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Sample records for actin-based transport mediated

  1. Analysis of persistence during intracellular actin-based transport mediated by molecular motors

    Pallavicini, C; Levi, V; Bruno, L [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Desposito, M A, E-mail: lbruno@df.uba.a

    2010-09-01

    The displacement of particles or probes in the cell cytoplasm as a function of time is characterized by different anomalous diffusion regimes. The transport of large cargoes, such as organelles, vesicles or large proteins, involves the action of ATP-consuming molecular motors. We investigate the motion of pigment organelles driven by myosin-V motors in Xenopus laevis melanocytes using a high spatio-temporal resolution tracking technique. By analyzing the turning angles ({phi}) of the obtained 2D trajectories as a function of the time lag, we determine the critical time of the transition between anticorrelated and directed motion as the time when the turning angles begin to concentrate around {phi} = 0. We relate this transition with the crossover from subdiffusive to superdiffusive behavior observed in a previous work [5]. We also assayed the properties of the trajectories in cells with inhibited myosin activity, and we can compare the results in the presence and absence of active motors.

  2. Transition to superdiffusive behavior in intracellular actin-based transport mediated by molecular motors

    Bruno, L; Brunstein, M; Despósito, M A

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular transport of large cargoes, such as organelles, vesicles or large proteins, is a complex dynamical process that involves the interplay of ATP-consuming molecular motors, cytoskeleton filaments and the viscoelastic cytoplasm. The displacements of particles or probes in the cell cytoplasm as a function of time are characterized by different (anomalous) diffusion regimes. We investigate here the motion of pigment organelles (melanosomes) driven by myosin-V motors in \\emph{Xenopus laevis} melanocytes using a high spatio-temporal resolution tracking technique. By analyzing the mean square displacement (MSD) of the obtained trajectories as a function of the time lag, we show that the melanosomes display a transition between subdiffusive to superdiffusive behavior. A stochastic theoretical model is introduced to generalize the interpretation of our data. Starting from a generalized Langevin equation that explicitly considers the collective action of the molecular motors we derive an analytical expressi...

  3. Mesoscopic model of actin-based propulsion.

    Jie Zhu

    Full Text Available Two theoretical models dominate current understanding of actin-based propulsion: microscopic polymerization ratchet model predicts that growing and writhing actin filaments generate forces and movements, while macroscopic elastic propulsion model suggests that deformation and stress of growing actin gel are responsible for the propulsion. We examine both experimentally and computationally the 2D movement of ellipsoidal beads propelled by actin tails and show that neither of the two models can explain the observed bistability of the orientation of the beads. To explain the data, we develop a 2D hybrid mesoscopic model by reconciling these two models such that individual actin filaments undergoing nucleation, elongation, attachment, detachment and capping are embedded into the boundary of a node-spring viscoelastic network representing the macroscopic actin gel. Stochastic simulations of this 'in silico' actin network show that the combined effects of the macroscopic elastic deformation and microscopic ratchets can explain the observed bistable orientation of the actin-propelled ellipsoidal beads. To test the theory further, we analyze observed distribution of the curvatures of the trajectories and show that the hybrid model's predictions fit the data. Finally, we demonstrate that the model can explain both concave-up and concave-down force-velocity relations for growing actin networks depending on the characteristic time scale and network recoil. To summarize, we propose that both microscopic polymerization ratchets and macroscopic stresses of the deformable actin network are responsible for the force and movement generation.

  4. A new mechanism for nuclear import by actin-based propulsion used by a baculovirus nucleocapsid.

    Au, Shelly; Wu, Wei; Zhou, Lixin; Theilmann, David A; Panté, Nelly

    2016-08-01

    The transport of macromolecules into the nucleus is mediated by soluble cellular receptors of the importin β superfamily and requires the Ran-GTPase cycle. Several studies have provided evidence that there are exceptions to this canonical nuclear import pathway. Here, we report a new unconventional nuclear import mechanism exploited by the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). We found that AcMNPV nucleocapsids entered the nucleus of digitonin-permeabilized cells in the absence of exogenous cytosol or under conditions that blocked the Ran-GTPase cycle. AcMNPV contains a protein that activates the Arp2/3 complex and induces actin polymerization at one end of the rod-shaped nucleocapsid. We show that inhibitors of Arp2/3 blocked nuclear import of nucleocapsids in semi-permeabilized cells. Nuclear import of nucleocapsids was also reconstituted in purified nuclei supplemented with G-actin and Arp2/3 under actin polymerization conditions. Thus, we propose that actin polymerization drives not only migration of baculovirus through the cytoplasm but also pushes the nucleocapsid through the nuclear pore complex to enter the cell nucleus. Our findings point to a very distinct role of actin-based motility during the baculovirus infection cycle. PMID:27284005

  5. Control of actin-based motility through localized actin binding

    A wide variety of cell biological and biomimetic systems use actin polymerization to drive motility. It has been suggested that an object such as a bacterium can propel itself by self-assembling a high concentration of actin behind it, if it is repelled by actin. However, it is also known that it is essential for the moving object to bind actin. Therefore, a key question is how the actin tail can propel an object when it both binds and repels the object. We present a physically consistent Brownian dynamics model for actin-based motility that includes the minimal components of the dendritic nucleation model and allows for both attractive and repulsive interactions between actin and a moveable disc. We find that the concentration gradient of filamentous actin generated by polymerization is sufficient to propel the object, even with moderately strong binding interactions. Additionally, actin binding can act as a biophysical cap, and may directly control motility through modulation of network growth. Overall, this mechanism is robust in that it can drive motility against a load up to a stall pressure that depends on the Young’s modulus of the actin network and can explain several aspects of actin-based motility. (paper)

  6. Behaviorally Mediated Larval Transport in Upwelling Systems

    Morgan, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Highly advective upwelling systems along the western margins of continents are widely believed to transport larvae far offshore in surface currents resulting in larval wastage, limited recruitment, and increased population connectivity. However, suites of larval behaviors effectively mediate interspecific differences in the extent of cross-shelf migrations between nearshore adult habitats and offshore larval habitats. Interspecific differences in behavior determining whether larvae complete d...

  7. Actin-based propulsion of spatially extended objects

    We propose a mathematical model of the actin-based propulsion of spatially extended obstacles. It starts from the properties of individual actin filaments and includes transient attachment to the obstacle, polymerization as well as cross-linking. Two particular geometries are discussed, which apply to the motion of protein-coated beads in a cell-like medium and the leading edge of a cell protrusion, respectively. The model gives rise to both steady and saltatory movement of beads and can explain the experimentally observed transitions of the dynamic regime with changing bead radius and protein surface density. Several spatiotemporal patterns are obtained with a soft obstacle under tension, including the experimentally observed spontaneous emergence of lateral traveling waves in crawling cells. Thus, we suggest a unifying mechanism for systems that are currently described by differential concepts.

  8. Plutonium and Cesium Colloid Mediated Transport

    Boukhalfa, H.; Dittrich, T.; Reimus, P. W.; Ware, D.; Erdmann, B.; Wasserman, N. L.; Abdel-Fattah, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    Plutonium and cesium have been released to the environment at many different locations worldwide and are present in spent fuel at significant levels. Accurate understanding of the mechanisms that control their fate and transport in the environment is important for the management of contaminated sites, for forensic applications, and for the development of robust repositories for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. Plutonium, which can be present in the environment in multiple oxidations states and various chemical forms including amorphous oxy(hydr)oxide phases, adsorbs/adheres very strongly to geological materials and is usually immobile in all its chemical forms. However, when associated with natural colloids, it has the potential to migrate significant distances from its point of release. Like plutonium, cesium is not very mobile and tends to remain adhered to geological materials near its release point, although its transport can be enhanced by natural colloids. However, the reactivity of plutonium and cesium are very different, so their colloid-mediated transport might be significantly different in subsurface environments. In this study, we performed controlled experiments in two identically-prepared columns; one dedicated to Pu and natural colloid transport experiments, and the other to Cs and colloid experiments. Multiple flow-through experiments were conducted in each column, with the effluent solutions being collected and re-injected into the same column two times to examine the persistence and scaling behavior of the natural colloids, Pu and Cs. The data show that that a significant fraction of colloids were retained in the first elution through each column, but the eluted colloids collected from the first run transported almost conservatively in subsequent runs. Plutonium transport tracked natural colloids in the first run but deviated from the transport of natural colloids in the second and third runs. Cesium transport tracked natural

  9. Forces generated during actin-based propulsion: A direct measurement by micromanipulation

    Marcy, Yann; Prost, Jacques; Carlier, Marie-France; Sykes, Cécile

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic actin networks generate forces for numerous types of movements such as lamellipodia protrusion or the motion of endocytic vesicles. The actin-based propulsive movement of Listeria monocytogenes or of functionalized microspheres have been extensively used as model systems to identify the biochemical components that are necessary for actin-based motility. However, quantitative force measurements are required to elucidate the mechanism of force generation, which is still under debate. To...

  10. 2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase binds to actin-based cytoskeletal elements in an isoprenylation-independent manner.

    De Angelis, D A; Braun, P E

    1996-09-01

    2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) is an isoprenylated protein enriched in myelin and oligodendrocytes but also present in several other tissues at low levels. CNP binds avidly to membranes and in addition possesses several characteristics of cytoskeletal proteins. The role of isoprenylation in the association of CNP with the cytoskeleton was analyzed by ectopic expression in L cells of epitope-tagged CNP1 and a non-isoprenylated mutant CNP1. Using nonionic detergent extraction, drug-mediated cytoskeletal disruption, and coimmunoprecipitation with an anti-actin antibody, we show that CNP1 is associated with actin-based cytoskeletal elements independently of its isoprenylation status. A control protein, p21c-H-ras, which is also modified by isoprenylation at its carboxyl-terminus, does not bind to cytoskeletal structures as judged by the same criteria. We present a model that accounts for the association of CNP1 with membranes and the cytoskeleton. PMID:8752099

  11. Trapped-Particle-Mediated Damping and Transport

    Weak axial variations in B(z) or φ(z) in Penning-Malmberg traps cause some particles to be trapped locally. This causes a velocity-space separatrix between trapped and passing populations, and collisional separatrix diffusion then causes mode damping and asymmetry-induced transport. This separatrix dissipation scales with collisionality as v1/2, so it dominates in low collisionallity plasmas. The confinement lifetime in the 'CamV' apparatus was dominated by a weak magnetic ripple with δB/B ∼ 10-3, and it appears likely that the ubiquitous (L/B)-2 lifetime scalings and other applied asymmetry scalings represent similar TPM effects. TPM transport will limit the containment of large numbers of positrons or p-bars, since TPM loss rates generally scale as total charge Q2, independent of length

  12. Inhibition of OCTN2-Mediated Transport of Carnitine by Etoposide

    Hu, Chaoxin; Lancaster, Cynthia S.; Zuo, Zhili; Hu, Shuiying; Chen, Zhaoyuan; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Baker, Sharyn D.; Sparreboom, Alex

    2012-01-01

    OCTN2 is a bifunctional transporter that reabsorbs filtered carnitine in a sodium dependent manner and secretes organic cations into urine as a proton antiport mechanism. We hypothesized that inhibition of OCTN2 by anticancer drugs can influence carnitine resorption. OCTN2-mediated transport inhibition by anticancer drugs was assessed using cells transfected with human OCTN2 (hOCTN2) or mouse Octn2 (mOctn2). Excretion of carnitine and acetylcarnitine was measured in urine collected from mice ...

  13. Nonlinear charge transport in DNA mediated by twist modes

    Palmero, F.; Archilla, J. F. R.; Hennig, D.; Romero, F. R.

    2003-01-01

    Recent works on localized charge transport along DNA, based on a three--dimensional, tight--binding model (Eur. Phys. J. B 30:211, 2002; Phys. D 180:256, 2003), suggest that charge transport is mediated by the coupling of the radial and electron variables. However, these works are based on a linear approximation of the distances among nucleotides, which forces for consistency the assumption that the parameter $\\alpha$, that describes the coupling between the transfer integral and the distance...

  14. Functionalization mediates heat transport in graphene nanoflakes

    Han, Haoxue; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Nan; Samani, Majid Kabiri; Ni, Yuxiang; Mijbil, Zainelabideen Y.; Edwards, Michael; Xiong, Shiyun; Sääskilahti, Kimmo; Murugesan, Murali; Fu, Yifeng; Ye, Lilei; Sadeghi, Hatef; Bailey, Steven; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Lambert, Colin J.; Liu, Johan; Volz, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity of graphene and few-layer graphene undergoes severe degradations through contact with the substrate. Here we show experimentally that the thermal management of a micro heater is substantially improved by introducing alternative heat-escaping channels into a graphene-based film bonded to functionalized graphene oxide through amino-silane molecules. Using a resistance temperature probe for in situ monitoring we demonstrate that the hotspot temperature was lowered by ∼28 °C for a chip operating at 1,300 W cm−2. Thermal resistance probed by pulsed photothermal reflectance measurements demonstrated an improved thermal coupling due to functionalization on the graphene–graphene oxide interface. Three functionalization molecules manifest distinct interfacial thermal transport behaviour, corroborating our atomistic calculations in unveiling the role of molecular chain length and functional groups. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the functionalization constrains the cross-plane phonon scattering, which in turn enhances in-plane heat conduction of the bonded graphene film by recovering the long flexural phonon lifetime. PMID:27125636

  15. Actin based processes that could determine the cytoplasmic architecture of plant cells

    Honing; Emons, A.M.C.; Ketelaar, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Actin polymerisation can generate forces that are necessary for cell movement, such as the propulsion of a class of bacteria, including Listeria, and the protrusion of migrating animal cells. Force generation by the actin cytoskeleton in plant cells has not been studied. One process in plant cells that is likely to depend on actin-based force generation is the organisation of the cytoplasm. We compare the function of actin binding proteins of three well-studied mammalian models that depend on...

  16. Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters

    Stine C. Klinger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer’s disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN.

  17. Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters.

    Klinger, Stine C; Siupka, Piotr; Nielsen, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN) constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer's disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN. PMID:26154780

  18. Magnetic fields facilitate DNA-mediated charge transport

    Wong, Jiun Ru; Lee, Kee Jin; Shu, Jian-Jun; Shao, Fangwei

    2015-01-01

    Exaggerate radical-induced DNA damage under magnetic fields is of great concerns to medical biosafety and to bio-molecular device based upon DNA electronic conductivity. In this report, the effect of applying an external magnetic field (MF) on DNA-mediated charge transport (CT) was investigated by studying guanine oxidation by a kinetics trap (8CPG) via photoirradiation of anthraquinone (AQ) in the presence of an external MF. Positive enhancement in CT efficiencies was observed in both the pr...

  19. DNA-mediated Charge Transport in Redox Sensing and Signaling

    Genereux, Joseph C.; Boal, Amie K.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2010-01-01

    The transport of charge through the DNA base pair stack offers a route to carry out redox chemistry at a distance. Here we describe characteristics of this chemistry that have been elucidated and how this chemistry may be utilized within the cell. The shallow distance dependence associated with these redox reactions permits DNA-mediated signaling over long molecular distances in the genome and facilitates the activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors globally in response to oxidativ...

  20. Monocarboxylate transporters as targets and mediators in cancer therapy response.

    Baltazar, F; Pinheiro, C; Morais-Santos, F; Azevedo-Silva, J; Queirós, O; Preto, A; Casal, M

    2014-12-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) belong to a family of transporters, encoded by the SLC16 gene family, which is presently composed by 14 members, but only MCT1 to 4 have been biochemically characterized. They have important functions in healthy tissues, being involved in the transmembrane transport of lactic acid and other monocarboxylic acids in human cells. One of the recently recognized hallmarks of cancer is altered metabolism, with high rates of glucose consumption and consequent lactate production. To maintain this metabolic phenotype, cancer cells upregulate a series of plasma membrane proteins, including MCTs. MCT1 and MCT4, in particular, play a dual role in the maintenance of the metabolic phenotype of tumour cells. On one hand, they facilitate the efflux of lactate and, on the other hand, they contribute to the preservation of the intracellular pH, by co-transporting a proton. Thus, MCTs are attractive targets in cancer therapy, especially in cancers with a hyper-glycolytic and acid-resistant phenotype. Recent evidence demonstrates that MCTs are involved in cancer cell uptake of chemotherapeutic agents, including 3-bromopyruvate. In this way MCTs can act as "Trojan horses", as their elevated expression in cancer cells can mediate the entry of this chemotherapeutic agent into the cells and selectively kill cancer cells. As a result, MCTs will be mediators of chemotherapeutic response, and their expression can be used as a molecular marker to predict response to chemotherapy. PMID:24921258

  1. Reconstitution of actin-based motility of Listeria and Shigella using pure proteins

    Loisel, Thomas P.; Boujemaa, Rajaa; Pantaloni, Dominique; Carlier, Marie-France

    1999-10-01

    Actin polymerization is essential for cell locomotion and is thought to generate the force responsible for cellular protrusions. The Arp2/3 complex is required to stimulate actin assembly at the leading edge in response to signalling. The bacteria Listeria and Shigella bypass the signalling pathway and harness the Arp2/3 complex to induce actin assembly and to propel themselves in living cells. However, the Arp2/3 complex alone is insufficient to promote movement. Here we have used pure components of the actin cytoskeleton to reconstitute sustained movement in Listeria and Shigella in vitro. Actin-based propulsion is driven by the free energy released by ATP hydrolysis linked to actin polymerization, and does not require myosin. In addition to actin and activated Arp2/3 complex, actin depolymerizing factor (ADF, or cofilin) and capping protein are also required for motility as they maintain a high steady-state level of G-actin, which controls the rate of unidirectional growth of actin filaments at the surface of the bacterium. The movement is more effective when profilin, α-actinin and VASP (for Listeria) are also included. These results have implications for our understanding of the mechanism of actin-based motility in cells.

  2. Metal complexes for DNA-mediated charge transport

    Barton, Jacqueline K.; Olmon, Eric D.; Sontz, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    In all organisms, oxidation threatens the integrity of the genome. DNA-mediated charge transport (CT) may play an important role in the generation and repair of this oxidative damage. In studies involving long-range CT from intercalating Ru and Rh complexes to 5′-GG-3′ sites, we have examined the efficiency of CT as a function of distance, temperature, and the electronic coupling of metal oxidants bound to the base stack. Most striking is the shallow distance dependence and the sensitivity of...

  3. Modulation of intracellular transport by transported proteins: Insight from regulation of COPI-mediated transport

    Aoe, Tomohiko; Lee, Agnes J.; van Donselaar, Elly; Peters, Peter J.; Hsu, Victor W.

    1998-01-01

    Intracellular transport is best understood for how proteins are shuttled among different compartments of the secretory pathway by membrane-bound transport carriers. However, it remains unclear whether regulation of this transport is modulated by the transported (cargo) proteins in the lumen of transport pathways. In the early secretory pathways that connect the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi complex, the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) recruits a cytosolic coat protein...

  4. Donor-acceptor electron transport mediated by solitons

    Brizhik, L. S.; Piette, B. M. A. G.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2014-11-01

    We study the long-range electron and energy transfer mediated by solitons in a quasi-one-dimensional molecular chain (conjugated polymer, alpha-helical macromolecule, etc.) weakly bound to a donor and an acceptor. We show that for certain sets of parameter values in such systems an electron, initially located at the donor molecule, can tunnel to the molecular chain, where it becomes self-trapped in a soliton state, and propagates to the opposite end of the chain practically without energy dissipation. Upon reaching the end, the electron can either bounce back and move in the opposite direction or, for suitable parameter values of the system, tunnel to the acceptor. We estimate the energy efficiency of the donor-acceptor electron transport depending on the parameter values. Our calculations show that the soliton mechanism works for the parameter values of polypeptide macromolecules and conjugated polymers. We also investigate the donor-acceptor electron transport in thermalized molecular chains.

  5. Wave mediated angular momentum transport in astrophysical boundary layers

    Hertfelder, Marius; Kley, Wilhelm

    2015-07-01

    Context. Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized stars leads to the formation of a boundary layer (BL) where the gas loses its excess kinetic energy and settles onto the star. There are still many open questions concerning the BL, for instance the transport of angular momentum (AM) or the vertical structure. Aims: It is the aim of this work to investigate the AM transport in the BL where the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is not operating owing to the increasing angular velocity Ω(r) with radius. We will therefore search for an appropriate mechanism and examine its efficiency and implications. Methods: We perform 2D numerical hydrodynamical simulations in a cylindrical coordinate system (r,ϕ) for a thin, vertically integrated accretion disk around a young star. We employ a realistic equation of state and include both cooling from the disk surfaces and radiation transport in radial and azimuthal direction. The viscosity in the disk is treated by the α-model; in the BL there is no viscosity term included. Results: We find that our setup is unstable to the sonic instability which sets in shortly after the simulations have been started. Acoustic waves are generated and traverse the domain, developing weak shocks in the vicinity of the BL. Furthermore, the system undergoes recurrent outbursts where the activity in the disk increases strongly. The instability and the waves do not die out for over 2000 orbits. Conclusions: There is indeed a purely hydrodynamical mechanism that enables AM transport in the BL. It is efficient and wave mediated; however, this renders it a non-local transport method, which means that models of a effective local viscosity like the α-viscosity are probably not applicable in the BL. A variety of further implications of the non-local AM transport are discussed.

  6. Actin-Based Motility of Burkholderia thailandensis Requires a Central Acidic Domain of BimA That Recruits and Activates the Cellular Arp2/3 Complex▿

    Sitthidet, Chayada; Stevens, Joanne M; Field, Terence R.; Layton, Abigail N.; Korbsrisate, Sunee; Stevens, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Burkholderia species use BimA for intracellular actin-based motility. Uniquely, Burkholderia thailandensis BimA harbors a central and acidic (CA) domain. The CA domain was required for actin-based motility, binding to the cellular Arp2/3 complex, and Arp2/3-dependent polymerization of actin monomers. Our data reveal distinct strategies for actin-based motility among Burkholderia species.

  7. Course 6: Physics of Composite Cell Membrane and Actin Based Cytoskeleton

    Sackmann, E.; Bausch, A. R.; Vonna, L.

    1 Architecture of composite cell membranes 1.1 The lipid/protein bilayer is a multicomponent smectic phase with mosaic like architecture 1.2 The spectrin/actin cytoskeleton as hyperelastic cell stabilizer 1.3 The actin cortex: Architecture and function 2 Physics of the actin based cytoskeleton 2.1 Actin is a living semiflexible polymer 2.2 Actin network as viscoelastic body 2.3 Correlation between macroscopic viscoelasticity and molecular 3 Heterogeneous actin gels in cells and biological function 3.1 Manipulation of actin gels 3.2 Control of organization and function of actin cortex by cell signalling 4 Micromechanics and microrheometry of cells 5 Activation of endothelial cells: On the possibility of formation of stress fibers as phase transition of actin-network triggered by cell signalling pathways 6 On cells as adaptive viscoplastic bodies 7 Controll of cellular protrusions controlled by actin/myosin cortex

  8. RickA expression is not sufficient to promote actin-based motility of Rickettsia raoultii.

    Premanand Balraj

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rickettsia raoultii is a novel Rickettsia species recently isolated from Dermacentor ticks and classified within the spotted fever group (SFG. The inability of R. raoultii to spread within L929 cells suggests that this bacterium is unable to polymerize host cell actin, a property exhibited by all SFG rickettsiae except R. peacocki. This result led us to investigate if RickA, the protein thought to generate actin nucleation, was expressed within this rickettsia species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Amplification and sequencing of R. raoultii rickA showed that this gene encoded a putative 565 amino acid protein highly homologous to those found in other rickettsiae. Using immunofluorescence assays, we determined that the motility pattern (i.e. microcolonies or cell-to-cell spreading of R. raoultii was different depending on the host cell line in which the bacteria replicated. In contrast, under the same experimental conditions, R. conorii shares the same phenotype both in L929 and in Vero cells. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of infected cells showed that non-motile bacteria were free in the cytosol instead of enclosed in a vacuole. Moreover, western-blot analysis demonstrated that the defect of R. raoultii actin-based motility within L929 cells was not related to lower expression of RickA. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results, together with previously published data about R. typhi, strongly suggest that another factor, apart from RickA, may be involved with be responsible for actin-based motility in bacteria from the Rickettsia genus.

  9. STM tip-mediated mass transport on Cu surfaces

    Highlights: • Tip-induced atomic motion of Co atoms embedded in the Cu (0 0 1) surface in the presence of vacancies. • Interlayer mass transport at the island edge is found to depend strongly on the tip height and the lateral distance from the tip. • The jumping and the Ehrlich–Schwoebel (E–S) diffusion barrier can be reduced by tip manipulation. - Abstract: Atomic-scale simulations are performed to study atomic motion on Cu surfaces to illustrate the effect of the scanning tunneling microscopy tip on mass transport (MT) in the surfaces and on top of the Co island in heteroepitaxial Co/Cu(0 0 1) and Co/Cu(1 1 1) systems. First we investigate tip-induced atomic motion of Co atoms embedded in the Cu(0 0 1) surface at zero bias voltage. With the help of the tip, the Co atom in the surface can freely diffuse toward its nearby vacancy site. So-called vacancy mechanism is used to interpret this phenomenon. Then tip-mediated atomic motion of Co adatoms on the Co islands supported by a Cu(1 1 1) surface is studied. It is revealed that the tip has a significant effect on the diffusion of adatoms on the islands and interlayer mass transport at the island edge. Interlayer mass transport at the island edge is found to depend strongly on the tip height and the lateral distance from the tip. By calculating the diffusion barriers, it is found that the jumping diffusion barrier on the island can be zero by the tip vertical manipulation while the Ehrlich–Schwoebel diffusion barrier at the island edge can be reduced by the tip lateral manipulation. Thus, the quality of thin films can be improved by controlling MT in and/or on the surface

  10. Activation of CFTR-mediated Cl- Transport by Magnolin

    JIN Ling-ling; LIU Xin; SUN Yan; LIN Sen; ZHOU Na; XU Li-na; YU BO; HOU Shu-guang; YANG Hong

    2008-01-01

    Magnolin is a herbal compound from Magnolia biondii Pamp.It possesses numerous biological activities.Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator(CFTR)is all epithelial chloride channel that plays a key role in the fluid secretion of various exocrine organs.In the present study,the activation of CFTR-mediated chloride transport by magnolin is indentified and characterized.In CFTR stably trailsfected FRT cells.magnolin increases CFTR Cl- currents in a concentration-dependent manner.The activation of magnolin on CFTR is rapid,reversible,and cAMP-dependent.Magnolin does not elevate cellular cAMP level.indicating that it activates CFTR by direct binding and interaction with CFTR protein.Magnolin selectively activates wildtype CFTR rather than mutant CFTIL Magnolin may present a novel class of therapeutic lead compound for the treatment of diseases associated with reduced CFTR function such as keratoconjunctivitis sicca,idiopathic chronic pancreatiti,and chromc constipation.

  11. Microbially Mediated Kinetic Sulfur Isotope Fractionation: Reactive Transport Modeling Benchmark

    Wanner, C.; Druhan, J. L.; Cheng, Y.; Amos, R. T.; Steefel, C. I.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Microbially mediated sulfate reduction is a ubiquitous process in many subsurface systems. Isotopic fractionation is characteristic of this anaerobic process, since sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) favor the reduction of the lighter sulfate isotopologue (S32O42-) over the heavier isotopologue (S34O42-). Detection of isotopic shifts have been utilized as a proxy for the onset of sulfate reduction in subsurface systems such as oil reservoirs and aquifers undergoing uranium bioremediation. Reactive transport modeling (RTM) of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation has been applied to field and laboratory studies. These RTM approaches employ different mathematical formulations in the representation of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation. In order to test the various formulations, we propose a benchmark problem set for the simulation of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation during microbially mediated sulfate reduction. The benchmark problem set is comprised of four problem levels and is based on a recent laboratory column experimental study of sulfur isotope fractionation. Pertinent processes impacting sulfur isotopic composition such as microbial sulfate reduction and dispersion are included in the problem set. To date, participating RTM codes are: CRUNCHTOPE, TOUGHREACT, MIN3P and THE GEOCHEMIST'S WORKBENCH. Preliminary results from various codes show reasonable agreement for the problem levels simulating sulfur isotope fractionation in 1D.

  12. Magnetic fields facilitate DNA-mediated charge transport

    Wong, Jiun Ru; Shu, Jian-Jun; Shao, Fangwei

    2015-01-01

    Exaggerate radical-induced DNA damage under magnetic fields is of great concerns to medical biosafety and to bio-molecular device based upon DNA electronic conductivity. In this report, the effect of applying an external magnetic field (MF) on DNA-mediated charge transport (CT) was investigated by studying guanine oxidation by a kinetics trap (8CPG) via photoirradiation of anthraquinone (AQ) in the presence of an external MF. Positive enhancement in CT efficiencies was observed in both the proximal and distal 8CPG after applying a static MF of 300 mT. MF assisted CT has shown sensitivities to magnetic field strength, duplex structures, and the integrity of base pair stacking. MF effects on spin evolution of charge injection upon AQ irradiation and alignment of base pairs to CT-active conformation during radical propagation were proposed to be the two major factors that MF attributed to facilitate DNA-mediated CT. Herein, our results suggested that the electronic conductivity of duplex DNA can be enhanced by a...

  13. Magnetic Fields Facilitate DNA-Mediated Charge Transport.

    Wong, Jiun Ru; Lee, Kee Jin; Shu, Jian-Jun; Shao, Fangwei

    2015-06-01

    Exaggerated radical-induced DNA damage under magnetic fields is of great concern to medical biosafety and biomolecular electronic devices. In this report, the effects of an external magnetic field (MF) on DNA electronic conductivity were investigated by studying the efficiencies of photoinduced DNA-mediated charge transport (CT) via guanine damage. Under a static MF of 300 mT, positive enhancements in the decomposition of 8-cyclopropyldeoxyguanosine ((8CP)G) were observed at both the proximal and distal guanine doublets, indicating a more efficient propagation of radical cations and higher electronic conductivity of duplex DNA. MF-assisted CT has shown sensitivity to magnetic field strength, duplex structures, and the integrity of base pair stacking. Spin evolution of charge injection and the alignment of base pairs to the CT-active conformation during radical propagation were proposed to be the two major factors that MF contributes to facilitate DNA-mediated CT. Herein, MF-assisted CT may offer a new avenue for designing DNA-based electronic devices and unraveling MF effects on redox and radical relevant biological processes. PMID:25946473

  14. Zymosan-mediated inflammation impairs in vivo reverse cholesterol transport.

    Malik, Priya; Berisha, Stela Z; Santore, Jennifer; Agatisa-Boyle, Colin; Brubaker, Gregory; Smith, Jonathan D

    2011-05-01

    Inflammation has been proposed to impair HDL function and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). We investigated the effects of inflammation mediated by zymosan, a yeast glucan, on multiple steps along the RCT pathway in vivo and ex vivo. Acute inflammation with 70 mg/kg zymosan impaired RCT to plasma, liver, and feces similarly by 17-22% (P < 0.05), with no additional block at the liver. Hepatic gene expression further demonstrated no change in ABCG5, ABCB4, and ABCB11 expression but a decline in ABCG8 mRNA (32% P < 0.05). Plasma from zymosan-treated mice had a 21% decrease in cholesterol acceptor ability (P < 0.01) and a 35% decrease in ABCA1-specific efflux capacity (P < 0.01) in vitro. Zymosan treatment also decreased HDL levels and led to HDL remodeling with increased incorporation of serum amyloid A. In addition, cholesterol efflux from cultured macrophages declined with zymosan treatment in a dose dependent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that zymosan impairs in vivo RCT primarily by decreasing macrophage-derived cholesterol entering the plasma, with minimal additional blocks downstream. Our study supports the notion that RCT impairment is one of the mechanisms for the increased atherosclerotic burden observed in inflammatory conditions. PMID:21335620

  15. Organic anion transporter 3- and organic anion transporting polypeptides 1B1- and 1B3-mediated transport of catalposide

    Jeong HU

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyeon-Uk Jeong,1 Mihwa Kwon,2 Yongnam Lee,3 Ji Seok Yoo,3 Dae Hee Shin,3 Im-Sook Song,2 Hye Suk Lee1 1College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon 420-743, Korea; 2College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701, Korea; 3Central R&D Institute, Yungjin Pharm Co., Ltd., Suwon 443-270, Korea Abstract: We investigated the in vitro transport characteristics of catalposide in HEK293 cells overexpressing organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1, OAT3, organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1, OATP1B3, organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1, OCT2, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. The transport mechanism of catalposide was investigated in HEK293 and LLC-PK1 cells overexpressing the relevant transporters. The uptake of catalposide was 319-, 13.6-, and 9.3-fold greater in HEK293 cells overexpressing OAT3, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 transporters, respectively, than in HEK293 control cells. The increased uptake of catalposide via the OAT3, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 transporters was decreased to basal levels in the presence of representative inhibitors such as probenecid, furosemide, and cimetidine (for OAT3 and cyclosporin A, gemfibrozil, and rifampin (for OATP1B1 and OATP1B3. The concentration-dependent OAT3-mediated uptake of catalposide revealed the following kinetic parameters: Michaelis constant (Km =41.5 µM, maximum uptake rate (Vmax =46.2 pmol/minute, and intrinsic clearance (CLint =1.11 µL/minute. OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-mediated catalposide uptake also showed concentration dependency, with low CLint values of 0.035 and 0.034 µL/minute, respectively. However, the OCT1, OCT2, OAT1, P-gp, and BCRP transporters were apparently not involved in the uptake of catalposide into cells. In addition, catalposide inhibited the transport activities of OAT3, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3 with half-maximal inhibitory concentration values of 83, 200, and 235 µ

  16. Titin-Actin Interaction: PEVK-Actin-Based Viscosity in a Large Animal

    Charles S. Chung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Titin exhibits an interaction between its PEVK segment and the actin filament resulting in viscosity, a speed dependent resistive force, which significantly influences diastolic filling in mice. While diastolic disease is clinically pervasive, humans express a more compliant titin (N2BA:N2B ratio ~0.5–1.0 than mice (N2BA:N2B ratio ~0.2. To examine PEVK-actin based viscosity in compliant titin-tissues, we used pig cardiac tissue that expresses titin isoforms similar to that in humans. Stretch-hold experiments were performed at speeds from 0.1 to 10 lengths/s from slack sarcomere lengths (SL to SL of 2.15 μm. Viscosity was calculated from the slope of stress-relaxation vs stretch speed. Recombinant PEVK was added to compete off native interactions and this found to reduce the slope by 35%, suggesting that PEVK-actin interactions are a strong contributor of viscosity. Frequency sweeps were performed at frequencies of 0.1–400 Hz and recombinant protein reduced viscous moduli by 40% at 2.15 μm and by 50% at 2.25 μm, suggesting a SL-dependent nature of viscosity that might prevent SL ``overshoot’’ at long diastolic SLs. This study is the first to show that viscosity is present at physiologic speeds in the pig and supports the physiologic relevance of PEVK-actin interactions in humans in both health and disease.

  17. In silico reconstitution of actin-based symmetry breaking and motility.

    Mark J Dayel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells assemble viscoelastic networks of crosslinked actin filaments to control their shape, mechanical properties, and motility. One important class of actin network is nucleated by the Arp2/3 complex and drives both membrane protrusion at the leading edge of motile cells and intracellular motility of pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes. These networks can be reconstituted in vitro from purified components to drive the motility of spherical micron-sized beads. An Elastic Gel model has been successful in explaining how these networks break symmetry, but how they produce directed motile force has been less clear. We have combined numerical simulations with in vitro experiments to reconstitute the behavior of these motile actin networks in silico using an Accumulative Particle-Spring (APS model that builds on the Elastic Gel model, and demonstrates simple intuitive mechanisms for both symmetry breaking and sustained motility. The APS model explains observed transitions between smooth and pulsatile motion as well as subtle variations in network architecture caused by differences in geometry and conditions. Our findings also explain sideways symmetry breaking and motility of elongated beads, and show that elastic recoil, though important for symmetry breaking and pulsatile motion, is not necessary for smooth directional motility. The APS model demonstrates how a small number of viscoelastic network parameters and construction rules suffice to recapture the complex behavior of motile actin networks. The fact that the model not only mirrors our in vitro observations, but also makes novel predictions that we confirm by experiment, suggests that the model captures much of the essence of actin-based motility in this system.

  18. Actin-binding proteins from Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia thailandensis can functionally compensate for the actin-based motility defect of a Burkholderia pseudomallei bimA mutant

    Stevens, J. M.; Ulrich, R L; Taylor, L A; Wood, M W; DeShazer, D; M.P. Stevens; Galyov, E. E.

    2005-01-01

    Recently we identified a bacterial factor (BimA) required for actin-based motility of Burkholderia pseudomallei. Here we report that Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia thailandensis are capable of actin-based motility in J774.2 cells and that BimA homologs of these bacteria can restore the actin-based motility defect of a B. pseudomallei bimA mutant. While the BimA homologs differ in their amino-terminal sequence, they interact directly with actin in vitro and vary in their ability to bind ...

  19. Actin-Binding Proteins from Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia thailandensis Can Functionally Compensate for the Actin-Based Motility Defect of a Burkholderia pseudomallei bimA Mutant

    Stevens, Joanne M; Ulrich, Ricky L.; Taylor, Lowrie A.; Wood, Michael W.; DeShazer, David; Stevens, Mark P.; Galyov, Edouard E.

    2005-01-01

    Recently we identified a bacterial factor (BimA) required for actin-based motility of Burkholderia pseudomallei. Here we report that Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia thailandensis are capable of actin-based motility in J774.2 cells and that BimA homologs of these bacteria can restore the actin-based motility defect of a B. pseudomallei bimA mutant. While the BimA homologs differ in their amino-terminal sequence, they interact directly with actin in vitro and vary in their ability to bind ...

  20. Yarrowia lipolytica vesicle-mediated protein transport pathways

    Beckerich Jean-Marie

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein secretion is a universal cellular process involving vesicles which bud and fuse between organelles to bring proteins to their final destination. Vesicle budding is mediated by protein coats; vesicle targeting and fusion depend on Rab GTPase, tethering factors and SNARE complexes. The Génolevures II sequencing project made available entire genome sequences of four hemiascomycetous yeasts, Yarrowia lipolytica, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces lactis and Candida glabrata. Y. lipolytica is a dimorphic yeast and has good capacities to secrete proteins. The translocation of nascent protein through the endoplasmic reticulum membrane was well studied in Y. lipolytica and is largely co-translational as in the mammalian protein secretion pathway. Results We identified S. cerevisiae proteins involved in vesicular secretion and these protein sequences were used for the BLAST searches against Génolevures protein database (Y. lipolytica, C. glabrata, K. lactis and D. hansenii. These proteins are well conserved between these yeasts and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We note several specificities of Y. lipolytica which may be related to its good protein secretion capacities and to its dimorphic aspect. An expansion of the Y. lipolytica Rab protein family was observed with autoBLAST and the Rab2- and Rab4-related members were identified with BLAST against NCBI protein database. An expansion of this family is also found in filamentous fungi and may reflect the greater complexity of the Y. lipolytica secretion pathway. The Rab4p-related protein may play a role in membrane recycling as rab4 deleted strain shows a modification of colony morphology, dimorphic transition and permeability. Similarly, we find three copies of the gene (SSO encoding the plasma membrane SNARE protein. Quantification of the percentages of proteins with the greatest homology between S. cerevisiae, Y. lipolytica and animal homologues involved in vesicular

  1. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D–mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as ...

  2. Monocarboxylate transporters as targets and mediators in cancer therapy response

    Baltazar, Fátima; Pinheiro, Celine; Santos, Filipa Morais; Silva, J. Azevedo; Queirós, Odília; Preto, Ana; Casal, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Proofs Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) belong to a family of transporters, encoded by the SLC16 gene family, which is presently composed by 14 members, but only MCT1 to 4 have been biochemically characterized. They have important functions in healthy tissues, being involved in the transmembrane transport of lactic acid and other monocarboxylic acids in human cells. One of the recently recognized hallmarks of cancer is altered metabolism, with high rates of glucose consumption and conse...

  3. Zymosan-mediated inflammation impairs in vivo reverse cholesterol transport[S

    Malik, Priya; Berisha, Stela Z.; Santore, Jennifer; Agatisa-Boyle, Colin; Brubaker, Gregory; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation has been proposed to impair HDL function and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). We investigated the effects of inflammation mediated by zymosan, a yeast glucan, on multiple steps along the RCT pathway in vivo and ex vivo. Acute inflammation with 70 mg/kg zymosan impaired RCT to plasma, liver, and feces similarly by 17–22% (P < 0.05), with no additional block at the liver. Hepatic gene expression further demonstrated no change in ABCG5, ABCB4, and ABCB11 expression but a decline in ABCG8 mRNA (32% P < 0.05). Plasma from zymosan-treated mice had a 21% decrease in cholesterol acceptor ability (P < 0.01) and a 35% decrease in ABCA1-specfic efflux capacity (P < 0.01) in vitro. Zymosan treatment also decreased HDL levels and led to HDL remodeling with increased incorporation of serum amyloid A. In addition, cholesterol efflux from cultured macrophages declined with zymosan treatment in a dose dependant manner. Taken together, our results suggest that zymosan impairs in vivo RCT primarily by decreasing macrophage-derived cholesterol entering the plasma, with minimal additional blocks downstream. Our study supports the notion that RCT impairment is one of the mechanisms for the increased atherosclerotic burden observed in inflammatory conditions. PMID:21335620

  4. Adenovirus-mediated transfection with glucose transporter 3 suppresses PC12 cell apoptosis following ischemic injury

    Junliang Li; Xinke Xu; Shanyi Zhang; Meiguang Zheng; Zhonghua Wu; Yinlun Weng; Leping Ouyang; Jian Yu; Fangcheng Li

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of adenovirus-mediated transfection of PC12 cells with glucose transporter 3 after ischemic injury. The results of flow cytometry and TUNEL showed that exogenous glucose transporter 3 significantly suppressed PC12 cell apoptosis induced by ischemic injury. The results of isotopic scintiscan and western blot assays showed that, the glucose uptake rate was significantly increased and nuclear factor kappaB expression was significantly decreased after adenovirus-mediated transfection of ischemic PC12 cells with glucose transporter 3. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated transfection of cells with glucose transporter 3 elevates the energy metabolism of PC12 cells with ischemic injury, and inhibits cell apoptosis.

  5. What causes frictional behavior in fluid-mediated sediment transport?

    Pähtz, Thomas; Duran, Orencio

    2016-04-01

    Bagnoldian analytical models of sediment transport in Newtonian fluid (e.g., air or water) are based on Bagnold's assumption of a constant friction coefficient (particle-shear-pressure ratio, μ) at the interface (z = zb) between sediment bed and transport layer. In fact, this assumption is the main reason why these models predict the sediment load (which is the ratio between sediment transport rate and average particle velocity) to be proportional to the excess shear stress (τ ‑ τt), a scaling that has been confirmed in many wind-tunnel and flume experiments. Here, using numerical simulations with the coupled DEM/RANS model of sediment transport in Newtonian fluid by Duran et al. (POF, 103306, 2012), we investigate the physical reasons for this frictional behavior. In the case of subaqueous transport, we find that a local rheology μ(I), where I is the viscous number, can explain most of the simulation data. However, this rheology breaks down for aeolian transport. In an attempt to unify these transport regimes, we propose a novel characterization of frictional behavior through the dimensionless parameter ζ = ⟨Fxcvx ‑ Fzcvz⟩/⟨Fzcvx ‑ Fxcvz⟩, where Fc is the contact force, v the particle velocity, and ⟨ṡ⟩ a local ensemble average. We analytically derive ζ ≈√3 ‑ 1 for locations within the transport layer and slightly within the particle bed, where each derivation step and the final result are consistent with our numerical simulations throughout all simulated conditions. Our derivation is mainly based on the assumption that the conversion of horizontal kinetic particle energy into vertical kinetic particle energy in low-angle particle-bed impacts is the predominant collisional energy transformation process occurring in sediment transport. We then show that ζ(zs) ≈ μ(zs), where zs is the location at which the local production rate of particle fluctuation energy is maximal, and thus μ(zs) ≈√3- ‑ 1. This final result, which

  6. Donor-acceptor electron transport mediated by solitons.

    Brizhik, L.; Piette, B. M. A. G.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2014-01-01

    We study the long-range electron and energy transfer mediated by solitons in a quasi-one-dimensional molecular chain (conjugated polymer, alpha-helical macromolecule, etc.) weakly bound to a donor and an acceptor. We show that for certain sets of parameter values in such systems an electron, initially located at the donor molecule, can tunnel to the molecular chain, where it becomes self-trapped in a soliton state, and propagates to the opposite end of the chain practically without energy dis...

  7. DNA-mediated charge transport for DNA repair

    Boon, Elizabeth M; Livingston, Alison L.; Chmiel, Nikolas H.; David, Sheila S.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2003-01-01

    MutY, like many DNA base excision repair enzymes, contains a [4Fe4S](2+) cluster of undetermined function. Electrochemical studies of MutY bound to a DNA-modified gold electrode demonstrate that the [4Fe4S] cluster of MutY can be accessed in a DNA-mediated redox reaction. Although not detectable without DNA, the redox potential of DNA-bound MutY is approximate to275 mV versus NHE, which is characteristic of HiPiP iron proteins. Binding to DNA is thus associated with a change in [4Fe4S](3+/2+)...

  8. Bidirectionality From Cargo Thermal Fluctuations in Motor-Mediated Transport

    Miles, Christopher E

    2016-01-01

    Molecular motor proteins serve as an essential component of intracellular transport by generating forces to haul cargoes along cytoskeletal filaments. In some circumstances, two species of motors that are directed oppositely (e.g. kinesin, dynein) can be attached to the same cargo. The resulting net motion is known to be bidirectional, but the mechanism of switching remains unclear. In this work, we propose a mean-field mathematical model of the mechanical interactions of two populations of molecular motors with diffusion of the cargo (thermal fluctuations) as the fundamental noise source. By studying a simplified model, the delayed response of motors to rapid fluctuations in the cargo is quantified, allowing for the reduction of the full model to two "characteristic positions" of each of the motor populations. The system is then found to be "metastable", switching between two distinct directional transport states, or bidirectional motion. The time to switch between these states is then investigated using WKB...

  9. Specific Osmolyte Transporters Mediate Bile Tolerance in Listeria monocytogenes▿

    Watson, Debbie; Sleator, Roy D.; Casey, Pat G.; Hill, Colin; Gahan, Cormac G. M.

    2009-01-01

    The food-borne pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes has the potential to adapt to an array of suboptimal growth environments encountered within the host. The pathogen is relatively bile tolerant and has the capacity to survive and grow within both the small intestine and the gallbladder in murine models of oral infection. We have previously demonstrated a role for the principal carnitine transport system of L. monocytogenes (OpuC) in gastrointestinal survival of the pathogen (R. Sleato...

  10. Charge-transport-mediated recruitment of DNA repair enzymes

    Fok, Pak-Wing; Guo, Chin-Lin; Chou, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Damaged or mismatched bases in DNA can be repaired by base excision repair enzymes (BER) that replace the defective base. Although the detailed molecular structures of many BER enzymes are known, how they colocalize to lesions remains unclear. One hypothesis involves charge transport (CT) along DNA [Yavin et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102, 3546 (2005)]. In this CT mechanism, electrons are released by recently adsorbed BER enzymes and travel along the DNA. The electrons can scatter (by...

  11. Ion transport mediated by copolymers composed of polyoxyethylene and polyoxypropylene

    Block copolymers composed of polyoxyethylene and polyoxypropylene were found to increase the influx of Na+ and the efflux of K+ from human erythrocytes. They were, however, ineffective at promoting the transport of 45Ca2+. The size of the ion fluxes induced by the copolymers correlated with their efficacy in stimulating inflammation. These compounds were also found to induce conductance increases in planar lipid bilayers in a nonvoltage dependent and nonstepwise manner. In both experimental systems, ion transport was facilitated only under temperature and ionic-strength conditions in which the polymers form aggregates in aqueous solution. In neither system did the concentration dependence of transport activity exhibit a pronounced cooperativity. These observations are consistent with the view that aqueous monomers of these surface active agents partition into the membrane, where they facilitate the conductive movement of monovalent cations by means of a carrier type mechanism. As a novel class of ionophores, these substances are of practical interest because they can be water soluble and are potentially reversible

  12. Wave mediated angular momentum transport in astrophysical boundary layers

    Hertfelder, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Context. Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized stars leads to the formation of a boundary layer (BL) where the gas loses its excess kinetic energy and settles onto the star. There are still many open questions concerning the BL, for instance the transport of angular momentum (AM) or the vertical structure. Aims. It is the aim of this work to investigate the AM transport in the BL where the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is not operating owing to the increasing angular velocity $\\Omega(r)$ with radius. We will therefore search for an appropriate mechanism and examine its efficiency and implications. Methods. We perform 2D numerical hydrodynamical simulations in a cylindrical coordinate system $(r, \\varphi)$ for a thin, vertically inte- grated accretion disk around a young star. We employ a realistic equation of state and include both cooling from the disk surfaces and radiation transport in radial and azimuthal direction. The viscosity in the disk is treated by the {\\alpha}-model; in the BL there is no v...

  13. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D–mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as a novel in vivo PKD substrate. Phosphorylation on serine 132 by PKD decreases the affinity of CERT toward its lipid target phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate at Golgi membranes and reduces ceramide transfer activity, identifying PKD as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. We also show that CERT, in turn, is critical for PKD activation and PKD-dependent protein cargo transport to the plasma membrane. Thus, the interdependence of PKD and CERT is key to the maintenance of Golgi membrane integrity and secretory transport. PMID:17591919

  14. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D-mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein.

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A

    2007-07-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as a novel in vivo PKD substrate. Phosphorylation on serine 132 by PKD decreases the affinity of CERT toward its lipid target phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate at Golgi membranes and reduces ceramide transfer activity, identifying PKD as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. We also show that CERT, in turn, is critical for PKD activation and PKD-dependent protein cargo transport to the plasma membrane. Thus, the interdependence of PKD and CERT is key to the maintenance of Golgi membrane integrity and secretory transport. PMID:17591919

  15. The homodimeric ATP-binding cassette transporter LmrA mediates multidrug transport by an alternating two-site (two-cylinder engine) mechanism

    van Veen, HW; Margolles, A; Muller, M; Higgins, CF; Konings, WN

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial LmrA protein and the mammalian multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein are closely related ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that confer multidrug resistance on cells by mediating the extrusion of drugs at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. The mechanisms by which transport is mediated,

  16. Norepinephrine transport-mediated gene expression in noradrenergic neurogenesis

    Sieber-Blum Maya

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have identified a differential gene expression profile in neural crest stem cells that is due to deletion of the norepinephrine transporter (NET gene. NET is the target of psychotropic substances, such as tricyclic antidepressants and the drug of abuse, cocaine. NET mutations have been implicated in depression, anxiety, orthostatic intolerance and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. NET function in adult noradrenergic neurons of the peripheral and central nervous systems is to internalize norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. By contrast, during embryogenesis norepinephrine (NE transport promotes differentiation of neural crest stem cells and locus ceruleus progenitors into noradrenergic neurons, whereas NET inhibitors block noradrenergic differentiation. While the structure of NET und the regulation of NET function are well described, little is known about downstream target genes of norepinephrine (NE transport. Results We have prepared gene expression profiles of in vitro differentiating wild type and norepinephrine transporter-deficient (NETKO mouse neural crest cells using long serial analysis of gene expression (LongSAGE. Comparison analyses have identified a number of important differentially expressed genes, including genes relevant to neural crest formation, noradrenergic neuron differentiation and the phenotype of NETKO mice. Examples of differentially expressed genes that affect noradrenergic cell differentiation include genes in the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signaling pathway, the Phox2b binding partner Tlx2, the ubiquitin ligase Praja2, and the inhibitor of Notch signaling, Numbl. Differentially expressed genes that are likely to contribute to the NETKO phenotype include dopamine-β-hydroxylase (Dbh, tyrosine hydroxylase (Th, the peptide transmitter 'cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript' (Cart, and the serotonin receptor subunit Htr3a. Real-time PCR confirmed differential expression

  17. Rapid elevation of sodium transport through insulin is mediated by AKT in alveolar cells

    Mattes, Charlott; Laube, Mandy; Thome, Ulrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Alveolar fluid clearance is driven by vectorial Na+ transport and promotes postnatal lung adaptation. The effect of insulin on alveolar epithelial Na+ transport was studied in isolated alveolar cells from 18–19‐day gestational age rat fetuses. Equivalent short‐circuit currents (I SC) were measured in Ussing chambers and different kinase inhibitors were used to determine the pathway of insulin stimulation. In Western Blot measurements the activation of mediators stimulated by insulin ...

  18. Rapid elevation of sodium transport through insulin is mediated by AKT in alveolar cells

    Mattes, Charlott; Thome, Ulrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar fluid clearance is driven by vectorial Na+ transport and promotes postnatal lung adaptation. The effect of insulin on alveolar epithelial Na+ transport was studied in isolated alveolar cells from 18–19-day gestational age rat fetuses. Equivalent short-circuit currents (ISC) were measured in Ussing chambers and different kinase inhibitors were used to determine the pathway of insulin stimulation. In Western Blot measurements the activation of mediators stimulated by ...

  19. Requirement of nucleotide exchange factor for Ypt1 GTPase mediated protein transport

    1995-01-01

    Small GTPases of the rab family are involved in the regulation of vesicular transport. It is believed that cycling between the GTP- and GDP-bound forms, and accessory factors regulating this cycling are crucial for rab function. However, an essential role for rab nucleotide exchange factors has not yet been demonstrated. In this report we show the requirement of nucleotide exchange factor activity for Ypt1 GTPase mediated protein transport. The Ypt1 protein, a member of the rab family, plays ...

  20. GLTP Mediated Non-Vesicular GM1 Transport between Native Membranes

    Lauria, Ines; van Üüm, Jan; Mjumjunov-Crncevic, Esmina; Walrafen, David; Spitta, Luis; Thiele, Christoph; Lang, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are emerging as key players in lipid homeostasis by mediating non-vesicular transport steps between two membrane surfaces. Little is known about the driving force that governs the direction of transport in cells. Using the soluble LTP glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP), we examined GM1 (monosialotetrahexosyl-ganglioside) transfer to native membrane surfaces. With artificial GM1 donor liposomes, GLTP can be used to increase glycolipid levels over natural levels i...

  1. The fluctuation energy balance in non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport

    Pähtz, Thomas; Duran, Orancio; Ho, Tuan-Duc; Valance, Alexandre; Kok, Jasper F.

    2015-01-01

    International audience Here, we compare two extreme regimes of non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport, transport in light and heavy fluids (“saltation” and “bedload,” respectively), regarding their particle fluctuation energy balance. From direct numerical simulations, we surprisingly find that the ratio between collisional and fluid drag dissipation of fluctuation energy is significantly larger in saltation than in bedload, even though the contribution of interparticle collisions...

  2. Carrier-mediated transport of riboflavin in Ashbya gossypii.

    Förster, C; Revuelta, J L; Krämer, R

    2001-01-01

    The filamentous hemiascomycete Ashbya gossypii is used for industrial riboflavin production. We examined riboflavin uptake and excretion at the plasma membrane using riboflavin auxotrophic and overproducing mutants. The riboflavin uptake system had low activity [Vmax = 20 +/- 4 nmol min(-1) g(-1) mycelial dry weight (dw)] and high affinity (KM = 40 +/- 12 microM). Inhibitor studies with the analogs FMN and FAD revealed high specificity of the uptake system. Excretion of riboflavin was not the consequence of non-specific permeability of the plasma membrane. Excretion rates in the mid-production phase were determined to be 2.5 nmol min(-1) g(-1) dw for wild-type cells and 66.7 nmol min(-1) g(-1) dw for an overproducing mutant, respectively. Inhibition of the reverse reaction, riboflavin uptake, led to an increase in apparent riboflavin efflux in the early production phase, indicating the presence of a separate excretion carrier. Riboflavin accumulation in A. gossypii vacuoles leading to product retention was found to be a secondary transport process. To address the question of whether a flux from the vacuoles back into the cytoplasm is present, we characterized efflux in hyphae in which the plasma membrane was permeabilized with digitonin. Efflux kinetics across the vacuolar membrane were unaffected by the lack of vacuolar H+ATPase activity and ATP, suggesting a passive mechanism. Based on the characterization of riboflavin transport processes in this study, the design of new production strains with improved riboflavin excretion may be possible. PMID:11234964

  3. Geometric phase mediated topological transport of sound vortices

    Wang, Shubo; Chan, C T

    2016-01-01

    When a physical system undergoes a cyclic evolution, a non-integrable phase can arise in addition to the normal dynamical phase. This phase, depending only on the geometry of the path traversed in the parameter space and hence named geometric phase, has profound impact in both classical and quantum physics, leading to exotic phenomena such as electron weak anti-localization and light spin-Hall effect. Experimental observations of the geometric phase effect in classical system are typically realized using vector waves such as light characterized by a polarization. We show here that such an effect can also be realized in scalar wave systems such as sound wave. Using a helical hollow waveguide, we show that the geometric phase effect associated with the transportation of sound vortices, i.e. sound wave carrying intrinsic orbital angular momentum, can serve as a potential mechanism to control the flow of sound vortices with different topological charges, resulting in geometric phase-based sound vortex filters.

  4. Carrier-mediated system for transport of biotin in rat intestine in vitro

    Transport of biotin was examined in rat intestine using the everted sac technique. Transport of 0.1 μM biotin was linear with time for at least 30 min of incubation and occurred at a rate 3.7 pmol g initial tissue wet wt-1 min-1. Transport of biotin was higher in the jejunum than the ileum and was minimum in the colon (85 +/- 6, 36 +/- 6, and 2.8 +/- 0.6 pmol x g initial tissue wet wt-1 x 25 min-1, respectively). In the jejunum, transport of biotin was saturable at low concentrations but linear at higher concentrations. The transport of low concentrations of biotin was 1) inhibited by structural analogues (desthiobiotin, biotin methyl ester, diaminobiotin, and biocytin), 2) Na+ dependent, 3) energy dependent, 4) temperature dependent, and 5) proceeded against a concentration gradient in the serosal compartment. No metabolic alteration occurs to the biotin molecule during transport. This study demonstrates that biotin transport in rat intestine occurs by a carrier-mediated process at low concentrations and by simple diffusion at high concentrations. Furthermore, the carrier-mediated process is Na+, energy, and temperature dependent

  5. Surface trap mediated electronic transport in biofunctionalized silicon nanowires

    Puppo, F.; Traversa, F. L.; Di Ventra, M.; De Micheli, G.; Carrara, S.

    2016-08-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs), fabricated via a top-down approach and then functionalized with biological probes, are used for electrically-based sensing of breast tumor markers. The SiNWs, featuring memristive-like behavior in bare conditions, show, in the presence of biomarkers, modified hysteresis and, more importantly, a voltage memory component, namely a voltage gap. The voltage gap is demonstrated to be a novel and powerful parameter of detection thanks to its high-resolution dependence on charges in proximity of the wire. This unique approach of sensing has never been studied and adopted before. Here, we propose a physical model of the surface electronic transport in Schottky barrier SiNW biosensors, aiming at reproducing and understanding the voltage gap based behavior. The implemented model describes well the experimental I–V characteristics of the device. It also links the modification of the voltage gap to the changing concentration of antigens by showing the decrease of this parameter in response to increasing concentrations of the molecules that are detected with femtomolar resolution in real human samples. Both experiments and simulations highlight the predominant role of the dynamic recombination of the nanowire surface states, with the incoming external charges from bio-species, in the appearance and modification of the voltage gap. Finally, thanks to its compactness, and strict correlation with the physics of the nanodevice, this model can be used to describe and predict the I–V characteristics in other nanostructured devices, for different than antibody-based sensing as well as electronic applications.

  6. The fluctuation energy balance in non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport

    Pähtz, Thomas; Ho, Tuan-Duc; Valance, Alexandre; Kok, Jasper F

    2015-01-01

    Here we compare two extreme regimes of non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport, transport in light and heavy fluids ("saltation" and "bedload", respectively), regarding their particle fluctuation energy balance. From direct numerical simulations, we surprisingly find that the ratio between collisional and fluid drag dissipation of fluctuation energy is significantly larger in saltation than in bedload, even though the contribution of interparticle collisions to transport of momentum and energy is much smaller in saltation due to the low concentration of particles in the transport layer. We conclude that the much higher frequency of high-energy particle-bed impacts ("splash") in saltation is the cause for this counter-intuitive behavior. Moreover, from a comparison of these simulations to Particle Tracking Velocimetry measurements which we performed in a wind tunnel under steady transport of fine and coarse sand, we find that turbulent fluctuations of the flow produce particle fluctuation energy at an ...

  7. Evolution of the Cp-Actin-based Motility System of Chloroplasts in Green Plants.

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    During the course of green plant evolution, numerous light responses have arisen that optimize their growth under fluctuating light conditions. The blue light receptor phototropin mediates several photomovement responses at the tissue, cellular and organelle levels. Chloroplast photorelocation movement is one such photomovement response, and is found not only in most green plants, but also in some red algae and photosynthetic stramenopiles. In general, chloroplasts move toward weak light to maximally capture photosynthetically active radiation (the chloroplast accumulation response), and they move away from strong light to avoid photodamage (the avoidance response). In land plants, chloroplast movement is dependent on specialized actin filaments, chloroplast-actin filaments (cp-actin filaments). Through molecular genetic analysis using Arabidopsis thaliana, many molecular factors that regulate chloroplast photorelocation were identified. In this Perspective, we discuss the evolutionary history of the molecular mechanism for chloroplast photorelocation movement in green plants in view of cp-actin filaments. PMID:27200035

  8. TWISTED DWARF1 Mediates the Action of Auxin Transport Inhibitors on Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics.

    Zhu, Jinsheng; Bailly, Aurelien; Zwiewka, Marta; Sovero, Valpuri; Di Donato, Martin; Ge, Pei; Oehri, Jacqueline; Aryal, Bibek; Hao, Pengchao; Linnert, Miriam; Burgardt, Noelia Inés; Lücke, Christian; Weiwad, Matthias; Michel, Max; Weiergräber, Oliver H; Pollmann, Stephan; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Ferro, Noel; Fukao, Yoichiro; Hoffmann, Céline; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Friml, Jiří; Thomas, Clément; Geisler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Plant growth and architecture is regulated by the polar distribution of the hormone auxin. Polarity and flexibility of this process is provided by constant cycling of auxin transporter vesicles along actin filaments, coordinated by a positive auxin-actin feedback loop. Both polar auxin transport and vesicle cycling are inhibited by synthetic auxin transport inhibitors, such as 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), counteracting the effect of auxin; however, underlying targets and mechanisms are unclear. Using NMR, we map the NPA binding surface on the Arabidopsis thaliana ABCB chaperone TWISTED DWARF1 (TWD1). We identify ACTIN7 as a relevant, although likely indirect, TWD1 interactor, and show TWD1-dependent regulation of actin filament organization and dynamics and that TWD1 is required for NPA-mediated actin cytoskeleton remodeling. The TWD1-ACTIN7 axis controls plasma membrane presence of efflux transporters, and as a consequence act7 and twd1 share developmental and physiological phenotypes indicative of defects in auxin transport. These can be phenocopied by NPA treatment or by chemical actin (de)stabilization. We provide evidence that TWD1 determines downstream locations of auxin efflux transporters by adjusting actin filament debundling and dynamizing processes and mediating NPA action on the latter. This function appears to be evolutionary conserved since TWD1 expression in budding yeast alters actin polarization and cell polarity and provides NPA sensitivity. PMID:27053424

  9. Involvement of Multiple Transporters-mediated Transports in Mizoribine and Methotrexate Pharmacokinetics

    Teruo Murakami

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mizoribine is administered orally and excreted into urine without being metabolized. Many research groups have reported a linear relationship between the dose and peak serum concentration, between the dose and AUC, and between AUC and cumulative urinary excretion of mizoribine. In contrast, a significant interindividual variability, with a small intraindividual variability, in oral bioavailability of mizoribine is also reported. The interindividual variability is mostly considered to be due to the polymophisms of transporter genes. Methotrexate (MTX is administered orally and/or by parenteral routes, depending on the dose. Metabolic enzymes and multiple transporters are involved in the pharmacokinetics of MTX. The oral bioavailability of MTX exhibits a marked interindividual variability and saturation with increase in the dose of MTX, with a small intraindividual variability, where the contribution of gene polymophisms of transporters and enzymes is suggested. Therapeutic drug monitoring of both mizoribine and MTX is expected to improve their clinical efficacy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. COPI-mediated retrograde trafficking from the Golgi to the ER regulates EGFR nuclear transport

    Wang, Ying-Nai; Wang, Hongmei; Yamaguchi, Hirohito [Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Lee, Hong-Jen; Lee, Heng-Huan [Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Hung, Mien-Chie, E-mail: mhung@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Center for Molecular Medicine and Graduate Institute of Cancer Biology, China Medical University and Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan (China)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} ARF1 activation is involved in the EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. {yields} Assembly of {gamma}-COP coatomer mediates EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. {yields} Golgi-to-ER retrograde trafficking regulates nuclear transport of EGFR. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates that cell surface receptors, such as the entire epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, have been shown to localize in the nucleus. A retrograde route from the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is postulated to be involved in the EGFR trafficking to the nucleus; however, the molecular mechanism in this proposed model remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that membrane-embedded vesicular trafficking is involved in the nuclear transport of EGFR. Confocal immunofluorescence reveals that in response to EGF, a portion of EGFR redistributes to the Golgi and the ER, where its NH{sub 2}-terminus resides within the lumen of Golgi/ER and COOH-terminus is exposed to the cytoplasm. Blockage of the Golgi-to-ER retrograde trafficking by brefeldin A or dominant mutants of the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor, which both resulted in the disassembly of the coat protein complex I (COPI) coat to the Golgi, inhibit EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. We further find that EGF-dependent nuclear transport of EGFR is regulated by retrograde trafficking from the Golgi to the ER involving an association of EGFR with {gamma}-COP, one of the subunits of the COPI coatomer. Our findings experimentally provide a comprehensive pathway that nuclear transport of EGFR is regulated by COPI-mediated vesicular trafficking from the Golgi to the ER, and may serve as a general mechanism in regulating the nuclear transport of other cell surface receptors.

  11. The role of zinc ions in reverse transport mediated by monoamine transporters

    Scholze, Petra; Nørregaard, Lene; Singer, Ernst A;

    2002-01-01

    The human dopamine transporter (hDAT) contains an endogenous high affinity Zn2+ binding site with three coordinating residues on its extracellular face (His193, His375, and Glu396). Upon binding to this site, Zn2+ causes inhibition of [3H]1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ([3H]MPP+) uptake. We investig...

  12. Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated cell death via impairing electron transport chain complex III

    Highlights: •Heptachlor inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. •Heptachlor promoted generation of reactive oxygen species. •Heptachlor induced Bax activation. •Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. -- Abstract: Environmental toxins like pesticides have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Epidemiological studies suggested that exposures to organochlorine pesticides have an association with an increased PD risk. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of toxicity induced by an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor. In a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, heptachlor induced both morphological and functional damages in mitochondria. Interestingly, the compound inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. Rapid generation of reactive oxygen species and the activation of Bax were then detected. Subsequently, mitochondria-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis followed. Our results raise a possibility that an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor can act as a neurotoxicant associated with PD

  13. Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated cell death via impairing electron transport chain complex III

    Hong, Seokheon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Hwang, Joohyun [Department of Molecular Biology, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Ki Soon [Department of Biology, Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shin Jung, E-mail: sjkang@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Biology, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Heptachlor inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. •Heptachlor promoted generation of reactive oxygen species. •Heptachlor induced Bax activation. •Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. -- Abstract: Environmental toxins like pesticides have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Epidemiological studies suggested that exposures to organochlorine pesticides have an association with an increased PD risk. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of toxicity induced by an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor. In a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, heptachlor induced both morphological and functional damages in mitochondria. Interestingly, the compound inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. Rapid generation of reactive oxygen species and the activation of Bax were then detected. Subsequently, mitochondria-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis followed. Our results raise a possibility that an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor can act as a neurotoxicant associated with PD.

  14. Modified Electrodes for Amperometric Determination of Glucose and Glutamate Using Mediated Electron Transport

    Harper, Alice C

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of this research was to develop an easy to prepare and sensitive biosensor that would be able to detect glutamate in solution using ionic self-assembly methods. This was accomplished by preparing an ionically-self-assembled monolayer that included an electron transport mediator and an enzyme that would generate a current proportional to the concentration of analytes in solution. Biosensors were produced for the detection of glucose and glutamate. Ferrocene poly(allylamine)...

  15. State issues in radioactive waste transportation and applicable conflict mediation techniques

    Shipments of spent fuel will increase significantly with the completion of the high-level waste repository. Potential transit states are anxious to learn of the Department of Energy's plans for routing shipments, designing casks for safe transport and providing assistance for infrastructure improvements and emergency response training. Conflicts are expected to arise between the Department and the transit states and mediation techniques could be a valuable tool in resolving these disputes

  16. Solution, surface, and single molecule platforms for the study of DNA-mediated charge transport

    Muren, Natalie B.; Olmon, Eric D.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2012-01-01

    The structural core of DNA, a continuous stack of aromatic heterocycles, the base pairs, which extends down the helical axis, gives rise to the fascinating electronic properties of this molecule that is so critical for life. Our laboratory and others have developed diverse experimental platforms to investigate the capacity of DNA to conduct charge, termed DNA-mediated charge transport (DNA CT). Here, we present an overview of DNA CT experiments in solution, on surfaces, and with single molecu...

  17. A Multiplexed, Two-Electrode Platform for Biosensing based on DNA-Mediated Charge Transport

    Furst, Ariel L.; Hill, Michael G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a thin layer, multiplexed biosensing platform that features two working-electrode arrays for detecting small molecules, nucleic acid sequences, and DNA-binding proteins. DNA duplexes are patterned onto the primary electrode array, while a secondary electrode array is used both to initiate DNA monolayer formation and for electrochemical readout via DNA-mediated charge transport (DNA CT) chemistry. Electrochemical reduction of Cu(phendione)_2^(2+) (phendione is 1,10-phenanthro...

  18. Low levels of graphene and graphene oxide inhibit cellular xenobiotic defense system mediated by efflux transporters.

    Liu, Su; Jiang, Wei; Wu, Bing; Yu, Jing; Yu, Haiyan; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Cherr, Gary N

    2016-06-01

    Low levels of graphene and graphene oxide (GO) are considered to be environmentally safe. In this study, we analyzed the potential effects of graphene and GO at relatively low concentrations on cellular xenobiotic defense system mediated by efflux transporters. The results showed that graphene (<0.5 μg/mL) and GO (<20 μg/mL) did not decrease cell viability, generate reactive oxygen species, or disrupt mitochondrial function. However, graphene and GO at the nontoxic concentrations could increase calcein-AM (CAM, an indicator of membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter) activity) accumulation, indicating inhibition of ABC transporters' efflux capabilities. This inhibition was observed even at 0.005 μg/mL graphene and 0.05 μg/mL GO, which are 100 times and 400 times lower than their lowest toxic concentration from cytotoxicity experiments, respectively. The inhibition of ABC transporters significantly increased the toxicity of paraquat and arsenic, known substrates of ABC transporters. The inhibition of ABC transporters was found to be based on graphene and GO damaging the plasma membrane structure and fluidity, thus altering functions of transmembrane ABC transporters. This study demonstrates that low levels of graphene and GO are not environmentally safe since they can significantly make cell more susceptible to other xenobiotics, and this chemosensitizing activity should be considered in the risk assessment of graphene and GO. PMID:26554512

  19. Effect of COPD treatments on MRP1-mediated transport in bronchial epithelial cells

    Margaretha van der Deen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Margaretha van der Deen1, Sandra Homan1, Hetty Timmer-Bosscha1, Rik J Scheper2, Wim Timens3, Dirkje S Postma4, Elisabeth G de Vries1Departments of 1Medical Oncology, 3Pathology, 4Pulmonary Diseases, University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, The Netherlands; 2Department of Pathology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsBackground: Smoking is the principle risk factor for development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1 is known to protect against toxic compounds and oxidative stress, and might play a role in protection against smoke-induced disease progression. We questioned whether MRP1-mediated transport is influenced by pulmonary drugs that are commonly prescribed in COPD.Methods: The immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE14o- was used to analyze direct in vitro effects of budesonide, formoterol, ipratropium bromide and N-acetylcysteine (NAC on MRP1-mediated transport. Carboxyfluorescein (CF was used as a model MRP1 substrate and was measured with functional flow cytometry.Results: Formoterol had a minor effect, whereas budesonide concentration-dependently decreased CF transport by MRP1. Remarkably, addition of formoterol to the highest concentration of budesonide increased CF transport. Ipratropium bromide inhibited CF transport at low concentrations and tended to increase CF transport at higher levels. NAC increased CF transport by MRP1 in a concentration-dependent manner.Conclusions: Our data suggest that, besides their positive effects on respiratory symptoms, budesonide, formoterol, ipratropium bromide, and NAC modulate MRP1 activity in bronchial epithelial cells. Further studies are required to assess whether stimulation of MRP1 activity is beneficial for long-term treatment of COPD.Keywords: bronchus epithelium, COPD, drugs, MRP1, multidrug resistance, oxidative stress

  20. Kinetic Isotope Effect on Transport Mediated by Clc-Type H+/CL- Exchangers

    Picollo, Alessandra; Malvezzi, Mattia; Accardi, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    CLC transporters mediate the stoichiometric exchange of 2 Cl- ions for 1 H+ across the membranes of cellular compartments, mostly endosomes and lysosomes. Despite intense biophysical, structural and electrophysiological scrutiny the H+ transfer mechanism of these exchangers remains largely unknown. Previous work showed that two conserved Glutamates define the extremities of the H+ pathway in CLC exchangers. However, we don't know whether H+ transfer between these residues takes place along a series of protonatable moieties, via a Grotthuss mechanism and by diffusion of an H3+O cation and if at any step H+ tunneling plays a role. To differentiate between these possible mechanisms we measured the deuterium kinetic isotope effect on the transport rate of CLC-ec1 and CLC-5, respectively a prokaryotic and a eukaryotic CLC exchanger. We found that transport mediated by both proteins is slowed by ˜20-40% when H2O is replaced by D2O. This result suggests that the rate limiting step for H+ transport takes place along a hydrogen-bonded pathway, possibly formed by water molecules. However, we found that the voltage dependence of CLC-5 inhibition by extracellular H+ is eliminated by this substitution. This suggests that the voltage dependence of this process arises from a mechanism that is exquisitely sensitive to particle mass such as proton tunneling.

  1. Reactive Transport Modeling of Microbe-mediated Fe (II) Oxidation for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Surasani, V.; Li, L.

    2011-12-01

    Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) aims to improve the recovery of entrapped heavy oil in depleted reservoirs using microbe-based technology. Reservoir ecosystems often contain diverse microbial communities those can interact with subsurface fluids and minerals through a network of nutrients and energy fluxes. Microbe-mediated reactions products include gases, biosurfactants, biopolymers those can alter the properties of oil and interfacial interactions between oil, brine, and rocks. In addition, the produced biomass and mineral precipitates can change the reservoir permeability profile and increase sweeping efficiency. Under subsurface conditions, the injection of nitrate and Fe (II) as the electron acceptor and donor allows bacteria to grow. The reaction products include minerals such as Fe(OH)3 and nitrogen containing gases. These reaction products can have large impact on oil and reservoir properties and can enhance the recovery of trapped oil. This work aims to understand the Fe(II) oxidation by nitrate under conditions relevant to MEOR. Reactive transport modeling is used to simulate the fluid flow, transport, and reactions involved in this process. Here we developed a complex reactive network for microbial mediated nitrate-dependent Fe (II) oxidation that involves both thermodynamic controlled aqueous reactions and kinetic controlled Fe (II) mineral reaction. Reactive transport modeling is used to understand and quantify the coupling between flow, transport, and reaction processes. Our results identify key parameter controls those are important for the alteration of permeability profile under field conditions.

  2. GLTP mediated non-vesicular GM1 transport between native membranes.

    Ines Lauria

    Full Text Available Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs are emerging as key players in lipid homeostasis by mediating non-vesicular transport steps between two membrane surfaces. Little is known about the driving force that governs the direction of transport in cells. Using the soluble LTP glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP, we examined GM1 (monosialotetrahexosyl-ganglioside transfer to native membrane surfaces. With artificial GM1 donor liposomes, GLTP can be used to increase glycolipid levels over natural levels in either side of the membrane leaflet, i.e., external or cytosolic. In a system with native donor- and acceptor-membranes, we find that GLTP balances highly variable GM1 concentrations in a population of membranes from one cell type, and in addition, transfers lipids between membranes from different cell types. Glycolipid transport is highly efficient, independent of cofactors, solely driven by the chemical potential of GM1 and not discriminating between the extra- and intracellular membrane leaflet. We conclude that GLTP mediated non-vesicular lipid trafficking between native membranes is driven by simple thermodynamic principles and that for intracellular transport less than 1 µM GLTP would be required in the cytosol. Furthermore, the data demonstrates the suitability of GLTP as a tool for artificially increasing glycolipid levels in cellular membranes.

  3. GLTP mediated non-vesicular GM1 transport between native membranes.

    Lauria, Ines; van Üüm, Jan; Mjumjunov-Crncevic, Esmina; Walrafen, David; Spitta, Luis; Thiele, Christoph; Lang, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are emerging as key players in lipid homeostasis by mediating non-vesicular transport steps between two membrane surfaces. Little is known about the driving force that governs the direction of transport in cells. Using the soluble LTP glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP), we examined GM1 (monosialotetrahexosyl-ganglioside) transfer to native membrane surfaces. With artificial GM1 donor liposomes, GLTP can be used to increase glycolipid levels over natural levels in either side of the membrane leaflet, i.e., external or cytosolic. In a system with native donor- and acceptor-membranes, we find that GLTP balances highly variable GM1 concentrations in a population of membranes from one cell type, and in addition, transfers lipids between membranes from different cell types. Glycolipid transport is highly efficient, independent of cofactors, solely driven by the chemical potential of GM1 and not discriminating between the extra- and intracellular membrane leaflet. We conclude that GLTP mediated non-vesicular lipid trafficking between native membranes is driven by simple thermodynamic principles and that for intracellular transport less than 1 µM GLTP would be required in the cytosol. Furthermore, the data demonstrates the suitability of GLTP as a tool for artificially increasing glycolipid levels in cellular membranes. PMID:23555818

  4. Substrate-specific effects of pirinixic acid derivatives on ABCB1-mediated drug transport.

    Michaelis, Martin; Rothweiler, Florian; Wurglics, Mario; Aniceto, Natália; Dittrich, Michaela; Zettl, Heiko; Wiese, Michael; Wass, Mark; Ghafourian, Taravat; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2016-03-01

    Pirinixic acid derivatives, a new class of drug candidates for a range of diseases, interfere with targets including PPARα, PPARγ, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), and microsomal prostaglandin and E2 synthase-1 (mPGES1). Since 5-LO, mPGES1, PPARα, and PPARγ represent potential anti-cancer drug targets, we here investigated the effects of 39 pirinixic acid derivatives on prostate cancer (PC-3) and neuroblastoma (UKF-NB-3) cell viability and, subsequently, the effects of selected compounds on drug-resistant neuroblastoma cells. Few compounds affected cancer cell viability in low micromolar concentrations but there was no correlation between the anti-cancer effects and the effects on 5-LO, mPGES1, PPARα, or PPARγ. Most strikingly, pirinixic acid derivatives interfered with drug transport by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter ABCB1 in a drug-specific fashion. LP117, the compound that exerted the strongest effect on ABCB1, interfered in the investigated concentrations of up to 2μM with the ABCB1-mediated transport of vincristine, vinorelbine, actinomycin D, paclitaxel, and calcein-AM but not of doxorubicin, rhodamine 123, or JC-1. In silico docking studies identified differences in the interaction profiles of the investigated ABCB1 substrates with the known ABCB1 binding sites that may explain the substrate-specific effects of LP117. Thus, pirinixic acid derivatives may offer potential as drug-specific modulators of ABCB1-mediated drug transport. PMID:26887049

  5. Plasmon-Mediated Electron Transport in Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopic Junctions.

    Pal, Partha Pratim; Jiang, Nan; Sonntag, Matthew D; Chiang, Naihao; Foley, Edward T; Hersam, Mark C; Van Duyne, Richard P; Seideman, Tamar

    2015-11-01

    We combine experiment, theory, and first-principles-based calculations to study the light-induced plasmon-mediated electron transport characteristics of a molecular-scale junction. The experimental data show a nonlinear increase in electronic current perturbation when the focus of a chopped laser beam moves laterally toward the tip-sample junction. To understand this behavior and generalize it, we apply a combined theory of the electronic nonequilibrium formed upon decoherence of an optically triggered plasmon and first-principles transport calculations. Our model illustrates that the current via an adsorbed molecular monolayer increases nonlinearly as more energy is pumped into the junction due to the increasing availability of virtual molecular orbital channels for transport with higher injection energies. Our results thus illustrate light-triggered, plasmon-enhanced tunneling current in the presence of a molecular linker. PMID:26538036

  6. Sucrose nonfermenting AMPK-related kinase (SNARK) mediates contraction-stimulated glucose transport in mouse skeletal muscle

    Koh, Ho-Jin; Toyoda, Taro; Fujii, Nobuharu;

    2010-01-01

    The signaling mechanisms that mediate the important effects of contraction to increase glucose transport in skeletal muscle are not well understood, but are known to occur through an insulin-independent mechanism. Muscle-specific knockout of LKB1, an upstream kinase for AMPK and AMPK....... Whole-body SNARK heterozygotic knockout mice also had impaired contraction-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle, and knockdown of SNARK in C2C12 muscle cells impaired sorbitol-stimulated glucose transport. SNARK is activated by muscle contraction and is a unique mediator of contraction......-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle....

  7. The Heterodimeric ABC Transporter EfrCD Mediates Multidrug Efflux in Enterococcus faecalis.

    Hürlimann, Lea M; Corradi, Valentina; Hohl, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido V; Tieleman, D Peter; Seeger, Markus A

    2016-09-01

    Nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecalis are an emerging health problem. However, drug efflux pumps contributing to intrinsic drug resistance are poorly studied in this Gram-positive pathogen. In this study, we functionally investigated seven heterodimeric ABC transporters of E. faecalis that are annotated as drug efflux pumps. Deletion of ef0789-ef0790 on the chromosome of E. faecalis resulted in increased susceptibility to daunorubicin, doxorubicin, ethidium, and Hoechst 33342, and the corresponding transporter was named EfrCD. Unexpectedly, the previously described heterodimeric multidrug ABC transporter EfrAB contributes marginally to drug efflux in the endogenous context of E. faecalis In contrast, heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis revealed that EfrAB, EfrCD, and the product of ef2226-ef2227 (EfrEF) mediate the efflux of fluorescent substrates and confer resistance to multiple dyes and drugs, including fluoroquinolones. Four of seven transporters failed to exhibit drug efflux activity for the set of drugs and dyes tested, even upon overexpression in L. lactis Since all seven transporters were purified as heterodimers after overexpression in L. lactis, a lack of drug efflux activity is not attributed to poor expression or protein aggregation. Reconstitution of the purified multidrug transporters EfrAB, EfrCD, and EfrEF in proteoliposomes revealed functional coupling between ATP hydrolysis and drug binding. Our analysis creates an experimental basis for the accurate prediction of drug efflux transporters and indicates that many annotated multidrug efflux pumps might be incapable of drug transport and thus might fulfill other physiological functions in the cell. PMID:27381387

  8. Psychopathic traits mediate the association of serotonin transporter genotype and child externalizing behavior.

    Brammer, Whitney A; Jezior, Kristen L; Lee, Steve S

    2016-09-01

    Although the promoter polymorphism of the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) gene is associated with externalizing behavior, its mediating pathways are unknown. Given their sensitivity to serotonin neurotransmission and unique association with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), we tested callous-unemotional (CU) traits and narcissism as separate mediators of the association of 5-HTTLPR with ADHD and ODD. We evaluated 209 5-9 year-old children with and without ADHD at baseline; approximately 2 years later (i.e., Wave 2), parents and teachers separately rated ADHD and ODD symptoms and youth self-reported antisocial behavior. Controlling for race-ethnicity and baseline ADHD/ODD, narcissism uniquely mediated predictions of multi-informant rated Wave 2 ADHD and ODD from variation in 5-HTTLPR; CU traits mediated predictions of Wave 2 ADHD from variations in 5-HTTLPR, but did not mediate the associations of 5-HTTLPR with ODD or youth self-reported antisocial behavior. Specifically, the number of 5-HTTLPR long alleles positively predicted CU traits and narcissism; narcissism was positively associated with Wave 2 ADHD and ODD symptoms, whereas CU traits were positively associated with Wave 2 ADHD. Child sex also moderated indirect effects of CU traits and narcissism, such that narcissism mediated predictions of ADHD/ODD in girls but not boys. Psychopathic traits may represent a relevant pathway underlying predictions of prospective change in ADHD and ODD from 5-HTTLPR, particularly in girls. We consider the role of psychopathic traits as a potential intermediate phenotype in genetically sensitive studies of child psychopathology. Aggr. Behav. 42:455-470, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990675

  9. Metformin and cimetidine: Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling to investigate transporter mediated drug-drug interactions.

    Burt, H J; Neuhoff, S; Almond, L; Gaohua, L; Harwood, M D; Jamei, M; Rostami-Hodjegan, A; Tucker, G T; Rowland-Yeo, K

    2016-06-10

    Metformin is used as a probe for OCT2 mediated transport when investigating possible DDIs with new chemical entities. The aim of the current study was to investigate the ability of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to simulate the effects of OCT and MATE inhibition by cimetidine on metformin kinetics. PBPK models were developed, incorporating mechanistic kidney and liver sub-models for metformin (OCT and MATE substrate) and a mechanistic kidney sub-model for cimetidine. The models were used to simulate inhibition of the MATE1, MATE2-K, OCT1 and OCT2 mediated transport of metformin by cimetidine. Assuming competitive inhibition and using cimetidine Ki values determined in vitro, the predicted metformin AUC ratio was 1.0 compared to an observed value of 1.46. The observed AUC ratio could only be recovered with this model when the cimetidine Ki for OCT2 was decreased 1000-fold or the Ki's for both OCT1 and OCT2 were decreased 500-fold. An alternative description of metformin renal transport by OCT1 and OCT2, incorporating electrochemical modulation of the rate of metformin uptake together with 8-18-fold decreases in cimetidine Ki's for OCTs and MATEs, allowed recovery of the extent of the observed effect of cimetidine on metformin AUC. While the final PBPK model has limitations, it demonstrates the benefit of allowing for the complexities of passive permeability combined with active cellular uptake modulated by an electrochemical gradient and active efflux. PMID:27019345

  10. Organic anion transporter (Slc22a) family members as mediators of toxicity

    Exposure of the body to toxic organic anions is unavoidable and occurs from both intentional and unintentional sources. Many hormones, neurotransmitters, and waste products of cellular metabolism, or their metabolites, are organic anions. The same is true for a wide variety of medications, herbicides, pesticides, plant and animal toxins, and industrial chemicals and solvents. Rapid and efficient elimination of these substances is often the body's best defense for limiting both systemic exposure and the duration of their pharmacological or toxicological effects. For organic anions, active transepithelial transport across the renal proximal tubule followed by elimination via the urine is a major pathway in this detoxification process. Accordingly, a large number of organic anion transport proteins belonging to several different gene families have been identified and found to be expressed in the proximal nephron. The function of these transporters, in combination with the high volume of renal blood flow, predisposes the kidney to increased toxic susceptibility. Understanding how the kidney mediates the transport of organic anions is integral to achieving desired therapeutic outcomes in response to drug interactions and chemical exposures, to understanding the progression of some disease states, and to predicting the influence of genetic variation upon these processes. This review will focus on the organic anion transporter (OAT) family and discuss the known members, their mechanisms of action, subcellular localization, and current evidence implicating their function as a determinant of the toxicity of certain endogenous and xenobiotic agents

  11. The fluctuation energy balance in non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport

    Pähtz, Thomas, E-mail: 0012136@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Physical Oceanography, Ocean College, Zhejiang University, 310058 Hangzhou (China); State Key Laboratory of Satellite Ocean Environment Dynamics, Second Institute of Oceanography, 310012 Hangzhou (China); Durán, Orencio [MARUM-Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Ho, Tuan-Duc; Valance, Alexandre [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR UR1-CNRS 6251, Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Kok, Jasper F. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, 90095-1565 Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Here, we compare two extreme regimes of non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport, transport in light and heavy fluids (“saltation” and “bedload,” respectively), regarding their particle fluctuation energy balance. From direct numerical simulations, we surprisingly find that the ratio between collisional and fluid drag dissipation of fluctuation energy is significantly larger in saltation than in bedload, even though the contribution of interparticle collisions to transport of momentum and energy is much smaller in saltation due to the low concentration of particles in the transport layer. We conclude that the much higher frequency of high-energy particle-bed impacts (“splash”) in saltation is the cause for this counter-intuitive behavior. Moreover, from a comparison of these simulations to particle tracking velocimetry measurements which we performed in a wind tunnel under steady transport of fine and coarse sand, we find that turbulent fluctuations of the flow produce particle fluctuation energy at an unexpectedly high rate in saltation even under conditions for which the effects of turbulence are usually believed to be small.

  12. The fluctuation energy balance in non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport

    Here, we compare two extreme regimes of non-suspended fluid-mediated particle transport, transport in light and heavy fluids (“saltation” and “bedload,” respectively), regarding their particle fluctuation energy balance. From direct numerical simulations, we surprisingly find that the ratio between collisional and fluid drag dissipation of fluctuation energy is significantly larger in saltation than in bedload, even though the contribution of interparticle collisions to transport of momentum and energy is much smaller in saltation due to the low concentration of particles in the transport layer. We conclude that the much higher frequency of high-energy particle-bed impacts (“splash”) in saltation is the cause for this counter-intuitive behavior. Moreover, from a comparison of these simulations to particle tracking velocimetry measurements which we performed in a wind tunnel under steady transport of fine and coarse sand, we find that turbulent fluctuations of the flow produce particle fluctuation energy at an unexpectedly high rate in saltation even under conditions for which the effects of turbulence are usually believed to be small

  13. Endotoxin-Mediated Downregulation of Hepatic Drug Transporters in HIV-1 Transgenic Rats.

    Ghoneim, Ragia H; Piquette-Miller, Micheline

    2016-05-01

    Altered expression of drug transporters and metabolic enzymes is known to occur in infection-induced inflammation. We hypothesize that in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, further alteration could occur as a result of augmented inflammation. The HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rat is used to simulate HIV pathologies associated with the presence of HIV viral proteins. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the effect of endotoxin administration on the gene expression of drug transporters in the liver of HIV-Tg rats. Male and female HIV-Tg and wild-type (WT) littermates were injected with 5 mg/kg endotoxin or saline (n= 7-9/group). Eighteen hours later, rats were euthanized and tissues were collected. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to measure hepatic gene and protein expression, respectively, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure serum cytokine levels. Although an augmented inflammatory response was seen in HIV-Tg rats, similar endotoxin- mediated downregulation of Abcb1a, Abcc2, Abcg2, Abcb11, Slco1a1, Slco1a2, Slco1b2, Slc10a1, Slc22a1, Cyp3a2, and Cyp3a9 gene expression was seen in the HIV-Tg and WT groups. A significantly greater endotoxin- mediated downregulation of Ent1/Slc29a1 was seen in female HIV-Tg rats. Basal expression of inflammatory mediators was not altered in the HIV-Tg rat; likewise, the basal expression of most transporters was not significantly different between HIV-Tg and WT rats. Our findings suggest that hepatobiliary clearances of endogenous and exogenous substrates are altered in the HIV-Tg rat after endotoxin exposure. This is of particular importance because HIV-infected individuals frequently present with bacterial or viral infections, which are a potential source for drug-disease interactions. PMID:26977098

  14. School site walkability and active school transport - association, mediation and moderation

    Breum, Lars; Toftager, M.; Schipperijn, J.; Ersbøll, A.K.; Giles-Corti, B.; Troelsen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing active school transport (AST) can improve population health, but its association with the urban form is not fully clear. This study investigated the association of an objective school walkability index with AST and how this association is mediated by the perceived physical and social...... walkability index was significantly associated with AST (Medium vs. Low OR 2.68; High vs. Low OR 2.49). Adding the perceived physical and social environment variables improved the model prediction of AST, with no change in the association with the school walkability index. Furthermore, distance to school...

  15. Size dispersion and colloid mediated radionuclide transport in a synthetic porous media.

    Delos, A; Walther, C; Schäfer, T; Büchner, S

    2008-08-01

    Size dispersion effects during the migration of natural submicron bentonite colloids (ceramic column are observed for the first time by laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) at ppm (parts per million) mass concentration. Larger size fractions ( approximately 200 nm) arrive prior to smaller size fractions (plutonium(IV), colloid mediated transport of these radionuclides is studied. The peak arrival times of Pu-244 and Am-241, as measured by ICP-MS, match the bentonite colloid breakthrough and occur significantly prior to the conservative tracer (HTO) indicating the colloid-borne migration of tri- and tetravalent radionuclides. PMID:18514680

  16. Common Mitochondrial DNA Mutations Generated through DNA-Mediated Charge Transport

    Merino, Edward J.; Davis, Molly L.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2009-01-01

    Mutation sites that arise in human mitochondrial DNA as a result of oxidation by a rhodium photooxidant have been identified. HeLa cells were incubated with [Rh(phi)2bpy]Cl3 (phi is 9,10-phenanthrenequinone diimine), an intercalating photooxidant, to allow the complex to enter the cell and bind mitochondrial DNA. Photoexcitation of DNA-bound [Rh(phi)2bpy]3+ can promote the oxidation of guanine from a distance through DNA-mediated charge transport. After two rounds of photolysis and growth of ...

  17. Simulating kinetic parameters in transporter mediated permeability across Caco-2 cells. A case study on estrange-3-sulphate

    Rolsted, Kamilla; Rapin, Nicolas; Steffansen, Bente

    2011-01-01

    Substances that compete for the same saturable intestinal transporters may when dosed together lead to altered permeability and hence influence bioavailability. The aim was to simulate kinetic parameters, i.e. K(m) and J(max), for transporter mediated E(1)S permeability across Caco-2 cells by a c...

  18. 8-cyclopropyl-2'-deoxyguanosine: a hole trap for DNA-mediated charge transport.

    Wong, Jiun Ru; Shao, Fangwei

    2014-05-26

    DNA duplexes containing 8-cyclopropyl-2'-deoxyguanosine ((8CP) G) were synthesized to investigate the effect of the C8-modified deoxyguanosine as a kinetic trap for transient hole occupancy on guanines during DNA-mediated hole transport (HT). Thermal denaturation and CD spectra show that DNA duplexes containing (8CP) G are able to form stable B-form duplexes. Photoirradiation of terminal tethered anthraquinone can induce oxidative decomposition of (8CP) G through DNA HT along adenine tracts with lengths of up to 4.8 nm. Shallow and periodic distance dependence was observed in a long adenine tract with intervening guanines. The efficient charge transport indicates that (8CP) G can electronically couple well with a DNA bridge and form HT-active conformational domains to facilitate transient hole delocalization over an adenine tract. PMID:24764318

  19. ARCN1 Mutations Cause a Recognizable Craniofacial Syndrome Due to COPI-Mediated Transport Defects.

    Izumi, Kosuke; Brett, Maggie; Nishi, Eriko; Drunat, Séverine; Tan, Ee-Shien; Fujiki, Katsunori; Lebon, Sophie; Cham, Breana; Masuda, Koji; Arakawa, Michiko; Jacquinet, Adeline; Yamazumi, Yusuke; Chen, Shu-Ting; Verloes, Alain; Okada, Yuki; Katou, Yuki; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Akiyama, Tetsu; Gressens, Pierre; Foo, Roger; Passemard, Sandrine; Tan, Ene-Choo; El Ghouzzi, Vincent; Shirahige, Katsuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Cellular homeostasis is maintained by the highly organized cooperation of intracellular trafficking systems, including COPI, COPII, and clathrin complexes. COPI is a coatomer protein complex responsible for intracellular protein transport between the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. The importance of such intracellular transport mechanisms is underscored by the various disorders, including skeletal disorders such as cranio-lenticulo-sutural dysplasia and osteogenesis imperfect, caused by mutations in the COPII coatomer complex. In this article, we report a clinically recognizable craniofacial disorder characterized by facial dysmorphisms, severe micrognathia, rhizomelic shortening, microcephalic dwarfism, and mild developmental delay due to loss-of-function heterozygous mutations in ARCN1, which encodes the coatomer subunit delta of COPI. ARCN1 mutant cell lines were revealed to have endoplasmic reticulum stress, suggesting the involvement of ER stress response in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Given that ARCN1 deficiency causes defective type I collagen transport, reduction of collagen secretion represents the likely mechanism underlying the skeletal phenotype that characterizes this condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of COPI-mediated transport in human development, including skeletogenesis and brain growth. PMID:27476655

  20. Tangeretin, a citrus pentamethoxyflavone, antagonizes ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance by inhibiting its transport function.

    Feng, Sen-Ling; Yuan, Zhong-Wen; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Ma, Wen-Zhe; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhong-Qiu; Xie, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) and tumor metastasis are the main causes of chemotherapeutic treatment failure and mortality in cancer patients. In this study, at achievable nontoxic plasma concentrations, citrus flavonoid tangeretin has been shown to reverse ABCB1-mediated cancer resistance to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents effectively. Co-treatment of cells with tangeretin and paclitaxel activated apoptosis as well as arrested cell cycle at G2/M-phase. Tangeretin profoundly inhibited the ABCB1 transporter activity since it significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin, and flutax-2 in A2780/T cells and decreased the efflux of ABCB1 substrates in Caco2 cells without altering the expression of ABCB1. Moreover, it stimulated the ATPase activity and inhibited verapamil-stimulated ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. The molecular docking results indicated a favorable binding of tangeretin with the transmemberane region site 1 of homology modeled ABCB1 transporter. The overall results demonstrated that tangeretin could sensitize ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells to chemotherapeutical agents by directly inhibiting ABCB1 transporter function, which encouraged further animal and clinical studies in the treatment of resistant cancers. PMID:27058921

  1. OSBP-Related Protein Family: Mediators of Lipid Transport and Signaling at Membrane Contact Sites.

    Kentala, Henriikka; Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and its related protein homologs, ORPs, constitute a conserved family of lipid-binding/transfer proteins (LTPs) expressed ubiquitously in eukaryotes. The ligand-binding domain of ORPs accommodates cholesterol and oxysterols, but also glycerophospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P). ORPs have been implicated as intracellular lipid sensors or transporters. Most ORPs carry targeting determinants for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and non-ER organelle membrane. ORPs are located and function at membrane contact sites (MCSs), at which ER is closely apposed with other organelle limiting membranes. Such sites have roles in lipid transport and metabolism, control of Ca(2+) fluxes, and signaling events. ORPs are postulated either to transport lipids over MCSs to maintain the distinct lipid compositions of organelle membranes, or to control the activity of enzymes/protein complexes with functions in signaling and lipid metabolism. ORPs may transfer PI4P and another lipid class bidirectionally. Transport of PI4P followed by its hydrolysis would in this model provide the energy for transfer of the other lipid against its concentration gradient. Control of organelle lipid compositions by OSBP/ORPs is important for the life cycles of several pathogenic viruses. Targeting ORPs with small-molecular antagonists is proposed as a new strategy to combat viral infections. Several ORPs are reported to modulate vesicle transport along the secretory or endocytic pathways. Moreover, antagonists of certain ORPs inhibit cancer cell proliferation. Thus, ORPs are LTPs, which mediate interorganelle lipid transport and coordinate lipid signals with a variety of cellular regimes. PMID:26811291

  2. Sap transporter mediated import and subsequent degradation of antimicrobial peptides in Haemophilus.

    Catherine L Shelton

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs contribute to host innate immune defense and are a critical component to control bacterial infection. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI is a commensal inhabitant of the human nasopharyngeal mucosa, yet is commonly associated with opportunistic infections of the upper and lower respiratory tracts. An important aspect of NTHI virulence is the ability to avert bactericidal effects of host-derived antimicrobial peptides (AMPs. The Sap (sensitivity to antimicrobial peptides ABC transporter equips NTHI to resist AMPs, although the mechanism of this resistance has remained undefined. We previously determined that the periplasmic binding protein SapA bound AMPs and was required for NTHI virulence in vivo. We now demonstrate, by antibody-mediated neutralization of AMP in vivo, that SapA functions to directly counter AMP lethality during NTHI infection. We hypothesized that SapA would deliver AMPs to the Sap inner membrane complex for transport into the bacterial cytoplasm. We observed that AMPs localize to the bacterial cytoplasm of the parental NTHI strain and were susceptible to cytoplasmic peptidase activity. In striking contrast, AMPs accumulated in the periplasm of bacteria lacking a functional Sap permease complex. These data support a mechanism of Sap mediated import of AMPs, a novel strategy to reduce periplasmic and inner membrane accumulation of these host defense peptides.

  3. Chronic Moderate Alcohol Intakes Accelerate SR-B1 Mediated Reverse Cholesterol Transport.

    Li, Menghua; Diao, Yan; Liu, Ying; Huang, Hui; Li, Yanze; Tan, Peizhu; Liang, Huan; He, Qi; Nie, Junhui; Dong, Xingli; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Lingyun; Gao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is essential for all animal life. However, a high level of cholesterol in the body is strongly associated with the progression of various severe diseases. In our study, the potential involvement of alcohol in the regulation of high density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor scavenger receptor class B and type I (SR-B1)-mediated reverse cholesterol transport was investigated. We separated male C57BL/6 mice into four diets: control, alcohol, Control + HC and alcohol + HC. The SR-B1 level and 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate- high- density lipoprotein (DiI-HDL) uptake were also measured in AML12 cells and HL7702 cells treated with alcohol. The control + HC diet led to increased hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol levels while alcohol + HC led no significant change. Compared with that of the control group, the SR-B1 mRNA level was elevated by 27.1% (P alcohol, control + HC and alcohol + HC groups, respectively. In AML12 and HL7702 cells, SR-B1 level and DiI-HDL uptake were repressed by SR-B1 siRNA or GW9662. However, these effects were reversed through alcohol treatment. These data suggest that a moderate amount of alcohol plays a novel role in reverse cholesterol transport, mainly mediated by PPARγ and SR-B1. PMID:27618957

  4. Cyanine-based 1-amino-1-deoxyglucose as fluorescent probes for glucose transporter mediated bioimaging.

    Xu, Hu; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Jinna; Liu, Ran; Li, Taoli; Shi, Yunli; Zhao, Hongxia; Gao, Qingzhi

    2016-05-27

    Two novel cyanine-based 1-amino-1-deoxy-β-glucose conjugates (Glu-1N-Cy3 and Glu-1N-Cy5) were designed, synthesized and their fluorescence characteristics were studied. Both Glu-1N-Cy3 and Glu-1N-Cy5 accumulate in living HT29 human colon cancer cells, which overexpress glucose transporters (GLUTs). The cellular uptake of the bioprobes was inhibited by natural GLUT substrate d-glucose and 2-deoxy-d-glucose. The GLUT specificity of the probes was validated with quercetin, which is both a permeant substrate via GLUTs and a high-affinity inhibitor of GLUT-mediated glucose transport. Competitive fluorometric assay for GLUT substrate cell uptake revealed that Glu-1N-Cy3 and Glu-1N-Cy5 are 5 and 10 times more sensitive than 2-NBDG, a leading fluorescent glucose bioprobe. This study provides fundamental data supporting the potential of these two conjugates as new powerful tools for GLUT-mediated theranostics, in vitro and in vivo molecular bioimaging and drug R&D. PMID:27033602

  5. A Multiplexed, Two-Electrode Platform for Biosensing Based on DNA-Mediated Charge Transport.

    Furst, Ariel L; Hill, Michael G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2015-06-16

    We have developed a thin layer, multiplexed biosensing platform that features two working-electrode arrays for detecting small molecules, nucleic acid sequences, and DNA-binding proteins. DNA duplexes are patterned onto the primary electrode array, while a secondary electrode array is used both to initiate DNA monolayer formation and for electrochemical readout via DNA-mediated charge transport (DNA CT) chemistry. Electrochemical reduction of Cu(phendione)2(2+) (phendione is 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione) at the secondary electrodes induces covalent attachment via click chemistry of ethynyl-labeled DNA probe duplexes onto the primary electrodes that have been treated with azide-terminated alkylthiols. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry confirm that catalyst activation at the secondary electrode is essential to maintain the integrity of the DNA monolayer. Electrochemical readout of DNA CT processes that occur at the primary electrode is accomplished also at the secondary electrode. The two-electrode system enables the platform to function as a collector-generator using either ferrocyanide or ferricyanide as mediators with methylene blue and DNA charge transport. Electrochemical measurements at the secondary electrode eliminate the need for large background corrections. The resulting sensitivity of this platform enables the reliable and simultaneous detection of femtomoles of the transcription factors TATA-binding protein and CopG on a single multiplexed device. PMID:26042916

  6. Specificity of drug transport mediated by CaMDR1: a major facilitator of Candida albicans

    Avmeet Kohli; Vinita Gupta; Shankarling Krishnamurthy; Seyed E Hasnain; Rajendra Prasad

    2001-09-01

    CaMDR1 encodes a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) protein in Candida albicans whose expression has been linked to azole resistance and which is frequently encountered in this human pathogenic yeast. In this report we have overexpressed CaMdr1p in Sf9 insect cells and demonstrated for the first time that it can mediate methotrexate (MTX) and fluconazole (FLC) transport. MTX appeared to be a better substrate for CaMdr1p among these two tested drugs. Due to severe toxicity of these drugs to insect cells, further characterization of CaMdr1p as a drug transporter could not be done with this system. Therefore, as an alternative, CaMdr1p and Cdr1p, which is an ABC protein (ATP binding cassette) also involved in azole resistance in C. albicans, were independently expressed in a common hypersensitive host JG436 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This allowed a better comparison between the functionality of the two export pumps. We observed that while both FLC and MTX are effluxed by CaMdr1p, MTX appeared to be a poor substrate for Cdr1p. JG436 cells expressing Cdr1p thus conferred resistance to other antifungal drugs but remained hypersensitive to MTX. Since MTX is preferentially transported by CaMdr1p, it can be used for studying the function of this MFS protein.

  7. Back Electron Transfer Suppresses the Periodic Length Dependence of DNA-mediated Charge Transport Across Adenine Tracts

    Genereux, Joseph C.; Augustyn, Katherine E.; Davis, Molly L.; Shao, Fangwei; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2008-01-01

    DNA-mediated charge transport (CT) is exquisitely sensitive to the integrity of the bridging π-stack and is characterized by a shallow distance dependence. These properties are obscured by poor coupling between the donor/acceptor pair and the DNA bridge, or by convolution with other processes. Previously, we found a surprising periodic length dependence for the rate of DNA-mediated CT across adenine tracts monitored by 2-aminopurine fluorescence. Here we report a similar periodicity by monito...

  8. PIN6 auxin transporter at endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane mediates auxin homeostasis and organogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    Simon, Sibu; Skůpa, Petr; Viaene, Tom; Zwiewka, Marta; Tejos, Ricardo; Klíma, Petr; Čarná, Mária; Rolčík, Jakub; De Rycke, Riet; Moreno, Ignacio; Dobrev, Petre I; Orellana, Ariel; Zažímalová, Eva; Friml, Jiří

    2016-07-01

    Plant development mediated by the phytohormone auxin depends on tightly controlled cellular auxin levels at its target tissue that are largely established by intercellular and intracellular auxin transport mediated by PIN auxin transporters. Among the eight members of the Arabidopsis PIN family, PIN6 is the least characterized candidate. In this study we generated functional, fluorescent protein-tagged PIN6 proteins and performed comprehensive analysis of their subcellular localization and also performed a detailed functional characterization of PIN6 and its developmental roles. The localization study of PIN6 revealed a dual localization at the plasma membrane (PM) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Transport and metabolic profiling assays in cultured cells and Arabidopsis strongly suggest that PIN6 mediates both auxin transport across the PM and intracellular auxin homeostasis, including the regulation of free auxin and auxin conjugates levels. As evidenced by the loss- and gain-of-function analysis, the complex function of PIN6 in auxin transport and homeostasis is required for auxin distribution during lateral and adventitious root organogenesis and for progression of these developmental processes. These results illustrate a unique position of PIN6 within the family of PIN auxin transporters and further add complexity to the developmentally crucial process of auxin transport. PMID:27240710

  9. Characterization of cesium uptake mediated by a potassium transport system of bacteria in a soil conditioner

    We found that bacteria in a commercial soil conditioner sold in Ishinomaki, Miyagi, exhibited concentrative and saturable cesium ion (Cs+) uptake in the natural range of pH and temperature. The concentration of intracellular Cs+ could be condensed at least a few times higher compared with the outside medium of the cells. This uptake appeared to be mediated by a K+ transport system, since Cs+ uptake was dose-dependently inhibited by potassium ion (K+). Eadie-Hofstee plot analysis indicated that the Cs+ uptake involved a single saturable process. The maximum uptake amount (Jmax) was the same in the presence and absence of K+, suggesting that Cs+ and K+ uptakes were competitive with respect to each other. These bacteria might be useful for bioremediation of cesium-contaminated soil. (author)

  10. Relative entropy and efficiency measure for diffusion-mediated transport processes

    We propose an efficiency measure for diffusion-mediated transport processes including molecular-scale engines such as Brownian motors (BMot) moving in ratchet potentials acting as mechanical 'rectifiers'. The efficiency measure is based on the concept of 'minimal energy required to complete a task' and is defined via a class of stochastic optimal control problems. The underlying objective function depends on both the external force field (i.e. the fluctuation rectifier in the case of BMot) and the amplitude of the environmental noise. Ultimately, the efficiency measure can be directly interpreted as the relative entropy between two probability distributions, namely: the distribution of the particles in presence of the external rectifying force field and a reference distribution describing the behaviour in the absence of the rectifier

  11. Relative entropy and efficiency measure for diffusion-mediated transport processes

    Filliger, Roger; Hongler, Max-Olivier [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institut de Production et Robotique (IPR), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2005-02-11

    We propose an efficiency measure for diffusion-mediated transport processes including molecular-scale engines such as Brownian motors (BMot) moving in ratchet potentials acting as mechanical 'rectifiers'. The efficiency measure is based on the concept of 'minimal energy required to complete a task' and is defined via a class of stochastic optimal control problems. The underlying objective function depends on both the external force field (i.e. the fluctuation rectifier in the case of BMot) and the amplitude of the environmental noise. Ultimately, the efficiency measure can be directly interpreted as the relative entropy between two probability distributions, namely: the distribution of the particles in presence of the external rectifying force field and a reference distribution describing the behaviour in the absence of the rectifier.

  12. Carrier-mediated transport of actinides and rare earth elements through liquid and plasticized membranes

    The first works in this field were realized approximately 25 years ago, when BLOCK et al. reported their studies about carrier-mediated transport (also called pertraction or membrane extraction) of uranium through plasticized membranes with neutral esters derived from phosphoric acid. At this time, the methodical principles of selective pertraction of ionic compounds through so-called bulk liquid membranes containing carriers were known. However, these membranes, similarly as plasticized membranes, have not achieved a broader use. This is probably because bulk liquid membranes are from a technical point of view fairly distant from the idea of a typical membrane system, and plasticized membranes (sometimes also called gel membranes) present great resistance. By the end of the 1960's and at the beginning of the 1970's, LI and CUSSLER worked out the principles for two widely used pertraction techniques, called pertraction through emulsion liquid and supported liquid membranes (ELM and SLM). These two techniques not only have greatest significance in laboratory practice, but they also are interesting for technological aims because of the attainable large phase boundaries, e.g. 103-104 m2/m3. Many ways to arrange membrane systems are described in papers. Recently, the significance of carrier-mediated transport through liquid membranes has grown to have (since 1980) separate section at the International Solvent Extraction Conference. This paper does not deal with mathematical models and the mechanism of pertraction in general, but it gives an overview of results obtained in publications referring to pertraction of two related element groups - actinoids and rare earth elements - using various membrane types. (author) 154 refs

  13. Estrogen mediated inhibition of dopamine transport in the striatum: regulation by G alpha i/o.

    Thompson, Tina L; Certain, Matthew E

    2005-03-28

    In the current study, the interaction between estrogen priming and dopamine D2 receptor activation on dopamine uptake in the striatum of ovariectomized female rats was investigated. Basal ADP-[(32)P(i)]ribosylation of G(i/o) was examined in synaptosomal membranes prepared from ovariectomized, estrogen primed or N-p-(isothiocyanatophenethyl) spiperone (NIPS) treated rats. [(32)P(i)]-incorporation was significantly increased (141%) in tissue from NIPS treated animals but attenuated (57%) in tissue from estrogen primed animals. Dopamine uptake kinetics were measured in vivo following manipulation of the heterotrimeric G-protein by pertussis toxin (0.5 microg, 48 h). Pertussis toxin significantly inhibited dopamine uptake at all concentrations of dopamine examined. Co-treatment with estrogen and pertussis toxin resulted in a further attenuation of dopamine transport at high but not low dopamine concentrations. These data are consistent with an estrogen mediated alteration of G-protein activity and support the hypothesis that estrogen may alter transporter activity through a modulation of dopamine D2 autoreceptor/G alpha(i/o) protein coupling. PMID:15792779

  14. Tripartite ATP-independent Periplasmic (TRAP) Transporters Use an Arginine-mediated Selectivity Filter for High Affinity Substrate Binding.

    Fischer, Marcus; Hopkins, Adam P; Severi, Emmanuele; Hawkhead, Judith; Bawdon, Daniel; Watts, Andrew G; Hubbard, Roderick E; Thomas, Gavin H

    2015-11-01

    Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporters are secondary transporters that have evolved an obligate dependence on a substrate-binding protein (SBP) to confer unidirectional transport. Different members of the DctP family of TRAP SBPs have binding sites that recognize a diverse range of organic acid ligands but appear to only share a common electrostatic interaction between a conserved arginine and a carboxylate group in the ligand. We investigated the significance of this interaction using the sialic acid-specific SBP, SiaP, from the Haemophilus influenzae virulence-related SiaPQM TRAP transporter. Using in vitro, in vivo, and structural methods applied to SiaP, we demonstrate that the coordination of the acidic ligand moiety of sialic acid by the conserved arginine (Arg-147) is essential for the function of the transporter as a high affinity scavenging system. However, at high substrate concentrations, the transporter can function in the absence of Arg-147 suggesting that this bi-molecular interaction is not involved in further stages of the transport cycle. As well as being required for high affinity binding, we also demonstrate that the Arg-147 is a strong selectivity filter for carboxylate-containing substrates in TRAP transporters by engineering the SBP to recognize a non-carboxylate-containing substrate, sialylamide, through water-mediated interactions. Together, these data provide biochemical and structural support that TRAP transporters function predominantly as high affinity transporters for carboxylate-containing substrates. PMID:26342690

  15. Functional characterisation of an intron retaining K+ transporter of barley reveals intron-mediated alternate splicing

    Shahzad, K.

    2015-01-01

    Intron retention in transcripts and the presence of 5 and 3 splice sites within these introns mediate alternate splicing, which is widely observed in animals and plants. Here, functional characterisation of the K+ transporter, HvHKT2;1, with stably retained introns from barley (Hordeum vulgare) in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and transcript profiling in yeast and transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) is presented. Expression of intron-retaining HvHKT2;1 cDNA (HvHKT2;1-i) in trk1, trk2 yeast strain defective in K+ uptake restored growth in medium containing hygromycin in the presence of different concentrations of K+ and mediated hypersensitivity to Na+. HvHKT2;1-i produces multiple transcripts via alternate splicing of two regular introns and three exons in different compositions. HKT isoforms with retained introns and exon skipping variants were detected in relative expression analysis of (i) HvHKT2;1-i in barley under native conditions, (ii) in transgenic tobacco plants constitutively expressing HvHKT2;1-i, and (iii) in trk1, trk2 yeast expressing HvHKT2;1-i under control of an inducible promoter. Mixed proportions of three HKT transcripts: HvHKT2;1-e (first exon region), HvHKT2;1-i1 (first intron) and HvHKT2;1-i2 (second intron) were observed. The variation in transcript accumulation in response to changing K+ and Na+ concentrations was observed in both heterologous and plant systems. These findings suggest a link between intron-retaining transcripts and different splice variants to ion homeostasis, and their possible role in salt stress.

  16. Dioxin mediates downregulation of the reduced folate carrier transport activity via the arylhydrocarbon receptor signalling pathway

    Dioxins such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) are common environmental contaminants known to regulate several genes via activation of the transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) associated with the development of numerous adverse biological effects. However, comparatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which dioxins display their toxic effects in vertebrates. The 5' untranslated region of the hepatocellular Reduced folate carrier (Rfc1; Slc19a1) exhibits AhR binding sites termed dioxin responsive elements (DRE) that have as yet only been found in the promoter region of prototypical TCDD target genes. Rfc1 mediated transport of reduced folates and antifolate drugs such as methotrexate (MTX) plays an essential role in physiological folate homeostasis and MTX cancer chemotherapy. In order to determine whether this carrier represents a target gene of dioxins we have investigated the influence of TCDD on functional Rfc1 activity in rat liver. Pre-treatment of rats with TCDD significantly diminished hepatocellular Rfc1 uptake activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In further mechanistic studies we demonstrated that this reduction was due to TCDD-dependent activation of the AhR signalling pathway. We additionally showed that binding of the activated receptor to DRE motifs in the Rfc1 promoter resulted in downregulation of Rfc1 gene expression and reduced carrier protein levels. As downregulation of pivotal Rfc1 activity results in functional folate deficiency associated with an elevated risk of cardiovascular diseases or carcinogenesis, our results indicate that deregulation of this essential transport pathway represents a novel regulatory mechanism how dioxins display their toxic effects through the Ah receptor.

  17. Phosphorylation of the norepinephrine transporter at threonine 258 and serine 259 is linked to protein kinase C-mediated transporter internalization

    Jayanthi, Lankupalle D; Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Samuvel, Devadoss J;

    2006-01-01

    G alpha(q)-coupled human neurokinin 1 (hNK-1) receptor coexpressed with the WT-hNET produced effects similar to beta-PMA via PKC stimulation. In striking contrast, an hNET double mutant harboring T258A and S259A failed to show NE uptake inhibition and plasma membrane redistribution by beta-PMA or SP...... hypothesis that PKC-mediated phosphorylation of NET is required for transporter internalization. Phosphoamino acid analysis of 32P-labeled native NETs from rat placental trophoblasts and heterologously expressed wild type human NET (WT-hNET) from human placental trophoblast cells revealed that the phorbol...... ester (beta-PMA)-induced phosphorylation of NET occurs on serine and threonine residues. Beta-PMA treatment inhibited NE transport, reduced plasma membrane hNET levels, and stimulated hNET phosphorylation in human placental trophoblast cells expressing the WT-hNET. Substance P-mediated activation of the...

  18. Chloroquine Transport in Plasmodium falciparum II: Analysis of PfCRT Mediated Drug Transport Using Proteoliposomes and a Fluorescent Chloroquine Probe

    Paguio, Michelle F.; Cabrera, Mynthia; Roepe, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the PfCRT protein cause chloroquine resistance (CQR) and earlier studies from our laboratory using plasma membrane inside-out vesicles (ISOV) prepared from yeast expressing recombinant PfCRT [Zhang, H., et al. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 8290–8296] suggested that the putative transporter mediates downhill facilitated diffusion of charged chloroquine (CQ). However, more recent experiments with a fluorescent CQ probe (NBD-CQ) presented in the accompanying paper [Cabrera, M., et al. (20...

  19. KIF20A-Mediated RNA Granule Transport System Promotes the Invasiveness of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Keisuke Taniuchi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancers are aggressive because they are highly invasive and highly metastatic; moreover, effective treatments for aggressive pancreatic cancers are lacking. Here, we report that the motor kinesin protein KIF20A promoted the motility and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells through transporting the RNA-binding protein IGF2BP3 and IGF2BP3-bound transcripts toward cell protrusions along microtubules. We previously reported that IGF2BP3 and its target transcripts are assembled into cytoplasmic stress granules of pancreatic cancer cells, and that IGF2BP3 promotes the motility and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells through regulation of localized translation of IGF2BP3-bound transcripts in cell protrusions. We show that knockdown of KIF20A inhibited accumulation of IGF2BP3-containing stress granules in cell protrusions and suppressed local protein expression from specific IGF2BP3-bound transcripts, ARF6 and ARHGEF4, in the protrusions. Our results provide insight into the link between regulation of KIF20A-mediated trafficking of IGF2BP3-containing stress granules and modulation of the motility and invasiveness in pancreatic cancers.

  20. Vigabatrin absorption is mediated via the proton-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1 – in vitro and in vivo

    Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Hansen, Steen Honore'; Brodin, Birger; Holm, René; Kreilgaard, Mads; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd

    2013-01-01

    proton coupled amino acid transporter PAT1, however the actual transport mechanisms involved in transepithelial absorption have not been clarified. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the transepithelial absorption of vigabatrin is mediated by PAT1 – in vitro as well as in vivo. Methods The.......4. The transepithelial transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers was polarized in the lumen-to-blood direction in the presence of a proton gradient. The presence of PAT1-ligands significantly decreased the permeability of vigabatrin across Caco-2 cell monolayers. In Sprague Dawley rats the presence of PAT1......-ligands altered the pharmacokinetic profile of vigabatrin with an apparent prolonged absorption of vigabatrin. Conclusions Transport of vigabatrin across Caco-2 cell monolayers was polarized in the lumen-to-blood directions, dependent on an acidic pH in the lumen compartment and inhibited by PAT1-ligands...

  1. AtSWEET4, a hexose facilitator, mediates sugar transport to axial sinks and affects plant development.

    Liu, Xiaozhu; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Chao; Tian, Zhihong; Li, Jianxiong

    2016-01-01

    Plants transport photoassimilates from source organs to sink tissues through the phloem translocation pathway. In the transport phloem, sugars that escape from the sieve tubes are released into the apoplasmic space between the sieve element/companion cell complex (SE/CC) and phloem parenchyma cells (PPCs) during the process of long-distance transport. The competition for sugar acquisition between SE/CC and adjoining PPCs is mediated by plasma membrane translocators. YFP-tagged AtSWEET4 protein is localized in the plasma membrane, and PromoterAtSWEET4-GUS analysis showed that AtSWEET4 is expressed in the stele of roots and veins of leaves and flowers. Overexpression of AtSWEET4 in Arabidopsis increases plant size and accumulates more glucose and fructose. By contrast, knock-down of AtSWEET4 by RNA-interference leads to small plant size, reduction in glucose and fructose contents, chlorosis in the leaf vein network, and reduction in chlorophyll content in leaves. Yeast assays demonstrated that AtSWEET4 is able to complement both fructose and glucose transport deficiency. Transgenic plants of AtSWEET4 overexpression exhibit higher freezing tolerance and support more growth of bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121. We conclude that AtSWEET4 plays an important role in mediating sugar transport in axial tissues during plant growth and development. PMID:27102826

  2. Tetracycline resistance element of pBR322 mediates potassium transport.

    Dosch, D C; Salvacion, F F; Epstein, W

    1984-01-01

    The tetracycline resistance element of plasmid pBR322 partially complements the potassium transport defect of Escherichia coli K-12 mutants having markedly impaired K+ transport. The plasmid increases K+ transport. The Tn10 element does not result in increased transport, demonstrating that the effect is not general for elements that increase resistance to tetracycline.

  3. Dehydroascorbic acid, a blood–brain barrier transportable form of vitamin C, mediates potent cerebroprotection in experimental stroke

    Huang, Judy; Agus, David B.; Winfree, Christopher J.; Kiss, Szilard; William J Mack; Ryan A McTaggart; Choudhri, Tanvir F.; Kim, Louis J.; Mocco, J; Pinsky, David J; Fox, William D.; Israel, Robert J.; Boyd, Thomas A.; Golde, David W.; Connolly, E Sander

    2001-01-01

    Neuronal injury in ischemic stroke is partly mediated by cytotoxic reactive oxygen species. Although the antioxidant ascorbic acid (AA) or vitamin C does not penetrate the blood–brain barrier (BBB), its oxidized form, dehydroascorbic acid (DHA), enters the brain by means of facilitative transport. We hypothesized that i.v. DHA would improve outcome after stroke because of its ability to cross the BBB and augment brain antioxidant levels. Reversible or permanent focal ...

  4. Enhancing Crystalline Structural Orders of Polymer Semiconductors for Efficient Charge Transport via Polymer-Matrix-Mediated Molecular Self-Assembly.

    Lei, Yanlian; Deng, Ping; Lin, Ming; Zheng, Xuelin; Zhu, Furong; Ong, Beng S

    2016-08-01

    A facile polymer-matrix-mediated molecular self-assembly of polymer semiconductors into highly crystalline orders for efficient charge transport in organic thin-film transistors is demonstrated. Phenomenal enhancements in field-effect mobility of about one order of magnitude and current on/off ratio of two to three orders of magnitude are realized with polyacrylonitrile-incorporated polymer semiconductor compositions via solution deposition. PMID:27168128

  5. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein-mediated transport by extracts of and monoterpenoids contained in Zanthoxyli Fructus

    Citrus (rutaceous) herbs are often used in traditional medicine and Japanese cuisine and can be taken concomitantly with conventional medicine. In this study, the effect of various citrus-herb extracts on P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated transport was examined in vitro to investigate a possible interaction with P-gp substrates. Component monoterpenoids of the essential oil in Zanthoxyli Fructus was screened to find novel P-gp inhibitors. LLC-GA5-COL150 cells transfected with human MDR1 cDNA encoding P-gp were used. Cellular accumulation of [3H]digoxin was measured in the presence or absence of P-gp inhibitors or test samples. Aurantii Fructus, Evodiae Fructus, Aurantii Fructus Immaturus, Aurantii Nobilis Pericarpium, Phellodendri Cortex, and Zanthoxyli Fructus were extracted with hot water (decocted) and then fractionated with ethyl acetate. The cell to medium ratio of [3H]digoxin accumulation increased significantly in the presence of the decoction of Evodiae Fructus, Aurantii Nobilis Pericarpium, and Zanthoxyli Fructus, and the ethyl acetate fraction of all citrus herbs used. The ethyl acetate fraction of Zanthoxyli Fructus exhibited the strongest inhibition of P-gp among tested samples with an IC5 value of 166 μg/mL. Then its component monoterpenoids, geraniol, geranyl acetate (R)-(+)-limonene, (R)-(+)-linalool, citronellal (R)-(+)-citronellal, DL-citronellol (S)-(-)-β-citronellol, and cineole, were screened. (R)-(+)-citronellal and (S)-(-)-β-citronellol inhibited P-gp with IC5 values of 167 μM and 504 μM, respectively. These findings suggest that Zanthoxyli Fructus may interact with P-gp substrates and that some monoterpenoids with the relatively lower molecular weight of about 150 such as (R)-(+)-citronellal can be potent inhibitors of P-gp

  6. Linking Intertidal and Subtidal Food Webs: Consumer-Mediated Transport of Intertidal Benthic Microalgal Carbon.

    Chang-Keun Kang

    Full Text Available We examined stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios for a large variety of consumers in intertidal and subtidal habitats, and their potential primary food sources [i.e., microphytobenthos (MPB, phytoplankton, and Phragmites australis] in a coastal bay system, Yeoja Bay of Korea, to test the hypothesis that the transfer of intertidal MPB-derived organic carbon to the subtidal food web can be mediated by motile consumers. Compared to a narrow δ13C range (-18 to -16‰ of offshore consumers, a broad δ13C range (-18 to -12‰ of both intertidal and subtidal consumers indicated that 13C-enriched sources of organic matter are an important trophic source to coastal consumers. In the intertidal areas, δ13C of most consumers overlapped with or was 13C-enriched relative to MPB. Despite the scarcity of MPB in the subtidal, highly motile consumers in subtidal habitat had nearly identical δ13C range with many intertidal foragers (including crustaceans and fish, overlapping with the range of MPB. In contrast, δ13C values of many sedentary benthic invertebrates in the subtidal areas were similar to those of offshore consumers and more 13C-depleted than motile foragers, indicating high dependence on phytoplankton-derived carbon. The isotopic mixing model calculation confirms that the majority of motile consumers and also some of subtidal sedentary ones depend on intertidal MPB for more than a half of their tissue carbon. Finally, although further quantitative estimates are needed, these results suggest that direct foraging by motile consumers on intertidal areas, and thereby biological transport of MPB-derived organic carbon to the subtidal areas, may provide important trophic connection between intertidal production and the nearshore shallow subtidal food webs.

  7. Rab7 associates with early endosomes to mediate sorting and transport of Semliki forest virus to late endosomes.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Semliki forest virus (SFV is internalized by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and transported via early endosomes to late endosomes and lysosomes. The intracellular pathway taken by individual fluorescently labeled SFV particles was followed using immunofluorescence in untransfected cells, and by video-enhanced, triple-color fluorescence microscopy in live cells transfected with GFP- and RFP-tagged Rab5, Rab7, Rab4, and Arf1. The viruses progressed from Rab5-positive early endosomes to a population of early endosomes (about 10% of total that contained both Rab5 and Rab7. SFV were sequestered in the Rab7 domains, and they were sorted away from the early endosomes when these domains detached as separate transport carriers devoid of Rab5, Rab4, EEA1, Arf1, and transferrin. The process was independent of Arf1 and the acidic pH in early endosomes. Nocodazole treatment showed that the release of transport carriers was assisted by microtubules. Expression of constitutively inactive Rab7T22N resulted in accumulation of SFV in early endosomes. We concluded that Rab7 is recruited to early endosomes, where it forms distinct domains that mediate cargo sorting as well as the formation of late-endosome-targeted transport vesicles.

  8. Microstructure defects mediated charge transport in Nb-doped epitaxial BaTiO3 thin films

    Zhou, Jian; Jing, Xiaosai; Alexe, Marin; Dai, Jiyan; Qin, Minghui; Wu, Sujuan; Zeng, Min; Gao, Jinwei; Lu, Xubing; Liu, J.-M.

    2016-05-01

    Nb-doped BaTiO3 (BNTO) films were deposited on MgO substrates at different substrate temperatures by pulsed laser deposition. The temperature dependence of their resistivity, carrier mobility and carrier concentration were systematically investigated. It reveals that the BNTO films deposited at lower temperature show higher resistivity and lower carrier mobility, and only show semiconductor characteristics at measurement temperatures ranging from 10 to 400 K. There is a metal-semiconductor transition at about 20 K for the films grown at relatively higher temperature. The intrinsic mechanism responsible for the different charge transport behavior was revealed by microstructure studies. Low crystal quality and high density of microstructure defects, observed for BNTO films grown at low temperatures, are, in particular, massively affecting the charge transport behavior of the BNTO films. The mediated charge transport of the microstructure defects is dominated by the thermal excitation process.

  9. Comparison between s - and d -electron mediated transport in a photoswitching dithienylethene molecule using ab initio transport methods

    Odell, Anders

    2011-10-03

    The influence of the electrode\\'s Fermi surface on the transport properties of a photoswitching molecule is investigated with state-of-the-art ab initio transport methods. We report results for the conducting properties of the two forms of dithienylethene attached either to Ag or to nonmagnetic Ni leads. The I-V curves of the Ag/dithienylethene/Ag device are found to be very similar to those reported previously for Au. In contrast, when Ni is used as the electrode material the zero-bias transmission coefficient is profoundly different as a result of the role played by the Ni d bands in the bonding between the molecule and the electrodes. Intriguingly, despite these differences the overall conducting properties depend little on the electrode material. We thus conclude that electron transport in dithienylethene is, for the cases studied, mainly governed by the intrinsic electronic structure of the molecule. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  10. Transporter-Mediated Drug–Drug Interactions with Oral Antidiabetic Drugs

    Jörg König; Fromm, Martin F; Sabine Klatt

    2011-01-01

    Uptake transporters (e.g., members of the SLC superfamily of solute carriers) and export proteins (e.g., members of the ABC transporter superfamily) are important determinants for the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Alterations of drug transport due to concomitantly administered drugs that interfere with drug transport may alter the kinetics of drug substrates. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that many drugs used for the treatment of metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases (e.g., ora...

  11. Vacuolar Transport of the Medicinal Alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus Is Mediated by a Proton-Driven Antiport1[W

    Carqueijeiro, Inês; Noronha, Henrique; Duarte, Patrícia; Gerós, Hernâni; Sottomayor, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus is one of the most studied medicinal plants due to the interest in their dimeric terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) vinblastine and vincristine, which are used in cancer chemotherapy. These TIAs are produced in very low levels in the leaves of the plant from the monomeric precursors vindoline and catharanthine and, although TIA biosynthesis is reasonably well understood, much less is known about TIA membrane transport mechanisms. However, such knowledge is extremely important to understand TIA metabolic fluxes and to develop strategies aimed at increasing TIA production. In this study, the vacuolar transport mechanism of the main TIAs accumulated in C. roseus leaves, vindoline, catharanthine, and α-3′,4′-anhydrovinblastine, was characterized using a tonoplast vesicle system. Vindoline uptake was ATP dependent, and this transport activity was strongly inhibited by NH4+ and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazine and was insensitive to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter inhibitor vanadate. Spectrofluorimetry assays with a pH-sensitive fluorescent probe showed that vindoline and other TIAs indeed were able to dissipate an H+ gradient preestablished across the tonoplast by either vacuolar H+-ATPase or vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase. The initial rates of H+ gradient dissipation followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, suggesting the involvement of mediated transport, and this activity was species and alkaloid specific. Altogether, our results strongly support that TIAs are actively taken up by C. roseus mesophyll vacuoles through a specific H+ antiport system and not by an ion-trap mechanism or ABC transporters. PMID:23686419

  12. Vacuolar transport of the medicinal alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus is mediated by a proton-driven antiport.

    Carqueijeiro, Inês; Noronha, Henrique; Duarte, Patrícia; Gerós, Hernâni; Sottomayor, Mariana

    2013-07-01

    Catharanthus roseus is one of the most studied medicinal plants due to the interest in their dimeric terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) vinblastine and vincristine, which are used in cancer chemotherapy. These TIAs are produced in very low levels in the leaves of the plant from the monomeric precursors vindoline and catharanthine and, although TIA biosynthesis is reasonably well understood, much less is known about TIA membrane transport mechanisms. However, such knowledge is extremely important to understand TIA metabolic fluxes and to develop strategies aimed at increasing TIA production. In this study, the vacuolar transport mechanism of the main TIAs accumulated in C. roseus leaves, vindoline, catharanthine, and α-3',4'-anhydrovinblastine, was characterized using a tonoplast vesicle system. Vindoline uptake was ATP dependent, and this transport activity was strongly inhibited by NH4(+) and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazine and was insensitive to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter inhibitor vanadate. Spectrofluorimetry assays with a pH-sensitive fluorescent probe showed that vindoline and other TIAs indeed were able to dissipate an H(+) gradient preestablished across the tonoplast by either vacuolar H(+)-ATPase or vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase. The initial rates of H(+) gradient dissipation followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, suggesting the involvement of mediated transport, and this activity was species and alkaloid specific. Altogether, our results strongly support that TIAs are actively taken up by C. roseus mesophyll vacuoles through a specific H(+) antiport system and not by an ion-trap mechanism or ABC transporters. PMID:23686419

  13. Estrone-1-sulphate (E1S) has impact on the kinetics parameters of transporter mediated taurine and glutamate influx in Caco-2 cells

    Steffansen, Bente; El-Sayed, F

    membrane transporters. The aim was therefore to investigate if addition of E1S to the growth medium of Caco-2 cells before but not during the influx study, change the kinetic parameters of transporter-mediated influx of taurine and glutamate by respective TAUT and EAAT transporters. The results show that 4...... days pretreatment with E1S change the concentration dependent influx curves and Km for transporter mediated taurine and Km and Jmax for glutamate influx although the effects on Km and Jmax are not significant....

  14. Tissue- and Development-specific Expression of Proton-mediated Peptide Transporters in the Developing Chicken

    Zwarycz, Bailey

    2012-01-01

    PepT1, PepT2 and PHT1 are all members of the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter family, which are important in the transport of amino acids in peptide form. PepT1 acts as a low affinity/high capacity transporter and PepT2 as a high affinity/low capacity transporter for di- and tri-peptides. PHT1 transports di- and tri-peptides as well as histidine. The objective of this study was to profile PepT1, PepT2 and PHT1 mRNA expression in the proventriculus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, ceca, large...

  15. Assessment of ABCG2-mediated transport of pesticides across the rabbit placenta barrier using a novel MDCKII in vitro model.

    Halwachs, Sandra; Schäfer, Ingo; Kneuer, Carsten; Seibel, Peter; Honscha, Walther

    2016-08-15

    In humans, the ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 contributes to the fetoprotective barrier function of the placenta, potentially limiting the toxicity of transporter substrates to the fetus. During testing of chemicals including pesticides, developmental toxicity studies are performed in rabbit. Despite its toxicological relevance, ABCG2-mediated transport of pesticides in rabbit placenta has not been yet elucidated. We therefore generated polarized MDCK II cells expressing the ABCG2 transporter from rabbit placenta (rbABCG2) and evaluated interaction of the efflux transporter with selected insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides. The Hoechst H33342 accumulation assay indicated that 13 widely used pesticidal active substances including azoxystrobin, carbendazim, chlorpyrifos, chlormequat, diflufenican, dimethoate, dimethomorph, dithianon, ioxynil, methiocarb, propamocarb, rimsulfuron and toclofos-methyl may be rbABCG2 inhibitors and/or substrates. No such evidence was obtained for chlorpyrifos-methyl, epoxiconazole, glyphosate, imazalil and thiacloprid. Moreover, chlorpyrifos (CPF), dimethomorph, tolclofos-methyl and rimsulfuron showed concentration-dependent inhibition of H33342 excretion in rbABCG2-transduced MDCKII cells. To further evaluate the role of rbABCG2 in pesticide transport across the placenta barrier, we generated polarized MDCKII-rbABCG2 monolayers. Confocal microscopy confirmed correct localization of rbABCG2 protein in the apical plasma membrane. In transepithelial flux studies, we showed the time-dependent preferential basolateral to apical (B>A) directed transport of [(14)C] CPF across polarized MDCKII-rbABCG2 monolayers which was significantly inhibited by the ABCG2 inhibitor fumitremorgin C (FTC). Using this novel in vitro cell culture model, we altogether showed functional secretory activity of the ABCG2 transporter from rabbit placenta and identified several pesticides like the insecticide CPF as potential rbABCG2 substrates

  16. Requirement of kinesin-mediated membrane transport of WAVE2 along microtubules for lamellipodia formation promoted by hepatocyte growth factor.

    Takahashi, Kazuhide; Suzuki, Katsuo

    2008-07-01

    Lamellipodia formation necessary for epithelial cell migration and invasion is accomplished by rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton at the leading edge through membrane transport of WAVE2. However, how WAVE2 is transported to the cell periphery where lamellipodia are formed remains to be established. We report here that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) promoted lamellipodia formation and intracellular transport of WAVE2 to the cell periphery, depending on Rac1 activity, in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Immunoblot analyses indicating the coimmunoprecipitation of WAVE2 with kinesin heavy chain KIF5B, one of the motor proteins, and IQGAP1 suggest that KIF5B and IQGAP1 formed a complex with WAVE2 in serum-starved cells and increased in their amount after HGF stimulation. Both downregulation of KIF5B by the small interfering RNA and depolymerization of microtubules with nocodazole abrogated the HGF-induced lamellipodia formation and WAVE2 transport. Therefore, we propose here that the promotion of lamellipodia formation by HGF in MDA-MB-231 cells is Rac1-dependent and requires KIF5B-mediated transport of WAVE2 and IQGAP1 to the cell periphery along microtubules. PMID:18514191

  17. Podocyte expression of membrane transporters involved in puromycin aminonucleoside-mediated injury.

    Cristina Zennaro

    Full Text Available Several complex mechanisms contribute to the maintenance of the intricate ramified morphology of glomerular podocytes and to interactions with neighboring cells and the underlying basement membrane. Recently, components of small molecule transporter families have been found in the podocyte membrane, but expression and function of membrane transporters in podocytes is largely unexplored. To investigate this complex field of investigation, we used two molecules which are known substrates of membrane transporters, namely Penicillin G and Puromycin Aminonucleoside (PA. We observed that Penicillin G pre-administration prevented both in vitro and in vivo podocyte damage caused by PA, suggesting the engagement of the same membrane transporters by the two molecules. Indeed, we found that podocytes express a series of transporters which are known to be used by Penicillin G, such as members of the Organic Anion Transporter Polypeptides (OATP/Oatp family of influx transporters, and P-glycoprotein, a member of the MultiDrug Resistance (MDR efflux transporter family. Expression of OATP/Oatp transporters was modified by PA treatment. Similarly, in vitro PA treatment increased mRNA and protein expression of P-glycoprotein, as well as its activity, confirming the engagement of the molecule upon PA administration. In summary, we have characterized some of the small molecule transporters present at the podocyte membrane, focusing on those used by PA to enter and exit the cell. Further investigation will be needed to understand precisely the role of these transporter families in maintaining podocyte homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of podocyte injury.

  18. Bacterial multidrug resistance mediated by a homologue of the human multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein

    Konings, WN; Poelarends, GJ

    2002-01-01

    Most ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters known to date are of eukaryotic origin, such as the P-glycoproteins (Pgps) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs). Only one well-characterized ABC multidrug transporter, LmrA, is of bacterial origin. On the basis of its structural a

  19. Seed filling in domesticated maize and rice depends on SWEET-mediated hexose transport

    Carbohydrate import into seeds directly determines seed size and must have been increased through domestication. However, evidence for domestication of sugar translocation and the identity of seed filling transporters remained elusive. Maize ZmSWEET4c, as opposed to its sucrose-transporting homologs...

  20. Upon bolting the GTR1 and GTR2 transporters mediate transport of glucosinolates to the inflorescence rather than roots

    Andersen, Tonni Grube; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2014-01-01

    We recently described the glucosinolate transporters GTR1 and GTR2 as actively contributing to the establishment of tissue-specific distribution of the defense compounds glucosinolates in vegetative Arabidopsis plants. Upon bolting and thereby development of the inflorescence and initiation of seed...... setting, the spatial distribution of glucosinolates does undergo major changes. Here we investigate the role of GTR1 and GTR2 in establishment of glucosinolate source-sink relationships in bolting plants. By in vivo feeding the exogenous p-hydroxybenzylglucosinolate to a rosette leaf or the roots of...... wildtype and a gtr1 gtr2 mutant, we show that this glucosinolate can specifically translocate from the rosette and the roots to the inflorescence in a GTR1- and GTR2-dependent manner. This marks that, upon bolting, the inflorescence rather than the roots constitute the strongest sink for leaf...

  1. Vacuolar-Iron-Transporter1-Like Proteins Mediate Iron Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    Gollhofer, Julia; Timofeev, Roman; LAN, PING; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Buckhout, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a nutritional problem in plants and reduces crop productivity, quality and yield. With the goal of improving the iron (Fe) storage properties of plants, we have investigated the function of three Arabidopsis proteins with homology to Vacuolar Iron Transporter1 (AtVIT1). Heterologous expression of Vacuolar Iron Transporter-Like1 (AtVTL1; At1g21140), AtVTL2 (At1g76800) or AtVTL5 (At3g25190) in the yeast vacuolar Fe transport mutant, Δccc1, restored growth in the presence of 4...

  2. Polyamines as mediators of insulin's action on pyruvate dehydrogenase, 45Ca2+ fluxes, and membrane transport

    Insulin (IN) induces a rapid stimulation of Ca2+ fluxes and membrane transport in mouse kidney cortex which involves rapid polyamine synthesis. 1.3 nM (IN) induced an early (45Ca2+ influx and efflux peaked at 1-2 min and returned to basal levels by 5-10 min. The ODC inhibitor α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO, 5 mM) abolished IN stimulation of PDH, 45Ca2+ fluxes and membrane transport, and putrescine (.5 mM) nullified DFMO inhibition. IN (50 mUnits/kg) in rats induced an early (2+ fluxes, and membrane transport

  3. Endosome-mediated retrograde axonal transport of P2X3 receptor signals in primary sensory neurons

    Xu-Qiao Chen; BinWang; Chengbiao Wu; Jin Pan; Bo Yuan; Yuan-Yuan Su; Xing-Yu Jiang; Xu Zhang; Lan Bao

    2012-01-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors adopt signaling endosomes to transmit retrograde signals.However,the mechanisms of retrograde signaling for other ligand/receptor systems are poorly understood.Here,we report that the signals of the purinergic (P)2X3 receptor,an ATP-gated ion channel are retrogradely transported in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron axons.We found that Rab5,a small GTPase,controls the early sorting of P2X3 receptors into endosomes,while Rab7 mediates the fast retrograde transport of P2X3 receptors.Intraplantar injection and axonal application into the microfluidic chamber of α,β-methylene-ATP (α,β-MeATP),a P2X selective agonist,enhanced the endocytosis and retrograde transport of P2X3 receptors.The α,β-MeATP-induced Ca2+ influx activated a pathway comprised of protein kinase C,rat sarcoma viral oncogene and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK),which associated with endocytic P2X3 receptors to form signaling endosomes.Disruption of the lipid rafts abolished the α,β-MeATP-induced ERK phosphorylation,endocytosis and retrograde transport of P2X3 receptors.Furthermore,treatment of peripheral axons with α,β-MeATP increased the activation level of ERK and cAMP response element-binding protein in the cell bodies of DRG neurons and enhanced neuronal excitability.Impairment of either microtubule-based axonal transport in vivo or dynein function in vitro blocked α,β-MeATP-induced retrograde signals.These results indicate that P2X3 receptor-activated signals are transmitted via retrogradely transported endosomes in primary sensory neurons and provide a novel signaling mechanism for ligand-gated channels.

  4. Image transport through a disordered optical fiber mediated by transverse Anderson localization

    Karbasi, Salman; Koch, Karl W; Hawkins, Thomas; Ballato, John; Mafi, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Transverse Anderson localization of light allows localized optical-beam-transport through a transversely-disordered and longitudinally-invariant medium. Its successful implementation in disordered optical fibers recently resulted in the simultaneous propagation of multiple beams in a single strand of an optical fiber, suggesting potential applications for spatial beam multiplexing and image transport. We present what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of optical image transport using transverse Anderson localization of light. The image transport quality obtained in the polymer disordered optical fiber is comparable with or better than some of the best commercially available multicore imaging fibers with less pixelation and higher contrast. A proof-of-concept glass version is also evaluated and further optimization is discussed. Our results open the way to device-level implementation of the transverse Anderson localization of light with potential applications in biological and medical im...

  5. HAK transporters from Physcomitrella patens and Yarrowia lipolytica mediate sodium uptake

    Benito Casado, Begoña; García de Blas González, Blanca; Rodriguez Navarro, Alonso

    2012-01-01

    The widespread presence of Na+ specific uptake systems across plants and fungi is a controversial topic. In this study we identify two HAK genes, one in the moss Physcomitrella patens and the other in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, that encode Na+ specific transporters. Because HAK genes are numerous in plants and are duplicated in many fungi, our findings suggest that some HAK genes encode Na+ transporters and that Na+ might play physiological functions in plants and fungi more extensively t...

  6. Enzyme- and transporter-mediated beverage-drug interactions: An update on fruit juices and green tea.

    An, Guohua; Mukker, Jatinder Kaur; Derendorf, Hartmut; Frye, Reginald F

    2015-12-01

    Beverage-drug interactions have remained an active area of research and have been the subject of extensive investigations in the past 2 decades. The known mechanisms of clinically relevant beverage-drug interactions include modulation of the activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A and organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP). For CYP3A-mediated beverage-drug interaction, the in vivo CYP3A inhibitory effect is limited to grapefruit juice (GFJ), which increases the bioavailability of several orally administered drugs that undergo extensive first-pass metabolism via enteric CYP3A. In contrast, clinically significant OATP-mediated beverage-drug interactions have been observed with not only GFJ but also orange juice, apple juice, and, most recently, green tea. Fruit juices and green tea are all a mixture of a large number of constituents. The investigation of specific constituent(s) responsible for the enzyme and/or transporter inhibition remains an active area of research, and many new findings have been obtained on this subject in the past several years. This review highlights the multiple mechanisms through which beverages can alter drug disposition and provides an update on the new findings of beverage-drug interactions, with a focus on fruit juices and green tea. PMID:26095990

  7. Role of plant-mediated gas transport in CH4 emissions from Phragmites-dominated peatlands

    van den Berg, Merit; Ingwersen, Joachim; van den Elzen, Eva; Lamers, Leon P. M.; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    A large part of the methane (CH4) produced in peatlands is directly oxidized and the extent of its oxidation depends on the gas transport pathway. In wetland ecosystems, CH4 can be transported from the soil to the atmosphere via diffusion, ebullition and via aerenchyma of roots and stems of vascular plants. Compared to other wetland plants, the very common species Phragmites australis (Common reed) appears to have a high ability to transport gases between the soil and atmosphere. The gas exchange within Phragmites plants takes place via convective flow through the culm, which is believed to be achieved by a humidity-induced pressure gradient and is more than 5-times as efficient as diffusion. By this mechanism, CH4 surpasses the upper (oxic) soil layers and therefore oxidation of CH4 may well be reduced. On the other hand, transport of oxygen in Phragmites plants tends to enhance O2concentration in the rhizosphere, which will foster CH4oxidation in deeper soil layers. It is therefore unknown whether humidity-induced convection leads to higher or lower overall CH4 emission in Phragmites, which is essential to understand their role in the emissions from these very common peatland types. To investigate whether this internal gas transport mechanism of reed promotes or reduces CH4 fluxes to the atmosphere, we conducted manipulative field experiments in a large Phragmites peatland in South-West Germany in October 2014 and July 2015. Using large chambers, we compared CH4 fluxes from intact plots, plots with cut reed, and plots with cut + sealed reed to exclude gas transport through the plants. Additionally, pore water samples from the plots were analyzed for possible changes in soil chemistry due to the change of oxygen transport into the soil by the treatments. Based on our results, we will explain the potential role of rhizosphere oxygenation and convective flow on CH4 emissions from Phragmites-dominated peatlands in relation to other environmental condition.

  8. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells.

    Flavio Alves Lara

    Full Text Available In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA, a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may

  9. PEPT2-mediated transport of 5-aminolevulinic acid and carnosine in astrocytes

    Xiang, Jianming; Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E.; Keep, Richard F

    2006-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and carnosine have important physiological and pathophysiological roles in the CNS. Both are substrates for the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter PEPT2. The purpose of the current study was to determine the importance of PEPT2 in the uptake of ALA and carnosine in rat and mouse (PEPT2+/+ and PEPT2−/−) cultured neonatal astrocytes. Although neonatal astrocytes are known to express PEPT2, its quantitative importance in the transport of these compounds is not kn...

  10. Carrier-mediated transport of rare earth elements through liquid membranes. Pt. 3

    Transport of tervalent REEs - Sc, Y, Ce, Eu, Gd, Tm, Yb - from nitrate medium through flat-sheet SLM containing DEHPA in n-dodecane, supported on a nucleoporous filter, has been studied. Influences of both aqueous phase acidities, concentrations of metal and carrier were investigated. Transport courses of the metals in question had been obtained and their permeation coefficients or initial fluxes were evaluated. Separation of some binary mixtures Ce-Tm, Ce-Yb, Ce-Sc was experimentally achieved. (author) 21 refs.; 13 figs.; 4 tabs

  11. Neonatal Fc Receptor-Mediated IgG Transport Across Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells: Potentially Provide the Mucosal Protection.

    Guo, Jinyue; Li, Fei; He, Qigai; Jin, Hui; Liu, Mei; Li, Shaowen; Hu, Sishun; Xiao, Yuncai; Bi, Dingren; Li, Zili

    2016-06-01

    It has been well characterized that piglets can absorb colostrum IgG across the intestine to neonatal bloodstream and a certain level of IgG has been found in the mucosal secretions of the porcine intestinal tract. However, little is known about how the maternal IgG transport across the intestinal barrier and how IgG enter the lumen of intestinal tract. In this study, we demonstrated that the porcine neonatal Fc receptor (pFcRn) was expressed in a model of normal porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) as well as in kidney cells (PK-15), and pFcRn was mainly distributed in the apical side of the polarized IPEC-J2 cells. Analyzing the phylogenetic relatedness of this gene we found that swine and human neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) amino acid sequence are closer than rodents. We also showed that pFcRn mediated bidirectional IgG transport across polarized IPEC-J2 cells and bound to IgG in a pH-dependent manner. Furthermore, pFcRn-transcytosed viral-specific IgG reduced the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) yield from the luminal direction by a 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) assay. Our results indicate that pFcRn-dependent bidirectional IgG transport across the intestinal epithelium plays critical role in the acquisition of humoral immunity in early life and in host defense at mucosal surfaces. PMID:26982157

  12. Cholesterol and ORP1L-mediated ER contact sites control autophagosome transport and fusion with the endocytic pathway.

    Wijdeven, Ruud H; Janssen, Hans; Nahidiazar, Leila; Janssen, Lennert; Jalink, Kees; Berlin, Ilana; Neefjes, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is the main homeostatic pathway guiding cytosolic materials for degradation by the lysosome. Maturation of autophagosomes requires their transport towards the perinuclear region of the cell, with key factors underlying both processes still poorly understood. Here we show that transport and positioning of late autophagosomes depends on cholesterol by way of the cholesterol-sensing Rab7 effector ORP1L. ORP1L localizes to late autophagosomes and-under low-cholesterol conditions-contacts the ER protein VAP-A, forming ER-autophagosome contact sites, which prevent minus-end transport by the Rab7-RILP-dynein complex. ORP1L-mediated contact sites also inhibit localization of PLEKHM1 to Rab7. PLEKHM1, together with RILP, then recruits the homotypic fusion and vacuole protein-sorting (HOPS) complex for fusion of autophagosomes with late endosomes and lysosomes. Thus, ORP1L, via its liganding by lipids and the formation of contacts between autophagic vacuoles and the ER, governs the last steps in autophagy that lead to the lysosomal degradation of cytosolic material. PMID:27283760

  13. Calbindin-D28K dynamically controls TRPV5-mediated Ca2+ transport.

    Lambers, T.T.; Mahieu, F.; Oancea, E.; Hoofd, L.J.C.; Lange, F. de; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Voets, T.; Nilius, B.; Clapham, D.E.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia, calbindin-D(28K) (CaBP(28K)) facilitates Ca(2+) diffusion from the luminal Ca(2+) entry side of the cell to the basolateral side, where Ca(2+) is extruded into the extracellular compartment. Simultaneously, CaBP(28K) provides protection against toxic high Ca(2+) lev

  14. Substrate induction of siderophore transport in Bacillus subtilis mediated by a novel one-component regulator

    Gaballa, Ahmed; Helmann, John D.

    2007-01-01

    When iron is scarce, Bacillus subtilis expresses genes involved in the synthesis and uptake of the siderophore bacillibactin (BB) and uptake systems to pirate other microbial siderophores. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional induction of the feuABCybbA operon, encoding the Fe-BB uptake system, is mediated by Btr (formerly YbbB) which is encoded by the immediately upstream gene. Btr contains an AraC-type DNA binding domain fused to a substrate binding protein (SBP) domain related to FeuA...

  15. Linking Intertidal and Subtidal Food Webs: Consumer-Mediated Transport of Intertidal Benthic Microalgal Carbon

    Chang-Keun Kang; Hyun Je Park; Eun Jung Choy; Kwang-Sik Choi; Kangseok Hwang; Jong-Bin Kim

    2015-01-01

    We examined stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios for a large variety of consumers in intertidal and subtidal habitats, and their potential primary food sources [i.e., microphytobenthos (MPB), phytoplankton, and Phragmites australis] in a coastal bay system, Yeoja Bay of Korea, to test the hypothesis that the transfer of intertidal MPB-derived organic carbon to the subtidal food web can be mediated by motile consumers. Compared to a narrow δ13C range (-18 to -16‰) of offshore consumers, a...

  16. The response of electron transport mediated by active NADPH dehydrogenase complexes to heat stress in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803

    2008-01-01

    The electron-transport machinery in photosynthetic membranes is known to be very sensitive to heat. In this study, the rate of electron transport (ETR) driven by photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII) during heat stress in the wild-type Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 (WT) and its ndh gene inactiva-tion mutants △ndhB (M55) and △ndhD1/ndhD2 (D1/D2) was simultaneously assessed by using the novel Dual-PAM-100 measuring system. The rate of electron transport driven by the photosystems (ETRPSs) in the WT, M55, and D1/D2 cells incubated at 30℃ and at 55℃ for 10 min was compared. Incubation at 55 ℃ for 10 min significantly inhibited PSII-driven ETR (ETRPSII) in the WT, M55 and D1/D2 cells, and the ex-tent of inhibition in both the M55 and D1/D2 cells was greater than that in the WT cells. Further, PSI-driven ETR (ETRPSI) was stimulated in both the WT and D1/D2 cells, and this rate was increased to a greater extent in the D1/D2 than in the WT cells. However, ETRPSI was considerably inhibited in the M55 cells. Analysis of the effect of heat stress on ETRPSs with regard to the alterations in the 2 active NDH-1 complexes in the WT, M55, and D1/D2 cells indicated that the active NDH-1 supercomplex and medi-umcomplex are essential for alleviating the heat-induced inhibition of ETRPSII and for accelerating the heat-induced stimulation of ETRPSI, respectively. Further, it is believed that these effects are most likely brought about by the electron transport mediated by each of these 2 active NDH-1 complexes.

  17. Vacuolar-Iron-Transporter1-Like proteins mediate iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Gollhofer, Julia; Timofeev, Roman; Lan, Ping; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Buckhout, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a nutritional problem in plants and reduces crop productivity, quality and yield. With the goal of improving the iron (Fe) storage properties of plants, we have investigated the function of three Arabidopsis proteins with homology to Vacuolar Iron Transporter1 (AtVIT1). Heterologous expression of Vacuolar Iron Transporter-Like1 (AtVTL1; At1g21140), AtVTL2 (At1g76800) or AtVTL5 (At3g25190) in the yeast vacuolar Fe transport mutant, Δccc1, restored growth in the presence of 4 mM Fe. Isolated vacuoles from yeast expressing either of the VTL genes in the Δccc1 background had a three- to four-fold increase in Fe concentration compared to vacuoles isolated from the untransformed mutant. Transiently expressed GFP-tagged AtVTL1 was localized exclusively and AtVTL2 was localized primarily to the vacuolar membrane of onion epidermis cells. Seedling root growth of the Arabidopsis nramp3/nramp4 and vit1-1 mutants was decreased compared to the wild type when seedlings were grown under Fe deficiency. When expressed under the 35S promoter in the nramp3/nramp4 or vit1-1 backgrounds, AtVTL1, AtVTL2 or AtVTL5 restored root growth in both mutants. The seed Fe concentration in the nramp3/nramp4 mutant overexpressing AtVTL1, AtVTL2 or AtVTL5 was between 50 and 60% higher than in non-transformed double mutants or wild-type plants. We conclude that the VTL proteins catalyze Fe transport into vacuoles and thus contribute to the regulation of Fe homeostasis in planta. PMID:25360591

  18. Glucose Transporter 8 (GLUT8) Mediates Fructose-induced de Novo Lipogenesis and Macrosteatosis*

    DeBosch, Brian J.; Chen, Zhouji; Saben, Jessica L.; Finck, Brian N; Moley, Kelle H.

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the world, and it is thought to be the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. Excess dietary fructose causes both metabolic syndrome and NAFLD in rodents and humans, but the pathogenic mechanisms of fructose-induced metabolic syndrome and NAFLD are poorly understood. GLUT8 (Slc2A8) is a facilitative glucose and fructose transporter that is highly expressed in liver, heart, and other oxidative tissues. We p...

  19. On the molecular mechanism of flippase- and scramblase-mediated phospholipid transport.

    Montigny, Cédric; Lyons, Joseph; Champeil, Philippe; Nissen, Poul; Lenoir, Guillaume

    2016-08-01

    Phospholipid flippases are key regulators of transbilayer lipid asymmetry in eukaryotic cell membranes, critical to many trafficking and signaling pathways. P4-ATPases, in particular, are responsible for the uphill transport of phospholipids from the exoplasmic to the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane, as well as membranes of the late secretory/endocytic pathways, thereby establishing transbilayer asymmetry. Recent studies combining cell biology and biochemical approaches have improved our understanding of the path taken by lipids through P4-ATPases. Additionally, identification of several protein families catalyzing phospholipid 'scrambling', i.e. disruption of phospholipid asymmetry through energy-independent bi-directional phospholipid transport, as well as the recent report of the structure of such a scramblase, opens the way to a deeper characterization of their mechanism of action. Here, we discuss the molecular nature of the mechanism by which lipids may 'flip' across membranes, with an emphasis on active lipid transport catalyzed by P4-ATPases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26747647

  20. Water transport inside carbon nanotubes mediated by phonon-induced oscillating friction.

    Ma, Ming; Grey, François; Shen, Luming; Urbakh, Michael; Wu, Shuai; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Liu, Yilun; Zheng, Quanshui

    2015-08-01

    The emergence of the field of nanofluidics in the last decade has led to the development of important applications including water desalination, ultrafiltration and osmotic energy conversion. Most applications make use of carbon nanotubes, boron nitride nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide. In particular, understanding water transport in carbon nanotubes is key for designing ultrafiltration devices and energy-efficient water filters. However, although theoretical studies based on molecular dynamics simulations have revealed many mechanistic features of water transport at the molecular level, further advances in this direction are limited by the fact that the lowest flow velocities accessible by simulations are orders of magnitude higher than those measured experimentally. Here, we extend molecular dynamics studies of water transport through carbon nanotubes to flow velocities comparable with experimental ones using massive crowd-sourced computing power. We observe previously undetected oscillations in the friction force between water and carbon nanotubes and show that these oscillations result from the coupling between confined water molecules and the longitudinal phonon modes of the nanotube. This coupling can enhance the diffusion of confined water by more than 300%. Our results may serve as a theoretical framework for the design of new devices for more efficient water filtration and osmotic energy conversion devices. PMID:26149236

  1. Graphene-mediated microfluidic transport and nebulization via high frequency Rayleigh wave substrate excitation.

    Ang, Kar M; Yeo, Leslie Y; Hung, Yew M; Tan, Ming K

    2016-09-21

    The deposition of a thin graphene film atop a chip scale piezoelectric substrate on which surface acoustic waves are excited is observed to enhance its performance for fluid transport and manipulation considerably, which can be exploited to achieve further efficiency gains in these devices. Such gains can then enable complete integration and miniaturization for true portability for a variety of microfluidic applications across drug delivery, biosensing and point-of-care diagnostics, among others, where field-use, point-of-collection or point-of-care functionality is desired. In addition to a first demonstration of vibration-induced molecular transport in graphene films, we show that the coupling of the surface acoustic wave gives rise to antisymmetric Lamb waves in the film which enhance molecular diffusion and hence the flow through the interstitial layers that make up the film. Above a critical input power, the strong substrate vibration displacement can also force the molecules out of the graphene film to form a thin fluid layer, which subsequently destabilizes and breaks up to form a mist of micron dimension aerosol droplets. We provide physical insight into this coupling through a simple numerical model, verified through experiments, and show several-fold improvement in the rate of fluid transport through the film, and up to 55% enhancement in the rate of fluid atomization from the film using this simple method. PMID:27502324

  2. Overcoming ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance: Molecular mechanisms and novel therapeutic drug strategies.

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Han; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Zhao, Kun; Xu, Xiaojun; Xie, Jinbing; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is a key determinant of cancer chemotherapy failure. One of the major causes of multidrug resistance is the enhanced efflux of drugs by membrane ABC transporters. Targeting ABC transporters projects a promising approach to eliminating or suppressing drug resistance in cancer treatment. To reveal the functional mechanisms of ABC transporters in drug resistance, extensive studies have been conducted from identifying drug binding sites to elucidating structural dynamics. In this review article, we examined the recent crystal structures of ABC proteins to depict the functionally important structural elements, such as domains, conserved motifs, and critical amino acids that are involved in ATP-binding and drug efflux. We inspected the drug-binding sites on ABC proteins and the molecular mechanisms of various substrate interactions with the drug binding pocket. While our continuous battle against drug resistance is far from over, new approaches and technologies have emerged to push forward our frontier. Most recent developments in anti-MDR strategies include P-gp inhibitors, RNA-interference, nano-medicines, and delivering combination strategies. With the advent of the 'Omics' era - genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics - these disciplines play an important role in fighting the battle against chemoresistance by further unraveling the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and shed light on medical therapies that specifically target MDR. PMID:27449595

  3. Plant-mediated CH4 transport and C gas dynamics quantified in-situ in a Phalaris arundinacea-dominant wetland

    Jensen, Louise Askær; Elberling, Bo; Friborg, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    predominantly passive. Thus, diurnal variations are less important in contrast to wetland vascular plants facilitating convective gas flow. Despite of plant-dominant CH4 transport, net CH4 fluxes were low (–0.005–0.016 µmol m-2 s-1) and annually less than 1% of the annual C-CO2 assimilation. This is considered......±35% of ecosystem CH4 emissions were plant-mediated, but data show no evidence of significant diurnal variations related to convective gas flow regardless of season or plant growth stages. Therefore, despite a high percentage of arenchyma, P. arundinacea-mediated CH4 transport is interpreted to be...

  4. Use of iron-meso-tetra-(4-sulfonatophenyl)-porphine (FeTPPS) to examine hemopexin-mediated heme transport

    Hemopexin (HPX) alters conformation upon binding heme as shown by circular dichroism (CD) while FeTPPS binds without changes in the CD spectrum . Therefore, FeTPPS was used to examine the importance of changes in HPX conformation for receptor binding and for HPX-mediated heme transport. FeTPPS-HPX binds to the HPX receptor on mouse hepatoma Hepa cells but with lower affinity then heme-HPX. Incubation of cells with 50 nM heme-125I-HPX after 2.5 μM heme- or FeTPPS-HPX decreased binding from 0.34 pmol/mg protein to 0.10 and 0.27, respectively. Preincubation with 2.5 μM apoHPX reduced binding to the same extent as FeTPPS-HPX indicating that certain conformational changes in HPX increase the affinity of its receptor. Interestingly, FeTPPS-HPX inhibited heme uptake more effectively than heme-HPX. Preincubation of cells with 2.5 μM heme- or FeTPPS-HPX decreased 55Feheme uptake from 55Feheme-HPX (500 nM) by 28% and 70%, respectively; heme or FeTPPS alone had no effect. After incubation with 500 nM 55Feheme-HPX or 55FeTPPS-HPX for up to 30 minutes at 370C, 55Feheme was associated with the plasma-membrane and intracellular compartments but 55FeTPPs remained with the plasma membrane. FeTPPS presented to the cells as a complex with HPX inhibits HPX-mediated heme uptake by blocking events after heme-HPX binds to its receptor but needed for heme transport

  5. ROTUNDA3 function in plant development by phosphatase 2A-mediated regulation of auxin transporter recycling

    Karampelias, Michael; Neyt, Pia; De Groeve, Steven; Aesaert, Stijn; Coussens, Griet; Rolčík, Jakub; Bruno, Leonardo; De Winne, Nancy; Van Minnebruggen, Annemie; Van Montagu, Marc; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis; Friml, Jiří; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    The shaping of organs in plants depends on the intercellular flow of the phytohormone auxin, of which the directional signaling is determined by the polar subcellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin transport proteins. Phosphorylation dynamics of PIN proteins are affected by the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and the PINOID kinase, which act antagonistically to mediate their apical–basal polar delivery. Here, we identified the ROTUNDA3 (RON3) protein as a regulator of the PP2A phosphatase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The RON3 gene was map-based cloned starting from the ron3-1 leaf mutant and found to be a unique, plant-specific gene coding for a protein with high and dispersed proline content. The ron3-1 and ron3-2 mutant phenotypes [i.e., reduced apical dominance, primary root length, lateral root emergence, and growth; increased ectopic stages II, IV, and V lateral root primordia; decreased auxin maxima in indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-treated root apical meristems; hypergravitropic root growth and response; increased IAA levels in shoot apices; and reduced auxin accumulation in root meristems] support a role for RON3 in auxin biology. The affinity-purified PP2A complex with RON3 as bait suggested that RON3 might act in PIN transporter trafficking. Indeed, pharmacological interference with vesicle trafficking processes revealed that single ron3-2 and double ron3-2 rcn1 mutants have altered PIN polarity and endocytosis in specific cells. Our data indicate that RON3 contributes to auxin-mediated development by playing a role in PIN recycling and polarity establishment through regulation of the PP2A complex activity. PMID:26888284

  6. Super-Poissonian Shot Noise of Squeezed-Magnon Mediated Spin Transport

    Kamra, Akashdeep; Belzig, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    The magnetization of a ferromagnet (F ) driven out of equilibrium injects pure spin current into an adjacent conductor (N ). Such F |N bilayers have become basic building blocks in a wide variety of spin-based devices. We evaluate the shot noise of the spin current traversing the F |N interface when F is subjected to a coherent microwave drive. We find that the noise spectrum is frequency independent up to the drive frequency, and increases linearly with frequency thereafter. The low frequency noise indicates super-Poissonian spin transfer, which results from quasiparticles with effective spin ℏ*=ℏ(1 +δ ). For typical ferromagnetic thin films, δ ˜1 is related to the dipolar interaction-mediated squeezing of F eigenmodes.

  7. Inhibition of ABCG2-mediated transport by protein kinase inhibitors with a bisindolylmaleimide or indolocarbazole structure.

    Robey, Robert W; Shukla, Suneet; Steadman, Kenneth; Obrzut, Tomasz; Finley, Elizabeth M; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Bates, Susan E

    2007-06-01

    ABCG2 is a transporter with potential importance in cancer drug resistance, drug oral absorption, and stem cell biology. In an effort to identify novel inhibitors of ABCG2, we examined the ability of commercially available bisindolylmaleimides (BIM) and indolocarbazole protein kinase inhibitors (PKI) to inhibit ABCG2, given the previous demonstration that the indolocarbazole PKI UCN-01 interacted with the transporter. At a concentration of 10 micromol/L, all of the compounds tested increased intracellular fluorescence of the ABCG2-specific substrate pheophorbide a in ABCG2-transfected HEK-293 cells by 1.3- to 6-fold as measured by flow cytometry; the ABCG2-specific inhibitor fumitremorgin C increased intracellular fluorescence by 6.6-fold. In 4-day cytotoxicity assays, wild-type ABCG2-transfected cells were not more than 2-fold resistant to any of the compounds, suggesting that the PKIs are not significantly transported by ABCG2. BIMs I, II, III, IV, and V, K252c, and arcyriaflavin A were also able to inhibit [(125)I]iodoarylazidoprazosin labeling of ABCG2 by 65% to 80% at 20 micromol/L, compared with a 50% to 70% reduction by 20 micromol/L fumitremorgin C. K252c and arcyriaflavin A were the most potent compounds, with IC(50) values for inhibition of [(125)I]iodoarylazidoprazosin labeling of 0.37 and 0.23 micromol/L, respectively. K252c and arcyriaflavin A did not have any effect on the ATPase activity of ABCG2. Four minimally toxic compounds--BIM IV, BIM V, arcyriaflavin A, and K252c-reduced the relative resistance of ABCG2-transfected cells to SN-38 in cytotoxicity assays. We find that indolocarbazole and BIM PKIs directly interact with the ABCG2 protein and may thus increase oral bioavailability of ABCG2 substrates. PMID:17575116

  8. The multidrug transporter, P-glycoprotein, actively mediates cholesterol redistribution in the cell membrane

    Garrigues, Alexia; Escargueil, Alexandre E.; Orlowski, Stéphane

    2002-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporter, responsible for multidrug resistance in tumor cells. P-gp catalyzes the ATP hydrolysis-dependent efflux of numerous amphiphilic compounds of unrelated chemical structures. In the absence of any identified substrate, P-gp exhibits an apparently futile, basal ATPase activity. By using native membrane vesicles containing high amounts of P-gp, we show here that (i) this basal ATPase activity is tightly dependent on the p...

  9. Hypoxia sensing in the fetal chicken femoral artery is mediated by the mitochondrial electron transport chain

    Zoer, Bea; Cogolludo, Angel L; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco;

    2010-01-01

    Vascular hypoxia sensing is transduced into vasoconstriction in the pulmonary circulation, whereas systemic arteries dilate. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC), reactive O(2) species (ROS), and K(+) channels have been implicated in the sensing/signaling mechanisms of hypoxic relaxation...... in mammalian systemic arteries. We aimed to investigate their putative roles in hypoxia-induced relaxation in fetal chicken (19 days of incubation) femoral arteries mounted in a wire myograph. Acute hypoxia (Po(2) approximately 2.5 kPa) relaxed the contraction induced by norepinephrine (1 microM). Hypoxia...

  10. Carrier-mediated transport of rare earth elements through liquid membranes Pt. 4

    Transport of tervalent REEs - Sc, Y, Ce, Eu, Gd, Tm, Yb - from nitrate medium through a liquid membrane containing TBP in n-dodecane, impregnated on a flat-sheet nucleoporous support, has been studied as a function of time and initial metal concentration, salting-out agent concentration and pH of the feed phase. Influences of various complexing agents dissolved in the strip phase was investigated, too. Adding a suitable amount of EDTA into the feed phase, separation of binary mixtures of REEs was experimentally achieved. (author) 15 refs.; 8 figs.; 7 tabs

  11. Plasmodesmal-mediated cell-to-cell transport in wheat roots is modulated by anaerobic stress

    Cleland, R. E.; Fujiwara, T.; Lucas, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cell-to-cell transport of small molecules and ions occurs in plants through plasmodesmata. Plant roots are frequently subjected to localized anaerobic stress, with a resultant decrease in ATP. In order to determine the effect of this stress on plasmodesmal transport, fluorescent dyes of increasing molecular weight (0.46 to 1OkDa) were injected into epidermal and cortical cells of 3-day-old wheat roots, and their movement into neighboring cells was determined by fluorescence microscopy. Anaerobiosis was generated by N2 gas or simulated by the presence of sodium azide, both of which reduced the ATP levels in the tissue by over 80%. In the absence of such stress, the upper limit for movement, or size exclusion limit (SEL), of cortical plasmodesmata was cells. Upon imposition of stress, the SEL rose to between 5 and 10 kDa. This response of plasmodesmata to a decrease in the level of ATP suggests that they are constricted by an ATP-dependent process so as to maintain a restricted SEL. When roots are subjected to anaerobic stress, an increase in SEL may permit enhanced delivery of sugars to the affected cells of the root where anaerobic respiration could regenerate the needed ATP.

  12. Regulation of Local Ambient GABA Levels via Transporter-Mediated GABA Import and Export for Subliminal Learning.

    Hoshino, Osamu

    2015-06-01

    Perception of supraliminal stimuli might in general be reflected in bursts of action potentials (spikes), and their memory traces could be formed through spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). Memory traces for subliminal stimuli might be formed in a different manner, because subliminal stimulation evokes a fraction (but not a burst) of spikes. Simulations of a cortical neural network model showed that a subliminal stimulus that was too brief (10 msec) to perceive transiently (more than about 500 msec) depolarized stimulus-relevant principal cells and hyperpolarized stimulus-irrelevant principal cells in a subthreshold manner. This led to a small increase or decrease in ongoing-spontaneous spiking activity frequency (less than 1 Hz). Synaptic modification based on STDP during this period effectively enhanced relevant synaptic weights, by which subliminal learning was improved. GABA transporters on GABAergic interneurons modulated local levels of ambient GABA. Ambient GABA molecules acted on extrasynaptic receptors, provided principal cells with tonic inhibitory currents, and contributed to achieving the subthreshold neuronal state. We suggest that ongoing-spontaneous synaptic alteration through STDP following subliminal stimulation may be a possible neuronal mechanism for leaving its memory trace in cortical circuitry. Regulation of local ambient GABA levels by transporter-mediated GABA import and export may be crucial for subliminal learning. PMID:25774546

  13. Ligand-Receptor Interaction-Mediated Transmembrane Transport of Dendrimer-like Soft Nanoparticles: Mechanisms and Complicated Diffusive Dynamics.

    Liang, Junshi; Chen, Pengyu; Dong, Bojun; Huang, Zihan; Zhao, Kongyin; Yan, Li-Tang

    2016-05-01

    Nearly all nanomedical applications of dendrimer-like soft nanoparticles rely on the functionality of attached ligands. Understanding how the ligands interact with the receptors in cell membrane and its further effect on the cellular uptake of dendrimer-like soft nanoparticles is thereby a key issue for their better application in nanomedicine. However, the essential mechanism and detailed kinetics for the ligand-receptor interaction-mediated transmembrane transport of such unconventional nanoparticles remain poorly elucidated. Here, using coarse-grained simulations, we present the very first study of molecular mechanism and kinetics behaviors for the transmembrane transport of dendrimer-like soft nanoparticles conjugated with ligands. A phase diagram of interaction states is constructed through examining ligand densities and membrane tensions that allows us to identify novel endocytosis mechanisms featured by the direct wrapping and the penetration-extraction vesiculation. The results provide an in-depth insight into the diffusivity of receptors and dendrimer in the membrane plane and demonstrate how the ligand density influences receptor diffusion and uptake kinetics. It is interesting to find that the ligand-conjugated dendrimers present superdiffusive behaviors on a membrane, which is revealed to be driven by the random fluctuation dynamics of the membrane. The findings facilitate our understanding of some recent experimental observations and could establish fundamental principles for the future development of such important nanomaterials for widespread nanomedical applications. PMID:27049403

  14. Schisandra chinensis regulates drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters via activation of Nrf2-mediated signaling pathway

    He JL

    2014-12-01

    increase in the intracellular level of glutathione and total glutathione S-transferase content. SCE significantly elevated the messenger ribonucleic acid and protein levels of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 and 4, whereas the expression of organic anion transporting peptide 1A2 and 1B1 was significantly downregulated by SCE. Knockdown of Nrf2 by small interfering ribonucleic acid attenuated the regulatory effect of SCE on these DMEs and drug transporters. SCE significantly upregulated Nrf2 and promoted the translocation of Nrf2 from cytoplasm to the nuclei. Additionally, SCE significantly suppressed the expression of cytosolic Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (the repressor of Nrf2 and remarkably increased Nrf2 stability in HepG2 cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that the hepatoprotective effects of SCE may be partially ascribed to the modulation of DMEs and drug transporters via Nrf2-mediated signaling pathway. SCE may alter the pharmacokinetics of other coadministered drugs that are substrates of these DMEs and transporters and thus cause unfavorable herb–drug interactions. Keywords: Nrf2, Keap1, HepG2 cell, drug metabolizing enzyme, drug transporter, P-gp, MRP, OATP, Schisandra chinensis

  15. Essential Role for Zinc Transporter 2 (ZnT2)-mediated Zinc Transport in Mammary Gland Development and Function during Lactation.

    Lee, Sooyeon; Hennigar, Stephen R; Alam, Samina; Nishida, Keigo; Kelleher, Shannon L

    2015-05-22

    The zinc transporter ZnT2 (SLC30A2) imports zinc into vesicles in secreting mammary epithelial cells (MECs) and is critical for zinc efflux into milk during lactation. Recent studies show that ZnT2 also imports zinc into mitochondria and is expressed in the non-lactating mammary gland and non-secreting MECs, highlighting the importance of ZnT2 in general mammary gland biology. In this study we used nulliparous and lactating ZnT2-null mice and characterized the consequences on mammary gland development, function during lactation, and milk composition. We found that ZnT2 was primarily expressed in MECs and to a limited extent in macrophages in the nulliparous mammary gland and loss of ZnT2 impaired mammary expansion during development. Secondly, we found that lactating ZnT2-null mice had substantial defects in mammary gland architecture and MEC function during secretion, including fewer, condensed and disorganized alveoli, impaired Stat5 activation, and unpolarized MECs. Loss of ZnT2 led to reduced milk volume and milk containing less protein, fat, and lactose compared with wild-type littermates, implicating ZnT2 in the regulation of mammary differentiation and optimal milk production during lactation. Together, these results demonstrate that ZnT2-mediated zinc transport is critical for mammary gland function, suggesting that defects in ZnT2 not only reduce milk zinc concentration but may compromise breast health and increase the risk for lactation insufficiency in lactating women. PMID:25851903

  16. Tivantinib (ARQ 197) exhibits antitumor activity by directly interacting with tubulin and overcomes ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance.

    Aoyama, Aki; Katayama, Ryohei; Oh-Hara, Tomoko; Sato, Shigeo; Okuno, Yasushi; Fujita, Naoya

    2014-12-01

    Tivantinib (ARQ197) was first reported as a highly selective inhibitor of c-MET and is currently being investigated in a phase III clinical trial. However, as recently reported by us and another group, tivantinib showed cytotoxic activity independent of cellular c-MET status and also disrupted microtubule dynamics. To investigate if tivantinib exerts its cytotoxic activity by disrupting microtubules, we quantified polymerized tubulin in cells and xenograft tumors after tivantinib treatment. Consistent with our previous report, tivantinib reduced tubulin polymerization in cells and in mouse xenograft tumors in vivo. To determine if tivantinib directly binds to tubulin, we performed an in vitro competition assay. Tivantinib competitively inhibited colchicine but not vincristine or vinblastine binding to purified tubulin. These results imply that tivantinib directly binds to the colchicine binding site of tubulin. To predict the binding mode of tivantinib with tubulin, we performed computer simulation of the docking pose of tivantinib with tubulin using GOLD docking program. Computer simulation predicts tivantinib fitted into the colchicine binding pocket of tubulin without steric hindrance. Furthermore, tivantinib showed similar IC50 values against parental and multidrug-resistant cells. In contrast, other microtubule-targeting drugs, such as vincristine, paclitaxel, and colchicine, could not suppress the growth of cells overexpressing ABC transporters. Moreover, the expression level of ABC transporters did not correlate with the apoptosis-inducing ability of tivantinib different from other microtubule inhibitor. These results suggest that tivantinib can overcome ABC transporter-mediated multidrug-resistant tumor cells and is potentially useful against various tumors. PMID:25313010

  17. Particle mediated transport of Pb-210 through the epilimnion of Lake Michigan

    Concentrations of Pb-210 were measured on four size fractions of suspended particulate material and a dissolved fraction (500-111, 111-21, 21-6, 6-1 and 2/yr indicating a steady-state system with respect to Pb-210. During such dynamic particle events as the spring diatom bloom and the late summer calcium carbonate precipitation, however, Pb-210 fluxes increased by a factor of approx.2 over the steady-state flux. The 6-1 μm size fraction contained the largest percentage of the particulate Pb-210 standing crop-60% in April increasing to 98% during August through November. The importance of these particle events on trace metal transport through the water column are discussed

  18. Fatty acid transporter CD36 mediates hypothalamic effect of fatty acids on food intake in rats.

    Valentine S Moullé

    Full Text Available Variations in plasma fatty acid (FA concentrations are detected by FA sensing neurons in specific brain areas such as the hypothalamus. These neurons play a physiological role in the control of food intake and the regulation of hepatic glucose production. Le Foll et al. previously showed in vitro that at least 50% of the FA sensing in ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH neurons is attributable to the interaction of long chain FA with FA translocase/CD36 (CD36. The present work assessed whether in vivo effects of hypothalamic FA sensing might be partly mediated by CD36 or intracellular events such as acylCoA synthesis or β-oxidation. To that end, a catheter was implanted in the carotid artery toward the brain in male Wistar rats. After 1 wk recovery, animals were food-deprived for 5 h, then 10 min infusions of triglyceride emulsion, Intralipid +/- heparin (IL, IL(H, respectively or saline/heparin (SH were carried out and food intake was assessed over the next 5 h. Experimental groups included: 1 Rats previously injected in ventromedian nucleus (VMN with shRNA against CD36 or scrambled RNA; 2 Etomoxir (CPT1 inhibitor or saline co-infused with IL(H/S(H; and 3 Triacsin C (acylCoA synthase inhibitor or saline co-infused with IL(H/S(H. IL(H significantly lowered food intake during refeeding compared to S(H (p<0.001. Five hours after refeeding, etomoxir did not affect this inhibitory effect of IL(H on food intake while VMN CD36 depletion totally prevented it. Triacsin C also prevented IL(H effects on food intake. In conclusion, the effect of FA to inhibit food intake is dependent on VMN CD36 and acylCoA synthesis but does not required FA oxidation.

  19. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    Schumaker, Karen S [Professor

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  20. Chemically- and mechanically-mediated influences on the transport and mechanical characteristics of rock fractures

    Min, K.-B.; Rutqvist, J.; Elsworth, D.

    2009-02-01

    A model is presented to represent changes in the mechanical and transport characteristics of fractured rock that result from coupled mechanical and chemical effects. The specific influence is the elevation of dissolution rates on contacting asperities, which results in a stress- and temperature-dependent permanent closure. A model representing this pressure-dissolution-like behavior is adapted to define the threshold and resulting response in terms of fundamental thermodynamic properties of a contacting fracture. These relations are incorporated in a stress-stiffening model of fracture closure to define the stress- and temperature-dependency of aperture loss and behavior during stress and temperature cycling. These models compare well with laboratory and field experiments, representing both decoupled isobaric and isothermal responses. The model was applied to explore the impact of these responses on heated structures in rock. The result showed a reduction in ultimate induced stresses over the case where chemical effects were not incorporated, with permanent reduction in final stresses after cooling to ambient conditions. Similarly, permeabilities may be lower than they were in the case where chemical effects were not considered, with a net reduction apparent even after cooling to ambient temperature. These heretofore-neglected effects may have a correspondingly significant impact on the performance of heated structures in rock, such as repositories for the containment of radioactive wastes.

  1. Temperature-mediated polymorphism in molecular crystals: The impact on crystal packing and charge transport

    Stevens, Loah A.

    2015-01-13

    We report a novel synthesis to ultra high purity 7,14-bis((trimethylsilyl)ethynyl)dibenzo[b,def]-chrysene (TMS-DBC) and the use of this material in the growth of single crystals by solution and vapor deposition techniques. We observe that the substrate temperature has a dramatic impact on the crystal growth, producing two distinct polymorphs of TMS-DBC; low temperature (LT) fine red needles and high temperature (HT) large yellow platelets. Single crystal X-ray crystallography confirms packing structures where the LT crystals form a 1D slipped-stack structure, while the HT crystals adopt a 2D brickwork motif. These polymorphs also represent a rare example where both are extremely stable and do not interconvert to the other crystal structure upon solvent or thermal annealing. Single crystal organic field-effect transistors of the LT and HT crystals show that the HT 2D brickwork motif produces hole mobilities as high as 2.1 cm2 V-1 s-1, while the mobility of the 1D structure is significantly lower, at 0.028 cm2 V-1 s-1. Electronic-structure calculations indicate that the superior charge transport in the brickwork polymorph in comparison to the slipped-stack polymorph is due to the presence of an increased dimensionality of the charge migration pathways.

  2. MCT1-mediated transport of a toxic molecule is an effective strategy for targeting glycolytic tumors.

    Birsoy, Kivanç; Wang, Tim; Possemato, Richard; Yilmaz, Omer H; Koch, Catherine E; Chen, Walter W; Hutchins, Amanda W; Gultekin, Yetis; Peterson, Tim R; Carette, Jan E; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Clish, Clary B; Sabatini, David M

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that oncogenic transformation modifies the metabolic program of cells. A common alteration is the upregulation of glycolysis, and efforts to target glycolytic enzymes for anticancer therapy are under way. Here, we performed a genome-wide haploid genetic screen to identify resistance mechanisms to 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), a drug candidate that inhibits glycolysis in a poorly understood fashion. We identified the SLC16A1 gene product, MCT1, as the main determinant of 3-BrPA sensitivity. MCT1 is necessary and sufficient for 3-BrPA uptake by cancer cells. Additionally, SLC16A1 mRNA levels are the best predictor of 3-BrPA sensitivity and are most elevated in glycolytic cancer cells. Furthermore, forced MCT1 expression in 3-BrPA-resistant cancer cells sensitizes tumor xenografts to 3-BrPA treatment in vivo. Our results identify a potential biomarker for 3-BrPA sensitivity and provide proof of concept that the selectivity of cancer-expressed transporters can be exploited for delivering toxic molecules to tumors. PMID:23202129

  3. Transport, resealing, and re-poration dynamics of two-pulse electroporation-mediated molecular delivery.

    Demiryurek, Yasir; Nickaeen, Masoud; Zheng, Mingde; Yu, Miao; Zahn, Jeffrey D; Shreiber, David I; Lin, Hao; Shan, Jerry W

    2015-08-01

    Electroporation is of interest for many drug-delivery and gene-therapy applications. Prior studies have shown that a two-pulse-electroporation protocol consisting of a short-duration, high-voltage first pulse followed by a longer, low-voltage second pulse can increase delivery efficiency and preserve viability. In this work the effects of the field strength of the first and second pulses and the inter-pulse delay time on the delivery of two different-sized Fluorescein-Dextran (FD) conjugates are investigated. A series of two-pulse-electroporation experiments were performed on 3T3-mouse fibroblast cells, with an alternating-current first pulse to permeabilize the cell, followed by a direct-current second pulse. The protocols were rationally designed to best separate the mechanisms of permeabilization and electrophoretic transport. The results showed that the delivery of FD varied strongly with the strength of the first pulse and the size of the target molecule. The delivered FD concentration also decreased linearly with the logarithm of the inter-pulse delay. The data indicate that membrane resealing after electropermeabilization occurs rapidly, but that a non-negligible fraction of the pores can be reopened by the second pulse for delay times on the order of hundreds of seconds. The role of the second pulse is hypothesized to be more than just electrophoresis, with a minimum threshold field strength required to reopen nano-sized pores or defects remaining from the first pulse. These results suggest that membrane electroporation, sealing, and re-poration is a complex process that has both short-term and long-term components, which may in part explain the wide variation in membrane-resealing times reported in the literature. PMID:25911207

  4. The TULIP superfamily of eukaryotic lipid-binding proteins as a mediator of lipid sensing and transport.

    Alva, Vikram; Lupas, Andrei N

    2016-08-01

    The tubular lipid-binding (TULIP) superfamily has emerged in recent years as a major mediator of lipid sensing and transport in eukaryotes. It currently encompasses three protein families, SMP-like, BPI-like, and Takeout-like, which share a common fold. This fold consists of a long helix wrapped in a highly curved anti-parallel β-sheet, enclosing a central, lipophilic cavity. The SMP-like proteins, which include subunits of the ERMES complex and the extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts), appear to be mainly located at membrane contacts sites (MCSs) between organelles, mediating inter-organelle lipid exchange. The BPI-like proteins, which include the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), the LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-binding protein (LBP), the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), are either involved in innate immunity against bacteria through their ability to sense lipopolysaccharides, as is the case for BPI and LBP, or in lipid exchange between lipoprotein particles, as is the case for CETP and PLTP. The Takeout-like proteins, which are comprised of insect juvenile hormone-binding proteins and arthropod allergens, transport, where known, lipid hormones to target tissues during insect development. In all cases, the activity of these proteins is underpinned by their ability to bind large, hydrophobic ligands in their central cavity and segregate them away from the aqueous environment. Furthermore, where they are involved in lipid exchange, recent structural studies have highlighted their ability to establish lipophilic, tubular channels, either between organelles in the case of SMP domains or between lipoprotein particles in the case of CETP. Here, we review the current knowledge on the structure, versatile functions, and evolution of the TULIP superfamily. We propose a deep evolutionary split in this superfamily, predating the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor, between the SMP-like proteins, which act on

  5. Transport

    Transport is one of the major causes of environmental damage in Austria. Energy consumption, pollutants emissions, noise emissions, use of surfaces, sealing of surfaces, dissection of ecosystems and impact on landscape are the most significant environmental impacts caused by it. An overview of the transport development of passengers and freight in Austria is presented. Especially the energy consumption growth, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions by type of transport, and the emissions development (HC, particle and carbon monoxide) of goods and passengers transport are analyzed covering the years 1980 - 1999. The health cost resulting from transport-related air pollution in Austria is given and measures to be taken for an effective control of the transport sector are mentioned. Figs. 8, Table 1. (nevyjel)

  6. Leukemia-Associated Nup214 Fusion Proteins Disturb the XPO1-Mediated Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Transport Pathway and Thereby the NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    Saito, Shoko; Cigdem, Sadik; Okuwaki, Mitsuru; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear-cytoplasmic transport through nuclear pore complexes is mediated by nuclear transport receptors. Previous reports have suggested that aberrant nuclear-cytoplasmic transport due to mutations or overexpression of nuclear pore complexes and nuclear transport receptors is closely linked to diseases. Nup214, a component of nuclear pore complexes, has been found as chimeric fusion proteins in leukemia. Among various Nup214 fusion proteins, SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 have been shown to be engaged in tumorigenesis, but their oncogenic mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we examined the functions of the Nup214 fusion proteins by focusing on their effects on nuclear-cytoplasmic transport. We found that SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 interact with exportin-1 (XPO1)/CRM1 and nuclear RNA export factor 1 (NXF1)/TAP, which mediate leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES)-dependent protein export and mRNA export, respectively. SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 decreased the XPO1-mediated nuclear export of NES proteins such as cyclin B and proteins involved in the NF-κB signaling pathway by tethering XPO1 onto nuclear dots where Nup214 fusion proteins are localized. We also demonstrated that SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 expression inhibited NF-κB-mediated transcription by abnormal tethering of the complex containing p65 and its inhibitor, IκB, in the nucleus. These results suggest that SET-Nup214 and DEK-Nup214 perturb the regulation of gene expression through alteration of the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport system. PMID:27114368

  7. The Bubble Transport Mechanism: Indications for a bubble-mediated transfer of microorganisms from the sediment into the water column

    Schmale, Oliver; Stolle, Christian; Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Leifer, Ira; Kießlich, Katrin; Krause, Stefan; Frahm, Andreas; Treude, Tina

    2015-04-01

    Gas releasing seep areas are known to impact the methane biogeochemistry in the surrounding sediment and water column. Due to microbial processes most of the methane is oxidized under anaerobic and aerobic conditions before the greenhouse gas can escape into the atmosphere. However, methane gas bubbles can largely bypass this microbial filter mechanism, enabling highly efficient transport of methane from the sediment towards the sea surface. Studies in the water column surrounding hydrocarbon seeps indicated an elevated abundance of methanotrophic microorganism in the near field of gas bubble plumes. The enhanced methane concentration in the seep-affected water column stimulates the activity of methane oxidizers and leads to a rapid rise in the abundance of methane-oxidizing microorganisms in the aging plume water. In our study we hypothesized that a bubble-mediated transport mechanisms between the benthic and pelagic habitats represents an exchange process, which transfers methanotrophic microorganisms from the sediment into the water column, a process we termed the "Bubble Transport Mechanism". This mechanism could eventually influence the pelagic methanotrophic community, thereby indirectly providing feedback mechanisms for dissolved methane concentrations in the water column and thus impacting the sea/atmosphere methane flux. To test our hypothesis, field studies were conducted at the "Rostocker Seep" site (Coal Oil Point seep area, California, USA). Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) analyzes were performed to determine the abundance of aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophic microorganisms. Aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria were detected in the sediment and the water column, whereas anaerobic methanotrophs were detected exclusively in the sediment. The key device of the project was a newly developed "Bubble Catcher" used to collect naturally emanating gas bubbles at the sea floor together with particles attached to the

  8. Methyl 6-Amino-6-deoxy-d-pyranoside-Conjugated Platinum(II) Complexes for Glucose Transporter (GLUT)-Mediated Tumor Targeting: Synthesis, Cytotoxicity, and Cellular Uptake Mechanism.

    Li, Taoli; Gao, Xiangqian; Yang, Liu; Shi, Yunli; Gao, Qingzhi

    2016-05-19

    Methyl 6-aminodeoxy-d-pyranoside-derived platinum(II) glycoconjugates were designed and synthesized based on the clinical drug oxaliplatin for glucose transporter (GLUT)-mediated tumor targeting. In addition to a substantial improvement in water solubility, the conjugates exhibited cytotoxicity similar to or higher than that of oxaliplatin in six different human cancer cell lines. GLUT-mediated transport of the complexes was investigated with a cell-based fluorescence competition assay and GLUT-inhibitor-mediated cytotoxicity analysis in a GLUT-overexpressing human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29) cell line. The antitumor effect of the aminodeoxypyranoside-conjugated platinum(II) complexes was found to depend significantly on the GLUT inhibitor, and the cellular uptake of the molecules was regulated by GLUT-mediated transport. The results from this study demonstrate the potential advantages of aminodeoxypyranosides as sugar motifs for glycoconjugation for Warburg-effect-targeted drug design. These fundamental results also support the potential of aminodeoxypyranoside-conjugated platinum(II) complexes as lead compounds for further preclinical evaluation. PMID:27135196

  9. Adenoviral-mediated placental gene transfer of IGF-1 corrects placental insufficiency via enhanced placental glucose transport mechanisms.

    Helen N Jones

    Full Text Available Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that over-expression of human insulin-like growth factor -1 (hIGF-1 in the placenta corrects fetal weight deficits in mouse, rat, and rabbit models of intrauterine growth restriction without changes in placental weight. The underlying mechanisms of this effect have not been elucidated. To investigate the effect of intra-placental IGF-1 over-expression on placental function we examined glucose transporter expression and localization in both a mouse model of IUGR and a model of human trophoblast, the BeWo Choriocarcinoma cell line.At gestational day 18, animals were divided into four groups; sham-operated controls, uterine artery branch ligation (UABL, UABL+Ad-hIGF-1 (10(8 PFU, UABL+Ad-LacZ (10(8 PFU. At gestational day 20, pups and placentas were harvested by C-section. For human studies, BeWo choriocarcinoma cells were grown in F12 complete medium +10%FBS. Cells were incubated in serum-free control media ± Ad-IGF-1 or Ad-LacZ for 48 hours. MOIs of 10∶1 and 100∶1 were utilized. The RNA, protein expression and localization of glucose transporters GLUT1, 3, 8, and 9 were analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry.In both the mouse placenta and BeWo, GLUT1 regulation was linked to altered protein localization. GLUT3, localized to the mouse fetal endothelial cells, was reduced in placental insufficiency but maintained with Ad-I GF-1 treatment. Interestingly, GLUT8 expression was reduced in the UABL placenta but up-regulated following Ad-IGF-1 in both mouse and human systems. GLUT9 expression in the mouse was increased by Ad-IGF-1 but this was not reflected in the BeWo, where Ad-IGF-1 caused moderate membrane relocalization.Enhanced GLUT isoform transporter expression and relocalization to the membrane may be an important mechanism in Ad-hIGF-1mediated correction of placental insufficiency.

  10. Organic cation transporter-mediated ergothioneine uptake in mouse neural progenitor cells suppresses proliferation and promotes differentiation into neurons.

    Takahiro Ishimoto

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to clarify the functional expression and physiological role in neural progenitor cells (NPCs of carnitine/organic cation transporter OCTN1/SLC22A4, which accepts the naturally occurring food-derived antioxidant ergothioneine (ERGO as a substrate in vivo. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression of OCTN1 was much higher than that of other organic cation transporters in mouse cultured cortical NPCs. Immunocytochemical analysis showed colocalization of OCTN1 with the NPC marker nestin in cultured NPCs and mouse embryonic carcinoma P19 cells differentiated into neural progenitor-like cells (P19-NPCs. These cells exhibited time-dependent [(3H]ERGO uptake. These results demonstrate that OCTN1 is functionally expressed in murine NPCs. Cultured NPCs and P19-NPCs formed neurospheres from clusters of proliferating cells in a culture time-dependent manner. Exposure of cultured NPCs to ERGO or other antioxidants (edaravone and ascorbic acid led to a significant decrease in the area of neurospheres with concomitant elimination of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Transfection of P19-NPCs with small interfering RNA for OCTN1 markedly promoted formation of neurospheres with a concomitant decrease of [(3H]ERGO uptake. On the other hand, exposure of cultured NPCs to ERGO markedly increased the number of cells immunoreactive for the neuronal marker βIII-tubulin, but decreased the number immunoreactive for the astroglial marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, with concomitant up-regulation of neuronal differentiation activator gene Math1. Interestingly, edaravone and ascorbic acid did not affect such differentiation of NPCs, in contrast to the case of proliferation. Knockdown of OCTN1 increased the number of cells immunoreactive for GFAP, but decreased the number immunoreactive for βIII-tubulin, with concomitant down-regulation of Math1 in P19-NPCs. Thus, OCTN1-mediated uptake of ERGO in NPCs inhibits

  11. Membrane metabolism mediated by Sec14 family members influences Arf GTPase activating protein activity for transport from the trans-Golgi.

    Wong, Tania A; Fairn, Gregory D; Poon, Pak P; Shmulevitz, Maya; McMaster, Christopher R; Singer, Richard A; Johnston, Gerald C

    2005-09-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a family of Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) GTPase activating protein (GAP) proteins with the Gcs1 + Age2 ArfGAP pair providing essential overlapping function for the movement of transport vesicles from the trans-Golgi network. We have generated a temperature-sensitive but stable version of the Gcs1 protein that is impaired only for trans-Golgi transport and find that deleterious effects of this enfeebled Gcs1-4 mutant protein are relieved by increased gene dosage of the gcs1-4 mutant gene itself or by the SFH2 gene (also called CSR1), encoding a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PITP). This effect was not seen for the SEC14 gene, encoding the founding member of the yeast PITP protein family, even though the Gcs1 and Age2 ArfGAPs are known to be downstream effectors of Sec14-mediated activity for trans-Golgi transport. Sfh2-mediated suppression of inadequate Gcs1-4 function depended on phospholipase D, whereas inadequate Gcs1-4 activity was relieved by increasing levels of diacylglycerol (DAG). Recombinant Gcs1 protein was found to bind certain phospholipids but not DAG. Our findings favor a model of Gcs1 localization through binding to specific phospholipids and activation of ArfGAP activity by DAG-mediated membrane curvature as the transport vesicle is formed. Thus, ArfGAPs are subject to both temporal and spatial regulation that is facilitated by Sfh2-mediated modulation of the lipid environment. PMID:16126894

  12. Impact of oral meloxicam and long-distance transport on cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in feedlot steers receiving modified live BVDV booster vaccination on arrival.

    Van Engen, N K; Platt, R; Roth, J A; Stock, M L; Engelken, T; Vann, R C; Wulf, L W; Busby, W D; Wang, C; Kalkwarf, E M; Coetzee, J F

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of oral meloxicam (MEL) and long-distance transportation on cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in preconditioned steers receiving a booster vaccination on arrival. We hypothesized that steers treated with MEL at 1mg/kg body weight, 6h before night-time transport, would be less immunocompromised on arrival (day 0) and after 7days, and that CMI following vaccination with a modified live bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) recall antigen would be increased. Brahman crossbreed steers, 13-17 months of age (n=87), were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: MEL, transported (MTR) (n=22), MEL, non-transported (MNT) (n=22), lactose placebo, transported (CTR) (n=21), and lactose placebo, non-transported (CNT) (n=22). MTR and CTR steers were transported for approximately 16h non-stop on a truck from Mississippi to Iowa (approximately 1300km), whereas steers in the MNT and CNT groups remained in Mississippi as non-transported controls. Body weight was measured and jugular blood was collected at -1, 0, and 7days from all steers at the same time, regardless of location. Multi-parameter flow cytometry (MP-FCM) was used to identify T-cell subsets and detect the expression of three activation markers (CD25 [interleukin (IL)-2 receptor], intracellular interferon-gamma [IFNγ], and IL-4) after in vitro stimulation with BVDV recall antigen. Plasma cortisol concentration was measured on day -1, 0, and 7 as a marker of transport-associated stress. Serum antibody titer to BVDV was assessed on day -1 and day 7 post-booster vaccination. Whole-blood samples were analyzed using MP-FCM on days 0 and 7. Results were log transformed and analyzed using repeated measures of analysis of variance. Compared with non-transported controls, transport led to an increase in BVDV-induced expression of CD25, IFNγ, and IL-4 in CD4(+), CD8(+), and γδ(+) T-cell subsets (P0.10). A treatment*transport interaction was noted for the increase in IL

  13. Divalent metal transporter 1 (Dmt1) Mediates Copper Transport in the Duodenum of Iron-Deficient Rats and When Overexpressed in Iron-Deprived HEK-293 Cells12

    Jiang, Lingli; Garrick, Michael D.; Garrick, Laura M.; Zhao, Lin; Collins, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular copper-binding proteins (metallothionein I/II) and a copper exporter (Menkes copper-transporting ATPase) are upregulated in duodenal enterocytes from iron-deficient rats, consistent with copper accumulation in the intestinal mucosa. How copper enters enterocytes during iron deficiency is, however, not clear. Divalent metal transporter 1 (Dmt1), the predominant iron importer in the mammalian duodenum, also transports other metal ions, possibly including copper. Given this possibi...

  14. Salinomycin overcomes ABC transporter-mediated multidrug and apoptosis resistance in human leukemia stem cell-like KG-1a cells

    Fuchs, Dominik [Research Group Molecular Neuro-Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Immunology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 305, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Daniel, Volker; Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Opelz, Gerhard [Institute of Immunology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 305, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Naujokat, Cord, E-mail: cord.naujokat@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Immunology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 305, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-04-16

    Leukemia stem cells are known to exhibit multidrug resistance by expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters which constitute transmembrane proteins capable of exporting a wide variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cytosol. We show here that human promyeloblastic leukemia KG-1a cells exposed to the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate resemble many characteristics of leukemia stem cells, including expression of functional ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein, BCRP and MRP8. Consequently, KG-1a cells display resistance to the induction of apoptosis by various chemotherapeutic drugs. Resistance to apoptosis induction by chemotherapeutic drugs can be reversed by cyclosporine A, which effectively inhibits the activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP, thus demonstrating ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance in KG-1a cells. However, KG-1a are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction by salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to kill human breast cancer stem cell-like cells and to induce apoptosis in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug and apoptosis resistance. Whereas KG-1a cells can be adapted to proliferate in the presence of apoptosis-inducing concentrations of bortezomib and doxorubicin, salinomycin does not permit long-term adaptation of the cells to apoptosis-inducing concentrations. Thus, salinomycin should be regarded as a novel and effective agent for the elimination of leukemia stem cells and other tumor cells exhibiting ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance.

  15. Salinomycin overcomes ABC transporter-mediated multidrug and apoptosis resistance in human leukemia stem cell-like KG-1a cells

    Leukemia stem cells are known to exhibit multidrug resistance by expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters which constitute transmembrane proteins capable of exporting a wide variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cytosol. We show here that human promyeloblastic leukemia KG-1a cells exposed to the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate resemble many characteristics of leukemia stem cells, including expression of functional ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein, BCRP and MRP8. Consequently, KG-1a cells display resistance to the induction of apoptosis by various chemotherapeutic drugs. Resistance to apoptosis induction by chemotherapeutic drugs can be reversed by cyclosporine A, which effectively inhibits the activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP, thus demonstrating ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance in KG-1a cells. However, KG-1a are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction by salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to kill human breast cancer stem cell-like cells and to induce apoptosis in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug and apoptosis resistance. Whereas KG-1a cells can be adapted to proliferate in the presence of apoptosis-inducing concentrations of bortezomib and doxorubicin, salinomycin does not permit long-term adaptation of the cells to apoptosis-inducing concentrations. Thus, salinomycin should be regarded as a novel and effective agent for the elimination of leukemia stem cells and other tumor cells exhibiting ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance.

  16. Connexin-43 hemichannels mediate cyclic ADP-ribose generation and its Ca2+-mobilizing activity by NAD+/cyclic ADP-ribose transport.

    Song, Eun-Kyung; Rah, So-Young; Lee, Young-Rae; Yoo, Chae-Hwa; Kim, Yu-Ri; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Park, Kwang-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Suk; Kim, Uh-Hyun; Han, Myung-Kwan

    2011-12-30

    The ADP-ribosyl cyclase CD38 whose catalytic domain resides in outside of the cell surface produces the second messenger cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) from NAD(+). cADPR increases intracellular Ca(2+) through the intracellular ryanodine receptor/Ca(2+) release channel (RyR). It has been known that intracellular NAD(+) approaches ecto-CD38 via its export by connexin (Cx43) hemichannels, a component of gap junctions. However, it is unclear how cADPR extracellularly generated by ecto-CD38 approaches intracellular RyR although CD38 itself or nucleoside transporter has been proposed to import cADPR. Moreover, it has been unknown what physiological stimulation can trigger Cx43-mediated export of NAD(+). Here we demonstrate that Cx43 hemichannels, but not CD38, import cADPR to increase intracellular calcium through RyR. We also demonstrate that physiological stimulation such as Fcγ receptor (FcγR) ligation induces calcium mobilization through three sequential steps, Cx43-mediated NAD(+) export, CD38-mediated generation of cADPR and Cx43-mediated cADPR import in J774 cells. Protein kinase A (PKA) activation also induced calcium mobilization in the same way as FcγR stimulation. FcγR stimulation-induced calcium mobilization was blocked by PKA inhibition, indicating that PKA is a linker between FcγR stimulation and NAD(+)/cADPR transport. Cx43 knockdown blocked extracellular cADPR import and extracellular cADPR-induced calcium mobilization in J774 cells. Cx43 overexpression in Cx43-negative cells conferred extracellular cADPR-induced calcium mobilization by the mediation of cADPR import. Our data suggest that Cx43 has a dual function exporting NAD(+) and importing cADPR into the cell to activate intracellular calcium mobilization. PMID:22033928

  17. Fluid forces or impacts, what governs the entrainment of soil particles in sediment transport mediated by a Newtonian fluid?

    Pähtz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    To sustain steady sediment transport, the loss of transported particles that become trapped in the soil bed must be balanced by the entrainment of bed particles through fluid forces or energetic impacts of transported particles. Here we show that the transition to fully impact-sustained transport occurs at a critical impact number $\\mathrm{Im}=\\Theta\\mathrm{Re}\\sqrt{s}\\approx3$, where $\\Theta$ is the Shields number, $\\mathrm{Re}$ the particle Reynolds number, and $s$ the particle-fluid-density ratio. Hence, fluid entrainment is negligible for most regimes, including turbulent bedload transport.

  18. Arabidopsis POLYOL TRANSPORTER5, a new member of the monosaccharide transporter-like superfamily, mediates H+-Symport of numerous substrates, including myo-inositol, glycerol, and ribose.

    Klepek, Yvonne-Simone; Geiger, Dietmar; Stadler, Ruth; Klebl, Franz; Landouar-Arsivaud, Lucie; Lemoine, Rémi; Hedrich, Rainer; Sauer, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    Six genes of the Arabidopsis thaliana monosaccharide transporter-like (MST-like) superfamily share significant homology with polyol transporter genes previously identified in plants translocating polyols (mannitol or sorbitol) in their phloem (celery [Apium graveolens], common plantain [Plantago major], or sour cherry [Prunus cerasus]). The physiological role and the functional properties of this group of proteins were unclear in Arabidopsis, which translocates sucrose and small amounts of raffinose rather than polyols. Here, we describe POLYOL TRANSPORTER5 (AtPLT5), the first member of this subgroup of Arabidopsis MST-like transporters. Transient expression of an AtPLT5-green fluorescent protein fusion in plant cells and functional analyses of the AtPLT5 protein in yeast and Xenopus oocytes demonstrate that AtPLT5 is located in the plasma membrane and characterize this protein as a broad-spectrum H+-symporter for linear polyols, such as sorbitol, xylitol, erythritol, or glycerol. Unexpectedly, however, AtPLT5 catalyzes also the transport of the cyclic polyol myo-inositol and of different hexoses and pentoses, including ribose, a sugar that is not transported by any of the previously characterized plant sugar transporters. RT-PCR analyses and AtPLT5 promoter-reporter gene plants revealed that AtPLT5 is most strongly expressed in Arabidopsis roots, but also in the vascular tissue of leaves and in specific floral organs. The potential physiological role of AtPLT5 is discussed. PMID:15598803

  19. Interactive ion-mediated sap flow regulation in olive and laurel stems: physicochemical characteristics of water transport via the pit structure.

    Jeongeun Ryu

    Full Text Available Sap water is distributed and utilized through xylem conduits, which are vascular networks of inert pipes important for plant survival. Interestingly, plants can actively regulate water transport using ion-mediated responses and adapt to environmental changes. However, ionic effects on active water transport in vascular plants remain unclear. In this report, the interactive ionic effects on sap transport were systematically investigated for the first time by visualizing the uptake process of ionic solutions of different ion compositions (K+/Ca2+ using synchrotron X-ray and neutron imaging techniques. Ionic solutions with lower K+/Ca2+ ratios induced an increased sap flow rate in stems of Olea europaea L. and Laurus nobilis L. The different ascent rates of ionic solutions depending on K+/Ca2+ ratios at a fixed total concentration increases our understanding of ion-responsiveness in plants from a physicochemical standpoint. Based on these results, effective structural changes in the pit membrane were observed using varying ionic ratios of K+/Ca2+. The formation of electrostatically induced hydrodynamic layers and the ion-responsiveness of hydrogel structures based on Hofmeister series increase our understanding of the mechanism of ion-mediated sap flow control in plants.

  20. Three Transporters Mediate Uptake of Glycine Betaine and Carnitine by Listeria monocytogenes in Response to Hyperosmotic Stress

    Angelidis, Apostolos S.; Smith, Gary M.

    2003-01-01

    The uptake and accumulation of the potent osmolytes glycine betaine and carnitine enable the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to proliferate in environments of elevated osmotic stress, often rendering salt-based food preservation inadequate. To date, three osmolyte transport systems are known to operate in L. monocytogenes: glycine betaine porter I (BetL), glycine betaine porter II (Gbu), and a carnitine transporter OpuC. We investigated the specificity of each transporter towards e...

  1. Epidermal growth factor and insulin stimulate nuclear pore-mediated macromolecular transport in isolated rat liver nuclei

    1987-01-01

    Fluorescence photobleaching was used to measure the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin, and glucagon on the nuclear transport of fluorescent-labeled dextrans across the nuclear pore complex. EGF and insulin were found to stimulate transport approximately 200%, while boiling these polypeptide growth factors greatly diminished this enhancement activity. Glucagon demonstrated no enhancement effect. The nuclear transport enhancement effects were observed at EGF and insulin concentra...

  2. The synthesis and biodistribution of [(11)C]metformin as a PET probe to study hepatobiliary transport mediated by the multi-drug and toxin extrusion transporter 1 (MATE1) in vivo.

    Hume, W Ewan; Shingaki, Tomotaka; Takashima, Tadayuki; Hashizume, Yoshinobu; Okauchi, Takashi; Katayama, Yumiko; Hayashinaka, Emi; Wada, Yasuhiro; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-12-15

    In order to develop a new positron emission tomography (PET) probe to study hepatobiliary transport mediated by the multi-drug and toxin extrusion transporter 1 (MATE1), (11)C-labelled metformin was synthesized and then evaluated as a PET probe. [(11)C]Metformin ([(11)C]4) was synthesized in three steps, from [(11)C]methyl iodide. Evaluation by small animal PET of [(11)C]4 showed that there was increased concentrations of [(11)C]4 in the livers of mice pre-treated with pyrimethamine, a potential inhibitor of MATEs, inhibiting the hepatobiliary excretion of metformin. Radiometabolite analysis showed that [(11)C]4 was not degraded in vivo during the PET scan. Biodistribution studies were undertaken and the organ distributions were extrapolated into a standard human model. In conclusion, [(11)C]4 may be useful as a PET probe to non-invasively study the in vivo function of hepatobiliary transport and drug-drug interactions, mediated by MATE1 in future clinical investigations. PMID:24238901

  3. A role for DNA-mediated charge transport in regulating p53: Oxidation of the DNA-bound protein from a distance

    Augustyn, Katherine E.; Merino, Edward J.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2007-01-01

    Charge transport (CT) through the DNA base pairs provides a means to promote redox reactions at a remote site and potentially to effect signaling between molecules bound to DNA. Here we describe the oxidation of a cell-cycle regulatory protein, p53, from a distance through DNA-mediated CT. A consensus p53 binding site as well as three DNA promoters regulated by p53 were synthesized containing a tethered DNA photooxidant, anthraquinone. Photoinduced oxidation of the protein occurs from a dista...

  4. Microtubule-binding protein doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) guides kinesin-3-mediated cargo transport to dendrites.

    Lipka, Joanna; Kapitein, Lukas C; Jaworski, Jacek; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2016-02-01

    In neurons, the polarized distribution of vesicles and other cellular materials is established through molecular motors that steer selective transport between axons and dendrites. It is currently unclear whether interactions between kinesin motors and microtubule-binding proteins can steer polarized transport. By screening all 45 kinesin family members, we systematically addressed which kinesin motors can translocate cargo in living cells and drive polarized transport in hippocampal neurons. While the majority of kinesin motors transport cargo selectively into axons, we identified five members of the kinesin-3 (KIF1) and kinesin-4 (KIF21) subfamily that can also target dendrites. We found that microtubule-binding protein doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) labels a subset of dendritic microtubules and is required for KIF1-dependent dense-core vesicles (DCVs) trafficking into dendrites and dendrite development. Our study demonstrates that microtubule-binding proteins can provide local signals for specific kinesin motors to drive polarized cargo transport. PMID:26758546

  5. Effect of base-pair inhomogeneities on charge transport along the DNA molecule, mediated by twist and radial polarons

    Some recent results for a three-dimensional, semi-classical, tight-binding model for DNA show that there are two types of polarons, namely radial and twist polarons, which can transport charge along the DNA molecule. However, the existence of two types of base pairs in real DNA makes it crucial to find out if charge transport also exists in DNA chains with different base pairs. In this paper, we address this problem in its simple case, a homogeneous chain except for a single different base pair, which we call a base-pair inhomogeneity, and its effect on charge transport. Radial polarons experience either reflection or trapping. However, twist polarons are good candidates for charge transport along real DNA. This transport is also very robust with respect to weak parametric and diagonal disorder

  6. DNA-Fragments Are Transcytosed across CaCo-2 Cells by Adsorptive Endocytosis and Vesicular Mediated Transport

    Johannessen, Lene E.; Spilsberg, Bjørn; Wiik-Nielsen, Christer R.; Kristoffersen, Anja B.; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Berdal, Knut G.

    2013-01-01

    Dietary DNA is degraded into shorter DNA-fragments and single nucleosides in the gastrointestinal tract. Dietary DNA is mainly taken up as single nucleosides and bases, but even dietary DNA-fragments of up to a few hundred bp are able to cross the intestinal barrier and enter the blood stream. The molecular mechanisms behind transport of DNA-fragments across the intestine and the effects of this transport on the organism are currently unknown. Here we investigate the transport of DNA-fragment...

  7. The CebE/MsiK Transporter is a Doorway to the Cello-oligosaccharide-mediated Induction of Streptomyces scabies Pathogenicity

    Jourdan, Samuel; Francis, Isolde Maria; Kim, Min Jung; Salazar, Joren Jeico C.; Planckaert, Sören; Frère, Jean-Marie; Matagne, André; Kerff, Frédéric; Devreese, Bart; Loria, Rosemary; Rigali, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces scabies is an economically important plant pathogen well-known for damaging root and tuber crops by causing scab lesions. Thaxtomin A is the main causative agent responsible for the pathogenicity of S. scabies and cello-oligosaccharides are environmental triggers that induce the production of this phytotoxin. How cello-oligosaccharides are sensed or transported in order to induce the virulent behavior of S. scabies? Here we report that the cellobiose and cellotriose binding protein CebE, and MsiK, the ATPase providing energy for carbohydrates transport, are the protagonists of the cello-oligosaccharide mediated induction of thaxtomin production in S. scabies. Our work provides the first example where the transport and not the sensing of major constituents of the plant host is the central mechanism associated with virulence of the pathogen. Our results allow to draw a complete pathway from signal transport to phytotoxin production where each step of the cascade is controlled by CebR, the cellulose utilization regulator. We propose the high affinity of CebE to cellotriose as possible adaptation of S. scabies to colonize expanding plant tissue. Our work further highlights how genes associated with primary metabolism in nonpathogenic Streptomyces species have been recruited as basic elements of virulence in plant pathogenic species. PMID:27250236

  8. The ABCG2 Efflux Transporter in the Mammary Gland Mediates Veterinary Drug Secretion across the Blood-Milk Barrier into Milk of Dairy Cows.

    Mahnke, Hanna; Ballent, Mariana; Baumann, Sven; Imperiale, Fernanda; von Bergen, Martin; Lanusse, Carlos; Lifschitz, Adrian L; Honscha, Walther; Halwachs, Sandra

    2016-05-01

    In human and mice ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter ABCG2 represents the main route for active drug transport into milk. However, there is no detailed information on the role of ABCG2 in drug secretion and accumulation in milk of dairy animals. We therefore examined ABCG2-mediated drug transport in the bovine mammary gland by parallel pharmacokinetic studies in lactating Jersey cows and in vitro flux studies using the anthelmintic drug monepantel (MNP) as representative bovine ABCG2 (bABCG2) drug substrate. Animals received MNP (Zolvix, Novartis Animal Health Inc.) once (2.5 mg/kg per os) and the concentrations of MNP and the active MNP metabolite MNPSO2were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Compared with the parent drug MNP, we detected higher MNPSO2plasma concentrations (expressed as area under the concentration-versus-time curve). Moreover, we observed MNPSO2excretion into milk of dairy cows with a high milk-to-plasma ratio of 6.75. In mechanistic flux assays, we determined a preferential time-dependent basolateral-to-apical (B > A) MNPSO2transport across polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells-bABCG2 monolayers using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The B > A MNPSO2transport was significantly inhibited by the ABCG2 inhibitor fumitremorgin C in bABCG2- but not in mock-transduced MDCKII cells. Additionally, the antibiotic drug enrofloxacin, the benzimidazole anthelmintic oxfendazole and the macrocyclic lactone anthelmintic moxidectin caused a reduction in the MNPSO2(B > A) net efflux. Altogether, this study indicated that therapeutically relevant drugs like the anthelmintic MNP represent substrates of the bovine mammary ABCG2 transporter and may thereby be actively concentrated in dairy milk. PMID:26956640

  9. Revealing the mechanism of passive transport in lipid bilayers via phonon-mediated nanometre-scale density fluctuations.

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Bolmatov, Dima; Soloviov, Dmitry; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Bosak, Alexey; Cai, Yong Q

    2016-01-01

    The passive transport of molecules through a cell membrane relies on thermal motions of the lipids. However, the nature of transmembrane transport and the precise mechanism remain elusive and call for a comprehensive study of phonon excitations. Here we report a high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering study of the in-plane phonon excitations in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine above and below the main transition temperature. In the gel phase, for the first time, we observe low-frequency transverse modes, which exhibit a phonon gap when the lipid transitions into the fluid phase. We argue that the phonon gap signifies the formation of short-lived nanometre-scale lipid clusters and transient pores, which facilitate the passive molecular transport across the bilayer plane. Our findings suggest that the phononic motion of the hydrocarbon tails provides an effective mechanism of passive transport, and illustrate the importance of the collective dynamics of biomembranes. PMID:27175859

  10. Revealing the mechanism of passive transport in lipid bilayers via phonon-mediated nanometre-scale density fluctuations

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail; Bolmatov, Dima; Soloviov, Dmitry; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P.; Cunsolo, Alessandro; Bosak, Alexey; Cai, Yong Q.

    2016-05-01

    The passive transport of molecules through a cell membrane relies on thermal motions of the lipids. However, the nature of transmembrane transport and the precise mechanism remain elusive and call for a comprehensive study of phonon excitations. Here we report a high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering study of the in-plane phonon excitations in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine above and below the main transition temperature. In the gel phase, for the first time, we observe low-frequency transverse modes, which exhibit a phonon gap when the lipid transitions into the fluid phase. We argue that the phonon gap signifies the formation of short-lived nanometre-scale lipid clusters and transient pores, which facilitate the passive molecular transport across the bilayer plane. Our findings suggest that the phononic motion of the hydrocarbon tails provides an effective mechanism of passive transport, and illustrate the importance of the collective dynamics of biomembranes.

  11. Oat β-glucan depresses SGLT1- and GLUT2-mediated glucose transport in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6).

    Abbasi, Nazanin N; Purslow, Peter P; Tosh, Susan M; Bakovic, Marica

    2016-06-01

    Oat β-glucan consumption is linked to reduced risk factors associated with diabetes and obesity by lowering glycemic response and serum level of low-density lipoproteins. The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism of action of oat β-glucan at the interface between the gut wall and the lumen responsible for attenuating glucose levels. We proposed that viscous oat β-glucan acts as a physical barrier to glucose uptake in normally absorptive gut epithelial cells IEC-6 by affecting the expression of intestinal glucose transporters. Concentration and time-dependent changes in glucose uptake were established by using a nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-d-glucose. The effectiveness of nutrient transport in IEC-6 cells was shown by significant differences in glucose uptake and corresponding transporter expression. The expressions of glucose transporters sodium-glucose-linked transport protein 1 (SGLT1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) increased with time (0-60 minutes) and glucose levels (5-25 mmol/L). The suppression of glucose uptake and SGLT1 and GLUT2 expression by increasing concentrations (4-8 mg/mL) of oat β-glucan demonstrated a direct effect of the physical properties of oat β-glucan on glucose transport. These results affirmed oat β-glucan as a dietary agent for minimizing postprandial glucose and showed that modulating the activity of the key intestinal glucose transporters with oat β-glucan could be an effective way of lowering blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes. PMID:27188900

  12. Cation-selective transporters are critical to the AMPK-mediated antiproliferative effects of metformin in human breast cancer cells.

    Cai, Hao; Zhang, Yunhui; Han, Tianxiang Kevin; Everett, Ruth S; Thakker, Dhiren R

    2016-05-01

    The antidiabetic drug metformin exerts antineoplastic effects against breast cancer and other cancers. One mechanism by which metformin is believed to exert its anticancer effect involves activation of its intracellular target, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is also implicated in the antidiabetic effect of metformin. It is proposed that in cancer cells, AMPK activation leads to inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the downstream pS6K that regulates cell proliferation. Due to its hydrophilic and cationic nature, metformin requires cation-selective transporters to enter cells and activate AMPK. This study demonstrates that expression levels of cation-selective transporters correlate with the antiproliferative and antitumor efficacy of metformin in breast cancer. Metformin uptake and antiproliferative activity were compared between a cation-selective transporter-deficient human breast cancer cell line, BT-20, and a BT-20 cell line that was engineered to overexpress organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3), a representative of cation-selective transporters and a predominant transporter in human breast tumors. Metformin uptake was minimal in BT-20 cells, but increased by >13-fold in OCT3-BT20 cells, and its antiproliferative potency was >4-fold in OCT3-BT20 versus BT-20 cells. This increase in antiproliferative activity was associated with greater AMPK phosphorylation and decreased pS6K phosphorylation in OCT3-BT20 cells. In vitro data were corroborated by in vivo observations of significantly greater antitumor efficacy of metformin in xenograft mice bearing OCT3-overexpressing tumors versus low transporter-expressing wildtype tumors. Collectively, these findings establish a clear relationship between cation-selective transporter expression, the AMPK-mTOR-pS6K signaling cascade, and the antiproliferative activity of metformin in breast cancer. PMID:26669511

  13. The quorum-sensing molecule farnesol is a modulator of drug efflux mediated by ABC multidrug transporters and synergizes with drugs in Candida albicans.

    Sharma, Monika; Prasad, Rajendra

    2011-10-01

    Overexpression of the CaCDR1-encoded multidrug efflux pump protein CaCdr1p (Candida drug resistance protein 1), belonging to the ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters, is one of the most prominent contributors of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Candida albicans. Thus, blocking or modulating the function of the drug efflux pumps represents an attractive approach in combating MDR. In the present study, we provide first evidence that the quorum-sensing molecule farnesol (FAR) is a specific modulator of efflux mediated by ABC multidrug transporters, such as CaCdr1p and CaCdr2p of C. albicans and ScPdr5p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Interestingly, FAR did not modulate the efflux mediated by the multidrug extrusion pump protein CaMdr1p, belonging to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Kinetic data revealed that FAR competitively inhibited rhodamine 6G efflux in CaCdr1p-overexpressing cells, with a simultaneous increase in an apparent K(m) without affecting the V(max) values and the ATPase activity. We also observed that when used in combination, FAR at a nontoxic concentration synergized with the drugs at their respective nonlethal concentrations, as was evident from their resistant clinical isolates of C. albicans. Our biochemical experiments revealed that the synergistic interaction of FAR with the drugs led to reactive oxygen species accumulation, which triggered early apoptosis, and that both could be partly reversed by the addition of an antioxidant. Collectively, FAR modulates drug extrusion mediated exclusively by ABC proteins and is synergistic to fluconazole (FLC), ketoconazole (KTC), miconazole (MCZ), and amphotericin (AMB). PMID:21768514

  14. Transport of glycosides through liquid organic membranes mediated by reversible boronate formation is a diffusion-controlled process

    Morin, G.T.; Hughes, M.P.; Paugam, M.F.; Smith, B.D. (Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States))

    1994-10-05

    The ability of phenylboronic acid, [3-(1-adamantylcarboxamido)phenyl]boronic acid, and diphenylborinic acid to extract and transport p-nitrophenyl [beta]-D-glucopyranoside (glucoside), p-nitrophenyl [beta]-D-galactopyranoside (galactoside), and p-nitrophenyl [beta]-D-mannopyranoside (mannoside) through a liquid organic membrane, in the presence of trioctylmethylammonium or tetrabutylammonium chloride, was determined. Under the conditions examined, glycoside transport was facilitated by the reversible formation of covalent tetrahedral, anionic glycoside-boronate complexes, which partitioned into the organic membrane as lipophilic ion pairs. The results of various experiments indicated the rate-limiting step in the transport process was diffusion of the solutes through the narrow unstirred boundary layers adjacent the organic/aqueous interfaces. A plot of glycoside transport rate versus glycoside extraction constant, K[sub ex], formed an approximate bell-shaped relationship. Maximal transport occurred when the carrier admixture had an extraction constant of log K[sub ex(max)] approximately 2.2. 20 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. NasFED proteins mediate assimilatory nitrate and nitrite transport in Klebsiella oxytoca (pneumoniae) M5al.

    Wu, Q; Stewart, V

    1998-03-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources. The enzymes required for nitrate and nitrite assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. We report here the complete nasFED sequence. Sequence comparisons indicate that the nasFED genes encode components of a conventional periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein (NasF), a homodimeric intrinsic membrane protein (NasE), and a homodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein (NasD). The NasF protein and the related NrtA and CmpA proteins of cyanobacteria contain leader (signal) sequences with the double-arginine motif that is hypothesized to direct prefolded proteins to an alternate protein export pathway. The NasE protein and the related NrtB and CmpB proteins of cyanobacteria contain unusual variants of the EAA loop sequence that defines membrane-intrinsic proteins of ABC transporters. To characterize nitrate and nitrite transport, we constructed in-frame nonpolar deletions of the chromosomal nasFED genes. Growth tests coupled with nitrate and nitrite uptake assays revealed that the nasFED genes are essential for nitrate transport and participate in nitrite transport as well. Interestingly, the delta nasF strain exhibited leaky phenotypes, particularly at elevated nitrate concentrations, suggesting that the NasED proteins are not fully dependent on the NasF protein. PMID:9495773

  16. Glucocorticoid receptor, but not mineralocorticoid receptor, mediates cortisol regulation of epidermal ionocyte development and ion transport in zebrafish (danio rerio.

    Shelly Abad Cruz

    Full Text Available Cortisol is the major endogenous glucocorticoid (GC both in human and fish, mediated by corticosteroid receptors. Due to the absence of aldosterone production in teleost fish, cortisol is also traditionally accepted to function as mineralocorticoid (MC; but whether it acts through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR or the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR remains a subject of debate. Here, we used loss-of-function and rescue assays to determine whether cortisol affects zebrafish epidermal ionocyte development and function via the GR and/or the MR. GR knockdown morphants displayed a significant decrease in the major ionocytes, namely Na(+-K(+-ATPase-rich cells (NaRCs and H(+-ATPase-rich cells (HRCs, as well as other cells, including epidermal stem cells (ESCs, keratinocytes, and mucus cells; conversely, cell numbers were unaffected in MR knockdown morphants. In agreement, GR morphants, but not MR morphants, exhibited decreased NaRC-mediated Ca(2+ uptake and HRC-mediated H(+ secretion. Rescue via GR capped mRNA injection or exogenous cortisol incubation normalized the number of epidermal ionocytes in GR morphants. We also provide evidence for GR localization in epidermal cells. At the transcript level, GR mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in gill sections and present in both NaRCs and HRCs, supporting the knockdown and functional assay results in embryo. Altogether, we have provided solid molecular evidence that GR is indeed present on ionocytes, where it mediates the effects of cortisol on ionocyte development and function. Hence, cortisol-GR axis performs the roles of both GC and MC in zebrafish skin and gills.

  17. In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter-Mediated Efflux at the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Wei, Bih-Rong; Hall, Matthew D; Simpson, R Mark; Gottesman, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    We provide a detailed protocol for imaging ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) function at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of transgenic mice. D-Luciferin is specifically transported by ABCG2 found on the apical side of endothelial cells at the BBB. The luciferase-luciferin enzymatic reaction produces bioluminescence, which allows a direct measurement of ABCG2 function at the BBB. Therefore bioluminescence imaging (BLI) correlates with ABCG2 function at the BBB and this can be measured by administering luciferin in a mouse model that expresses luciferase in the brain parenchyma. BLI allows for a relatively low-cost alternative for studying transporter function in vivo compared to other strategies such as positron emission tomography. This method for imaging ABCG2 function at the BBB can be used to investigate pharmacokinetic inhibition of the transporter. PMID:27424909

  18. Effect of base-pair inhomogeneities on charge transport along DNA mediated by twist and radial polarons

    Palmero, F.; Archilla, J. F. R.; Hennig, D.; Romero, F. R.

    2003-01-01

    Some recent results for a three--dimensional, semi--classical, tight--binding model for DNA show that there are two types of polarons, named radial and twist polarons, that can transport charge along the DNA molecule. However, the existence of two types of base pairs in real DNA, makes it crucial to find out if charge transport also exist in DNA chains with different base pairs. In this paper we address this problem in its simple case, an homogeneous chain except for a single different base p...

  19. The Antimicrobial Agent Fusidic Acid Inhibits Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide-Mediated Hepatic Clearance and May Potentiate Statin-Induced Myopathy.

    Eng, Heather; Scialis, Renato J; Rotter, Charles J; Lin, Jian; Lazzaro, Sarah; Varma, Manthena V; Di, Li; Feng, Bo; West, Michael; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2016-05-01

    Chronic treatment of methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureusstrains with the bacteriostatic agent fusidic acid (FA) is frequently associated with myopathy including rhabdomyolysis upon coadministration with statins. Because adverse effects with statins are usually the result of drug-drug interactions, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of FA against human CYP3A4 and clinically relevant drug transporters such as organic anion transporting polypeptides OATP1B1 and OATP1B3, multidrug resistant protein 1, and breast cancer resistance protein, which are involved in the oral absorption and/or systemic clearance of statins including atorvastatin, rosuvastatin, and simvastatin. FA was a weak reversible (IC50= 295 ± 1.0μM) and time-dependent (KI= 216 ± 41μM andkinact= 0.0179 ± 0.001 min(-1)) inhibitor of CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam-1'-hydroxylase activity in human liver microsomes. FA demonstrated inhibition of multidrug resistant protein 1-mediated digoxin transport with an IC50value of 157 ± 1.0μM and was devoid of breast cancer resistance protein inhibition (IC50> 500μM). In contrast, FA showed potent inhibition of OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-specific rosuvastatin transport with IC50values of 1.59μM and 2.47μM, respectively. Furthermore, coadministration of oral rosuvastatin and FA to rats led to an approximately 19.3-fold and 24.6-fold increase in the rosuvastatin maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve, respectively, which could be potentially mediated through inhibitory effects of FA on rat Oatp1a4 (IC50= 2.26μM) and Oatp1b2 (IC50= 4.38μM) transporters, which are responsible for rosuvastatin uptake in rat liver. The potent inhibition of human OATP1B1/OATP1B3 by FA could attenuate hepatic uptake of statins, resulting in increased blood and tissue concentrations, potentially manifesting in musculoskeletal toxicity. PMID:26888941

  20. Neuronal activity mediated regulation of glutamate transporter GLT-1 surface diffusion in rat astrocytes in dissociated and slice cultures.

    Al Awabdh, Sana; Gupta-Agarwal, Swati; Sheehan, David F; Muir, James; Norkett, Rosalind; Twelvetrees, Alison E; Griffin, Lewis D; Kittler, Josef T

    2016-07-01

    The astrocytic GLT-1 (or EAAT2) is the major glutamate transporter for clearing synaptic glutamate. While the diffusion dynamics of neurotransmitter receptors at the neuronal surface are well understood, far less is known regarding the surface trafficking of transporters in subcellular domains of the astrocyte membrane. Here, we have used live-cell imaging to study the mechanisms regulating GLT-1 surface diffusion in astrocytes in dissociated and brain slice cultures. Using GFP-time lapse imaging, we show that GLT-1 forms stable clusters that are dispersed rapidly and reversibly upon glutamate treatment in a transporter activity-dependent manner. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and single particle tracking using quantum dots revealed that clustered GLT-1 is more stable than diffuse GLT-1 and that glutamate increases GLT-1 surface diffusion in the astrocyte membrane. Interestingly, the two main GLT-1 isoforms expressed in the brain, GLT-1a and GLT-1b, are both found to be stabilized opposed to synapses under basal conditions, with GLT-1b more so. GLT-1 surface mobility is increased in proximity to activated synapses and alterations of neuronal activity can bidirectionally modulate the dynamics of both GLT-1 isoforms. Altogether, these data reveal that astrocytic GLT-1 surface mobility, via its transport activity, is modulated during neuronal firing, which may be a key process for shaping glutamate clearance and glutamatergic synaptic transmission. GLIA 2016;64:1252-1264. PMID:27189737

  1. Protein τ-mediated effects on rat hippocampal choline transporters CHT1 and τ-amyloid β interactions

    Krištofíková, Z.; Řípová, D.; Hegnerová, Kateřina; Šírová, J.; Homola, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 9 (2013), s. 1949-1959. ISSN 0364-3190 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Tau protein * Amyloid β peptide * Choline transporter Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.551, year: 2013

  2. Perceived Parenting Mediates Serotonin Transporter Gene (5-HTTLPR) and Neural System Function during Facial Recognition: A Pilot Study.

    Nishikawa, Saori; Toshima, Tamotsu; Kobayashi, Masao

    2015-01-01

    This study examined changes in prefrontal oxy-Hb levels measured by NIRS (Near-Infrared Spectroscopy) during a facial-emotion recognition task in healthy adults, testing a mediational/moderational model of these variables. Fifty-three healthy adults (male = 35, female = 18) aged between 22 to 37 years old (mean age = 24.05 years old) provided saliva samples, completed a EMBU questionnaire (Swedish acronym for Egna Minnen Beträffande Uppfostran [My memories of upbringing]), and participated in a facial-emotion recognition task during NIRS recording. There was a main effect of maternal rejection on RoxH (right frontal activation during an ambiguous task), and a gene × environment (G × E) interaction on RoxH, suggesting that individuals who carry the SL or LL genotype and who endorse greater perceived maternal rejection show less right frontal activation than SL/LL carriers with lower perceived maternal rejection. Finally, perceived parenting style played a mediating role in right frontal activation via the 5-HTTLPR genotype. Early-perceived parenting might influence neural activity in an uncertain situation i.e. rating ambiguous faces among individuals with certain genotypes. This preliminary study makes a small contribution to the mapping of an influence of gene and behaviour on the neural system. More such attempts should be made in order to clarify the links. PMID:26418317

  3. The role of global trade and transport network topology in the human-mediated dispersal of alien species.

    Banks, Natalie Clare; Paini, Dean Ronald; Bayliss, Kirsty Louise; Hodda, Michael

    2015-02-01

    More people and goods are moving further and more frequently via many different trade and transport networks under current trends of globalisation. These networks can play a major role in the unintended introduction of exotic species to new locations. With the continuing rise in global trade, more research attention is being focused on the role of networks in the spread of invasive species. This represents an emerging field of research in invasion science and the substantial knowledge being generated within other disciplines can provide ecologists with new tools with which to study invasions. For the first time, we synthesise studies from several perspectives, approaches and disciplines to derive the fundamental characteristics of network topology determining the likelihood of spread of organisms via trade and transport networks. These characteristics can be used to identify critical points of vulnerability within these networks and enable the development of more effective strategies to prevent invasions. PMID:25529499

  4. The role of PKCalpha and RLIP76 in transport-mediated doxorubicin-resistance in lung cancer.

    Singhal, Sharad S; Yadav, Sushma; Singhal, Jyotsana; Drake, Kenneth; Awasthi, Yogesh C; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2005-08-29

    In deletion mutant analyses of potential phosphorylation sites in RLIP76, we identified T297 and S509 as targets for phosphorylation by PKCalpha. Phosphorylation at T297 increased doxorubicin (DOX)-transport activity approximately 2-fold for RLIP76 purified from recombinant source, or from three small (H69, H1417, H1618) and three non-small cell, one each derived from H226 (squamous), H358 (bronchio alveolar), and H1395 (adenocarcinoma) lung cancer cell lines. T297 phosphorylation conferred sensitivity to tryptic digestion at R293. The specific activity for DOX-transport by RLIP76 purified from non-small cell, which was primarily in the phosphorylated form, was approximately twice that in small cell lung cancer cell lines. These finding offer a novel explanation for the observed intrinsic differences in sensitivity to DOX between non-small cell and small cell lung cancer cell lines. PMID:16087181

  5. Alisol B 23-acetate protects against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes involved in bile acid homeostasis.

    Meng, Qiang; Chen, Xin-Li; Wang, Chang-Yuan; Liu, Qi; Sun, Hui-Jun; Sun, Peng-Yuan; Huo, Xiao-Kui; Liu, Zhi-Hao; Yao, Ji-Hong; Liu, Ke-Xin

    2015-03-15

    Intrahepatic cholestasis is a clinical syndrome with systemic and intrahepatic accumulation of excessive toxic bile acids that ultimately cause hepatobiliary injury. Appropriate regulation of bile acids in hepatocytes is critically important for protection against liver injury. In the present study, we characterized the protective effect of alisol B 23-acetate (AB23A), a natural triterpenoid, on alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced liver injury and intrahepatic cholestasis in mice and further elucidated the mechanisms in vivo and in vitro. AB23A treatment dose-dependently protected against liver injury induced by ANIT through reducing hepatic uptake and increasing efflux of bile acid via down-regulation of hepatic uptake transporters (Ntcp) and up-regulation of efflux transporter (Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2) expression. Furthermore, AB23A reduced bile acid synthesis through repressing Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1, increased bile acid conjugation through inducing Bal, Baat and bile acid metabolism through an induction in gene expression of Sult2a1. We further demonstrate the involvement of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the hepatoprotective effect of AB23A. The changes in transporters and enzymes, as well as ameliorative liver histology in AB23A-treated mice were abrogated by FXR antagonist guggulsterone in vivo. In vitro evidences also directly demonstrated the effect of AB23A on FXR activation in a dose-dependent manner using luciferase reporter assay in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, AB23A produces protective effect against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes. PMID:25655198

  6. Role of transporter-mediated efflux in the placental biodisposition of bupropion and its metabolite, OH-bupropion

    HEMAUER, Sarah J.; PATRIKEEVA, Svetlana L; Wang, Xiaoming; Abdelrahman, Doaa R.; Hankins, Gary D.V.; AHMED, Mahmoud S.; Nanovskaya, Tatiana N.

    2010-01-01

    Cigarette smoking during pregnancy is a preventable risk factor associated with maternal and fetal complications. Bupropion is an antidepressant used successfully for smoking cessation in non-pregnant patients. Our goal is to determine whether it could benefit the pregnant patient seeking smoking cessation. The aim of this investigation was to determine the role of human placenta in the disposition of bupropion and its major hepatic metabolite, OH-bupropion. The expression of efflux transport...

  7. Vps10p Transport from the trans-Golgi Network to the Endosome Is Mediated by Clathrin-coated Vesicles

    Deloche, Olivier; Yeung, Bonny G.; Payne, Gregory S.; Schekman, Randy

    2001-01-01

    A native immunoisolation procedure has been used to investigate the role of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) in the transport of vacuolar proteins between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and the prevacuolar/endosome compartments in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that Apl2p, one large subunit of the adaptor protein-1 complex, and Vps10p, the carboxypeptidase Y vacuolar protein receptor, are associated with clathrin molecules. Vps10p packaging in CCVs is re...

  8. NasFED Proteins Mediate Assimilatory Nitrate and Nitrite Transport in Klebsiella oxytoca (pneumoniae) M5al

    Wu, Qitu; Stewart, Valley

    1998-01-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources. The enzymes required for nitrate and nitrite assimilation are encoded by the nasFEDCBA operon. We report here the complete nasFED sequence. Sequence comparisons indicate that the nasFED genes encode components of a conventional periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein (NasF), a homodimeric intrinsic membrane protein (NasE), and a homodimeric ATP-binding cassette (...

  9. Multidrug resistance mediated by ABC transporters in osteosarcoma cell lines: mRNA analysis and functional radiotracer studies

    Gomes, Celia Maria Freitas [Department of Pathology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Biophysics/Biomathematics, IBILI, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: cgomes@ibili.uc.pt; van Paassen, Heidi [Department of Pathology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Romeo, Salvatore [Department of Pathology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Welling, Mick M. [Department of Radiology, Section of Nuclear Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Feitsma, R.I.J. [Department of Radiology, Section of Nuclear Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Abrunhosa, Antero J. [Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Biophysics/Biomathematics, IBILI, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Botelho, M. Filomena [Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Biophysics/Biomathematics, IBILI, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Hogendoorn, Pancras C.W. [Department of Pathology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Pauwels, Ernest [Department of Radiology, Section of Nuclear Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Cleton-Jansen, Anne Marie [Department of Pathology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands)

    2006-10-15

    Drug resistance remains a significant impediment to successful chemotherapy and constitutes a major prognostic factor in osteosarcoma (OS) patients. This study was designed to identify the role and prognostic significance of multidrug-resistance (MDR)-related transporters, such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP1) and breast-cancer-related protein (BCRP), in OS using cationic lipophilic radiotracers. We evaluated the chemosensitivity of four OS cell lines (Saos-2, 143B, MNNG/HOS and U-2OS) to doxorubicin (DOX), cisplatin (CIS) and methotrexate. The expression of MDR-related transporters was analyzed at mRNA level by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and at functional level by {sup 99m}Tc sestamibi and {sup 99m}Tc tetrofosmin. The effectiveness of MDR modulators [cyclosporin A (CsA) and imatinib] on transporter inhibition and on the reversal of resistance was also assessed. MNNG/HOS and U-2OS cells expressing high levels of MDR1 were highly resistant to DOX and showed reduced accumulation and higher efflux for radiotracers. Although MRP1 was uniformly expressed in all cells, only U-2OS was resistant to CIS. CsA restored sensitivity to DOX and CIS, and enhanced the accumulation and efflux half-life of radiotracers in MDR1-expressing cell lines. The chemosensitivity of OS cells to DOX was strongly dependent on mRNA MDR1 expression and could be circumvented by adding CsA. The kinetic parameters of radiotracers correlated with MDR1 expression levels, hence predicting DOX resistance. We concluded that sensitivity to chemotherapy is strongly dependent on the expression of MDR1 transporter and that radiotracer studies could prove clinically useful in predicting chemotherapy response and in evaluating the efficacy of MDR-reversing agents.

  10. Pomalidomide: evaluation of cytochrome P450 and transporter-mediated drug-drug interaction potential in vitro and in healthy subjects.

    Kasserra, Claudia; Assaf, Mahmoud; Hoffmann, Matthew; Li, Yan; Liu, Liangang; Wang, Xiaomin; Kumar, Gondi; Palmisano, Maria

    2015-02-01

    Pomalidomide offers an alternative for patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma who have exhausted treatment options with lenalidomide and bortezomib. Little is known about pomalidomide's potential for drug-drug interactions (DDIs); as pomalidomide clearance includes hydrolysis and cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated hydroxylation, possible DDIs via CYP450 and drug-transporter proteins were investigated in vitro and in a clinical study. In vitro pomalidomide was neither an inducer nor inhibitor of CYP450, nor an inhibitor of transporter proteins P glycoprotein (P-gp), BCRP, OAT1, OAT3, OCT2, OATP1B1, and OATP1B3. Oxidative metabolism of pomalidomide was predominately mediated by CYP1A2 and CYP3A4, and pomalidomide was shown to be a P-gp substrate. In healthy males, co-administration of oral (4 mg) pomalidomide with ketoconazole (CYP3A/P-gp inhibitor) or carbamazepine (CYP3A/P-gp inducer) did not result in clinically relevant changes in pomalidomide exposure. Co-administration of pomalidomide with fluvoxamine (CYP1A2 inhibitor) in the presence of ketoconazole approximately doubled pomalidomide exposure. Pomalidomide appears to have low potential for clinically relevant DDI and is unlikely to affect the clinical exposure of other drugs. Avoid co-administration of strong CYP1A2 inhibitors unless medically necessary. Pomalidomide dose should be reduced by 50% if co-administered with strong CYP1A2 inhibitors and strong CYP3A/P-gp inhibitors. PMID:25159194

  11. Hydrogen plasma-mediated modification of the electrical transport properties of ZnO nanowire field effect transistors

    We investigated the effects of hydrogen plasma treatment on the electrical transport properties of ZnO nanowire field effect transistors (FETs) with a back gate configuration. After hydrogen plasma treatment of the FET devices, the effective carrier density and mobility of the nanowire FETs increased with a threshold voltage shift toward a negative gate bias direction. This can be attributed to the desorption of oxygen molecules adsorbed on the surface of the nanowire channel, to passivation and to doping effects due to the incorporation of energetic hydrogen ions generated in plasma. (paper)

  12. The nitrate transporter MtNPF6.8 (MtNRT1.3) transports abscisic acid and mediates nitrate regulation of primary root growth in Medicago truncatula.

    Pellizzaro, Anthoni; Clochard, Thibault; Cukier, Caroline; Bourdin, Céline; Juchaux, Marjorie; Montrichard, Françoise; Thany, Steeve; Raymond, Valérie; Planchet, Elisabeth; Limami, Anis M; Morère-Le Paven, Marie-Christine

    2014-12-01

    Elongation of the primary root during postgermination of Medicago truncatula seedlings is a multigenic trait that is responsive to exogenous nitrate. A quantitative genetic approach suggested the involvement of the nitrate transporter MtNPF6.8 (for Medicago truncatula NITRATE TRANSPORTER1/PEPTIDE TRANSPORTER Family6.8) in the inhibition of primary root elongation by high exogenous nitrate. In this study, the inhibitory effect of nitrate on primary root elongation, via inhibition of elongation of root cortical cells, was abolished in npf6.8 knockdown lines. Accordingly, we propose that MtNPF6.8 mediates nitrate inhibitory effects on primary root growth in M. truncatula. pMtNPF6.8:GUS promoter-reporter gene fusion in Agrobacterium rhizogenes-generated transgenic roots showed the expression of MtNPF6.8 in the pericycle region of primary roots and lateral roots, and in lateral root primordia and tips. MtNPF6.8 expression was insensitive to auxin and was stimulated by abscisic acid (ABA), which restored the inhibitory effect of nitrate in npf6.8 knockdown lines. It is then proposed that ABA acts downstream of MtNPF6.8 in this nitrate signaling pathway. Furthermore, MtNPF6.8 was shown to transport ABA in Xenopus spp. oocytes, suggesting an additional role of MtNPF6.8 in ABA root-to-shoot translocation. (15)NO3(-)-influx experiments showed that only the inducible component of the low-affinity transport system was affected in npf6.8 knockdown lines. This indicates that MtNPF6.8 is a major contributor to the inducible component of the low-affinity transport system. The short-term induction by nitrate of the expression of Nitrate Reductase1 (NR1) and NR2 (genes that encode two nitrate reductase isoforms) was greatly reduced in the npf6.8 knockdown lines, supporting a role of MtNPF6.8 in the primary nitrate response in M. truncatula. PMID:25367858

  13. Transporter-Mediated Drug Interaction Strategy for 5-Aminolevulinic Acid (ALA-Based Photodynamic Diagnosis of Malignant Brain Tumor: Molecular Design of ABCG2 Inhibitors

    Toshihisa Ishikawa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD is a practical tool currently used in surgical operation of aggressive brain tumors, such as glioblastoma. PDD is achieved by a photon-induced physicochemical reaction which is induced by excitation of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX exposed to light. Fluorescence-guided gross-total resection has recently been developed in PDD, where 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA or its ester is administered as the precursor of PpIX. ALA induces the accumulation of PpIX, a natural photo-sensitizer, in cancer cells. Recent studies provide evidence that adenosine triphosphate (ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter ABCG2 plays a pivotal role in regulating the cellular accumulation of porphyrins in cancer cells and thereby affects the efficacy of PDD. Protein kinase inhibitors are suggested to potentially enhance the PDD efficacy by blocking ABCG2-mediated porphyrin efflux from cancer cells. It is of great interest to develop potent ABCG2-inhibitors that can be applied to PDD for brain tumor therapy. This review article addresses a pivotal role of human ABC transporter ABCG2 in PDD as well as a new approach of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR analysis to design potent ABCG2-inhibitors.

  14. The high-mobility group box 1 cytokine induces transporter-mediated release of glutamate from glial subcellular particles (gliosomes) prepared from in situ-matured astrocytes.

    Bonanno, Giambattista; Raiteri, Luca; Milanese, Marco; Zappettini, Simona; Melloni, Edon; Pedrazzi, Marco; Passalacqua, Mario; Tacchetti, Carlo; Usai, Cesare; Sparatore, Bianca

    2007-01-01

    The multifunctional protein high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is expressed in restricted areas of adult brain where it can act as a proinflammatory cytokine. We report here that HMGB1 affects CNS transmission by inducing glutamatergic release from glial (gliosomes) but not neuronal (synaptosomes) resealed subcellular particles isolated from mouse cerebellum and hippocampus. Confocal microscopy showed that gliosomes are enriched with glia-specific proteins such as GFAP and S-100, but not with neuronal proteins such as PSD-95, MAP-2, and beta-tubulin III. Furthermore, gliosomes exhibit labeling neither for integrin-alphaM nor for myelin basic protein, specific for microglia and oligodendrocytes, respectively. The gliosomal fraction contains proteins of the exocytotic machinery coexisting with GFAP. Consistent with ultrastructural analysis, several approximately 30-nm nonclustered vesicles are present in the gliosome cytoplasm. Finally, gliosomes represent functional organelles that actively export glutamate when subjected to releasing stimuli, such as ionomycin or ATP, by mechanisms involving extracellular Ca(2+) and Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. HMGB1-induced release of the stable glutamate analogue [(3)H]d-aspartate and endogenous glutamate form gliosomes, whereas nerve terminals were insensitive to the protein. The HMGB1-evoked release of glutamate was independent on modifications of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, but it was blocked by dl-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate, suggesting the involvement of transporter-mediated release mechanisms. Moreover, dihydrokainic acid, a selective inhibitor of glutamate transporter 1 does not block the HMGB1 effect, indicating a role for the glial glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST) subtype in this response. HMGB1 bind to gliosomes but not to synaptosomes and can physically interact with GLAST and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Taken together, these results suggest that the HMGB1 cytokine

  15. Akt-mediated regulation of antidepressant-sensitive serotonin transporter function, cell-surface expression and phosphorylation

    Rajamanickam, Jeyaganesh; Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels; Sundaramurthy, Santhanalakshmi; Gether, Ulrik; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda

    2015-01-01

    The serotonin [5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine)] transporter (SERT) controls serotonergic neurotransmission in the brain by rapid clearance of 5-HT from the synaptic cleft into presynaptic neurons. SERTs are primary targets for antidepressants for therapeutic intervention of mood disorders. Our previous...... studies have identified the involvement of several signalling pathways and protein kinases in regulating SERT function, trafficking and phosphorylation. However, whether Akt/PKB (protein kinase) regulates SERT function is not known. In the present study, we made the novel observation that inhibition of...... basal phosphorylation. Our results provide evidence that Akt regulates SERT function and cell-surface expression by regulating the intracellular SERT distribution and plasma membrane availability, which perhaps may be linked to SERT phosphorylation state. Thus any changes in the activation of Akt and...

  16. Formaldehyde mediated proton-transport catalysis in the ketene-water radical cation CH2C(O)OH2+

    Lee, Richard; Ruttink, Paul J. A.; Burgers, Peter C.; Terlouw, Johan K.

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that the solitary ketene-water ion CH2C(O)OH2+ (1) does not isomerize into CH2C(OH)2+ (2), its more stable hydrogen shift isomer. Tandem mass spectrometry based collision experiments reveal that this isomerization does take place in the CH2O loss from low-energy 1,3-dihydroxyacetone ions (HOCH2)2CO+. A mechanistic analysis using the CBS-QB3 model chemistry shows that such molecular ions rearrange into hydrogen-bridged radical cations [CH2C(O)O(H)-H...OCH2]+ in which the CH2O molecule catalyzes the transformation 1 --> 2 prior to dissociation. The barrier for the unassisted reaction, 29 kcal mol-1, is reduced to a mere 0.6 kcal mol-1 for the catalysed transformation. Formaldehyde is an efficient catalyst because its proton affinity meets the criterion for facile proton-transport catalysis.

  17. Metalloprobes: Fluorescence imaging of multidrug resistance (MDR1) P-Glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated functional transport activity in cellulo.

    Sundaram, G S M; Sharma, Monica; Kaganov, Daniel; Cho, Junsang; Harpstrite, Scott E; Sharma, Vijay

    2016-06-01

    Radiolabeled metalloprobes offer sensitive tools for evaluating quantitative accumulation of chemical entities within pooled cell populations. Although beneficial in translational nuclear imaging, this method precludes interrogation of effects resulting from variations at a single cell level, within the same segment of cell population. Compared with radiotracer bioassays, fluorescence imaging offers a cost-efficient technique to assess accumulation of metalloprobes at a single cell level, and determine their intracellular localization under live cell conditions. To evaluate, whether or not radiotracer assay and fluorescence imaging provide complementary information on utility of metalloprobes to assess functional expression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) on plasma membrane of tumor cells, imaging studies of fluorescent cationic Ga(III)-ENBDMPI (bis(3-ethoxy-2-hydroxy-benzylidene)-N,N'-bis(2,2-dimethyl-3-amino-propyl)ethylenediamine) and its neutral counterpart Zn(II)-ENBDMPI are performed. While the uptake profiles of the cationic metalloprobe are inversely proportional to expression of Pgp in tumor cells, the accumulation profiles of the neutral Zn(II)-ENBDMPI in non-MDR and MDR cells are not significantly impacted. The cationic Ga(III)-ENBDMPI maps with Mito-Tracker Red, thereby confirming localization within mitochondria of non-MDR (Pgp-) cells. Depolarization of both plasmalemmal and mitochondrial potentials decreased retention of the cationic Ga(III)-ENBDMPI within the mitochondria. Additionally, LY335979, an antagonist-induced accumulation of the cationic Ga(III) metalloprobe in MDR (Pgp+) cells indicated specificity of the agent. Compared with traits of Ga(III)-ENBDMPI as a Pgp recognized substrate, Zn(II)-ENBDMPI demonstrated uptake in both MDR and non-MDR cells thus indicating the significance of overall molecular charge in mediating Pgp recognition profiles. Combined data indicate that live cell imaging can offer a cost-effective methodology for monitoring

  18. Transport evidence for Fermi-arc-mediated chirality transfer in the Dirac semimetal Cd3As2.

    Moll, Philip J W; Nair, Nityan L; Helm, Toni; Potter, Andrew C; Kimchi, Itamar; Vishwanath, Ashvin; Analytis, James G

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion of charge carriers in a metal is distinctly different from that of free electrons owing to their interactions with the crystal lattice. These interactions may lead to quasiparticles mimicking the massless relativistic dynamics of high-energy particle physics, and they can twist the quantum phase of electrons into topologically non-trivial knots-producing protected surface states with anomalous electromagnetic properties. These effects intertwine in materials known as Weyl semimetals, and in their crystal-symmetry-protected analogues, Dirac semimetals. The latter show a linear electronic dispersion in three dimensions described by two copies of the Weyl equation (a theoretical description of massless relativistic fermions). At the surface of a crystal, the broken translational symmetry creates topological surface states, so-called Fermi arcs, which have no counterparts in high-energy physics or conventional condensed matter systems. Here we present Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in focused-ion-beam-prepared microstructures of Cd3As2 that are consistent with the theoretically predicted 'Weyl orbits', a kind of cyclotron motion that weaves together Fermi-arc and chiral bulk states. In contrast to conventional cyclotron orbits, this motion is driven by the transfer of chirality from one Weyl node to another, rather than momentum transfer of the Lorentz force. Our observations provide evidence for direct access to the topological properties of charge in a transport experiment, a first step towards their potential application. PMID:27376477

  19. Transport evidence for Fermi-arc-mediated chirality transfer in the Dirac semimetal Cd3As2

    Moll, Philip J. W.; Nair, Nityan L.; Helm, Toni; Potter, Andrew C.; Kimchi, Itamar; Vishwanath, Ashvin; Analytis, James G.

    2016-07-01

    The dispersion of charge carriers in a metal is distinctly different from that of free electrons owing to their interactions with the crystal lattice. These interactions may lead to quasiparticles mimicking the massless relativistic dynamics of high-energy particle physics, and they can twist the quantum phase of electrons into topologically non-trivial knots—producing protected surface states with anomalous electromagnetic properties. These effects intertwine in materials known as Weyl semimetals, and in their crystal-symmetry-protected analogues, Dirac semimetals. The latter show a linear electronic dispersion in three dimensions described by two copies of the Weyl equation (a theoretical description of massless relativistic fermions). At the surface of a crystal, the broken translational symmetry creates topological surface states, so-called Fermi arcs, which have no counterparts in high-energy physics or conventional condensed matter systems. Here we present Shubnikov–de Haas oscillations in focused-ion-beam-prepared microstructures of Cd3As2 that are consistent with the theoretically predicted ‘Weyl orbits’, a kind of cyclotron motion that weaves together Fermi-arc and chiral bulk states. In contrast to conventional cyclotron orbits, this motion is driven by the transfer of chirality from one Weyl node to another, rather than momentum transfer of the Lorentz force. Our observations provide evidence for direct access to the topological properties of charge in a transport experiment, a first step towards their potential application.

  20. The Oligopeptide Permease Opp Mediates Illicit Transport of the Bacterial P-site Decoding Inhibitor GE81112.

    Maio, Alessandro; Brandi, Letizia; Donadio, Stefano; Gualerzi, Claudio O

    2016-01-01

    GE81112 is a tetrapeptide antibiotic that binds to the 30S ribosomal subunit and specifically inhibits P-site decoding of the mRNA initiation codon by the fMet-tRNA anticodon. GE81112 displays excellent microbiological activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in both minimal and complete, chemically defined, broth, but is essentially inactive in complete complex media. This is due to the presence of peptides that compete with the antibiotic for the oligopeptide permease system (Opp) responsible for its illicit transport into the bacterial cells as demonstrated in the cases of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Mutations that inactivate the Opp system and confer GE81112 resistance arise spontaneously with a frequency of ca. 1 × 10(-6), similar to that of the mutants resistant to tri-l-ornithine, a known Opp substrate. On the contrary, cells expressing extrachromosomal copies of the opp genes are extremely sensitive to GE81112 in rich medium and GE81112-resistant mutations affecting the molecular target of the antibiotic were not detected upon examining >10⁸ cells of this type. However, some mutations introduced in the 16S rRNA to confer kasugamycin resistance were found to reduce the sensitivity of the cells to GE81112. PMID:27231947

  1. Mitochondrial electron transport chain identified as a novel molecular target of SPIO nanoparticles mediated cancer-specific cytotoxicity.

    He, Chengyong; Jiang, Shengwei; Jin, Haijing; Chen, Shuzhen; Lin, Gan; Yao, Huan; Wang, Xiaoyong; Mi, Peng; Ji, Zhiliang; Lin, Yuchun; Lin, Zhongning; Liu, Gang

    2016-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are highly cytotoxic and target cancer cells with high specificity; however, the mechanism by which SPIONs induce cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity remains unclear. Herein, the molecular mechanism of SPION-induced cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity to cancer cells is clarified through DNA microarray and bioinformatics analyses. SPIONs can interference with the mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) in cancer cells, which further affects the production of ATP, mitochondrial membrane potential, and microdistribution of calcium, and induces cell apoptosis. Additionally, SPIONs induce the formation of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria; these reactive oxygen species trigger cancer-specific cytotoxicity due to the lower antioxidative capacity of cancer cells. Moreover, the DNA microarray and gene ontology analyses revealed that SPIONs elevate the expression of metallothioneins in both normal and cancer cells but decrease the expression of METC genes in cancer cells. Overall, these results suggest that SPIONs induce cancer cell death by targeting the METC, which is helpful for designing anti-cancer nanotheranostics and evaluating the safety of future nanomedicines. PMID:26773667

  2. Effect of polyoxyethylene n-alkyl ethers on carrier-mediated transport of lanthanide ions through cellulose triacetate membranes

    Fluxes of 14 kinds of lanthanides across cellulose triacetate membranes were determined by using mixtures of o-nitrophenyl n-octyl ether and a series of polyoxythylene n-alkyl ethers (POE ethers) as plasticizers, and hinokitiol as carrier. Effects of alkyl and polyoxyethylene (POE) chains of POE ether on the flux were demonstrated. The transport of the lanthanides was coupled to a flow of hydrogen ions. The POE ethers used [CnH2n+1(OCH2CH2)xOH, referred to as CnEx] were C10E3, C12E3, C14E3, C16E3, C12E2, C12E4, C12E6 and C12E8, In all cases, high fluxes were observed for the lanthanides from samarium to lutetium. On the contrary, the fluxes for lanthanum to neodymium were extremely low. In experiments testing the effect of the alkyl chain, the order of the POE ethers in the lanthanide flux for samarium to lutetium was C12E3 > C10E3 > C14E3 >C16E3. In experiments testing the effect of the POE chain, the flux decreased with an increase in the chain length

  3. Alisol B 23-acetate protects against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes involved in bile acid homeostasis

    Intrahepatic cholestasis is a clinical syndrome with systemic and intrahepatic accumulation of excessive toxic bile acids that ultimately cause hepatobiliary injury. Appropriate regulation of bile acids in hepatocytes is critically important for protection against liver injury. In the present study, we characterized the protective effect of alisol B 23-acetate (AB23A), a natural triterpenoid, on alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced liver injury and intrahepatic cholestasis in mice and further elucidated the mechanisms in vivo and in vitro. AB23A treatment dose-dependently protected against liver injury induced by ANIT through reducing hepatic uptake and increasing efflux of bile acid via down-regulation of hepatic uptake transporters (Ntcp) and up-regulation of efflux transporter (Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2) expression. Furthermore, AB23A reduced bile acid synthesis through repressing Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1, increased bile acid conjugation through inducing Bal, Baat and bile acid metabolism through an induction in gene expression of Sult2a1. We further demonstrate the involvement of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the hepatoprotective effect of AB23A. The changes in transporters and enzymes, as well as ameliorative liver histology in AB23A-treated mice were abrogated by FXR antagonist guggulsterone in vivo. In vitro evidences also directly demonstrated the effect of AB23A on FXR activation in a dose-dependent manner using luciferase reporter assay in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, AB23A produces protective effect against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes. - Highlights: • AB23A has at least three roles in protection against ANIT-induced liver injury. • AB23A decreases Ntcp, and increases Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2 expression. • AB23A represses Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1 through inducing Shp and Fgf15 expression. • AB23A increases bile acid metabolism through inducing Sult2a1 expression. • FXR activation is involved

  4. Alisol B 23-acetate protects against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes involved in bile acid homeostasis

    Meng, Qiang; Chen, Xin-li; Wang, Chang-yuan; Liu, Qi; Sun, Hui-jun; Sun, Peng-yuan; Huo, Xiao-kui; Liu, Zhi-hao; Yao, Ji-hong; Liu, Ke-xin, E-mail: kexinliu@dlmedu.edu.cn

    2015-03-15

    Intrahepatic cholestasis is a clinical syndrome with systemic and intrahepatic accumulation of excessive toxic bile acids that ultimately cause hepatobiliary injury. Appropriate regulation of bile acids in hepatocytes is critically important for protection against liver injury. In the present study, we characterized the protective effect of alisol B 23-acetate (AB23A), a natural triterpenoid, on alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced liver injury and intrahepatic cholestasis in mice and further elucidated the mechanisms in vivo and in vitro. AB23A treatment dose-dependently protected against liver injury induced by ANIT through reducing hepatic uptake and increasing efflux of bile acid via down-regulation of hepatic uptake transporters (Ntcp) and up-regulation of efflux transporter (Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2) expression. Furthermore, AB23A reduced bile acid synthesis through repressing Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1, increased bile acid conjugation through inducing Bal, Baat and bile acid metabolism through an induction in gene expression of Sult2a1. We further demonstrate the involvement of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the hepatoprotective effect of AB23A. The changes in transporters and enzymes, as well as ameliorative liver histology in AB23A-treated mice were abrogated by FXR antagonist guggulsterone in vivo. In vitro evidences also directly demonstrated the effect of AB23A on FXR activation in a dose-dependent manner using luciferase reporter assay in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, AB23A produces protective effect against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes. - Highlights: • AB23A has at least three roles in protection against ANIT-induced liver injury. • AB23A decreases Ntcp, and increases Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2 expression. • AB23A represses Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1 through inducing Shp and Fgf15 expression. • AB23A increases bile acid metabolism through inducing Sult2a1 expression. • FXR activation is involved

  5. Apparent receptor-mediated activation of Ca2+-dependent conductive Cl- transport by shark-derived polyaminosterols.

    Chernova, Marina N; Vandorpe, David H; Clark, Jeffrey S; Williams, Jon I; Zasloff, Michael A; Jiang, Lianwei; Alper, Seth L

    2005-12-01

    The shark liver antimicrobial polyaminosterol squalamine is an angiogenesis inhibitor under clinical investigation as an anti-cancer agent and as a treatment for the choroidal neovascularization associated with macular degeneration of the retina. The related polyaminosterol MSI-1436 is an appetite suppressant that decreases systemic insulin resistance. However, the mechanisms of action of these polyaminosterols are unknown. We report effects of MSI-1436 on Xenopus oocytes consistent with the existence of a receptor for polyaminosterols. MSI-1436 activates bidirectional, trans-chloride-independent Cl- flux in Xenopus oocytes. At least part of this DIDS-sensitive Cl- flux is conductive, as measured using two-electrode voltage-clamp and on-cell patch-clamp techniques. MSI-1436 also elevates cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]) and increases bidirectional 45Ca2+ flux. Activation of Cl- flux and elevation of cytosolic [Ca2+] by MSI-1436 both are accelerated by lowering bath Ca2+ and are not acutely inhibited by extracellular EGTA. Elevation of cytosolic [Ca2+] by MSI-1436 requires heparin-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores. Although injected EGTA abolishes the increased conductive Cl- flux, that Cl- flux is not dependent on heparin-sensitive stores. In low-bath Ca2+ conditions, several structurally related polyaminosterols act as strong agonists or weak agonists of conductive Cl- flux in oocytes. Weak agonist polyaminosterols antagonize the strong agonist, MSI-1436, but upon addition of the conductive Cl- transport inhibitor DIDS, they are converted into strong agonists. Together, these properties operationally define a polyaminosterol receptor at or near the surface of the Xenopus oocyte, provide an initial description of receptor signaling, and suggest routes toward further understanding of a novel class of appetite suppressants and angiogenesis inhibitors. PMID:16109810

  6. Simulation of oxygen carrier mediated oxygen transport to C3A hepatoma cells housed within a hollow fiber bioreactor.

    Sullivan, Jesse P; Gordon, Jason E; Palmer, Andre F

    2006-02-01

    A priori knowledge of the dissolved oxygen (O2) concentration profile within a hepatic hollow fiber (HF) bioreactor is important in developing an effective bioartificial liver assist device (BLAD). O2 provision is limiting within HF bioreactors and we hypothesize that supplementing a hepatic HF bioreactor's circulating media with bovine red blood cells (bRBCs), which function as an O2 carrier, will improve oxygenation. The dissolved O2 concentration profile within a single HF (lumen, membrane, and representative extra capillary space (ECS)) was modeled with the finite element method, and compared to experimentally measured data obtained on an actual HF bioreactor with the same dimensions housing C3A hepatoma cells. Our results (experimental and modeling) indicate bRBC supplementation of the circulating media leads to an increase in O2 consumed by C3A cells. Under certain experimental conditions (pO2,IN) = 95 mmHg, Q = 8.30 mL/min), the addition of bRBCs at 5% of the average in vivo human red blood cell concentration (% hRBC) results in approximately 50% increase in the O2 consumption rate (OCR). By simply adjusting the operating conditions (pO2,IN) = 25 mmHg, Q = 1.77 mL/min) and increasing bRBC concentration to 25% hRBC the OCR increase is approximately 10-fold. However, the improved O2 concentration profile experienced by the C3A cells could not duplicate the full range of in vivo O2 tensions (25-70 mmHg) typically experienced within the liver sinusoid with this particular HF bioreactor. Nonetheless, we demonstrate that the O2 transport model accurately predicts O2 consumption within a HF bioreactor, thus setting up the modeling framework for improving the design of future hepatic HF bioreactors. PMID:16161160

  7. Effect of lyophilized grapefruit juice on P-glycoprotein-mediated drug transport in-vitro and in-vivo.

    Ahmed, Iman S; Hassan, Mariame A; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    The administration of grapefruit juice (GFJ) has been postulated to inhibit the activity of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transport system and thus can enhance the uptake of substrate drugs. However, for various reasons, the results obtained have been always swaying between confirmation and refutation. This study aims at re-evaluating the effect of lyophilized freshly-prepared grapefruit juice (LGFJ) prepared from the whole peeled fruit on P-gp activity using the model drug doxorubicin (DOX) in-vitro and timolol maleate (TM) in-vivo. Human uterine sarcoma MES-SA/DX5v cells, grown under nanomolar concentration of DOX and highly expressing P-gp, were used as model cells for in-vitro studies whereas white New Zealand male rabbits were used for in-vivo studies. Results showed that the accumulation of DOX in MES-SA/DX5v cells was increased by 18.3 ± 2.0% in presence of LGFJ compared to control experiments. Results from in-vivo absorption studies showed that the relative oral bioavailability of TM ingested with LGFJ was significantly higher by 70% and 43% compared to the oral bioavailability of TM ingested with saline and a commercial GFJ, respectively. This study as such confirms the inhibitory effects of LGFJ on P-gp efflux proteins and highlights the superiority of using lyophilized freshly prepared juices over the commercially available juices in research studies. Also, the results call for further studies to assess the possibility of co-administrating LGFJ with anti-cancer agents to modulate multidrug resistance in their cellular environment or incorporating LGFJ in solid dosage forms to improve oral bioavailability of drugs. PMID:24303901

  8. Differential inhibitory effects of CysLT(1 receptor antagonists on P2Y(6 receptor-mediated signaling and ion transport in human bronchial epithelia.

    Wendy Ka-hoi Lau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT is one of the proinflammatory mediators released by the bronchi during inflammation. CysLTs exert their biological effects via specific G-protein-coupled receptors. CysLT(1 receptor antagonists are available for clinical use for the treatment of asthma. Recently, crosstalk between CysLT(1 and P2Y(6 receptors has been delineated. P2Y receptors are expressed in apical and/or basolateral membranes of virtually all polarized epithelia to control the transport of fluid and electrolytes. Previous research suggests that CysLT(1 receptor antagonists inhibit the effects of nucleotides acting at P2Y receptors. However, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying the inhibition remains unresolved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, western blot analysis confirmed that both CysLT(1 and P2Y(6 receptors were expressed in the human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE14o-. All three CysLT(1 antagonists inhibited the uridine diphosphate (UDP-evoked I(SC, but only montelukast inhibited the UDP-evoked [Ca(2+](i increase. In the presence of forskolin or 8-bromoadenosine 3'5' cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP, the UDP-induced I(SC was potentiated but was reduced by pranlukast and zafirlukast but not montelukast. Pranlukast inhibited the UDP-evoked I(SC potentiated by an Epac activator, 8-(4-Chlorophenylthio-2'-O-methyladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-CPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, while montelukast and zafirlukast had no such effect. Pranlukast inhibited the real-time increase in cAMP changes activated by 8-CPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP as monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging. Zafirlukast inhibited the UDP-induced I(SC potentiated by N(6-Phenyladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Sp-isomer (Sp-6-Phe-cAMP; a PKA activator and UDP-activated PKA activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, our data strongly suggest for the first time that in human airway epithelia, the three specific CysLT(1 receptor

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine prostaglandin transporter (SLCO2A1: evaluation of its role in F4 mediated neonatal diarrhoea

    Cox Eric

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because prostaglandins are involved in many (pathophysiological processes, SLCO2A1 was already characterized in several species in an attempt to unravel specific processes/deficiencies. Here, we describe the molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine ortholog in order to evaluate its possible involvement in F4 enterotoxigenic E. coli mediated neonatal diarrhoea, based on a positional candidate gene approach study. Results Porcine SLCO2A1 is organized in 14 exons, containing an open reading frame of 1935 bp, encoding a 12-transmembrane organic anion cell surface transporter of 644 aa. The -388 to -5 upstream region comprises a (CpG48 island containing a number of conserved promoter elements, including a TATA box. A potential alternative promoter region was found in the conserved -973 to -700 upstream region. No consensus polyadenylation signal was discovered in the 3' UTR. Repeat sequences were found in 15% of all the non coding sequences. As expected for a multifunctional protein, a wide tissue distribution was observed. mRNA expression was found in the adrenal gland, bladder, caecum, colon (centripetal coil/centrifugal coil, diaphragm, duodenum, gallbladder, heart, ileum, jejunum, kidney, liver, longissimus dorsi muscle, lung, lymph node, mesenterium, rectum, spleen, stomach, tongue and ureter, but not in the aorta, oesophagus and pancreas. The promoter region and the exons (including the splice sites of SLCO2A1 were resequenced in 5 F4ab/ac receptor positive and 5 F4ab/ac receptor negative pigs. Two silent and 2 missense (both S → L at position 360 and 633 mutations were found, but none was associated with the F4ab/ac receptor phenotype. In addition, no phenotype associated differential mRNA expression or alternative/abberant splicing/polyadenylation was found in the jejunum. Conclusion The molecular cloning and characterization of porcine SLCO2A1 not only contributes to the already existing knowledge about the

  10. Evaluation of a conceptual model for the subsurface transport of plutonium involving surface mediated reduction of PuV to PuIV.

    Fjeld, R A; Serkiz, S M; McGinnis, P L; Elci, Alper; Kaplan, Daniel I

    2003-12-01

    A conceptual model is proposed to explain the transport behavior of plutonium in laboratory columns packed with a sandy coastal soil from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Savannah River Site. The column transport experiments involved the introduction of a finite step input of plutonium, predominately in the +5 oxidation state, into the columns followed by elution with a low-carbonate solution of 0.02 M NaClO4 at pH 3, 5, and 8. Total plutonium concentrations were measured in the effluent as a function of time. These elution profiles suggest at least two distinct physical/chemical forms of plutonium, each with a different mobility. To explain the observed behavior, the following conceptual model was evaluated: [1] equilibrium partitioning of plutonium (V) and plutonium (IV) between the aqueous and sorbed phases as defined by pH-dependent, oxidation-state specific distribution coefficients and [2] kinetic reduction of plutonium (V) to plutonium (IV) in the sorbed phase. The conceptual model was applied to the column experiments through a one-dimensional advective/dispersive mathematical model, and predictions of the mathematical model were compared with the experimental data. Overall, the model was successful in predicting some of the major features observed in the experiments. It also yielded quantitative estimates of the rate constant for surface mediated reduction of plutonium (V) to plutonium (IV) that were of the same order (10(-4) to 10(-5) s(-1)) as those calculated from batch data both for this soil and for goethite. PMID:14607471