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Sample records for act trial experience

  1. Using process evaluation for program improvement in dose, fidelity and reach: the ACT trial experience

    Kitzman-Ulrich Heather

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how formative program process evaluation was used to improve dose and fidelity of implementation, as well as reach of the intervention into the target population, in the "Active by Choice Today" (ACT randomized school-based trial from years 1 to 3 of implementation. Methods The intervention integrated constructs from Self-Determination Theory and Social Cognitive Theory to enhance intrinsic motivation and behavioral skills for increasing long-term physical activity (PA behavior in underserved adolescents (low income, minorities. ACT formative process data were examined at the end of each year to provide timely, corrective feedback to keep the intervention "on track". Results Between years 1 and 2 and years 2 and 3, three significant changes were made to attempt to increase dose and fidelity rates in the program delivery and participant attendance (reach. These changes included expanding the staff training, reformatting the intervention manual, and developing a tracking system for contacting parents of students who were not attending the after-school programs regularly. Process outcomes suggest that these efforts resulted in notable improvements in attendance, dose, and fidelity of intervention implementation from years 1 to 2 and 2 to 3 of the ACT trial. Conclusion Process evaluation methods, particularly implementation monitoring, are useful tools to ensure fidelity in intervention trials and for identifying key best practices for intervention delivery.

  2. The Experiment as Act

    Søndergaard, Morten

    identify and locate the experiments of POEX65 as acts; and to ask the questions: what constitutes those acts as experiments? and how do we possibly archive them? My purpose, then, is to define the methodologies to obtain the contours of a post-phenomenology of experimental artistic production in order to...... be able to analyse the phenomena found at POEX65. Here I will use the notion of the ‘ontological theatre’ (Pickering), which, according to Pickering, is acted out in experimental art productions. The experiment could thus be seen as an ‘agency-realism’ – as an ‘act’ of relations across the aesthetics...

  3. How do parents experience being asked to enter a child in a randomised controlled trial?

    Young Bridget

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the number of randomised controlled trials of medicines for children increases, it becomes progressively more important to understand the experiences of parents who are asked to enrol their child in a trial. This paper presents a narrative review of research evidence on parents' experiences of trial recruitment focussing on qualitative research, which allows them to articulate their views in their own words. Discussion Parents want to do their best for their children, and socially and legally their role is to care for and protect them yet the complexities of the medical and research context can challenge their fulfilment of this role. Parents are simultaneously responsible for their child and cherish this role yet they are dependent on others when their child becomes sick. They are keen to exercise responsibility for deciding to enter a child in a trial yet can be fearful of making the 'wrong' decision. They make judgements about the threat of the child's condition as well as the risks of the trial yet their interpretations often differ from those of medical and research experts. Individual pants will experience these and other complexities to a greater or lesser degree depending on their personal experiences and values, the medical situation of their child and the nature of the trial. Interactions at the time of trial recruitment offer scope for negotiating these complexities if practitioners have the flexibility to tailor discussions to the needs and situation of individual parents. In this way, parents may be helped to retain a sense that they have acted as good parents to their child whatever decision they make. Summary Discussing randomised controlled trials and gaining and providing informed consent is challenging. The unique position of parents in giving proxy consent for their child adds to this challenge. Recognition of the complexities parents face in making decisions about trials suggests lines for future

  4. Experiences with the new German Energy Act

    Kraus, M. [Price Waterhouse Coopers, Berlin (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    The new German Energy Act has been in force since April this year, but competition has been slow to develop so far. New alliances and joint ventures are being formed to exploit the new freedoms that the Law brings, but the structures needed to operate competition are still being built. The question many are asking is whether an electricity exchange can bring the breakthrough? (Author)

  5. Results from the Xylitol for Adult Caries Trial (X-ACT)

    Bader, James D.; Vollmer, William M.; Shugars, Daniel A.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Amaechi, Bennett T.; Brown, John P.; Laws, Reesa L.; Funkhouser, Kimberly A.; Makhija, Sonia K.; Ritter, André V.; Leo, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although caries is prevalent in adults, few preventive therapies have been tested in adult populations. This randomized clinical trial evaluated the effectiveness of xylitol lozenges in preventing caries in elevated caries-risk adults. Methods X-ACT was a three-site placebo-controlled randomized trial. Participants (n=691) ages 21–80 consumed five 1.0 g xylitol or placebo lozenges daily for 33 months. Clinical examinations occurred at baseline, 12, 24 and 33 months. Results Xylitol lozenges reduced the caries increment 11%. This reduction, which represented less than one-third of a surface per year, was not statistically significant. There was no indication of a dose-response effect. Conclusions Daily use of xylitol lozenges did not result in a statistically or clinically significant reduction in 33-month caries increment among elevated caries-risk adults. Clinical Implications These results suggest that xylitol used as a supplement in adults does not significantly reduce their caries experience. PMID:23283923

  6. A signal detection experiment with limited number of trials

    Sawada, Tadamasa

    2015-01-01

    Signal detection theory has been well accepted in vision science to measure human sensitivity to stimuli in a Psychophysical experiment. The theory is formulated so that the measured sensitivity is independent from a response bias (criterion). The formulation is based on an assumption that number of trials in the experiment is infinite but this assumption cannot be satisfied in practice. The assumption came from two normal distributions used in the formulation. The distributions respectively ...

  7. Design of the Xylitol for Adult Caries Trial (X-ACT)

    2010-01-01

    Background Dental caries incidence in adults is similar to that in children and adolescents, but few caries preventive agents have been evaluated for effectiveness in adults populations. In addition, dentists direct fewer preventive services to their adult patients. Xylitol, an over-the-counter sweetener, has shown some potential as a caries preventive agent, but the evidence for its effectiveness is not yet conclusive and is based largely on studies in child populations. Methods/Design X-ACT is a three-year, multi-center, placebo controlled, double-blind, randomized clinical trial that tests the effects of daily use of xylitol lozenges versus placebo lozenges on the prevention of adult caries. The trial has randomized 691 participants (ages 21-80) to the two arms. The primary outcome is the increment of cavitated lesions. Discussion This trial should help resolve the overall issue of the effectiveness of xylitol in preventing caries by contributing evidence with a low risk of bias. Just as importantly, the trial will provide much-needed information about the effectiveness of a promising caries prevention agent in adults. An effective xylitol-based caries prevention intervention would represent an easily disseminated method to extend caries prevention to individuals not receiving caries preventive treatment in the dental office. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.Gov NCT00393055 PMID:20920261

  8. Design of the Xylitol for Adult Caries Trial (X-ACT

    Amaechi Bennett T

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental caries incidence in adults is similar to that in children and adolescents, but few caries preventive agents have been evaluated for effectiveness in adults populations. In addition, dentists direct fewer preventive services to their adult patients. Xylitol, an over-the-counter sweetener, has shown some potential as a caries preventive agent, but the evidence for its effectiveness is not yet conclusive and is based largely on studies in child populations. Methods/Design X-ACT is a three-year, multi-center, placebo controlled, double-blind, randomized clinical trial that tests the effects of daily use of xylitol lozenges versus placebo lozenges on the prevention of adult caries. The trial has randomized 691 participants (ages 21-80 to the two arms. The primary outcome is the increment of cavitated lesions. Discussion This trial should help resolve the overall issue of the effectiveness of xylitol in preventing caries by contributing evidence with a low risk of bias. Just as importantly, the trial will provide much-needed information about the effectiveness of a promising caries prevention agent in adults. An effective xylitol-based caries prevention intervention would represent an easily disseminated method to extend caries prevention to individuals not receiving caries preventive treatment in the dental office. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.Gov NCT00393055

  9. Dasatinib first-line: Multicentric Italian experience outside clinical trials.

    Breccia, Massimo; Stagno, Fabio; Luciano, Luigiana; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Annunziata, Mario; D'Adda, Mariella; Maggi, Alessandro; Sgherza, Nicola; Russo-Rossi, Antonella; Pregno, Patrizia; Castagnetti, Fausto; Iurlo, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Cedrone, Michele; Di Renzo, Nicola; Sorà, Federica; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; La Nasa, Giorgio; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Greco, Giovanna; Franceschini, Luca; Sica, Simona; Bocchia, Monica; Crugnola, Monica; Orlandi, Esther; Guarini, Attilio; Specchia, Giorgina; Rosti, Gianantonio; Saglio, Giuseppe; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    Dasatinib was approved for the treatment of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in first line therapy based on the demonstration of efficacy and safety reported in patients enrolled in clinical trials. We describe a multicentric Italian "real-life" experience of dasatinib used as frontline treatment outside clinical trials. One hundred and nine patients (median age 54 years) were treated from January 2012 to December 2013. Increased incidence of high risk patients were detected according to stratification (26% according to Sokal score, 19% according to Euro score and 16% according to EUTOS) when compared to company sponsored studies. Median time from diagnosis to start of dasatinib was 18 days. Ten patients received unscheduled starting dose (6 patients 50mg and 4 patients 80 mg QD), whereas 99 patients started with 100mg QD. At 3 months, 92% of patients achieved a BCR-ABL ratio less than 10%. At 6 months, the rate of CCyR was 91% and the rate of MR3 was 40%, with 8% of the patients reaching MR4.5. Ninety-three patients were evaluable at 12 months: the rate of MR3 was 62%, with MR4.5 being achieved by 19% of the patients. At a median follow-up of 12 months, 27 patients (24.7%) were receiving the drug at reduced dose. Two patients (1.8%) experienced a lymphoid blast crisis and the overall incidence of resistance was 8%. As regards safety, the major side effects recorded were thrombocytopenia, neutropenia and pleural effusions, which occurred in 22%, 10% and 8% of patients, respectively. Present results, achieved in a large cohort of patients treated outside clinical trials, further confirm the efficacy and safety of dasatinib as firstline treatment in CML. PMID:26643920

  10. The Anti-Clot Treatment Scale (ACTS in clinical trials: cross-cultural validation in venous thromboembolism patients

    Cano Stefan J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Anti-Clot Treatment Scale (ACTS is a 15-item patient-reported instrument of satisfaction with anticoagulant treatment. It includes a 12-item ACTS Burdens scale and a 3-item ACTS Benefits scale. Its role in clinical trials and other settings should be supported by evidence that it is both clinically meaningful and scientifically sound. The aim of the study was to evaluate the measurement performance of the ACTS (Dutch, Italian, French, German and English language versions in patients with venous thromboembolism based on traditional psychometric methods. Methods ACTS Burdens and Benefits scale data from a large clinical trial (EINSTEIN DVT involving 1336 people with venous thromboembolism were analysed at both the scale and item level. Five key psychometric properties were examined using traditional psychometric methods: acceptability, scaling assumptions, reliability (including internal consistency reliability, test-retest reproducibility; validity (including known groups and discriminant validity; and responsiveness. These methods of examination underpin the US Food and Drug Administration recommendations for patient-reported outcome instrument evaluation. Results Overall, the 12-item ACTS Burdens scale and 3-item ACTS Benefits scale met the psychometric criteria evaluated at both item and scale levels, with the exception of some relatively minor issues in the Dutch language version, which were just below reliability criteria (i.e. alpha = 0.72, test-retest intraclass correlation = 0.79. A consistent finding from item-level evaluations of aggregate endorsement frequencies and skewness suggested that response scales may be improved by reducing the number of response options from five to four. Conclusions Both the ACTS Burdens and ACTS Benefits scales consistently satisfied traditional reliability and validity criteria across multiple language datasets, supporting it as a clinically useful patient

  11. From ACT-ONE to Miranda, a Translation Experiment

    Charles, Nathan; Bowman, Howard; Thompson, Simon

    1997-01-01

    It is now almost universally acknowledged that the data language ACT-ONE associated with the formal description technique LOTOS is inappropriate for the purpose of OSI formal description. In response to this the LOTOS restandardisation activity plans to replace ACT-ONE with a functional language. Thus, compatibility between ACT-ONE and the replacement data language becomes an issue. In response to this, we present an experimental investigation of backward compatibility between ACT-ONE and the...

  12. The influence of vocal training and acting experience on measures of voice quality and emotional genuineness

    StevenRobertLivingstone; DeannaChoi; FrankARusso

    2014-01-01

    Vocal training through singing and acting lessons is known to modify acoustic parameters of the voice. While the effects of singing training have been well documented, the role of acting experience on the singing voice remains unclear. In two experiments, we used linear mixed models to examine the relationships between the relative amounts of acting and singing experience on the acoustics and perception of the male singing voice. In Experiment 1, twelve male vocalists were recorded while sing...

  13. Tolerance to bronchodilation during treatment with long-acting beta-agonists, a randomised controlled trial

    Hancox Robert J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular use of beta-agonists leads to tolerance to their bronchodilator effects. This can be demonstrated by measuring the response to beta-agonist following bronchoconstriction using methacholine. However most studies have demonstrated tolerance after a period of beta-agonist withdrawal, which is not typical of their use in clinical practice. This study assessed tolerance to the bronchodilator action of salbutamol during ongoing treatment with long-acting beta-agonist. Methods Random-order, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. After 1 week without beta-agonists, 13 asthmatic subjects inhaled formoterol 12 μg twice daily or matching placebo for 1 week. Eight hours after the first and last doses subjects inhaled methacholine to produce a 20% fall in FEV1. Salbutamol 100, 200 and 400 μg (cumulative dose was then given at 5-minute intervals and FEV1 was measured 5 minutes after each dose. After a 1 week washout subjects crossed over to the other treatment. Unscheduled use of beta-agonists was not allowed during the study. The main outcome variable was the area under the salbutamol response curve. Results The analysis showed a significant time by treatment interaction indicating that the response to salbutamol fell during formoterol therapy compared to placebo. After 1 week of formoterol the area under the salbutamol response curve was 48% (95% confidence interval 28 to 68% lower than placebo. This reduction in response remained significant when the analyses were adjusted for changes in the pre-challenge FEV1 and dose of methacholine given (p = 0.001. Conclusion The bronchodilator response to salbutamol is significantly reduced in patients taking formoterol. Clinically relevant tolerance to rescue beta-agonist treatment is likely to occur in patients treated with long-acting beta-agonists.

  14. The influence of vocal training and acting experience on measures of voice quality and emotional genuineness.

    Livingstone, Steven R; Choi, Deanna H; Russo, Frank A

    2014-01-01

    Vocal training through singing and acting lessons is known to modify acoustic parameters of the voice. While the effects of singing training have been well documented, the role of acting experience on the singing voice remains unclear. In two experiments, we used linear mixed models to examine the relationships between the relative amounts of acting and singing experience on the acoustics and perception of the male singing voice. In Experiment 1, 12 male vocalists were recorded while singing with five different emotions, each with two intensities. Acoustic measures of pitch accuracy, jitter, and harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR) were examined. Decreased pitch accuracy and increased jitter, indicative of a lower "voice quality," were associated with more years of acting experience, while increased pitch accuracy was associated with more years of singing lessons. We hypothesized that the acoustic deviations exhibited by more experienced actors was an intentional technique to increase the genuineness or truthfulness of their emotional expressions. In Experiment 2, listeners rated vocalists' emotional genuineness. Vocalists with more years of acting experience were rated as more genuine than vocalists with less acting experience. No relationship was reported for singing training. Increased genuineness was associated with decreased pitch accuracy, increased jitter, and a higher HNR. These effects may represent a shifting of priorities by male vocalists with acting experience to emphasize emotional genuineness over pitch accuracy or voice quality in their singing performances. PMID:24639659

  15. The influence of vocal training and acting experience on measures of voice quality and emotional genuineness

    StevenRobertLivingstone

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vocal training through singing and acting lessons is known to modify acoustic parameters of the voice. While the effects of singing training have been well documented, the role of acting experience on the singing voice remains unclear. In two experiments, we used linear mixed models to examine the relationships between the relative amounts of acting and singing experience on the acoustics and perception of the male singing voice. In Experiment 1, twelve male vocalists were recorded while singing with five different emotions, each with two intensities. Acoustic measures of pitch accuracy, jitter, and harmonics-to-noise (HNR ratio were examined. Decreased pitch accuracy and increased jitter, indicative of a lower ‘voice quality’, were associated with more years of acting experience, while increased pitch accuracy was associated with more years of singing lessons. We hypothesized that the acoustic deviations exhibited by more experienced actors was an intentional technique to increase the genuineness or truthfulness of their emotional expressions. In Experiment 2, listeners rated vocalists’ emotional genuineness. Vocalists with more years of acting experience were rated as more genuine than vocalists with less acting experience. No relationship was reported for singing training. Increased genuineness was associated with decreased pitch accuracy, increased jitter, and a higher harmonics-to-noise ratio. These effects may represent a shifting of priorities by male vocalists with acting experience to emphasize emotional genuineness over pitch accuracy or voice quality in their singing performances.

  16. Clinical trial experience using erythropoietin during radiation therapy

    Oncologists have several reasons for trying to maintain or increase hemoglobin levels in their patients during therapy. Relief of the symptoms of anemia, including fatigue and dyspnea, are traditional, well-accepted indications. A newer rationale is to enhance the efficacy of radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy in controlling tumors. A laboratory animal study found that administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) increased intratumoral median oxygen levels and diminished the proportion of measurements in the very low (<3 mm Hg) range. Hemoglobin level is a strong independent prognostic factor for tumor control by radiation therapy. The hemoglobin level at the end of radiation therapy is a stronger prognostic factor than is the hemoglobin level at the start of therapy. Numerous clinical trials have utilized rHuEPO during radiation with or without concurrent chemotherapy. All 4 trials which enrolled patients with low hemoglobin levels (<12 to 13.5 g/dl) found that rHuEPO significantly increased hemoglobin within 2 weeks and that hemoglobin levels continued to rise until the end of rHuEPO treatment. rHuEPO was efficacious in limiting the decrease in hemoglobin and use of packed red blood cell transfusion in the one reported trial in which it was used in patients with initially normal hemoglobin levels during intensive concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. One trial found a statistically significant improvement in complete pathologic response rate after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with the use of rHuEPO. rHuEPO has a potentially large role to play in the care of the cancer patient. (orig.)

  17. Special features of health services and register based trialsexperiences from a randomized trial of childbirth classes

    Sevón Tiina

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluating complex interventions in health services faces various difficulties, such as making practice changes and costs. Ways to increase research capacity and decrease costs include making research an integral part of health services and using routine data to judge outcomes. The purpose of this article is to report the feasibility of a pilot trial relying solely on routinely collected register data and being based on ordinary health services. Methods The example intervention was education to public health nurses (PHN (childbirth classes to reduce caesarean section rates via pre-delivery considerations of pregnant women. 20 maternity health centers (MHC were paired and of each 10 pairs, one MHC was randomly allocated to an intervention group and the other to a control; 8 pairs with successful intervention were used in the analyses (1601 mothers. The women visiting to the study maternity centers were identified from the Customer Register of Helsinki City. A list of the study women was made using the mother's personal identification number, visit date, the maternity center code, birth date and gestation length. The mode of delivery and health outcomes were retrieved from the Finnish Medical Birth Register (MBR. Process data of the intervention are based on observations, written feedback and questionnaires from PHNs, and project correspondence. Results It took almost two years to establish how to obtain permissions and to actually obtain it for the trial. Obtaining permissions for the customer and outcome data and register linkages was unproblematic and the cluster randomization provided comparable groups. The intervention did not succeed well. Had the main aim of the trial been to cause a change in PHNs behavior, we would have very likely intensified the intervention during the trial. Conclusion Our experiences encourage the use of trials that obtain their outcomes from registers. Changing the behavior of ordinary health

  18. Drawing and acting as user experience research tools

    Fleury, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of participant-generated drawings and drama workshops as user experience research methods. In spite of the lack of background literature on how drawings can generate useful insights on HCI issues, drawings have been successfully used in other research fields. On the...... contrary, drama workshops seem to be increasingly popular in recent participatory design research. After briefly introducing such previous work, three case studies are presented, illustrating the use of drawing and drama workshops when investigating the relationship between media technology users and two...... specific devices, namely televisions and mobile phones. The paper focuses on the methods and discusses their benefits and the challenges associated with their application. In particular, the findings are compared to those collected through a quantitative cross-cultural survey. The experience gathered...

  19. An online guided ACT intervention for enhancing the psychological wellbeing of university students: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Räsänen, Panajiota; Lappalainen, Päivi; Muotka, Joona; Tolvanen, Asko; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2016-03-01

    Stress, anxiety and depression are relatively common problems among university students. This study examined whether an online psychological intervention aiming at enhancing the wellbeing of university students could be an effective and practical alternative for meeting the needs of a university population. University students (N = 68; 85% female; 19-32 years old) were randomly assigned to either a guided seven-week online Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (iACT) intervention or a waiting list control condition (WLC). A between-groups pre-post (iACT vs WLC) design with 12-month follow-up for the iACT participants was conducted. The intervention participants were offered two face-to-face meetings, completed online exercises during a five-week period, and received personal weekly written feedback via the website from their randomly assigned, trained student coaches. Waitlist participants were offered the intervention program soon after the post measurements. Results in this small efficacy trial showed that the iACT participants had significantly higher gains in wellbeing (between group, d = 0.46), life satisfaction (d = 0.65), and mindfulness skills (d = 0.49). In addition, iACT participants' self-reported stress (d = 0.54) and symptoms of depression (d = 0.69) were significantly reduced compared to the participants in the control group. These benefits were maintained over a 12-month follow-up period (within iACT group, d = 0.65-0.69, for primary measures). The results suggest that an online-based, coach-guided ACT program with blended face-to-face and online sessions could be an effective and well-accepted alternative for enhancing the wellbeing of university students. PMID:26848517

  20. Clinical trial experience using erythropoietin during radiation therapy

    Lavey, R.S. [Radiation Oncology Program, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Univ. of Southern California, CA, Los Angeles (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Oncologists have several reasons for trying to maintain or increase hemoglobin levels in their patients during therapy. Relief of the symptoms of anemia, including fatigue and dyspnea, are traditional, well-accepted indications. A newer rationale is to enhance the efficacy of radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy in controlling tumors. A laboratory animal study found that administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) increased intratumoral median oxygen levels and diminished the proportion of measurements in the very low (<3 mm Hg) range. Hemoglobin level is a strong independent prognostic factor for tumor control by radiation therapy. The hemoglobin level at the end of radiation therapy is a stronger prognostic factor than is the hemoglobin level at the start of therapy. Numerous clinical trials have utilized rHuEPO during radiation with or without concurrent chemotherapy. All 4 trials which enrolled patients with low hemoglobin levels (<12 to 13.5 g/dl) found that rHuEPO significantly increased hemoglobin within 2 weeks and that hemoglobin levels continued to rise until the end of rHuEPO treatment. rHuEPO was efficacious in limiting the decrease in hemoglobin and use of packed red blood cell transfusion in the one reported trial in which it was used in patients with initially normal hemoglobin levels during intensive concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. One trial found a statistically significant improvement in complete pathologic response rate after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with the use of rHuEPO. rHuEPO has a potentially large role to play in the care of the cancer patient. (orig.) [Deutsch] In der Onkologie bestehen zahlreiche Gruende, die Haemoglobinkonzentration der Patienten waehrend der Therapie zu halten oder sogar anzuheben. Als anerkannte Indikation gilt hierbei die Besserung anaemiebedingter Symptome wie Muedigkeit und Dyspnoe, wobei jedoch neuere Ergebnisse darauf hinweisen, dass auch die Effizienz der Strahlen- und

  1. Canadian Environmental Assessment Act screening report (draft) proposal for the Petitcodiac River Trial Gate Opening Project

    A Memorandum of Agreement has been signed by the federal government and the Government of New Brunswick concerning a trial opening of the Petitcodiac River Causeway gates at Riverview, New Brunswick. The structure has significantly impeded upstream and downstream diadromous fish migration. Several renovations have been undertaken to solve the problem. Environment Canada and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans have conducted an environmental assessment to address relevant environmental issues concerning the trial gate opening. This report is the draft of the environmental assessment, providing a description of the scope, time table and methodology of the assessment and a list of the various consultations undertaken during the assessment. The project is expected to begin as early as April 1, 1999, with a pre-trial flushing and the drawdown of the head pond. Once the river flow is low enough to allow the management of the gates, the trial gate will be opened. The project will end with the refilling of the head pond, possibly as late as November 1999. 30 refs., 5 tabs., 1 append

  2. [The personal data act, clinical trials and data privacy. Rules for treatment of personal data in clinical trials and scientific research projects].

    Daasnes, Camilla

    2003-04-14

    The Danish Act on Processing of Personal Data applies to all processing of data for the purpose of carrying out medical trials and other scientific or statistical studies. Prior to the commencement of the processing of data, a private controller, i.e. a pharmaceutical company, shall notify the Danish Data Protection Agency and obtain the authorisation of the Agency. The article presents the various conditions laid down by the Agency for the carrying out of the processing operations. Furthermore, special attention is drawn to the data subject's various rights. In order to ensure the privacy of the data subject and to protect data against accidental or unlawful destruction, loss or alteration and against unauthorized disclosure, the controller shall implement certain technical and organisational security measures laid down by the Agency. When a controller leaves the processing of data to a processor, the processor is obliged to ensure compliance with the given measures. The Data Protection Agency supervises that the processing is carried out in compliance with the provisions of the Act and the conditions laid down by the Agency. PMID:12756831

  3. Paul’s ecstatic trance experience near Damascus in Acts of the Apostles

    John J. Pilch

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Luke reports more than twenty altered states of consciousness experiences in Acts of the Apostles. These  are common and normal human experiences in approximately ninety percent of contemporary cultures.    In the ancient Circum-Mediterranean world, it seems to have been common and normal in about eighty percent  of  those  cultures. Insights from psychological anthropology, cultural anthropology and cognitive neuroscience contribute to an improved understanding and interpretation of these experiences in the Bible, particularly the call of Paul as reported in Acts 9; 22; 26.

  4. Experiments for Ka-band mobile applications: The ACTS mobile terminal

    Estabrook, Polly; Dessouky, Khaled; Jedrey, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    To explore the potential of Ka-band to support mobile satellite services, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has initiated the design and development of a Ka-band land-mobile terminal to be used with the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The planned experimental setup with ACTS is described. Brief functional descriptions of the mobile and fixed terminals are provided. The inputs required from the propagation community to support the design activities and the planned experiments are also discussed.

  5. Student Experience of Oral Communication Assessment Tasks Online from a Multi-Disciplinary Trial

    McBain, Bonnie; Drew, Antony; James, Carole; Phelan, Liam; Harris, Keith M; Archer, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the experiences of tertiary students learning oral presentation skills in a range of online and blended learning contexts across diverse disciplines. Design/methodology/approach: The research was designed as a "federation" of trials of diverse online oral communications assessment tasks…

  6. A six month randomized controlled trial of long acting injectable risperidone 50 and 100mg in treatment resistant schizophrenia.

    Meltzer, H Y; Lindenmayer, J-P; Kwentus, J; Share, D B; Johnson, R; Jayathilake, K

    2014-04-01

    It has been suggested that atypical antipsychotic drugs (A-APDs) other than clozapine may be effective to improve positive symptoms in some patients with treatment resistant schizophrenia (TRS), if both the dose is higher, and the duration of the trial longer, than those which have been ineffective in non-TRS (NTRS) patients. This hypothesis was tested with long acting injectable risperidone (Risperdal Consta®, RLAI). One hundred sixty TRS patients selected for persistent moderate-severe delusions or hallucinations, or both, were randomized to RLAI, 50 or 100mg biweekly, in a six month, outpatient, double-blind, multicenter trial. We hypothesized that RLAI, 100mg, would be more effective than RLAI, 50mg. However, both doses produced clinically significant and equivalent improvement in PANSS Total, Positive, and Negative subscale scores, as well as key cognitive, global and functional measures, with increasing response during the course of the study, confirming the value of longer clinical trial duration for patients with TRS, but not superiority of the higher dose. The overall response rate was comparable to that previously reported for clozapine and high dose olanzapine, another A-APD, in TRS. Both doses of RLAI were equally well tolerated, producing minimal extrapyramidal side effects and few drop outs. Plasma levels of the active moiety, risperidone+9-hydroxyrisperidone, during treatment with RLAI 100mg, were comparable to those for 6-8 mg/day oral risperidone, which have not been effective in TRS. Further study of RLAI, ≥ 50-100mg biweekly, should compare it with clozapine and oral risperidone in TRS, with duration of treatment ≥ six months. PMID:24630262

  7. Opinions of the people of learning and experience about the Monju trial

    The Monju trial means the judgment Nagoya High Court Kanazawa branch office made on January 27, 2003 to invalidate the Monju construction permission because there are 'a blunder, the omission that are hard to overlook' for safety examination, and also wrong serious enough to invalidate the permission. Forty-three opinions of people of learning and experience were presented on this special number. Most of them expressed the judgment was technically irrational. Technical points regarding the trial decision were disputed. Some appreciated the judgment based on precautionary principle. (T. Tanaka)

  8. A comparison of a laboratory scale experiment with a field trial treatment using chlorpyrifos-methyl

    An experiment was carried out in which a field treatment of a small bulk of grain with chlorpyrifos-methyl was compared with a laboratory treatment of 1 kg of grain with 14C radiolabelled chlorpyrifos-methyl. The conditions under which the grain was maintained in the laboratory mimicked those of the field trial as closely as possible, with sampling and analysis being carried out at the same time and in a similar manner in both. The results from the two experiments were in general agreement with approx. 60% of the chlorpyrifos-methyl remaining intact at the end. A satisfactory level of biological control was achieved in the field trial. The use of the radio-label enabled more information about the fate of the degraded insecticide to be obtained from the laboratory experiment. The majority of this radioactivity comprised a fraction which remained within the grain tissue after solvent extraction. The level of activity in the grain tissues gradually increased with time but its nature is as yet unknown. The good agreement obtained between the residue profile and the breakdown patterns in both experiments would suggest that a laboratory scale experiment is a satisfactory model for the situation pertaining in a large scale field trial. (author)

  9. Streamlining IRB review in multisite trials through single-study IRB Cooperative Agreements: experience of the Beta-Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET).

    Thornquist, Mark D; Edelstein, Cim; Goodman, Gary E; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2002-02-01

    With their extensive data and specimen repositories, clinical trials are a long-term, valuable resource to health researchers. However, assuring protection of participants' rights can be challenging, particularly when such trials are conducted at multiple sites with multiple Institutional Review Boards (IRBs). One little-used mechanism that can streamline IRB review in multisite trials while maintaining participants' protections is the single-study IRB Cooperative Agreement. This agreement is entirely different from reciprocity agreements between institutions. Beginning in 1996, the Beta-Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial established single-study IRB Cooperative Agreements among its performance sites, which reduced the average time to complete IRB approval from over 6 months to 1 month for each of many substudies. We describe our experience and make recommendations for other multisite clinical trials. PMID:11852169

  10. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: from clinical trials to real-life experiences

    Sergio Harari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Randomised controlled clinical trials are fundamental in medicine to develop new effective drugs and new therapeutic regimens and are the strength of evidence-based medicine. These studies allow us to avoid the repetition of misleading experiences that have been reported in the past, where drugs or associations were utilised without compelling evidence and ultimately proven to be ineffective. In recent years, randomised clinical trials have been conducted and concluded for many rare diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, clinical trials do not always reflect the real-life scenario. Patients selected for clinical trials present fewer comorbidities, they fall between certain age limits, and the severity of their disease is defined; therefore, they do not always reflect the whole of the population affected by a specific disease. These are the reasons why we also need data that mirror real-life experience. The limitations that these kind of studies present are always several and the studies should be interpreted with caution, although they can fill the important gap between efficacy and effectiveness. In this article, we will review the existing clinical data on real-life treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  11. Emotional Labor: The Role of Employee Acting Strategies on Customer Emotional Experience and Subsequent Buying Decisions

    Chaoying Tang; Craig R. Seal; Stefanie E. Naumann; Krystal Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Prior research has demonstrated the impact of employee emotional labor strategies (deep and surface acting) on customer behavioral intentions. However, there is limited data on the impact of emotional labor strategy on potential intervening variables and on actual buying decisions. This study extends the prior research by examining the effect of employee emotional labor strategies on customers’ emotional experiences and actual customer purchasing decisions. Data were collected from 294 employ...

  12. Implementation of the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997: The Indiana Experience

    Cathleen S. Graham

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997 (ASFA is expected to have a profound impact on children and families the child welfare system serves. This article provides information about Indiana’s experience in implementing ASFA, including policy decisions made by the legislative and executive branches of government and the involvement of the judiciary. A multidisciplinary task force addressed training and program needs for positive implementation. Initial outcomes for Indiana children and remaining challenges are discussed.

  13. EMOTIONAL LABOR: THE ROLE OF EMPLOYEE ACTING STRATEGIES ON CUSTOMER EMOTIONAL EXPERIENCE AND SUBSEQUENT BUYING DECISIONS

    Chaoying Tang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prior research has demonstrated the impact of employee emotional labor strategies (deep and surface acting on customer behavioral intentions. However, there is limited data on the impact of emotional labor strategy on potential intervening variables and on actual buying decisions. This study extends the prior research by examining the effect of employee emotional labor strategies on customers’ emotional experiences and actual customer purchasing decisions. Data were collected from 294 employee-customer pairs from retail cell phone stores in China. Results indicated that choice of strategy (deep or surface does significantly impact purchase decisions. In addition, the relationship between strategy and purchase is mediated by the customer's emotional experience.

  14. Inactive experiments for advanced separation processes prior to high activity trials in ATALANTE

    Duhamet, Jean; Lanoe, Jean-Yves; Rivalier, Patrick; Borda, Gilles [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), CEA/DEN/VRH/DTEC/SGCS, Centre de Marcoule - BP 17171, 302007 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    Many trials have been performed in ATALANTE's shielded cells to demonstrate the technical feasibility of processes involving minor actinide separation. They required developments of new extractors as well as a step by step procedure have been used to lower the risks of malfunction during high active operation. The design of the extractors developed by Cea has included shielded cells restrictions, miniaturization to lower the quantity of high active material and wastes and the care for being representative of industrial equipment. After individual shake down inactive tests, with actual phases, each process experiment scheduled in ATALANTE has been tested at G1 Facility in Marcoule. The objective was to reproduce as much as possible all the equipment chosen for active tests. This procedure has demonstrated its efficiency to detect many problems that would have heavy impact if they have been discovered during active trials. It was also used for operators'training. (authors)

  15. Tickling the CMB damping tail: scrutinizing the tension between the ACT and SPT experiments

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo; Pagano, Luca; Said, Najla

    2013-01-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and the South Pole Telescope (SPT) have recently provided new, very precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy damping tail. The values of the cosmological parameters inferred from these measurements, while broadly consistent with the expectations of the standard cosmological model, are providing interesting possible indications for new physics that are definitely worth of investigation. The ACT results, while compatible with the standard expectation of three neutrino families, indicate a level of CMB lensing, parametrized by the lensing amplitude parameter A_L, that is about 70% higher than expected. If not a systematic, this anomalous lensing amplitude could be produced by modifications of general relativity or coupled dark energy. Vice-versa, the SPT experiment, while compatible with a standard level of CMB lensing, prefers an excess of dark radiation, parametrized by the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom N_eff. Here we p...

  16. A phase 2 trial of everolimus and pasireotide long-acting release in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma.

    Shoushtari, Alexander N; Ong, Leonard T; Schoder, Heiko; Singh-Kandah, Shahnaz; Abbate, Kelly T; Postow, Michael A; Callahan, Margaret K; Wolchok, Jedd; Chapman, Paul B; Panageas, Katherine S; Schwartz, Gary K; Carvajal, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that inhibiting mammalian target of rapamycin and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor would be efficacious in metastatic uveal melanoma. This was a phase 2 trial of everolimus 10 mg daily plus pasireotide long-acting release 60 mg every 28 days enrolling patients with progressive, metastatic uveal melanoma to treatment until progression by Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors 1.1 (RECIST 1.1) or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was clinical benefit rate, defined as any objective response or RECIST 1.1 stable disease at 16 weeks. A subset of patients underwent baseline indium-111-octreotide scans. A total of 14 patients were enrolled, of which 13 were evaluable for the primary endpoint, before the study was terminated due to poor accrual. Three of 13 (26%) patients obtained clinical benefit. Seven of 13 (54%) had stable disease lasting for a median of 8 weeks (range: 8-16 weeks). Grade 3 adverse events deemed at least possibly related to study drugs were hyperglycemia (n=7), oral mucositis (n=2), diarrhea (n=1), hypophosphatemia (n=1), and anemia (n=1). Seven of 14 (50%) patients required at least one dose reduction due to toxicity. Seven of eight (88%) patients with baseline indium-111-octreotide scans had at least one avid lesion, with significant intrapatient heterogeneity. There was a trend toward an association between octreotide avidity and cytostatic response to therapy (P=0.078). The combination of everolimus and pasireotide has limited clinical benefit in this small metastatic uveal melanoma cohort. Dose reductions for side effects were common. Further investigation into the relationship between somatostatin receptor expression and cytostatic activity of somatostatin analogues is warranted. PMID:26795274

  17. Experiences of a long-term randomized controlled prevention trial in a maiden environment: Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy trial

    Rahu Mati

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preventive drugs require long-term trials to show their effectiveness or harms and often a lot of changes occur during post-marketing studies. The purpose of this article is to describe the research process in a long-term randomized controlled trial and discuss the impact and consequences of changes in the research environment. Methods The Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy trial (EPHT, originally planned to continue for five years, was planned in co-operation with the Women's International Study of Long-Duration Oestrogen after Menopause (WISDOM in the UK. In addition to health outcomes, EPHT was specifically designed to study the impact of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT on health services utilization. Results After EPHT recruited in 1999–2001 the Women's Health Initiative (WHI in the USA decided to stop the estrogen-progestin trial after a mean of 5.2 years in July 2002 because of increased risk of breast cancer and later in 2004 the estrogen-only trial because HT increased the risk of stroke, decreased the risk of hip fracture, and did not affect coronary heart disease incidence. WISDOM was halted in autumn 2002. These decisions had a major influence on EPHT. Conclusion Changes in Estonian society challenged EPHT to find a balance between the needs of achieving responses to the trial aims with a limited budget and simultaneously maintaining the safety of trial participants. Flexibility was the main key for success. Rapid changes are not limited only to transiting societies but are true also in developed countries and the risk must be included in planning all long-term trials. The role of ethical and data monitoring committees in situations with emerging new data from other studies needs specification. Longer funding for preventive trials and more flexibility in budgeting are mandatory. Who should prove the effectiveness of an (old drug for a new preventive indication? In preventive drug trials companies may

  18. Review of the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act and the Pediatric Research Equity Act: What can the obstetric community learn from the pediatric experience?

    Ren, Zhaoxia; Zajicek, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Children have been called therapeutic orphans as they have been excluded from drug research and new drug development resulting in the lack of proper labels for majority of the drugs for pediatric use. The Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act (BPCA) and the Pediatric Research Equity Act (PREA) are two legislative mandates to improve pediatric drug labeling. The BPCA legislation authorizes the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to implement research programs through funding clinical trials to study off-patent drugs in pediatric population. Obstetric pharmacology research gaps are in many ways similar to those in pediatrics, including off-label use of common medications, and lack of knowledge of appropriate dosing, safety, and efficacy of drugs. Much research is needed to define mechanisms of disease and drug actions in pregnant women to fill the knowledge gaps. PMID:26455383

  19. Field trial experiences of remote monitoring system for unattended mode NDA in PFPF

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed a Remote Monitoring System (RMS) for unattended mode Nondestructive Assay (NDA) at the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF). The principal objective of this development is to improve the efficiency of safeguards activities for both the operator and the inspectorates, and to improve transparency of nuclear material management. In June 1999, with the cooperation of the IAEA and JSGO, the RMS was installed for field trial at the plutonium storage area in PFPF. At the beginning of the field trial, the RMS encountered reliability problems in both hardware and software. At this point, these difficulties have been mostly overcome by steady, progressive improvements in hardware and by upgrading of software and troubleshooting procedures. The RMS has successfully taken data for more than 13 consecutive months from the May 2001. Reliable remote transmission of NDA data has been demonstrated under realistic operational conditions. This paper describes the outline and status of the PFPF RMS based on the experience gained in the field trial. Future plans for implementing remote monitoring under the international safeguards regime are also discussed. (author)

  20. Trial fabrication and performance test of in-pile sodium loop for NSRR experiment

    Described are the details of trial in-pile sodium loop for the NSRR experiment and its performance test results. The loop can be inserted inside the experimental tube of the NSRR reactor, and consists of main four systems of sodium circulation, cover gas, evacuation and air cooling. Seven fuel pins in maximum can be accommodated in the test section, and the test section is surrounded by neutron modetator made of zirconium hydride to get higher thermal neutron flux, thereby higher energy deposition in a test fuel pin. The loop is a doubly contained loop to avoid sodium leakage to the experimental tube in case of the failure of the sodium circulation systems, and thermal insulation is made by evacuating the gas inside the secondary containment. The performance test was made successfully, and the design target values of sodium temperature of 5000C and sodium velocity of 8 m/sec were attained well stably and safely through the test, although the operation with high sodium velocity at low sodium temperature was rather difficult due to large heat generation by the operation of the electromagnetic pump. Furthermore, before filling the loop with sodium, trial cutting and welding at the test section were performed for exchange it after the in-pile experiment and the difficulties and problems of the work were understood. (author)

  1. Licensing Procedures for Sodium Experiment Facility using Safety Control of Dangerous Substances Act

    Sodium used as a coolant in the SFR is utilized in various fields and yet there has been no record of handling and storing sodium exceeding designated quantity, which is a quantity that serves as the lowest level permitted for construction. The difficulty in achieving the license for sodium experiment facilities and equipment has been the main issue since the first time of sodium-related plan. Sodium is under regulation of four kinds of laws including the Safety Control of Dangerous Substances Act and it is under categorized as Class 3(pyrophoric material and water-prohibiting substance). The objective of this study is to investigate the procedure of installing a sodium-related facility and achieving the license from the fire agency of government. In this work, the licensing procedure for a sodium experiment facility was investigated under the Safety Control of Dangerous Substances Act. For the construction of the PGSFR (Prototype Gen-IV Sodium cooled Fast Reactor), the described procedure should be reviewed and prepared carefully in accordance with the fire safety regulatory body

  2. Long acting β2 agonists for stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with poor reversibility: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

    Mensinkai Shaila

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The long acting β2-agonists, salmeterol and formoterol, have been recommended, by some, as first line treatment of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. We reviewed evidence of efficacy and safety when compared with placebo or anticholinergic agents in patients with poorly reversible COPD. Methods After searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, HealthSTAR, BIOSIS Previews, PASCAL, ToxFile, SciSearch, the Cochrane Library, and PubMed, as well as Web sites, selected journals, reference lists, and contacting drug manufacturers, two reviewers independently screened reports of randomised controlled trials of parallel or crossover design lasting four weeks or longer and including patients with a forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 ≤ 75% of predicted, a ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FVC ≤ 88% of predicted, and Results Twelve trials satisfied our inclusion criteria; eight were high quality (Jadad score >2 and four were low quality (≤ 2. The adequacy of allocation concealment was unclear in all of them. We did not perform a meta-analysis due to differences in trial design and how outcomes were reported. Two trials comparing salmeterol with ipratropium did not detect differences; one trial comparing formoterol and ipratropium described greater improvement with formoterol in morning PEFR (15.3 versus 7.1 l/min, p = 0.040. Of twelve trials comparing long acting β2 agonists with placebo, six reported no improvement in exercise capacity, eleven reported improvements in FEV1 lung function (one reported no improvement, six reported less rescue inhaler usage (one reported no difference and five reported improved dyspnea scores (two reported no improvement. Differences in quality of life were detected in one salmeterol trial ; however, two salmeterol, and one formoterol trial reported no differences. Adverse effects of interest were not reported. Conclusion In terms of clinical outcomes and safety, we could not find

  3. Rationale, design, and baseline characteristics of the Acetylcystein for Contrast-Induced nephropaThy (ACT Trial: a pragmatic randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of acetylcysteine for the prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aceltylcysteine has been evaluated in several small trials as a means of reducing the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN, however systematic reviews of these studies do not provide conclusive answers. Therefore, a large randomized controlled trial (RCT is needed to provide a reliable answer as to whether acetylcysteine is effective in decreasing the risk of CIN in high-risk patients undergoing angiographic procedures. Methods ACT is a RCT of acetylcysteine versus placebo in 2,300 patients at-risk for CIN undergoing an intravascular angiographic procedure. The randomization list will be concealed. Participants, health care staff, investigators and outcome assessors will be blinded to whether patients receive acetylcysteine or placebo. All analysis will follow the intention-to-treat principle. The study drugs (acetylcysteine 1200 mg or placebo will be administered orally twice daily for two doses before and two doses after the procedure. The primary outcome is the occurrence of CIN, defined as a 25% elevation of serum creatinine above baseline between 48 and 96 hours after angiography. Discussion The first patient entered the trial on September, 2008. Up to April 7, 2009, 810 patients had been included in 35 centers. The mean age was 69 (Standard deviation: 10, 18% had a baseline serum creatinine >1.5 mg/dL, 57% were diabetics and 13% had a history of heart failure. The ongoing ACT Trial is the largest multicentre RCT that will determine whether acetylcysteine is effective in decreasing the risk of CIN in patients at risk undergoing angiography. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00736866

  4. Altruism, personal benefit, and anxieties: a phenomenological study of healthy volunteers' experiences in a placebo‐controlled trial of duloxetine

    Kwakye, Isaac N.; Garner, Matthew; Baldwin, David S.; Bamford, Susan; Pinkney, Verity

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to develop an in‐depth understanding of healthy volunteers' experiences of mental health trials. Methods A qualitative study was nested within a healthy volunteer placebo‐controlled trial of duloxetine, a psychotropic drug used for treating patients with major depression and generalized anxiety disorder. Eight participants were interviewed, and data were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results Interviewees described volunteering for the trial because they were interested in research, wanted the monetary incentive, wanted to help researchers, and wanted to be part of something. On entering the trial, participants considered the possible risks and described feeling anxious, excited, and determined; they had some clear expectations and some loosely held hopes about what would happen. During the trial, participants were curious about whether they were taking duloxetine or placebo, self‐monitored their bodies' reactions, and guessed which treatment they received. On being un‐blinded to treatment allocation after completing the trial, some participants' guesses were confirmed, but others were surprised, and a few were disappointed. Conclusions Small changes to advertising/consent materials to reflect volunteers' motivations could improve recruitment rates to similar trials; “active” placebos might be particularly useful for maintaining blinding in healthy volunteer trials; and sensitive procedures are needed for un‐blinding participants to treatment allocation. © 2016 The Authors. Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27378326

  5. A zero-training algorithm for EEG single-trial classification applied to a face recognition ERP experiment.

    Lage-Castellanos, Agustin; Nieto, Juan I; Quiñones, Ileana; Martinez-Montes, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a machine learning based approach to discriminate between EEG single trials of two experimental conditions in a face recognition experiment. The algorithm works using a single-trial EEG database of multiple subjects and thus does not require subject-specific training data. This approach supports the idea that zero-training classification and on-line detection Brain Computer Interface (BCI) systems are areas with a significant amount of potential. PMID:21096895

  6. Prediction of responders for outcome measures of Locomotor Experience Applied Post Stroke trial

    Bruce H. K. Dobkin, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Locomotor Experience Applied Post Stroke rehabilitation trial found equivalent walking outcomes for body weight-supported treadmill plus overground walking practice versus home-based exercise that did not emphasize walking. From this large database, we examined several clinically important questions that provide insights into recovery of walking that may affect future trial designs. Using logistic regression analyses, we examined predictors of response based on a variety of walking speed-related outcomes and measures that captured disability, physical impairment, and quality of life. The most robust predictor was being closer at baseline to the primary outcome measure, which was the functional walking speed thresholds of 0.4 m/s (household walking and 0.8 m/s (community walking. Regardless of baseline walking speed, a younger age and higher Berg Balance Scale score were relative predictors of responding, whether operationally defined by transitioning beyond each speed boundary or by a continuous change or a greater than median increase in walking speed. Of note, the cutoff values of 0.4 and 0.8 m/s had no particular significance compared with other walking speed changes despite their general use as descriptors of functional levels of walking. No evidence was found for any difference in predictors based on treatment group.

  7. Comparison of Subjective Experiences and Effectiveness of First-Generation Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics and Risperidone Long-Acting Injectables in Patients With Schizophrenia.

    Chen, Wen-Yin; Lin, Shih-Ku

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to compare the subjective experiences and clinical effects of first-generation long-acting injectable (FGA-LAI) antipsychotics with those of risperidone long-acting injectables (RIS-LAIs) in 434 schizophrenia patients. Compared with the RIS-LAI group, the patients treated with FGA-LAIs had a significantly longer duration of illness and LAI treatment and were older. Our results suggest that patients treated with FGA-LAI have more satisfactory subjective experiences compared with patients treated with RIS-LAI and that both FGA-LAI and RIS-LAI treatments can prevent relapses and hospitalization. Additional longitudinal studies determining the long-term benefits of RIS-LAI are warranted. PMID:27580495

  8. The Danish patient safety experience: the Act on Patient Safety in the Danish health care system

    Mette Lundgaard; Louise Raboel; Elisabeth Broegger Jensen; Jacob Anhoej; Beth Lilja Pedersen; Danish Society for Patient Safety

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the process that lead to the passing of the Act for Patient Safety in the Danish health care system, the contents of the act and how the act is used in the Danish health care system.

    The act obligates frontline health care personnel to report adverse events, hospital owners to act on the reports and the National Board of Health to communicate the learning nationally.

    The act protects health care providers from sanctions as a re...

  9. The Danish patient safety experience: the Act on Patient Safety in the Danish Health care system

    Lundgaard, Mette; Rabøl, Louise; Jensen, Elisabeth Agnete Brøgger;

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the process that lead to the passing of the Act for Patient Safety in the Danisk health care sytem, the contents of the act and how the act is used in the Danish health care system. The act obligates frontline health care personnel to report adverse events, hospital owners to...... act on the reports and the National Board of Health to commuicate the learning nationally. The act protects health care providers from sanctions as a result of reporting. In January 2004, the Act on Patient Safety in the Danish health care system was put into force. In the first twelve months 5740...... adverse events were reported. the reports were analyzed locally (hospital and region), anonymized ad then sent to the National Board af Health. The Act on Patient Safety has driven the work with patient safety forward but there is room for improvement. Continuous and improved feedback from all parts of...

  10. Detailed review and analysis of complex radiotherapy clinical trial planning data: Evaluation and initial experience with the SWAN software system

    Aim: Contemporary radiotherapy clinical trials typically require complex three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning. This produces large amounts of data relating technique and dose delivery for correlation with patient outcomes. Assessment of the quality of this information is required to ensure protocol compliance, to quantify the variation in treatments given to patients and to enhance the power of studies to determine correlates of patient outcomes. Materials and methods: A software system ('SWAN') was developed to facilitate the objective analysis, quality-assurance and review of digital treatment planning data from multi-centre radiotherapy trials. The utility of this system was assessed on the basis of its functionality and our experience of its use in the context of multi-centre clinical trials and trials-support activities. Results: The SWAN system has been shown to have the functionality required for use in several multi-centre trials, including automated review and archive processes. Approximately 800 treatment plans from over 30 participating institutions have so far been assessed with the system for several treatment planning scenarios. To illustrate this we include a description of the use of the system for a large-recruitment prostate radiotherapy trial being undertaken in Australasia, including examples of how the review process has changed clinical practice. Conclusion: The successful implementation of SWAN has been demonstrated in a number of clinical trials. The software provides an opportunity for comprehensive review of treatment parameters that could impact on clinical outcomes and trial results. Such quality-assurance (QA) has previously been difficult or impossible to achieve, particularly for a clinical trial involving large numbers of patients. Such reviews have highlighted inconsistencies in clinical practice that have since been addressed through feedback from the review process. The process of data collection and review should be

  11. [Influence of the Nuremberg physicians' trials--beginning a new era in the ethical judging of human experiments].

    Kerpel-Fronius, Sándor

    2008-02-01

    This short historical review attempts to shed light on the tortuous road on which society moved toward the general acceptance of the idea of experimenting on human beings. Unfortunately people had to realize that under antihuman or lenient political leadership, some physicians might apply their knowledge against their fellow beings, or might endanger them while pursuing their scientific goals. For this reason, it became necessary to codify the ethical requirements of medical experiments. This was done first by the Prussian government in 1900. The historical significance of the Nuremberg physicians' trials is that, by recognizing the enormous scientific importance of human experiments, they led to the formulation of general ethical principles governing human studies, which became known as the Nuremberg Code. Broad, international regulations were developed as the consequence of the trial. Unfortunately human experiments performed on prison inmates were judged at the trial as ethically acceptable, provided an informed consent was signed. Misusing this possibility many unethical experiments were done primarily in the US after the war. The great indignation due to ethical misconduct in prison trials and the highly unethical Tuskegee experiments performed on black Americans' suffering from syphilis, led much later to the organization of independent ethics committees. Through these committees, society exercises supervision of human trials. However, in case of severely ill patients the physician might be left alone to make a quick, and ethically correct, decision corresponding to the situation. In the final analysis the safety and ethical protection of research subjects remain the joint responsibility of society and of the experimenting physicians. PMID:18218586

  12. Remote sensing of the 1994 NOFO-dispersant field trial. Experiences and results

    As part of the Norwegian Clean Seas Association For Operating Companies' (NOFO) ''oil on water''-exercise early June 1994, a dispersant field trial was carried out. During the experiment period, an extensive monitoring programme was carried out. both on surface oil/emulsion, dispersed oil (subsurface monitoring) as well as monitoring by aerial remote sensing. The aerial remote sensing included SLAR (Side-Looking Airborne Radar) and IR/UV from the surveillance aircrafts from the Norwegian State Pollution Control Authority (SPCA) and the Swedish Coast Guard. In addition to the planned monitoring programme, the spill was detected in an ERS-1 SAR scene by the Operational oil spill detection service run by Tromsoe Satellite Station (TSS) and the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (NDRE). The remotely sensed data from the Swedish Coast Guard are stored digitally on computer tape, and after the experiment, selected IR/UV data have been processed and analyzed to estimate the areal distribution of thick oil (emulsion) and thinner oil (''rainbow'', ''blueshine'') and how this distribution changed with time. This paper presents how the data was processed, associated problems, and the results of the analysis. The paper also includes information about the oil spill and surrounding wave conditions as derived from the ERS-1 SAR scene. 3 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  13. What determines patient preferences for treating low risk basal cell carcinoma when comparing surgery vs imiquimod? A discrete choice experiment survey from the SINS trial

    Tinelli Michela; Ozolins Mara; Bath-Hextall Fiona; Williams Hywel C

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The SINS trial (Controlled Clinical Trials ISRCTN48755084; Eudract No. 2004-004506-24) is a randomised controlled trial evaluating long term success of excisional surgery vs. imiquimod 5% cream for low risk nodular and superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The trial included a discrete choice experiment questionnaire to explore patient preferences of a cream versus surgery for the treatment of their skin cancer. Methods The self-completed questionnaire was administered a...

  14. B-cell depletion in SLE: clinical and trial experience with rituximab and ocrelizumab and implications for study design.

    Reddy, Venkat; Jayne, David; Close, David; Isenberg, David

    2013-01-01

    B cells are believed to be central to the disease process in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), making them a target for new therapeutic intervention. In recent years there have been many publications regarding the experience in SLE of B-cell depletion utilising rituximab, an anti-CD20 mAb that temporarily depletes B cells,reporting promising results in uncontrolled open studies and in routine clinical use. However, the two large randomised controlled trials in extra-renal lupus (EXPLORER study) and lupus nephritis (LUNAR study) failed to achieve their primary endpoints. Based on the clinical experience with rituximab this failure was somewhat unexpected and raised a number of questions and concerns, not only into the true level of benefit of B-cell depletion in a broad population but also how to test the true level of effectiveness of an investigational agent as we seek to improve the design of therapeutic trials in SLE. A better understanding of what went wrong in these trials is essential to elucidate the underlying reasons for the disparate observations noted in open studies and controlled trials. In this review, we focus on various factors that may affect the ability to accurately and confidently establish the level of treatment effect of the investigational agent, in this case rituximab, in the tw studies and explore hurdles faced in the randomised controlled trials investigating the efficacy of ocrelizumab, the humanised anti-CD20 mAb, in SLE. Further, based on the lessons learned from the clinical trials, we make suggestions that could be implemented in future clinical trial design to overcome the hurdles faced. PMID:23566295

  15. Bringing Buprenorphine-Naloxone Detoxification to Community Treatment Providers: The NIDA Clinical Trials Network Field Experience

    Amass, Leslie; Ling, Walter; Freese, Thomas E.; Reiber, Chris; Annon, Jeffrey J.; Cohen, Allan J.; M.F.T.; McCarty, Dennis; Reid, Malcolm S.; Brown, Lawrence S.; Clark, Cynthia; Ziedonis, Douglas M.; Krejci, Jonathan; Stine, Susan; Winhusen, Theresa

    2004-01-01

    In October 2002, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved buprenorphine-naloxone (Suboxone®) sublingual tablets as an opioid dependence treatment available for use outside traditionally licensed opioid treatment programs. The NIDA Center for Clinical Trials Network (CTN) sponsored two clinical trials assessing buprenorphine-naloxone for short-term opioid detoxification. These trials provided an unprecedented field test of its use in twelve diverse community-based treatment programs. Opi...

  16. Are Clinical Trial Experiences Utilized?: A Differentiated Model of Medical Sites’ Information Transfer Ability

    Smed, Marie; Schultz, Carsten; Getz, Kenneth A.;

    2015-01-01

    The collaboration with medical professionals in pharmaceutical clinical trials facilitates opportunities to gain valuable market information concerning product functionality issues, as well as issues related to market implementation and adoption. However, previous research on trial management lacks...... a differentiated perspective on the potential for information transfer from site to producer. An exploration of the variation in stickiness of information, and therefore the complexity of information transfer in clinical trials, is the main aim of this study. To further enrich the model of the dispersed sites......, complementary service issues and usability patterns are all significantly more difficult to transfer in clinical trials than issues related to product functionality....

  17. Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) versus Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Mixed Anxiety Disorders

    Arch, Joanna J.; Eifert, Georg H.; Davies, Carolyn; Vilardaga, Jennifer C. Plumb; Rose, Raphael D.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Randomized comparisons of acceptance-based treatments with traditional cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders are lacking. To address this gap, we compared acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) to CBT for heterogeneous anxiety disorders. Method: One hundred twenty-eight individuals (52% female, mean age = 38, 33%…

  18. Long-acting somatostatin analogues provide significant beneficial effect in patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia: Results from a proof of concept open label mono-centre trial

    Hall, Barry; Breslin, Niall; McNamara, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small bowel angiodysplasias account for over 50% of causes of small bowel bleeding and carry a worse prognosis than lesions located elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract. Re-bleeding rates are high even after first-line endoscopic therapy and are associated with high levels of morbidity for affected patients. Small trials of long-acting somatostatin analogues have shown promising results but have not yet been assessed in patients with refractory small bowel disease. Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of long-acting somatostatin analogues in reducing re-bleeding rates and transfusion requirements, and improving haemoglobin levels in patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia. Methods Patients with refractory small bowel angiodysplasia were treated with 20 mg of long-acting octreotide for a minimum of three months. Response was assessed according to: rates of re-bleeding, haemoglobin levels, transfusion requirements, and side effects. Results A total of 24 patients were initially treated and 20 received at least three doses. Rates of complete, partial and non-response were 70%, 20% and 10% respectively. Average haemoglobin rates increased from 9.19 g/dl to 11.35 g/dl (p = 0.0027, 95% confidence interval (CI) −3.5 to −1.1) in the group overall and 70% remained transfusion-free after a mean treatment duration of 8.8 months. The rate of adverse events was higher than previously reported at 30%. Conclusion Long-acting somatostatin analogues offer a therapeutic advantage in a significant proportion of patients with small bowel angiodysplasia. With careful patient selection and close observation, a long-acting somatostatin analogue should be considered in all patients with persistent anaemia attributable to refractory disease in conjunction with other standard treatments. PMID:26966525

  19. Diagnostic criteria and adjudication process both determine published event-rates : The ACTION trial experience

    Kirwan, Bridget-Anne; Lubsen, Jacobus; de Brouwer, Sophie; Danchin, Nicolas; Battler, Alexander; de Luna, Antonio Bayes; Dunselman, Peter H. J. M.; Glasser, Stephen; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Sutton, George; van Dalen, Frederik J.; Poole-Wilson, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Few trials report event-adjudication procedures in detail. Using data from the ACTION (A Coronary disease Trial Investigating Outcome with Nifedipine GITS) study, we compared the impact on event-rates of an adjudication strategy based on systematic screening of all reported serious advers

  20. Nazi Medical Experiment Report: Evidence from the Nuremberg Medical Trial. Teaching with Documents.

    Haverkamp, Beth; Schamel, Wynell

    1995-01-01

    Describes the historical background to the Nuremberg War Trials. Asserts that there is a wealth of evidence in the National Archives documenting atrocities committed by the Nazis. Presents primary source documents used in the Trials and provides seven suggested teaching strategies. (CFR)

  1. Challenges with participant reimbursement: experiences from a post-trial access study.

    Mngadi, Kathryn Therese; Frohlich, Janet; Montague, Carl; Singh, Jerome; Nkomonde, Nelisiwe; Mvandaba, Nomzamo; Ntombeka, Fanelesibonge; Luthuli, Londiwe; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Mansoor, Leila

    2015-11-01

    Reimbursement of trial participants remains a frequently debated issue, with specific guidance lacking. Trials combining post-trial access and implementation science may necessitate new strategies and models. CAPRISA 008, a post-trial access study testing the feasibility of using family planning services to rollout a prelicensure HIV prevention intervention, tried to balance the real-life scenario of no reimbursement for attendance at public sector clinics with that of a trial including some visits that focused on research procedures and others that focused on standard of care procedures. A reduced reimbursement was offered for 'standard of care' visits, meant primarily to cover transport costs to and from the clinic only. This impacted negatively on accrual, retention and participant morale, primarily due to the protracted delay in regulatory approval, during which time, the costs of living, including travel costs had increased. Relevant guidelines were reviewed and institutional policy was updated to incorporate the South African National Health Research Ethics Committee guidelines on reimbursement (taking into account participant time, travel and inconvenience). The reimbursement amount for 'standard of care' visits was increased accordingly. The question remains whether a trial that combines post-trial access with implementation science, with clear benefits for the participants and the provision of above standard medical care, should have reimbursement rates that approach those of a proof-of-concept trial, for 'standard of care' visits. PMID:26392172

  2. Employing a Mock Trial in a Criminology Course: An Applied Learning Experience.

    Shepelak, Norma J.

    1996-01-01

    Recounts a criminology class exercise that consisted of staging a mock trial using the murders from Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" as source material. Students research the case and role play various lawyers, jury members, and witnesses. Identifies and discusses four educational objectives attainable through the staging of mock trials. (MJP)

  3. Experience gained during commissioning and trial operation of Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant

    In this paper authors describe the experience gained during commissioning and trial operation of Mochovce NPP (EMO). The first year of EMO operation from the point of view of safety and reliability was successful. Evidently we were challenged with certain problems characteristic to this stage of operation which resulted in automatic reactor shutdown. There were 11 automatic shutdowns in 1998 by action of the quick emergency protection AO-1 and two manual shutdowns by the AO-1 key. In 1999, there were 6 automatic shutdowns by action of the quick emergency protection AO-1. Three of them was connected to the falsely activated binary signal of MCP switch of, in two cases the reason came out from the turbo-generator (TG) cooling water system. Very positive trend in the operation of both units shows the fact that during all commissioning period of the second unit there were only three automatic reactor shutdowns by the signal AO-1. All these actions were done in frame of commissioning tests. All causes which activated the automatic unit shutdowns were found out and rectified, the overall tuning of the cooling water system is on the process now. The solution of this problem is possible only power commissioning, and in the stage of the trial operation had no direct impacts on the nuclear, radiation, or technical safety respectively. In 1998 two events according to the INES scale after second unit commissioning because of two unit links of the cooling water system. The operational events during the commissioning tests, start-up tests, physical commissioning, were ranked the category 1 ('Action of SIS U040 ppo <8,34 MPa at the system 2 and 3' and 'Breaching the L and C'). In 1999 only events occurred that were ranked in the category safety insignificant events and lower (category 0, or off the scale respectively). In the frame of the safety culture principles adopted, such as critical attitude, exact and careful approach, and communication, these problems were given the

  4. Neck collar, "act-as-usual" or active mobilization for whiplash injury? A randomized parallel-group trial

    Kongsted, Alice; Montvilas, Erisela Qerama; Kasch, Helge;

    2007-01-01

    listed at 1 year follow-up. No significant differences were observed between the 3 interventions group. Conclusion. Immobilization, "act-as-usual," and mobilization had similar effects regarding prevention of pain, disability, and work capability 1 year after a whiplash injury....... practitioners within 10 days after a whiplash injury and randomized to: 1) immobilization of the cervical spine in a rigid collar followed by active mobilization, 2) advice to "act-as-usual," or 3) an active mobilization program (Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy). Follow-up was carried out after 3, 6, and 12...... months postinjury. Treatment effect was measured in terms of headache and neck pain intensity (0-10), disability, and work capability. Results. A total of 458 participants were included. At the 1-year follow-up, 48% of participants reported considerable neck pain, 53% disability, and 14% were still sick...

  5. Incidence of tardive dyskinesia: a comparison of long-acting injectable and oral paliperidone clinical trial databases

    Gopal, S; Xu, H.(Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou, 730000, China); Bossie, C; Burón, J A; Fu, D J; Savitz, A; Nuamah, I.; Hough, D

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess the tardive dyskinesia (TD) rate in studies of once-monthly long-acting injectable (LAI) paliperidone palmitate (PP) and once-daily oral paliperidone extended release (Pali ER). Methods Completed schizophrenia and bipolar studies for PP and Pali ER (≥ 6 month duration with retrievable patient-level data) were included in this post hoc analysis. Schooler–Kane research criteria were applied using Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) scores to categorise probable (qual...

  6. "Did the trial kill the intervention?" experiences from the development, implementation and evaluation of a complex intervention

    Cox Karen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development, implementation and evaluation of any new health intervention is complex. This paper uses experiences from the design, implementation and evaluation of a rehabilitation programme to shed light on, and prompt discussion around, some of the complexities involved in such an undertaking. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 trial participants and five members of staff at the conclusion of a trial evaluating a rehabilitation programme aimed at promoting recovery after stem cell transplantation. Results This study identified a number of challenges relating to the development and evaluation of complex interventions. The difficulty of providing a standardised intervention that was acceptable to patients was highlighted in the participant interviews. Trial participants and some members of staff found the concept of equipoise and randomisation challenging and there was discord between the psychosocial nature of the intervention and the predominant bio-medical culture in which the research took place. Conclusions A lack of scientific evidence as to the efficacy of an intervention does not preclude staff and patients holding strong views about the benefits of an intervention. The evaluation of complex interventions should, where possible, facilitate not restrict that complexity. Within the local environment where the trial is conducted, acquiescence from those in positions of authority is insufficient; commitment to the trial is required.

  7. Experiences in conducting multiple community-based HIV prevention trials among women in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Moodley Jothi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa, with its scientific capacity, good infrastructure and high HIV incidence rates, is ideally positioned to conduct large-scale HIV prevention trials. The HIV Prevention Research Unit of the South African Medical Research Council conducted four phase III and one phase IIb trials of women-initiated HIV prevention options in KwaZulu-Natal between 2003 and 2009. A total of 7046 women participated, with HIV prevalence between 25% and 45% and HIV incidence ranging from 4.5-9.1% per year. Unfortunately none of the interventions tested had any impact on reducing the risk of HIV acquisition; however, extremely valuable experience was gained, lessons learned and capacity built, while the communities gained associated benefits. Experience Our experience in conducting these trials ranged from setting up community partnerships to developing clinical research sites and dissemination of trial results. Community engagement included setting up community-based research sites with approval from both political and traditional leaders, and developing community advisory groups to assist with the research process. Community-wide education on HIV/sexually transmitted infection prevention, treatment and care was provided to over 90 000 individuals. Myths and misconceptions were addressed through methods such as anonymous suggestion boxes in clinic waiting areas and intensive education and counselling. Attempts were made to involve male partners to foster support and facilitate recruitment of women. Peer educator programmes were initiated to provide ongoing education and also to facilitate recruitment of women to the trials. Recruitment strategies such as door-to-door recruitment and community group meetings were initiated. Over 90% of women enrolled were retained. Community benefits from the trial included education on HIV prevention, treatment and care and provision of ancillary care (such as Pap smears, reproductive health care and

  8. A Controlled, Evidence-Based Trial of Paliperidone Palmitate, A Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotic, in Schizophrenia

    Nasrallah, Henry A.; Gopal, Srihari; Gassmann-Mayer, Cristiana; Quiroz, Jorge A.; Lim, Pilar; Eerdekens, Mariëlle; Yuen, Eric; Hough, David

    2010-01-01

    Paliperidone palmitate is a long-acting injectable antipsychotic agent. This 13-week, multicenter, randomized (1 : 1 : 1 : 1), double-blind, parallel-group study evaluated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of fixed 25, 50, and 100 milligram equivalent (mg equiv.) doses of paliperidone palmitate vs placebo administered as gluteal injections on days 1 and 8, then every 4 weeks (days 36 and 64) in 518 adult patients with schizophrenia. The intent-to-treat analysis set (N=514) was 67% men an...

  9. Improving biological relevancy of transcriptional biomarkers experiments by applying the MIQE guidelines to pre-clinical and clinical trials.

    Dooms, M; Chango, A; Barbour, E; Pouillart, P; Abdel Nour, A M

    2013-01-01

    The "Minimum Information for the Publication of qPCR Experiments" (MIQE [3]) guidelines are very much targeted at basic research experiments and have to our knowledge not been applied to qPCR assays carried out in the context of clinical trials. This report details the use of the MIQE qPCR app for iPhone (App Store, Apple) to assess the MIQE compliance of one clinical and five pre-clinical trials. This resulted in the need to include 14 modifications that make the guidelines more relevant for the assessment of this special type of application. We also discuss the need for flexibility, since while some parameters increase experimental quality, they also require more reagents and more time, which is not always feasible in a clinical setting. PMID:22910527

  10. Evaluation of a Women's Safe Shelter Experience to Teach Internal Medicine Residents About Intimate Partner Violence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Brienza, Rebecca S.; Whitman, Laura; Ladouceur, Lynnea; Green, Michael L.

    2005-01-01

    Although intimate partner violence (IPV) remains a major public health problem, physicians often fail to screen female patients. Reported IPV training approaches suffer from weak study designs and limited outcome assessments. We hypothesized that an educational experience for residents at a women's safe shelter would have significantly greater impact on IPV competencies, screening, and care for victims than a workshop seminar alone. In a pre-post randomized controlled trial, we compared resid...

  11. The Appalachian Tri-State Node Experiences with the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network

    Kelly, Thomas M.; Daley, Dennis C; Byrne, Mimmie; DeMarzo, Larry; Smith, Doris; Madl, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)-sponsored Clinical Trial Network (CTN) recently celebrated 10 years of conducting “real world” research into the treatment of addiction. This article reviews the history and results of the most recent CTN studies and describes the experiences of one of the 13 participating research affiliates, the Appalachian Tri-State (ATS) Node. We discuss our “bidirectional” collaboration with multiple community treatment programs (CTPs) on research and dissemina...

  12. B-cell depletion in SLE: clinical and trial experience with rituximab and ocrelizumab and implications for study design

    Reddy, V; Jayne, D; Close, D.; Isenberg, D

    2013-01-01

    B cells are believed to be central to the disease process in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), making them a target for new therapeutic intervention. In recent years there have been many publications regarding the experience in SLE of B-cell depletion utilising rituximab, an anti-CD20 mAb that temporarily depletes B cells, reporting promising results in uncontrolled open studies and in routine clinical use. However, the two large randomised controlled trials in extra-renal lupus (EXPLORER s...

  13. Somatisation in primary care: experiences of primary care physicians involved in a training program and in a randomised controlled trial

    Salazar Agustín

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new intervention aimed at managing patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS based on a specific set of communication techniques was developed, and tested in a cluster randomised clinical trial. Due to the modest results obtained and in order to improve our intervention we need to know the GPs' attitudes towards patients with MUS, their experience, expectations and the utility of the communication techniques we proposed and the feasibility of implementing them. Physicians who took part in 2 different training programs and in a randomised controlled trial (RCT for patients with MUS were questioned to ascertain the reasons for the doctors' participation in the trial and the attitudes, experiences and expectations of GPs about the intervention. Methods A qualitative study based on four focus groups with GPs who took part in a RCT. A content analysis was carried out. Results Following the RCT patients are perceived as true suffering persons, and the relationship with them has improved in GPs of both groups. GPs mostly valued the fact that it is highly structured, that it made possible a more comfortable relationship and that it could be applied to a broad spectrum of patients with psychosocial problems. Nevertheless, all participants consider that change in patients is necessary; GPs in the intervention group remarked that that is extremely difficult to achieve. Conclusion GPs positively evaluate the communication techniques and the interventions that help in understanding patient suffering, and express the enormous difficulties in handling change in patients. These findings provide information on the direction in which efforts for improving intervention should be directed. Trial registration US ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00130988

  14. Socially-marketed rapid diagnostic tests and ACT in the private sector: ten years of experience in Cambodia

    Allen Henrietta

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Whilst some populations have recently experienced dramatic declines in malaria, the majority of those most at risk of Plasmodium falciparum malaria still lack access to effective treatment with artemisinin combination therapy (ACT and others are already facing parasites resistant to artemisinins. In this context, there is a crucial need to improve both access to and targeting of ACT through greater availability of good quality ACT and parasitological diagnosis. This is an issue of increasing urgency notably in the private commercial sector, which, in many countries, plays an important role in the provision of malaria treatment. The Affordable Medicines Facility for malaria (AMFm is a recent initiative that aims to increase the provision of affordable ACT in public, private and NGO sectors through a manufacturer-level subsidy. However, to date, there is little documented experience in the programmatic implementation of subsidized ACT in the private sector. Cambodia is in the unique position of having more than 10 years of experience not only in implementing subsidized ACT, but also rapid diagnostic tests (RDT as part of a nationwide social marketing programme. The programme includes behaviour change communication and the training of private providers as well as the sale and distribution of Malarine, the recommended ACT, and Malacheck, the RDT. This paper describes and evaluates this experience by drawing on the results of household and provider surveys conducted since the start of the programme. The available evidence suggests that providers' and consumers' awareness of Malarine increased rapidly, but that of Malacheck much less so. In addition, improvements in ACT and RDT availability and uptake were relatively slow, particularly in more remote areas. The lack of standardization in the survey methods and the gaps in the data highlight the importance of establishing a clear system for monitoring and evaluation for similar initiatives

  15. Environmental life cycle information management and acquisition - first experiences and results from field trials

    Bodenhoefer, K.; Schneider, A. [Sony International (Europe) GmbH (SIE), Stuttgart (Germany); Cock, T.; Brooks, A.; Sands, G. [Merloni Elletrodomestici, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Allman, L.; Simon, M. [Sheffield Hallam Univ., Sheffield (United Kingdom); Chong, S.K.; Yang, K. [De Montfort Univ., Leicester (United Kingdom); Delannoy, O.; Catanese, B. [Cybernetix, Rousset (France); Mueller, K. [Motorola GmbH, Taunusstein (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    An improved control of product life cycles enables a more sustainable use of resources. In the EU co-funded project ELIMA (Environmental Life Cycle Information Management and Acquisition for Consumer Products) both hard- and software tools are developed to record and manage reliable product life cycle data to improve service/repair and recycling/reuse as well as product design. Field trials with demonstrator products from two categories - consumer electronics and large household appliances - are running until August 2004. Data collection and general analysis is performed with the help of the internet-based ELIMA information management system. This paper describes the applied data acquisition and data management technologies and the field trials in which they are tested. First field trial results are presented both as a general data interpretation and as subsequent customer oriented analysis. Linked to this, user acceptance survey results from UK and Germany and the conclusions drawn are discussed. (orig.)

  16. At the Center or the Margin: Massachusetts' Experience under the School-to-Work Opportunities Act.

    Diehl, William; Alex, Hoffinger; Weisstein, Ephraim

    2002-01-01

    Describes background for school-to-work effort in Massachusetts, the state's design and implementation of the School-to-Work Opportunities Act (STWOA) of 1994, the local impact of the state's STWOA grant, challenges to making school-to-work a top priority of state education reform strategies to improve student achievement, and state and local…

  17. Transitional Child Care: State Experiences and Emerging Policies under the Family Support Act.

    Ebb, Nancy; And Others

    This guide is designed to provide information about transitional child care (TCC) program policies and operations and to offer recommendations to policymakers and advocates. Transitional child care is a new federal child care program that every state must implement by April 1, 1990. Established by the Family Support Act (FSA) of 1988, TCC is…

  18. Deposit insurance reform in the FDIC Improvement Act: the experience to date

    George J. Benston; George G. Kaufman

    1998-01-01

    In 1991, the U.S. adopted fundamental deposit insurance reform in the FDIC Improvement Act. This article reveals why such reform was necessary in light of the severe banking crisis of the 1980s and analyzes its success to date.

  19. Preliminary experience using milnacipran in patients with juvenile fibromyalgia: lessons from a clinical trial program

    Arnold, Lesley M.; Bateman, Lucinda; Palmer, Robert H.; Lin, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    Background There are no approved medications for juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM), a disorder that is often under-diagnosed. The effects of milnacipran, a drug approved for the management of fibromyalgia (FM) in adults, was assessed in a clinical trial program for JFM. Methods Patients, ages 13–17 years who met the Yunus and Masi criteria for JFM and/or 1990 American College of Rheumatology criteria for FM, were enrolled in a responder-enriched, randomized withdrawal trial. After receiving open-la...

  20. Reconciling research and implementation in micro health insurance experiments in India: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Doyle Conor

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microinsurance or Community-Based Health Insurance is a promising healthcare financing mechanism, which is increasingly applied to aid rural poor persons in low-income countries. Robust empirical evidence on the causal relations between Community-Based Health Insurance and healthcare utilisation, financial protection and other areas is scarce and necessary. This paper contains a discussion of the research design of three Cluster Randomised Controlled Trials in India to measure the impact of Community-Based Health Insurance on several outcomes. Methods/Design Each trial sets up a Community-Based Health Insurance scheme among a group of micro-finance affiliate families. Villages are grouped into clusters which are congruous with pre-existing social groupings. These clusters are randomly assigned to one of three waves of implementation, ensuring the entire population is offered Community-Based Health Insurance by the end of the experiment. Each wave of treatment is preceded by a round of mixed methods evaluation, with quantitative, qualitative and spatial evidence on impact collected. Improving upon practices in published Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial literature, we detail how research design decisions have ensured that both the households offered insurance and the implementers of the Community-Based Health Insurance scheme operate in an environment replicating a non-experimental implementation. Discussion When a Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial involves randomizing within a community, generating adequate and valid conclusions requires that the research design must be made congruous with social structures within the target population, to ensure that such trials are conducted in an implementing environment which is a suitable analogue to that of a non-experimental implementing environment.

  1. The Motivations and Experiences of Young Women in a Microbicide Trial in the USA and Puerto Rico.

    Giguere, Rebecca; Zimet, Gregory D; Kahn, Jessica A; Dolezal, Curtis; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Mabragaña, Marina; McGowan, Ian; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex

    2013-09-01

    Young women are an important target group in microbicide research, yet little is known about why they participate and stay in microbicide trials. Our study examined motivations for participating in a Phase I microbicide trial among 61 women ages 18 - 24 years in the continental USA and Puerto Rico. We also examined their perspectives on study participation. Participants underwent a semi-structured in-depth interview in which they were asked about factors that motivated enrollment and their experiences while participating. They also completed a Web-based Computer Assisted Self Interview in which they were asked to rate study burden (1 = low to 4 = high). Factors that motivated enrollment were altruism (29%), compensation (17%), a combination of altruism and compensation (37%) and free medical exams (17%). Factors that encouraged participants to stay in the study were study staff (95%), confirmation of good health (41%), and the opportunity to learn about their bodies (17%). Mean ratings of study burden ranged from 1.83 (having to travel to site) to 2.41 (colposcopy), indicating that participants were not highly bothered by visits or procedures. Although Phase I trials require invasive procedures, participants were not highly bothered by them and recognized them as necessary. Good relationships with staff and clear information about how procedures contribute to study goals may encourage participants to remain in trials. Young women may be motivated to enter microbicide trials by stressing the role they will play in discovering better HIV-prevention methods and highlighting the comprehensive preventive exams they will receive. PMID:24324918

  2. Testing nicotine gum for ulcerative colitis patients. Experience with single-patient trials.

    Lashner, B A; Hanauer, S B; Silverstein, M D

    1990-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies have documented an association between nonsmoking and ulcerative colitis and case reports have demonstrated that symptoms improve with smoking and worsen with removal of a nicotine source. A double-blind randomized crossover trial for individual ulcerative colitis patients (single-patient trial, or N of 1 clinical trial) was designed to study the safety, patient acceptance, and the effectiveness of nicotine gum in improving patient symptoms and proctoscopic appearance of involved colon. Seven nonsmoking patients chewed up to 10 squares/day (20 mg) of nicotine gum or placebo gum for two weeks. Therapy was crossed-over every two weeks over the eight-week trial. Effectiveness was judged from comparisons between nicotine-gum and placebo-gum periods of patient self-reported symptoms at the conclusion of each two-week period using visual analog scales and proctoscopic appearance using ordered categorical scales. Three of seven patients, all three of whom were former smokers, demonstrated sufficient improvement without adverse effects to warrant institution of nicotine gum into their drug treatment regimens. Three patients demonstrated an uncertain response, despite tolerating the drug, and have not had nicotine gum added to their regimens. One patient could not tolerate the medication and was withdrawn from the study. No serious side effects were noted. We conclude that a randomized trial for an individual patient is a useful method for evaluating treatment regimens for ulcerative colitis and that nicotine gum may be effective therapy for individual patients with ulcerative colitis who demonstrate an objective response with few adverse effects. PMID:2194767

  3. Metabolic implications when employing heavy pre- and post-exercise rapid-acting insulin reductions to prevent hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes patients: a randomised clinical trial.

    Matthew D Campbell

    Full Text Available To examine the metabolic, gluco-regulatory-hormonal and inflammatory cytokine responses to large reductions in rapid-acting insulin dose administered prandially before and after intensive running exercise in male type 1 diabetes patients.This was a single centre, randomised, controlled open label study. Following preliminary testing, 8 male patients (24±2 years, HbA1c 7.7±0.4%/61±4 mmol.l-1 treated with insulin's glargine and aspart, or lispro attended the laboratory on two mornings at ∼08:00 h and consumed a standardised breakfast carbohydrate bolus (1 g carbohydrate.kg-1BM; 380±10 kcal and self-administered a 75% reduced rapid-acting insulin dose 60 minutes before 45 minutes of intensive treadmill running at 73.1±0.9% VO2peak. At 60 minutes post-exercise, patients ingested a meal (1 g carbohydrate.kg-1BM; 660±21 kcal and administered either a Full or 50% reduced rapid-acting insulin dose. Blood glucose and lactate, serum insulin, cortisol, non-esterified-fatty-acids, β-Hydroxybutyrate, and plasma glucagon, adrenaline, noradrenaline, IL-6, and TNF-α concentrations were measured for 180 minutes post-meal.All participants were analysed. All glycaemic, metabolic, hormonal, and cytokine responses were similar between conditions up to 60 minutes following exercise. Following the post-exercise meal, serum insulin concentrations were lower under 50% (p<0.05 resulting in 75% of patients experiencing hyperglycaemia (blood glucose ≥8.0 mmol.l-1; 50% n = 6, Full n = 3. β-Hydroxybutyrate concentrations decreased similarly, such that at 180 minutes post-meal concentrations were lower than rest under Full and 50%. IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations remained similar to fasting levels under 50% but declined under Full. Under 50% IL-6 concentrations were inversely related with serum insulin concentrations (r = -0.484, p = 0.017.Heavily reducing rapid-acting insulin dose with a carbohydrate bolus before, and a meal after intensive

  4. Field trial experiment over 1200 km on a 100GHz grid-aligned multi-channel black-box wavelength converter

    Rancaño, V.J.F.; Parmigiani, F.; Petropoulos, P.; Richardson, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    A flexible modulation-, bit rate- independent and polarization insensitive wavelength converter based on a highly nonlinear fiber is demonstrated in the middle-point of a field trial transmission experiment.

  5. Onset of efficacy and tolerability following the initiation dosing of long-acting paliperidone palmitate: post-hoc analyses of a randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    Fu Dong-Jing

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paliperidone palmitate is a long-acting injectable atypical antipsychotic for the acute and maintenance treatment of adults with schizophrenia. The recommended initiation dosing regimen is 234 mg on Day 1 and 156 mg on Day 8 via intramuscular (deltoid injection; followed by 39 to 234 mg once-monthly thereafter (deltoid or gluteal. These post-hoc analyses addressed two commonly encountered clinical issues regarding the initiation dosing: the time to onset of efficacy and the associated tolerability. Methods In a 13-week double-blind trial, 652 subjects with schizophrenia were randomized to paliperidone palmitate 39, 156, or 234 mg (corresponding to 25, 100, or 150 mg equivalents of paliperidone, respectively or placebo (NCT#00590577. Subjects randomized to paliperidone palmitate received 234 mg on Day 1, followed by their randomized fixed dose on Day 8, and monthly thereafter, with no oral antipsychotic supplementation. The onset of efficacy was defined as the first timepoint where the paliperidone palmitate group showed significant improvement in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS score compared to placebo (Analysis of Covariance [ANCOVA] models and Last Observation Carried Forward [LOCF] methodology without adjusting for multiplicity using data from the Days 4, 8, 22, and 36 assessments. Adverse event (AE rates and relative risks (RR with 95% confidence intervals (CI versus placebo were determined. Results Paliperidone palmitate 234 mg on Day 1 was associated with greater improvement than placebo on Least Squares (LS mean PANSS total score at Day 8 (p = 0.037. After the Day 8 injection of 156 mg, there was continued PANSS improvement at Day 22 (p ≤ 0.007 vs. placebo and Day 36 (p Conclusions Significantly greater symptom improvement was observed by Day 8 with paliperidone palmitate (234 mg on Day 1 compared to placebo; this effect was maintained after the 156 mg Day 8 injection, with a trend towards a dose

  6. Safety profile of Cerebrolysin: clinical experience from dementia and stroke trials.

    Thome, J; Doppler, E

    2012-04-01

    The safety of Cerebrolysin has been shown through many years of clinical use, observations from postmarketing surveillance studies, and safety data from randomized, controlled clinical trials. The reported events showed that adverse reactions to Cerebrolysin were generally mild and transient. Most common adverse events included vertigo, agitation and feeling hot. In the controlled clinical trials analyzed for this report, the incidence of adverse events was similar in Cerebrolysin- and placebo-treated groups. Cerebrolysin seems to be safe when used in combination with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator or cholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil or rivastigmine. To our knowledge, Cerebrolysin was not associated with major changes in vital signs or laboratory parameters. PMID:22514795

  7. Experience and challenges from clinical trials with malaria vaccines in Africa.

    Mwangoka, Grace; Ogutu, Bernhards; Msambichaka, Beverly; Mzee, Tutu; Salim, Nahya; Kafuruki, Shubis; Mpina, Maxmillian; Shekalaghe, Seif; Tanner, Marcel; Abdulla, Salim

    2013-01-01

    Malaria vaccines are considered amongst the most important modalities for potential elimination of malaria disease and transmission. Research and development in this field has been an area of intense effort by many groups over the last few decades. Despite this, there is currently no licensed malaria vaccine. Researchers, clinical trialists and vaccine developers have been working on many approached to make malaria vaccine available.African research institutions have developed and demonstrated a great capacity to undertake clinical trials in accordance to the International Conference on Harmonization-Good Clinical Practice (ICH-GCP) standards in the last decade; particularly in the field of malaria vaccines and anti-malarial drugs. This capacity is a result of networking among African scientists in collaboration with other partners; this has traversed both clinical trials and malaria control programmes as part of the Global Malaria Action Plan (GMAP). GMAP outlined and support global strategies toward the elimination and eradication of malaria in many areas, translating in reduction in public health burden, especially for African children. In the sub-Saharan region the capacity to undertake more clinical trials remains small in comparison to the actual need.However, sustainability of the already developed capacity is essential and crucial for the evaluation of different interventions and diagnostic tools/strategies for other diseases like TB, HIV, neglected tropical diseases and non-communicable diseases. There is urgent need for innovative mechanisms for the sustainability and expansion of the capacity in clinical trials in sub-Saharan Africa as the catalyst for health improvement and maintained. PMID:23496910

  8. Heat Transfer Reactor Experiment (HTRE)-3 Container Storage Unit Resource Conservation Recovery Act closure plan

    This document describes the closure of the HTRE-3 Container Storage Unit under the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. The unit's location, size, history, and current status are described. The document also summarizes the decontamination and decommissioning efforts performed in 1983 and provides an estimate of,waste residues remaining in the HTRE-3 assembly. A risk evaluation was performed that demonstrates that the residue does not pose a hazard to public health or the environment. Based on the risk evaluation, it is proposed that the HTRE-3 Container Storage Unit be closed in its present condition, without further decontamination or removal activities

  9. The impact of homicide trials on the forensic pathologist's time--the Fulton County experience.

    Hanzlick, R

    1997-05-01

    Subpoenas received for criminal trials related to homicides in Fulton County (Atlanta) Georgia were tracked in a computer database for an 18 month period in order to determine the proportion of forensic pathologist worktime required for testimony in homicide cases. The number of subpoenas received annually amounted to 64% of the average number of homicides occurring annually. Testimony was required in about 33% of cases in which a subpoena was received, and, therefore, the number of testimony appearances per year was about 21% of the average annual number of homicides. Assuming a 40 hour work week for 52 weeks per year and an average of 3 hours of time preparing for, traveling to, and testifying in court, the time required of the forensic pathologist to testify in homicide trials amounted to about 2% of a full-time-equivalent. Although the time required for testimony in homicide cases may vary among jurisdictions because of the nature of its homicides, distance and travel time to court, and other factors, the data presented here may be used to estimate the impact of homicide trial court time on forensic pathology practice. PMID:9144948

  10. Improving recruitment and retention for an online randomized controlled trial: experience from the Youthnet study.

    Bull, S S; Vallejos, D; Levine, D; Ortiz, C

    2008-09-01

    The objective of the study was to present recruitment and retention findings for an Internet based HIV prevention trial evaluated using a randomized controlled design among 15-25-year-olds accessing a website on the Internet. We used a combination of automated electronic and personalized approaches to increase and diversify recruitment, verify participant eligibility and increase retention. We posted 3.5 million banner advertisements, 9354 individuals clicked on the advertisement, 8950 completed an eligibility screener and 3298 a baseline survey; we flagged 675 of these as suspicious and enrolled 2623 individuals. Of these, 2082 (79%) completed a follow-up at one-month and 1398 (53%) completed a two-month follow-up. This retention rate is the highest we have seen for an Internet-based HIV-prevention trial. Our procedures can be replicated in other trials. We stress the importance of using a combination of automated and personalized techniques to increase enrollment, verify eligibility and promote retention. PMID:18777217

  11. Financial protection against nuclear hazards: thirty years' experience under the Price-Anderson Act

    Supplementing earlier reports on ways to provide financial protection against the potential hazards involved in the production of nuclear energy by analyzing the issues raised in the Silkwood v. Kerr-McGee Corporation decision, the author explores the impact of the case on the availability of funds to compensate the public and any increased exposure of the nuclear industry or the federal government to public liability. She concludes that the decision will have a significant impact on the day-to-day administration of claims, and could lead to higher premiums. The court would have to determine the priority given to claims in the event of a catastrophic accident, in which case the only significant impact would be under amendments to the Price-Anderson Act which resulted in elimination of its coverage or a substantial increase in or elimination of the limitation on liability

  12. Preoperative airway assessment - experience gained from a multicentre cluster randomised trial and the Danish Anaesthesia Database

    Nørskov, Anders Kehlet

    2016-01-01

    , using state of the art methodology, in order to test the clinical impact of using the SARI for preoperative airway assessment compared with a clinical judgement based on usual practice for airway assessment. Finally, to test if implementation of the SARI would reduce the proportion of unanticipated...... techniques in SARI departments reached statistical significance, p = 0.29 and p = 0.06 respectively. The papers constituting this thesis demonstrate that at high proportion of airway management difficulties are unanticipated. In a cluster randomised trial it was not possible to reduce the proportion of...

  13. Experiences from a randomised, controlled trial on cycling to school: does cycling increase cardiorespiratory fitness?

    Børrestad, Line Anita Bjørkelund; Østergaard, Lars; Andersen, Lars Bo; Bere, Elling

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of a 12-week randomised controlled cycling-to-school trial on cardiorespiratory fitness. Methods: A total of 53 10- to 13-year-old children from one public school were included. The children were randomised into either a cycling group or a control group. The cycling group was encouraged to cycle to and from school each day during a period of 12 weeks. Peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) and anthropometrical data (weight and ...

  14. Deviant bodies, stigmatized identities, and racist acts: examining the experiences of African-American gamers in Xbox Live

    Gray, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate how minority gamers, particularly African-American males, are subject to the label of deviant within the virtual gaming community of Xbox Live. They are labeled deviant based on the stigma of their physical identity - blackness, through a process of linguistic profiling. By employing virtual ethnography, the author identifies a process that leads to racism based on how the black gamer sounds within the space. The act of racism emerges through a process involving questioning, provoking, instigating, and ultimately racism. Many black gamers have normalized these racist experiences and have accepted the label of deviant placed upon their bodies.

  15. The Juggling Act: A Phenomenological Study of Gifted and Talented Girls' Experiences with Facebook

    Price, Eunice; Wardman, Janna; Bruce, Toni; Millward, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Facebook is a frequently accessed social networking site with more than one billion active users worldwide. Although there are numerous studies on its impact on teenagers, none have investigated its impact on gifted and talented girls. This study's aim was to understand the social media experiences of talented female student leaders. A qualitative…

  16. Results from a blind and a non-blind randomised trial run in parallel: experience from the Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy (EPHT Trial

    Veerus Piret

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy (EPHT Trial assigned 4170 potential participants prior to recruitment to blind or non-blind hormone therapy (HT, with placebo or non-treatment the respective alternatives. Before having to decide on participation, women were told whether they had been randomised to the blind or non-blind trial. Eligible women who were still willing to join the trial were recruited. After recruitment participants in the non-blind trial (N = 1001 received open-label HT or no treatment, participants in the blind trial (N = 777 remained blinded until the end of the trial. The aim of this paper is to analyse the effect of blinding on internal and external validity of trial outcomes. Methods Effect of blinding was calculated as the hazard ratio of selected chronic diseases, total mortality and all outcomes. For analysing the effect of blinding on external validity, the hazard ratios from women recruited to the placebo arm and to the non-treatment arm were compared with those not recruited; for analysing the effect of blinding on internal validity, the hazard ratios from the blind trial were compared with those from the non-blind trial. Results The women recruited to the placebo arm had less cerebrovascular disease events (HR 0.43; 95% CI: 0.26-0.71 and all outcomes combined (HR 0.76; 95% CI: 0.63-0.91 than those who were not recruited. Among women recruited or not recruited to the non-treatment arm, no differences were observed for any of the outcomes studied. Among women recruited to the trial, the risk for coronary heart disease events (HR 0.77; 95% CI: 0.64-0.93, cerebrovascular disease events (HR 0.66; 95%CI: 0.47-0.92, and all outcomes combined (HR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.72-0.94 was smaller among participants in the blind trial than in the non-blind trial. There was no difference between the blind and the non-blind trial for total cancer (HR 0.95; 95% CI: 0.64-1.42, bone fractures (0.93; 95% CI: 0

  17. Small-scale medical waste incinerators - experiences and trials in South Africa

    Formal waste management services are not accessible for the majority of primary healthcare clinics on the African continent, and affordable and practicable technology solutions are required in the developing country context. In response, a protocol was established for the first quantitative and qualitative evaluation of relatively low cost small-scale incinerators for use at rural primary healthcare clinics. The protocol comprised the first phase of four, which defined the comprehensive trials of three incineration units. The trials showed that all of the units could be used to render medical waste non-infectious, and to destroy syringes or render needles unsuitable for reuse. Emission loads from the incinerators are higher than large-scale commercial incinerators, but a panel of experts considered the incinerators to be more acceptable compared to the other waste treatment and disposal options available in under-serviced rural areas. However, the incinerators must be used within a safe waste management programme that provides the necessary resources in the form of collection containers, maintenance support, acceptable energy sources, and understandable operational instructions for the incinerators, whilst minimising the exposure risks to emissions through the correct placement of the units in relation to the clinic and the surrounding communities. On-going training and awareness building are essential in order to ensure that the incinerators are correctly used as a sustainable waste treatment option

  18. Phytostabilization of a Pb-contaminated mine tailing by various tree species in pot and field trial experiments.

    Meeinkuirt, Weeradej; Pokethitiyook, Prayad; Kruatrachue, Maleeya; Tanhan, Phanwimol; Chaiyarat, Rattanawat

    2012-10-01

    The potential of 6 tree species (Leucaena leucocephala, Acacia mangium, Peltophorum pterocarpum, Pterocarpus macrocarpus, Lagerstroemia floribunda, Eucalyptus camaldulensis) for phytoremediation of Pb in sand tailings (total Pb >9850 mg kg(-1)) from KEMCO Pb mine in Kanchanaburi province, Thailand, were investigated employing a pot experiment (3 months) and field trial experiment (12 months). In pot study E. camaldulensis treated with Osmocote fertilizer attained the highest total biomass (15.3 g plant(-1)) followed by P. pterocarpum (12.6 g plant(-1)) and A. mangium (10.8 g plant(-1)) both treated with cow manure. Cow manure application resulted in the highest root Pb accumulation (>10000 mg kg(-1)) in L. floribunda and P. macrocarpus. These two species also exhibited the highest Pb uptake (85-88 mg plant(-1)). Results from field trial also showed that Osmocote promoted the best growth performance in E. camaldulensis (biomass 385.7 g plant(-1), height 141.7 cm) followed by A. mangium (biomass 215.9 g plant(-1), height 102.7 cm), and they also exhibited the highest Pb uptake (600-800 microg plant(-1)). A. mangium with the addition of organic fertilizer was the best option for phytostabilization of Pb-contaminated mine tailing because it retained higher Pb concentration in the roots. PMID:22908655

  19. Experience of using long-acting testosterone undecanoate in hypogonadism, obesity and metabolic syndrome in men

    R V Rozhivanov

    2013-01-01

    The paper outlines the author's experience on the efficacy and safety of androgen therapy of metabolic syndrome and obesity in men with hypogonadism. The study used testosterone undecanoate therapy that reduced body fat and the severity of the other components of the metabolic syndrome, improved sexual function without causing severe side effects. A number of patients on therapy observed suppression of spermatogenesis, which prevents the use of the drug in the reproductive rehabilitation.

  20. Experience of using long-acting testosterone undecanoate in hypogonadism, obesity and metabolic syndrome in men

    R V Rozhivanov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper outlines the author's experience on the efficacy and safety of androgen therapy of metabolic syndrome and obesity in men with hypogonadism. The study used testosterone undecanoate therapy that reduced body fat and the severity of the other components of the metabolic syndrome, improved sexual function without causing severe side effects. A number of patients on therapy observed suppression of spermatogenesis, which prevents the use of the drug in the reproductive rehabilitation.

  1. Learning from 25 years of experience with the United States clean air act

    Schulze, R.H. [Trinity Consultants Incorporated, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Twenty-five years ago, the United States embarked on a quest to attain clean air. President Nixon, in signing the Clean Air Act of 1970, defined clean air as the objective for the `70s. Although enormous progress has been made, much remains to be done. Newly constructed industry is quite clean, but many older facilities continue to operate with antiquated controls. Significant advances have been made in cleaning up the emissions from new automobiles, but two factors have impaired progress. First, cars last longer than they did in 1970, so the average age of the fleet has increased. Second, travel has increased as people have moved to the suburbs. Thus, the emission decreases from clean cars have not been as great as expected. This presentation will address some of the lessons learned from the efforts in the United States to implement clean air programs. In a large number of countries, excessively elaborate studies have been substituted for action programs. Since much is now known about air quality, fairly brief studies can define programs that should be undertaken. What may take longer is developing public support and enthusiasm for improved air quality. In most cases, it is desirable to reduce spending on studies and increase spending on devising and implementing plans, as well as effectively communicating the necessary changes to the public. Balanced spending on studies- and action programs is essential to a sound air quality control program. (author)

  2. Dose-associated changes in safety and efficacy parameters observed in a 24-week maintenance trial of olanzapine long-acting injection in patients with schizophrenia

    Watson Susan B

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a recently published 24-week maintenance study of olanzapine long-acting injection (LAI in schizophrenia (Kane et al., 2010, apparent dose-associated changes were noted in both efficacy and safety parameters. To help clinicians balance safety and efficacy when choosing a dose of olanzapine LAI, we further studied these changes. Methods Outpatients with schizophrenia who had maintained stability on open-label oral olanzapine for 4 to 8 weeks were randomly assigned to "low" (150 mg/2 weeks; N = 140, "medium" (405 mg/4 weeks; N = 318, or "high" (300 mg/2 weeks; N = 141 dosages of olanzapine LAI for 24 weeks. Potential relationships between dose and several safety or efficacy measures were examined via regression analysis, the Jonckheere-Terpstra test (continuous data, or the Cochran-Armitage test (categorical data. Results Safety parameters statistically significantly related to dose were mean weight change (low: +0.67 [SD = 4.38], medium: +0.89 [SD = 3.87], high: +1.70 [SD = 4.14] kg, p = .024; effect size [ES] = 0.264 high vs. low dose, mean change in prolactin (low: -5.61 [SD = 12.49], medium: -2.76 [SD = 19.02], high: +3.58 [SD = 33.78] μg/L, p = .001; ES = 0.410 high vs. low dose, fasting triglycerides change from normal at baseline to high (low: 3.2%, medium: 6.0%, high: 18.9%, p = .001; NNT = 7 high vs. low dose and fasting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol change from normal at baseline to low (low: 13.8%, medium: 19.6%, high: 30.7%, p = .019; NNT = 6 high vs. low dose. Efficacy measures significantly related to dose included Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score mean change (low: +2.66 [SD = 14.95], medium: -0.09 [SD = 13.47], high: -2.19 [SD = 13.11], p Conclusions Analyses of several safety and efficacy parameters revealed significant associations with dose of olanzapine LAI, with the highest dose generally showing greater efficacy as well as greater adverse changes in metabolic safety measures. When

  3. Preoperative airway assessment - experience gained from a multicentre cluster randomised trial and the Danish Anaesthesia Database.

    Nørskov, Anders Kehlet

    2016-05-01

    Difficulties with airway management in relation to general anaesthesia have been a challenge for the anaesthesiologist since the birth of anaesthesia. Massive landmark improvements have been made and general anaesthesia is now regarded as a safe procedure. However, rare, difficult airway management still occurs and it prompts increased risk of morbidity and mortality - especially when not anticipated. Several preoperative risk factors for airway difficulties have been identified, yet none have convincing diagnostic accuracy as stand alone tests. Combining several risk factors increase the predictive value of the test and multivariable risk models have been developed. The Simplified Airway Risk Index (SARI) is a predictive model developed for anticipation of a difficult direct laryngoscopy. However, neither the diagnostic accuracy of the SARI nor of any other model has been tested prospectively and compared with existing practice for airway assessment in a randomised trial setting. The first objective of this thesis was to quantify the proportion of unanticipated difficult intubation and difficult mask ventilation in Denmark. The second objective was to design a cluster randomised trial, using state of the art methodology, in order to test the clinical impact of using the SARI for preoperative airway assessment compared with a clinical judgement based on usual practice for airway assessment. Finally, to test if implementation of the SARI would reduce the proportion of unanticipated difficult intubation compared with usual care for airway assessment. This thesis is based on data from the Danish Anaesthesia Database (DAD). Paper 1 presents an observational cohort study on 188,064 patients who underwent tracheal intubation from 2008 to 2011. Data on the anaesthesiologists' preoperative anticipations of airway difficulties was compared with actual airway management conditions, thus enabling an estimation of the proportion of unanticipated difficulties with intubation

  4. [New graduate program at UNISINOS: sharing the experience of a pedagogical act].

    Mallmann, Marly Terezinha; Daudt, Sônia Isabel Dondonis

    2003-01-01

    In this article we present the process of creation of an innovative proposal for undergraduate teaching, developed by an interdisciplinary group at "Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos--UNISINOS". Besides pointing out the theoretical-epistemological referential supporting this proposal, we will also be discussing the implications some paradigm ruptures have brought to the educational process presently being used at this University. We would like to introduce the reader to the process behind this way of understanding and living the educational practice, as well as to follow the account of an experience a group of teachers has had, when confronted with the task of pondering a new undergraduate program. PMID:14699751

  5. Contraceptive use in women enrolled into preventive HIV vaccine trials: experience from a phase I/II trial in East Africa.

    Hannah Kibuuka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV vaccine trials generally require that pregnant women are excluded from participation, and contraceptive methods must be used to prevent pregnancy during the trial. However, access to quality services and misconceptions associated with contraceptive methods may impact on their effective use in developing countries. We describe the pattern of contraceptive use in a multi-site phase I/IIa HIV Vaccine trial in East Africa (Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania and factors that may have influenced their use during the trial. METHODS: Pregnancy prevention counseling was provided to female participants during informed consent process and at each study visit. Participants' methods of contraception used were documented. Methods of contraceptives were provided on site. Pregnancy testing was done at designated visits during the trial. Obstacles to contraceptive use were identified and addressed at each visit. RESULTS: Overall, 103 (31.8% of a total of 324 enrolled volunteers were females. Female participants were generally young with a mean age of 29(+/-7.2, married (49.5% and had less than high school education (62.1%. Hormonal contraceptives were the most common method of contraception (58.3% followed by condom use (22.3%. The distribution of methods of contraception among the three sites was similar except for more condom use and less abstinence in Uganda. The majority of women (85.4% reported to contraceptive use prior to screening. The reasons for not using contraception included access to quality services, insufficient knowledge of certain methods, and misconceptions. CONCLUSION: Although hormonal contraceptives were frequently used by females participating in the vaccine trial, misconceptions and their incorrect use might have led to inconsistent use resulting in undesired pregnancies. The study underscores the need for an integrated approach to pregnancy prevention counseling during HIV vaccine trials. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials

  6. Interference in acetylene intersystem crossing acts as the molecular analog of Young's double-slit experiment.

    de Groot, Mattijs; Field, Robert W; Buma, Wybren J

    2009-02-24

    We report on an experimental approach that reveals crucial details of the composition of singlet-triplet mixed eigenstates in acetylene. Intersystem crossing in this prototypical polyatomic molecule embodies the mixing of the lowest excited singlet state (S(1)) with 3 triplet states (T(1), T(2), and T(3)). Using high-energy (157-nm) photons from an F(2) laser to record excited-state photoelectron spectra, we have decomposed the mixed eigenstates into their S(1), T(3), T(2), and T(1) constituent parts. One example of the interpretive power that ensues from the selective sensitivity of the experiment to the individual electronic state characters is the discovery and examination of destructive interference between two doorway-mediated intersystem crossing pathways. This observation of an interference effect in nonradiative decay opens up possibilities for rational coherent control over molecular excited state dynamics. PMID:19179288

  7. Therapist experience and knowledge acquisition in internet-delivered CBT for social anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Gerhard Andersson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Guided internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT has been tested in several trials on social anxiety disorder (SAD with moderate to large effects. The aims of this study were threefold. First, to compare the effects of ICBT including online discussion forum with a moderated online discussion forum only. Second, to investigate if knowledge about SAD increased following treatment and third to compare the effects of inexperienced versus experienced therapists on patient outcomes. METHODS: A total of 204 participants with a primary diagnosis of SAD were included and randomized to either guided ICBT or the control condition. ICBT consisted of a 9-week treatment program which was guided by either psychology students at MSc level (n = 6 or by licensed psychologists with previous experience of ICBT (n = 7. A knowledge test dealing with social anxiety was administered before and after treatment. Measures of social anxiety and secondary outcomes dealing with general anxiety, depression, and quality of life were administered before and after treatment. In addition, a 1-year follow-up was conducted on the treated individuals. RESULTS: Immediately following treatment, the ICBT group showed superior outcome on the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale self-report version with a between group posttreatment Hedges g effect size of g = 0.75. In addition, significant differences on all the secondary outcomes were observed. Gains were well maintained one year later. Knowledge, as assessed by the knowledge test, increased following treatment with little gain in the control group. Therapist experience did not result in different outcomes, but experienced therapists logged in less frequently compared to the inexperienced therapists, suggesting that they needed less time to support patients. DISCUSSION: We conclude that guided ICBT reduce symptoms of SAD, increase knowledge about SAD and that therapist experience does not make a difference

  8. A web-based medical safety reporting system for a large multicenter clinical trial: the ALIAS experience.

    Zhao, Wenle; Waldman, Bonnie D; Dillon, Catherine; Pauls, Keith; Kim, Jaemyung; Patterson, Lynn; Ginsberg, Myron D; Hill, Michael D; Palesch, Yuko

    2010-11-01

    An electronic safety reporting (ESR) module was developed and integrated into a home-grown web-based clinical trial management system (CTMS) to enhance the efficiency, completeness and consistency of reporting and reviewing serious adverse events, monitoring safety, and submitting safety reports to regulatory authorities for a large multicenter clinical trial. The architecture of this integrated module provided many advantages. First, the ESR module was developed based on a comprehensive procedure which incorporated both computer logic processing steps and human intervention steps in order to deal with the complex and unexpected situations where pre-programmed computer logic may fail. Second, safety and efficacy data were managed within the same relational database. Relevant data captured on efficacy case report forms, such as demographics, medical history, lab data and concomitant medications, were directly retrievable for MedWatch report composition without requiring redundant data entry. Finally, the ESR module shared the same generic user interfaces and data processing functions with other modules in the CTMS. These generic components include data editing, data retrieving, data reporting, dictionary-based automatic and interactive coding, event-driven and calendar-driven automatic email notifications, and user privilege management. This integrated ESR module was implemented in the Albumin in Acute Stroke (ALIAS) Trial-Part 1. A total of 397 serious adverse event reports were processed and 33 FDA MedWatch reports, 28 initial reports, and 5 follow-up reports were submitted to FDA and Health Canada using this system. Experiences and lessons learned from the development and implementation of this system are presented in this paper. PMID:20828636

  9. Data quality assurance and quality control measures in large multicenter stroke trials: the African-American Antiplatelet Stroke Prevention Study experience

    Richardson DeJuran

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Data quality assurance and quality control are critical to the effective conduct of a clinical trial. In the present commentary, we discuss our experience in a large, multicenter stroke trial. In addition to standard data quality control techniques, we have developed novel methods to enhance the entire process. Central to our methods is the use of clinical monitors who are trained in the techniques of data monitoring.

  10. Effects of soil amendments and EDTA on lead uptake by Chromolaena odorata: greenhouse and field trial experiments.

    Tanhan, Phanwimol; Pokethitiyook, Prayad; Kruatrachue, Maleeya; Chaiyarat, Rattanawat; Upatham, Suchart

    2011-10-01

    Greenhouse and field trial experiments were performed to evaluate the use of Chromolaena odorata with various soil amendments for phytoextraction of Pb contaminated soil Pb mine soils contain low amount of nutrients, so the additions of organic (cow manure) and inorganic (Osmocote and NH4NO3 and KCl) fertilizers with EDTA were used to enhance plant growth and Pb accumulation. Greenhouse study showed that cow manure decreased available Pb concentrations and resulted in the highest Pb concentration in roots (4660 mg kg(-1)) and shoots (389.2 mg kg(-1)). EDTA increased Pb accumulation in shoots (17-fold) and roots (11-fold) in plants grown in soil with Osmocote with Pb uptake up to 203.5 mg plant(-1). Application of all fertilizers had no significant effects on relative growth rates of C. odorata. Field trial study showed that C. odorata grown in soil with 99545 mg kg(-1) total Pb accumulated up to 3730.2 and 6698.2 mg kg(-1) in shoots and roots, respectively, with the highest phytoextraction coefficient (1.25) and translocation factor (1.18). These results indicated that C. odorata could be used for phytoextraction of Pb contaminated soil. In addition, more effective Pb accumulation could be enhanced by Osmocote fertilizer. However, the use of EDTA in the field should be concerned with their leaching problems. PMID:21972512

  11. The Nutritional Balancing Act of a Large Herbivore: An Experiment with Captive Moose (Alces alces L).

    Felton, Annika M; Felton, Adam; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J; Krizsan, Sophie J; Hedwall, Per-Ola; Stolter, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The nutrient balancing hypothesis proposes that, when sufficient food is available, the primary goal of animal diet selection is to obtain a nutritionally balanced diet. This hypothesis can be tested using the Geometric Framework for nutrition (GF). The GF enables researchers to study patterns of nutrient intake (e.g. macronutrients; protein, carbohydrates, fat), interactions between the different nutrients, and how an animal resolves the potential conflict between over-eating one or more nutrients and under-eating others during periods of dietary imbalance. Using the moose (Alces alces L.), a model species in the development of herbivore foraging theory, we conducted a feeding experiment guided by the GF, combining continuous observations of six captive moose with analysis of the macronutritional composition of foods. We identified the moose's self-selected macronutrient target by allowing them to compose a diet by mixing two nutritionally complementary pellet types plus limited access to Salix browse. Such periods of free choice were intermixed with periods when they were restricted to one of the two pellet types plus Salix browse. Our observations of food intake by moose given free choice lend support to the nutrient balancing hypothesis, as the moose combined the foods in specific proportions that provided a particular ratio and amount of macronutrients. When restricted to either of two diets comprising a single pellet type, the moose i) maintained a relatively stable intake of non-protein energy while allowing protein intakes to vary with food composition, and ii) increased their intake of the food item that most closely resembled the self-selected macronutrient intake from the free choice periods, namely Salix browse. We place our results in the context of the nutritional strategy of the moose, ruminant physiology and the categorization of food quality. PMID:26986618

  12. The Nutritional Balancing Act of a Large Herbivore: An Experiment with Captive Moose (Alces alces L.

    Annika M Felton

    Full Text Available The nutrient balancing hypothesis proposes that, when sufficient food is available, the primary goal of animal diet selection is to obtain a nutritionally balanced diet. This hypothesis can be tested using the Geometric Framework for nutrition (GF. The GF enables researchers to study patterns of nutrient intake (e.g. macronutrients; protein, carbohydrates, fat, interactions between the different nutrients, and how an animal resolves the potential conflict between over-eating one or more nutrients and under-eating others during periods of dietary imbalance. Using the moose (Alces alces L., a model species in the development of herbivore foraging theory, we conducted a feeding experiment guided by the GF, combining continuous observations of six captive moose with analysis of the macronutritional composition of foods. We identified the moose's self-selected macronutrient target by allowing them to compose a diet by mixing two nutritionally complementary pellet types plus limited access to Salix browse. Such periods of free choice were intermixed with periods when they were restricted to one of the two pellet types plus Salix browse. Our observations of food intake by moose given free choice lend support to the nutrient balancing hypothesis, as the moose combined the foods in specific proportions that provided a particular ratio and amount of macronutrients. When restricted to either of two diets comprising a single pellet type, the moose i maintained a relatively stable intake of non-protein energy while allowing protein intakes to vary with food composition, and ii increased their intake of the food item that most closely resembled the self-selected macronutrient intake from the free choice periods, namely Salix browse. We place our results in the context of the nutritional strategy of the moose, ruminant physiology and the categorization of food quality.

  13. Randomized Controlled Trial of Teaching Methods: Do Classroom Experiments Improve Economic Education in High Schools?

    Eisenkopf, Gerald; Sulser, Pascal A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors present results from a comprehensive field experiment at Swiss high schools in which they compare the effectiveness of teaching methods in economics. They randomly assigned classes into an experimental and a conventional teaching group, or a control group that received no specific instruction. Both teaching treatments improve economic…

  14. The cardiac troponins: uses in routine clinical practice. Experiences from GUSTO and other clinical trials.

    Stubbs, P

    1998-11-01

    Recent advances in pharmacological and mechanical approaches to acute coronary syndromes have led to rapid changes in the management of patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes. These changes have been mirrored by the appearance of newer highly specific biochemical markers of myocardial damage particularly the cardiac troponins. When new biochemical markers become available it is the responsibility of the clinical chemist to evaluate them critically in terms of sensitivity, specificity, efficiency and analyzer precision, in the rigid setting of quality control that laboratories practise, and to compare them with other markers. When the data are shown to Clinical Cardiologists with supporting statements such as 'useful management tool' and 'can be used for early diagnosis of Myocardial Infarction', a different set of questions may need to be answered. The 'So what?' response is most frequent and is the most important hurdle that these newer biochemical markers have to overcome to convince physicians to change their current practice. This presentation will review the results of studies that have examined the potential clinical usefulness of the cardiac troponins with respect to diagnosis and risk stratification of patients admitted with suspected acute coronary syndromes. Any troponin variable that survives the 'so what' question has one further major hurdle to overcome. This is the requirement to inform physicians what different therapeutic strategies they should follow if the variable is present. Available clinical trial evidence about differing management options for patients according to their troponin status will be reviewed and outline management algorithms will be presented. Many questions remain unanswered and these will be included at the time points where they may be relevant. PMID:9857942

  15. How informed is consent in vulnerable populations? Experience using a continuous consent process during the MDP301 vaginal microbicide trial in Mwanza, Tanzania

    Kavit Natujwa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV prevention trials conducted among disadvantaged vulnerable at-risk populations in developing countries present unique ethical dilemmas. A key concern in bioethics is the validity of informed consent for trial participation obtained from research subjects in such settings. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a continuous informed consent process adopted during the MDP301 phase III vaginal microbicide trial in Mwanza, Tanzania. Methods A total of 1146 women at increased risk of HIV acquisition working as alcohol and food vendors or in bars, restaurants, hotels and guesthouses have been recruited into the MDP301 phase III efficacy and safety trial in Mwanza. During preparations for the trial, participatory community research methods were used to develop a locally-appropriate pictorial flipchart in order to convey key messages about the trial to potential participants. Pre-recorded audio tapes were also developed to facilitate understanding and compliance with gel-use instructions. A comprehension checklist is administered by clinical staff to all participants at screening, enrolment, 12, 24, 40 and 50 week follow-up visits during the trial. To investigate women's perceptions and experiences of the trial, including how well participants internalize and retain key messages provided through a continuous informed consent process, a random sub-sample of 102 women were invited to participate in in-depth interviews (IDIs conducted immediately after their 4, 24 and 52 week follow-up visits. Results 99 women completed interviews at 4-weeks, 83 at 24-weeks, and 74 at 52 weeks (a total of 256 interviews. In all interviews there was evidence of good comprehension and retention of key trial messages including that the gel is not currently know to be effective against HIV; that this is the key reason for conducting the trial; and that women should stop using gel in the event of pregnancy. Conclusions

  16. Adaptive self-regulation in cycle time trials: goal pursuit, goal disengagement and the affective experience

    Clare Louise Rhoden; Julia West; Andrew Renfree; Mark Corbett; Alan St Clair Gibson

    2015-01-01

    Self-regulation research analyses behaviour and emotion through goal progress (Carver and Scheier 2013). Goal disengagement is advocated as an adaptive self-regulatory strategy for unattainable goals to reduce distress (Wrosch et al. 2003a; 2003b). In an attempt to further understand ongoing goal pursuit and emotions on endurance athletes, this paper applies adaptive self-regulation theory to interpret and explain the experiences of three cyclists in case studies which display variations in s...

  17. The effect of antenatal exercise on women’s experience of labor: A randomized controlled trial

    Austad, Åshild; Forså, Marianne Inngjerdingen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether following a standardized exercise program during pregnancy affects women’s experience of labor.Methods: 855 healthy pregnant women were randomized to an intervention or a control group. The intervention group followed a 12 weeks standardized exercise program between gestational weeks 20 and 36. The program included aerobic and strengthening exercises of moderate to high-intensity. The control group followed standard antenatal care. At inclusion and three months po...

  18. Effect of long-acting testosterone undecanoate treatment on quality of life in men with testosterone deficiency syndrome: a double blind randomized controlled trial

    Seng-Fah Tong; Chirk-Jenn Ng; Boon-Cheok Lee; Verna-KM Lee; Ee-Ming Khoo; Eng-Giap Lee; Hui-Meng Tan

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of intramuscular injection of testosterone undecanoate on overall quality of life (QoL) in men with testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS).A randomized controlled trial over a 12-month period was carried out in 2009.One hundred and twenty men aged 40 years and above with a diagnosis of TDS (serum total testosterone < 12 nmol l-1 and total Aging Male Symptom (AMS) scores ≥ 27) were invited to participate.Interventions comprised intramuscular injection of either placebo or 1000 mg testosterone undecanoate,given at weeks 0,6,18,30 and 42.This paper presents the secondary analysis of QoL changes measured in the scores of Short-Form-12 (SF-12) scale at baseline,weeks 30 and 48 after the first injection.A total of 56/60 and 58/60 men from the active treatment and placebo group,respectively,completed the study.At week 48,before adjusting for baseline differences,the QoL of men in the treatment group improved significantly in five out of the eight domains on SF-12.The physical health composite scores improved 4.0 points from a baseline of 41.9±7.0 in the treatment group compared to 0.8 point from a baseline of 43.7±7.1 in the placebo group (F=3.652,P=0.027).The mental health composite scores improved 4.4 points from a baseline of 37.1±9.0 in the treatment group compared to 1.0 points from a baseline of 37.6±7.9 in the placebo group (F=4.514,P=0.018).After adjusting for baseline differences,significant improvement was observed in mental health composite scores,but not in physical health composite scores.Long-acting testosterone undecanoate significantly improved the mental health component of QoL in men with TDS.

  19. Quality assurance experience with the randomized neuropathic bone pain trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group, 96.05)

    Background and purpose: Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 96.05 is a prospective randomized controlled trial comparing a single 8 Gy with 20 Gy in five fractions of radiotherapy (RT) for neuropathic pain due to bone metastases. This paper summarizes the quality assurance (QA) activities for the first 234 patients (accrual target 270). Materials and methods: Independent audits to assess compliance with eligibility/exclusion criteria and appropriateness of treatment of the index site were conducted after each cohort of approximately 45 consecutive patients. Reported serious adverse events (SAEs) in the form of cord/cauda equina compression or pathological fracture developing at the index site were investigated and presented in batches to the Independent Data Monitoring Committee. Finally, source data verification of the RT prescription page and treatment records was undertaken for each of the first 234 patients to assess compliance with the protocol. Results: Only one patient was found conclusively not to have genuine neuropathic pain, and there were no detected 'geographical misses' with RT fields. The overall rate of detected infringements for other eligibility criteria over five audits (225 patients) was 8% with a dramatic improvement after the first audit. There has at no stage been a statistically significant difference in SAEs by randomization arm. There was a 22% rate of RT protocol variations involving ten of the 14 contributing centres, although the rate of major dose violations (more than ±10% from protocol dose) was only 6% with no statistically significant difference by randomization arm (P=0.44). Conclusions: QA auditing is an essential but time-consuming component of RT trials, including those assessing palliative endpoints. Our experience confirms that all aspects should commence soon after study activation

  20. Can Culture Act as an Enabler to Innovation? Exploring the Germany-Ontario Experience Regarding the Introduction of Green Energy

    Bill Irwin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the role that societal culture may play in terms of acting as an inhibitor or enabler when creating conditions conducive to innovative enterprise. To further understanding of this concept, the paper's authors explore different cultural influences and traditions of the country of Germany and the Canadian province of Ontario against the backdrop of the introduction of a government green energy policy and how local business reacts to new opportunities forthcoming from this shift in policy direction. The authors contend that the current Ontario psyche has contributed to an overall cultural drag on innovative activities. They demonstrate that in no place is this cultural impact more evident than the apparent lack of home-grown innovative activity surrounding green energy entrepreneurship; where, in spite of progressive and favourable provincial government policy, continued manufacturing growth is led by offshore companies The Ontario experience is in sharp contrast to current and historical German activity, when it comes to local innovation and advances in green energy. While Germany officially enacted their green energy act at the turn of the last century, experts agree that the German tenure with going green is in fact 35 to 40 years in the making. Although it has been contended that unique historical conditions such as postwar reconstruction and the reunification of the former East and West Germany have been significant contributing factors to Germany's embracing of sustainable energy, the authors of this paper contend that cultural factors such as the German sense of naturfreund; an overwhelming sense of being a nature-lover, may also play a significant role. In their exploration the authors build upon Hofstede's cultural dimension theory unpacking specific cultural components, as they compare actions and responses made by German and Ontarian policy-makers and business decision-makers.

  1. Everolimus and long acting octreotide as a volume reducing treatment of polycystic livers (ELATE: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Chrispijn Melissa

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycystic liver disease (PLD is defined as having more than 20 liver cysts and can present as a severe and disabling condition. Most symptoms are caused by the mass effect of the liver size and include abdominal pain and distension. The somatostatin analogues octreotide and lanreotide have proven to reduce polycystic liver volume. mTOR inhibitors such as everolimus inhibit cell proliferation and might thereby reduce growth of liver cysts. This trial aims to assess the benefit of combination therapy of everolimus and octreotide compared to octreotide monotherapy. In this study we present the structure of the trial and the characteristics of the included patients. Methods/design This is a randomized open-label clinical trial comparing the effect of 12 months of everolimus and octreotide to octreotide monotherapy in PLD patients. Primary outcome is change in liver volume determined by CT-volumetry. Secondary outcomes are changes in abdominal symptoms and quality of life. Moreover, safety and tolerability of the drugs will be assessed. Discussion This trial will compare the relative efficacy of combination therapy with octreotide and everolimus to octreotide monotherapy. Since they apply to different pathways of cystogenesis we expect that combining octreotide and everolimus will result in a cumulative reduction of polycystic liver volume. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01157858

  2. Blood Trials: Transfusions, Injections, and Experiments in Africa, 1890-1920.

    Sunseri, Thaddeus

    2016-07-01

    From about 1880 to 1920, a culture of medical experimentation promoted blood transfusion as a therapy for severe anemia in Europe, which was applied in German East Africa in 1892 for a case of blackwater fever, a complication of malaria afflicting mainly Europeans. This first case of blood transfusion in Africa, in which an African's blood was transfused into a German official, complicates the dominant narrative that blood transfusions in Africa came only after World War I. Medical researchers moreover experimented with blood serum therapies on human and animal subjects in Europe and Africa, injecting blood of different species, "races" and ethnicities into others to demonstrate parasite transmissibility and to discover vaccines for diseases such as malaria, sleeping sickness, and yellow fever. While research in German colonies is highlighted here, this was a transnational medical culture that crossed borders and oceans. This research is of interest as a possible early pathway for the epidemic spread of HIV and other zoonoses in Africa and the world, which biomedical researchers have identified as emerging in West-Central Africa sometime around the turn of the twentieth century. PMID:26514397

  3. Amyloid PET Screening for Enrichment of Early-Stage Alzheimer Disease Clinical Trials: Experience in a Phase 1b Clinical Trial.

    Sevigny, Jeff; Suhy, Joyce; Chiao, Ping; Chen, Tianle; Klein, Gregory; Purcell, Derk; Oh, Joonmi; Verma, Ajay; Sampat, Mehul; Barakos, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is being investigated as a screening tool to identify amyloid-positive patients as an enrichment strategy for Alzheimer disease (AD) clinical trial enrollment. In a multicenter, phase 1b trial, patients meeting clinical criteria for prodromal or mild AD underwent florbetapir PET scanning at screening. PET, magnetic resonance imaging, and coregistered PET/magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed by 2 independent readers and binary visual readings tabulated. Semiquantitative values of cortical to whole cerebellar standard uptake value ratios were computed (threshold 1.10). Of 278 patients with an evaluable PET scan, 170 (61%) and 185 (67%) were amyloid-positive by visual reading and quantitative analysis, respectively; 39% were excluded from the study due to an amyloid-negative scan based on visual readings. More ApoE ε4 carriers than noncarriers were amyloid-positive (80% vs. 43%). Comparison of visual readings with quantitative results identified 21 discordant cases (92% agreement). Interreader and intrareader agreements from visual readings were 98% and 100%, respectively. Amyloid PET imaging is an effective and feasible screening tool for enrollment of amyloid-positive patients with early stages of AD into clinical trials. PMID:26885819

  4. Participant experiences from chronic administration of a multivitamin versus placebo on subjective health and wellbeing: a double-blind qualitative analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    Sarris Jerome

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While many randomised controlled trials have been conducted on multivitamins, to our knowledge no qualitative research exploring the subjective experience of taking a multivitamin during a clinical trial has been reported. Methods Semi-structured and open-ended written questions were incorporated into a 16-week double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel groups trial of once-daily multivitamin administration. At the final study visit (week 16, three open-ended questions were posed to elucidate any positive, negative or unusual experiences from taking either the multivitamin or matched placebo. Qualitative thematic analysis was undertaken by researchers who were blind as to treatment condition of participants, and triangulation (independent analysis from three researchers was employed to ensure methodological rigour. Participant’s experiences were categorised as “positive” or “negative” and a Chi Square analysis was then applied to each of the experiential themes, to compare experiences between the multivitamin and placebo groups, (subdividing the groups by gender. Usual experiences were categorised and discussed separately. Results Of the 182 participants enrolled, 116 completed the study and qualitative data were available from 114 participants. Thematic analysis revealed significant effects in favour of the multivitamin over placebo for participants experiencing increased energy levels (p=.022 and enhanced mood (p=.027. The beneficial effect on energy levels was particularly evident among female participants. A trend was found for participants reporting better sleep in the multivitamin over placebo. The multivitamin and placebo groups did not significantly differ in perceived positive or negative effects in areas relating to other aspects of mental function or physical health. No significant negative effects were revealed, although there was a non-significant trend for more people in the multivitamin

  5. Practical aspects of recruitment and retention in clinical trials of rare genetic diseases: the phenylketonuria (PKU) experience.

    DeWard, Stephanie J; Wilson, Ashley; Bausell, Heather; Volz, Ashley S; Mooney, Kimberly

    2014-02-01

    Bringing treatments for rare genetic diseases to patients requires clinical research. Despite increasing activism from patient support and advocacy groups to increase access to clinical research studies, connecting rare disease patients with the clinical research opportunities that may help them has proven challenging. Chief among these challenges are the low incidence of these diseases resulting in a very small pool of known patients with a particular disease, difficulty of diagnosing rare genetic diseases, logistical issues such as long distances to the nearest treatment center, and substantial disease burden leading to loss of independence. Using clinical studies of phenylketonuria as an example, this paper discusses how, based on the authors' collective experience, partnership among clinicians, patients, study coordinators, genetic counselors, dietitians, industry, patient support groups, and families can help overcome the challenges of recruiting and retaining patients in rare disease clinical trials. We discuss specific methods of collaboration, communication, and education as part of a long-term effort to build a community committed to advancing the medical care of patients with rare genetic diseases. By talking to patients and families regularly about research initiatives and taking steps to make study participation as easy as possible, rare disease clinic staff can help ensure adequate study enrollment and successful study completion. PMID:24014152

  6. Experiences recruiting Indian worksites for an integrated health protection and health promotion randomized control trial in Maharashtra, India.

    Cordeira, L Shulman; Pednekar, M S; Nagler, E M; Gautam, J; Wallace, L; Stoddard, A M; Gupta, P C; Sorensen, G C

    2015-06-01

    This article provides an overview of the recruitment strategies utilized in the Mumbai Worksites Tobacco Control Study, a cluster randomized trial testing the effectiveness of an integrated tobacco control and occupational safety and health program in Indian manufacturing worksites. From June 2012 to June 2013, 20 companies were recruited. Companies were identified using association lists, referrals, internet searches and visits to industrial areas. Four hundred eighty companies were contacted to validate information, introduce the study and seek an in-person meeting with a company representative. Eighty-three company representatives agreed to meet. Of those 83 companies, 55 agreed to a formal 'pitch meeting' with key decision makers at the company. Seventy-seven recruitment 'pitches' were given, including multiple meetings in the same companies. If the company was interested, we obtained a letter of participation and employee roster. Based on this experience, recommendations are made that can help inform future researchers and practitioners wishing to recruit Indian worksites. When compared with recruitment of US manufacturing worksites, recruitment of Indian worksites lacked current industrial lists of companies to serve as a sampling frame, and required more in-person visits, incentives for control companies and more assurances around confidentiality to allow occupational safety and health experts into their worksite. PMID:25796269

  7. Design and conduct of early-phase radiotherapy trials with targeted therapeutics: Lessons from the PRAVO experience

    New strategies to facilitate the improvement of physical and integrated biological optimization of high-precision treatment protocols are an important priority for modern radiation oncology. From a clinical perspective, as knowledge accumulates from molecular radiobiology, there is a complex and exciting opportunity to investigate novel approaches to rational patient treatment stratification based on actionable tumor targets, together with the appropriate design of next-generation early-phase radiotherapy trials utilizing targeted therapeutics, to formally evaluate relevant clinical and biomarker endpoints. A unique aspect in the development pathway of systemic agents with presumed radiosensitizing activity will also be the need for special attention on patient eligibility and the rigorous definition of radiation dose–volume relationships and potential dose-limiting toxicities. Based on recent experience from systematically investigating histone deacetylase inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents, from initial studies in preclinical tumor models through the conduct of a phase I clinical study to evaluate tumor activity of the targeted agent as well as patient safety and tumor response to the combined treatment modality, this communication will summarize principles relating to early clinical evaluation of combining radiotherapy and targeted therapeutics

  8. BNCT treatment planning for superficial and deep-seated tumors: Experience from clinical trial of recurrent head and neck cancer at THOR.

    Liu, Yen-Wan Hsueh; Chang, Chih-Ting; Yeh, Lan-Yun; Wang, Ling-Wei; Lin, Tzung-Yi

    2015-12-01

    Under the collaboration between National Tsing Hua University and Taipei Veterans General Hospital, clinical trial of recurrent head-and-neck cancer by Boron neutron capture therapy at Tsing Hua open-pool reactor started on August 11, 2010. Up to January 2014, 17 patients were treated. Based on the treatment planning experiences of clinical trials using in-house designed THORplan, different setups should be used for superficial and deep-seated tumors. Superficial tumor treatment gains benefits from the use of patient collimator, while direct irradiation is a better choice for deep-seated tumor. PMID:26278349

  9. Effect of long-acting testosterone undecanoate treatment on quality of life in men with testosterone deficiency syndrome: a double blind randomized controlled trial

    Tong, Seng-Fah; Ng, Chirk-Jenn; Lee, Boon-Cheok; Lee, Verna-KM; Khoo, Ee-Ming; Lee, Eng-Giap; Tan, Hui-Meng

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of intramuscular injection of testosterone undecanoate on overall quality of life (QoL) in men with testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS). A randomized controlled trial over a 12-month period was carried out in 2009. One hundred and twenty men aged 40 years and above with a diagnosis of TDS (serum total testosterone

  10. Quality assurance of 3-D conformal radiation therapy for a cooperative group trial - RTOG 3D QA center initial experience

    's correction and resubmission in 7 of 67 (10.4%) reviewed cases. Normal tissues required correction in 6 of 67 (8.9%) of cases. Initial field shaping differed from the submitted treatment plan by more than 5 mm in significant regions of the field in only 2% of the cases. Isocenter shifts of more than 5 mm on at least one of the treated fields was identified in 7% of initial port films examined. Dosimetry review has demonstrated that 14 of 86 cases (16.3%) had minor variations in target volume coverage (<100% of the target volume coverage by the prescription isodose) and 3.4% had major variation in dose coverage (<95% coverage of target volume by prescription isodose). Nineteen of 93 cases (20%) had more than 7% heterogeneity of dose within the planning target volume. CONCLUSION: 3DCRT can be studied and implemented in a cooperative group setting. Although data exchange problems in this study have been frequent, most of these problems occurred early in the trial and have been resolved in most circumstances. A significant amount of variation has been identified in the definition of target volumes and organs at risk. Similarly, field shaping and port film evaluation showed occasional errors. It is our impression that quality assurance is a critical component of 3DCRT in the cooperative group setting. As experience in the planning of patients with 3DCRT increases, it is expected that the frequency of planning variations will diminish

  11. Current Experience in Testing Mitochondrial Nutrients in Disorders Featuring Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Rational Design of Chemoprevention Trials

    Giovanni Pagano

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An extensive number of pathologies are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction (MDF and oxidative stress (OS. Thus, mitochondrial cofactors termed “mitochondrial nutrients” (MN, such as α-lipoic acid (ALA, Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, and l-carnitine (CARN (or its derivatives have been tested in a number of clinical trials, and this review is focused on the use of MN-based clinical trials. The papers reporting on MN-based clinical trials were retrieved in MedLine up to July 2014, and evaluated for the following endpoints: (a treated diseases; (b dosages, number of enrolled patients and duration of treatment; (c trial success for each MN or MN combinations as reported by authors. The reports satisfying the above endpoints included total numbers of trials and frequencies of randomized, controlled studies, i.e., 81 trials testing ALA, 107 reports testing CoQ10, and 74 reports testing CARN, while only 7 reports were retrieved testing double MN associations, while no report was found testing a triple MN combination. A total of 28 reports tested MN associations with “classical” antioxidants, such as antioxidant nutrients or drugs. Combinations of MN showed better outcomes than individual MN, suggesting forthcoming clinical studies. The criteria in study design and monitoring MN-based clinical trials are discussed.

  12. What determines patient preferences for treating low risk basal cell carcinoma when comparing surgery vs imiquimod? A discrete choice experiment survey from the SINS trial

    Tinelli Michela

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SINS trial (Controlled Clinical Trials ISRCTN48755084; Eudract No. 2004-004506-24 is a randomised controlled trial evaluating long term success of excisional surgery vs. imiquimod 5% cream for low risk nodular and superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC. The trial included a discrete choice experiment questionnaire to explore patient preferences of a cream versus surgery for the treatment of their skin cancer. Methods The self-completed questionnaire was administered at baseline to 183 participants, measuring patients’ strength of preferences when choosing either alternative ‘surgery’ or ‘imiquimod cream’ instead of a fixed ‘current situation’ option (of surgical excision as standard practice in UK. The treatments were described according to: cost, chance of complete clearance, side effects and appearance. Participants had to choose between various scenarios. Analysis was performed using a mixed logit model, which took into account the impact of previous BCC treatment and sample preference variability. Results The analysis showed that respondents preferred ‘imiquimod cream’ to their ‘current situation’ or ‘surgery’, regardless of previous experience of BCC symptoms and treatment. Respondents were more likely to be worried about their cosmetic outcomes and side effects they might experience over and above their chance of clearance and cost. Those with no experience of surgery (compared with experience valued more the choice of ‘imiquimod cream’ (£1013 vs £781. All treatment characteristics were significant determinants of treatment choice, and there was significant variability in the population preferences for all of them. Conclusions Patients with BCC valued more ‘imiquimod cream’ than alternative ‘surgery’ options, and all treatment characteristics were important for their choice of care. Understanding how people with a BCC value alternative interventions may better inform the

  13. Experiences in conducting multiple community-based HIV prevention trials among women in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Moodley Jothi; Maharaj Rashika; Guddera Vijayanand; Govinden Roshini; Gappoo Sharika; Ganesh Shay; Dladla-Qwabe Nozizwe; Coumi Nicola; Ramjee Gita; Morar Neetha; Naidoo Sarita; Palanee Thesla

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background South Africa, with its scientific capacity, good infrastructure and high HIV incidence rates, is ideally positioned to conduct large-scale HIV prevention trials. The HIV Prevention Research Unit of the South African Medical Research Council conducted four phase III and one phase IIb trials of women-initiated HIV prevention options in KwaZulu-Natal between 2003 and 2009. A total of 7046 women participated, with HIV prevalence between 25% and 45% and HIV incidence ranging fr...

  14. Process evaluation of the MOSAIC trial: treatment experience of two psychological therapies for out-patient treatment of Anorexia Nervosa

    Zainal, K. A.; Renwick, B.; Keyes, A.; Lose, A.; Kenyon, M.; DeJong, H; Broadbent, H.; Serpell, L; Richards, L.; Johnson-Sabine, E.; Boughton, N.; Whitehead, L.; Treasure, J; Schmidt, U.; MOSAIC trial group

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study is part of a series of process evaluations within the MOSAIC Trial (Maudsley Outpatient Study of Treatments for Anorexia Nervosa and Related Conditions). This randomised controlled trial (RCT) compared two psychological treatments, the Maudsley Model for Treatment of Adults with Anorexia Nervosa (MANTRA) and Specialist Supportive Clinical Management (SSCM) for adult outpatients with Anorexia Nervosa. The present process study integrates quantitative (treatment acceptabi...

  15. The cost of implementing consumer financial regulations: an analysis of experience with the Truth in Savings Act

    Elliehausen, Gregory E.; Barbara R. Lowrey

    1997-01-01

    The Truth in Savings Act mandates that financial institutions disclose certain information about the terms of consumer deposit accounts in specific forms and at specific times. Although many depository institutions provided disclosures of account terms before the act was passed in 1991, most did not satisfy completely all the requirements of the regulation (Regulation DD) adopted by the Federal Reserve Board to implement the law. Thus, the Truth in Savings law likely caused every depository i...

  16. Effect of Acting Experience on Emotion Expression and Recognition in Voice: Non-Actors Provide Better Stimuli than Expected

    Jürgens, Rebecca; Grass, Annika; Drolet, Matthis; Fischer, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Both in the performative arts and in emotion research, professional actors are assumed to be capable of delivering emotions comparable to spontaneous emotional expressions. This study examines the effects of acting training on vocal emotion depiction and recognition. We predicted that professional actors express emotions in a more realistic fashion than non-professional actors. However, professional acting training may lead to a particular speech pattern; this might account for vocal expressi...

  17. Effects of natural childbirth preparation versus standard antenatal education on epidural rates, experience of childbirth and parental stress in mothers and fathers: a randomised controlled multicentre trial

    Bergström, M; Kieler, H; Waldenström, U

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of antenatal education focussing on natural childbirth preparation with psychoprophylactic training versus standard antenatal education on the use of epidural analgesia, experience of childbirth and parental stress in first-time mothers and fathers. Design Randomised controlled multicentre trial. Setting Fifteen antenatal clinics in Sweden between January 2006 and May 2007. Sample A total of 1087 nulliparous women and 1064 of their partners. Methods Natural gr...

  18. The integration of the treatment for common mental disorders in primary care: experiences of health care providers in the MANAS trial in Goa, India

    Kirkwood Betty R.; Pednekar Sulochana; Andrew Gracy; Pereira Bernadette; Patel Vikram

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The MANAS trial reported that a Lay Health Counsellor (LHC) led collaborative stepped care intervention (the "MANAS intervention") for Common Mental Disorders (CMD) was effective in public sector primary care clinics but private sector General Practitioners (GPs) did as well with or without the additional counsellor. This paper aims to describe the experiences of integrating the MANAS intervention in primary care. Methods Qualitative semi-structured interviews with key mem...

  19. Assessment of nutrient deficiencies in maize in nutrient omission trials and long-term field experiments in the West African Savanna

    Nziguheba, G.; Tossah, B.K.; Diels, J.; Franke, A.C.; Aihou, K.; Iwuafor, E.N.O.; Nwoke, C.; Merckx, R.

    2009-01-01

    Low soil fertility is one of the main constraints to crop production in the West African savanna. However, the response of major cereals to fertilizer applications is often far below the potential yields. Low fertilizer efficiency, inadequacy of current fertilizer recommendations, and the ignorance of nutrients other than N, P, and K may limit crop production. Nutrient limitations to maize production were identified in on-farm trials in Togo and in several long-term experiments in Nigeria and...

  20. Developing and evaluating interventions to reduce inappropriate prescribing by general practitioners of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections: A randomised controlled trial to compare paper-based and web-based modelling experiments

    Sullivan Frank; MacLennan Graeme; Pitts Nigel B; Bonetti Debbie; Eccles Martin; Francis Jillian; Ricketts Ian W; Treweek Shaun; Jones Claire; Weal Mark; Barnett Karen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Much implementation research is focused on full-scale trials with little evidence of preceding modelling work. The Medical Research Council Framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions has argued for more and better theoretical and exploratory work prior to a trial as a means of improving intervention development. Intervention modelling experiments (IMEs) are a way of exploring and refining an intervention before moving to a full-scale trial. They do this ...

  1. Developing and evaluating interventions to reduce inappropriate prescribing by general practitioners of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections: a randomised controlled trial to compare paper-based and web-based modelling experiments

    Treweek, S.; Ricketts, I. W.; Francis, J.; Eccles, M. P.; Bonetti, D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Much implementation research is focused on full-scale trials with little evidence of preceding modelling work. The Medical Research Council Framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions has argued for more and better theoretical and exploratory work prior to a trial as a means of improving intervention development. Intervention modelling experiments (IMEs) are a way of exploring and refining an intervention before moving to a full-scale trial. They do this by deliv...

  2. Overexpectation and Trial Massing

    Sissons, Heather T.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2009-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to examine the interaction of overexpectation treatment and trial massing using a Pavlovian fear conditioning procedure with rats. In first-order conditioning, Experiment 1 found the overexpectation effect (i.e., decreased conditioned responding to a cue after compound training when the elements were previously reinforced), the trial spacing effect (i.e., decreased responding to a cue when reinforced trials are massed), and a counteraction between overexpectat...

  3. The first clinical experience on efficacy of topical flutamide on melasma compared with topical hydroquinone: a randomized clinical trial

    Adalatkhah H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hassan Adalatkhah,1 Homayoun Sadeghi-Bazargani2,3 1Department of Dermatology, Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil, Iran; 2Road Traffic Injury Research Center, Department of Statistics and Epidemiology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 3Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden Background: Treatment of melasma is unsatisfactory most of the times. Hormonal role is shown to exist in pathogenesis of the melasma, and sex-hormone related drugs may have an effect on melasma.Aim: To investigate efficacy of 1% flutamide cream versus 4% hydroquinone cream on melasma.Methods: In a parallel randomized clinical trial, 74 women with melasma were allocated to receive a sunscreen along with 4% hydroquinone cream or 1% flutamide cream. Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI, mexameter melanin assay, and patient satisfaction were investigated.Results: Mean age of the participants was 33.8 years. Mean length of time suffering from Melasma was 96.3 months. The subjects reported in average 1.1 hours per day of exposure to sunlight. Mean standardized total patient satisfaction score was 28.8 (standard deviation [SD] 17.2 in flutamide group patients versus 18 (SD 15.5 in control group (P<0.01. Regardless of treatment group, the skin darkness assessed upon MASI scales was reduced over the treatment course (P<0.001. Using mixed effects, longitudinal modeling showed better treatment efficacy based on MASI scale for flutamide group compared to the hydroquinone group (P<0.05. However, longitudinal analysis of mexameter scores did not reveal any significant difference in melanin measurements between flutamide and hydroquinone.Conclusion: Topical flutamide appeared as effective as topical hydroquinone in treating melasma using mexameter assessment but with a better MASI improvement trend and higher patient satisfaction in flutamide treatment versus topical hydroquinone. As the present study is possibly the

  4. Evaluating the impact of the alcohol act on off-trade alcohol sales: a natural experiment in Scotland

    Robinson, Mark; Geue, Claudia; Lewsey, James; MacKay, Daniel; McCartney, Gerry; Curnock, Esther; Beeston, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims A ban on multi-buy discounts of off-trade alcohol was introduced as part of the Alcohol Act in Scotland in October 2011. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of this legislation on alcohol sales, which provide the best indicator of population consumption. Design Setting and Participants Interrupted time-series regression was used to assess the impact of the Alcohol Act on alcohol sales among off-trade retailers in Scotland. Models accounted for underlyi...

  5. Onset of efficacy and tolerability following the initiation dosing of long-acting paliperidone palmitate: post-hoc analyses of a randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    Fu Dong-Jing; Ma Yi-Wen; Sliwa Jennifer K; Bossie Cynthia A; Alphs Larry

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Paliperidone palmitate is a long-acting injectable atypical antipsychotic for the acute and maintenance treatment of adults with schizophrenia. The recommended initiation dosing regimen is 234 mg on Day 1 and 156 mg on Day 8 via intramuscular (deltoid) injection; followed by 39 to 234 mg once-monthly thereafter (deltoid or gluteal). These post-hoc analyses addressed two commonly encountered clinical issues regarding the initiation dosing: the time to onset of efficacy and ...

  6. The effectiveness of physical activity monitoring and distance counseling in an occupational setting – Results from a randomized controlled trial (CoAct

    Reijonsaari Karita

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of physical activity (PA is a known risk factor for many health conditions. The workplace is a setting often used to promote activity and health. We investigated the effectiveness of an intervention on PA and productivity-related outcomes in an occupational setting. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 12 months duration with two 1:1 allocated parallel groups of insurance company employees. Eligibility criteria included permanent employment and absence of any condition that risked the participant’s health during PA. Subjects in the intervention group monitored their daily PA with an accelerometer, set goals, had access to an online service to help them track their activity levels, and received counseling via telephone or web messages for 12 months. The control group received the results of a fitness test and an information leaflet on PA at the beginning of the study. The intervention’s aim was to increase PA, improve work productivity, and decrease sickness absence. Primary outcomes were PA (measured as MET minutes per week, work productivity (quantity and quality of work; QQ index, and sickness absence (SA days at 12 months. Participants were assigned to groups using block randomization with a computer-generated scheme. The study was not blinded. Results There were 544 randomized participants, of which 521 were included in the analysis (64% female, mean age 43 years. At 12 months, there was no significant difference in physical activity levels between the intervention group (n = 264 and the control group (n = 257. The adjusted mean difference was −206 MET min/week [95% Bayesian credible interval −540 to 128; negative values favor control group]. There was also no significant difference in the QQ index (−0.5 [−4.4 to 3.3] or SA days (0.0 [−1.2 to 0.9]. Of secondary outcomes, body weight (0.5 kg [0.0 to 1.0] and percentage of body fat (0.6% [0.2% to 1.1%] were slightly

  7. Impact of mothers’ employment on infant feeding and care: a qualitative study of the experiences of mothers employed through the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act

    Nair, Manisha; Ariana, Proochista; Webster, Premila

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the experiences of mothers employed through the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA) using focus group discussions (FGDs) to understand the impact of mothers’ employment on infant feeding and care. The effects of mothers’ employment on nutritional status of children could be variable. It could lead to increased household income, but could also compromise child care and feeding. Setting The study was undertaken in the Dungarpur district of Rajas...

  8. Study protocol: an early intervention program to improve motor outcome in preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial and a qualitative study of physiotherapy performance and parental experiences

    Øberg Gunn

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about early physiotherapy to preterm infants is sparse, given the risk of delayed motor development and cerebral palsy. Methods/Design A pragmatic randomized controlled study has been designed to assess the effect of a preventative physiotherapy program carried out in the neonatal intensive care unit. Moreover, a qualitative study is carried out to assess the physiotherapy performance and parents' experiences with the intervention. The aim of the physiotherapy program is to improve motor development i.e. postural control and selective movements in these infants. 150 infants will be included and randomized to either intervention or standard follow-up. The infants in the intervention group will be given specific stimulation to facilitate movements based on the individual infant's development, behavior and needs. The physiotherapist teaches the parents how to do the intervention and the parents receive a booklet with photos and descriptions of the intervention. Intervention is carried out twice a day for three weeks (week 34, 35, 36 postmenstrual age. Standardized tests are carried out at baseline, term age and at three, six, 12 and 24 months corrected age. In addition eight triads (infant, parent and physiotherapist are observed and videotaped in four clinical encounters each to assess the process of physiotherapy performance. The parents are also interviewed on their experiences with the intervention and how it influences on the parent-child relationship. Eight parents from the follow up group are interviewed about their experience. The interviews are performed according to the same schedule as the standardized measurements. Primary outcome is at two years corrected age. Discussion The paper presents the protocol for a randomized controlled trial designed to study the effect of physiotherapy to preterm infants at neonatal intensive care units. It also studies physiotherapy performance and the parent's experiences

  9. Onset of efficacy with acute long-acting injectable paliperidone palmitate treatment in markedly to severely ill patients with schizophrenia: post hoc analysis of a randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    Ma Yi-Wen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This post hoc analysis (trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00590577 assessed onset of efficacy and tolerability of acute treatment with once-monthly paliperidone palmitate (PP, a long-acting atypical antipsychotic initiated by day 1 and day 8 injections, in a markedly to severely ill schizophrenia population. Methods Subjects entering the 13-week, double-blind trial were randomized to PP (39, 156, or 234 mg [25, 100, and 150 mg eq of paliperidone, respectively] or placebo. This subgroup analysis included those with a baseline Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (CGI-S score indicating marked to severe illness. PP subjects received a 234-mg day 1 injection (deltoid, followed by their assigned dose on day 8 and monthly thereafter (deltoid or gluteal. Thus, data for PP groups were pooled for days 4 and 8. Measures included Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, CGI-S, Personal and Social Performance (PSP, and adverse events (AEs. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA and last-observation-carried-forward (LOCF methodologies, without multiplicity adjustments, were used to assess changes in continuous measures. Onset of efficacy was defined as the first time point a treatment group showed significant PANSS improvement (assessed days 4, 8, 22, 36, 64, and 92 versus placebo, which was maintained through end point. Results A total of 312 subjects met inclusion criterion for this subgroup analysis. After the day 1 injection, mean PANSS total scores improved significantly with PP (all received 234 mg versus placebo at day 4 (P = 0.012 and day 8 (P = 0.007. After the day 8 injection, a significant PANSS improvement persisted at all subsequent time points in the 234-mg group versus placebo (P P P P Conclusions In this markedly to severely ill population, acute treatment with 234 mg PP improved psychotic symptoms compared with placebo by day 4. After subsequent injections, observed improvements are suggestive of a dose

  10. -ctgov-: A suite of Stata commands for reporting trial results to ClinicalTrials.gov

    Phil Schumm; Theodore Karrison

    2014-01-01

    In response to the 1997 Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act (FDAMA), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) established ClinicalTrials.gov, an online, publicly-accessible registry for clinical trials. The 2007 Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act (FDAAA) broadened the scope of eligible trials, added outcomes reporting as a requirement, and established penalties for non-compliance. Although ClinicalTrials.gov increased the transparency with which clinical trials are conducte...

  11. Clinical, Ethical and Financial Implications of Incidental Imaging Findings: Experience from a Phase I Trial in Healthy Elderly Volunteers

    Pinato, D J; Stavraka, C.; Tanner, M.; Esson, A.; Jacobson, E. W.; Wilkins, M. R.; Libri, V.

    2012-01-01

    Background The detection of incidental findings (IF) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies is common and increases as a function of age. Responsible handling of IF is required, with implications for the conduct of research and the provision of good clinical care. Aim To investigate the prevalence and clinical significance of IF in a prospective cohort of healthy elderly volunteers who underwent MRI of the torso as a baseline investigation for a phase I trial. We assessed the ...

  12. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial.

    Santagostino, Elena; Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-04-01

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P< .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered atwww.clinicaltrials.govas #NCT0101496274. PMID:26755710

  13. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial

    Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-01-01

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P < .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT0101496274. PMID:26755710

  14. Working Experience and Practice in Field Trials of Pesticides%农药田间药效试验工作的经验及做法

    宋烨华

    2012-01-01

    Field trials of pesticides are different from the general demonstration and simple effect observation They are the important workthat the country in order to ensure pesticide can control biological effect and be safe to crops and environment before pesticide entering the market. Field trials of pesticides need to evaluate their control effects, negative effects and environmental effects, and to provide data of registrations for pesticide enterprises and pesticide extension. As a result of efficacy trials of pesticide by natural conditions, the agricultural conditions, test the improper operation and other factorsled to the inaccuracy of the test data and the incomparability of prone. In order to ensure the accuracy and efficacy of pesticide trials, the experience and measures of field trials for pesticide were summed up based on many years of practicing experience.%农药田间药效试验有别于一般防治示范或简单的效果观察。它是农药在进入市场之前,国家为保证农药对有害生物的防治效果和对作物及环境的安全性而开展的一项重要工作。农药田间药效试验需要对农药产品防治效果、负面效应以及环境影响作出客观、公正的综合评价,为农药生产企业办理农药登记提供资料,为农药推广应用提供科学依据。为保证农药田间药效试验的准确性和对试验药剂进行客观合理的分析、评价,笔者通过多年的实践经历,总结了做好农药田间药效试验经验以及具体做法。

  15. Organizing the Donation of Convalescent Plasma for a Therapeutic Clinical Trial on Ebola Virus Disease: The Experience in Guinea.

    Delamou, Alexandre; Haba, Nyankoye Yves; Mari-Saez, Almudena; Gallian, Pierre; Ronse, Maya; Jacobs, Jan; Camara, Bienvenu Salim; Kadio, Kadio Jean-Jacques Olivier; Guemou, Achille; Kolie, Jean Pe; Crop, Maaike De; Chavarin, Patricia; Jacquot, Chantal; Lazaygues, Catherine; Weggheleire, Anja De; Lynen, Lutgarde; van Griensven, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Although convalescent plasma (CP) transfusion was prioritized among potential Ebola treatments by the World Health Organization, there were concerns on the feasibility of its implementation. We report on the successful organization of donor mobilization and plasma collection as part of the Ebola-Tx clinical trial from November 2014 to July 2015 in Conakry, Guinea. Project implementation registers, tools and reports, mission reports, and minutes of research team meetings were used to reconstruct the sequence of events on how donor mobilization was organized, plasmapheresis was set up, and how effective this approach was in collecting CP. An initial needs assessment of the Guinean National Blood Transfusion Center resulted in targeted training of staff on site, resulting in autonomy and independent production of CP within 3 months. The Conakry Ebola Survivors Association played a direct role in donor mobilization and organization of CP donations. A total of 98 Ebola survivors were screened for plasma donation, of which 84 were found eligible for plasmapheresis. Of these, 26 (30.9%) were excluded. The remaining 58 donors made a total of 90 donations, corresponding to 50.9 L of CP. This sufficed to treat the 99 eligible patients enrolled in the trial. Within a poor resource emergency context, transfusion capacity could be rapidly improved through the strengthening of local capacities and gradual transfer of skills coupled with active involvement of Ebola survivors. However, large-scale plasma collection or multisite studies may require further adaptations of both strategy and logistics. The Ebola-Tx trial was funded by the European Union and others. PMID:27430546

  16. Organizing the Donation of Convalescent Plasma for a Therapeutic Clinical Trial on Ebola Virus Disease: The Experience in Guinea

    Delamou, Alexandre; Haba, Nyankoye Yves; Mari-Saez, Almudena; Gallian, Pierre; Ronse, Maya; Jacobs, Jan; Camara, Bienvenu Salim; Kadio, Kadio Jean-Jacques Olivier; Guemou, Achille; Kolie, Jean Pe; De Crop, Maaike; Chavarin, Patricia; Jacquot, Chantal; Lazaygues, Catherine; De Weggheleire, Anja; Lynen, Lutgarde; van Griensven, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Although convalescent plasma (CP) transfusion was prioritized among potential Ebola treatments by the World Health Organization, there were concerns on the feasibility of its implementation. We report on the successful organization of donor mobilization and plasma collection as part of the Ebola-Tx clinical trial from November 2014 to July 2015 in Conakry, Guinea. Project implementation registers, tools and reports, mission reports, and minutes of research team meetings were used to reconstruct the sequence of events on how donor mobilization was organized, plasmapheresis was set up, and how effective this approach was in collecting CP. An initial needs assessment of the Guinean National Blood Transfusion Center resulted in targeted training of staff on site, resulting in autonomy and independent production of CP within 3 months. The Conakry Ebola Survivors Association played a direct role in donor mobilization and organization of CP donations. A total of 98 Ebola survivors were screened for plasma donation, of which 84 were found eligible for plasmapheresis. Of these, 26 (30.9%) were excluded. The remaining 58 donors made a total of 90 donations, corresponding to 50.9 L of CP. This sufficed to treat the 99 eligible patients enrolled in the trial. Within a poor resource emergency context, transfusion capacity could be rapidly improved through the strengthening of local capacities and gradual transfer of skills coupled with active involvement of Ebola survivors. However, large-scale plasma collection or multisite studies may require further adaptations of both strategy and logistics. The Ebola-Tx trial was funded by the European Union and others. PMID:27430546

  17. The experience of becoming a grandmother to a premature infant - A balancing act, influenced by ambivalent feeling

    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla; Eriksson, Carrie; Pernehed, Sara; Mörelius, Evalotte

    2012-01-01

    Aims and objectives.  To explore and describe the experience of becoming a grandmother to a premature infant. Background.  Becoming a grandmother involves a new perspective of life. Grandmothers of sick infants find themselves in a new situation with an adult child undergoing serious stress. Few studies have approached the grandmothers’ own experience of becoming a grandmother to a premature infant. Design.  A qualitative content analysis was used. Methods.  Eleven women, 52–66 years of age, ...

  18. Continuous 5-fluorouracil infusion plus long acting octreotide in advanced well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas. A phase II trial of the Piemonte Oncology Network

    Well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas are highly vascularized and may be sensitive to drugs administered on a metronomic schedule that has shown antiangiogenic properties. A phase II study was designed to test the activity of protracted 5-fluorouracil (5FU) infusion plus long-acting release (LAR) octreotide in patients with neuroendocrine carcinoma. Twenty-nine patients with metastatic or locally advanced well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma were treated with protracted 5FU intravenous infusion (200 mg/m2 daily) plus LAR octreotide (20 mg monthly). Patients were followed for toxicity, objective response, symptomatic and biochemical response, time to progression and survival. Assessment by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria showed partial response in 7 (24.1%), stable disease in 20 (69.0%), and disease progression in 2 patients. Response did not significantly differ when patients were stratified by primary tumor site and proliferative activity. A biochemical (chromogranin A) response was observed in 12/25 assessable patients (48.0%); symptom relief was obtained in 9/15 symptomatic patients (60.0%). There was non significant decrease in circulating vascular epithelial growth factor (VEGF) over time. Median time to progression was 22.6 months (range, 2.7-68.5); median overall survival was not reached yet. Toxicity was mild and manageable. Continuous/metronomic 5FU infusion plus LAR octreotide is well tolerated and shows activity in patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. The potential synergism between metronomic chemotherapy and antiangiogenic drugs provides a rationale for exploring this association in the future. NCT00953394

  19. Trials and tribulations of conducting interventional studies in urban slums of a developing country: Experiences from Kolkata, India.

    Mahapatra, Tanmay; Mahapatra, Sanchita; Pal, Debottam; Saha, Jayanta; Lopez, AnnaLena; Ali, Mohammad; Bannerjee, Barnali; Manna, Byomkesh; Sur, Dipika; Bhattacharya, Sujit; Kanungo, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Experimental studies involving human subjects provide most internally valid evidences in epidemiological research due to their robust methodology. While conducting population-based interventional studies, to achieve external validity, inclusion of information from vulnerable groups like urban slum-dwellers of the developing world, in the epidemiological estimates is of paramount importance. The challenges faced while conducting 2 consecutive large-scale, community-based vaccine trials in urban slums of Kolkata, India are presented in this article. Interventions in these communities often get constrained by issues pertaining to human rights and benefits, socio-cultural factors, political environment, methodological shortcomings in addition to the challenges in ensuring community participation. While conducting these trials although we intermittently faced obstacles, by virtue of having a long term and robust surveillance system and developing a trusted relationship between the researchers, community leaders and residents we were able to come up with a commendable community participation which culminated into the success of the interventions. Bridging the gap between research and field operations by incorporating knowledge gathered from interventional studies and making strategies to improve health conditions of these informal settlers is a major unfulfilled agenda. We believe the lessons learnt during our research will help researchers while developing efficient interventions in similar setting. PMID:26224251

  20. Compliance with mandatory reporting of clinical trial results on ClinicalTrials.gov: cross sectional study

    Prayle, A.P.; Hurley, M.N.; Smyth, Alan R

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine compliance with mandatory reporting of summary clinical trial results (within one year of completion of trial) on ClinicalTrials.gov for studies that fall under the recent Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act (FDAAA) legislation. Design Registry based study of clinical trial summaries. Data sources ClinicalTrials.gov, searched on 19 January 2011, with cross referencing with Drugs@FDA to determine for which trials mandatory reporting was required within one...

  1. Does it matter if clinicians recruiting for a trial don't understand what the trial is really about? Qualitative study of surgeons' experiences of participation in a pragmatic multi-centre RCT

    Snowdon Claire; Featherstone Katie; Ziebland Sue; Barker Karen; Frost Helen; Fairbank Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Qualitative methods are increasingly used to study the process of clinical trials and patients understanding of the rationale for trials, randomisation and reasons for taking part or refusing. Patients' understandings are inevitably influenced by the recruiting clinician's understanding of the trial, yet relatively little qualitative work has explored clinicians' perceptions and understandings of trials. This study interviewed surgeons shortly after the multi-centre, pragm...

  2. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available ... In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks and Benefits Terms to Know Finding a Clinical Trial Informed ... for more information Scientists usually do years of experiments in the laboratory and in animals before they even consider testing an experimental treatment ...

  3. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available ... In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks and Benefits Terms to Know Finding a Clinical Trial Informed ... years of experiments in the laboratory and in animals before they even ... this early research occurs at universities and medical centers across the ...

  4. Which treatment for low back pain? A factorial randomised controlled trial comparing intravenous analgesics with oral analgesics in the emergency department and a centrally acting muscle relaxant with placebo over three days [ISRCTN09719705

    Koreny Maria

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About two thirds of adults suffer from backpain at some time during their life. In the emergency room many patients with acute back pain are treated with intravenous non-steroidal analgesics. Whether this treatment is superior to oral administration of non-steroidal analgesics is unknown. Intravenous administration, however, requires considerable amounts of resources and accounts for high workload in busy clinics. In the further course centrally acting muscle relaxants are prescribed but the effectiveness remains unclear. The objective of this study is on the one hand to compare the effectiveness of intravenous with oral non-steroidal analgesics for acute treatment and on the other hand to compare the effectiveness of a centrally active muscle relaxant with placebo given for three days after presentation to the ED (emergency department. Methods/Design This study is intended as a randomised controlled factorial trial mainly for two reasons: (1 the sequence of treatments resembles the actual proceedings in every-day clinical practice, which is important for the generalisability of the results and (2 this design allows to take interactions between the two sequential treatment strategies into account. There is a patient preference arm included because patients preference is an important issue providing valuable information: (1 it allows to assess the interaction between desired treatment and outcome, (2 results can be extrapolated to a wider group while (3 conserving the advantages of a fully randomised controlled trial. Conclusion We hope to shed more light on the effectiveness of treatment modalities available for acute low back pain.

  5. Onset of efficacy with acute long-acting injectable paliperidone palmitate treatment in markedly to severely ill patients with schizophrenia: post hoc analysis of a randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    2011-01-01

    Background This post hoc analysis (trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00590577) assessed onset of efficacy and tolerability of acute treatment with once-monthly paliperidone palmitate (PP), a long-acting atypical antipsychotic initiated by day 1 and day 8 injections, in a markedly to severely ill schizophrenia population. Methods Subjects entering the 13-week, double-blind trial were randomized to PP (39, 156, or 234 mg [25, 100, and 150 mg eq of paliperidone, respectively]) or placebo. This subgroup analysis included those with a baseline Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (CGI-S) score indicating marked to severe illness. PP subjects received a 234-mg day 1 injection (deltoid), followed by their assigned dose on day 8 and monthly thereafter (deltoid or gluteal). Thus, data for PP groups were pooled for days 4 and 8. Measures included Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), CGI-S, Personal and Social Performance (PSP), and adverse events (AEs). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and last-observation-carried-forward (LOCF) methodologies, without multiplicity adjustments, were used to assess changes in continuous measures. Onset of efficacy was defined as the first time point a treatment group showed significant PANSS improvement (assessed days 4, 8, 22, 36, 64, and 92) versus placebo, which was maintained through end point. Results A total of 312 subjects met inclusion criterion for this subgroup analysis. After the day 1 injection, mean PANSS total scores improved significantly with PP (all received 234 mg) versus placebo at day 4 (P = 0.012) and day 8 (P = 0.007). After the day 8 injection, a significant PANSS improvement persisted at all subsequent time points in the 234-mg group versus placebo (P < 0.05). PANSS improvements were greater from day 36 through end point in the 156-mg group (P < 0.05) and only at end point in the 39-mg group (P < 0.05). CGI-S and PSP scores improved significantly in the 234-mg and 156-mg PP groups versus placebo at end

  6. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available ... radiotherapy. Click for more information Scientists usually do years of experiments in the laboratory and in animals ... term side effects. This phase can last several years. A Phase III trial gathers more information about ...

  7. A balancing act: a phenomenological exploration of medical students' experiences of using mobile devices in the clinical setting

    Rashid-Doubell, F; Mohamed, S; Elmusharaf, K; O'Neill, C S

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to describe the experiences of senior students using mobile devices in a clinical setting while learning and interacting with clinical teachers, patients and each other, and to identify challenges that facilitated or impeded the use of such devices in the hospital. Design Interpretative phenomenology was chosen to guide our enquiry. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to examine the experiences of five senior medical students using mobile devices in the clinical setting. Setting and participants Senior medical students at an international medical school in the Middle East. Results Three main themes emerged from the data analysis: learning; professional identity and transitioning from student to doctor. The findings showed that using mobile devices in the clinical area as a learning tool was not a formalised process. Rather, it was opportunistic learning at the bedside and on occasion a source of distraction from clinical teaching. Students needed to negotiate relationships between themselves, the clinical teacher and patients in order to ensure that they maintained an acceptable professional image. Participants experienced and negotiated the change from student to doctor making them mindful of using their devices at the bedside. Conclusions Mobile devices are part of daily life for a medical student and there is a need to adapt medical education in the clinical setting, to allow the students to use their devices in a sensitive manner. PMID:27142860

  8. Challenges of maintaining research protocol fidelity in a clinical care setting: A qualitative study of the experiences and views of patients and staff participating in a randomized controlled trial

    Farmer Andrew J

    2011-05-01

    align it with their clinical practices and experiences. Conclusions To understand trial findings, foster attainment of endpoints, and promote protocol fidelity, it may be necessary to look beyond individual patient characteristics and experiences. Specifically, the context of trial delivery, the impact of staff involvement, and the difficulties staff may encounter in balancing competing 'clinical' and 'research' roles and responsibilities may need to be considered and addressed.

  9. Act local, think global: how the Malawi experience of scaling up antiretroviral treatment has informed global policy.

    Harries, Anthony D; Ford, Nathan; Jahn, Andreas; Schouten, Erik J; Libamba, Edwin; Chimbwandira, Frank; Maher, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    The scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Malawi was based on a public health approach adapted to its resource-poor setting, with principles and practices borrowed from the successful tuberculosis control framework. From 2004 to 2015, the number of new patients started on ART increased from about 3000 to over 820,000. Despite being a small country, Malawi has made a significant contribution to the 15 million people globally on ART and has also contributed policy and service delivery innovations that have supported international guidelines and scale up in other countries. The first set of global guidelines for scaling up ART released by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2002 focused on providing clinical guidance. In Malawi, the ART guidelines adopted from the outset a more operational and programmatic approach with recommendations on health systems and services that were needed to deliver HIV treatment to affected populations. Seven years after the start of national scale-up, Malawi launched a new strategy offering all HIV-infected pregnant women lifelong ART regardless of the CD4-cell count, named Option B+. This strategy was subsequently incorporated into a WHO programmatic guide in 2012 and WHO ART guidelines in 2013, and has since then been adopted by the majority of countries worldwide. In conclusion, the Malawi experience of ART scale-up has become a blueprint for a public health response to HIV and has informed international efforts to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030. PMID:27600800

  10. Fractionated BNCT for locally recurrent head and neck cancer: Experience from a phase I/II clinical trial at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor

    To introduce our experience of treating locally and regionally recurrent head and neck cancer patients with BNCT at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor in Taiwan, 12 patients (M/F=10/2, median age 55.5 Y/O) were enrolled and 11 received two fractions of treatment. Fractionated BNCT at 30-day interval with adaptive planning according to changed T/N ratios was feasible, effective and safe for selected recurrent head and neck cancer in this trial. - Highlights: • We treated 12 patients with recurrent Head and Neck (H and N) cancer after radical surgery and radiotherapy since 2010. • Four complete response (CR) and 3 partial response (PR) were found. Total response rate was 58%. • Two patients had local control longer than one year. • No grade 4 or higher toxicity was noted for both acute and chronic effects

  11. Experiences with the realisation of a multimedial computer-aided instruction for acting persons from external companies and institutions according the German radiation protection ordinance

    At the Rossendorf location persons from external companies and institutions are acting in the scope of the decommissioning of the nuclear facilities. In addition to an individual monitoring in radiation protection an instruction is required for those persons before starting the work. The aim of this instruction is to give among important directives the actual facts about the location an their facilities. A system with particular selecting components seems to be the best solution with regard to effectiveness and available knowledge. The instruction takes place with a computer-added multimedia presentation. In the present paper should be presented in a short view the contents of the components and first experiences in handling this instruction. (orig.)

  12. Does it matter if clinicians recruiting for a trial don't understand what the trial is really about? Qualitative study of surgeons' experiences of participation in a pragmatic multi-centre RCT

    Snowdon Claire

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Qualitative methods are increasingly used to study the process of clinical trials and patients understanding of the rationale for trials, randomisation and reasons for taking part or refusing. Patients' understandings are inevitably influenced by the recruiting clinician's understanding of the trial, yet relatively little qualitative work has explored clinicians' perceptions and understandings of trials. This study interviewed surgeons shortly after the multi-centre, pragmatic RCT in which they had participated had been completed. Methods We used in-depth interviews with surgeons who participated in the Spine Stabilisation Trial (a pragmatic RCT to explore their understanding of the trial purpose and how this understanding had influenced their recruitment procedures and interpretation of the results. A purposive sample of eleven participating surgeons was chosen from 8 of the 15 UK trial centres. Results Although the surgeons thought that the trial was addressing an important question there was little agreement about what this question was: although it was a trial of 'equivalent' treatments, some thought that it was a trial of surgery, others a trial of rehabilitation and others that it was exploring what to do with patients in whom all other treatment options had been unsuccessful. The surgeons we interviewed were not aware of the rationale for the pragmatic inclusion criteria and nearly all were completely baffled about the meaning of 'equipoise'. Misunderstandings about the entry criteria were an important source of confusion about the results and led to reluctance to apply the results to their own practice. Conclusion The study suggests several lessons for the conduct of future multi-centre trials. Recruiting surgeons (and other clinicians may not be familiar with the rationale for pragmatic designs and may need to be regularly reminded about the purpose during the study. Reassurance may be necessary that a pragmatic

  13. Clinical Trials

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

  14. Results availability for analgesic device, complex regional pain syndrome, and post-stroke pain trials: comparing the RReADS, RReACT, and RReMiT databases

    Dufka, Faustine L.; Munch, Troels; Dworkin, Robert H.; Rowbotham, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Evidence-based medicine rests on the assumption that treatment recommendations are robust, free from bias, and include results of all randomized clinical trials. The Repository of Registered Analgesic Clinical Trials search and analysis methodology was applied to create databases of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and central post-stroke pain (CPSP) trials and adapted to create the Repository of Registered Analgesic Device Studies databases for trials of spinal cord stimulation (SCS), repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). We identified 34 CRPS trials, 18 CPSP trials, 72 trials of SCS, and 92 trials of rTMS/tDCS. Irrespective of time since study completion, 45% of eligible CRPS and CPSP trials and 46% of eligible SCS and rTMS/tDCS trials had available results (peer-reviewed literature, results entered on registry, or gray literature); peer-reviewed publications could be found for 38% and 39%, respectively. Examining almost 1000 trials across a spectrum of painful disorders (fibromyalgia, diabetic painful neuropathy, post-herpetic neuralgia, migraine, CRPS, CPSP) and types of treatment, no single study characteristic consistently predicts unavailability of results. Results availability is higher 12 months after study completion but remains below 60% for peer-reviewed publications. Recommendations to increase results availability include supporting organizations advocating for transparency, enforcing existing results reporting regulations, enabling all primary registries to post results, stating trial registration numbers in all publication abstracts, and reducing barriers to publishing “negative” trials. For all diseases and treatment modalities, evidence-based medicine must rigorously adjust for the sheer magnitude of missing results in formulating treatment recommendations. PMID:25599303

  15. Experience with the functional assessment of cancer therapy-lung (FACT-L) in ECOG 4593, a phase II hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy (HART) trial

    PURPOSE: To gain experience in measuring quality of life (QOL) using the FACT-L in patients (pt) with non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with an altered fractionation regimen, HART, in a Phase II, multiinstitutional ECOG trial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Version 2 of FACT-L, with 43 questions in 6 subscale categories (8 physical well-being, 8 social/family well-being, 3 relationship with doctor, 6 emotional well-being, 8 functional well-being, 10 lung cancer symptoms), available in English, Spanish and French, was administered by data managers and filled out by pts, independent of physician presence or input. The HART trial enrolled 30 pts, and FACT-L was administered at baseline (tp 1), treatment completion (tp 2) and 4 weeks following therapy (tp 3). (35(43)) FACT-L items were designed to yield a total QOL score with higher values reflective of better QOL; in addition, a FACT-L trial outcome index (TOI) was computed (TOI = physical score + functional score + lung cancer related score), and is considered the most relevant clinical QOL measure. RESULTS: The FACT-L completion rates were: tp 1 - (30(30)) (100%), tp 2 - (29(30)) (97%) and tp 3 - (24(30)) (80%); the mean scores at various time points are summarized in the table below and indicate that FACT-L is responsive to changes over time. The differences in subscales and total scores can be used as a measure of change in QOL resulting from treatment; statistically significant change was noted from baseline to tp 2 for physical, emotional and functional well-being; and from baseline to tp 3 for emotional well-being. The change in TOI score was also evaluated as a function of response and toxicity grade, and no clear association emerged. When assessed as a function of survival (at the time of this analysis, (5(30)) pt were alive, with median survival of 56 weeks), the degradation in QOL was most severe for pt who died early; the mean change in TOI from baseline to tp 3 for pt dying in the first 25 weeks, 25

  16. Rhythm experience and Africana culture trial (REACT!): A culturally salient intervention to promote neurocognitive health, mood, and well-being in older African Americans.

    Lukach, Alexis J; Jedrziewski, M Kathryn; Grove, George A; Mechanic-Hamilton, Dawn J; Williams, Shardae S; Wollam, Mariegold E; Erickson, Kirk I

    2016-05-01

    The Rhythm Experience and Africana Culture Trial (REACT!) is a multi-site randomized controlled intervention study designed to examine the efficacy of using African Dance as a form of moderate-intensity physical activity to improve cognitive function in older African Americans. African Americans are almost two times more likely than Caucasians to experience cognitive impairment in late adulthood. This increased risk may be attributed to lower level and quality of education, lower socioeconomic status, and higher prevalence of vascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and obesity, all of which are recognized as risk factors for dementia. Fortunately, interventions targeting cardiovascular health (i.e., physical activity) are associated with improved neurocognitive function and a reduced risk for dementia, so African Americans may be particularly suited for interventions targeting cardiovascular health and cognitive function. Here, we describe a randomized intervention protocol for increasing physical activity in older (65-75years) African Americans. Participants (n=80) at two study locations will be randomized into one of two groups. The treatment group will participate in African Dance three times per week for six months and the control group will receive educational training on Africana history and culture, as well as information about health behaviors, three times per week for six months. If successful, the REACT! study may transform community interventions and serve as a platform and model for testing other populations, age groups, and health outcomes, potentially identifying novel and creative methods for reducing or eliminating health disparities. PMID:27033674

  17. Lumacaftor alone and combined with ivacaftor: preclinical and clinical trial experience of F508del CFTR correction.

    Brewington, John J; McPhail, Gary L; Clancy, John P

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR), leading to significant morbidity and mortality. CFTR is a chloride and bicarbonate channel at the epithelial cell membrane. The most common CFTR mutation is F508del, resulting in minimal CFTR at the plasma membrane. Current disease management is supportive, whereas an ultimate goal is to develop therapies to restore CFTR activity. We summarize experience with lumacaftor, a small molecule that increases F508del-CFTR levels at the plasma membrane. Lumacaftor in combination with ivacaftor, a modulator of CFTR gating defects, improves clinical outcome measures in patients homozygous for the F508del mutation. Lumacaftor represents a significant advancement in the treatment of biochemical abnormalities in CF. Further development of CFTR modulators will improve upon current therapies, although it remains unclear whether this approach will provide therapies for all CFTR mutations. PMID:26581802

  18. Design and Experiment of FBG-Based Icing Monitoring on Overhead Transmission Lines with an Improvement Trial for Windy Weather

    Min Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A scheme for monitoring icing on overhead transmission lines with fiber Bragg grating (FBG strain sensors is designed and evaluated both theoretically and experimentally. The influences of temperature and wind are considered. The results of field experiments using simulated ice loading on windless days indicate that the scheme is capable of monitoring the icing thickness within 0–30 mm with an accuracy of ±1 mm, a load cell error of 0.0308v, a repeatability error of 0.3328v and a hysteresis error is 0.026%. To improve the measurement during windy weather, a correction factor is added to the effective gravity acceleration, and the absolute FBG strain is replaced by its statistical average.

  19. ACT Test

    ... ACT. It is important to evaluate how the person is responding to this ACT lower limit and to the amount of heparin ... to determine someone's heparin anticoagulant requirements, stabilize the person, and then change the monitoring tool. The ACT may be influenced by a person's platelet count ...

  20. Metabolic changes during a field experiment in a world-class windsurfing athlete: a trial with multivariate analyses.

    Resende, Nathália Maria; de Magalhães Neto, Anibal Monteiro; Bachini, Flávio; de Castro, Luis Eduardo Viveiros; Bassini, Adriana; Cameron, L C

    2011-10-01

    Physical exercise affects hematological equilibrium and metabolism. This study evaluated the biochemical and hematological responses of a male world-class athlete in sailing who is ranked among the top athletes on the official ISAF ranking list of windsurfing, class RS:X. The results describe the metabolic adaptations of this athlete in response to exercise in two training situations: the first when the athlete was using the usual training and dietary protocol, and the second following training and nutritional interventions based on a careful analysis of his diet and metabolic changes measured in a simulated competition. The intervention protocol for this study consisted of a 3-month facility-based program using neuromuscular training (NT), aerobic training (AT), and nutritional changes to promote anabolism and correct micronutrient malnutrition. Nutritional and training intervention produced an increase in the plasma availability of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), aromatic amino acids (AAAs), alanine, glutamate, and glutamine during exercise. Both training and nutritional interventions reduced ammonemia, uricemia, and uremia. In addition, we are able to correct a significant drop in potassium levels during races by correct supplementation. Due to the uniqueness of this experiment, these results may not apply to other windsurfers, but we nonetheless had the opportunity to characterize the metabolic adaptations of this athlete. We also proposed the importance of in-field metabolic analyses to the understanding, support, and training of world-class elite athletes. PMID:21978397

  1. ACTS 2014

    Co-curator of ACTS 2014 together with Rasmus Holmboe, Judith Schwarzbart and Sanne Kofoed. ACTS is the Museum of Contemporary Art’s international bi-annual festival. ACTS was established in 2011 and, while the primary focus is on sound and performance art, it also looks toward socially oriented art....... For the 2014 festival, the museum has entered into a collaboration with the Department for Performance Design at Roskilde University – with continued focus on sound and performance art, and social art in public spaces. With ACTS, art moves out of its usual exhibition space and instead utilizes the...... city, its various possibilities and public spaces as a stage. ACTS takes place in and around the museum and diverse locations in Roskilde city. ACTS is partly curated by the museum staff and partly by guest curators. ACTS 2014 is supported by Nordea-fonden and is a part of the project The Museum goes...

  2. Biochar: from laboratory mechanisms through the greenhouse to field trials

    Masiello, C. A.; Gao, X.; Dugan, B.; Silberg, J. J.; Zygourakis, K.; Alvarez, P. J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The biochar community is excellent at pointing to individual cases where biochar amendment has changed soil properties, with some studies showing significant improvements in crop yields, reduction in nutrient export, and remediation of pollutants. However, many studies exist which do not show improvements, and in some cases, studies clearly show detrimental outcomes. The next, crucial step in biochar science and engineering research will be to develop a process-based understanding of how biochar acts to improve soil properties. In particular, we need a better mechanistic understanding of how biochar sorbs and desorbs contaminants, how it interacts with soil water, and how it interacts with the soil microbial community. These mechanistic studies need to encompass processes that range from the nanometer to the kilometer scale. At the nanometer scale, we need a predictive model of how biochar will sorb and desorb hydrocarbons, nutrients, and toxic metals. At the micrometer scale we need models that explain biochar's effects on soil water, especially the plant-available fraction of soil water. The micrometer scale is also where mechanistic information is neeed about microbial processes. At the macroscale we need physical models to describe the landscape mobility of biochar, because biochar that washes away from fields can no longer provide crop benefits. To be most informative, biochar research should occur along a lab-greenhouse-field trial trajectory. Laboratory experiments should aim determine what mechanisms may act to control biochar-soil processes, and then greenhouse experiments can be used to test the significance of lab-derived mechanisms in short, highly replicated, controlled experiments. Once evidence of effect is determined from greenhouse experiments, field trials are merited. Field trials are the gold standard needed prior to full deployment, but results from field trials cannot be extrapolated to other field sites without the mechanistic backup provided

  3. Reasons Why Individuals Remain Uninsured Under the Affordable Care Act: Experiences of Patients at a Student-Run Free Clinic in Michigan, a Medicaid Expansion State.

    Desmond, Brian S; Laux, Molly A; Levin, Carolyn C; Huang, Jiaxin; Williams, Brent C

    2016-04-01

    Since the enactment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), many people remain uninsured. While studies have examined this population, few have explored patients' experiences seeking insurance. To elucidate these individuals' perspectives, we surveyed patients (n = 80) at the University of Michigan Student-Run Free Clinic concerning their activity accessing insurance. Over half of respondents had sought insurance in the past 6 months; 57 % of respondents qualified for Medicaid by self-reported income (≤138 % FPL) and all but one were eligible for tax credits on the Health Insurance Marketplace. However, only 35 % of apparently Medicaid-eligible respondents had recently applied. There was no significant difference in the rate of applying for those above the income cutoff (p = 0.901). Perceived expense of plans and belief of ineligibility for Medicaid discouraged respondents from actively seeking insurance. Personalized outreach emphasizing new Medicaid eligibility requirements and tax credits may be needed to facilitate Medicaid enrollment for some uninsured persons under the ACA. PMID:26512012

  4. Scalable and Cost-Effective Assignment of Mobile Crowdsensing Tasks Based on Profiling Trends and Prediction: The ParticipAct Living Lab Experience.

    Bellavista, Paolo; Corradi, Antonio; Foschini, Luca; Ianniello, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, sensor-rich smartphones potentially enable the harvesting of huge amounts of valuable sensing data in urban environments, by opportunistically involving citizens to play the role of mobile virtual sensors to cover Smart City areas of interest. This paper proposes an in-depth study of the challenging technical issues related to the efficient assignment of Mobile Crowd Sensing (MCS) data collection tasks to volunteers in a crowdsensing campaign. In particular, the paper originally describes how to increase the effectiveness of the proposed sensing campaigns through the inclusion of several new facilities, including accurate participant selection algorithms able to profile and predict user mobility patterns, gaming techniques, and timely geo-notification. The reported results show the feasibility of exploiting profiling trends/prediction techniques from volunteers' behavior; moreover, they quantitatively compare different MCS task assignment strategies based on large-scale and real MCS data campaigns run in the ParticipAct living lab, an ongoing MCS real-world experiment that involved more than 170 students of the University of Bologna for more than one year. PMID:26263985

  5. Scalable and Cost-Effective Assignment of Mobile Crowdsensing Tasks Based on Profiling Trends and Prediction: The ParticipAct Living Lab Experience

    Paolo Bellavista

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, sensor-rich smartphones potentially enable the harvesting of huge amounts of valuable sensing data in urban environments, by opportunistically involving citizens to play the role of mobile virtual sensors to cover Smart City areas of interest. This paper proposes an in-depth study of the challenging technical issues related to the efficient assignment of Mobile Crowd Sensing (MCS data collection tasks to volunteers in a crowdsensing campaign. In particular, the paper originally describes how to increase the effectiveness of the proposed sensing campaigns through the inclusion of several new facilities, including accurate participant selection algorithms able to profile and predict user mobility patterns, gaming techniques, and timely geo-notification. The reported results show the feasibility of exploiting profiling trends/prediction techniques from volunteers’ behavior; moreover, they quantitatively compare different MCS task assignment strategies based on large-scale and real MCS data campaigns run in the ParticipAct living lab, an ongoing MCS real-world experiment that involved more than 170 students of the University of Bologna for more than one year.

  6. Adubação do algodoeiro: XV- ensaios com vários adubos nitrogenados Fertilizer experiments with cotton: XV - trials with various nitrogenous fertilizers

    Milton G. Fuzatto

    1965-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo são relatados os resultados de 12 ensaios, instalados em vários tipos de solo do Estado de São Paulo, para comparar o efeito de diferentes adubos azotados na cultura algodoeira. Salitre do Chile, nitrato de cal IG e Calnitro IG, aplicados no sulco de plantio juntamente com fósforo e potássio, não diferiram substancialmente. Apenas Urecal IG se mostrou menos eficiente. Aplicados em cobertura aos 30 dias após a germinação, o salitre do Chile, sulfato dc amônio e Nitrocálcio tiveram comportamento semelhante, mas a uréia se mostrou levemente inferior.In this paper are reported the results obtained in twelve experiments comparing various nitrogen sources as mineral fertilizers for cotton. Experiments were conducted for some years, located at different soil types used for cotton in the State of São Paulo. When applying Chilean nitrate, Calnitro IG. nitrato de cal IG and Urecal IG in the furrows together with phosphorus and potassium, the effects obtained were practically the same, except for Urecal IG which showed minor response. With exception of Chilean nitrate, these fertilisers are no more used by farmers presently. In another series of trials Chilean nitrate, ammonium sulphate, Nitrocalcio (ammonium nitrate + calcium carbonate and urea were applied as dressing after 30 days of planting time. These treatments had about the same results; however treatment with urea had a lower effect.

  7. Fundamentals of clinical trials

    Friedman, Lawrence M; DeMets, David L; Reboussin, David M; Granger, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    This is the fifth edition of a very successful textbook on clinical trials methodology, written by recognized leaders who have long and extensive experience in all areas of clinical trials. The three authors of the first four editions have been joined by two others who add great expertise.  Most chapters have been revised considerably from the fourth edition.  A chapter on regulatory issues has been included and the chapter on data monitoring has been split into two and expanded.  Many contemporary clinical trial examples have been added.  There is much new material on adverse events, adherence, issues in analysis, electronic data, data sharing, and international trials.  This book is intended for the clinical researcher who is interested in designing a clinical trial and developing a protocol. It is also of value to researchers and practitioners who must critically evaluate the literature of published clinical trials and assess the merits of each trial and the implications for the care and treatment of ...

  8. The integration of the treatment for common mental disorders in primary care: experiences of health care providers in the MANAS trial in Goa, India

    Kirkwood Betty R

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MANAS trial reported that a Lay Health Counsellor (LHC led collaborative stepped care intervention (the "MANAS intervention" for Common Mental Disorders (CMD was effective in public sector primary care clinics but private sector General Practitioners (GPs did as well with or without the additional counsellor. This paper aims to describe the experiences of integrating the MANAS intervention in primary care. Methods Qualitative semi-structured interviews with key members (n = 119 of the primary health care teams upon completion of the trial and additional interviews with control arm GPs upon completion of the outcome analyses which revealed non-inferiority of this arm. Results Several components of the MANAS intervention were reported to have been critically important for facilitating integration, notably: screening and the categorization of the severity of CMD; provision of psychosocial treatments and adherence management; and the support of the visiting psychiatrist. Non-adherence was common, often because symptoms had been controlled or because of doubt that health care interventions could address one's 'life difficulties'. Interpersonal therapy was intended to be provided face to face by the LHC; however it could not be delivered for most eligible patients due to the cost implications related to travel to the clinic and the time lost from work. The LHCs had particular difficulty in working with patients with extreme social difficulties or alcohol related problems, and elderly patients, as the intervention seemed unable to address their specific needs. The control arm GPs adopted practices similar to the principles of the MANAS intervention; GPs routinely diagnosed CMD and provided psychoeducation, advice on life style changes and problem solving, prescribed antidepressants, and referred to specialists as appropriate. Conclusion The key factors which enhance the acceptability and integration of a LHC in primary care are

  9. Sôbre a necessidade de fileiras de bordadura, em experiências de campo On the need of using guard rows in varietal trials

    Hermano Vaz de Arruda

    1959-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho é apresentado um método de pesquisar a necessidade de fileiras de bordaduras, num ensaio de variedades de feijão. O método baseou-se na concordância das análises parciais (fileiras úteis e fileiras de bordaduras com a análise do total (úteis mais bordaduras, verificada através dos valores de F e dos coeficientes de variação. A concordância das três análises, para os citados valores, indica uma correlação entre as produções das fileiras centrais e de bordaduras e, portanto, a dispensa destas últimas. Como complemento da análise anterior aplicou-se a análise da covariância, considerando x a produção das fileiras de bordadura e y a das fileiras centrais. Com base nesta análise calcularam-se os coeficientes de correlação entre as médias das variedades e dentro das variedades. Ambos foram altamente significativos, indicando alta correlação entre as produções parciais (fileiras úteis e de bordaduras, já deduzidas pela primeira análise. Conclui-se que o uso das fileiras de bordaduras em experiências de campo, principalmente nas de competição de variedades, só deve ser feito quando houver qualquer razão para se suspeitar da concorrência entre as linhas adjacentes dos diversos canteiros. Quando forem incluídas as fileiras de bordaduras, estas devem ser também colhidas para r em confronto com as fileiras internas ou úteis, decidir-se pela continuação de tal técnica experimental.A been variety trial was used by the author to investigate the problem as to whether or not it is necessary to use guard rows for this type of experiments. The inner rows and the guard rows of each plot of the experiment, were harvested separately and statistical analysis was carried out on their separate yields and also on that of the plot as a whole. A satisfactory agreement was found between the F values and the coefficients of variation for the inner rows, for the guard rows, and for the whole plot. An F

  10. ACT Internet-based vs face-to-face? A randomized controlled trial of two ways to deliver Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for depressive symptoms: an 18-month follow-up.

    Lappalainen, Päivi; Granlund, Anna; Siltanen, Sari; Ahonen, Suvi; Vitikainen, Minna; Tolvanen, Asko; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate two interventions based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for depressive symptoms: A face-to-face treatment (ACT group) was compared to a guided self-help treatment delivered via the Internet consisting of two assessment sessions (pre and post) and an ACT-based Internet program (iACT). Outpatients experiencing at least mild depressive symptoms were randomized to either approach. The iACT treatment group received access to an ACT-based Internet program and supportive web-based contact over a period of 6 weeks. The face-to-face group received ACT-based treatment once a week over the same period of time. In both groups, the results showed a significant effect on depression symptomatology, and general wellbeing after treatment and at the 18-month follow-up. However, the data indicated that the iACT group changed differently regarding depressive symptoms and wellbeing as compared to the face-to face ACT group. Results showed large pre-treatment to 18-month follow-up within-group effect sizes for all symptom measures in the iACT treatment group (1.59-2.08), and for most outcome measures in the face-to-face ACT group (1.12-1.37). This non-inferiority study provides evidence that guided Internet-delivered ACT intervention can be as effective as ACT-based face-to-face treatment for outpatients reporting depressive symptoms, and it may offer some advantages over a face-to-face intervention. PMID:25127179

  11. Market trials of irradiated chicken

    The potential market for irradiated chicken breasts was investigated using a mail survey and a retail trial. Results from the mail survey suggested a significantly higher level of acceptability of irradiated chicken than did the retail trial. A subsequent market experiment involving actual purchases showed levels of acceptability similar to that of the mail survey when similar information about food irradiation was provided

  12. Assessing the Impact of Community Engagement Interventions on Health Worker Motivation and Experiences with Clients in Primary Health Facilities in Ghana: A Randomized Cluster Trial

    Alhassan, Robert Kaba; Nketiah-Amponsah, Edward; Spieker, Nicole; Arhinful, Daniel Kojo; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Health worker density per 1000 population in Ghana is one of the lowest in the world estimated to be 2.3, below the global average of 9.3. Low health worker motivation induced by poor working conditions partly explain this challenge. Albeit the wage bill for public sector health workers is about 90% of domestic government expenditure on health in countries such as Ghana, staff motivation and performance output remain a challenge, suggesting the need to complement financial incentives with non-financial incentives through a community-based approach. In this study, a systematic community engagement (SCE) intervention was implemented to engage community groups in healthcare quality assessment to promote mutual collaboration between clients and healthcare providers, and enhance health worker motivation levels. SCE involves structured use of existing community groups and associations to assess healthcare quality in health facilities. Identified quality gaps are discussed with healthcare providers, improvements made and rewards given to best performing facilities for closing quality care gaps. Purpose To evaluate the effect of SCE interventions on health worker motivation and experiences with clients. Methods The study is a cluster randomized trial involving health workers in private (n = 38) and public (n = 26) primary healthcare facilities in two administrative regions in Ghana. Out of 324 clinical and non-clinical staff randomly interviewed at baseline, 234 (72%) were successfully followed at end-line and interviewed on workplace motivation factors and personal experiences with clients. Propensity score matching and difference-in-difference estimations were used to estimate treatment effect of the interventions on staff motivation. Results Intrinsic (non-financial) work incentives including cordiality with clients and perceived career prospects appeared to be prime sources of motivation for health staff interviewed in intervention health facilities while

  13. Adubação do milho: VII - Ensaios com torta de algodão Fertilizer experiments with corn: VII - Trials with cottonseed meal

    G. P. Viégas

    1956-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo são apresentados os resultados obtidos em dez ensaios - três dos quais repetidos, nos mesmos canteiros, por cinco, sete ou oito anos - visando investigar o efeito da torta de algodão empregada isoladamente ou em combinação com cinzas de café e farinha de ossos. Êsses ensaios foram realizados entre 1943-44 e 1951-52 e localizados em sete diferentes estações experimentais do Estado de São Paulo : Campinas, Capão Bonito, Jaú, Pindamonhangaba, Ribeirão Prêto, Santa Rita do Passa-Quatro e Sorocaba. Enquanto a farinha de ossos só aumentou significativamente a produção em Santa Rita, e as cinzas de café, em Santa Rita e Ribeirão Prêto, a torta de algodão provocou aumentos significativos em Santa Rita (dois ensaios, Ribeirão Prêto, Jaú e Campinas Nem sempre a torta deu os resultados esperados, para isso concorrendo, conforme o caso, a elevada fertilidade de algumas terras, o tempo e outros fatores desfavoráveis. Umfator, que em muitos casos contribuiu para diminuir o efeito da torta, foi a redução por ela causada no "stand". Na dose de 500 kg/ha, e completada com outros adubos, onde necessário, a torta de algodão mostrou ser ótima fonte de nutrientes para o milho, mas seu efeito é muito variável quando a aplicação é feita nos sulcos de plantio e no momento em que este é efetuado.In this paper are reported the results obtained in ten fertilizer experiments three of which repeated in the same plots during five, seven or eight seasons - to study the effect, on the corn crop, of cottonseed meal used alone or combined with bone meal or coffee bean ash. These trials were conducted between 1943-44 and 1951-52 and located at seven different agricultural experiment stations of the State of São Paulo. As a whole, the study indicates that, at the rate of about 500 kilograms to the hectare and supplemented where needed with other fertilizers, cottonseed meal is a good source of nutrients for corn, but results

  14. Japan nuclear ship sea trial

    The sea trial of the first Japan nuclear Ship 'MUTSU' was conducted from the end of October to December in 1990. The purpose of the sea trial was to verify the nuclear propulsive performances and maneuverabilities. The present report describes the results of the sea trial. These results are classified into four items: 1. Speed test and engineering performance tests 2. Maneuvering performance tests 3. Vibration tests 4. Other tests. Acceptable performances were demonstrated, as expected in the original design. The experience of the use of the Global Positioning System (GPS), which were newly adopted for the sea trial, is also reported. (author)

  15. Japan nuclear ship sea trial

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Toshikatus; Mizushima, Toshihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Mutsu, Aomori (Japan). Mutsu Establishment] [and others

    1992-01-01

    The sea trial of the first Japan nuclear Ship `MUTSU` was conducted from the end of October to December in 1990. The purpose of the sea trial was to verify the nuclear propulsive performances and maneuverabilities. The present report describes the results of the sea trial. These results are classified into four items: 1. Speed test and engineering performance tests 2. Maneuvering performance tests 3. Vibration tests 4. Other tests. Acceptable performances were demonstrated, as expected in the original design. The experience of the use of the Global Positioning System (GPS), which were newly adopted for the sea trial, is also reported. (author).

  16. Japan nuclear ship sea trial

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Toshikatus; Mizushima, Toshihiko (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Mutsu, Aomori (Japan). Mutsu Establishment) (and others)

    1992-01-01

    The sea trial of the first Japan nuclear Ship 'MUTSU' was conducted from the end of October to December in 1990. The purpose of the sea trial was to verify the nuclear propulsive performances and maneuverabilities. The present report describes the results of the sea trial. These results are classified into four items: 1. Speed test and engineering performance tests 2. Maneuvering performance tests 3. Vibration tests 4. Other tests. Acceptable performances were demonstrated, as expected in the original design. The experience of the use of the Global Positioning System (GPS), which were newly adopted for the sea trial, is also reported. (author).

  17. Adubação do algodoeiro: XII - Quatro experiências com N, P e K em terra - roxa Fertilizer experiments with cotton: XII- Trials with N, P, and K on "terra-roxa" soils

    W. Schmidt

    1962-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho são relatados os resultados de quatro experiências de adubação do algodoeiro em terra-roxa, realizadas nos municípios de Araras, Avaré, Limeira e São Carlos. Tôdas foram instaladas em 1942-43. sendo que a de Araras foi conduzida por quatro anos nos mesmos canteiros. Em esquema fatorial 2x4x3, com seis repetições, foram comparados os níveis 0 e 15 kg/ha de N (salitre do Chile; 0, 30, 60 e 90 kg/ha de P2O5 (superfosfato simples; 0, 25 e 50 kg. ha de K2O (cloreto de potássio. Somente na experiência de Limeira, em solo repetidamente adubado com fósforo nas culturas anteriores, é que as respostas ao nitrogênio e ao potássio foram satisfatórias. Para a pequena reação a êsses elementos nas outras localidades parece terem concorrido a pobreza dos solos em fósforo e o método de aplicação dos adubos: nos sulcos de plantio, ao ser êste efetuado. Em contraste, o efeito principal do fósforo, que foi de apenas + 13% em Limeira, ultrapassou +30% nas demais experiências. As respostas às doses de 30, 60 e 90 kg/ha de P2O5, corresponderam, respectivamente, a +62, +85 e +96% em Araras (médias dos quatro anos, +36, +39 e +48% em São Carlos. +36, +34 e +42% em Avaré e tão somente a +11, +16 e +12% em Limeira. Nesta localidade, o efeito do fósforo foi nulo, quando aplicado sòzinho, mas, em média das três doses, atingiu +18% na presença de nitrogênio + potássio. Nas outras experiências também se notou maior efeito do fósforo na presença dos outros nutrientes. Terminando, os autores sugerem uma revisão nas fórmulas de adubação destinadas às áreas repetidamente adubadas com fósforo.This paper reports the results of four trials located at Araras, Avaré, Limeira, and São Carlos, in the State of São Paulo, to study the effects of N, P and K on "terra-roxa" soils. The responses to N and K were satisfactory only in the Limeira experiment, located on an area repeatedly fertilized with phosphorus in the

  18. Adubação da batata-doce em São Paulo parte IV: experiências comparando formas de N, P e K Fertilizer experiments with sweet potatoes IV: trials with some N, P, and K sources

    A. Paes de Camargo

    1962-01-01

    Full Text Available De 1943-44 a 1945-46 realizaram-se seis experiências (três anuais, uma conduzida por dois e duas por três anos, em três localidades do Estado de São Paulo, para estudar o efeito, sôbre a batata-doce, de diversas formulas contendo sempre 60-100-40 kg/ha de N-P2O5-K2O, mas preparadas com diferentes adubos nitrogenados, fosfatados e potássicos. Em relação ao tratamento sem adubo, foram poucos os casos em que as adubações com NPK aumentaram substancialmente a produção. Nessas condições, superfosfato se mostrou ligeiramente superior à farinha de ossos e não se notou diferença entre cloreto de potássio e cinzas de café. Sulfato de amônio, que figurou na experiênca conduzida por dois anos, e torta de algodão, nas demais, em regra com portaram-se melhor do que salitre do Chile. Individualmente, as fórmulas mais eficientes foram as preparadas com superfosfato, cloreto de potássio e sulfato de amônio ou torta de algodão. Contudo, mesmo com estas, foi muito baixa a freqüência de resultados compensadores.Six experiments with sweet potatoes were located on two soil types of the State of São Paulo to study the effects of fertilizer mixtures prepared with different, N. P, and K sources, but containing always 60-100-40 kilograms of N-P(20(5-K(20 per hectare. The yield increases of fertilized over the unfertilized plots were satisfactory only in a few of the 11 annual results obtained. Under such poor conditions, superphosphate was slightly superior to bone meal and no difference was observed between coffee ashes and potassium chloride. Ammonium sulphate, in one, and cottonseed meal, in the other five trials, as a rule, were more efficient than Chilean nitrate. Individually, the mixtures prepared with superphosphate, potassium chloride, and ammonium sulphate or cottonseed meal gave the best results but even with them the frequency of satisfactory yield increases was very low.

  19. Book Act

    Kivland, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Book Act was a new project by AMBruno, initiated by Sophie Loss, in which artist book-makers performed and embodied the concept or essence of their books through the medium of film or performance. The exhibition at The Tetley, Leeds, comprised the originating books and corresponding video work, with live performances on Sunday 9 March 2014. Book Act took place during the 17th International Contemporary Artists' Book Fair (7th to 9th March) and the exhibition continued until 26th March 2014.

  20. Stroke Trials Registry

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions Sponsors ... a clinical trial near you Welcome to the Stroke Trials Registry Our registry of clinical trials in ...

  1. Visual scoring of non-cavitated caries lesions and clinical trial efficiency, testing xylitol in caries active adults

    Brown, JP; Amaechi, BT; Bader, JD; Gilbert, GH; Makhija, SK; Lozano-Pineda, J; Leo, MC; Chuhe, C; Vollmer, WM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To better understand the effectiveness of xylitol in caries prevention in adults, and to attempt improved clinical trial efficiency. Methods As part of the Xylitol for Adult Caries Trial (X-ACT), non-cavitated and cavitated caries lesions were assessed in subjects who were experiencing the disease. The trial was a test of the effectiveness of 5 grams/day of xylitol, consumed by dissolving in the mouth five 1 gram lozenges spaced across each day, compared with a sucralose placebo. For this analysis, seeking trial efficiency, 538 subjects aged 21–80, with complete data for four dental examinations were selected from the 691 randomized into the three year trial, conducted at three sites. Acceptable inter and intra examiner reliability before and during the trial was quantified using the kappa statistic. Results The mean annualized non-cavitated plus cavitated lesion transition scores in coronal and root surfaces, from sound to carious favoured xylitol over placebo, during the three cumulative periods of 12, 24, and 33 months, but these clinically and statistically non-significant differences declined in magnitude over time. Restricting the present assessment to those subjects with a higher baseline lifetime caries experience showed possible but inconsistent benefit. Conclusions There was no clear and clinically relevant preventive effect of xylitol on caries in adults with adequate fluoride exposure when non-cavitated plus cavitated lesions were assessed. This conformed to the X-ACT trial result assessing cavitated lesions. Including non-cavitated lesion assessment in this full scale, placebo controlled, multi site, randomized, double blinded clinical trial in adults experiencing dental caries, did not achieve added trial efficiency or demonstrate practical benefit of xylitol. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.Gov NCT00393055 PMID:24205951

  2. Comparison of published orthopaedic trauma trials following registration in Clinicaltrials.gov

    Gandhi Rajiv; Jan Meryam; Smith Holly N; Mahomed Nizar N; Bhandari Mohit

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background After the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997, the registration of all clinical trials became mandatory prior to publication. Our primary objective was to determine publication rates for orthopaedic trauma trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov. We further evaluated methodological consistency between registration and publication. Methods We searched Clinical Trials.gov for all trials related to orthopaedic trauma. We excluded active trials and trials ...

  3. Adubação do milho: VIII - Ensaios com estêrco e adubos minerais Fertilizer experiments with corn: VIII - Trials with farm manure and mineral fertilizers

    G. P. Viégas

    1956-01-01

    the results of experiments conducted during several years at three different sites of the State of São Paulo: Campinas, on terra roxa misturada soil; Ribeirão Prêto, on terra roxa legítima soil, and Engenheiro Hermilo, on glacial soil. In the Campinas experiment, beside other treatments, manure at the rate of 12.8 metric tons per hectare was compared with a mixture containing 30-90-70 kilograms per hectare of N, P2O5 and K2O respectively as sulfate of ammonia, bone meal (occasionally, superphosphate, and potash chloride, (and also with plots which received half the doses of minerals in addition to half the quantity of manure. The materials used and the rates of application per hectare in Ribeirão Prêto and Engenheiro Hermilo were: 10 metric tons of manure; 80 kilograms of P2O5 in the form of bone meal, and 50 kilograms of K2O as coffee bean ash. The asli supplied also 20 kilograms of P2O5. Each of these materials was used alone or in the possible combinations. At the three locations the manure and minerals were applied annually, before every corn crop. The results obtained in the Campinas experiment with each of the fertilizer treatments were excellent. With small differences, their effect increased in the order: minerals alone, manure alone, 1/2 manure + 1/2 minerals. At Ribeirão Prêto corn gave no response to phosphorus, whereas either manure or coffee bean ash increased considerably the yield. The combination manure-ash was not better than manure alone, showing that the potash content of the later was sufficient for the maximum yield under the conditions of the experiment. Here, manure acted principally as a potash fertilizer. At Engenheiro Hermilo potash did not affect the yield, but bone meal, as well as manure, brought out substantial increases. T increase due to the combination manure-bone meal corresponded to the addition of the increases caused by each material. Under the conditions of this experiment, on soil fairly supplied with organic matter and

  4. Therapeutic trials in digital osteoarthritis. A critical review.

    Trêves, R; Maheu, E; Dreiser, R L

    1995-06-01

    Although common, hand osteoarthritis is controversial and rarely used as a model for clinical trials in osteoarthritis. We found only 13 therapeutic trials conducted in digital or trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis between 1983 and 1994. Eleven of these trials were published. Seven were on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs given either per os (two trials, meclofenamate and ibuprofen) or percutaneously (one trial each on etofenamate, ibuprofen, and ketoprofen gel, and two trials on niflumic acid gel), three were on symptomatic slow-acting drugs (glycosaminoglycanes in two trials and chondroitin sulfate in one), and three were on miscellaneous agents (the muscle relaxant idrocilamide, as a gel; the antisubstance P agent capsaicin, also as a gel; and a spa treatment). We have reviewed the methodology and findings of these trials with the goal of determining the optimal approach to realize better standardized trials in the next future for identifying symptomatic slow-acting drugs and/or "chondroprotective" agents with beneficial effects in digital osteoarthritis. PMID:7583181

  5. Rapid Activation of Plasticity-Associated Gene Transcription in Hippocampal Neurons Provides a Mechanism for Encoding of One-Trial Experience

    Miyashita, T.; Kubík, Štěpán; Haghighi, N.; Steward, O.; Guzowski, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 4 (2009), s. 898-906. ISSN 0270-6474 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : hippocampus * one-trial learning * Arc Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 7.178, year: 2009

  6. Handbook for Sponsors; Standards and Procedures for Work-Training Experience Programs under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, as Amended.

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Bureau of Work-Training Programs.

    The standards and procedures presented establish the basic rules governing the development and operation of various programs administered by the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Work Programs under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, as amended. Basic standards relate to qualification of sponsors, eligibility of enrollees, hours of work,…

  7. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available ... treatment, screening, diagnostic, prevention, and supportive care trials. Treatment Trials In treatment trials, researchers may gather information about experimental treatments, ...

  8. Montelukast as Add-On Therapy with Inhaled Corticosteroids or Inhaled Corticosteroids and Long-Acting Beta-2-Agonists in the Management of Patients Diagnosed with Asthma and Concurrent Allergic Rhinitis (The RADAR Trial

    Paul K Keith

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of montelukast as add-on therapy for patients diagnosed with asthma and concurrent allergic rhinitis who remain uncontrolled while receiving inhaled corticosteroid (ICS monotherapy or ICS/long-acting beta-2-agonist (LABA therapy in a community practice setting.

  9. Combinations of long acting β2 agonists to tiotropium: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, active-drug controlled, parallel design academic clinical trial in moderate COPD male patients

    Mohammed Imran

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Study shows that tiotropium alone once a day is the evidence based and rationale pharmacotherapy in moderate COPD. There is no advantage or statistical significance of adding long acting β2 agonists (LABA such as formoterol to tiotropium either for 12 h (once daily or 24 h (twice daily.

  10. Experimenting with the Trial of a Research Data Audit: Some Preliminary Findings about Data Types, Access to Data and Factors for Long Term Preservation

    P. Polydoratou

    2009-01-01

    Developing systems and services for the effective and efficient management of research data as well as addressing issues around their long term curation is an area of increasing activity in UK Higher Education. This paper discusses some preliminary results from a questionnaire survey, conducted as part of the trial implementation of the Data Audit Framework Methodology at University College London (UCL). Fifty seven (57) academic and research staff from 5 designated departments and an interdi...

  11. Minimising bias in an un-masked, pragmatic rct comparing two treatment pathways for glaucoma by the use of decision support software - the light trial experience

    Gazzard, G; Zhu, H; Lewis, A.; Nathwani, N.

    2013-01-01

    ragmatic trials of treatment pathways can require patient awareness of treatment allocation in order to better represent clinical reality, for example when concordance with a treatment has an important effect on outcome. Conversely, masking of treating clinicians to allocation group can be impossible when full clinical assessment requires knowledge of the current treatments, resources do not permit separate teams for treatment and assessment or when such duplication of clinician contact might...

  12. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available Home > Health topics A-Z > Participating in Clinical Trials: About Clinical Trials In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks ... centers across the country. The National Institutes of Health funds much of this basic research. Screening Trials ...

  13. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available ... Usually, trial participants must show signs of the disease or condition before they can join this type of trial. Prevention Trials Click for more information In prevention trials, ...

  14. The CEO's second act.

    Nadler, David A

    2007-01-01

    When a CEO leaves because of performance problems, the company typically recruits someone thought to be better equipped to fix what the departing executive couldn't--or wouldn't. The board places its confidence in the new person because of the present dilemma's similarity to some previous challenge that he or she dealt with successfully. But familiar problems are inevitably succeeded by less familiar ones, for which the specially selected CEO is not quite so qualified. More often than not, the experiences, skills, and temperament that yielded triumph in Act I turn out to be unequal to Act II's difficulties. In fact, the approaches that worked so brilliantly in Act I may be the very opposite of what is needed in Act II. The CEO has four choices: refuse to change, in which case he or she will be replaced; realize that the next act requires new skills and learn them; downsize or circumscribe his or her role to compensate for deficiencies; or line up a successor who is qualified to fill a role to which the incumbent's skills and interests are no longer suited. Hewlett-Packard's Carly Fiorina exemplifies the first alternative; Merrill Lynch's Stanley O'Neal the second; Google's Sergey Brin and Larry Page the third; and Quest Diagnostics' Ken Freeman the fourth. All but the first option are reasonable responses to the challenges presented in the second acts of most CEOs' tenures. And all but the first require a power of observation, a propensity for introspection, and a strain of humility that are rare in the ranks of the very people who need those qualities most. There are four essential steps executives can take to discern that they have entered new territory and to respond accordingly: recognition that their leadership style and approach are no longer working; acceptance of others' advice on why performance is faltering; analysis and understanding of the nature of the Act II shift; and, finally, decision and action. PMID:17286076

  15. Open-Label Dose Optimization of Methylphenidate Modified Release Long Acting (MPH-LA): A Post Hoc Analysis of Real-Life Titration from a 40-Week Randomized Trial

    Huss, Michael; Ginsberg, Ylva; Arngrim, Torben; Philipsen, Alexandra; Carter, Katherine; Chen, Chien-Wei; Gandhi, Preetam; Kumar, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives In the management of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults it is important to recognize that individual patients respond to a wide range of methylphenidate doses. Studies with methylphenidate modified release long acting (MPH-LA) in children have reported the need for treatment optimization for improved outcomes. We report the results from a post hoc analysis of a 5-week dose optimization phase from a large randomized, placebo-controlled, multicen...

  16. How Experimental Trial Context Affects Perceptual Categorization

    Thomas J Palmeri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To understand object categorization, participants are tested in experiments often quite different from how people experience object categories in the real world. Learning and knowledge of categories is measured in discrete experimental trials, those trials may or may not provide feedback, trials appear one after another, after some fixed inter-trial interval, with hundreds of trials in a row, within experimental blocks with some structure dictated by the experimental design. In the real world, outside of certain educational and vocational contexts, opportunities to learn and use categories are intermixed over time with a whole multitude of intervening experiences. It is clear from any elementary understanding of human cognition that sequential effects matter, yet this understanding is often ignored, and categorization trials are often instead treated as independent events, immune to local trial context. In this perspective, we use some of our work to illustrate some of the consequences of the fact that categorization experiments have a particular trial structure. Experimental trial context can affect performance in category learning and categorization experiments in ways that can profoundly affect theoretical conclusions.

  17. Long-term prognosis in an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction population treated with routine primary percutaneous coronary intervention: from clinical trial to real-life experience

    Pedersen, Sune; Galatius, Soren; Mogelvang, Rasmus; Davidsen, Ulla; Galloe, Anders; Abildstrom, Steen Z; Abildgaard, Ulrik; Hansen, Peter Riis; Bech, Jan; Iversen, Allan; Jorgensen, Erik; Kelbaek, Henning; Saunamaki, Kari; Madsen, Jan Kyst; Jensen, Jan Skov

    2009-01-01

    patients admitted during office hours (hazards ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.8 to 1.5; P=0.81). Door-to-balloon times of less than 90 minutes were achieved in 60% among patients admitted directly to an invasive center but only in 40% among transferred patients (P<0.001). Despite this difference, no difference in...... the DANAMI-2 trial. Furthermore, we analyzed the impact of patient presentation to the angioplasty center during "off hours" (4 pm to 8 am plus weekends and holidays) and the impact of being referred from noninvasive hospitals. At 3 years, 20.4% in the routinely treated population versus 19.6% in the...... DANAMI-2 trial reached the combined end point of death, reinfarction, or stroke (P=0.68), whereas the all-cause mortality was 13.0% and 13.7%, respectively (P=0.65). Patients admitted during off hours had the same risk of reaching the combined end point of death, reinfarction, or stroke compared with...

  18. A Strategy Anthelmintic Control for Helminthoses of Sheep: Some Experiences in On-Farm Trials in Smallholder Farms in Central Kenya

    An on-farm in Kenya to evaluate the merits of a strategic drenching regime against the existing control measures showed that it was difficult to get statistically significant sample sizes within individual farms and that differences in farm management existed especially where animals are communally grazed. Consequently, production data were rendered difficult to analyse and interpret. Unlike in on-station trials, it was evident that the large number of smallholder farms (up to 80) that was required for realistic statistical comparisons conflicted with the limits of logistics and funding. The strategic treatment for gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep resulted in lower mean faecal egg counts in treated animals for most of the study period but overall, there was no significant effect of strategic treatment over the existing treatments on FEC, birth weight and growth rates in lambs. Possible approaches in future studies, could include use of clusters of smallholder farms that are far apart in different treatment groups. Commonly grazed flocks can either be excluded completely in such trials or if that method of grazing is predominant, entire village or cleary designated locations could be used in different treatment groups. Even with above, the use of production data (growth rate, off-take, mortality etc) need to be handled with great caution

  19. The rights of victims according to the criminal procedure act of Republic of Croatia - needs of the victim and practical experience from the perspective of the victim and witness support offices

    Hamer-Vidmar Nikica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is to analyze the provisions of the Criminal Procedure Act relating to the general rights of victims and the rights of victims of criminal offenses against sexual freedom and human trafficking. The goal was to determine the relationship between the statutory rights of the victims and their needs, as well as to analyze how the application of these rights affects the victim’s status, a sense of security and protection. Intention was to analyze whether the Act contributes to the prevention of retraumatization and revictimization of victims and if it increases confidence in the judicial system. These effects can be achieved primarily by timely informing victims about their rights, and then by providing those rights in the practice. The analysis made is based on the experience of officials from Victims and Witnesses Support Offices. The purpose of this paper is to promote the implementation of the rights that victims have according the Criminal Procedure Act in order to enable their wellbeing.

  20. Lessons and implications from a mass immunization campaign in squatter settlements of Karachi, Pakistan: an experience from a cluster-randomized double-blinded vaccine trial [NCT00125047

    Abu-Elyazeed Remon

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To determine the safety and logistic feasibility of a mass immunization strategy outside the local immunization program in the pediatric population of urban squatter settlements in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods A cluster-randomized double blind preventive trial was launched in August 2003 in 60 geographic clusters covering 21,059 children ages 2 to 16 years. After consent was obtained from parents or guardians, eligible children were immunized parenterally at vaccination posts in each cluster with Vi polysaccharide or hepatitis A vaccine. Safety, logistics, and standards were monitored and documented. Results The vaccine coverage of the population was 74% and was higher in those under age 10 years. No life-threatening serious adverse events were reported. Adverse events occurred in less than 1% of all vaccine recipients and the main reactions reported were fever and local pain. The proportion of adverse events in Vi polysaccharide and hepatitis A recipients will not be known until the end of the trial when the code is broken. Throughout the vaccination campaign safe injection practices were maintained and the cold chain was not interrupted. Mass vaccination in slums had good acceptance. Because populations in such areas are highly mobile, settlement conditions could affect coverage. Systemic reactions were uncommon and local reactions were mild and transient. Close community involvement was pivotal for information dissemination and immunization coverage. Conclusion This vaccine strategy described together with other information that will soon be available in the area (cost/effectiveness, vaccine delivery costs, etc will make typhoid fever control become a reality in the near future.

  1. Effects of a long-acting formulation of octreotide on renal function and renal sodium handling in cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension: a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial

    Ottesen, LH; Aagaard, N K; Kiszka-Kanowitz, M;

    2001-01-01

    Octreotide seems to have a beneficial effect on variceal bleeding, and long-term administration for the prevention of rebleeding is currently being evaluated. Experimental studies have suggested a beneficial effect of chronic octreotide treatment on renal function, while clinical studies have shown...... variable effects. Twenty-five cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension were randomized in a double-blind design to placebo or a single subcutaneous dose of a long-acting formulation of octreotide (octreotide-LAR) (20 mg). Renal function tests were performed before dosing and repeated after 30 days. The...... octreotide along with a reduction of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) (P <.01) and an increase of IGF binding protein 1 (P <.05) were demonstrated. No effect of octreotide was observed on GFR, ERPF, or filtration fraction (GFR/ERPF). Changes in clearance and extraction fraction of sodium and lithium...

  2. How Do Clinical Trials Work?

    ... Trials Clinical Trial Websites How Do Clinical Trials Work? If you take part in a clinical trial, ... kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial is led by a principal investigator ( ...

  3. Impact of sending email reminders of the legal requirement for posting results on ClinicalTrials.gov: cohort embedded pragmatic randomized controlled trial

    Maruani, Annabel; Boutron, Isabelle; Baron, Gabriel; Ravaud, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of sending an email to responsible parties of completed trials that do not comply with the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act 801 legislation, to remind them of the legal requirement to post results. Design Cohort embedded pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Setting Trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov. Participants 190 out of 379 trials randomly selected by computer generated randomization list to receive the intervention (personalized emails s...

  4. “Mind the Gap”—The Impact of Variations in the Duration of the Treatment Gap and Overall Treatment Time in the First UK Anal Cancer Trial (ACT I)

    Purpose: The United Kingdom Coordinating Committee on Cancer Research anal cancer trial demonstrated the benefit of combined modality treatment (CMT) using radiotherapy (RT), infusional 5-fluorouracil, and mitomycin C over RT alone. The present study retrospectively examines the impact of the recommended 6-week treatment gap and local RT boost on long-term outcome. Methods and Materials: A total of 577 patients were randomly assigned RT alone or CMT. After a 6-week gap responders received a boost using either additional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (15 Gy) or iridium-192 implant (25 Gy). The effect of boost, the gap between initial treatment (RT alone or CMT) and boost (Tgap), and overall treatment time (OTT) were examined for their impact on outcome. Results: Among the 490 good responders, 436 (89%) patients received a boost after initial treatment. For boosted patients, the risk of anal cancer death decreased by 38% (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.62, 99% CI 0.35–1.12; p = 0.04), but there was no evidence this was mediated via a reduction in locoregional failure (LRF) (HR: 0.90, 99% CI 0.48–1.68; p = 0.66). The difference in Tgap was only 1.4 days longer for EBRT boost, compared with implant (p = 0.51). OTT was longer by 6.1 days for EBRT (p = 0.006). Tgap and OTT were not associated with LRF. Radionecrosis was reported in 8% of boosted, compared with 0% in unboosted patients (p = 0.03). Conclusions: These results question the benefit of a radiotherapy boost after a 6-week gap. The higher doses of a boost may contribute more to an increased risk of late morbidity, rather than local control.

  5. The Installation Restoration Program: Three years of experience in the Department of Defense CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) program

    The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) Support Contractor Office plays a major role in the Department of Defense (DOD) Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The IRP is DOD's program for identifying past disposal sites and for eliminating hazards to public health and the environment. Since 1986, HAZWRAP has conducted a variety of projects for the US Air Force and Navy at the request of the Department of Energy (DOE). This paper discusses HAZWRAP's involvement in the IRP, some of the lessons learned during the course of this relationship, and initiatives that are being taken to remove sites from the IRP. The DOE may have an interest in HAZWRAP's experiences with the IRP in planning for its equivalent program

  6. Performance trial experience with Danieli new-generation eddy-current surface inspection system for wire rod mill: the equipment and the results at TRM, Rotherham, England

    Battistutto, R. [Instruments and Special Devices Dept. (UTP), Carlo Toso, Danieli Automation, Buttrio, Udine (Italy)

    1999-07-01

    Production flexibility and product quality are key subjects that can significantly influence the competitiveness of a steel-making company; recently, they can even affect its profitable permanence on the market. Danieli Automation, thanks to 25-year experience in automation systems for the rolling mill, can offer their customers effective products and solutions specifically designed and developed for total control on the finished product quality. This target is achieved by optimization of yield, availability of the installations and use of the human resources. Results of the above experience and development is the IIITEST instrumentation product family for in-line surface inspection quality control. (author)

  7. Performance trial experience with Danieli new-generation eddy-current surface inspection system for wire rod mill: the equipment and the results at TRM, Rotherham, England

    Production flexibility and product quality are key subjects that can significantly influence the competitiveness of a steel-making company; recently, they can even affect its profitable permanence on the market. Danieli Automation, thanks to 25-year experience in automation systems for the rolling mill, can offer their customers effective products and solutions specifically designed and developed for total control on the finished product quality. This target is achieved by optimization of yield, availability of the installations and use of the human resources. Results of the above experience and development is the IIITEST instrumentation product family for in-line surface inspection quality control. (author)

  8. Civil society perspectives on negative biomedical HIV prevention trial results and implications for future trials.

    Essack, Zaynab; Koen, Jennifer; Slack, Catherine; Lindegger, Graham; Newman, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Community engagement is crucial to ongoing development and testing of sorely needed new biomedical HIV prevention technologies. Yet, negative trial results raise significant challenges for community engagement in HIV prevention trials, including the early termination of the Cellulose Sulfate microbicide trial and two Phase IIb HIV vaccine trials (STEP and Phambili). The present study aimed to explore the perspectives and experiences of civil society organization (CSO) representatives regarding negative HIV prevention trial results and perceived implications for future trials. We conducted in-depth interviews with 14 respondents from a broad range of South African and international CSOs, and analyzed data using thematic analysis. CSO representatives reported disappointment in response to negative trial results, but acknowledged such outcomes as inherent to clinical research. Respondents indicated that in theory negative trial results seem likely to impact on willingness to participate in future trials, but that in practice people in South Africa have continued to volunteer. Negative trial results were described as having contributed to improving ethical standards, and to a re-evaluation of the scientific agenda. Such negative results were identified as potentially impacting on funding for trials and engagement activities. Our findings indicate that trial closures may be used constructively to support opportunities for reflection and renewed vigilance in strategies for stakeholder engagement, communicating trial outcomes, and building research literacy among communities; however, these strategies require sustained resources for community engagement and capacity-building. PMID:22360605

  9. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available ... that could identify a disease in its early stages. Usually, trial participants must show signs of the ... Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based on their phase. The U.S. Food and Drug ...

  10. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available ... trial is to find out if an experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will ... disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based on their phase. The ...

  11. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available ... on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical trial is a research study that involves human subjects. The purpose ...

  12. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available ... Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical trial is a research study ... lifestyle changes, such as exercising more, getting more sleep, keeping mentally active, or eating nutritious foods, can ...

  13. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available ... Participating in Clinical Trials: About Clinical Trials In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks and Benefits Terms ... with Your Doctor Taking Medicines The information in this topic was provided by the National Library of ...

  14. Towards sustainable clinical trials

    Group, Sustainable Trials Study

    2007-01-01

    Currently, few researchers think about the carbon footprint of their trial. The Sustainable Trials Study Group reports that clinical trials are carbon intensive and suggests ways to make them more efficient

  15. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available ... Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical trial is a research study that involves human subjects. The purpose of ...

  16. Akteurinnen im Dienst der rassistischen Gemeinschaft. Handlungsräume und Erfahrungen Females Acting in Service of the Racist Community—Domains of Action and Experience

    Katharina Hoffmann

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Sybille Steinbacher hat in ihrem Band Volksgenossinnen Aufsätzen versammelt, in denen die Rolle von Frauen bei der Durchsetzung des Ordnungsmodells „Volksgemeinschaft“ untersucht wird. Gegenstand der analytischen Beschreibungen sind das Selbstverständnis und die Erfahrungsgeschichten von Frauen, die als anerkannte Mitglieder der nationalsozialistischen Gesellschaft Handlungsräume in Anspruch nahmen. Insbesondere in den Kriegsjahren vergrößerten sich Tätigkeitsfelder und Aufstiegschancen für „Volksgenossinnen”. Die Beiträge des Bandes erweitern die bisher noch geringen Kenntnisse über Deutungsmuster und Handlungsweisen einer großen Zahl von so genannten arischen, nicht verfolgten Frauen im Nationalsozialismus.Sybille Steinbacher’s volume Female Comrades (Volksgenossinnen contains essays that examine the role of women during the propagation of the nationalistic structural model of Germany as an “ethnic community.” The subject of the analytical descriptions is the self-conception and historical experience of women, who as recognized members of the national socialist community laid claim to specific spheres of action. The war years, in particular, offered these “female comrades” chances for promotion and to expand their fields of activity. The contributions in this volume build on the rather minimal existing knowledge about the interpretive patterns and manners of conduct of a large number of non-persecuted so-called Aryan women during National Socialism.

  17. Developing a communication strategy for illegal acts involving radioactive materials - drawing on experience obtained during the polonium-210 incident in Hamburg in 2006

    The paper presents examples of difficulties experienced by the German authorities during the 210Po incident in Hamburg in December 2006, which can be blamed, to varying degrees, on poor internal or external communication. The cases presented draw on the large amount of newspaper coverage of the event, controversial images, actions undertaken by inexperienced emergency responders and, to a lesser extent, anecdotal evidence from the 'worried well' among the emergency responders. The experience obtained has been examined and evaluated, and it is apparent that the inclusion of a communication strategy as part of the response to an intentional attack using radioactive materials, including the threat thereof, could dramatically improve the effectiveness of the emergency services. As a result, a new communication strategy has been developed and is beginning to be adopted by the German national authorities involved in the defence against nuclear hazards. The essential elements of the new communication strategy are described here, with the aim of producing a customized, homogeneous and appropriate response to future incidents involving radioactive materials. (author)

  18. First clinical experiences with a new ovine Fab Echis ocellatus snake bite antivenom in Nigeria: randomized comparative trial with Institute Pasteur Serum (Ipser) Africa antivenom.

    Meyer, W P; Habib, A G; Onayade, A A; Yakubu, A; Smith, D C; Nasidi, A; Daudu, I J; Warrell, D A; Theakston, R D

    1997-03-01

    During the past decade, effective snake antivenoms have become scarce in northern Nigeria. As a result, many patients severely envenomed by the saw-scaled or carpet viper (Echis ocellatus), which is responsible for more than 95% of the snake bites in the region, did not receive effective treatment and mortality and morbidity increased. To combat this crisis, a new monospecific ovine Fab antivenom (EchiTab) is being developed. Its theoretical advantages over conventional equine F(ab')2 antivenom are a more rapid tissue penetration and larger apparent volume of distribution (the volume of [tissue] fluid in which the the antivenom would be uniformly distributed to achieve the observed plasma concentration). In a preliminary study, two vials (20 ml; 1.0 g of protein) of EchiTab rapidly and permanently restored blood coagulability and cleared venom antigenemia in seven envenomed patients. Four experienced early reactions that responded to epinephrine. In a randomized comparative trial of one vial (10 ml; 0.5 g protein) of EchiTab or four ampules (40 ml; 2.12 g of protein) of Institute Pasteur Serum (Ipser) Africa polyspecific F(ab')2 antivenom, there were fewer reactions, but only 36% and 35% of patients, respectively, showed permanent restoration of coagulability, with the remainder requiring further doses. This suggests that 0.5 g (one vial) of EchiTab is approximately equivalent to 2.12 g (four ampules) of Ipser Africa antivenom, and that a higher initial dose will be required for most patients. Measurements of circulating venom and antivenom levels reflected the clinical events. PMID:9129531

  19. P-wave velocity structure of the southern Ryukyu margin east of Taiwan: Results from the ACTS wide-angle seismic experiment

    Klingelhoefer, F.; Berthet, T.; Lallemand, S.; Schnurle, P.; Lee, C.-S.; Liu, C.-S.; McIntosh, K.; Theunissen, T.

    2012-11-01

    An active seismic experiment has been conducted across the southern Ryukyu margin east of Taiwan over the whole trench-arc-backarc system in May 2009. Twenty-four ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) were deployed from the Ryukyu trench to the southern Okinawa trough over the Ryukyu arc and forearc. Wide angle seismic data were recorded by the OBS array while coincident reflection seismic data were acquired using a 6 km long streamer and a 6600 cubic inch seismic airgun array. Results from tomographic inversion of 21091 travel time picks along this line allowed us to image crustal structures of the Ryukyu margin down to a depth of 25 km. The transect has been designed to provide a better seismic velocity structure of the subduction zone in a highly deformed area that has produced an M8 earthquake in 1920. The line crosses a seismic cluster of earthquakes which source mechanisms are still poorly understood. The subducting oceanic crust of the Huatung Basin is about 5-6 km thick. The underlying mantle exhibits low seismic velocities around 7.8 km/s suggesting some hydrothermal alterations or alteration of the upper mantle through faults generated by the flexure of the subducting plate as it enters the subduction. Low velocities, up to 4.5 km/s, associated with the accretionary wedge are well imaged from the trench back to the Nanao forearc. A major result concerns the abrupt termination of the buttress at the rear of the accretionary wedge. Despite the low resolution of the tomographic inversion near the subduction interface, several lines of evidence supporting the presence of a low velocity zone beneath the toe of the forearc buttress could be established. The Moho beneath the Ryukyu non-volcanic arc is located at a depth around 25 km depth.

  20. Clinical experience with the MammoSite[reg] radiation therapy system for brachytherapy of breast cancer: Results from an international phase II trial

    Background and purpose: In a prospective multi-center phase II trial, we investigated the MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System, a new device for delivering intracavitary brachytherapy following breast conserving surgery. The MammoSite[reg] is a dual lumen, closed ended catheter with a small, spherical inflatable balloon and a port for connecting a remote afterloader to the central lumen. We analyzed the surgical procedure and placement of the MammoSite[reg], treatment planning and radiation delivery complications and cosmesis, as well the comfort for the patients. Patients and methods: Between 2002 and 2004 a total of 32 patients (pts) were implanted using the MammoSite[reg]. The reference isodose was defined 1 cm from the balloon surface. We analyzed the post-implant anatomic position of the applicator and the geometric form of the balloon via ultrasound, CT and X-ray, related side effects, cosmetic outcome and patient quality of life. Results: Twenty-three out of 32 patients (72%) were eligible for MammoSite[reg] intracavitary brachytherapy. Twenty-eight percentage had to be excluded because of different reasons. Eleven patients were treated with primary brachytherapy with a total dose of 34 Gy (2x3.4 Gy) and 12 had a boost with a mean dose of 13.3 Gy (range: 7.5-15 Gy; 2x2.5 Gy) combined with EBRT and doses ranged between 46 and 50 Gy. In three cases a balloon rupture occurred. We observed two abscesses within 3 months of implantation and serious seroma development in 10 patients (39%). Skin related side effects were erythema in 21 patients (91%), hyperpigmentation in 13 patients (56%) and teleangiectasia in six patients (26%) after mean follow-up 20 months. Conclusions: The MammoSite[reg] Radiation Therapy System is a feasible treatment modality for intracavitary brachytherapy of breast cancer after breast conserving surgery. The advantage of the system is only one applicator is necessary for the delivery of a fractionated radiotherapy. In addition, patient

  1. Progress in the prognosis of adult Hodgkin's lymphoma in the past 35 years through clinical trials in Argentina: a GATLA experience.

    Pavlovsky, Santiago; Lastiri, Francisco

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the trends in complete remission (CR) rate, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) through 35 years of Grupo Argentino de Tratamiento de la Leucemia Aguda (GATLA) clinical trials. A total of 1,254 adult patients with Hodgkin's Lymphoma were evaluated according to seven consecutive protocols. This 35-year study was divided into three phases. The patients in the first phase (1968-1985) were treated with CVPP (cyclophosphamide/vinblastine/procarbazine/prednisone) plus involved-field radiotherapy (IFRT). In the CVPP regimen, cyclophosphamide and vinblastine were administered intravenously on day 1 and prednisone and procarbazine were administered orally on days 1-14 every 28 days. The second phase (1986-1996) used mainly reinforced CVPP with cyclophosphamide and vinblastine on days 1-8 plus IFRT. The third phase (1997-2003) used ABVD(doxorubicin/bleomycin/vinblastine/dacarbazine) plus IFRT. In clinical stage I/II, the CR rate was 86% in 252 patients treated in the first phase and DFS and OS were 57% and 78% at 5 years and 50% and 71% at 10 years. The second phase had 148 patients with clinical stage I/II disease, and the CR rate was 91%, 5-year DFS and OS were 78% and 90%, and 10-year DFS and OS were 70% and 83%. The third phase had 182 patients with clinical stage I/II disease, and the CR rate was 95%, 5-year DFS and OS were 87% and 96%, and 10-year DFS and OS were not reached. The statistical difference was P = 0.016 in terms of CR and P < 0.001 in terms of DFS and OS. In the first phase of 394 patients with clinical stage III/IV disease, the CR rate was 71%, DFS and OS at 5 years were 37% and 62%, and DFS and OS at 10 years were 32% and 53%. In the second phase of 164 patients with clinical stage III/IV disease, the CR rate was 84%, DFS and OS at 5 years were 66% and 80%, and DFS and OS at 10 years were 60% and 75%. In the third phase of 114 patients with clinical stage III/IV disease, the CR rate was 88% and

  2. Atomic Energy Commission Act, 2000 (Act 588)

    Act 588 of the Republic of Ghana entitled, Atomic Energy Commission Act, 2000, amends and consolidates the Atomic Energy Commission Act, 204 of 1963 relating to the establishment of the Atomic Energy Commission. Act 588 makes provision for the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission to establish more institutes for the purpose of research in furtherance of its functions and also promote the commercialization of its research and development results. (E.A.A.)

  3. Challenges of maintaining research protocol fidelity in a clinical care setting: A qualitative study of the experiences and views of patients and staff participating in a randomized controlled trial

    Farmer Andrew J; Holman Rury R; Darbyshire Julie L; Jenkins Nicholas; Lawton Julia; Hallowell Nina

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Trial research has predominantly focused on patient and staff understandings of trial concepts and/or motivations for taking part, rather than why treatment recommendations may or may not be followed during trial delivery. This study sought to understand why there was limited attainment of the glycaemic target (HbA1c ≤6.5%) among patients who participated in the Treating to Target in Type 2 Diabetes Trial (4-T). The objective was to inform interpretation of trial outcomes ...

  4. Microbicide clinical trial adherence: insights for introduction.

    Woodsong, Cynthia; MacQueen, Kathleen; Amico, K Rivet; Friedland, Barbara; Gafos, Mitzy; Mansoor, Leila; Tolley, Elizabether; McCormack, Sheena

    2013-01-01

    After two decades of microbicide clinical trials it remains uncertain if vaginally- delivered products will be clearly shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in women and girls. Furthermore, a microbicide product with demonstrated clinical efficacy must be used correctly and consistently if it is to prevent infection. Information on adherence that can be gleaned from microbicide trials is relevant for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, pre-licensure implementation trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery. Drawing primarily from data and experience that has emerged from the large-scale microbicide efficacy trials completed to-date, the paper identifies six broad areas of adherence lessons learned: (1) Adherence measurement in clinical trials, (2) Comprehension of use instructions/Instructions for use, (3) Unknown efficacy and its effect on adherence/Messages regarding effectiveness, (4) Partner influence on use, (5) Retention and continuation and (6) Generalizability of trial participants' adherence behavior. Each is discussed, with examples provided from microbicide trials. For each of these adherence topics, recommendations are provided for using trial findings to prepare for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery programs. PMID:23561044

  5. Microbicide clinical trial adherence: insights for introduction

    Cynthia Woodsong

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available After two decades of microbicide clinical trials it remains uncertain if vaginally- delivered products will be clearly shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in women and girls. Furthermore, a microbicide product with demonstrated clinical efficacy must be used correctly and consistently if it is to prevent infection. Information on adherence that can be gleaned from microbicide trials is relevant for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, pre-licensure implementation trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery. Drawing primarily from data and experience that has emerged from the large-scale microbicide efficacy trials completed to-date, the paper identifies six broad areas of adherence lessons learned: (1 Adherence measurement in clinical trials, (2 Comprehension of use instructions/Instructions for use, (3 Unknown efficacy and its effect on adherence/Messages regarding effectiveness, (4 Partner influence on use, (5 Retention and continuation and (6 Generalizability of trial participants' adherence behavior. Each is discussed, with examples provided from microbicide trials. For each of these adherence topics, recommendations are provided for using trial findings to prepare for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery programs.

  6. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Full Text Available ... this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical ... to treat or cure a disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based ...

  7. Clinical Trials in Vision Research

    ... Eye Health Information > Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical Trials in Vision Research Listen Clinical studies depend on ... vision research in the United States. Basics of Clinical Trials What is a clinical trial? Clinical trials are ...

  8. Experience with dispersant application: long-path recirculation cleanup trial at Byron Unit 1 during spring 2011 and online addition update

    The first nuclear application of PAA dispersant to improve corrosion product removal during LPR (Long-path recirculation) cleanup occurred at Byron Unit 1 in spring 2011. The main conclusions and lessons learned are as follows: -) there were no significant problems with application of PAA during LPR with an initial PAA concentration of about 650 ppb; -) a reasonable estimate of the additional iron mass removed due to the presence of PAA is 5-9 kg. The qualification work, application details and an assessment of the results are the first focus of this paper. The second part of this paper summarizes the online experience to date at the Exelon and STP (South Texas Project) plants on the effects of dispersant on -) blowdown iron removal efficiency, -) steam generator heat transfer efficiency and -) ion exchange resin performance

  9. 20 CFR 404.1592 - The trial work period.

    2010-04-01

    ....1592 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY... of disability benefit under title II of the Social Security Act (i.e., child's benefits based on... the trial work period in determining whether your disability ended at any time after the trial...

  10. 20 CFR 220.170 - The trial work period.

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false The trial work period. 220.170 Section 220.170 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Trial Work Period and Reentitlement Period for Annuitants Disabled for Any...