid marsupials are an interesting lineage in this context as all species have prehensile tails, but show a range of tail-function depending on either their arboreal or terrestrial locomotor habits. Differences in prehensility suggest that MHC isoform fiber types may also be different, in that terrestrial opossums may have a large distribution of oxidative fibers for object carrying tasks instead of faster, glycolytic fiber types expected in mammals with long tails. To test this hypothesis, MHC isoform fiber type and their regional distribution (proximal/transitional/distal) were determined in the tail of the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana). Fiber types were determined by a combination of myosin-ATPase histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and SDS-PAGE. Results indicate a predominance of the fast MHC-2A and -2X isoforms in each region of the tail. The presence of two fast isoforms, in addition to the slow MHC-1 isoform, was confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis. The overall MHC isoform fiber type distribution for the tail was: 25% MHC-1, 71% MHC-2A/X hybrid, and 4% MHC-1/2A hybrid. Oxidative MHC-2A/X isoform fibers were found to be relatively large in cross-section compared to slow, oxidative MHC-1 and MHC-1/2A hybrid fibers. A large percentage of fast MHC-2A/X hybrids fibers may be suggestive of an evolutionary transition in MHC isoform distribution (fast-to-slow fiber type) in the tail musculature of an opossum with primarily a terrestrial locomotor habit and adaptive tail-function. PMID:23152195

  14. Mechanochemical coupling in the myosin motor domain. I. Insights from equilibrium active-site simulations.

    Haibo Yu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the major structural transitions in molecular motors are often argued to couple to the binding of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP, the recovery stroke in the conventional myosin has been shown to be dependent on the hydrolysis of ATP. To obtain a clearer mechanistic picture for such "mechanochemical coupling" in myosin, equilibrium active-site simulations with explicit solvent have been carried out to probe the behavior of the motor domain as functions of the nucleotide chemical state and conformation of the converter/relay helix. In conjunction with previous studies of ATP hydrolysis with different active-site conformations and normal mode analysis of structural flexibility, the results help establish an energetics-based framework for understanding the mechanochemical coupling. It is proposed that the activation of hydrolysis does not require the rotation of the lever arm per se, but the two processes are tightly coordinated because both strongly couple to the open/close transition of the active site. The underlying picture involves shifts in the dominant population of different structural motifs as a consequence of changes elsewhere in the motor domain. The contribution of this work and the accompanying paper [] is to propose the actual mechanism behind these "population shifts" and residues that play important roles in the process. It is suggested that structural flexibilities at both the small and large scales inherent to the motor domain make it possible to implement tight couplings between different structural motifs while maintaining small free-energy drops for processes that occur in the detached states, which is likely a feature shared among many molecular motors. The significantly different flexibility of the active site in different X-ray structures with variable level arm orientations supports the notation that external force sensed by the lever arm may transmit into the active site and influence the chemical steps (nucleotide

  15. Ragweed sensitization-induced increase of myosin light chain kinase content in canine airway smooth muscle.

    Jiang, H; Rao, K; Halayko, A J; Liu, X; Stephens, N L

    1992-12-01

    Previous studies have identified changes of mechanical properties of airway smooth muscle (ASM) from a canine model of atopic airway hyperreactivity. These changes, including increased maximum shortening capacity (delta Lmax) and early shortening velocity (Vo), may be responsible for the airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma. We have suggested that these changes may be due to increased actomyosin ATPase activity, controlled via phosphorylation of the 20 kD myosin light chain (MLC20) by MLC kinase (MLCK). Therefore, ATPase activity, MLC20 phosphorylation, and MLCK content and activity were assessed in tracheal and bronchial smooth muscles (TSM and BSM) of ragweed pollen-sensitized dogs (S) and their littermate controls (C). Specific ATPase activities from STSM and SBSM were significantly higher than their control counterparts (CTSM, CBSM). Phosphorylation of MLC20 in STSM was greater both at rest and during electrical stimulation due to the increased amount of MLCK in STSM and SBSM by 30 and 25%, respectively. MLCK activity was also increased significantly in STSM and SBSM (from 46.99 +/- 8.33 and 42.85 +/- 5.92 to 91.9 +/- 6.43 and 64.12 +/- 7.88 32P mmol/mg fresh tissue weight/min respectively [mean +/- SEM]). When normalized to the amount of MLCK in the tissue, however, specific MLCK activity in STSM and SBSM was similar to that in controls. It is unlikely that myosin phosphatase plays any role in the changes of MLC20 phosphorylation in sensitized animals. Peptide mapping showed no visible change in primary structure of MLCK in STSM and SBSM compared with those of controls. We report that ASM actomyosin ATPase activity is increased in STSM and SBSM. The increased ATPase activity is the result of increased MLC20 phosphorylation, the latter likely resulting from the increased MLCK content, which may account for the hyperresponsiveness found in ASM from these animals. PMID:1449804

  16. Cardiac myosin light chain is phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent and -independent kinase activities.

    Chang, Audrey N; Mahajan, Pravin; Knapp, Stefan; Barton, Hannah; Sweeney, H Lee; Kamm, Kristine E; Stull, James T

    2016-07-01

    The well-known, muscle-specific smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) (smMLCK) and skeletal muscle MLCK (skMLCK) are dedicated protein kinases regulated by an autoregulatory segment C terminus of the catalytic core that blocks myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) binding and phosphorylation in the absence of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM). Although it is known that a more recently discovered cardiac MLCK (cMLCK) is necessary for normal RLC phosphorylation in vivo and physiological cardiac performance, information on cMLCK biochemical properties are limited. We find that a fourth uncharacterized MLCK, MLCK4, is also expressed in cardiac muscle with high catalytic domain sequence similarity with other MLCKs but lacking an autoinhibitory segment. Its crystal structure shows the catalytic domain in its active conformation with a short C-terminal "pseudoregulatory helix" that cannot inhibit catalysis as a result of missing linker regions. MLCK4 has only Ca(2+)/CaM-independent activity with comparable Vmax and Km values for different RLCs. In contrast, the Vmax value of cMLCK is orders of magnitude lower than those of the other three MLCK family members, whereas its Km (RLC and ATP) and KCaM values are similar. In contrast to smMLCK and skMLCK, which lack activity in the absence of Ca(2+)/CaM, cMLCK has constitutive activity that is stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM. Potential contributions of autoregulatory segment to cMLCK activity were analyzed with chimeras of skMLCK and cMLCK. The constitutive, low activity of cMLCK appears to be intrinsic to its catalytic core structure rather than an autoinhibitory segment. Thus, RLC phosphorylation in cardiac muscle may be regulated by two different protein kinases with distinct biochemical regulatory properties. PMID:27325775

  17. Impact of resistance exercise during bed rest on skeletal muscle sarcopenia and myosin isoform distribution

    Bamman, M. M.; Clarke, M. S.; Feeback, D. L.; Talmadge, R. J.; Stevens, B. R.; Lieberman, S. A.; Greenisen, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Because resistance exercise (REx) and bed-rest unloading (BRU) are associated with opposing adaptations, our purpose was to test the efficacy of REx against the effects of 14 days of BRU on the knee-extensor muscle group. Sixteen healthy men were randomly assigned to no exercise (NoEx; n = 8) or REx (n = 8). REx performed five sets of leg press exercise with 80-85% of one repetition maximum (1 RM) every other day during BRU. Muscle samples were removed from the vastus lateralis muscle by percutaneous needle biopsy. Myofiber distribution was determined immunohistochemically with three monoclonal antibodies against myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms (I, IIa, IIx). MHC distribution was further assessed by quantitative gel electrophoresis. Dynamic 1-RM leg press and unilateral maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) were determined. Maximal neural activation (root mean squared electromyogram) and rate of torque development (RTD) were measured during MVC. Reductions (P < 0.05) in type I (15%) and type II (17%) myofiber cross-sectional areas were found in NoEx but not in REx. Electrophoresis revealed no changes in MHC isoform distribution. The percentage of type IIx myofibers decreased (P < 0.05) in REx from 9 to 2% and did not change in NoEx. 1 RM was reduced (P < 0.05) by 9% in NoEx but was unchanged in REx. MVC fell by 15 and 13% in NoEx and REx, respectively. The agonist-to-antagonist root mean squared electromyogram ratio decreased (P < 0.05) 19% in REx. RTD slowed (P < 0.05) by 54% in NoEx only. Results indicate that REx prevented BRU-induced myofiber atrophy and also maintained training-specific strength. Unlike spaceflight, BRU did not induce shifts in myosin phenotype. The reported benefits of REx may prove useful in prescribing exercise for astronauts in microgravity.

  18. Parallel inhibition of active force and relaxed fiber stiffness in skeletal muscle by caldesmon: implications for the pathway to force generation.

    Brenner, B; Yu, L C; Chalovich, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    In recent hypotheses on muscle contraction, myosin cross-bridges cycle between two types of actin-bound configuration. These two configurations differ greatly in the stability of their actin-myosin complexes ("weak-binding" vs. "strong-binding"), and force generation or movement is the result of structural changes associated with the transition from the weak-binding (preforce generating) configuration to strong-binding (force producing) configuration [cf. Eisenberg, E. & Hill, T. L. (1985) Sc...

  19. Head first C#

    Stellman, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Head First C# is a complete learning experience for object-oriented programming, C#, and the Visual Studio IDE. Built for your brain, this book covers C# 3.0 and Visual Studio 2008, and teaches everything from language fundamentals to advanced topics including garbage collection, extension methods, and double-buffered animation. You'll also master C#'s hottest and newest syntax, LINQ, for querying SQL databases, .NET collections, and XML documents. By the time you're through, you'll be a proficient C# programmer, designing and coding large-scale applications. Every few chapters you will come

  20. Head first C#

    Stellman, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    You want to learn C# programming, but you're not sure you want to suffer through another tedious technical book. You're in luck: Head First C# introduces this language in a fun, visual way. You'll quickly learn everything from creating your first program to learning sophisticated coding skills with C# 4.0, Visual Studio 2010 and .NET 4, while avoiding common errors that frustrate many students. The second edition offers several hands-on labs along the way to help you build and test programs using skills you've learned up to that point. In the final lab, you'll put everything together. From o

  1. Detector support head

    The support head of detectors for densitometric measurements of the regional function of lungs using gamma radiation consists of a group of detectors placed in a common rack. The detectors are placed on holders with adjustable height which allow side movement. The holders are slidably connected to the converging quide rail on the frame via arms. Between the holders and the rack is fitted the drive mechanism consisting of a screw. The design allows the stable adjustment of detectors on the lung field during examination and thereby allows the comparison of results of measurements carried out at different times. (J.B.). 2 figs

  2. Head First Web Design

    Watrall, Ethan

    2008-01-01

    Want to know how to make your pages look beautiful, communicate your message effectively, guide visitors through your website with ease, and get everything approved by the accessibility and usability police at the same time? Head First Web Design is your ticket to mastering all of these complex topics, and understanding what's really going on in the world of web design. Whether you're building a personal blog or a corporate website, there's a lot more to web design than div's and CSS selectors, but what do you really need to know? With this book, you'll learn the secrets of designing effecti

  3. Head First Python

    Barry, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Ever wished you could learn Python from a book? Head First Python is a complete learning experience for Python that helps you learn the language through a unique method that goes beyond syntax and how-to manuals, helping you understand how to be a great Python programmer. You'll quickly learn the language's fundamentals, then move onto persistence, exception handling, web development, SQLite, data wrangling, and Google App Engine. You'll also learn how to write mobile apps for Android, all thanks to the power that Python gives you. We think your time is too valuable to waste struggling with

  4. Head First Mobile Web

    Gardner, Lyza; Grigsby, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Despite the huge number of mobile devices and apps in use today, your business still needs a website. You just need it to be mobile. Head First Mobile Web walks you through the process of making a conventional website work on a variety smartphones and tablets. Put your JavaScript, CSS media query, and HTML5 skills to work-then optimize your site to perform its best in the demanding mobile market. Along the way, you'll discover how to adapt your business strategy to target specific devices. Navigate the increasingly complex mobile landscapeTake both technical and strategic approaches to mobile

  5. Reactor vessel head permanent shield

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising: a nuclear reactor pressure vessel closure head; control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) disposed within the closure head so as to project vertically above the closure head; cooling air baffle means surrounding the control rod drive mechanisms for defining cooling air paths relative to the control rod drive mechanisms; means defined within the periphery of the closure head for accommodating fastening means for securing the closure head to its associated pressure vessel; lifting lugs fixedly secured to the closure head for facilitating lifting and lowering movements of the closure head relative to the pressure vessel; lift rods respectively operatively associated with the plurality of lifting lugs for transmitting load forces, developed during the lifting and lowering movements of the closure head, to the lifting lugs; upstanding radiation shield means interposed between the cooling air baffle means and the periphery of the enclosure head of shielding maintenance personnel operatively working upon the closure head fastening means from the effects of radiation which may emanate from the control rod drive mechanisms and the cooling air baffle means; and connecting systems respectively associated with each one of the lifting lugs and each one of the lifting rods for connecting each one of the lifting rods to a respective one of each one of the lifting lugs, and for simultaneously connecting a lower end portion of the upstanding radiation shield means to each one of the respective lifting lugs

  6. The cortical acto-myosin network: from diffusion barrier to functional gateway in the transport of neurosecretory vesicles to the plasma membrane

    FredericAMeunier

    2013-10-01

    Here we discuss the functions of the cortical actin network, myosins and their effectors in controlling the processes that lead to tethering, directed transport, docking, and fusion of exocytotic vesicles in regulated exocytosis.

  7. Myosin light chain phosphorylation in sup 32 P-labeled rabbit aorta stimulated by phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate and phenylephrine

    Singer, H.A.; Oren, J.W.; Benscoter, H.A. (Sigfried and Janet Weis Center for Research, Danville, PA (USA))

    1989-12-15

    The mechanism(s) of force development in vascular smooth muscle following pharmacological activation of protein kinase C by phorbol esters are not known. In this study, we examined the myosin light chain phosphorylation response following stimulation by phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDB) or phenylephrine in rabbit aorta which had been incubated with 32PO4 in order to label ATP pools. Through tryptic phosphopeptide mapping of myosin light chain from intact tissue and comparison to controls using purified components, we inferred that Ca2+-dependent force stimulated by PDB was associated with small increases in serine-19 phosphorylation, consistent with a contractile mechanism involving indirect activation of myosin light chain kinase. Additional residues, consistent with the in vitro substrate specificity of protein kinase C, were also observed to be phosphorylated in response to PDB and represented proportionately a larger fraction of the total phosphorylated myosin light chain in Ca2+-depleted tissues. Stimulation by an alpha 1-adrenergic agonist (phenylephrine) resulted in phosphorylation of residues which were consistent with an activation mechanism involving myosin light chain kinase only. These results indicate that in rabbit aorta the contractile effects of PDB may be partially mediated by Ca2+-dependent activation of myosin light chain kinase. However, the data do not rule out a component of the PDB-stimulated contractile response which is independent of myosin light chain phosphorylation on the serine-19 residue. In addition, activation by a more physiological stimulus, phenylephrine, does not result in protein kinase C-mediated myosin light chain phosphorylation.

  8. Embryonic Form of Smooth Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain (SMemb/MHC-B) in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor and Interstitial Cells of Cajal

    Sakurai, Shinji; Fukasawa, Tomoki; Chong, Ja-Mun; TANAKA, Akira; Fukayama, Masashi

    1999-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to clarify a possible link between gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Using monoclonal antibodies against MHC isoforms, 18 of 27 GISTs (67%) showed immunoreactivity for non-smooth-muscle myosin or the embryonic form of MHC (SMemb), but only one tumor showed immunoreactivity f...

  9. Nonmuscle Myosin Heavy Chain IIA Mutations Define a Spectrum of Autosomal Dominant Macrothrombocytopenias: May-Hegglin Anomaly and Fechtner, Sebastian, Epstein, and Alport-Like Syndromes

    Heath, Karen E.; Campos-Barros, Angel; Toren, Amos; Rozenfeld-Granot, Galit; Carlsson, Lena E.; Savige, Judy; Denison, Joyce C.; Gregory, Martin C.; White, James G.; Barker, David F.; Greinacher, Andreas; Epstein, Charles J.; Glucksman, Marc J.; Martignetti, John A.

    2001-01-01

    May-Hegglin anomaly (MHA) and Fechtner (FTNS) and Sebastian (SBS) syndromes are autosomal dominant platelet disorders that share macrothrombocytopenia and characteristic leukocyte inclusions. FTNS has the additional clinical features of nephritis, deafness, and cataracts. Previously, mutations in the nonmuscle myosin heavy chain 9 gene (MYH9), which encodes nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MYHIIA), were identified in all three disorders. The spectrum of mutations and the genotype-phenotype a...

  10. An optimized micro-assay of myosin II ATPase activity based on the molybdenum blue method and its application in screening natural product inhibitors.

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Guan-Jun; Kou, Jun-Ping; Yu, Bo-Yang

    2016-06-01

    Myosin II plays multiple roles in physiological and pathological functions through its ATPase activity. The present study was designed to optimize a micro-assay of myosin II ATPase activity based on molybdenum blue method, using a known myosin II ATPase inhibitor, blebbistatin. Several parameters were observed in the enzymatic reaction procedure, including the concentrations of the substrate (ATP) and calcium chloride, pH, and the reaction and incubation times. The proportion of coloration agent was also investigated. The sensitivity of this assay was compared with the malachite green method and bioluminescence method. Additionally, 20 natural compounds were studied for myosin II ATPase inhibitory activity using the optimized method. Our results showed that ATP at the concentration of 5 mmol·L(-1) and ammonium molybdate : stannous chloride at the ratio of 15 : 1 could greatly improve the sensitivity of this method. The IC50 of blebbistatin obtained by this method was consistent with literature. Compound 8 was screened with inhibitory activity on myosin II ATPase. The optimized method showed similar accuracy, lower detecting limit, and wider linear range, which could be a promising approach to screening myosin II ATPase inhibitors in vitro. PMID:27473959

  11. Eye-based head gestures

    Mardanbegi, Diako; Witzner Hansen, Dan; Pederson, Thomas

    A novel method for video-based head gesture recognition using eye information by an eye tracker has been proposed. The method uses a combination of gaze and eye movement to infer head gestures. Compared to other gesture-based methods a major advantage of the method is that the user keeps the gaze...... on the interaction object while interacting. This method has been implemented on a head-mounted eye tracker for detecting a set of predefined head gestures. The accuracy of the gesture classifier is evaluated and verified for gaze-based interaction in applications intended for both large public...

  12. Head to cloaca and head-only stunning of poultry

    Lambooij, E.; Workel, L.D.; Reimert, H.G.M.; Hindle, V.A.

    2010-01-01

    The alternative stunning methods head cloaca and head only are examined for inducing unconsciousness and affect on meat quality. When both methods are applied they induce unconsciousness without compromising the meat quality. It is recommended to develop the equipment for practical application and to implement the methods in commercial slaughterhouses.

  13. NASA head sworn in

    James C. Fletcher was sworn in on May 12, 1986, as administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). At a news conference after he was sworn in, Fletcher said that NASA would deal with both its technical problems and its procedural problems before the shuttle will fly again. According to press accounts, he stressed that funds should be made available to replace the Challenger orbiter, which was lost in an explosion on January 28.Fletcher, who had also headed the agency from 1971 to 1977, succeeds James M. Beggs, who was indicted in December 1985 for conspiring to defraud the federal government while serving as a senior executive at the General Dynamics Corporation.

  14. Chryse 'Alien Head'

    2005-01-01

    26 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an impact crater in Chryse Planitia, not too far from the Viking 1 lander site, that to seems to resemble a bug-eyed head. The two odd depressions at the north end of the crater (the 'eyes') may have formed by wind or water erosion. This region has been modified by both processes, with water action occurring in the distant past via floods that poured across western Chryse Planitia from Maja Valles, and wind action common occurrence in more recent history. This crater is located near 22.5oN, 47.9oW. The 150 meter scale bar is about 164 yards long. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/lower left.

  15. Structural evidence for non-canonical binding of Ca2+ to a canonical EF-hand of a conventional myosin.

    Debreczeni, Judit E; Farkas, László; Harmat, Veronika; Hetényi, Csaba; Hajdú, István; Závodszky, Péter; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Nyitray, László

    2005-12-16

    We have previously identified a single inhibitory Ca2+-binding site in the first EF-hand of the essential light chain of Physarum conventional myosin (Farkas, L., Malnasi-Csizmadia, A., Nakamura, A., Kohama, K., and Nyitray, L. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 27399-27405). As a general rule, conformation of the EF-hand-containing domains in the calmodulin family is "closed" in the absence and "open" in the presence of bound cations; a notable exception is the unusual Ca2+-bound closed domain in the essential light chain of the Ca2+-activated scallop muscle myosin. Here we have reported the 1.8 A resolution structure of the regulatory domain (RD) of Physarum myosin II in which Ca2+ is bound to a canonical EF-hand that is also in a closed state. The 12th position of the EF-hand loop, which normally provides a bidentate ligand for Ca2+ in the open state, is too far in the structure to participate in coordination of the ion. The structure includes a second Ca2+ that only mediates crystal contacts. To reveal the mechanism behind the regulatory effect of Ca2+, we compared conformational flexibilities of the liganded and unliganded RD. Our working hypothesis, i.e. the modulatory effect of Ca2+ on conformational flexibility of RD, is in line with the observed suppression of hydrogen-deuterium exchange rate in the Ca2+-bound form, as well as with results of molecular dynamics calculations. Based on this evidence, we concluded that Ca2+-induced change in structural dynamics of RD is a major factor in Ca2+-mediated regulation of Physarum myosin II activity. PMID:16227209

  16. Structural attributes for the recognition of weak and anomalous regions in coiled-coils of myosins and other motor proteins

    Sunitha Margaret S; Nair Anu G; Charya Amol; Jadhav Kamalakar; Mukhopadhyay Sami; Sowdhamini Ramanathan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Coiled-coils are found in different proteins like transcription factors, myosin tail domain, tropomyosin, leucine zippers and kinesins. Analysis of various structures containing coiled-coils has revealed the importance of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. In such domains, regions of different strength of interactions need to be identified since they could be biologically relevant. Findings We have updated our coiled-coil validation webserver, now called COILCHECK...

  17. Inhibition of long myosin light-chain kinase activation alleviates intestinal damage after binge ethanol exposure and burn injury

    Zahs, Anita; Bird, Melanie D.; Ramirez, Luis; Turner, Jerrold R; Choudhry, Mashkoor A.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory evidence suggests that intestinal permeability is elevated following either binge ethanol exposure or burn injury alone, and this barrier dysfunction is further perturbed when these insults are combined. We and others have previously reported a rise in both systemic and local proinflammatory cytokine production in mice after the combined insult. Knowing that long myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) is important for epithelial barrier maintenance and can be activated by proinflammatory...

  18. S-glutathiolation impairs phosphoregulation and function of cardiac myosin-binding protein C in human heart failure.

    Stathopoulou, Konstantina; Wittig, Ilka; Heidler, Juliana; Piasecki, Angelika; Richter, Florian; Diering, Simon; van der Velden, Jolanda; Buck, Friedrich; Donzelli, Sonia; Schröder, Ewald; Wijnker, Paul J M; Voigt, Niels; Dobrev, Dobromir; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Carrier, Lucie; Eaton, Philip; Cuello, Friederike

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) regulates actin-myosin interaction and thereby cardiac myocyte contraction and relaxation. This physiologic function is regulated by cMyBP-C phosphorylation. In our study, reduced site-specific cMyBP-C phosphorylation coincided with increased S-glutathiolation in ventricular tissue from patients with dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy compared to nonfailing donors. We used redox proteomics, to identify constitutive and disease-specific S-glutathiolation sites in cMyBP-C in donor and patient samples, respectively. Among those, a cysteine cluster in the vicinity of the regulatory phosphorylation sites within the myosin S2 interaction domain C1-M-C2 was identified and showed enhanced S-glutathiolation in patients. In vitro S-glutathiolation of recombinant cMyBP-C C1-M-C2 occurred predominantly at Cys(249), which attenuated phosphorylation by protein kinases. Exposure to glutathione disulfide induced cMyBP-C S-glutathiolation, which functionally decelerated the kinetics of Ca(2+)-activated force development in ventricular myocytes from wild-type, but not those from Mybpc3-targeted knockout mice. These oxidation events abrogate protein kinase-mediated phosphorylation of cMyBP-C and therefore potentially contribute to the reduction of its phosphorylation and the contractile dysfunction observed in human heart failure.-Stathopoulou, K., Wittig, I., Heidler, J., Piasecki, A., Richter, F., Diering, S., van der Velden, J., Buck, F., Donzelli, S., Schröder, E., Wijnker, P. J. M., Voigt, N., Dobrev, D., Sadayappan, S., Eschenhagen, T., Carrier, L., Eaton, P., Cuello, F. S-glutathiolation impairs phosphoregulation and function of cardiac myosin-binding protein C in human heart failure. PMID:26839380

  19. Contractile properties, fiber types, and myosin isoforms in fast and slow muscles of hyperactive Japanese waltzing mice

    Asmussen, G.; Schmalbruch, I.; Soukup, Tomáš; Pette, D.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 184, č. 2 (2003), s. 758-766. ISSN 0014-4886 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/00/1653 Grant ostatní: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) -; Sonderforschungsbereich(DE) 156; Schwerpunkt Muskelforschung(DE) As 74/1-2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Japanese waltzing mouse * muscle contraction * myosin isoforms Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.676, year: 2003

  20. Molecular pathology of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in the cardiac myosin binding protein C gene.

    Yu, B.; French, J. A.; Carrier, L.; Jeremy, R W; McTaggart, D R; Nicholson, M R; Hambly, B; Semsarian, C; Richmond, D R; Schwartz, K.; Trent, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    DNA studies in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) have shown that it is caused by mutations in genes coding for proteins which make up the muscle sarcomere. The majority of mutations in the FHC genes result from missense changes, although one of the most recent genes to be identified (cardiac myosin binding protein C gene, MYBPC3) has predominantly DNA mutations which produce truncated proteins. Both dominant negative and haploinsufficiency models have been proposed to explain the mol...

  1. Finding the Cell Center by a Balance of Dynein and Myosin Pulling and Microtubule Pushing: A Computational Study

    Zhu, Jie; Burakov, Anton; Rodionov, Vladimir; Mogilner, Alex

    2010-01-01

    The centrosome position in many types of interphase cells is actively maintained in the cell center. Our previous work indicated that the centrosome is kept at the center by pulling force generated by dynein and actin flow produced by myosin contraction and that an unidentified factor that depends on microtubule dynamics destabilizes position of the centrosome. Here, we use modeling to simulate the centrosome positioning based on the idea that the balance of three forces—dyneins pulling along...

  2. Independent specialisation of myosin II paralogues in muscle vs. non-muscle functions during early animal evolution: a ctenophore perspective

    Dayraud Cyrielle

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin II (or Myosin Heavy Chain II, MHCII is a family of molecular motors involved in the contractile activity of animal muscle cells but also in various other cellular processes in non-muscle cells. Previous phylogenetic analyses of bilaterian MHCII genes identified two main clades associated respectively with smooth/non-muscle cells (MHCIIa and striated muscle cells (MHCIIb. Muscle cells are generally thought to have originated only once in ancient animal history, and decisive insights about their early evolution are expected to come from expression studies of Myosin II genes in the two non-bilaterian phyla that possess muscles, the Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Results We have uncovered three MHCII paralogues in the ctenophore species Pleurobrachia pileus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the MHCIIa / MHCIIb duplication is more ancient than the divergence between extant metazoan lineages. The ctenophore MHCIIa gene (PpiMHCIIa has an expression pattern akin to that of "stem cell markers" (Piwi, Vasa… and is expressed in proliferating cells. We identified two MHCIIb genes that originated from a ctenophore-specific duplication. PpiMHCIIb1 represents the exclusively muscular form of myosin II in ctenophore, while PpiMHCIIb2 is expressed in non-muscle cells of various types. In parallel, our phalloidin staining and TEM observations highlight the structural complexity of ctenophore musculature and emphasize the experimental interest of the ctenophore tentacle root, in which myogenesis is spatially ordered and strikingly similar to striated muscle formation in vertebrates. Conclusion MHCIIa expression in putative stem cells/proliferating cells probably represents an ancestral trait, while specific involvement of some MHCIIa genes in smooth muscle fibres is a uniquely derived feature of the vertebrates. That one ctenophore MHCIIb paralogue (PpiMHCIIb2 has retained MHCIIa-like expression features furthermore suggests that muscular

  3. Effect of nuclear factor antisense oligonucleotide on cardiac muscle myosin isoenzymes and cytokines in rat models of chronic heart failure

    Objective: To investigate the effect of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) antisense oligonucleotide (AS-ON) on cardiac muscle myosin isoenzymes (MI) and serum cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, Fas) expressions in rat models of chronic heart failure. Methods: Wistar rat models of chronic heart failure were prepared with abdominal aorta constriction. Half of the models were treated with intrapericardial injection of 0.5ml AS-ON at the time of model preparation. Control rats were given intrapericardial injection of normal saline. Non-invasive echocardiographic study or invasive hemodynamic studies with sacrifice of the animal and procurement of left ventricular cardiac muscle for examination of myosin isoenzymes with SDS-PAGE were performed on 10 models each eveny two weeks until six months after establishment of the models. Inner canthus blood aspiration for determination of serum cytokines (TNF -α and IL-1β with RIA and Fas with ELISA) were done at the same time. Results: In the models without AS-ON treatment, cardiac function was deterioated somewhat at 3 months and frank cardiac failure was apparent at 6 months. In the AS-OD treated models, carbiac function parameters were much better, with lower TNF-α, IL-1β and Fas levels as well as less V1→V3 shift in myosin isoenzymes. Conclusion: Intrapericardial injection of AS-ON was of great benefit in prevention of development of cardiac failure in the rat models with abdominal aorta constriction, probably throngh maintainence of normal cytokines network as well as inbibition of V1 →V3 shift of myosin isoenzymes. (authors)

  4. Myosin catalyzed ATP hydrolysis elucidated by 31P NMR kinetic studies and 1H PFG-diffusion measurements

    Song, Zhiyan; Parker, Kari J.; Enoh, Idorenyin; Zhao, Hua; Olubajo, Olarongbe

    2009-01-01

    We conducted 31P NMR kinetic studies and 1H-diffusion measurements on myosin-catalyzed hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) under varied conditions. The data elucidate well the overall hydrolysis rate and various factors that significantly impact the reaction. We found that the enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was followed by ADP hydrolysis, and different nucleotides such as ADP and guanosine triphosphate (GTP) acted as competitors of ATP. Increasing ATP or Mg2...

  5. Comparison of new ELISA method with established SDS-PAGE method for determination of muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms

    Říčný, Jan; Soukup, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 6 (2011), s. 899-904. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Grant ostatní: EC(XE) LSH-CT-2004-511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscle fiber types * myosin heavy chains * SDS-PAGE * immunoreactions * thyroid hormones * ELISA Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.555, year: 2011

  6. Myosin cross-bridge orientation in rigor and in the presence of nucleotide studied by electron spin resonance.

    Ajtai, K; French, A R; Burghardt, T P

    1989-01-01

    The tilt series electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrum from muscle fibers decorated with spin labeled myosin subfragment 1 (S1) was measured from fibers in rigor and in the presence of MgADP. ESR spectra were measured at low amplitude modulation of the static magnetic field to insure that a minimum of spectral lineshape distortion occurs. Ten tilt series ESR data sets were fitted simultaneously by the model-independent methodology described in the accompanying paper (Burghardt, T. P., and A. ...

  7. Membrane-induced lever arm expansion allows myosin VI to walk with large and variable step sizes.

    Yu, Cong; Lou, Jizhong; Wu, Jingjing; Pan, Lifeng; Feng, Wei; Zhang, Mingjie

    2012-10-12

    Myosin VI, the only known minus-ended actin filament-dependent motor, plays diverse cellular roles both as a processive motor and as a mechanical anchor. Although myosin VI has a short lever arm containing only one "IQ-motif" and a unique insertion for CaM binding, the motor walks with large and variable step sizes of ∼30-36 nm. Here, we show that the previously predicted coiled-coil domain immediately following the IQ-motifs (referred to as the lever arm extension (LAE)) adopts a stable monomeric, three-helix bundle fold in solution. Importantly, the LAE can undergo reversible, lipid membrane-dependent conformational changes. Upon exposure to lipid membranes, the LAE adopts a partially extended rod shape, and the removal of lipids from the LAE converts it back into the compact helix bundle structure. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that lipid membrane binding may initiate unfolding and thereby trigger the LAE expansion. This reversible, lipid membrane-dependent expansion of the LAE provides a mechanistic base for myosin VI to walk with large and variable step sizes. PMID:22936804

  8. Synthesised genes of VH and VL of single-chain antibody of human cardiac myosin heavy chain

    Objective: To synthesize genes of the heavy chain variable region (VH) and light chain variable region (VL) of single-chain antibody of human cardiac myosin heavy chain for the development of myocardial imaging agents: single-chain antibody of human cardiac myosin heavy chain. Methods: To extracted total RNA of the anti-HCMHC McAb hybridoma using TRIZOL reagent, synthesize the first-strand cDNA, using this first-strand cDNA as template, with specific primers, DNA polymerase and four single nucleotides, amplify the genes of the heavy chain variable region (VH) and light chain variable region (VL) by PCR. To identify products of each step and study relationship between RNA stability and storage temperature and optimize cycle selection temperature with MgCl2 concentration. Results: The purity of the first-strand cDNA reached 95%, PCR products by agarose gel electrophoresis showed a single band with a bright swimming, molecular weight of VH and VL genes were 340bp and 320bp, which was consistent with literature reports. Conclusion: Synthesized genes of VH and VL, laid the foundation for the development of myocardial imaging agents: single-chain antibody of human cardiac myosin heavy chain. (authors)

  9. Ontogenesis of myosin light chain phosphorylation in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle.

    Chitano, Pasquale; Worthington, Charles L; Jenkin, Janet A; Stephens, Newman L; Gyapong, Sylvia; Wang, Lu; Murphy, Thomas M

    2005-02-01

    Increased airway responsiveness occurs in normal young individuals compared to adults. A maturation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contractility is likely a mechanism of this juvenile airway hyperresponsiveness. Indeed, we showed in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle (TSM) that maximum shortening velocity decreases dramatically after the first 3 weeks of life. Because the phosphorylation of the 20-kDa myosin light chain (MLC(20)) was shown to be a key event in ASM contractility, in the present work we sought to investigate it during ontogenesis. In three age groups (1-week-old, 3-week-old, and adult guinea pigs), we assessed the amount of MLC(20) phosphorylation achieved either in TSM crude protein homogenates exposed to Mg(2+) . ATP . CaCl(2) or in tracheal strips during electrical field stimulation (EFS). Phosphorylated and unphosphorylated MLC(20) were separated on nondenaturing 10% polyacrylamide gels, and the ratio of phosphorylation was obtained by densitometric analysis of chemiluminescent Western immunoblots. Maximum MLC(20) phosphorylation (% of total MLC(20)) in TSM tissue homogenate was, respectively, 32.6 +/- 5.7, 32.2 +/- 5.7, and 46.8 +/- 5.8 in 1-week, 3-week, and adult guinea pigs. Interestingly, in nonstimulated intact tracheal strips, we found a substantial degree of MLC(20) phosphorylation: respectively, 42.2 +/- 5.8, 36.5 +/- 7.8, and 46.4 +/- 4.7 in 1-week, 3-week, and adult guinea pigs. Maximal EFS-induced MLC(20) phosphorylation (% increase over baseline) in the 3-week age group was attained after 3 sec of EFS, and was 161.2 +/- 17.6, while in 1-week and adult guinea pigs, it was attained at 1.5 sec of EFS and was, respectively, 133.3 +/- 9.3 and 110.2 +/- 3.9 (P MLC(20) phosphorylation in guinea pig intact tracheal strips correlates with ontogenetic changes in shortening velocity and changes in myosin light chain kinase content. These results further suggest that the maturation of ASM contractile properties plays a role in the greater airway

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic ... that are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation ...

  13. 49 CFR 572.112 - Head assembly.

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.112 Section 572.112... 50th Percentile Male § 572.112 Head assembly. The head assembly consists of the head (drawing 78051-61X...) accelerometers that are mounted in conformance to § 572.36 (c). (a) Test procedure. (1) Soak the head assembly...

  14. Vascular O-GlcNAcylation augments reactivity to constrictor stimuli by prolonging phosphorylated levels of the myosin light chain

    O-GlcNAcylation is a modification that alters the function of numerous proteins. We hypothesized that augmented O-GlcNAcylation levels enhance myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and reduce myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity, leading to increased vascular contractile responsiveness. The vascular responses were measured by isometric force displacement. Thoracic aorta and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from rats were incubated with vehicle or with PugNAc, which increases O-GlcNAcylation. In addition, we determined whether proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation. PugNAc enhanced phenylephrine (PE) responses in rat aortas (maximal effect, 14.2±2 vs 7.9±1 mN for vehicle, n=7). Treatment with an MLCP inhibitor (calyculin A) augmented vascular responses to PE (13.4±2 mN) and abolished the differences in PE-response between the groups. The effect of PugNAc was not observed when vessels were preincubated with ML-9, an MLCK inhibitor (7.3±2 vs 7.5±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). Furthermore, our data showed that differences in the PE-induced contractile response between the groups were abolished by the activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AICAR; 6.1±2 vs 7.4±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). PugNAc increased phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT-1) and protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitor protein of 17 kDa (CPI-17), which are involved in RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated inhibition of myosin phosphatase activity. PugNAc incubation produced a time-dependent increase in vascular phosphorylation of myosin light chain and decreased phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase, which decreased the affinity of MLCK for Ca2+/calmodulin. Our data suggest that proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation, favoring vascular contraction

  15. Vascular O-GlcNAcylation augments reactivity to constrictor stimuli by prolonging phosphorylated levels of the myosin light chain

    Lima, V.V. [Instituto de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, MT (Brazil); Lobato, N.S.; Filgueira, F.P. [Curso de Medicina, Setor de Fisiologia Humana, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Jataí, GO (Brazil); Webb, R.C. [Department of Physiology, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (United States); Tostes, R.C. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Giachini, F.R. [Instituto de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, MT (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    O-GlcNAcylation is a modification that alters the function of numerous proteins. We hypothesized that augmented O-GlcNAcylation levels enhance myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and reduce myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity, leading to increased vascular contractile responsiveness. The vascular responses were measured by isometric force displacement. Thoracic aorta and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from rats were incubated with vehicle or with PugNAc, which increases O-GlcNAcylation. In addition, we determined whether proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation. PugNAc enhanced phenylephrine (PE) responses in rat aortas (maximal effect, 14.2±2 vs 7.9±1 mN for vehicle, n=7). Treatment with an MLCP inhibitor (calyculin A) augmented vascular responses to PE (13.4±2 mN) and abolished the differences in PE-response between the groups. The effect of PugNAc was not observed when vessels were preincubated with ML-9, an MLCK inhibitor (7.3±2 vs 7.5±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). Furthermore, our data showed that differences in the PE-induced contractile response between the groups were abolished by the activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AICAR; 6.1±2 vs 7.4±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). PugNAc increased phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT-1) and protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitor protein of 17 kDa (CPI-17), which are involved in RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated inhibition of myosin phosphatase activity. PugNAc incubation produced a time-dependent increase in vascular phosphorylation of myosin light chain and decreased phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase, which decreased the affinity of MLCK for Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin. Our data suggest that proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation, favoring vascular contraction.

  16. Turbidity Current Head Mixing

    Hernandez, David; Sanchez, Miguel Angel; Medina, Pablo

    2010-05-01

    A laboratory experimental set - up for studying the behaviour of sediment in presence of a turbulent field with zero mean flow is compared with the behaviour of turbidity currents [1] . Particular interest is shown on the initiation of sediment motion and in the sediment lift - off. The behaviour of the turbidity current in a flat ground is compared with the zero mean flow oscilating grid generated turbulence as when wave flow lifts off suspended sediments [2,3]. Some examples of the results obtained with this set-up relating the height of the head of the turbidity current to the equilibrium level of stirred lutoclines are shown. A turbulent velocity u' lower than that estimated by the Shield diagram is required to start sediment motion. The minimum u' required to start sediment lift - off, is a function of sediment size, cohesivity and resting time. The lutocline height depends on u', and the vorticity at the lutocline seems constant for a fixed sediment size [1,3]. Combining grid stirring and turbidty current head shapes analyzed by means of advanced image analysis, sediment vertical fluxes and settling speeds can be measured [4,5]. [1] D. Hernandez Turbulent structure of turbidity currents and sediment transport Ms Thesis ETSECCPB, UPC. Barcelona 2009. [2] A. Sánchez-Arcilla; A. Rodríguez; J.C. Santás; J.M. Redondo; V. Gracia; R. K'Osyan; S. Kuznetsov; C. Mösso. Delta'96 Surf-zone and nearshore measurements at the Ebro Delta. A: International Conference on Coastal Research through large Scale Experiments (Coastal Dynamics '97). University of Plymouth, 1997, p. 186-187. [3] P. Medina, M. A. Sánchez and J. M. Redondo. Grid stirred turbulence: applications to the initiation of sediment motion and lift-off studies Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Part B: Hydrology, Oceans and Atmosphere. 26, Issue 4, 2001, Pages 299-304 [4] M.O. Bezerra, M. Diez, C. Medeiros, A. Rodriguez, E. Bahia., A. Sanchez-Arcilla and J.M. Redondo. Study on the influence of waves on

  17. Myosin Id is required for planar cell polarity in ciliated tracheal and ependymal epithelial cells.

    Hegan, Peter S; Ostertag, Eric; Geurts, Aron M; Mooseker, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    In wild type (WT) tracheal epithelial cells, ciliary basal bodies are oriented such that all cilia on the cell surface beat in the same upward direction. This precise alignment of basal bodies and, as a result, the ciliary axoneme, is termed rotational planar cell polarity (PCP). Rotational PCP in the multi-ciliated epithelial cells of the trachea is perturbed in rats lacking myosin Id (Myo1d). Myo1d is localized in the F-actin and basal body rich subapical cortex of the ciliated tracheal epithelial cell. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of Myo1d knock out (KO) trachea revealed that the unidirectional bending pattern is disrupted. Instead, cilia splay out in a disordered, often radial pattern. Measurement of the alignment axis of the central pair axonemal microtubules was much more variable in the KO, another indicator that rotational PCP is perturbed. The asymmetric localization of the PCP core protein Vangl1 is lost. Both the velocity and linearity of cilia-driven movement of beads above the tracheal mucosal surface was impaired in the Myo1d KO. Multi-ciliated brain ependymal epithelial cells exhibit a second form of PCP termed translational PCP in which basal bodies and attached cilia are clustered at the anterior side of the cell. The precise asymmetric clustering of cilia is disrupted in the ependymal cells of the Myo1d KO rat. While basal body clustering is maintained, left-right positioning of the clusters is lost. PMID:26446290

  18. Downregulation of myosin VI reduced cell growth and increased apoptosis in human colorectal cancer.

    You, Weiqiang; Tan, Gewen; Sheng, Nengquan; Gong, Jianfeng; Yan, Jun; Chen, Di; Zhang, Huizhen; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide, with the mortality increasing steadily over the last decade. Myosin VI (MYO6) expression is found to be elevated in some types of human carcinoma cell types, suggesting that it may be a sensitive biomarker for the diagnosis and follow-up. In this study, we first used the Oncomine database to explore the expression of MYO6 in CRC tissues, and then constructed a plasmid of RNA interference targeting MYO6 gene. After transfection of lentivirus targeting MYO6 into SW1116 cells, cell viability and proliferation were measured with 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and colony formation assay. Cell cycle distribution was assayed by flow cytometry and apoptosis was evaluated by Annexin V. MYO6 expression was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. It was found that MYO6 mRNA was upregulated in CRC tissues using data mining of public Oncomine microarray datasets. Depletion of MYO6 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation. In addition, knockdown of MYO6 slightly arrested cell cycle in G0/G1 phase, but remarkably increased the proportion of the sub-G1 phase of cell with the increase of apoptotic cells. These results suggest that MYO6 may promote cell growth and may be used as a potential target for anticancer therapy of CRC. PMID:27044563

  19. Changes in myosin isozyme expression during cardiac hypertrophy in hyperthyroid rabbits.

    Seiden, D; Srivatsan, M; Navidad, P A

    1989-01-01

    The myosin isozyme distribution in the left ventricle and in the interventricular septum of rabbits was studied after 3, 7, 11, 14 and 21 days of L-thyroxine (500 micrograms/kg/day) administration. Histochemical procedures were employed to identify V1 and V3 by their Ca2+ ATPase activity and their proportions were quantified through polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In the left ventricle, the subepicardium was the first to show the shift from V3 to V1, followed by the subendocardium. The intermediate region became heterogeneous by 11 days and remained so until 21 days. The right subendocardial and the intermediate regions of the interventricular septum were heterogeneous in the normal rabbit and hyperthyroidism resulted in a shift from V3 to V1 in both the right and left subendocardial regions of the septum. Like the left ventricle, the intermediate region of the interventricular septum remained heterogeneous. Localized accumulations of collagen were seen in all regions of the left ventricle and interventricular septum. From these results we conclude that in thyrotoxic myocardial hypertrophy the isozymic shift from V3 to V1 is progressive, region-specific and is directly correlated with the period of hyperthyroidism in the first 2 weeks. Prolonged hyperthyroidism results in localized accumulation of collagen which does not exhibit any regional specificity. PMID:2528881

  20. Dynamic myosin activation promotes collective morphology and migration by locally balancing oppositional forces from surrounding tissue.

    Aranjuez, George; Burtscher, Ashley; Sawant, Ketki; Majumder, Pralay; McDonald, Jocelyn A

    2016-06-15

    Migrating cells need to overcome physical constraints from the local microenvironment to navigate their way through tissues. Cells that move collectively have the additional challenge of negotiating complex environments in vivo while maintaining cohesion of the group as a whole. The mechanisms by which collectives maintain a migratory morphology while resisting physical constraints from the surrounding tissue are poorly understood. Drosophila border cells represent a genetic model of collective migration within a cell-dense tissue. Border cells move as a cohesive group of 6-10 cells, traversing a network of large germ line-derived nurse cells within the ovary. Here we show that the border cell cluster is compact and round throughout their entire migration, a shape that is maintained despite the mechanical pressure imposed by the surrounding nurse cells. Nonmuscle myosin II (Myo-II) activity at the cluster periphery becomes elevated in response to increased constriction by nurse cells. Furthermore, the distinctive border cell collective morphology requires highly dynamic and localized enrichment of Myo-II. Thus, activated Myo-II promotes cortical tension at the outer edge of the migrating border cell cluster to resist compressive forces from nurse cells. We propose that dynamic actomyosin tension at the periphery of collectives facilitates their movement through restrictive tissues. PMID:27122602

  1. Both Myosin-10 isoforms are required for radial neuronal migration in the developing cerebral cortex.

    Ju, Xing-Da; Guo, Ye; Wang, Nan-Nan; Huang, Ying; Lai, Ming-Ming; Zhai, Yan-Hua; Guo, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Cao, Rang-Juan; Yu, Hua-Li; Cui, Lei; Li, Yu-Ting; Wang, Xing-Zhi; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Zhu, Xiao-Juan

    2014-05-01

    During embryonic development of the mammalian cerebral cortex, postmitotic cortical neurons migrate radially from the ventricular zone to the cortical plate. Proper migration involves the correct orientation of migrating neurons and the transition from a multipolar to a mature bipolar morphology. Herein, we report that the 2 isoforms of Myosin-10 (Myo10) play distinct roles in the regulation of radial migration in the mouse cortex. We show that the full-length Myo10 (fMyo10) isoform is located in deeper layers of the cortex and is involved in establishing proper migration orientation. We also demonstrate that fMyo10-dependent orientation of radial migration is mediated at least in part by the netrin-1 receptor deleted in colorectal cancer. Moreover, we show that the headless Myo10 (hMyo10) isoform is required for the transition from multipolar to bipolar morphologies in the intermediate zone. Our study reveals divergent functions for the 2 Myo10 isoforms in controlling both the direction of migration and neuronal morphogenesis during radial cortical neuronal migration. PMID:23300110

  2. Electrophoretic Mobility of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Revisited: Application of MALDI TOF/TOF Analysis

    Petra Arnostova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of two cardiac myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoforms in response to the thyroid status was studied in left ventricles (LVs of Lewis rats. Major MyHC isoform in euthyroid and hyperthyroid LVs had a higher mobility on SDS-PAGE, whereas hypothyroid LVs predominantly contained a MyHC isoform with a lower mobility corresponding to that of the control soleus muscle. By comparing the MyHC profiles obtained under altered thyroid states together with the control soleus, we concluded that MyHCα was represented by the lower band with higher mobility and MyHCβ by the upper band. The identity of these two bands in SDS-PAGE gels was confirmed by western blot and mass spectrometry. Thus, in contrast to the literature data, we found that the MyHCα possessed a higher mobility rate than the MyHCβ isoform. Our data highlighted the importance of the careful identification of the MyHCα and MyHCβ isoforms analyzed by the SDS-PAGE.

  3. Control of myosin heavy chain expression: interaction of hypothyroidism and hindlimb suspension.

    Diffee, G M; Haddad, F; Herrick, R E; Baldwin, K M

    1991-12-01

    The aim of this study was to contrast competing influences, hypothyroidism and hindlimb suspension, on myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression studied at the protein level and mRNA level. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to either normal control (NC), normal suspended (NS), or hypothyroid (thyroidectomized) control (TC) and suspended (TS) groups. NS and TS animals were suspended for 14 days following which myofibrils and total RNA were purified from the hindlimb muscles. In the soleus and vastus intermedius (VI), there was an increase in type I MHC and a decrease in type IIa MHC in both the TC and TS groups and a decrease in type I and increase in type IIa MHC in the NS group. At the mRNA level, similar shifts were observed with the exception that 1) the increased type IIa MHC seen in the soleus and VI of the NS animals was not accompanied by an increase in IIa mRNA and 2) type IIb mRNA was increased in the NS soleus without concomitant changes in IIb protein levels. These data suggest the following: 1) a hypothyroid state predominates over mechanical unweighting factors in the control of MHC distribution in slow muscles; and 2) translational or posttranslational factors may be important in the regulation of type IIa and IIb MHC expression during hindlimb suspension. PMID:1767813

  4. Non-muscle myosin II in disease: mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities

    Karen A. Newell-Litwa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The actin motor protein non-muscle myosin II (NMII acts as a master regulator of cell morphology, with a role in several essential cellular processes, including cell migration and post-synaptic dendritic spine plasticity in neurons. NMII also generates forces that alter biochemical signaling, by driving changes in interactions between actin-associated proteins that can ultimately regulate gene transcription. In addition to its roles in normal cellular physiology, NMII has recently emerged as a critical regulator of diverse, genetically complex diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancers and vascular disease. In the context of these disorders, NMII regulatory pathways can be directly mutated or indirectly altered by disease-causing mutations. NMII regulatory pathway genes are also increasingly found in disease-associated copy-number variants, particularly in neuronal disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Furthermore, manipulation of NMII-mediated contractility regulates stem cell pluripotency and differentiation, thus highlighting the key role of NMII-based pharmaceuticals in the clinical success of stem cell therapies. In this Review, we discuss the emerging role of NMII activity and its regulation by kinases and microRNAs in the pathogenesis and prognosis of a diverse range of diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancer and vascular disease. We also address promising clinical applications and limitations of NMII-based inhibitors in the treatment of these diseases and the development of stem-cell-based therapies.

  5. Computational characterization of the mutation impact on domain C5 of Myosin Binding Protein C

    Guardiani, Carlo; Cecconi, Fabio; Livi, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    Three mutations of domain C5 of Myosin Binding Protein C are involved in Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. We assess their impact through Molecular Dynamics simulations within the framework of a native-centric coarse-grained model. We characterize the clinical relevance of a mutation by: the extent of temperature shift it induces in the unfolding transition, the increase of the kinetic unfolding rates with respect to the wild type, and by \\Fgr-value analysis. Further analysis of folding stages based on the evolution of native contact probabilities reveals an entropy-driven pathway originating in the protein region close to Res115 and ending up in the area of Res28. The mutation of the former residue thus appears to be responsible for an early interruption of the folding process, leaving the protein largely unstructured and yielding a serious impairment of cardiac function. Mut28, on the contrary, thwarts a late stage of folding when the protein is almost completely native-like, leading to a mild phenotype. A bio-informatic analisys of the long and destabilizing CD loop finally shows an excess of negative charge and a low hydrophobicity indicating a possible classification as a natively unfolded sequence. Accordingly, the folding mechanism is suggested to be coupled with binding with a specific ligand.

  6. Age dependence of myosin heavy chain transitions induced by creatine depletion in rat skeletal muscle

    Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that myosin heavy chain (MHC) plasticity resulting from creatine depletion is an age-dependent process. At weaning (age 28 days), rat pups were placed on either standard rat chow (normal diet juvenile group) or the same chow supplemented with 1% wt/wt of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (creatine depletion juvenile (CDJ) group). Two groups of adult rats (age approximately 8 wk) were placed on the same diet regimens (normal diet adult and creatine depletion adult (CDA) groups). After 40 days (CDJ and normal diet juvenile groups) and 60 days (CDA and normal diet adult groups), animals were killed and several skeletal muscles were removed for analysis of creatine content or MHC ditribution. In the CDJ group, creatine depletion (78%) was accompanied by significant shifts toward expression of slower MHC isoforms in two slow and three fast skeletal muscles. In contrast, creatine depletion in adult animals did not result in similar shifts toward slow MHC isoform expression in either muscle type. The results of this study indicate that there is a differential effect of creatine depletion on MHC tranitions that appears to be age dependent. These results strongly suggest that investigators contemplating experimental designs involving the use of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid should consider the age of the animals to be used.

  7. Effect of myosin heavy chain composition of muscles on meat quality in Laiwu pigs and Duroc

    2008-01-01

    In order to explain the mechanism of high meat quality in Laiwu pigs and investigate the relation between myosin heavy chains (MyHC) composition and meat quality, meat quality analysis was conducted and mRNA expression of MyHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb was quantified by real-time fluorescence PCR in longissimus muscle (LM) and semimembranous muscle of Laiwu pigs and Duroc. The result indicated that, compared with Duroc, mRNA expression of MyHC IIa, IIx in LM and semimembranous muscle of Laiwu pigs was significantly increased, mRNA expression of MyHC IIb was dramatically decreased. However, the expression of MyHC I was not significantly affected by breeds. The correlation between mRNA expression of MyHC I, IIa, IIx in LM and meat color, pH value, marbling, intramuscular fat content was positive, but shear value of LM was negative. The relation between MyHC IIb mRNA expression and marbling, intramuscular fat content was dramatically negative, whereas shear value was strikingly positive, as well as fiber diameter, but without reaching statistical significance. Therefore, the composition of MyHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb affected meat quality, furthermore, expression of MyHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb mRNA prominently influenced meat characteristics, especially edible quality of muscle, suggesting that mRNA expression level of MyHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb can exactly and impersonally estimate meat quality.

  8. Effect of myosin heavy chain composition of muscles on meat quality in Laiwu pigs and Duroc

    HU HongMei; WANG JiYing; ZHU RongSheng; GUO JianFeng; WU Ying

    2008-01-01

    In order to explain the mechanism of high meat quality in Laiwu pigs and investigate the relation between myosin heavy chains (MyHC) composition and meat quality, meat quality analysis was conducted and mRNA expression of MyHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb was quantified by real-time fluorescence PCR in Iongissimus muscle (LM) and semimembranous muscle of Laiwu pigs and Duroc. The result indicated that, compared with Duroc, mRNA expression of MyHC IIa, IIx in LM and semimembranous muscle of Laiwu pigs was significantly increased, mRNA expression of MyHC Ilia'was dramatically decreased.However, the expression of MyHC I was not significantly affected by breeds. The correlation between mRNA expression of MyHC I, IIa, IIx in LM and meat color, pH value, marbling, intramuscular fat content was positive, but shear value of LM was negative. The relation between MyHC lib mRNA expression and marbling, intramuscular fat content was dramatically negative, whereas shear value was strikingly positive, as well as fiber diameter, but without reaching statistical significance. Therefore, the composition of MyHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb affected meat quality, furthermore, expression of MyHC I,IIa, IIx, IIb mRNA prominently influenced meat characteristics, especially edible quality of muscle, suggesting that mRNA expression level of MyHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb can exactly and impersonally estimate meat quality.

  9. Visual head motion monitoring

    Sieber, Lukáš

    2012-01-01

    Bakalářská práce se zabývá určením polohy a natočení hlavy v reálném čase ze snímků pořízených webovou kamerou vůči pevným ramenům. Dále poukazuje na výhody využití Open CV. Zahrnut je též podrobnější popis užitých funkcí Open CV, jako například optický tok, hledání korespondujících dvojic 3D-2D bodů a mimo jiné také operace s rotační maticí. V závěru jsou zhodnoceny dosažené výsledky a navržen další možný postup. This bachelor thesis is based on finding of head rotation and position again...

  10. Abusive Head Trauma (Shaken Baby Syndrome)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Abusive Head Trauma (Shaken Baby Syndrome) KidsHealth > For Parents > Abusive Head ... babies tend to cry the most. How These Injuries Happen Abusive head trauma results from injuries caused ...

  11. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Full Text Available ... Up! Prevent Concussions Prevent Head Injuries Sports Safety Students Play Safe Youth Sports Safety PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS "Heads ... Up! Prevent Concussions Prevent Head Injuries Sports Safety Students Play Safe Youth Sports Safety ORDER FREE PRINT ...

  12. Heads Up to High School Sports

    ... What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button HEADS UP to School Sports Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Connect with HEADS UP & CDC's Injury Center HEADS UP Resources File Formats ...

  13. Return of the talking heads

    Reinecke Hansen, Kenneth; Bro, Peter; Andersson, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    . In order to analyze the latest development entering the third wave, we propose a theoretically based dramaturgical model for the television news item. The analysis concludes that, with the current ‘return’ of the talking heads format, the pre-produced and pre-packaged bulletin program about past events......The present article suggests that the brief history of Western television news dramaturgy can be expounded as three major waves: from the early days of the talking heads in the studio, over the narrativization of the field report to a (re-)current studio- and field-based talking heads format...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ... Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and ... sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head ... gadolinium contrast, it may still be possible to use it after appropriate pre-medication. Patient consent will ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... imaging of the head is performed for a number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It ... women should not have this exam in the first trimester of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... page What does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  19. Preventing head injuries in children

    ... 2012:chap 50B. US Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Heads up. Facts for ... repair - discharge Epilepsy - children - discharge Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... or cause problems during an MRI exam. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is currently a recognized, but rare, complication ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  1. Head and neck cancer imaging

    Hermans, R. (ed.) [University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-07-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of state-of-the-art imaging in head and neck cancer. Precise determination of tumor extent is of the utmost importance in these neoplasms, as it has important consequences for staging of disease, prediction of outcome and choice of treatment. Only the radiologist can fully appreciate submucosal, perineural, and perivascular tumor spread and detect metastatic disease at an early stage. Imaging is also of considerable benefit for patient surveillance after treatment. All imaging modalities currently used in the management of head and neck neoplasms are considered in depth, and in addition newer techniques such as PET-CT and diffusion-weighted MRI are discussed. This book will help the reader to recommend, execute and report head and neck imaging studies at a high level of sophistication and thereby to become a respected member of the team managing head and neck cancer. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ... CD. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine ...

  5. New Russian science head named

    Levitin, C

    2000-01-01

    Ilya Klebanov, a deputy prime minister, has been appointed the country's new head of industrial and scientific policy. He will control the new Ministry for Industry, Science and Technologies (4 paragraphs).

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... of the head (particularly the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common ... acutely injured; however, this decision is based on clinical judgment. This is because traction devices and many ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and ... most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... in patients with very poor kidney function. Careful assessment of kidney function before considering a contrast injection ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... during MRI, but this is rarely a problem. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... conditions such as: brain tumors stroke infections developmental anomalies hydrocephalus — dilatation of fluid spaces within the brain ( ...

  13. Tensile Tests of Round-head, Flat-head, and Brazier-head Rivets

    Schuette, Evan H; Bartone, Leonard M; Mandel, Merven W

    1944-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the tensile strength of round-head (AN43C), flat-head(AN442), and brazier-head (AN4556) aluminum-alloy rivets because of the scarcity of information on the tensile strength of rivets. The results of the investigation are presented as curves that show the variation of the ratio of the tensile strength of the rivet to the tensile strength of the rivet crank with the ratio of the sheet thickness to the rivet diameter for the different types of rivet.

  14. Dropped head syndrome in mitochondriopathy

    Finsterer, J

    2004-01-01

    In a 63-year-old, 165-cm-tall woman with a history of repeated tick bites, dilative cardiomyopathy, osteoporosis, progressive head ptosis with neck stiffness and cervical pain developed. The family history was positive for thyroid dysfunction and neuromuscular disorders. Neurological examination revealed prominent forward head drop, weak anteflexion and retroflexion, nuchal rigidity, weakness of the shoulder girdle, cogwheel rigidity, and tetraspasticity. The lactate stress test was abnormal....

  15. Serious head injury in sport.

    Lindsay, K W; McLatchie, G; Jennett, B

    1980-01-01

    Of 1900 head injuries serious enough to be admitted to the neurosurgical unit in Glasgow over a five year period, 52 (2.7%) were due to "sport." Golf, horse-riding, and Association football were the sports most commonly linked with serious head injury. Golfing injuries were all compound depressed fractures, and all these patients made a good recovery; horse-riding produced more severe injuries, three of the eight patients being left with residual disability. Much attention has been directed t...

  16. Analytical modelling of soccer heading

    Zahari Taha; Mohd Hasnun Arif Hassan; Iskandar Hasanuddin

    2015-08-01

    Heading occur frequently in soccer games and studies have shown that repetitive heading of the soccer ball could result in degeneration of brain cells and lead to mild traumatic brain injury. This study proposes a two degree-of-freedom linear mathematical model to study the impact of the soccer ball on the brain. The model consists of a mass–spring–damper system, in which the skull, the brain and the soccer ball are modelled as a mass and the neck modelled as a spring–damper system. The proposed model was compared with previous dynamic model for soccer ball-to-head impact. Moreover, it was also validated against drop ball experiment on an instrumented dummy skull and also compared with head acceleration data from previous studies. Comparison shows that our proposed model is capable of describing both the skull and brain accelerations qualitatively and quantitatively. This study shows that a simple linear mathematical model can be useful in giving a preliminary insight on the kinematics of human skull and brain during a ball-to-head impact. The model can be used to investigate the important parameters during soccer heading that affect the brain displacement and acceleration, thus providing better understanding of the mechanics behind it.

  17. Association analysis of genetic variants in the myosin IXB gene in acute pancreatitis.

    Rian M Nijmeijer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Impairment of the mucosal barrier plays an important role in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. The myosin IXB (MYO9B gene and the two tight-junction adaptor genes, PARD3 and MAGI2, have been linked to gastrointestinal permeability. Common variants of these genes are associated with celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease, two other conditions in which intestinal permeability plays a role. We investigated genetic variation in MYO9B, PARD3 and MAGI2 for association with acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in MYO9B, two SNPs in PARD3, and three SNPs in MAGI2 were studied in a Dutch cohort of 387 patients with acute pancreatitis and over 800 controls, and in a German cohort of 235 patients and 250 controls. RESULTS: Association to MYO9B and PARD3 was observed in the Dutch cohort, but only one SNP in MYO9B and one in MAGI2 showed association in the German cohort (p < 0.05. Joint analysis of the combined cohorts showed that, after correcting for multiple testing, only two SNPs in MYO9B remained associated (rs7259292, p = 0.0031, odds ratio (OR 1.94, 95% confidence interval (95% CI 1.35-2.78; rs1545620, p = 0.0006, OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.16-1.53. SNP rs1545620 is a non-synonymous SNP previously suspected to impact on ulcerative colitis. None of the SNPs showed association to disease severity or etiology. CONCLUSION: Variants in MYO9B may be involved in acute pancreatitis, but we found no evidence for involvement of PARD3 or MAGI2.

  18. Expression of Calmodulin and Myosin Light Chain Kinase during Larval Settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    Chen, Zhang-Fan

    2012-02-13

    Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM) and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus (= Amphibalanus) amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM), encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca 2+/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite. © 2012 Chen et al.

  19. Myosin light chain kinase mediates intestinal barrier disruption following burn injury.

    Chuanli Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Severe burn injury results in the loss of intestinal barrier function, however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Myosin light chain (MLC phosphorylation mediated by MLC kinase (MLCK is critical to the pathophysiological regulation of intestinal barrier function. We hypothesized that the MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates the regulation of intestinal barrier function following burn injury, and that MLCK inhibition attenuates the burn-induced intestinal barrier disfunction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male balb/c mice were assigned randomly to either sham burn (control or 30% total body surface area (TBSA full thickness burn without or with intraperitoneal injection of ML-9 (2 mg/kg, an MLCK inhibitor. In vivo intestinal permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-dextran was measured. Intestinal mucosa injury was assessed histologically. Tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin and claudin-1 was analyzed by immunofluorescent assay. Expression of MLCK and phosphorylated MLC in ileal mucosa was assessed by Western blot. Intestinal permeability was increased significantly after burn injury, which was accompanied by mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and increase of both MLCK and MLC phosphorylation. Treatment with ML-9 attenuated the burn-caused increase of intestinal permeability, mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and decreased MLC phosphorylation, but not MLCK expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction after severe burn injury. It is suggested that MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation may be a critical target for the therapeutic treatment of intestinal epithelial barrier disruption after severe burn injury.

  20. Structural and functional aspects of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    Muthu, Priya; Wang, Li; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Huang, Wenrui; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kawai, Masataka; Irving, Thomas C.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta (IIT); (Iowa); (Miami-MED)

    2012-04-02

    The myosin essential light chain (ELC) is a structural component of the actomyosin cross-bridge, but its function is poorly understood, especially the role of the cardiac specific N-terminal extension in modulating actomyosin interaction. Here, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the A57G (alanine to glycine) mutation in the cardiac ELC known to cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). The function of the ELC N-terminal extension was investigated with the Tg-{Delta}43 mouse model, whose myocardium expresses a truncated ELC. Low-angle X-ray diffraction studies on papillary muscle fibers in rigor revealed a decreased interfilament spacing ({approx} 1.5 nm) and no alterations in cross-bridge mass distribution in Tg-A57G mice compared to Tg-WT, expressing the full-length nonmutated ELC. The truncation mutation showed a 1.3-fold increase in I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, indicating a shift of cross-bridge mass from the thick filament backbone toward the thin filaments. Mechanical studies demonstrated increased stiffness in Tg-A57G muscle fibers compared to Tg-WT or Tg-{Delta}43. The equilibrium constant for the cross-bridge force generation step was smallest in Tg-{Delta}43. These results support an important role for the N-terminal ELC extension in prepositioning the cross-bridge for optimal force production. Subtle changes in the ELC sequence were sufficient to alter cross-bridge properties and lead to pathological phenotypes.

  1. Park7 expression influences myotube size and myosin expression in muscle.

    Hui Yu

    Full Text Available Callipyge sheep exhibit postnatal muscle hypertrophy due to the up-regulation of DLK1 and/or RTL1. The up-regulation of PARK7 was identified in hypertrophied muscles by microarray analysis and further validated by quantitative PCR. The expression of PARK7 in hypertrophied muscle of callipyge lambs was confirmed to be up-regulated at the protein level. PARK7 was previously identified to positively regulate PI3K/AKT pathway by suppressing the phosphatase activity of PTEN in mouse fibroblasts. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of PARK7 in muscle growth and protein accretion in response to IGF1. Primary myoblasts isolated from Park7 (+/+ and Park7 (-/- mice were used to examine the effect of differential expression of Park7. The Park7 (+/+ myotubes had significantly larger diameters and more total sarcomeric myosin expression than Park7 (-/- myotubes. IGF1 treatment increased the mRNA abundance of Myh4, Myh7 and Myh8 between 20-40% in Park7 (+/+ myotubes relative to Park7 (-/-. The level of AKT phosphorylation was increased in Park7 (+/+ myotubes at all levels of IGF1 supplementation. After removal of IGF1, the Park7 (+/+ myotubes maintained higher AKT phosphorylation through 3 hours. PARK7 positively regulates the PI3K/AKT pathway by inhibition of PTEN phosphatase activity in skeletal muscle. The increased PARK7 expression can increase protein synthesis and result in myotube hypertrophy. These results support the hypothesis that elevated expression of PARK7 in callipyge muscle would increase levels of AKT activity to cause hypertrophy in response to the normal IGF1 signaling in rapidly growing lambs. Increasing expression of PARK7 could be a novel mechanism to increase protein accretion and muscle growth in livestock or help improve muscle mass with disease or aging.

  2. Effect of aerobic exercise on the contractile function of gastrocnemius myosin heavy chain

    Wen-jun Ren

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of 4- 6 weeks' treadmill training of male SD rats on the contractile function of their gnstroenemius myosin heavy chain (MHC). Methods Forty male SD rats were randomly divided into control group and training group. The treadmill training of the training group rats was incessantly performed for 4- 6 weeks at an intensity of about 75% VO2max (18. 5- 24 m/min, gradient of 0°, each training session lasting 50 minutes, twice a day). The content of gastrocnemlas MHC mRNA was tested by reverse transcription polymernse chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the changes of muscle fibre and its cross-section area (CSA) were measured using immunohistochemistry. Electric stimulation tests were used to determine the maximal tension of isometric contraction of the post-training gastrocnemius. Results ① After continuous treadmill training for 4 - 6 weeks, we found that the content of the total MHC, MHC Ⅰ , MHC Ⅱ x, MHC Ⅱ a mRNAs was 105%, 105%, 109% and 108% of that in the resting control group, respectively, and the MHC Ⅱ b mRNA content did not change significantly. The percentage of MHC Ⅰ mRNA in the total MHC mRNA increased while that of MHC Ⅱ mRNA decreased after aerobic training. ② The slow type of fibre type Ⅰ was the main part of the MHC after training and the CSA of the muscle fibres increased simultaneously. ③ The maximal tension of isometric contraction by pulse stimulation of square wave in the training group increased significantly compared with that in the control group (P<0. 01). Conclusion The findings indicate that aerobic exercise may promote an increase in the contractile function of MHC.

  3. Assessment of myocardial damage in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using cardiac enzymes, myosin light chain and myocardial scintigraphy

    To assess myocardial damage in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), CPK-MB, %LDH 1, myoglobin (Mb), and myosin light chain (MLC) were determined in 45 HCM patients. Of these patients, 10 also underwent Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy and In-111-antimyosin antibody (In-111 Fab-DTPA)(In-AM) myocardial scintigraphy. MLC was 0.56±0.55 ng/ml. An increase in CPK-MB, %LDH 1, and Mb was seen in 6 (14%), 19 (44%), and 7 (18%) patients, respectively. There was no correlation between MLC and any of CPK-MB, %LDH1 or Mb. Perfusion defects were seen on Tl-201 myocardial scintigrams in 4 patients. All of these patients had diffuse tracer uptake on In-AM myocardial scintigrams. The degree of In-AM uptake was not correlated with MLC; however, of 4 patients with intense In-AM uptake, 3 had perfusion defects on Tl-201 myocardial scintigrams and decreased left ventricular function. In 3 patients in whom CPK-MB and %LDH 1 were increased but MLC was not increased, diffuse tracer uptake was seen on In-AM myocardial scintigrams. Because diffuse uptake of In-AM was seen in spite of the lack of increased MLC, In-111-Fab-DTPA is likely to be incorporated by the myocardial damaged cells, as well as necrotic cells. HCM seems to be associated with a high likelihood of myocardial damage. Integrated assessment of myocardial damage is required, including an increase of MLC, CPK-MB, %LDH 1, and Mb, perfusion defects on Tl-201 scintigrams, and tracer uptake on In-AM scintigrams. (N.K.)

  4. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States); DiMario, Joseph X., E-mail: joseph.dimario@rosalindfranklin.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} co-activator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  5. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1 (PGC-1α) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  6. Hem-1 complexes are essential for Rac activation, actin polymerization, and myosin regulation during neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Orion D Weiner

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Migrating cells need to make different actin assemblies at the cell's leading and trailing edges and to maintain physical separation of signals for these assemblies. This asymmetric control of activities represents one important form of cell polarity. There are significant gaps in our understanding of the components involved in generating and maintaining polarity during chemotaxis. Here we characterize a family of complexes (which we term leading edge complexes, scaffolded by hematopoietic protein 1 (Hem-1, that organize the neutrophil's leading edge. The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family Verprolin-homologous protein (WAVE2 complex, which mediates activation of actin polymerization by Rac, is only one member of this family. A subset of these leading edge complexes are biochemically separable from the WAVE2 complex and contain a diverse set of potential polarity-regulating proteins. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Hem-1-containing complexes in neutrophil-like cells: (a dramatically impairs attractant-induced actin polymerization, polarity, and chemotaxis; (b substantially weakens Rac activation and phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5-tris-phosphate production, disrupting the (phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5-tris-phosphate/Rac/F-actin-mediated feedback circuit that organizes the leading edge; and (c prevents exclusion of activated myosin from the leading edge, perhaps by misregulating leading edge complexes that contain inhibitors of the Rho-actomyosin pathway. Taken together, these observations show that versatile Hem-1-containing complexes coordinate diverse regulatory signals at the leading edge of polarized neutrophils, including but not confined to those involving WAVE2-dependent actin polymerization.

  7. Mechanosensing in myosin filament solves a 60 years old conflict in skeletal muscle modeling between high power output and slow rise in tension

    Marcucci, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Almost 60 years ago Andrew Huxley with his seminal paper \\cite{Huxley1957} laid the foundation of modern muscle modeling, linking chemical events to mechanical performance. He described mechanics and energetics of muscle contraction through the cyclical attachment and detachment of myosin motors to the actin filament with ad hoc assumptions on the dependence of the rate constants on the strain of the myosin motors. That relatively simple hypothesis is still present in recent models, even though with several modifications to adapt the model to the different experimental constraints which became subsequently available. However, already in that paper, one controversial aspect of the model became clear. Relatively high attachment and detachment rates of myosin to the actin filament were needed to simulate the high power output at intermediate velocity of contraction. However, these rates were incompatible with the relatively slow rise in tension after activation, despite the rise should be generated by the same r...

  8. Load-dependent modulation of non-muscle myosin-2A function by tropomyosin 4.2

    Nikolas Hundt; Walter Steffen; Salma Pathan-Chhatbar; Taft, Manuel H; Manstein, Dietmar J

    2016-01-01

    Tropomyosin isoforms play an important role in the organisation of cytoplasmic actomyosin complexes in regard to function and cellular localisation. In particular, Tpm4.2 is upregulated in rapidly migrating cells and responsible for the specific recruitment of the cytoplasmic class-2 myosin NM-2A to actin filaments during the formation of stress fibres. Here, we investigate how the decoration of F-actin with Tpm4.2 affects the motor properties of NM-2A under conditions of low and high load. I...

  9. The role of the N-terminus of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jones, Michelle; Guzman, Georgianna; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kerrick, W. Glenn L.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2009-01-01

    To study the regulation of cardiac muscle contraction by the myosin essential light chain (ELC) and the physiological significance of its N-terminal extension, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice partially replacing the endogenous mouse ventricular ELC with either the human ventricular ELC wild type (Tg-WT) or its 43 amino acid N-terminal truncation mutant (Tg-Δ43) in the murine hearts. The mutant protein is similar in sequence to the short ELC variant present in skeletal muscle and the ELC pro...

  10. A technique for simultaneous measurement of force and overlap between single muscle filaments of myosin and actin.

    Kalganov, Albert; Novinger, Rowan; Rassier, Dilson E

    2010-12-17

    In this study, we show a method for direct measurements of force and simultaneous visualization of isolated muscle filaments. Single actin filaments isolated from chicken skeletal muscle and single thick filaments isolated from Mussels were imaged using fluorescence and dark field microscopy, respectively. Force generated by the filaments was measured using micro-fabricated cantilevers. Force values were in the range observed previously with myosin filaments and molecules. The results suggest that the technique can be used to investigate many issues of interest and debate in the field of muscle biophysics. PMID:21081114

  11. Are there any differences in the expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms between slow and fast rat skeletal muscles?

    Soukup, Tomáš

    Fyziologický ústav AV ČR, v. v. i.. Roč. 56, č. 3 (2007), 33P-33P ISSN 0862-8408. [Fyziologické dny /83./. 06.02.2007-08.02.2007, Brno] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/0327 Grant ostatní: MYORES(XE) 511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpr1 * rat slow and fast muscles * myosin heavy chain isoforms * thyroid hormone effects Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  12. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Full Text Available ... Health eCard Heads Up! Prevent Concussions Prevent Head Injuries Sports Safety Students Play Safe Youth Sports Safety PROMOTIONAL ... Health eCard Heads Up! Prevent Concussions Prevent Head Injuries Sports Safety Students Play Safe Youth Sports Safety ORDER ...

  13. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Full Text Available ... and parents “Heads Up” for school nurses, parents, teachers, counselors, and other school professionals “Heads Up” for ... Up! Prevent Concussions Prevent Head Injuries Sports Safety Students Play Safe Youth Sports Safety PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS "Heads ...

  14. 49 CFR 572.182 - Head assembly.

    2010-10-01

    .... The head shall be tested per procedure specified in 49 CFR § 572.112(a). (c) Performance criteria. (1... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head assembly. 572.182 Section 572.182... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.182 Head assembly. (a) The head assembly consists of the...

  15. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Full Text Available ... in Spanish [Podcast: 1:27 minutes] Send a Health eCard Heads Up! Prevent Concussions Prevent Head Injuries ... in Spanish [Podcast: 1:27 minutes] Send a Health eCard Heads Up! Prevent Concussions Prevent Head Injuries ...

  16. Heading for a fall? Management of head injury in infants.

    Williamson, M

    2010-09-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest reasons for infants (< 1 year) to attend the Emergency Department (ED). Clinical management varies considerably and concern about non accidental injury results in a high admission rate in some hospitals. Information was obtained on 103 children under one year of age presenting to the ED with head injury in a prospective study. The average age was 6.7 months and 57% of patients were male. Twenty eight babies had skull x rays with 1 skull fracture diagnosed. None required CT brain scan. Ninety eight (94%) were discharged home from the ED. There were no unplanned returns, readmissions or adverse events. The incidence of traumatic brain injury in children under one year of age presenting with head injury is low and the majority can be safely discharged home.

  17. Wheelchair control by head motion

    Pajkanović Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electric wheelchairs are designed to aid paraplegics. Unfortunately, these can not be used by persons with higher degree of impairment, such as quadriplegics, i.e. persons that, due to age or illness, can not move any of the body parts, except of the head. Medical devices designed to help them are very complicated, rare and expensive. In this paper a microcontroller system that enables standard electric wheelchair control by head motion is presented. The system comprises electronic and mechanic components. A novel head motion recognition technique based on accelerometer data processing is designed. The wheelchair joystick is controlled by the system’s mechanical actuator. The system can be used with several different types of standard electric wheelchairs. It is tested and verified through an experiment performed within this paper.

  18. Return of the talking heads

    Reinecke Hansen, Kenneth; Bro, Peter; Andersson, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The present article suggests that the brief history of Western television news dramaturgy can be expounded as three major waves: from the early days of the talking heads in the studio, over the narrativization of the field report to a (re-)current studio- and field-based talking heads format. In...... order to analyze the latest development entering the third wave, we propose a theoretically based dramaturgical model for the television news item. The analysis concludes that, with the current ‘return’ of the talking heads format, the pre-produced and pre-packaged bulletin program about past events is...... dissolving and transforming into an evaluative present- and future-oriented update format that resembles the 24-hour newsonly channels. Production time merges with broadcast time so that the uncertainty of live spreads to the dramaturgy....

  19. TNF causes changes in glomerular endothelial permeability and morphology through a Rho and myosin light chain kinase-dependent mechanism.

    Xu, Chang; Wu, Xiaoyan; Hack, Bradley K; Bao, Lihua; Cunningham, Patrick N

    2015-12-01

    A key function of the endothelium is to serve as a regulated barrier between tissue compartments. We have previously shown that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a crucial role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury, in part by causing injury to the renal endothelium through its receptor TNFR1. Here, we report that TNF increased permeability to albumin in primary culture mouse renal endothelial cells, as well as human glomerular endothelial cells. This process occurred in association with changes in the actin cytoskeleton and was associated with gaps between previously confluent cells in culture and decreases in the tight junction protein occludin. This process was dependent on myosin light chain activation, as seen by its prevention with Rho-associated kinase and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitors. Surprisingly, permeability was not blocked by inhibition of apoptosis with caspase inhibitors. Additionally, we found that the renal glycocalyx, which plays an important role in barrier function, was also degraded by TNF in a Rho and MLCK dependent fashion. TNF treatment caused a decrease in the size of endothelial fenestrae, dependent on Rho and MLCK, although the relevance of this to changes in permeability is uncertain. In summary, TNF-induced barrier dysfunction in renal endothelial cells is crucially dependent upon the Rho/MLCK signaling pathway. PMID:26634902

  20. Strain-dependent kinetics of the myosin working stroke, and how they could be probed with optical-trap experiments.

    Smith, David; Sleep, John

    2006-11-01

    The strain-dependent kinetics of the myosin working stroke under load is derived from a flat-energy-landscape model for its untethered lever-arm, and compared with other scenarios in the literature. The "flat landscape" scenario is compatible with muscle-fiber experiments, but is more critically relevant to single-myosin experiments with an optically trapped actin filament. In such experiments, the strain dependence of stroke kinetics may be explored by comparing event-averaged and time-averaged displacements of the filament. With a specific kinetic model of the cross-bridge cycle, we have previously shown that the event-averaged displacement underestimates the working stroke. Here we predict that the two kinds of averaging give diverging estimates of the working stroke as the resolving time of the event detector is decreased to 1 ms or less, the discrepancy being critically dependent on the strain dependence of the stroke rate. Such analysis of trap displacement data offers the possibility of testing the strain-dependent stroke rate predicted by the flat-landscape model. PMID:16891364

  1. Planar polarization of Vangl2 in the vertebrate neural plate is controlled by Wnt and Myosin II signaling

    Olga Ossipova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate neural tube forms as a result of complex morphogenetic movements, which require the functions of several core planar cell polarity (PCP proteins, including Vangl2 and Prickle. Despite the importance of these proteins for neurulation, their subcellular localization and the mode of action have remained largely unknown. Here we describe the anteroposterior planar cell polarity (AP-PCP of the cells in the Xenopus neural plate. At the neural midline, the Vangl2 protein is enriched at anterior cell edges and that this localization is directed by Prickle, a Vangl2-interacting protein. Our further analysis is consistent with the model, in which Vangl2 AP-PCP is established in the neural plate as a consequence of Wnt-dependent phosphorylation. Additionally, we uncover feedback regulation of Vangl2 polarity by Myosin II, reiterating a role for mechanical forces in PCP. These observations indicate that both Wnt signaling and Myosin II activity regulate cell polarity and cell behaviors during vertebrate neurulation.

  2. AN INTEGRATIVE WAY OF TEACHING MOLECULAR CELL BIOLOGY AND PROTEIN CHEMISTRY USING ACTIN IMMOBILIZATION ON CHITIN FOR PURIFYING MYOSIN II.

    M.G. Souza

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Our intent is to present our experience on teaching Molecular Cell Biology andProtein Chemistry at UNIRIO through an innovative approach that includes myosin IIextraction and purification. We took advantage of the properties of muscle contractionand propose a simple method for purifying myosin II by affinity chromatography. Thisoriginal method is based on the preparation of an affinity column containing actinmolecules covalently bound to chitin particles. We propose a three-week syllabus thatincludes lectures and bench experimental work. The syllabus favors the activelearning of protein extraction and purification, as well as, of scientific concepts suchas muscle contraction, cytoskeleton structure and its importance for the living cell. Italso promotes the learning of the biotechnological applications of chitin and theapplications of protein immobilization in different industrial fields. Furthermore, theactivities also target the development of laboratorial technical abilities, thedevelopment of problem solving skills and the ability to write up a scientific reportfollowing the model of a scientific article. It is very important to mention that thissyllabus can be used even in places where a facility such as ultra-centrifugation islacking.

  3. Head First 2D Geometry

    Fallow), Stray

    2009-01-01

    Having trouble with geometry? Do Pi, The Pythagorean Theorem, and angle calculations just make your head spin? Relax. With Head First 2D Geometry, you'll master everything from triangles, quads and polygons to the time-saving secrets of similar and congruent angles -- and it'll be quick, painless, and fun. Through entertaining stories and practical examples from the world around you, this book takes you beyond boring problems. You'll actually use what you learn to make real-life decisions, like using angles and parallel lines to crack a mysterious CSI case. Put geometry to work for you, and

  4. Head kinematics during shaking associated with abusive head trauma.

    Lintern, T O; Puhulwelle Gamage, N T; Bloomfield, F H; Kelly, P; Finch, M C; Taberner, A J; Nash, M P; Nielsen, P M F

    2015-09-18

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is a potentially fatal result of child abuse but the mechanisms of injury are controversial. To address the hypothesis that shaking alone is sufficient to elicit the injuries observed, effective computational and experimental models are necessary. This paper investigates the use of a coupled rigid-body computational modelling framework to reproduce in vivo shaking kinematics in AHT. A sagittal plane OpenSim computational model of a lamb was developed and used to interpret biomechanical data from in vivo shaking experiments. The acceleration of the head during shaking was used to provide in vivo validation of the associated computational model. Results of this study demonstrated that peak accelerations occurred when the head impacted the torso and produced acceleration magnitudes exceeding 200ms(-)(2). The computational model demonstrated good agreement with the experimental measurements and was shown to be able to reproduce the high accelerations that occur during impact. The biomechanical results obtained with the computational model demonstrate the utility of using a coupled rigid-body modelling framework to describe infant head kinematics in AHT. PMID:26256822

  5. Firing Properties of Rat Lateral Mammillary Single Units: Head Direction, Head Pitch, and Angular Head Velocity

    Stackman, Robert W.; Taube, Jeffrey S.

    1998-01-01

    Many neurons in the rat anterodorsal thalamus (ADN) and postsubiculum (PoS) fire selectively when the rat points its head in a specific direction in the horizontal plane, independent of the animal’s location and ongoing behavior. The lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) are interconnected with both the ADN and PoS and, therefore, are in a pivotal position to influence ADN/PoS neurophysiology. To further understand how the head direction (HD) cell signal is generated, we recorded single neurons fro...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known as diffusion, is impaired by most ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... symptoms. It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors stroke infections developmental anomalies hydrocephalus — dilatation of fluid ... Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : ...

  9. Blunt Head Trauma and Headache

    Ana B Chelse

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from New York Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital examined whether having an isolated headache following minor blunt head trauma was suggestive of traumatic brain injury (TBI among a large cohort of children 2-18 years of age.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. top of page What are the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able to ...

  11. Atrial and ventricular myosin heavy-chain expression in the developing chicken heart: Strengths and limitations of non-radioactive in situ hybridization

    S. Somi; A.T.J. Klein; A.C. Houweling; J.M. Ruijter; A.A.M. Buffing; A.F.M. Moorman; M.J.B. van den Hoff

    2006-01-01

    Myosin heavy-chain (MHC) isoforms are major structural components of the contractile apparatus of the heart muscle. Their spatio-temporal patterns of expression have been used as a tool to dissect cardiac development and differentiation. Although extensively investigated, controversy still exists co

  12. The influence of temperature on the distribution and intensity of the reaction product in rat muscle fibers obtained with the histochemical method for myosin ATPase

    Kirkeby, S; Tuxen, A

    1989-01-01

    was raised and in others was depressed by alteration of the incubation temperature. There was no obvious correlation between the temperature sensitivity of ATPase in the muscle fibers and their activity for succinic dehydrogenase. It is proposed that the histochemical method for myosin ATPase can be...

  13. Cloning and Expression Analysis of Skeletal Myosin Heavy Chain (MYHs Gene from the Most Famous Freshwater Fishes in China-Culter alburnus

    Kun Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Culter alburnus, one of the four most famous freshwater fishes, is a very important freshwater fishing species with high economic value in China. The present study focused on the myosin, major protein in skeletal muscles from Culter alburnus in Xingkai Lake. Two types of the gene encoding Myosin Heavy Chain (MYH, a large subunit of the myosin molecule, were cloned from fast skeletal muscle and defined as MYHa (Genbank ID JX272926 and MYHb (Gen bank ID JX402919. The full-length cDNA clones of MYHa and MYHb consisted of 6003 and 5990 bp, which encoded 1933 and 1930 amino acids, respectively. The total levels of the MYHs were significantly higher with the fish age increase. In comparison to the wild and cultured muscles, From 2 to 6 years old, MYHa gene expression of wild population was significantly lower than the cultured population (p<0.05, else MYHb gene expression of wild population was higher than cultured population. The two kinds of genotype interaction affect meat quality traits. The present study has therefore, revealed a complex pattern of expression of MYH genes in relation to developmental stage and population. Our work provided a novel myosin heavy chain gene sequence in fish biology and the results indicate that the MYH gene and the protein it encodes are important for the growth and development of fish, as well as its muscle characterization.

  14. Head-to-head linked isoprenoids in Miocene coal lithotypes

    Stefanova, M. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of Organic Chemistry

    2000-05-01

    Aliphatic fractions of chloroform bitumens from homogeneous (humovitrain, xylain and liptain) and heterogeneous (humoclarain) lithotypes of lignite Maritza-Iztok as well as products of their mild reduction with NaH were studied for acyclic isoprenoid biomarkers. Mass spectral data revealed the presence of regular C{sub 19}-C{sub 33} isoprenoids without pristane/phytane dominance, one 'tail to tail' isoprenoid, C{sub 30}, squalene, in all samples under study. High molecular weight 'head-to-head' isoprenoids, C{sub 38}-C{sub 40}, with slight preponderance of coupled pristyl- and phytyl units were registered in humovitrain and humoclarain samples after NaH treatment. These irregular isoprenoids are indicators for strictly anaerobic methanogens present in paleodepositional environment. Mild reductive treatment with NaH is a promising approach to rupture ether linkage in coal structure and give us one more possibility to loose isoprenoid moieties. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Full Text Available ... directors, athletic trainers, and parents “Heads Up” for school nurses, parents, teachers, counselors, and other school professionals “Heads Up” for health care professionals Baseline ...

  16. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Full Text Available ... Headache or "pressure" in head Nausea or vomiting Balance problems or dizziness Double or blurry vision Sensitivity ... pressure” in head 11 Nausea or vomiting 12 Balance problems or dizziness 13 Double or blurry vision ...

  17. First Class Call Stacks: Exploring Head Reduction

    Johnson-Freyd, Philip; Downen, Paul; Ariola, Zena M.

    2016-01-01

    Weak-head normalization is inconsistent with functional extensionality in the call-by-name $\\lambda$-calculus. We explore this problem from a new angle via the conflict between extensionality and effects. Leveraging ideas from work on the $\\lambda$-calculus with control, we derive and justify alternative operational semantics and a sequence of abstract machines for performing head reduction. Head reduction avoids the problems with weak-head reduction and extensionality, while our operational ...

  18. Process optimization in the head end area

    The measures to improve feed clarity and how they fit into the overall concept of the chemical head end are described as considerable changes in the head end. The effects which the conversion from the bundle shears to the individual rod shears has on the mechanical head end are also shown. The changes made, particularly in the chemical head end, are intended to increase the availability of the main process by improved feed clarity with a centrifuge, container and filter. (orig./DG)

  19. HISTOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF FUSARIUM HEAD BLIGHT

    Fusarium head blight re-emerged as a devastating disease of wheat and barley in the 1990s in the midwestern U.S. Research efforts to control the disease have been hampered by limited knowledge of how the fungal head blight pathogens infect and damage head tissue and what natural defenses the plant h...

  20. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Full Text Available ... TOOLS — CONCUSSION INFORMATION View CDC's “Heads Up” Concussion Educational Materials “Heads Up” for youth sports coaches, administrators, ... parents Order Free Copies of CDC's “Heads Up” Educational Materials Materials on Concussion in Sports Materials for ...

  1. Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

    Full Text Available ... CONCUSSION INFORMATION View CDC's “Heads Up” Concussion Educational Materials “Heads Up” for youth sports coaches, administrators, and ... Order Free Copies of CDC's “Heads Up” Educational Materials Materials on Concussion in Sports Materials for Health ...

  2. 21 CFR 868.1930 - Stethoscope head.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stethoscope head. 868.1930 Section 868.1930 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1930 Stethoscope head. (a) Identification. A stethoscope head is a weighted chest piece used during anesthesia to listen to a patient's heart, breath,...

  3. Resection indications of radius head fractures

    Domanic, Unsal; Taser, Omer; Akalin, Yilmaz; Cakmak, Mehmet

    2004-01-01

    Boundaries of resection indication of radius head and timing of resection problems in radius head fractures are discussed on our cases with literature on the subject. In Mason type II. And type III., the best treatment is resection of the head. But it must be performed as soon as possible.

  4. Dependence of myosin-ATPase on structure bound creatine kinase in cardiac myfibrils from rainbow trout and freshwater turtle

    Haagensen, L.; Jensen, D.H.; Gesser, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The influence of myofibrillar creatine kinase on the myosin-ATPase activity was examined in cardiac ventricular myofibrils isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and freshwater turtle (Trachemys scripta). The ATPase rate was assessed by recording the rephosphorylation of ADP by the...... pyruvate kinase reaction alone or together with the amount of creatine formed, when myofibrillar bound creatine kinase was activated with phosphocreatine. The steady-state concentration of ADP in the solution was varied through the activity of pyruvate kinase added to the solution. For rainbow trout...... myofibrils at a high pyruvate kinase activity, creatine kinase competed for ADP but did not influence the total ATPase activity. When the ADP concentration was elevated within the physiological range by lowering the pyruvate kinase activity, creatine kinase competed efficiently and increased the ATPase...

  5. Genotype phenotype correlations of cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain mutations in Indian patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy

    Rai, Taranjit Singh; Ahmad, Shamim; Bahl, Ajay; Ahuja, Monica; Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh; Singh, Balvinder; Talwar, K K; Khullar, Madhu

    The aim of the current study was to determine the frequency of mutations in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) in a cohort of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and their families, and to investigate correlations between genotype and phenotype. About 130...... consecutive patients diagnosed with HCM or DCM (69 with HCM and 61 with DCM) attending the cardiology clinic of Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research were screened for mutations in the MYH7 gene. The control group for genetic studies consisted of 100 healthy subjects. We report 14...... mutations in 6 probands (5 probands in HCM and 1 proband in DCM) and their family members. Out of these 6 mutations, 3 are new and are being reported for the first time. One known mutation (p.Gly716Arg) was found to be "de novo" which resulted in severe asymmetric septal hypertrophy (31 mm) and resulted in...

  6. Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Expression in Developing Neonatal Skeletal Muscle: Involvement of the Nerve, Gravity, and Thyroid State

    Baldwin, K. M.; Adams, G.; Haddad, F.; Zeng, M.; Qin, A.; Qin, L.; McCue, S.; Bodell, P.

    1999-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene family encodes at least six MHC proteins (herein designated as neonatal, embryonic, slow type I (beta), and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb) that are expressed in skeletal muscle in a muscle-specific and developmentally-regulated fashion. At birth, both antigravity (e.g. soleus) and locomotor (e.g., plantaris) skeletal muscles are undifferentiated relative to the adult MHC phenotype such that the neonatal and embryonic MHC isoforms account for 80 - 90% of the MHC pool in a fast locomotor muscle; whereas, the embryonic and slow, type I isoforms account for approx. 90% of the pool in a typical antigravity muscle. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of an intact nerve, gravity and thyroid hormone (T3), as well as certain interactions of these interventions, on MHC gene expression in developing neonatal skeletal muscles of rodents.

  7. Supernumerary head of biceps brachii

    Balasubramanian A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The biceps brachii muscle and the musculocutaneous nerve of arm are frequent in their variations. A third head of biceps brachii was noted unilaterally during routine anatomy dissection. Variation in musculocutaneous nerve was also seen on the same arm. The evolutionary and functional basis of such variations are discussed. Such variations become relevant during surgical intervention of the arm, especially after humeral fracture with subsequent unusual bone displacements.

  8. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Head Trauma.

    Shetty, Vilaas S; Reis, Martin N; Aulino, Joseph M; Berger, Kevin L; Broder, Joshua; Choudhri, Asim F; Kendi, A Tuba; Kessler, Marcus M; Kirsch, Claudia F; Luttrull, Michael D; Mechtler, Laszlo L; Prall, J Adair; Raksin, Patricia B; Roth, Christopher J; Sharma, Aseem; West, O Clark; Wintermark, Max; Cornelius, Rebecca S; Bykowski, Julie

    2016-06-01

    Neuroimaging plays an important role in the management of head trauma. Several guidelines have been published for identifying which patients can avoid neuroimaging. Noncontrast head CT is the most appropriate initial examination in patients with minor or mild acute closed head injury who require neuroimaging as well as patients with moderate to severe acute closed head injury. In short-term follow-up neuroimaging of acute traumatic brain injury, CT and MRI may have complementary roles. In subacute to chronic traumatic brain injury, MRI is the most appropriate initial examination, though CT may have a complementary role in select circumstances. Advanced neuroimaging techniques are areas of active research but are not considered routine clinical practice at this time. In suspected intracranial vascular injury, CT angiography or venography or MR angiography or venography is the most appropriate imaging study. In suspected posttraumatic cerebrospinal fluid leak, high-resolution noncontrast skull base CT is the most appropriate initial imaging study to identify the source, with cisternography reserved for problem solving. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:27262056

  9. CLONING AND CHARACTERISATION OF ALKALI MYOSIN LIGHT CHAIN GENE (MLC-3 OF CATTLE FILARIAL PARASITE SETARIA DIGITATA

    Arumugam Murugananthan, Eric Hamilton Karunanayake*, Kamani Hemamala Tennekoon

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis is a tropical disease caused by filarial parasites including Wuchereria bancrofti. Although bancroftian filariasis causes severe disabling and debilitating clinical conditions in human, very little is known about the molecular biology of the parasite. The paucity of parasitic material is the main reason for this lack of knowledge. Setaria digitata is a cattle filarial parasite, closely resembling W. bancrofti in many aspects. Therefore it can be used as a model organism to study W. bancrofti. In the present study, the genomic library of S. digitata adult parasites was constructed and probed with a 32P labeled partial mRNA sequence PCR amplified from a previously isolated cDNA clone containing a 661 bp mRNA transcript of S. digitata alkali myosin light chain gene. Isolated positive clones were sequenced and edited by using bioinformatics tools. Though the 5´ flanking region did not reveal any consensus TATA box sequences, a potential CAAT box like sequence, CCAAT and seven possible transcription factor elements were identified. The entire gene had four exons encoding 149 amino acids interrupted by three introns of varying lengths of 87, 295 and 69 bp respectively. Sequences around the splice junctions were fairly conserved and agreed with the general GT-AG splicing rule. The 3´ flanking region consists of three putative polyadenylation signals with the sequence AATAAA. The gene was AT rich with a GC content of 35%. Southern hybridisation studies suggested that this gene is likely to be a single-copy gene. Homology search of amino acid sequences showed more than 80% similarity with Caenorhabditis species and 40-50% with other vertebrate and invertebrate myosin light chains. Analysis of the amino acid sequence with the NCBI conserved domain database for interactive domain family identified the protein as a member of calcium binding protein family as it comprised of two highly conserved EF hand motifs, and may suggest a

  10. Hesperidin alleviates rat postoperative ileus through anti-inflammation and stimulation of Ca2+-dependent myosin phosphorylation

    Xiong, Yong-jian; Chu, Hong-wei; Lin, Yuan; Han, Fang; Li, Ya-chan; Wang, Ai-guo; Wang, Fu-jin; Chen, Da-peng; Wang, Jing-yu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Postoperative ileus (POI) is a postoperative dysmotility disorder of gastrointestinal tract, which remains one of the most perplexing problems in medicine. In the present study we investigated the effects of hesperidin, a major flavonoid in sweet oranges and lemons, on POI in rats. Methods: SD rats were administered hesperidin (5, 20, and 80 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 3 consecutive days. POI operation (gently manipulating the cecum for 1 min) was performed on d 2. The gastrointestinal motility and isolated intestinal contraction were examined 1 d after the operation. Then the myosin phosphorylation and inflammatory responses in cecum tissue were assessed. Smooth muscle cells were isolated from rat small intestine for in vitro experiments. Results: The gastric emptying and intestinal transit were significantly decreased in POI rats, which were reversed by administration of hesperidin. In ileum and cecum preparations of POI rats in vitro, hesperidin (2.5–160 μmol/L) dose-dependently increased the spontaneous contraction amplitudes without affecting the contractile frequency, which was blocked by the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 or verapamil, but not by TTX. Furthermore, administration of hesperidin increased the phosphorylation of MLC20 in the cecum tissue of POI rats. Moreover, administration of hesperidin reversed the increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, iNOS and COX-2 in cecum tissue of POI rats. In freshly isolated intestinal smooth muscle cells, hesperidin (5–80 μmol/L) dose-dependently increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration as well as the phosphorylation of MLC20, which was abrogated by ML-7 or siRNA that knocked down MLCK. Conclusion: Oral administration of hesperidin effectively alleviates rat POI through inhibition of inflammatory responses and stimulation of Ca2+-dependent MLC phosphorylation. PMID:27345626

  11. Cardiac myosin binding protein C and MAP-kinase activating death domain-containing gene polymorphisms and diastolic heart failure.

    Cho-Kai Wu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3 plays a role in ventricular relaxation. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3 gene polymorphisms and diastolic heart failure (DHF in a human case-control study. METHODS: A total of 352 participants of 1752 consecutive patients from the National Taiwan University Hospital and its affiliated hospital were enrolled. 176 patients diagnosed with DHF confirmed by echocardiography were recruited. Controls were matched 1-to-1 by age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, renal function and medication use. We genotyped 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs according to HapMap Han Chinese Beijing databank across a 40 kb genetic region containing the MYBPC3 gene and the neighboring DNA sequences to capture 100% of haplotype variance in all SNPs with minor allele frequencies ≥ 5%. We also analyzed associations of these tagging SNPs and haplotypes with DHF and linkage disequilibrium (LD structure of the MYBPC3 gene. RESULTS: In a single locus analysis, SNP rs2290149 was associated with DHF (allele-specific p = 0.004; permuted p = 0.031. The SNP with a minor allele frequency of 9.4%, had an odds ratio 2.14 (95% CI 1.25-3.66; p = 0.004 for the additive model and 2.06 for the autosomal dominant model (GG+GA : AA, 95% CI 1.17-3.63; p = 0.013, corresponding to a population attributable risk fraction of 12.02%. The haplotypes in a LD block of rs2290149 (C-C-G-C was also significantly associated with DHF (odds ratio 2.10 (1.53-2.89; permuted p = 0.029. CONCLUSIONS: We identified a SNP (rs2290149 among the tagging SNP set that was significantly associated with early DHF in a Chinese population.

  12. Expressiveness of multiple heads in CHR

    Di Giusto, Cinzia; Meo, Maria Chiara

    2008-01-01

    Constraint Handling Rules (CHR) are a committed-choice declarative language which has been designed for writing constraint solvers. A CHR program consists of multi-headed guarded rules which allow one to rewrite constraints into simpler ones until a solved form is reached. Many examples in the vast literature on the subject show that multiple heads are important in order to write programs which solve specific problems. On the other hand, the presence of multiples heads complicates considerably the semantics. Therefore, since restricting to single head rules does not affect the Turing completeness of the language, one can legitimately ask whether multiple heads do indeed augment the expressive power of the language. In this paper we answer positively to this question by showing that, under certain reasonable assumptions, it is not possible to encode the CHR language (with multi-headed rules) into a single head language while preserving the intended meaning of programs.

  13. Migraine, head trauma and sport.

    Ashworth, B

    1985-10-01

    In some people an attack of migraine may be provoked by heading a football or a blow on the face in a rugby tackle. The attack is sometimes alarming and clearly cannot be explained on a basis of trauma alone. Some people only have attacks in this particular circumstance but the majority have spontaneous episodes at other times. The presentation is usually in childhood or early adult life. The syndrome is discussed in relation to reports of seven patients to illustrate the variations which include migraine without headache and persistent features after the attack. The condition is benign but may cause the patient to give up playing football. PMID:4095535

  14. Head Access Piping System Desing

    中大路 道彦; 一宮 正和; 向坊 隆一; 前田 清彦; 永田 敬

    1994-01-01

    PNC made design studies on loop type FBR plants:a 600 MWe class in '91, and a 1300 MWe class in '93 both with the "head access" primary piping system. This paper focuses on the features of the smaller plant at first and afterwards on the extension to the larger one. The contents of the paper consist of R/V wall protection mechanism, primary piping circuit, secondary piping circuit, plant layout and then, discusses the extension of the applicability of the wall protection mechanism, primary pi...

  15. Head First jQuery

    Benedetti, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Want to add more interactivity and polish to your websites? Discover how jQuery can help you build complex scripting functionality in just a few lines of code. With Head First jQuery, you'll quickly get up to speed on this amazing JavaScript library by learning how to navigate HTML documents while handling events, effects, callbacks, and animations. By the time you've completed the book, you'll be incorporating Ajax apps, working seamlessly with HTML and CSS, and handling data with PHP, MySQL and JSON. If you want to learn-and understand-how to create interactive web pages, unobtrusive scrip

  16. Resonance in a head massager

    Ribeiro, Jair Lúcio Prados

    2015-04-01

    Mechanical structures such as pendula, bridges, or buildings always exhibit one (or more) natural oscillation frequency.1 If that structure is subjected to oscillatory forces of this same frequency, resonance occurs, with consequent increase of the structure oscillation amplitude. There is no shortage of simple experiments for demonstrating resonance in high school classes using a variety of materials, such as saw blades,2 guitars,3 pendulums,4 wine glasses,5 bottles,6 Ping-Pong balls,7 and pearl strings.8 We present here an experimental demonstration using only an inexpensive head (or scalp) massager, which can be purchased for less than a dollar.

  17. Head movement during walking in the cat.

    Zubair, Humza N; Beloozerova, Irina N; Sun, Hai; Marlinski, Vladimir

    2016-09-22

    Knowledge of how the head moves during locomotion is essential for understanding how locomotion is controlled by sensory systems of the head. We have analyzed head movements of the cat walking along a straight flat pathway in the darkness and light. We found that cats' head left-right translations, and roll and yaw rotations oscillated once per stride, while fore-aft and vertical translations, and pitch rotations oscillated twice. The head reached its highest vertical positions during second half of each forelimb swing, following maxima of the shoulder/trunk by 20-90°. Nose-up rotation followed head upward translation by another 40-90° delay. The peak-to-peak amplitude of vertical translation was ∼1.5cm and amplitude of pitch rotation was ∼3°. Amplitudes of lateral translation and roll rotation were ∼1cm and 1.5-3°, respectively. Overall, cats' heads were neutral in roll and 10-30° nose-down, maintaining horizontal semicircular canals and utriculi within 10° of the earth horizontal. The head longitudinal velocity was 0.5-1m/s, maximal upward and downward linear velocities were ∼0.05 and ∼0.1m/s, respectively, and maximal lateral velocity was ∼0.05m/s. Maximal velocities of head pitch rotation were 20-50°/s. During walking in light, cats stood 0.3-0.5cm taller and held their head 0.5-2cm higher than in darkness. Forward acceleration was 25-100% higher and peak-to-peak amplitude of head pitch oscillations was ∼20°/s larger. We concluded that, during walking, the head of the cat is held actively. Reflexes appear to play only a partial role in determining head movement, and vision might further diminish their role. PMID:27339731

  18. Characterization of the myosin light chain kinase from smooth muscle as an actin-binding protein that assembles actin filaments in vitro.

    Hayakawa, K; Okagaki, T; Ye, L H; Samizo, K; Higashi-Fujime, S; Takagi, T; Kohama, K

    1999-05-01

    In addition to its kinase activity, myosin light chain kinase has an actin-binding activity, which results in bundling of actin filaments [Hayakawa et al., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 199, 786-791, 1994]. There are two actin-binding sites on the kinase: calcium- and calmodulin-sensitive and insensitive sites [Ye et al., J. Biol. Chem. 272, 32182-32189, 1997]. The calcium/calmodulin-sensitive, actin-binding site is located at Asp2-Pro41 and the insensitive site is at Ser138-Met213. The cyanogen bromide fragment, consisting of Asp2-Met213, is furnished with both sites and is the actin-binding core of myosin light chain kinase. Cross-linking between the two sites assembles actin filaments into bundles. Breaking of actin-binding at the calcium/calmodulin-sensitive site by calcium/calmodulin disassembles the bundles. PMID:10231551

  19. Radioimmunoassay of myosin heavy beta chains in human serum for the evaluation of the size of myocardial infarction: correlation with myocardial Tl-201 SPECT and cardiac angioscintigraphy

    To determine the relationship between serum levels of myosin heavy beta chains assessed by an IRMA technique and other radionuclide and enzymatic parameters in the evaluation of the size of myocardial infarction, we studied 22 patients with acute myocardial infarction. Blood samples taken daily between 1st to 13th day of evolution allow the determination of peak and integral of myosine release that showed a good correlation (p<0.01) with myocardial underperfusion score in T1-201 SPECT, left ventricular ejection fractions at 1st day and at the pre-discharge study, just as CPK peak. This new assay is an interesting mean to evaluate the size of myocardial infarction

  20. SYNTHESIS OF POLY(VINYLIDENE FLUORIDE) WITH LOW CONTENTS OF HEAD-TO-HEAD CHAIN

    DUAN Youlu; YU Xiuying; XUE Ying; ZENG Miaoying; JI Shanrong

    1983-01-01

    The relations between polymerization conditions of vinylidene fluorideand contents of head-to-head chain in the polymer have been studied. It shows that the contents of head-to-head chain of the polymer are related to its polymerization temperature, but are not related with the kinds of initiators used. Therefore, poly(vinylidene fluoride) with low contents of head-to-head chain (ca. 3%)can be prepared under lower polymerization temperature. Plot of the contents of A chains against melting points of the polymer is linear, which can be expressed by an equation:A = 24.8 + 0.362 Tm(%).