WorldWideScience

Sample records for acquired neuroprotection induced

  1. Phytoceramide Shows Neuroprotection and Ameliorates Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment

    Seikwan Oh; Jong Hoon Ryu; Sohyeon Moon; Jae-Chul Jung; Yeonju Lee

    2011-01-01

    The function and the role phytoceramide (PCER) and phytosphingosine (PSO) in the central nervous system has not been well studied. This study was aimed at investigating the possible roles of PCER and PSO in glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in cultured neuronal cells and memory function in mice. Phytoceramide showed neuro-protective activity in the glutamate-induced toxicity in cultured cortical neuronal cells. Neither phytosphingosine nor tetraacetylphytosphingosine (TAPS) showed neuroproectiv...

  2. Superior neuroprotective effects of cerebrolysin in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of hyperthermia-induced brain pathology.

    Sharma, Aruna; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Mössler, Herbert; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, the incidence of heat stroke and associated brain pathology are increasing Worldwide. More than half of the world's population are living in areas associated with high environmental heat especially during the summer seasons. Thus, new research is needed using novel drug targets to achieve neuroprotection in heat-induced brain pathology. Previous research from our laboratory showed that the pathophysiology of brain injuries following heat stroke are exacerbated by chronic intoxication of engineered nanoparticles of small sizes (50-60 nm) following identical heat exposure in rats. Interestingly, in nanoparticle-intoxicated animals the known neuroprotective agents in standard doses failed to induce effective neuroprotection. This suggests that the dose-response of the drugs either requires modification or new therapeutic agents are needed to provide better neuroprotection in nanoparticle-intoxicated animals after heat stroke. This review is focused on the use of cerebrolysin, a mixture of several neurotrophic factors and active peptide fragments, in relation to other neuroprotective agents normally used to treat ischemic stroke in clinics in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain damage in heat stroke. It appears that cerebrolysin exerts the most superior neuroprotective effects in heat stress as compared to other neuroprotective agents on brain pathology in normal rats. Interestingly, to induce effective neuroprotection in nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain pathology a double dose of cerebrolysin is needed. On the other hand, double doses of the other drugs were quite ineffective in reducing brain damage. These observations suggest that the drug type and doses are important factors in attenuating nanoparticle-induced exacerbation of brain pathology in heat stroke. The functional significance and possible mechanisms of drug-induced neuroprotection in nanoparticle-treated, heat-stressed rats are discussed. PMID:22229316

  3. Neuroprotection by pramipexole against dopamine- and levodopa-induced cytotoxicity.

    Zou, L; Jankovic, J; Rowe, D B; Xie, W; Appel, S H; Le, W

    1999-01-01

    Pramipexole, a novel non-ergoline dopamine (DA) agonist, has been applied successfully for treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). We report here that pramipexole can protect dopaminergic cell line Mes23.5 against dopamine- and levodopa-induced cytotoxicity possibly through a mechanism related to antioxidant activity. In the MES 23.5 cultures, DA and L-DOPA induce a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity, as determined by tetrazolium salt and trypan blue assays. Furthermore, an in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase assay demonstrates that DA-induced cell death is apoptotic. Pretreatment with pramipexole in a concentration range (4-100 microM) significantly attenuates DA- or L-DOPA-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis, an action which is not blocked by D3 antagonist U-99194 A or D2 antagonist raclopride. Pramipexole also protects MES 23.5 cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner. In cell-free system, pramipexole can effectively inhibit the formation of melanin, an end product resulting from DA or L-DOPA oxidation. These results indicate that pramipexole exerts its neuroprotective effect possibly through a mechanism, which is independent of DA receptors but related to antioxidation or scavenging of free radicals (e.g. hydrogen peroxide). As a direct DA agonist and potentially neuroprotective agent, pramipexole remains attractive in the treatment of PD. PMID:10227583

  4. Phytoceramide Shows Neuroprotection and Ameliorates Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment

    Seikwan Oh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The function and the role phytoceramide (PCER and phytosphingosine (PSO in the central nervous system has not been well studied. This study was aimed at investigating the possible roles of PCER and PSO in glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in cultured neuronal cells and memory function in mice. Phytoceramide showed neuro-protective activity in the glutamate-induced toxicity in cultured cortical neuronal cells. Neither phytosphingosine nor tetraacetylphytosphingosine (TAPS showed neuroproective effects in neuronal cells. PCER (50 mg/kg, p.o. recovered the scopolamine-induced reduction in step-through latency in the passive avoidance test; however, PSO did not modulate memory function on this task. The ameliorating effects of PCER on spatial memory were confirmed by the Morris water maze test. In conclusion, through behavioral and neurochemical experimental results, it was demonstrated that central administration of PCER produces amelioration of memory impairment. These results suggest that PCER plays an important role in neuroprotection and memory enhancement and PCER could be a potential new therapeutic agent for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease.

  5. Sex differences in minocycline-induced neuroprotection after experimental stroke

    Li, Jun; McCullough, Louise D.

    2009-01-01

    Minocycline is neuroprotective in clinical and experimental stroke studies, due in part to its ability to inhibit poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Previous preclinical data have shown that interference with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase signaling leads to sex-specific neuroprotection, reducing stroke injury only in males. In this study, we show that minocycline is ineffective at reducing ischemic damage in females after middle cerebral artery occlusion, likely due to effects on poly (ADP-ribose) ...

  6. Neuroprotection of pramipexole in UPS impairment induced animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    Li, Chao; Guo, Yuan; Xie, Wenjie; Li, Xingang; Janokovic, Joseph; Le, Weidong

    2010-10-01

    Pramipexole (PPX), a dopamine (DA) receptor D3 preferring agonist, has been used as monotherapy or adjunct therapy to treat Parkinson's disease (PD) for many years. Several in vitro and in vivo studies in neurotoxin-induced DA neuron injury models have reported that PPX may possess neuroprotective properties. The present study is to evaluate the neuroprotection of PPX in a sustained DA neuron degeneration model of PD induced by ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) impairment. Adult C57BL/6 mice were treated with PPX (low dose 0.1 mg/kg or high dose 0.5 mg/kg, i.p, twice a day) started 7 days before, and continued after microinjection of proteasome inhibitor lactacystin in the medial forebrain bundle for a total 4 weeks. Animal behavior observation, and pathological and biochemical assays were conducted to determine the neuroprotective effects of PPX. We report here that PPX treatment significantly improves rotarod performance, attenuates DA neuron loss and striatal DA reduction, and alleviates proteasomal inhibition and microglial activation in the substantia nigra of lactacystin-lesioned mice. PPX can increase the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and induce an activation of autophagy. Furthermore, pretreatment with D3 receptor antagonist U99194 can significantly block the PPX-mediated neuroprotection. These results suggest that multiple molecular pathways may be attributed to the neuroprotective effects of PPX in the UPS impairment model of PD. PMID:20635141

  7. Repeated exposure to MDMA provides neuroprotection against subsequent MDMA-induced serotonin depletion in brain

    Bhide, Nirmal S.; Lipton, Jack; Cunningham, Jacobi; Yamamoto, Bryan K.; Gudelsky, Gary A.

    2009-01-01

    Repeated exposure to sub-lethal insults has been reported to result in neuroprotection against a subsequent deleterious insult. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether repeated exposure (preconditioning) to a non-5-HT depleting dose of MDMA in adult rats provides neuroprotection against subsequent MDMA induced 5-HT depletion. Treatment of rats with MDMA (10 mg/kg, ip every 2 hrs for 4 injections) resulted in a 50-65% depletion of 5-HT in the striatum, hippocampus and cortex, and the...

  8. Neuroprotective effects of constituents of Eragrostis ferruginea against Aβ-induced toxicity in PC12 cells.

    Na, Chae Sun; Hong, Seong Su; Choi, Yun-Hyeok; Lee, Yong Ho; Hong, Sun Hee; Lim, Ji-Youn; Kang, Byeong Hoa; Park, So-Young; Lee, Dongho

    2010-07-01

    A new flavonoid, 7-demethylageconyflavone A (1), and five known compounds, tricin (2), ageconyflavone A (3), corylin (4), nectandrin B (5), and 4-ketopinoresinol (6) were isolated from the aerial parts of Eragrostis ferruginea. Their structures were determined using spectroscopic techniques, including 1D- and 2D-NMR. All compounds were tested for the neuroprotective effects against amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) using PC12 cells, a major cause of the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Tricin (2) was found to have a neuroprotective effect with an ED(50) value of 20.3 microM against Abeta-induced toxicity in PC12 cells. Ageconyflavone A (3), nectandrin B (5) and 4-ketopinoresinol (6) demonstrated moderate neuroprotective effects with ED(50) values of 58.7, 44.1, and 54.8 microM, respectively. PMID:20661708

  9. Neuroprotective effects of pramipexole against tunicamycin-induced cell death in PC12 cells.

    Nakayama, Hitoshi; Zhao, Jing; Ei-Fakhrany, Amany; Isosaki, Minoru; Satoh, Hiroyasu; Kyotani, Yoji; Yoshizumi, Masanori

    2009-12-01

    1. Pramipexole (PPX), a dopamine D2 and D3 receptor agonist, exerts neuroprotective effects via both dopamine receptor-mediated and non-dopaminergic mechanisms. In the present study, we demonstrate that PPX reduces the toxicity of tunicamycin, a typical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stressor, in PC12h cells, a subline of PC12 cells. 2. The PC12h cells were treated with 300 micromol / L PPX in the presence of 0.5 micromol / L tunicamycin for 24 h. The neuroprotective effects of PPX against tunicamycin-induced cell death were evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays, Hoechst 33258 staining and western blot analysis. 3. Tunicamycin (0.2, 0.3 and 0.5 microg / mL) dose-dependently decreased MTT activity and increased LDH release from PC12h cells. Treatment with 300 micromol / L PPX rescued the tunicamycin-induced decrease in cell viability. 4. Spiperone (10 micromol / L), a dopamine D2 and D4 receptor antagonist, had no effect on PPX neuroprotection against tunicamycin in these cells. Marker proteins of ER stress and apoptosis are known to be upregulated by tunicamycin, but we detected no significant effects of PPX on these factors. 5. In conclusion, we speculate that a combination of several mechanisms may be involved in PPX-induced neuroprotection. PMID:19515063

  10. BCG vaccine-induced neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Yong, Jing; Lacan, Goran; Dang, Hoa; Hsieh, Terry; Middleton, Blake; Wasserfall, Clive; Tian, Jide; Melega, William P; Kaufman, Daniel L

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using vaccination with CNS antigens to induce autoreactive T cell responses that home to damaged areas in the CNS and ameliorate neurodegenerative disease. Neuroprotective vaccine studies have focused on administering oligodendrocyte antigens or Copaxone® in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Theoretical considerations, however, suggest that vaccination with a neuronal antigen may induce more robust neuroprotective immune responses. We assessed the neuroprotective potential of vaccines containing tyrosine hydroxylase (a neuronal protein involved in dopamine synthesis) or Copaxone® in CFA in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Surprisingly, we observed that the main beneficial factor in these vaccines was the CFA. Since the major immunogenic component in CFA is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which closely related to the bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) that is used in human vaccines, we tested BCG vaccination in the MPTP mouse model. We observed that BCG vaccination partially preserved markers of striatal dopamine system integrity and prevented an increase in activated microglia in the substantia nigra of MPTP-treated mice. These results support a new neuroprotective vaccine paradigm in which general (nonself-reactive) immune stimulation in the periphery can limit potentially deleterious microglial responses to a neuronal insult and exert a neurorestorative effect in the CNS. Accordingly, BCG vaccination may provide a new strategy to augment current treatments for a wide range of neuropathological conditions. PMID:21304945

  11. Neuroprotective effect of Tinospora cordifolia ethanol extract on 6-hydroxy dopamine induced Parkinsonism

    Jayasankar Kosaraju; Santhivardhan Chinni; Partha Deb Roy; Elango Kannan; A Shanish Antony; Satish Kumar, M.N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study investigates the neuroprotective activity of ethanol extract of Tinospora cordifolia aerial parts against 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA) lesion rat model of Parkinson′s disease (PD). Materials and Methods: T. cordifolia ethanol extract (TCEE) was standardized with high performance thin layer chromatography using berberine. Experimental PD was induced by intracerebral injection of 6-OHDA (8 μg). Animals were divided into five groups: sham operated, negative contro...

  12. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin-loaded lactoferrin nano particles against rotenone induced neurotoxicity.

    Bollimpelli, V Satish; Kumar, Prashant; Kumari, Sonali; Kondapi, Anand K

    2016-05-01

    Curcumin is known to have neuroprotective role and possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activities. Rotenone, a flavonoid induced neurotoxicity in dopaminergic cells is being widely studied in Parkinson's Disease (PD) research. In the present study, curcumin loaded lactoferrin nano particles prepared by sol-oil chemistry were used to protect dopaminergic cell line SK-N-SH against rotenone induced neurotoxicity. These curcumin loaded nano particles were of 43-60 nm diameter size and around 100 nm hydrodynamic size as assessed by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis respectively. The encapsulation efficiency was 61.3% ± 2.4%. Cellular uptake of curcumin through these nano particles was confirmed by confocal imaging and spectrofluorimetric analysis. The curcumin loaded lactoferrin nanoparticles showed greater intracellular drug uptake, sustained retention and greater neuroprotection than soluble counterpart. Neuroprotective activity was characterized through viability assays and by estimating ROS levels. Furthermore rotenone induced PD like features were characterized by decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase expression and increase in α-synuclein expression. Taken together curcumin loaded lactoferrin nanoparticles could be a promising drug delivery strategy against neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons. PMID:26826319

  13. Neuroprotective evaluation of Tilia americana and Annona diversifolia in the neuronal damage induced by intestinal ischemia.

    Angeles-López, Guadalupe E; González-Trujano, María Eva; Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Ventura-Martínez, Rosa

    2013-08-01

    Tilia americana and Annona diversifolia are plants widely distributed in Mexico and sold in markets for their medicinal properties on the central nervous system (CNS) including possible neuroprotection. Pharmacological studies have corroborated CNS activities due to flavonoid constituents, but evidence of their neuroprotector effects are lacking. This study was conducted to test aqueous and organic extracts of these two plants for neuroprotective effects in a novel experimental model of intestinal ischemia in situ. T. americana and A. diversifolia aqueous and organic extracts were administrated to guinea pigs at an oral dose of 100 and 300 mg/kg for 15 days. Twenty four hours after the last administration, the animals were anesthetized and intestinal ischemia in situ was induced by clamping for 80 min selected branches of the superior mesenteric artery. Ischemic segments placed in an in vitro organ bath were stimulated electrically (0.3 Hz frequency, 3.0 ms duration, 14 V intensity) and chemically (ACh; 1 × 10(-9) to 1×10(-5) M). Neuroprotection was considered present when the depressed contractile response of the ischemic tissue to electrical stimulation was normalized in the treated animals. Results showed that pretreatment with the T. americana hexane and aqueous extracts, but not with those from A. diversifolia, significantly improved responses of the ischemic tissue. These results suggest that T. americana possesses neuroprotective effects against neuronal damage induced by ischemia, and that flavonoids as well as non-polar constituents are involved. Our study supports the use of this plant in folk medicine and suggests its possible effectiveness for stroke prevention. PMID:23739919

  14. Neuroprotective effect of Tinospora cordifolia ethanol extract on 6-hydroxy dopamine induced Parkinsonism

    Jayasankar Kosaraju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study investigates the neuroprotective activity of ethanol extract of Tinospora cordifolia aerial parts against 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA lesion rat model of Parkinson′s disease (PD. Materials and Methods: T. cordifolia ethanol extract (TCEE was standardized with high performance thin layer chromatography using berberine. Experimental PD was induced by intracerebral injection of 6-OHDA (8 μg. Animals were divided into five groups: sham operated, negative control, positive control (levodopa 6 mg/kg and two experimental groups (n = 6/group. Experimental groups received 200 and 400 mg/kg of TCEE once daily for 30 days by oral gavage. Biochemical parameters including dopamine level, oxidative stress, complex I activity and brain iron asymmetry ratio and locomotor activity including skeletal muscle co-ordination and degree of catatonia were assessed. Results: TCEE exhibited significant neuroprotection by increasing the dopamine levels (1.96 ± 0.20 and 2.45 ± 0.40 ng/mg of protein and complex I activity (77.14 ± 0.89 and 78.50 ± 0.96 nmol/min/mg of protein at 200 and 400 mg/kg respectively when compared with negative control group. Iron asymmetry ratio was also significantly attenuated by TCEE at 200 (1.57 ± 0.18 and 400 mg/kg (1.11 ± 0.15 when compared with negative control group. Neuroprotection by TCEE was further supported by reduced oxidative stress and restored locomotor activity in treatment groups. Conclusion: Results show that TCEE possess significant neuroprotection in 6-OHDA induced PD by protecting dopaminergic neurons and reducing the iron accumulation.

  15. Differential effects of ethanol antagonism and neuroprotection in peptide fragment NAPVSIPQ prevention of ethanol-induced developmental toxicity

    Wilkemeyer, Michael F.; Chen, Shao-Yu; Menkari, Carrie E.; Brenneman, Douglas E.; Sulik, Kathleen K.; Charness, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    NAPVSIPQ (NAP), an active fragment of the glial-derived activity-dependent neuroprotective protein, is protective at femtomolar concentrations against a wide array of neural insults and prevents ethanol-induced fetal wastage and growth retardation in mice. NAP also antagonizes ethanol inhibition of L1-mediated cell adhesion (ethanol antagonism). We performed an Ala scanning substitution of NAP to determine the role of ethanol antagonism and neuroprotection in NAP preve...

  16. Neuroprotective and nootropic activity of Clitorea ternatea Linn.(Fabaceae) leaves on diabetes induced cognitive decline in experimental animals

    Talpate, Karuna A.; Bhosale, Uma A.; Zambare, Mandar R.; Somani, Rahul S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Ethanol extract of Clitorea ternatea (EECT) was evaluated in diabetes-induced cognitive decline rat model for its nootropic and neuroprotective activity. Materials and Methods: Effect on spatial working memory, spatial reference memory and spatial working-reference memory was evaluated by Y maze, Morris water maze and Radial arm maze respectively. Neuroprotective effects of EECT was studied by assaying acetylcholinesterase, lipid peroxide, superoxide dismutase (SOD), total nitric oxi...

  17. Neuroprotective effects of (-)-linalool against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced neuronal injury.

    Park, Hyeon; Seol, Geun Hee; Ryu, Sangwoo; Choi, In-Young

    2016-04-01

    (-)-Linalool, a major component of many essential oils, is widely used in cosmetics and flavoring ingredients as well as in traditional medicines. Although various in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that (-)-linalool has anti-convulsant, anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties, its anti-ischemic/hypoxic effects have yet to be determined. This study assessed the neuroprotective effects of (-)-linalool against oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R)-induced cortical neuronal injury, an in vitro model of ischemic stroke. (-)-Linalool significantly attenuated OGD/R-evoked cortical neuronal injury/death, although it did not inhibit N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced excitotoxicity. (-)-Linalool significantly reduced intracellular oxidative stress during OGD/R-induced injury, as well as scavenging peroxyl radicals (Trolox equivalents or TE = 3.8). This anti-oxidant effect was found to correlate with the restoration of OGD/R-induced decreases in the activities of SOD and catalase. In addition, (-)-linalool inhibited microglial migration induced by monocyte-chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a chemokine released by OGD/R. These findings show that (-)-linalool has neuroprotective effects against OGD/R-induced neuronal injury, which may be due to its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Detailed examination of the anti-ischemic mechanisms of (-)-linalool may indicate strategies for the development of drugs to treat cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:26832326

  18. Specific Conditions for Resveratrol Neuroprotection against Ethanol-Induced Toxicity

    Brigitte Gonthier; Nathalie Allibe; Cécile Cottet-Rousselle; Frédéric Lamarche; Laurence Nuiry; Luc Barret

    2012-01-01

    Aims. 3,5,4′-Trihydroxy-trans-stilbene, a natural polyphenolic compound present in wine and grapes and better known as resveratrol, has free radical scavenging properties and is a potent protector against oxidative stress induced by alcohol metabolism. Today, the mechanism by which ethanol exerts its toxicity is still not well understood, but it is generally considered that free radical generation plays an important role in the appearance of structural and functional alterations in cells. The...

  19. Bleomycin Containing Chemotherapeutic Regimen Induced Acquired Partial Lipodystrophy

    Tandon, Vishal R; Gupte, Novy; Mahajan, Vivek; Sharma, Rahul; Langer, Cheena; Khajuria, Vijay; Mahajan, Annil

    2016-01-01

    Bleomycin toxicity predominantly affects the skin and lungs. Cutaneous toxicity classically known to present with bleomycin are flagellate erythema and drug rash. We hereby report an isolated case of (bleomyicn)-induced acquired partial (lipodytrophy) having potential cosmetic implications in a young women prescribed postoperatively following a case of germ cell carcinoma of ovary (endodermal sinus tumor). PMID:26955139

  20. Neuroprotection by taurine in ethanol-induced apoptosis in the developing cerebellum

    Taranukhin Andrey G; Taranukhina Elena Y; Saransaari Pirjo; Podkletnova Irina M; Pelto-Huikko Markku; Oja Simo S

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Acute ethanol administration leads to massive apoptotic neurodegeneration in the developing central nervous system. We studied whether taurine is neuroprotective in ethanol-induced apoptosis in the mouse cerebellum during the postnatal period. Methods The mice were divided into three groups: ethanol-treated, ethanol+taurine-treated and controls. Ethanol (20% solution) was administered subcutaneously at a total dose of 5 g/kg (2.5 g/kg at time 1 h and 2.5 g/kg at 3 h) to th...

  1. Neuroprotection by GH against excitotoxic-induced cell death in retinal ganglion cells.

    Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Ávila-Mendoza, José; Wu, Yilun; Arellanes-Licea, Elvira Del Carmen; Louie, Marcela; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos; Harvey, Steve

    2016-08-01

    Retinal growth hormone (GH) has been shown to promote cell survival in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during developmental waves of apoptosis during chicken embryonic development. The possibility that it might also against excitotoxicity-induced cell death was therefore examined in the present study, which utilized quail-derived QNR/D cells as an in vitro RGC model. QNR/D cell death was induced by glutamate in the presence of BSO (buthionine sulfoxamide) (an enhancer of oxidative stress), but this was significantly reduced (PGH (rcGH). Similarly, QNR/D cells that had been prior transfected with a GH plasmid to overexpress secreted and non-secreted GH. This treatment reduced the number of TUNEL-labeled cells and blocked their release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). In a further experiment with dissected neuroretinal explants from ED (embryonic day) 10 embryos, rcGH treatment of the explants also reduced (PGH-overexpressing QNR/D cells. As rcGH treatment and GH-overexpression cells also increased the content of IGF-1 and IGF-1 mRNA this neuroprotective action of GH is likely to be mediated, at least partially, through an IGF-1 mechanism. This possibility is supported by the fact that the siRNA knockdown of GH or IGF-1 significantly reduced QNR/D cell viability, as did the immunoneutralization of IGF-1. GH is therefore neuroprotective against excitotoxicity-induced RGC cell death by anti-apoptotic actions involving IGF-1 stimulation. PMID:27129619

  2. Neuroprotective Properties of Melissa Officinalis L. Extract Against Ecstasy-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Gholamreza Hassanzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects ofMelissa officinalis, a major antioxidant plant, against neuron toxicity in hippocampal primaryculture induced by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy, oneof the most abused drugs, which causes neurotoxicity.Materials and Methods: 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTTassay was used to assess mitochondrial activity, reflecting cell survival. Caspase-3 activity assayand Hoechst / propiedium iodide (PI staining were done to show apoptotic cell death.Results: A high dose of ecstasy caused profound mitochondrial dysfunction, around 40%less than the control value, and increased apoptotic neuronal death to around 35% morethan the control value in hippocampal neuronal culture. Co-treatment with Melissa officinalissignificantly reversed these damages to around 15% and 20% respectively ofthe MDMA alone group, and provided protection against MDMA-induced mitochondrialdysfunction and apoptosis in neurons.Conclusion: Melissa officinalis has revealed neuroprotective effects against apoptosisinduced by MDMA in the primary neurons of hippocampal culture, which could be due toits free radical scavenging properties and monoamine oxidase (MAO inhibitory effects.

  3. MiRNA-124 induces neuroprotection and functional improvement after focal cerebral ischemia.

    Hamzei Taj, Somayyeh; Kho, Widuri; Riou, Adrien; Wiedermann, Dirk; Hoehn, Mathias

    2016-06-01

    microRNA-124 (miR-124), the most abundant miRNA of the CNS, was recently shown to modulate the polarization of activated microglia and infiltrating macrophages towards the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype and protect neurons in various ways after brain disease. In ischemic stroke, microglia and macrophages of a detrimental and persistent pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype have been shown to aggravate the secondary injury. Thus, shifting the polarization of microglia/macrophages into the beneficial, anti-inflammatory M2-like phenotype is considered neuroprotective after stroke onset. Here, we have induced 30 min transient occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery (MCAO) in 34 male, C57BL/6 mice. Lesion development was monitored with T2-weighted MRI. Liposomated miR-124 was injected in 11 animals at 48 h and in 5 animals at 10 days after MCAO. Arg-1, a marker for M2 phenotype, was co-stained with Iba-1, NeuN or GFAP. The distribution of astrocytes, neurons and microglia/macrophages and their expression of Arg-1 were quantified. Early miR-124 injection resulted in a significantly increased neuronal survival and a significantly increased number of M2-like polarized microglia/macrophages. Moreover, the lesion core, delineated by reactive astrocytes, was significantly reduced over time upon early miR-124 injection. These neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of the early miR-124 treatment were pronounced during the first week with Arg-1. Number of Arg-1+ microglia/macrophages correlated with neuronal protection and with functional improvement during the first week. Thus, our present results demonstrate that miR-124 may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for neuroprotection and functional recovery upon stroke onset. PMID:27031810

  4. Neuroprotective effects of protocatechuic aldehyde against neurotoxin-induced cellular and animal models of Parkinson's disease.

    Xin Zhao

    Full Text Available Protocatechuic aldehyde (PAL has been reported to bind to DJ-1, a key protein involved in Parkinson's disease (PD, and exerts potential neuroprotective effects via DJ-1 in SH-SY5Y cells. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective pharmacological effects of PAL against neurotoxin-induced cell and animal models of PD. In cellular models of PD, PAL markedly increased cell viability rates, mitochondrial oxidation-reduction activity and mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduced intracellular ROS levels to prevent neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. In animal models of PD, PAL reduced the apomorphine injection, caused turning in 6-OHDA treated rats, and increased the motor coordination and stride decreases in MPTP treated mice. Meanwhile, in an MPTP mouse model, PAL prevented a decrease of the contents of dopamine (DA and its metabolites in the striatum and TH-positive dopaminergic neuron loss in the substantia nigra (SN. In addition, PAL increased the protein expression of DJ-1 and reduced the level of α-synuclein in the SN of MPTP lesioned mice. PAL also increased the spine density in hippocampal CA1 neurons. The current study demonstrates that PAL can efficiently protect dopaminergic neurons against neurotoxin injury in vitro and in vivo, and that the potential mechanisms may be related to its effects in increasing DJ-1, decreasing α-synuclein and its growth-promoting effect on spine density.

  5. Neuroprotection of microglial conditioned medium on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal death: role of transforming growth factor beta-2.

    Polazzi, Elisabetta; Altamira, Luis Emiliano Peña; Eleuteri, Simona; Barbaro, Raffaella; Casadio, Chiara; Contestabile, Antonio; Monti, Barbara

    2009-07-01

    Microglia, the immune cells of the CNS, play essential roles in both physiological and pathological brain states. Here we have used an in vitro model to demonstrate neuroprotection of a 48 h-microglial conditioned medium (MCM) towards cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) challenged with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine, which induces a Parkinson-like neurodegeneration, and to identify the protective factor(s). MCM nearly completely protects CGNs from 6-hydroxydopamine neurotoxicity and at least some of the protective factor(s) are peptidic in nature. While the fraction of the medium containing molecules 10 kDa are not neuroprotective. We further demonstrate that microglia release high amounts of transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-beta2) and that its exogenous addition to the fraction of the medium not containing it (< 10 kDa) fully restores the neuroprotective action. Moreover, MCM neuroprotection is significantly counteracted by an inhibitor of TGF-beta2 transduction pathway. Our results identify TGF-beta2 as an essential neuroprotective factor released by microglia in its culture medium that requires to be fully effective the concomitant presence of other factor(s) of low molecular weight. PMID:19457129

  6. The PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone modulates inflammation and induces neuroprotection in parkinsonian monkeys

    Swanson Christine R

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ has been proposed as a possible neuroprotective strategy to slow down the progression of early Parkinson's disease (PD. Here we report preclinical data on the use of the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (Actos®; Takeda Pharmaceuticals Ltd. in a paradigm resembling early PD in nonhuman primates. Methods Rhesus monkeys that were trained to perform a battery of behavioral tests received a single intracarotid arterial injection of 20 ml of saline containing 3 mg of the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP. Twenty-four hours later the monkeys were assessed using a clinical rating scale, matched accordingly to disability, randomly assigned to one of three groups [placebo (n = 5, 2.5 (n = 6 or 5 (n = 5 mg/kg of pioglitazone] and their treatments started. Three months after daily oral dosing, the animals were necropsied. Results We observed significant improvements in clinical rating score (P = 0.02 in the animals treated with 5 mg/kg compared to placebo. Behavioral recovery was associated with preservation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic markers, observed as higher tyrosine hydroxylase (TH putaminal optical density (P = 0.011, higher stereological cell counts of TH-ir (P = 0.02 and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2-ir nigral neurons (P = 0.006. Stereological cell counts of Nissl stained nigral neurons confirmed neuroprotection (P = 0.017. Pioglitazone-treated monkeys also showed a dose-dependent modulation of CD68-ir inflammatory cells, that was significantly decreased for 5 mg/kg treated animals compared to placebo (P = 0.018. A separate experiment to assess CSF penetration of pioglitazone revealed that 5 mg/kg p.o. induced consistently higher levels than 2.5 mg/kg and 7.5 mg/kg. p.o. Conclusions Our results indicate that oral administration of pioglitazone is neuroprotective when administered early after inducing a

  7. Neuregulin-1 is neuroprotective in a rat model of organophosphate-induced delayed neuronal injury

    Current medical countermeasures against organophosphate (OP) nerve agents are effective in reducing mortality, but do not sufficiently protect the CNS from delayed brain damage and persistent neurological symptoms. In this study, we examined the efficacy of neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) in protecting against delayed neuronal cell death following acute intoxication with the OP diisopropylflurophosphate (DFP). Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were pretreated with pyridostigmine (0.1 mg/kg BW, i.m.) and atropine methylnitrate (20 mg/kg BW, i.m.) prior to DFP (9 mg/kg BW, i.p.) intoxication to increase survival and reduce peripheral signs of cholinergic toxicity but not prevent DFP-induced seizures or delayed neuronal injury. Pretreatment with NRG-1 did not protect against seizures in rats exposed to DFP. However, neuronal injury was significantly reduced in most brain regions by pretreatment with NRG-1 isoforms NRG-EGF (3.2 μg/kg BW, i.a) or NRG-GGF2 (48 μg/kg BW, i.a.) as determined by FluroJade-B labeling in multiple brain regions at 24 h post-DFP injection. NRG-1 also blocked apoptosis and oxidative stress-mediated protein damage in the brains of DFP-intoxicated rats. Administration of NRG-1 at 1 h after DFP injection similarly provided significant neuroprotection against delayed neuronal injury. These findings identify NRG-1 as a promising adjuvant therapy to current medical countermeasures for enhancing neuroprotection against acute OP intoxication. -- Highlights: ► NRG-1 blocked DFP induced neuronal injury. ► NRG-1 did not protect against seizures in rats exposed to DFP. ► NRG-1 blocked apoptosis and oxidative stress in the brains of DFP-intoxicated rats. ► Administration of NRG-1 at 1 h after DFP injection prevented delayed neuronal injury.

  8. Neuregulin-1 is neuroprotective in a rat model of organophosphate-induced delayed neuronal injury

    Li, Yonggang [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States); Lein, Pamela J. [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616 (United States); Liu, Cuimei [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States); Bruun, Donald A.; Giulivi, Cecilia [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616 (United States); Ford, Gregory D. [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States); Department of Biology, Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States); Tewolde, Teclemichael [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States); Ross-Inta, Catherine [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616 (United States); Ford, Byron D., E-mail: bford@msm.edu [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Current medical countermeasures against organophosphate (OP) nerve agents are effective in reducing mortality, but do not sufficiently protect the CNS from delayed brain damage and persistent neurological symptoms. In this study, we examined the efficacy of neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) in protecting against delayed neuronal cell death following acute intoxication with the OP diisopropylflurophosphate (DFP). Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were pretreated with pyridostigmine (0.1 mg/kg BW, i.m.) and atropine methylnitrate (20 mg/kg BW, i.m.) prior to DFP (9 mg/kg BW, i.p.) intoxication to increase survival and reduce peripheral signs of cholinergic toxicity but not prevent DFP-induced seizures or delayed neuronal injury. Pretreatment with NRG-1 did not protect against seizures in rats exposed to DFP. However, neuronal injury was significantly reduced in most brain regions by pretreatment with NRG-1 isoforms NRG-EGF (3.2 μg/kg BW, i.a) or NRG-GGF2 (48 μg/kg BW, i.a.) as determined by FluroJade-B labeling in multiple brain regions at 24 h post-DFP injection. NRG-1 also blocked apoptosis and oxidative stress-mediated protein damage in the brains of DFP-intoxicated rats. Administration of NRG-1 at 1 h after DFP injection similarly provided significant neuroprotection against delayed neuronal injury. These findings identify NRG-1 as a promising adjuvant therapy to current medical countermeasures for enhancing neuroprotection against acute OP intoxication. -- Highlights: ► NRG-1 blocked DFP induced neuronal injury. ► NRG-1 did not protect against seizures in rats exposed to DFP. ► NRG-1 blocked apoptosis and oxidative stress in the brains of DFP-intoxicated rats. ► Administration of NRG-1 at 1 h after DFP injection prevented delayed neuronal injury.

  9. Neuroprotective effects of bee venom acupuncture therapy against rotenone-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis.

    Khalil, Wagdy K B; Assaf, Naglaa; ElShebiney, Shaimaa A; Salem, Neveen A

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, is characterized by dopaminergic neurodegeneration, mitochondrial impairment, and oxidative stress. Exposure of animals to rotenone induces a range of responses characteristic of PD, including reactive oxygen species production and dopaminergic cell death. Although l-dopa is the drug of choice for improving core symptoms of PD, it is associated with involuntary movements. The current study was directed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of bee venom acupuncture therapy (BVA) against rotenone-induced oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and apoptosis in PD mouse model. Forty male Swiss mice were divided into four groups: (1) received saline solution orally and served as normal control, (2) received rotenone (1.5 mg/kg, s.c. every other day for 6 doses), (3) received rotenone concomitantly with l-dopa (25 mg/kg, daily, p.o. for 6 days), and finally (4) received rotenone concomitantly with BVA (0.02 ml once every 3 days for two weeks). Rotenone-treated mice showed impairment in locomotor behavior and a significant reduction in brain dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, GSH levels, and paraoxonase activity, whereas a significant increase was observed in brain malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-β levels besides DNA damage, and over-expression of caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2 genes. Significant improvement of the aforementioned parameters was demonstrated after BVA compared to l-dopa therapy. In conclusion, bee venom normalized all the neuroinflammatory and apoptotic markers and restored brain neurochemistry after rotenone injury. Therefore, BVA is a promising neuroprotective therapy for PD. PMID:25481089

  10. Neuroprotection against cobalt chloride-induced cell apoptosis of primary cultured cortical neurons by salidroside.

    Zhang, Shuqiang; Chen, Xia; Yang, Yumin; Zhou, Xinyang; Liu, Jie; Ding, Fei

    2011-08-01

    Salidroside, a phenol glycoside of plant origin, has been documented to possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological properties, including protective effects against neuronal death induced by different insults. To provide further insights into the neuroprotective functions peculiar to salidroside, this study used primary cultured cortical neurons of rats as a cell model to examine whether salidroside was able to prevent against cell damage after exposure to cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)), a hypoxia-inducing agent. The data from 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide test, Hoechst33342 staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP-mediated nicked end labeling assay, and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio analysis indicated that salidroside pretreatment attenuated hypoxia-induced apoptotic cell death of primary cultured cortical neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, preliminary exploration of the possible mechanisms suggested that the protective effects of salidroside, shown in our experimental setting, might probably be mediated by enhancing the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, alleviating the increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, and inhibiting over-expression of nuclear factor-kappa B protein. PMID:21499890

  11. Neuroprotective effects of Triticum aestivum L. against beta-amyloid-induced cell death and memory impairments.

    Jang, Jung-Hee; Kim, Chang-Yul; Lim, Sun Ha; Yang, Chae Ha; Song, Kyung-Sik; Han, Hyung Soo; Lee, Hyeong-Kyu; Lee, Jongwon

    2010-01-01

    beta-Amyloid (A beta) is a key component of senile plaques, neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and has been reported to induce cell death via oxidative stress. This study investigated the protective effects of Triticum aestivum L. (TAL) on A beta-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells and cognitive dysfunctions in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Cells treated with A beta exhibited decreased viability and apoptotic features, such as DNA fragmentation, alterations in mitochondria and an increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, which were attenuated by TAL extract (TALE) pretreatment. To elucidate the neuroprotective mechanisms of TALE, the study examined A beta-induced oxidative stress and cellular defense. TALE pretreatment suppressed A beta-increased intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via up-regulation of glutathione, an essential endogenous antioxidant. To further verify the effect of TALE on memory impairments, A beta or scopolamine was injected in SD rats and a water maze task conducted as a spatial memory test. A beta or scopolamine treatment increased the time taken to find the platform during training trials, which was decreased by TALE pretreatment. Furthermore, one of the active components of TALE, total dietary fiber also effectively inhibited A beta-induced cytotoxicity and scopolamine-caused memory deficits. These results suggest that TALE may have preventive and/or therapeutic potential in the management of AD. PMID:19441012

  12. Bioassay-Guided Isolation of Neuroprotective Compounds from Uncaria rhynchophylla against Beta-Amyloid-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Yan-Fang Xian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncaria rhynchophylla is a component herb of many Chinese herbal formulae for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Previous study in our laboratory has demonstrated that an ethanol extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla ameliorated cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease induced by D-galactose. However, the active ingredients of Uncaria rhynchophylla responsible for the anti-Alzheimer’s disease activity have not been identified. This study aims to identify the active ingredients of Uncaria rhynchophylla by a bioassay-guided fractionation approach and explore the acting mechanism of these active ingredients by using a well-established cellular model of Alzheimer’s disease, beta-amyloid- (Aβ- induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. The results showed that six alkaloids, namely, corynoxine, corynoxine B, corynoxeine, isorhynchophylline, isocorynoxeine, and rhynchophylline were isolated from the extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla. Among them, rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline significantly decreased Aβ-induced cell death, intracellular calcium overloading, and tau protein hyperphosphorylation in PC12 cells. These results suggest that rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline are the major active ingredients responsible for the protective action of Uncaria rhynchophylla against Aβ-induced neuronal toxicity, and their neuroprotective effect may be mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting intracellular calcium overloading and tau protein hyperphosphorylation.

  13. Neuroprotective effect of astaxanthin against rat retinal ganglion cell death under various stresses that induce apoptosis and necrosis

    Yamagishi, Reiko; Aihara, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Astaxanthin is a type of carotenoid known to have strong antioxidant effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether astaxanthin confers a neuroprotective effect against glutamate stress, oxidative stress, and hypoxia-induced apoptotic or necrotic cell death in primary cultures of rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Methods Purified rat RGCs were exposed to three kinds of stressors induced by 25 μM glutamate for 72 h, B27 medium without an antioxidant for 4 h, and a reduc...

  14. Unraveling the mechanism of neuroprotection of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic dysfunctions in rats

    Earlier, we found that arsenic induced cholinergic deficits in rat brain could be protected by curcumin. In continuation to this, the present study is focused to unravel the molecular mechanisms associated with the protective efficacy of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits. Exposure to arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats resulted to decrease the expression of CHRM2 receptor gene associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions as evident by decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, activity of mitochondrial complexes and enhanced apoptosis both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in comparison to controls. The ultrastructural images of arsenic exposed rats, assessed by transmission electron microscope, exhibited loss of myelin sheath and distorted cristae in the mitochondria both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus as compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats was found to protect arsenic induced changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of mitochondrial complexes both in frontal cortex and hippocampus. Alterations in the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and ultrastructural damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus following arsenic exposure were also protected in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin. The data of the present study reveal that curcumin could protect arsenic induced cholinergic deficits by modulating the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins in the brain. More interestingly, arsenic induced functional and ultrastructural changes in the brain mitochondria were also protected by curcumin. - Highlights: • Neuroprotective mechanism of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits studied • Curcumin protected arsenic induced enhanced expression of stress markers in rat brain • Arsenic compromised mitochondrial electron transport chain protected

  15. Unraveling the mechanism of neuroprotection of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic dysfunctions in rats

    Srivastava, Pranay [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Yadav, Rajesh S. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Department of Crimnology and Forensic Science, Harisingh Gour University, Sagar 470 003 (India); Chandravanshi, Lalit P.; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Dhuriya, Yogesh K.; Chauhan, Lalit K.S. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Dwivedi, Hari N. [Babu Banarasi Das University, BBD City, Faizabad Road, Lucknow 227 015 (India); Pant, Aditiya B. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Khanna, Vinay K., E-mail: vkkhanna1@gmail.com [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Earlier, we found that arsenic induced cholinergic deficits in rat brain could be protected by curcumin. In continuation to this, the present study is focused to unravel the molecular mechanisms associated with the protective efficacy of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits. Exposure to arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats resulted to decrease the expression of CHRM2 receptor gene associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions as evident by decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, activity of mitochondrial complexes and enhanced apoptosis both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in comparison to controls. The ultrastructural images of arsenic exposed rats, assessed by transmission electron microscope, exhibited loss of myelin sheath and distorted cristae in the mitochondria both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus as compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats was found to protect arsenic induced changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of mitochondrial complexes both in frontal cortex and hippocampus. Alterations in the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and ultrastructural damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus following arsenic exposure were also protected in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin. The data of the present study reveal that curcumin could protect arsenic induced cholinergic deficits by modulating the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins in the brain. More interestingly, arsenic induced functional and ultrastructural changes in the brain mitochondria were also protected by curcumin. - Highlights: • Neuroprotective mechanism of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits studied • Curcumin protected arsenic induced enhanced expression of stress markers in rat brain • Arsenic compromised mitochondrial electron transport chain protected

  16. The neuroprotective role of ferrostatin-1 under rotenone-induced oxidative stress in dopaminergic neuroblastoma cells.

    Kabiraj, Parijat; Valenzuela, Carlos A; Marin, Jose E; Ramirez, David A; Mendez, Lois; Hwang, Michael S; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Fenelon, Karine; Narayan, Mahesh; Skouta, Rachid

    2015-10-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins including protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) are playing crucial roles in maintaining appropriate protein folding. Under nitrosative stress, an excess of nitric oxide (NO) radical species induced the S-nitrosylation of PDI cysteines which eliminate its isomerase and oxidoreductase capabilities. In addition, the S-nitrosylation-PDI complex is the cause of aggregation especially of the α-synuclein (α-syn) protein (accumulation of Lewy-body aggregates). We recently identified a potent antioxidant small molecule, Ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1), that was able to inhibit a non-apoptotic cell death named ferroptosis. Ferroptosis cell death involved the generation of oxidative stress particularly lipid peroxide. In this work, we reported the neuroprotective role of ferrostatin-1 under rotenone-induced oxidative stress in dopaminergic neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). We first synthesized the Fer-1 and confirmed that it is not toxic toward the SH-SY5Y cells at concentrations up to 12.5 μM. Second, we showed that Fer-1 compound quenched the commercially available stable radical, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), in non-cellular assay at 82 %. Third, Fer-1 inhibited the ROS/RNS generated under rotenone insult in SH-SY5Y cells. Fourth, we revealed the effective role of Fer-1 in ER stress mediated activation of apoptotic pathway. Finally, we reported that Fer-1 mitigated rotenone-induced α-syn aggregation. PMID:26385697

  17. Neuroprotective effects of bloodletting atJing points combined with mild induced hypothermia in acute severe traumatic brain injury

    Yue Tu; Xiao-mei Miao; Tai-long Yi; Xu-yi Chen; Hong-tao Sun; Shi-xiang Cheng; Sai Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Bloodletting atJing points has been used to treat coma in traditional Chinese medicine. Mild induced hypothermia has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects. However, the therapeutic effects of bloodletting atJing points and mild induced hypothermia alone are limited. Therefore, we investigated whether combined treatment might have clinical effectiveness for the treatment of acute severe trau-matic brain injury. Using a rat model of traumatic brain injury, combined treatment substantially alleviated cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, neurological function was ameliorated, and cellular necrosis and the inlfammatory response were lessened. These ifndings suggest that the combined effects of bloodletting atJing points (20 µL, twice a day, for 2 days) and mild induced hypothermia (6 hours) are better than their individual effects alone. Their combined application may have marked neuroprotective effects in the clinical treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury.

  18. Neuroprotective effects of bloodletting at Jing points combined with mild induced hypothermia in acute severe traumatic brain injury

    Tu, Yue; Miao, Xiao-mei; Yi, Tai-long; Chen, Xu-yi; Sun, Hong-tao; Cheng, Shi-xiang; Zhang, Sai

    2016-01-01

    Bloodletting at Jing points has been used to treat coma in traditional Chinese medicine. Mild induced hypothermia has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects. However, the therapeutic effects of bloodletting at Jing points and mild induced hypothermia alone are limited. Therefore, we investigated whether combined treatment might have clinical effectiveness for the treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. Using a rat model of traumatic brain injury, combined treatment substantially alleviated cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, neurological function was ameliorated, and cellular necrosis and the inflammatory response were lessened. These findings suggest that the combined effects of bloodletting at Jing points (20 μL, twice a day, for 2 days) and mild induced hypothermia (6 hours) are better than their individual effects alone. Their combined application may have marked neuroprotective effects in the clinical treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury.

  19. Neuroprotective effect of cobalt chloride on hypobaric hypoxia-induced oxidative stress.

    Shrivastava, Kalpana; Shukla, Dhananjay; Bansal, Anju; Sairam, Mustoori; Banerjee, P K; Ilavazhagan, Govindaswamy

    2008-02-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia, characteristic of high altitude is known to increase the formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), and decrease effectiveness of antioxidant enzymes. RONS are involved and may even play a causative role in high altitude related ailments. Brain is highly susceptible to hypoxic stress and is involved in physiological responses that follow. Exposure of rats to hypobaric hypoxia (7619 m) resulted in increased oxidation of lipids and proteins due to increased RONS and decreased reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio. Further, there was a significant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) levels. Increase in heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was also noticed along with metallothionein (MT) II and III. Administration of cobalt appreciably attenuated the RONS generation, oxidation of lipids and proteins and maintained GSH/GSSH ratio similar to that of control cells via induction of HO-1 and MT offering efficient neuroprotection. It can be concluded that cobalt reduces hypoxia oxidative stress by maintaining higher cellular HO-1 and MT levels via hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) signaling mechanisms. These findings provide a basis for possible use of cobalt for prevention of hypoxia-induced oxidative stress. PMID:17706837

  20. Neuroprotection of Grape Seed Extract and Pyridoxine against Triton-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Abdou, Heba M.

    2016-01-01

    Triton WR-1339 administration causes neurotoxicity. Natural products and herbal extracts can attenuate cerebral injury. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective role of grape seed extract and/or vitamin B6 against triton-induced neurotoxicity. Thirty-five adult male albino rats of the Sprague-Dawley strain, weighing 140–145 g, were divided into five groups: control, triton, grape seed extract + triton, grape seed extract + triton + vitamin B6, and vitamin B6 + triton. The hematological and biochemical analyses were carried out. Alteration in iNOS mRNA gene expression was determined using reverse-transcriptase PCR analysis. In addition, qualitative DNA fragmentation was examined using agarose gel electrophoresis. Triton-treatment caused significant disturbances in the hematological parameters, the neurological functions, and the antioxidant profile. Also, triton significantly increased the iNOS mRNA expression and DNA damage. Our results showed that grape seed extract and/or vitamin B6 could attenuate all the examined parameters. These natural substances could exhibit protective effects against triton-induced neurological damage because of their antioxidative and antiapoptotic capacities. PMID:27293516

  1. The indirect NMDAR inhibitor flupirtine induces sustained post-ischemic recovery, neuroprotection and angioneurogenesis.

    Jaeger, Hanna M; Pehlke, Jens R; Kaltwasser, Britta; Kilic, Ertugrul; Bähr, Mathias; Hermann, Dirk M; Doeppner, Thorsten R

    2015-06-10

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation induces excitotoxicity, contributing to post-stroke brain injury. Hitherto, NMDAR deactivation failed in clinical trials due to insufficient pre-clinical study designs and drug toxicity. Flupirtine is an indirect NMDAR antagonist being used as analgesic in patients. Taking into account its tolerability profile, we evaluated effects of flupirtine on post-stroke tissue survival, neurological recovery and brain remodeling.Mice were exposed to stroke and intraperitoneally treated with saline (control) or flupirtine at various doses (1-10 mg/kg) and time-points (0-12 hours). Tissue survival and cell signaling were studied on day 2, whereas neurological recovery and tissue remodeling were analyzed until day 84.Flupirtine induced sustained neuroprotection, when delivered up to 9 hours. The latter yielded enhanced neurological recovery that persisted over three months and which was accompanied by enhanced angioneurogenesis. On the molecular level, inhibition of calpain activation was noted, which was associated with increased signal-transducer-and-activator-of-transcription-6 (STAT6) abundance, reduced N-terminal-Jun-kinase and NF-κB activation, as well as reduced proteasomal activity. Consequently, blood-brain-barrier integrity was stabilized, oxidative stress was reduced and brain leukocyte infiltration was diminished.In view of its excellent tolerability, considering its sustained effects on neurological recovery, brain tissue survival and remodeling, flupirtine is an attractive candidate for stroke therapy. PMID:26050199

  2. Neuroprotection of Grape Seed Extract and Pyridoxine against Triton-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Heba M. Abdou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Triton WR-1339 administration causes neurotoxicity. Natural products and herbal extracts can attenuate cerebral injury. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective role of grape seed extract and/or vitamin B6 against triton-induced neurotoxicity. Thirty-five adult male albino rats of the Sprague-Dawley strain, weighing 140–145 g, were divided into five groups: control, triton, grape seed extract + triton, grape seed extract + triton + vitamin B6, and vitamin B6 + triton. The hematological and biochemical analyses were carried out. Alteration in iNOS mRNA gene expression was determined using reverse-transcriptase PCR analysis. In addition, qualitative DNA fragmentation was examined using agarose gel electrophoresis. Triton-treatment caused significant disturbances in the hematological parameters, the neurological functions, and the antioxidant profile. Also, triton significantly increased the iNOS mRNA expression and DNA damage. Our results showed that grape seed extract and/or vitamin B6 could attenuate all the examined parameters. These natural substances could exhibit protective effects against triton-induced neurological damage because of their antioxidative and antiapoptotic capacities.

  3. In Vitro Neuroprotective Effect of Shikimic Acid Against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress.

    Rabelo, Thallita Kelly; Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Caregnato, Fernanda Freitas; Schnorr, Carlos Eduardo; Gasparotto, Juciano; Serafini, Mairim Russo; de Souza Araújo, Adriano Antunes; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo José; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Gelain, Daniel Pens

    2015-08-01

    Shikimic acid (SA), originally extracted from Illicium verum Hook. fil., is an indispensable starting material for the synthesis of the antiviral drug Oseltamivir (Tamiflu(®)) with very limited number of studies regarding its biological effects in vitro. Therefore, we here evaluated the thermoanalytical profile, redox properties, and in vitro effects of SA on human neuronal-like cells (SH-SY5Y). The thermoanalytical profile of SA was studied by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) characterization. Both antioxidant potential and in vitro lipoperoxidation levels were analyzed. Cell viability and intracellular reactive species (RS) production was determined by DCF and SRB assays, respectively. Our results show in vitro antioxidant activity of SA without exerting cytotoxic effects on SH-SY5Y cells at tested concentrations of 10 nM, 10 μM, and 10 mM. In addition, SA protected the cells against H2O2-induced toxicity; effect that could be related, at least in part, with decreased intracellular RS production and its antioxidant potential. The present study shows evidence for neuroprotective actions of SA against oxidative stress-induced toxicity on SH-SY5Y cells, inviting for further investigation about its potential use in the context of oxidative stress-associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25862258

  4. The endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor salubrinal inhibits the activation of autophagy and neuroprotection induced by brain ischemic preconditioning

    Bo GAO; Xiang-yang ZHANG; Rong HAN; Tong-tong ZHANG; Cheng CHEN; Zheng-hong QIN; Rui SHENG

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress participates in the neuroprotective effects of ischemic preconditioning (IPC)-induced neuroprotection and autophagy activation in rat brains.Methods:The right middle cerebral artery in SD rats was occluded for 10 min to induce focal cerebral IPC,and was occluded permanently 24 h later to induce permanent focal ischemia (PFI).ER stress inhibitor salubrinal (SAL) was injected via intracerebral ventricle infusion 10 min before the onset of IPC.Infarct volume and motor behavior deficits were examined after the ischemic insult.The protein levels of LC3,p62,HSP70,glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP 78),p-elF2α and caspase-12 in the ipsilateral cortex were analyzed using immunoblotting.LC3 expression pattern in the sections of ipsilateral cortex was observed with immunofluorescence.Results:Pretreatment with SAL (150 pmol) abolished the neuroprotective effects of IPC,as evidenced by the significant increases in mortality,infarct volume and motor deficits after PFI.At the molecular levels,pretreatment with SAL (150 pmol) significantly increased p-elF2α level,and decreased GRP78 level after PFI,suggesting that SAL effectively inhibited ER stress in the cortex.Furthermore,the pretreatment with SAL blocked the IPC-induced upregulation of LC3-Ⅱ and downregulation of p62 in the cortex,thus inhibiting the activation of autophagy.Moreover,SAL blocked the upregulation of HSP70,but significantly increased the cleaved caspase-12 level,thus promoting ER stress-dependent apoptotic signaling in the cortex.Conclusion:ER stress-induced autophagy might contribute to the neuroprotective effect of brain ischemic preconditioning.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol against glutamate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in PC12 cells.

    Bak, Dong-Ho; Kim, Hyung Don; Kim, Young Ock; Park, Chun Geun; Han, Seung-Yun; Kim, Jwa-Jin

    2016-02-01

    Ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Mey.) is commonly used in traditional oriental medicine for its wide spectrum of medicinal properties, including anti-inflammatory, antitumorigenic, adaptogenic and anti-aging properties. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PPD), the main intestinal metabolite of ginsenosides, is one of the active ingredients in ginseng. In this study, we aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of PPD on PC12 cells; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We examined cell viability by MTT assay and the morphological changes of PC12 cells following glutamate‑induced cell damage and evaluated the anti‑apoptotic effects of PPD using Hoechst 33258 staining, western blot analysis and Muse™ Cell Analyzer and the antioxidant effects of PPD using FACS analysis and immunofluorescence. Furthermore, PPD exerted protective effects on PC12 cells via the inhibition of mitochondrial damage against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity using immunofluorescence, electron microscopy and FACS analysis. We demonstrate that treatment with PPD suppresses apoptosis, which contributes to the neuroprotective effects of PPD against glutamate‑induced excitotoxicity in PC12 cells. Treatment with PPD inhibited nuclear condensation and decreased the number of Annexin V-positive cells. In addition, PPD increased antioxidant activity and mitochondrial homeostasis in the glutamate-exposed cells. These antioxidant effects were responsible for the neuroprotection and enhanced mitochondrial function following treatment with PPD. Furthermore, PD inhibited the glutamate-induced morphological changes in the mitochondria and scavenged the mitochondrial and cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by glutamate. In addition, mitochondrial function was significantly improved in terms of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and enhanced mitochondrial mass compared with the cells exposed to glutamate and not treated with PPD. Taken together, the findings of our study indicate

  6. Neuroprotective effects of a sesquiterpene lactone and flavanones from Paulownia tomentosa Steud. against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat cortical cells.

    Kim, Soo-Ki; Cho, Sang-Buem; Moon, Hyung-In

    2010-12-01

    The neuroprotective effects of Paulownia tomentosa against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity were studied in primary cultured rat cortical cells. It was found that the aqueous extract of this medicinal plant significantly attenuated glutamate-induced toxicity. In order to clarify the mechanism(s) underlying this neuroprotective effect, the active fractions and components were isolated and identified. Five compounds were isolated as the methanol extracts from air-dried flowers of P. tomentosa. Isoatriplicolide tiglate exhibited significant neuroprotective activity against glutamate-induced toxicity at concentrations ranging from 1 μM to 10 μM, and exhibited cell viability of approximately 43-78%. Therefore, the neuroprotective effect of P. tomentosa might be due to the inhibition of glutamate-induced toxicity by the sesquiterpene lactone derivative it contains. PMID:20683844

  7. Neuroprotective effects of melittin on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptotic cell death in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells

    Han, Sang Mi; Kim, Jung Min; Park, Kwan Kyu; Chang, Young Chae; Pak, Sok Cheon

    2014-01-01

    Background Free radicals are involved in neuronal cell death in human neurodegenerative diseases. Since ancient times, honeybee venom has been used in a complementary medicine to treat various diseases and neurologic disorders. Melittin, the main component of honeybee venom, has various biologic effects, including anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-inflammatory activities. Methods We investigated the neuroprotective effects of melittin against H2O2-induced apoptosis in the human neuroblasto...

  8. Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Complex.

    Marc Rubio

    Full Text Available Clarithromycin was considered the cornerstone for the treatment of Mycobacterium abscessus complex infections. Genetic resistance mechanisms have been described and many experts propose amikacin as an alternative. Nevertheless, clarithromycin has several advantages; therefore, it is necessary to identify the non-functional erm(41 allele to determine the most suitable treatment. The aims of this study were to characterize the molecular mechanisms of clarithromycin resistance in a collection of Mycobacterium abscessus complex isolates and to verify the relationship between these mechanisms and the antibiogram.Clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex (n = 22 from 16 patients were identified using four housekeeping genes (rpoB, secA1, sodA and hsp65, and their genetic resistance was characterized by studying erm(41 and rrl genes. Nine strains were recovered from the clinical isolates and subjected to E-test and microdilution clarithromycin susceptibility tests, with readings at 3, 7 and 14 days.We classified 11/16 (68.8% M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, 4/16 (25.0% M. abscessus subsp. bolletii, and 1/16 (6.3% M. abscessus subsp. massiliense. T28 erm(41 allele was observed in 8 Mycobacterium abscessus subps. abscessus and 3 Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii. One strain of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii had an erm(41 gene truncated and was susceptible to clarithromycin. No mutations were observed in rrl gene first isolates. In three patients, follow-up of initial rrl wild-type strains showed acquired resistance.Most clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex had inducible resistance to clarithromycin and total absence of constitutive resistance. Our findings showed that the acquisition of resistance mutations in rrl gene was associated with functional and non-functional erm(41 gene. Caution is needed when using erm(41 sequencing alone to identify M. abscessus subspecies. This study reports an acquired mutation at position 2057 of rrl gene

  9. Neuroprotection of geniposide against hydrogen peroxide induced PC12 cells injury: involvement of PI3 kinase signal pathway

    Jianhui LIU; Fei YIN; Lixia GUO; Xiaohong DENG; Yinhe HU

    2009-01-01

    Aim:Oxidative stress plays a critical role in the pathogenic cascade leading to neuronal degeneration in AD.Consequently,the induction of endogenous antioxidative proteins by antioxidants seems to be a very reasonable strategy for delaying the disease's progression.In previous work,we identified the neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects of geniposide,which result from the activation of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R).In this study,we explore the role of PI3 kinase sig-naling pathway in the neuroprotection of geniposide in PC12 cells.Methods: Cell viability was determined by MTr assay.Apoptosis was detected by Hoechst and PI double staining.The protein expression of Bcl-2 and phosphorylation of Akt308,Akt473,GSK-3β,and PDK1 was measured by Western blot.Results: Geniposide induced the expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2,which inhibited apoptosis in PC12 cells induced by H2O2,and this effect could be inhibited by preincubation with LY294002,a selective inhibitor of PI3K.Further-more,geniposide enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt308,Akt473,GSK-3β and PDK1 under conditions of oxidative stress.Conclusion: These results demonstrate that the PI3K signaling pathway is involved in the neuroprotection of geniposide in PC12 cells against the oxidative damage induced by H202 in PC12 cells.

  10. Neuroprotective mechanisms of puerarin in middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced brain infarction in rats

    Chang Yi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Puerarin, a major isoflavonoid derived from the Chinese medical herb Radix puerariae (kudzu root, has been reported to be useful in the treatment of various cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we examined the detailed mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of puerarin on inflammatory and apoptotic responses induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in rats. Treatment of puerarin (25 and 50 mg/kg; intraperitoneally 10 min before MCAO dose-dependently attenuated focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Administration of puerarin at 50 mg/kg, showed marked reduction in infarct size compared with that of control rats. MCAO-induced focal cerebral ischemia was associated with increases in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, and active caspase-3 protein expressions as well as the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α in ischemic regions. These expressions were markedly inhibited by the treatment of puerarin (50 mg/kg. In addition, puerarin (10~50 μM concentration-dependently inhibited respiratory bursts in human neutrophils stimulated by formyl-Met-Leu-Phe. On the other hand, puerarin (20~500 μM did not significantly inhibit the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance reaction in rat brain homogenates. An electron spin resonance (ESR method was conducted on the scavenging activity of puerarin on the free radicals formed. Puerarin (200 and 500 μM did not reduce the ESR signal intensity of hydroxyl radical formation. In conclusion, we demonstrate that puerarin is a potent neuroprotective agent on MCAO-induced focal cerebral ischemia in vivo. This effect may be mediated, at least in part, by the inhibition of both HIF-1α and TNF-α activation, followed by the inhibition of inflammatory responses (i.e., iNOS expression, apoptosis formation (active caspase-3, and neutrophil activation, resulting in a reduction in the infarct volume in ischemia-reperfusion brain injury. Thus

  11. MLC901, a Traditional Chinese Medicine induces neuroprotective and neuroregenerative benefits after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Quintard, H; Lorivel, T; Gandin, C; Lazdunski, M; Heurteaux, C

    2014-09-26

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a frequent and clinically highly heterogeneous neurological disorder with large socioeconomic consequences. NeuroAid (MLC601 and MLC901), a Traditional Medicine used in China for patients after stroke has been previously reported to induce neuroprotection and neuroplasticity. This study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects of MLC901 in a rat model of TBI. TBI was induced by a moderate lateral fluid percussion applied to the right parietal cortex. MLC901 was injected intraperitoneally at 2h post-TBI, and then administered in drinking water at a concentration of 10mg/ml until sacrifice of the animals. The cognitive deficits induced by TBI were followed by using the "what-where-when" task, which allows the measurement of episodic-like memory. MLC901 treatment decreased brain lesions induced by TBI. It prevented the serum increase of S-100 beta (S100B) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE), which may be markers to predict the neurologic outcome in human patients with TBI. MLC901 reduced the infarct volume when injected up to 2h post-TBI, prevented edema formation and assisted its resolution, probably via the regulation of aquaporin 4. These positive MLC901 effects were associated with an upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as well as an increase of endogenous hippocampal neurogenesis and gliogenesis around the lesion. Furthermore, MLC901 reduced cognitive deficits induced by TBI. Rats subjected to TBI displayed a suppression of temporal order memory, which was restored by MLC901. This work provides evidence that MLC901 has neuroprotective and neurorestorative actions, which lead to an improvement in the recovery of cognitive functions in a model of traumatic brain injury. PMID:24993477

  12. Neuroprotective Effects of Dexmedetomidine Against Hypoxia-Induced Nervous System Injury are Related to Inhibition of NF-κB/COX-2 Pathways.

    Pan, Wanying; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Nan; Yuan, Fuli; Hua, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Yueting; Mo, Liqiu

    2016-10-01

    Dexmedetomidine has been reported to provide neuroprotection against hypoxia-induced damage. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We examined whether dexmedetomidine's neuroprotective effects were mediated by the NF-κB/COX-2 pathways. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to a 30-min hypoxic treatment followed by recovery to normal conditions. They received dexmedetomidine (16 or 160 μg/kg) or 25 mg/kg atipamezole, an α2-adrenoreceptor antagonist, intraperitoneally before exposure to hypoxia. The whole brain was harvested 6, 18, or 36 h after the hypoxia to determine the histopathological outcome and cleaved caspase-3, Bax/Bcl, NF-κB, and COX-2 levels. Hypoxia treatment induced significant neurotoxicity, including destruction of the tissue structure and upregulation of the protein levels of caspase-3, the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, NF-κB, and COX-2. Dexmedetomidine pretreatment effectively improved histological outcome and restored levels of caspase-3, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, NF-κB, and COX-2. Atipamezole reversed the neuroprotection induced by dexmedetomidine. Neuroprotection was achieved by PDTC and NS-398, inhibitors of NF-κB and COX-2, respectively. Dexmedetomidine use before hypoxia provides neuroprotection. Inhibition of NF-κB/COX-2 pathways activation may contribute to the neuroprotection of dexmedetomidine. PMID:26683659

  13. Treatment with an activator of hypoxia-inducible factor 1, DMOG provides neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury.

    Sen, Tanusree; Sen, Nilkantha

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the major cause of morbidity and mortality and it affects more than 1.7 million people in the USA. A couple of regenerative pathways including activation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) are initiated to reduce cellular damage following TBI; however endogenous activation of these pathways is not enough to provide neuroprotection after TBI. Thus we aimed to see whether sustained activation of HIF-1α can provide neuroprotection and neurorepair following TBI. We found that chronic treatment with dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG) markedly increases the expression level of HIF-1α and mRNA levels of its downstream proteins such as Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 and 4 (PDK1, PDK4) and Erythropoietin (EPO). Treatment of DMOG activates a major cell survival protein kinase Akt and reduces both cell death and lesion volume following TBI. Moreover, administration of DMOG augments cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31) staining in pericontusional cortex after TBI, which suggests that DMOG stimulates angiogenesis after TBI. Treatment with DMOG also improves both memory and motor functions after TBI. Taken together our results suggest that sustained activation of HIF-1α provides significant neuroprotection following TBI. PMID:26970014

  14. A single fraction from Uncaria sinensis exerts neuroprotective effects against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured cortical neurons.

    Kim, Ha Neui; Jang, Ji Yeon; Choi, Byung Tae

    2015-06-01

    We identified a neuroprotective single fraction among 62 ones of hexane extract from Uncaria sinensis (JGH43IA) and investigated its effects and mechanisms in primary cortical neurons. Pretreatment with JGH43IA showed a significantly increase cell viability in a dose-dependent manner with a decrease in the lactate dehydrogenase release. When we performed morphological assay and flow cytometry to determination of the type of cell death, pretreatment with JGH43IA showed a significant reduction of glutamate-induced apoptotic cell death. Then we explored the downstream signaling pathways of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) with calpain activation to elucidate possible pathways of neuroprotection by JGH43IA. Pretreatment with JGH43IA exhibited a significant attenuation of NMDAR GluN2B subunit activation and a decrease in active form of calpain 1 leading to subsequent cleavage of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP). In addition, pretreatment with JGH43IA showed a marked increase of cAMP responsive element binding protein. These results suggest that JGH43IA may have neuroprotective effects through down-regulation of NMDAR GluN2B subunit and calpain 1 activation, and subsequent alleviation of STEP cleavage. This single fraction from U. sinensis might be a useful therapeutic agent for brain disorder associated with glutamate injury. PMID:26140220

  15. Human microglia transplanted in rat focal ischemia brain induce neuroprotection and behavioral improvement.

    Dashdemberel Narantuya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Microglia are resident immunocompetent and phagocytic cells of central nervous system (CNS, which produce various cytokines and growth factors in response to injury and thereby regulate disease pathology. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of microglial transplantation on focal cerebral ischemia model in rat. METHODS: Transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in rats was induced by the intraluminal filament technique. HMO6 cells, human microglial cell line, were transplanted intravenously at 48 hours after MCAO. Functional tests were performed and the infarct volume was measured at 7 and 14 days after MCAO. Migration and cell survival of transplanted microglial cells and host glial reaction in the brain were studied by immunohistochemistry. Gene expression of neurotrophic factors, cytokines and chemokines in transplanted cells and host rat glial cells was determined by laser capture microdissection (LCM and quantitative real time-PCR. RESULTS: HMO6 human microglial cells transplantation group demonstrated significant functional recovery compared with control group. At 7 and 14 days after MCAO, infarct volume was significantly reduced in the HMO group. In the HMO6 group, number of apoptotic cells was time-dependently reduced in the infarct core and penumbra. In addition, number of host rat microglia/macrophages and reactive astrocytes was significantly decreased at 7 and 14 days after MCAO in the penumbra. Gene expression of various neurotrophic factors (GDNF, BDNF, VEGF and BMP7 and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL4 and IL5 was up-regulated in transplanted HMO6 cells of brain tissue compared with those in culture. The expression of GDNF and VEGF in astrocytes in penumbra was significantly up-regulated in the HMO6 group. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that transplantation of HMO6 human microglial cells reduces ischemic deficits and apoptotic events in stroke animals. The results were mediated

  16. Neuroprotective Effects of Endurance Exercise Against High-Fat Diet-Induced Hippocampal Neuroinflammation.

    Kang, E-B; Koo, J-H; Jang, Y-C; Yang, C-H; Lee, Y; Cosio-Lima, L M; Cho, J-Y

    2016-05-01

    Obesity contributes to systemic inflammation, which is associated with the varied pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Growing evidence has demonstrated that endurance exercise (EE) mitigates obesity-induced brain inflammation. However, exercise-mediated anti-inflammatory mechanisms remain largely unknown. We investigated how treadmill exercise (TE) reverses obesity-induced brain inflammation, mainly focusing on toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4)-dependent neuroinflammation in the obese rat brain after 20 weeks of a high-fat diet (HFD). TE in HFD-fed rats resulted in a significant lowering in the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, the area under the curve for glucose and abdominal visceral fat, and also improved working memory ability in a passive avoidance task relative to sedentary behaviour in HFD-fed rats, with the exception of body weight. More importantly, TE revoked the increase in HFD-induced proinflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor α and interleukin-1β) and cyclooxygenase-2, which is in parallel with a reduction in TLR-4 and its downstream proteins, myeloid differentiation 88 and tumour necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6, and phosphorylation of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1, IkBα and nuclear factor-κB. Moreover, TE reduced an indicator of microglia activation, ionised calcium-binding adapter molecule-1, and also decreased glial fibrillary acidic protein, an indicator of gliosis formed by activated astrocytes in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampal dentate gyrus, compared to HFD-fed sedentary rats. Finally, EE up-regulated the expression of anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, and suppressed the expression of pro-apoptotic protein, Bax, in the hippocampus compared to HFD-fed sedentary rats. Taken together, these data suggest that TE may exert neuroprotective effects as a result of mitigating the production of proinflammatory cytokines by inhibiting the TLR4 signalling pathways. The results of

  17. Neuroprotection with metformin and thymoquinone against ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in prenatal rat cortical neurons

    Ullah Ikram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to ethanol during early development triggers severe neuronal death by activating multiple stress pathways and causes neurological disorders, such as fetal alcohol effects or fetal alcohol syndrome. This study investigated the effect of ethanol on intracellular events that predispose developing neurons for apoptosis via calcium-mediated signaling. Although the underlying molecular mechanisms of ethanol neurotoxicity are not completely determined, mitochondrial dysfunction, altered calcium homeostasis and apoptosis-related proteins have been implicated in ethanol neurotoxicity. The present study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective mechanisms of metformin (Met and thymoquinone (TQ during ethanol toxicity in rat prenatal cortical neurons at gestational day (GD 17.5. Results We found that Met and TQ, separately and synergistically, increased cell viability after ethanol (100 mM exposure for 12 hours and attenuated the elevation of cytosolic free calcium [Ca2+]c. Furthermore, Met and TQ maintained normal physiological mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔψM, which is typically lowered by ethanol exposure. Increased cytosolic free [Ca2+]c and lowered mitochondrial transmembrane potential after ethanol exposure significantly decreased the expression of a key anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2, increased expression of Bax, and stimulated the release of cytochrome-c from mitochondria. Met and TQ treatment inhibited the apoptotic cascade by increasing Bcl-2 expression. These compounds also repressed the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 and reduced the cleavage of PARP-1. Morphological conformation of cell death was assessed by TUNEL, Fluoro-Jade-B, and PI staining. These staining methods demonstrated more cell death after ethanol treatment, while Met, TQ or Met plus TQ prevented ethanol-induced apoptotic cell death. Conclusion These findings suggested that Met and TQ are strong protective agents against ethanol-induced

  18. Cerebrolysin, a mixture of neurotrophic factors induces marked neuroprotection in spinal cord injury following intoxication of engineered nanoparticles from metals.

    Menon, Preeti Kumaran; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Sharma, Aruna; Mössler, Herbert; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2012-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the world's most disastrous disease for which there is no effective treatment till today. Several studies suggest that nanoparticles could adversely influence the pathology of SCI and thereby alter the efficacy of many neuroprotective agents. Thus, there is an urgent need to find suitable therapeutic agents that could minimize cord pathology following trauma upon nanoparticle intoxication. Our laboratory has been engaged for the last 7 years in finding suitable therapeutic strategies that could equally reduce cord pathology in normal and in nanoparticle-treated animal models of SCI. We observed that engineered nanoparticles from metals e.g., aluminum (Al), silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) (50-60 nm) when administered in rats daily for 7 days (50 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in exacerbation of cord pathology after trauma that correlated well with breakdown of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) to serum proteins. The entry of plasma proteins into the cord leads to edema formation and neuronal damage. Thus, future drugs should be designed in such a way to be effective even when the SCI is influenced by nanoparticles. Previous research suggests that a suitable combination of neurotrophic factors could induce marked neuroprotection in SCI in normal animals. Thus, we examined the effects of a new drug; cerebrolysin that is a mixture of different neurotrophic factors e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and other peptide fragments to treat normal or nanoparticle-treated rats after SCI. Our observations showed that cerebrolysin (2.5 ml/kg, i.v.) before SCI resulted in good neuroprotection in normal animals, whereas nanoparticle-treated rats required a higher dose of the drug (5.0 ml/kg, i.v.) to induce comparable neuroprotection in the cord after SCI. Cerebrolysin also reduced spinal cord water content, leakage of plasma proteins

  19. Neuroprotective and nootropic activity of Clitorea ternatea Linn.(Fabaceae leaves on diabetes induced cognitive decline in experimental animals

    Karuna A Talpate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ethanol extract of Clitorea ternatea (EECT was evaluated in diabetes-induced cognitive decline rat model for its nootropic and neuroprotective activity. Materials and Methods: Effect on spatial working memory, spatial reference memory and spatial working-reference memory was evaluated by Y maze, Morris water maze and Radial arm maze respectively. Neuroprotective effects of EECT was studied by assaying acetylcholinesterase, lipid peroxide, superoxide dismutase (SOD, total nitric oxide (NO, catalase (CAT and glutathione (GSH levels in the brain of diabetic rats. Results: The EECT (200 and 400 mg/kg was found to cause significant increase in spatial working memory ( P < 0.05, spatial reference memory ( P < 0.001 and spatial working-reference ( P < 0.001 in retention trials on Y maze, Morris water maze and Radial arm maze respectively. Whereas significant decrease in acetylcholinesterase activity ( P < 0.05, lipid peroxide ( P < 0.001, total NO ( P < 0.001 and significant increase in SOD, CAT and GSH levels was observed in animals treated with EECT (200 and 400 mg/kg compared to diabetic control group. Conclusions: The present data indicates that Clitorea ternatea tenders protection against diabetes induced cognitive decline and merits the need for further studies to elucidate its mode of action.

  20. White tea (Camellia sinensis Kuntze) exerts neuroprotection against hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity in PC12 cells.

    López, Víctor; Calvo, Maria Isabel

    2011-03-01

    Tea is a popular beverage whose consumption is associated with prevention of certain disorders. The objective of the study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effect of white tea extract (WTE) on hydrogen peroxide induced toxicity in PC12 cells. Cells were treated with various doses of WTE (10-250 μg/ml) before exposition to 250 μM hydrogen peroxide and cell survival was determined through the MTT and LDH assays. Oxidative stress was quantified in the cells after treatments as intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the antioxidant activity of the extract was assessed in a cell free system in terms of free radical scavenging capacity. Results showed that WTE has a significant protective effect in the PC12 cell line against hydrogen peroxide as cell survival was significantly superior in WTE-treated cells compared to hydrogen peroxide-treated cells. A reduction on intracellular oxidative stress as well as radical scavenging properties were produced by WTE. Results suggest that WTE protects PC12 cells against H(2)O(2)-induced toxicity, and that an antioxidant mechanism through ROS scavenging may be in part responsible for cells neuroprotection. PMID:21271291

  1. Neuroprotective effect of melatonin against ischemia/reperfusion-induced neuronal apoptosis in mouse cerebellum

    Qiuhong Duan; Tao Lu; Yixiang Han; Zhiqiang Lu; Ximing Wang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some experiments have demonstrated that melatonin (N-aceyl-5-methoxytryptamine, Mel) has antioxidation. However, whether it has neuroprotective effect in the ischemia/reperfusion injury of central nervous system is unclear.OBJECTIVE: To observe the protective effect of Mel on ischemia/reperfusion-induced cerebellar neuronal apoptosis of rats, and the action mechanism. DESIGN: Controlled observation experiment.SETTING: Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology.MATERIALS: Eight Sprague-Dawley rats aged 7-8 days and weighing 10-12 g were provided by Medical Experimental Animal Center, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Anti-cytochrome C monoclonal antibody was purchased from R & D Company; 7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate(DCFH-DA), rhodamine 123 and Mel were purchased from Sigma Company (USA). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) kit was purchased from Nanjing Jiancheng Bioengineering Institute.METHODS: This experiment was carried out in the laboratory for Department of Biochemistry and Molecule Biology, Tongji Medical College between October 2002 and March 2004. Cerebellar neurons of rats were cultured in vitro. After oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 90 minutes, 1×10-4, 1×10-6, 1×10-9 mol/L Mel was added, respectively, namely high-, middle-, and low-concentration Mel groups. Cells, which were cultured by OGD, served as model group, and control group, in which OGD intervention was omitted, was set. ①Cytochrome C level of mitochondrial cells in each group was detected by ELISA method. ②LDH activity in the cell culture fluid was measured, and cell membrane permeability change was analyzed. The cells in the Mel group with the lowest LDH activity served as Mel treatment group, I.e. Cells were cultured with OGD, and then Mel was added; Meanwhile, Mel prevention group was set, I.e. Mel was added before OGD. Intervention was not changed in the

  2. Gender difference in the neuroprotective effect of rat bone marrow mesenchymal cells against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells

    Jing Yuan; Jian-xiong Yu

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can reduce retinal ganglion cell death and effectively prevent vision loss. Previously, we found that during differentiation, female rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells acquire a higher neurogenic potential compared with male rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. This suggests that female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have a stronger neuroprotective effect than male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Here, we first isolated and...

  3. Neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside

    Qi, Feng-yan; Yang, Le; Tian, Zhen; Zhao, Ming-gao; Liu, Shui-bing; An, Jia-ze

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system, Asiaticoside has been shown to attenuate in vitro neuronal damage caused by exposure to β-amyloid. In vivo studies demonstrated that Asiaticoside could attenuate neurobehavioral, neurochemical and histological changes in transient focal middle cerebral artery occlusion animals. In addition, Asiaticoside showed anxiolytic effects in acute and chronic stress animals. However, its potential neuroprotective properties in glutamate-induced excitotoxicity have not been fully studied. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons exposed to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity invoked by N-methyl-D-aspartate. Pretreatment with Asiaticoside decreased neuronal cell loss in a concentration-dependent manner and restored changes in expression of apoptotic-related proteins Bcl-2 and Bax. Asiaticoside pretreatment also attenuated the upregulation of NR2B expression, a subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, but did not affect expression of NR2A subunits. Additionally, in cultured neurons, Asiaticoside significantly inhibited Ca2+ influx induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate. These experimental findings provide preliminary evidence that during excitotoxicity induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate exposure in cultured cortical neurons, the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside are mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Aside from its anti-oxidant activity, down-regulation of NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors may be one of the underlying mechanisms in Asiaticoside neuroprotection. PMID:25221579

  4. Neuroprotective effects of various doses of topiramate against methylphenidate induced oxidative stress and inflammation in rat isolated hippocampus.

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Shabab, Behnaz

    2016-03-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) abuse causes neurodegeneration. The neuroprotective effects of topiramate (TPM) have been reported but its putative mechanism remains unclear. The current study evaluates the role of various doses of TPM on protection of rat hippocampal cells from MPH-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in vivo. Seventy adult male rats were divided into six groups. Group 1 received normal saline (0.7 mL/rat) and group 2 was injected with MPH (10 mg/kg) for 21 days. Groups 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 concurrently were treated by MPH (10 mg/kg) and TPM (10, 30, 50, 70 and 100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)), respectively for 21 days. After drug administration, the open field test (OFT) was used to investigate motor activity. Oxidative, antioxidant and inflammatory factors were measured in isolated hippocampus. Also, the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) level was measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. Cresyl violet staining of Dentate Gyrus (DG) and CA1 cell layers of the hippocampus were also performed. MPH significantly disturbs motor activity in OFT and TPM (70 and 100 mg/kg) decreased this disturbance. Also MPH significantly increased lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial reduced state of glutathione (GSH) level, interleukin (IL)-1β and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and BDNF level in isolated hippocampal cells. Also superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activity significantly decreased. Various doses of TPM attenuated these effects and significantly decreased MPH-induced oxidative damage, inflammation and hippocampal cell loss and increased BDNF level. This study suggests that TPM has the potential to be used as a neuroprotective agent against oxidative stress and neuroinflammation induced by frequent use of MPH. PMID:26718459

  5. Neuroprotective effects of cold-inducible RNA-binding protein during mild hypothermia on traumatic brain injur y

    Guan Wang; Jian-ning Zhang; Jia-kui Guo; Ying Cai; Hong-sheng Sun; Kun Dong; Cheng-gang Wu

    2016-01-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP), a key regulatory protein, could be facilitated by mild hypothermia in the brain, heart and liver. This study observed the effects of mild hypothermia at 31 ± 0.5°C on traumatic brain injury in rats. Results demonstrated that mild hypothermia suppressed apoptosis in the cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus, facilitated CIRP mRNA and protein expression in these regions, especially in the hypothalamus. The anti-apoptotic effect of mild hypothermia disappeared after CIRP silencing. There was no correlation between mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation and CIRP silencing. CIRP silencing inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 activation. These indicate that CIRP inhibits apoptosis by affecting extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 activation, and exerts a neuroprotective effect during mild hypothermia for traumatic brain injury.

  6. Acquired amylase production induced by radiotherapy in a myeloma patient

    A 55-year-old patient with multiple myeloma (IgG-λ) diagnosed in November 1988 was admitted because of bone pain throughout the body. After plasmapheresis and several courses of chemotherapy, a massive tumor of the left thoracic wall involving the rib appeared. Radiotherapy was performed to ameliorate the severe chest pain, after which myelomatous pleural effusion appeared on the left side. The serum, urine and pleural effusion revealed increased activity of amylase of the salivary type. Amylase activity was also detected in the supernatant of myeloma cells cultured from pleural effusion. We reviewed 12 cases of ectopic amylase-producing multiple myeloma. All the cases except one have been reported from Japan, and hyperamylasemia in these cases was detected at diagnosis or during course of the illness. Moreover, cytogenetic analysis of myeloma cells of previous reports revealed structural abnormalities including chromosome 1, near the amylase gene locus. This case also showed t (1; 10) (q21?; q26) by examination of 8 metaphase derived from bone marrow. These observations suggested that ectopic amylase production was induced by irradiation to the plasmacytoma of thoracic wall. (author)

  7. Pre-conditioning induces the precocious differentiation of neonatal astrocytes to enhance their neuroprotective properties

    Sandra J Hewett

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic preconditioning reprogrammes the brain's response to subsequent H/I (hypoxia–ischaemia injury by enhancing neuroprotective mechanisms. Given that astrocytes normally support neuronal survival and function, the purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that a hypoxic preconditioning stimulus would activate an adaptive astrocytic response. We analysed several functional parameters 24 h after exposing rat pups to 3 h of systemic hypoxia (8% O2. Hypoxia increased neocortical astrocyte maturation as evidenced by the loss of GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells with radial morphologies and the acquisition of multipolar GFAP-positive cells. Interestingly, many of these astrocytes had nuclear S100B. Accompanying their differentiation, there was increased expression of GFAP, GS (glutamine synthetase, EAAT-1 (excitatory amino acid transporter-1; also known as GLAST, MCT-1 (monocarboxylate transporter-1 and ceruloplasmin. A subsequent H/I insult did not result in any further astrocyte activation. Some responses were cell autonomous, as levels of GS and MCT-1 increased subsequent to hypoxia in cultured forebrain astrocytes. In contrast, the expression of GFAP, GLAST and ceruloplasmin remained unaltered. Additional experiments utilized astrocytes exposed to exogenous dbcAMP (dibutyryl-cAMP, which mimicked several aspects of the preconditioning response, to determine whether activated astrocytes could protect neurons from subsequent excitotoxic injury. dbcAMP treatment increased GS and glutamate transporter expression and function, and as hypothesized, protected neurons from glutamate excitotoxicity. Taken altogether, these results indicate that a preconditioning stimulus causes the precocious differentiation of astrocytes and increases the acquisition of multiple astrocytic functions that will contribute to the neuroprotection conferred by a sublethal preconditioning stress.

  8. Neuroprotective Effects of Erucin against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Oxidative Damage in a Dopaminergic-like Neuroblastoma Cell Line

    Giorgio Cantelli-Forti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS contributes to the cascade leading to the dysfunction or death of dopaminergic neurons during Parkinson’s disease (PD. A strategy to prevent the OS of dopaminergic neurons may be the use of phytochemicals as inducers of endogenous antioxidants and phase 2 enzymes. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment of the dopaminergic-like neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line with isothiocyanate erucin (ER, a compound of cruciferous vegetables, resulted in significant increases of both total glutathione (GSH levels and total antioxidant capacity at the cytosolic level. The increase of GSH levels was associated with an increase in the resistance of SH-SY5Y cells to neuronal death, in terms of apoptosis, induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA. The pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with ER was also shown to prevent the redox status impairment, in terms of intracellular ROS and O2•− formation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, early events that are initiators of the apoptotic process, induced by 6-OHDA. Last, the antiapoptotic and antioxidant effects of ER were abolished by buthionine sulfoximine, supporting the main role of GSH in the neuroprotective effects recorded by ER. These results suggest that ER may prevent the oxidative damage induced by 6-OHDA.

  9. High-Mobility Group Box-1 Induces Decreased Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Mediated Neuroprotection in the Diabetic Retina

    Ahmed M. Abu El-Asrar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the hypothesis that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-(BDNF- mediated neuroprotection is reduced by high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 in diabetic retina, paired vitreous and serum samples from 46 proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 34 nondiabetic patients were assayed for BDNF, HMGB1, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and TBARS. We also examined retinas of diabetic and HMGB1 intravitreally injected rats. The effect of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizin on diabetes-induced changes in retinal BDNF expressions was studied. Western blot, ELISA, and TBARS assays were used. BDNF was not detected in vitreous samples. BDNF levels were significantly lower in serum samples from diabetic patients compared with nondiabetics, whereas HMGB1, sRAGE, sICAM-1, and TBARS levels were significantly higher in diabetic serum samples. MCP-1 levels did not differ significantly. There was significant inverse correlation between serum levels of BDNF and HMGB1. Diabetes and intravitreal administration of HMGB1 induced significant upregulation of the expression of HMGB1, TBARS, and cleaved caspase-3, whereas the expression of BDNF and synaptophysin was significantly downregulated in rat retinas. Glycyrrhizin significantly attenuated diabetes-induced downregulation of BDNF. Our results suggest that HMGB1-induced downregulation of BDNF might be involved in pathogenesis of diabetic retinal neurodegeneration.

  10. Neuroprotective Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy in Acute Stages of TNBS-Induced Colitis in Guinea-Pigs.

    Ainsley M Robinson

    Full Text Available The therapeutic benefits of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, such as homing ability, multipotent differentiation capacity and secretion of soluble bioactive factors which exert neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, have been attributed to attenuation of autoimmune, inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we aimed to determine the earliest time point at which locally administered MSC-based therapies avert enteric neuronal loss and damage associated with intestinal inflammation in the guinea-pig model of colitis.At 3 hours after induction of colitis by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene-sulfonate (TNBS, guinea-pigs received either human bone marrow-derived MSCs, conditioned medium (CM, or unconditioned medium by enema into the colon. Colon tissues were collected 6, 24 and 72 hours after administration of TNBS. Effects on body weight, gross morphological damage, immune cell infiltration and myenteric neurons were evaluated. RT-PCR, flow cytometry and antibody array kit were used to identify neurotrophic and neuroprotective factors released by MSCs.MSC and CM treatments prevented body weight loss, reduced infiltration of leukocytes into the colon wall and the myenteric plexus, facilitated repair of damaged tissue and nerve fibers, averted myenteric neuronal loss, as well as changes in neuronal subpopulations. The neuroprotective effects of MSC and CM treatments were observed as early as 24 hours after induction of inflammation even though the inflammatory reaction at the level of the myenteric ganglia had not completely subsided. Substantial number of neurotrophic and neuroprotective factors released by MSCs was identified in their secretome.MSC-based therapies applied at the acute stages of TNBS-induced colitis start exerting their neuroprotective effects towards enteric neurons by 24 hours post treatment. The neuroprotective efficacy of MSC-based therapies can be exerted independently to their anti

  11. Neuroprotective effect of bee venom is mediated by reduced astrocyte activation in a subchronic MPTP-induced model of Parkinson's disease.

    Kim, Mi Eun; Lee, Joo Yeon; Lee, Kyung Moon; Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Eunjin; Lee, Yujeong; Lee, Jun Sik; Lee, Jaewon

    2016-08-01

    Bee venom (BV), also known as apitoxin, is widely used in traditional oriental medicine to treat immune-related diseases. Recent studies suggest that BV could be beneficial for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease next to Alzheimer's disease, and PD pathologies are closely associated with neuroinflammation. Previous studies have suggested the neuroprotective effects of BV in animal models of PD are due to the modulation of inflammation. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the anti-neuroinflammatory effect of BV have not been elucidated in astrocytes. Here, the authors investigated the neuroprotective effects of BV and pramipexole (PPX; a positive control) in a subchronic MPTP-induced murine PD model. Both BV and PPX prevented MPTP-induced impairments in motor performance and reduced dopaminergic neuron loss, and furthermore, these neuroprotective effects of BV and PPX were found to be associated with reduced astroglial activation in vivo PD model. However, in MPP(+) treated primary cultured astrocytes, BV modulated astrocyte activation, whereas PPX did not, indicating that the neuroprotective effects of PPX were not mediated by neuroinflammation. These findings suggest that BV should be considered a potential therapeutic or preventive agent for PD and other neuroinflammatory associated disorders. PMID:27469335

  12. Isoflurane Preconditioning Induces Neuroprotection by Up-Regulation of TREK1 in a Rat Model of Spinal Cord Ischemic Injury

    Wang, Kun; Kong, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the neuroprotection and mechanism of isoflurane on rats with spinal cord ischemic injury. Total 40 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the four groups (n=10). Group A was sham-operation group; group B was ischemia group; group C was isoflurane preconditioning group; group D was isoflurane preconditioning followed by ischemia treatment group. Then the expressions of TWIK-related K+ channel 1 (TREK1) in the four groups were detected by immunofluorescent assay, real time-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) and western blot. The primary neurons of rats were isolated and cultured under normal and hypoxic conditions. Besides, the neurons under two conditions were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-TREK1 and lentivirual to overexpress and silence TREK1. Additionally, the neurons were treated with isoflurane or not. Then caspase-3 activity and cell cycle of neurons under normal and hypoxic conditions were detected. Furthermore, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate (NADH) was detected using NAD+/NADH quantification colorimetric kit. Results showed that the mRNA and protein expressions of TREK1 increased significantly in group C and D. In neurons, when TREK1 silenced, isoflurane treatment improved the caspase-3 activity. In hypoxic condition, the caspase-3 activity and sub-G1 cell percentage significantly increased, however, when TREK1 overexpressed the caspase-3 activity and sub-G1 cell percentage decreased significantly. Furthermore, both isoflurane treatment and overexpression of TREK1 significantly decreased NADH. In conclusion, isoflurane-induced neuroprotection in spinal cord ischemic injury may be associated with the up-regulation of TREK1. PMID:27469140

  13. Anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects of synergetic combination of phenytoin and gastrodin on the convulsion induced by penicillin in mice.

    Zhou, Ziqi; Lin, Yanzhu; Zheng, Hongyi; He, Yuzhong; Xu, Haohua; Zhang, Siheng; Weng, Wen; Li, Wei; Zhu, Linyan; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-08-01

    Phenytoin (PHT) is a commonly prescribed first-line antiepileptic drug. However, long-term administration of PHT can cause memory loss and balance disturbance. Gastrodin (GD) is the major bioactive component in Tianma and has sedative, anticonvulsive, memory strengthening, and neuroprotective effects. To combine the two drugs seems attractive; however, little was known about the efficacy of combination therapy. In this study, convulsive attack was successfully induced by penicillin. Isobolographic analysis, memory and balance behavior test, histopathological examination, and Western blot analysis were used to investigate whether the combination therapy of GD and PHT can enhance anticonvulsive effect and reduce the side effects associated with PHT. The GD alone (950.60 mg/kg) and the PHT alone (45.50 mg/kg) could produce an anticonvulsive effect, while comparable effect could be produced by PHT : GD = 1 : 50 (8.59 : 429.27 mg/kg), which reduce the dose of PHT by 81% and GD by 55%. After the chronic anticonvulsive experiments of 16 days, the balance disturbance and short-/long-term memory loss were observed in the PHT group, while the PHT + GD therapy can protect the normal balance and memory function. The neuron morphology of hippocampus was preserved, and the number of surviving neurons after combination therapy was more than the model group. The amount of NF-κB (p65) expression was increased in combination group. All above suggested the potential of the combination of PHT and GD enhances the anticonvulsive effect and the neuroprotective effect and reduces the PHT-associated memory and balance disturbance. The PHT + GD strategy would provide new possibilities as a novel promising methodology to treat epileptic patients. PMID:26018871

  14. Retinoic acid-loaded polymeric nanoparticles induce neuroprotection in a mouse model for Parkinson’s disease.

    Lino Ferreira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid (RA plays an important role in the commitment, maturation and survival of neural cells. Recently, RA was pointed as a therapeutic option for some neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD. The administration of RA has been defying, and in this sense we have previously developed novel RA-loaded polymeric nanoparticles (RA-NPs that ensure the efficient intracellular transport and controlled release of RA. Herein, we show that nanoformulation as an efficient neuroprotective effect on dopaminergic (DA neurons in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP induced mouse model for PD. The results showed that the RA-NPs administration induced a significant reduction of DA neuron loss in the substantia nigra (SN as well as their neuronal fiber/axonal innervations in the striatum. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the expression levels of the transcription factors Pitx3 and Nurr1 induced by RA-NPs, showing its supportive effect on the development and functional maintenance of DA neurons in PD. This is the first study showing that RA-NPs can be an innovative strategy to halt the progression of PD pathogenesis, suggesting that this nanoformulation could be of particular interest for the development of new approaches for PD therapeutics.

  15. Magnetically softened iron oxide (MSIO) nanofluid and its application to thermally-induced heat shock proteins for ocular neuroprotection.

    Bae, Seongtae; Jeoung, Jin Wook; Jeun, Minhong; Jang, Jung-Tak; Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Yu Jeong; Lee, Kwan; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, Jooyoung; Hwang, Hey Min; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Ki Ho

    2016-09-01

    Magnetically softened iron oxide (MSIO) nanofluid, PEGylated (Mn0.5Zn0.5)Fe2O4, was successfully developed for local induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) 72 in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) for ocular neuroprotection. The MSIO nanofluid showed significantly enhanced alternating current (AC) magnetic heat induction characteristics including exceptionally high SLP (Specific Loss Power, > 2000 W/g). This phenomenon was resulted from the dramatically improved AC magnetic softness of MSIO caused by the magnetically tailored Mn(2+) and Zn(2+) distributions in Fe3O4. In addition, the MSIO nanofluid with ultra-thin surface coating layer thickness and high monodispersity allowed for a higher cellular uptake up to a 52.5% with RGCs and enhancing "relaxation power" for higher AC heating capability. The RGCs cultured with MSIO nanofluid successfully induced HSPs 72 by magnetic nanofluid hyperthermia (MNFH). Moreover, it was interestingly observed that systematic control of "AC magnetically-induced heating up rate" reaching to a constant heating temperature of HSPs 72 induction allowed to achieve maximized induction efficiency at the slowest AC heating up rate during MNFH. In addition to in-vitro experimental verification, the studies of MSIO infusion behavior using animal models and a newly designed magnetic coil system demonstrated that the MSIO has promising biotechnical feasibility for thermally-induced HSPs agents in future glaucoma clinics. PMID:27294536

  16. Neuroprotection induced by post-conditioning following ischemia/reperfusion in mice is associated with altered microRNA expression.

    Miao, Wei; Bao, Tian-Hao; Han, Jian-Hong; Yin, Mei; Zhang, Jie; Yan, Yong; Zhu, Yu-Hong

    2016-09-01

    Ischemic preconditioning and ischemic postconditioning (IPostC) represent promising strategies to reduce ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and attenuate the lethal ischemic damage following stroke. However, the mechanism underlying this attenuation remains to be elucidated. It was hypothesized that alterations in microRNA (miRNA) expression in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice following I/R is associated with the functional improvement induced by IPostC. Behavioral changes were assessed in a mouse model of I/R in the absence or presence of IPostC, followed by microarray analyses to investigate the expressional alterations of miRNAs in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice. The results of the present study revealed that IPostC abrogated the neurological impairment and hippocampus‑associated cognitive deficits induced by I/R, and upregulated or downregulated the expression levels of numerous miRNAs. Furthermore, the upregulation of miR‑19a, and the downregulation of miR‑1, let‑7f and miR‑124 expression levels following IPostC was confirmed utilizing reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study demonstrated that alterations in miRNA expression in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice following I/R was associated with the neuroprotection induced by IPostC. PMID:27485299

  17. A comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats

    Talha Jawaid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced neuroinflammation in albino Wistar rats was studied. Male albino rats were administered with scopolamine to induce memory impairment. The standard nootropic agent, piracetam (200 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.], perindopril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.], enalapril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.], and ramipril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.] were administered in different group of animals for 5 days. On 5 th day, scopolamine (1 mg/kg b.w., i.p. was administered after 60 min of the last dose of test drug. Memory function was evaluated in Morris water maze (MWM test and pole climbing test (PCT. Biochemical estimations like glutathione (GSH, malondialdehyde (MDA, and acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain were estimated after completion of behavior study. All three test groups shows improvement in learning and memory in comparison to control group. Perindopril treated group showed a more effective significant decrease in escape latency time and transfer latency time compared to enalapril and ramipril treated group on day 4 in MWM test and PCT, respectively. Perindopril shows a significant reduction in MDA level and acetylcholinesterase activity and a significant rise in GSH level compared to enalapril and ramipril. The finding of this study indicates that Perindopril is more effective in memory retention compared to enalapril and ramipril.

  18. A comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats.

    Jawaid, Talha; Jahan, Shah; Kamal, Mehnaz

    2015-01-01

    The comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced neuroinflammation in albino Wistar rats was studied. Male albino rats were administered with scopolamine to induce memory impairment. The standard nootropic agent, piracetam (200 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), perindopril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), enalapril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), and ramipril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]) were administered in different group of animals for 5 days. On 5(th) day, scopolamine (1 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) was administered after 60 min of the last dose of test drug. Memory function was evaluated in Morris water maze (MWM) test and pole climbing test (PCT). Biochemical estimations like glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain were estimated after completion of behavior study. All three test groups shows improvement in learning and memory in comparison to control group. Perindopril treated group showed a more effective significant decrease in escape latency time and transfer latency time compared to enalapril and ramipril treated group on day 4 in MWM test and PCT, respectively. Perindopril shows a significant reduction in MDA level and acetylcholinesterase activity and a significant rise in GSH level compared to enalapril and ramipril. The finding of this study indicates that Perindopril is more effective in memory retention compared to enalapril and ramipril. PMID:26317078

  19. A comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats

    Jawaid, Talha; Jahan, Shah; Kamal, Mehnaz

    2015-01-01

    The comparative study of neuroprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors against scopolamine-induced neuroinflammation in albino Wistar rats was studied. Male albino rats were administered with scopolamine to induce memory impairment. The standard nootropic agent, piracetam (200 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), perindopril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), enalapril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]), and ramipril (0.1 mg/kg b.w., [i.p.]) were administered in different group of animals for 5 days. On 5th day, scopolamine (1 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) was administered after 60 min of the last dose of test drug. Memory function was evaluated in Morris water maze (MWM) test and pole climbing test (PCT). Biochemical estimations like glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain were estimated after completion of behavior study. All three test groups shows improvement in learning and memory in comparison to control group. Perindopril treated group showed a more effective significant decrease in escape latency time and transfer latency time compared to enalapril and ramipril treated group on day 4 in MWM test and PCT, respectively. Perindopril shows a significant reduction in MDA level and acetylcholinesterase activity and a significant rise in GSH level compared to enalapril and ramipril. The finding of this study indicates that Perindopril is more effective in memory retention compared to enalapril and ramipril. PMID:26317078

  20. Constraint-induced movement therapy for children with acquired brain injury

    Pedersen, Kristina Schmidt; Pallesen, Hanne; Kristensen, Hanne Kaae

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 125–137 Danish children with acquired brain injury (ABI) require rehabilitation annually, 30–40 of these at a highly specialized level. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) has shown significant effects in increasing function in children with cerebral palsy. More knowledge of how...

  1. Neuroprotective Effects of Alpha Lipoic Acid on Haloperidol-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Brain

    Perera Joachim; Tan Joon; Jeevathayaparan S; Chakravarthi Srikumar; Haleagrahara Nagaraja

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Haloperidol is an antipsychotic drug that exerts its' antipsychotic effects by inhibiting dopaminergic neurons. Although the exact pathophysiology of haloperidol extrapyramidal symptoms are not known, the role of reactive oxygen species in inducing oxidative stress has been proposed as one of the mechanisms of prolonged haloperidol-induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, we evaluate the protective effect of alpha lipoic acid against haloperidol-induced oxidative stress in the ra...

  2. Neuroprotective effect of Quince leaf hydroalcoholic extract on intracerebroventricular streptozotocin-induced oxidative stress in cortical tissue of rat brain

    A Hajizadeh Moghaddam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Oxidative stress is a result of the imbalance between free radicals and the antioxidant system of the body. Increased oxidative stress in brain causes dysfunction of brain activities, destruction of neurons, and disease such as Alzheimer. Antioxidants, for example vitamins, phenolic compounds and flavonoids have been extensively investigated as potential therapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo for prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present experimental study, the neuro-protective effect of quince leaf hydroalcoholic extract (QLHE on intracerebroventricular streptozotocin (icv-STZ-induced oxidative stress in cortical tissue of rat brain was examined. Methods: In the present experimental research, forty-two Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, sham, icv-STZ and icv-STZ treated with QLHE groups. The ICV-STZ group rats were injected unilaterally with ICV-STZ (3 mg/kg using a stereotactic device and QLHE (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg/day were administered for 6 weeks starting from 3 weeks before of ICV-STZ injection. The rats were killed at the end of the study and their brain cortical tissue superoxide dismutase and catalase activity were measured. The assay of catalase and superoxide dismutase was performed by following the Genet method. The amount of protein was determined according to the Bradford method.The statistical analysis was performed using one way ANOVA. Data were expressed as mean±SD and  P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The present study indicated that in the ICV-STZ group showed significant decrease (P<0.001 in enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase and catalase in the cortical tissue of the brain. Treatment of different doses of QLHE significantly increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activity compared to icv-STZ group (P<0.001 in cortical tissue of the brain. Conclusion: The study demonstrated the effectiveness of quince leaf hydroalcoholic extract as a powerful antioxidant

  3. Glutamine acts as a neuroprotectant against DNA damage, beta-amyloid and H2O2-induced stress.

    Jianmin Chen

    Full Text Available Glutamine is the most abundant free amino acid in the human blood stream and is 'conditionally essential' to cells. Its intracellular levels are regulated both by the uptake of extracellular glutamine via specific transport systems and by its intracellular synthesis by glutamine synthetase (GS. Adding to the regulatory complexity, when extracellular glutamine is reduced GS protein levels rise. Unfortunately, this excess GS can be maladaptive. GS overexpression is neurotoxic especially if the cells are in a low-glutamine medium. Similarly, in low glutamine, the levels of multiple stress response proteins are reduced rendering cells hypersensitive to H(2O(2, zinc salts and DNA damage. These altered responses may have particular relevance to neurodegenerative diseases of aging. GS activity and glutamine levels are lower in the Alzheimer's disease (AD brain, and a fraction of AD hippocampal neurons have dramatically increased GS levels compared with control subjects. We validated the importance of these observations by showing that raising glutamine levels in the medium protects cultured neuronal cells against the amyloid peptide, Aβ. Further, a 10-day course of dietary glutamine supplementation reduced inflammation-induced neuronal cell cycle activation, tau phosphorylation and ATM-activation in two different mouse models of familial AD while raising the levels of two synaptic proteins, VAMP2 and synaptophysin. Together, our observations suggest that healthy neuronal cells require both intracellular and extracellular glutamine, and that the neuroprotective effects of glutamine supplementation may prove beneficial in the treatment of AD.

  4. Can Medical Herbs Stimulate Regeneration or Neuroprotection and Treat Neuropathic Pain in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy?

    Sven Schröder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy (CIPN has a relevant impact on the quality of life of cancer patients. There are no curative conventional treatments, so further options have to be investigated. We conducted a systematic review in English and Chinese language databases to illuminate the role of medical herbs. 26 relevant studies on 5 single herbs, one extract, one receptor-agonist, and 8 combinations of herbs were identified focusing on the single herbs Acorus calamus rhizoma, Cannabis sativa fructus, Chamomilla matricaria, Ginkgo biloba, Salvia officinalis, Sweet bee venom, Fritillaria cirrhosae bulbus, and the herbal combinations Bu Yang Huan Wu, modified Bu Yang Huan Wu plus Liuwei Di Huang, modified Chai Hu Long Gu Mu Li Wan, Geranii herba plus Aconiti lateralis praeparata radix , Niu Che Sen Qi Wan (Goshajinkigan, Gui Zhi Jia Shu Fu Tang (Keishikajutsubuto, Huang Qi Wu Wu Tang (Ogikeishigomotsuto, and Shao Yao Gan Cao Tang (Shakuyakukanzoto. The knowledge of mechanism of action is still limited, the quality of clinical trials needs further improvement, and studies have not yielded enough evidence to establish a standard practice, but a lot of promising substances have been identified. While CIPN has multiple mechanisms of neuronal degeneration, a combination of herbs or substances might deal with multiple targets for the aim of neuroprotection or neuroregeneration in CIPN.

  5. Can medical herbs stimulate regeneration or neuroprotection and treat neuropathic pain in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy?

    Schröder, Sven; Beckmann, Kathrin; Franconi, Giovanna; Meyer-Hamme, Gesa; Friedemann, Thomas; Greten, Henry Johannes; Rostock, Matthias; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy (CIPN) has a relevant impact on the quality of life of cancer patients. There are no curative conventional treatments, so further options have to be investigated. We conducted a systematic review in English and Chinese language databases to illuminate the role of medical herbs. 26 relevant studies on 5 single herbs, one extract, one receptor-agonist, and 8 combinations of herbs were identified focusing on the single herbs Acorus calamus rhizoma, Cannabis sativa fructus, Chamomilla matricaria, Ginkgo biloba, Salvia officinalis, Sweet bee venom, Fritillaria cirrhosae bulbus, and the herbal combinations Bu Yang Huan Wu, modified Bu Yang Huan Wu plus Liuwei Di Huang, modified Chai Hu Long Gu Mu Li Wan, Geranii herba plus Aconiti lateralis praeparata radix , Niu Che Sen Qi Wan (Goshajinkigan), Gui Zhi Jia Shu Fu Tang (Keishikajutsubuto), Huang Qi Wu Wu Tang (Ogikeishigomotsuto), and Shao Yao Gan Cao Tang (Shakuyakukanzoto). The knowledge of mechanism of action is still limited, the quality of clinical trials needs further improvement, and studies have not yielded enough evidence to establish a standard practice, but a lot of promising substances have been identified. While CIPN has multiple mechanisms of neuronal degeneration, a combination of herbs or substances might deal with multiple targets for the aim of neuroprotection or neuroregeneration in CIPN. PMID:23983777

  6. Hypoxic preconditioning induces neuroprotective stanniocalcin-1 in brain via IL-6 signaling

    Westberg, Johan A; Serlachius, Martina; Lankila, Petri;

    2007-01-01

    mRNA levels in brains of wild-type and IL-6 deficient mice. Furthermore, we monitored the Stc-1 response in brains of wild-type and transgenic mice, overexpressing IL-6 in the astroglia, before and after induced brain injury. RESULTS: Hypoxic preconditioning induced an upregulated expression of Stc...

  7. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Ying-bo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10-80 µM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent experiments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 µM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplanted via intracerebroventricular injection. These tests confirmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a significantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-specific enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  8. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Ying-bo Li; Yan Wang; Ji-ping Tang; Di Chen; Sha-li Wang

    2015-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10–80 μM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent exper-iments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 μM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypox-ic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplantedvia intracerebroventricular injection. These tests conifrmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a signiifcantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-speciifc enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  9. Comparative Neuroprotective Effects of Rasagiline and Aminoindan with Selegiline on Dexamethasone-Induced Brain Cell Apoptosis

    Tazik, Shawna; Johnson, Shakevia; Lu, Deyin; Johnson, Chandra; Youdim, Moussa B. H.; Stockmeier, Craig A.; Ou, Xiao-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Stress can affect the brain and lead to depression; however, the molecular pathogenesis is unclear. An association between stress and stress-induced hypersecretion of glucocorticoids occurs during stress. Dexamethasone (a synthetic glucocorticoid steroid) has been reported to induce apoptosis and increase the activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO) (Youdim et al. 1989). MAO is an enzyme for the degradation of aminergic neurotransmitters; dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin and dietary amines an...

  10. Egg white hydrolysate promotes neuroprotection for neuropathic disorders induced by chronic exposure to low concentrations of mercury.

    Rizzetti, Danize Aparecida; Fernandez, Francisca; Moreno, Silvia; Uranga Ocio, José Antonio; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Vera, Gema; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Castro, Marta Miguel; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to investigate whether the egg white hydrolysate (EWH) acts on the neuropathic disorders associated with long-term Mercury (Hg) exposure in rats. 8- week-old male Wistar rats were treated for 60 days with: a) Control - saline solution (i.m.); b) Mercury - HgCl2 (1st dose 4.6μg/kg, subsequent doses 0.07μg/kg/day, i.m.); c) Hydrolysate - EWH (1g/kg/day, gavage); d) Mercury and Hydrolysate. Mechanical allodynia was assessed using Von Frey Hairs test; heat hyperalgesia by the plantar test; catalepsy by a modification of the "ring test" and spontaneous locomotor activity by a photocell activity chambers. Analyses were performed at 0, 30 and 60 days of treatment. Brain and plasma MDA, plasma NPSH and TNF-α determination and skin immunohistochemistry were performed at 60 days. Hg induced a reduction in mechanical sensitivity threshold at 30 and 60 days and in thermal sensitivity threshold at 60 days. At the end of treatment catalepsy was developed, but there was not significant alteration in spontaneous locomotor activity. Hg also increased brain and plasma MDA, plasma NPSH and TNF-α levels and the number of Merkel cell-neurite complex in the skin. EWH prevented the development of mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia and catalepsy induced by Hg and the increase in MDA concentration in brain and plasma and in the number of Merkel cell-neurite complex in the skin. In conclusion, EWH promotes neuroprotection against the toxic effects caused by Hg, demonstrating a beneficial therapeutic potential. PMID:27350078

  11. Neuroprotective Effects of Alpha Lipoic Acid on Haloperidol-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Brain

    Perera Joachim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Haloperidol is an antipsychotic drug that exerts its' antipsychotic effects by inhibiting dopaminergic neurons. Although the exact pathophysiology of haloperidol extrapyramidal symptoms are not known, the role of reactive oxygen species in inducing oxidative stress has been proposed as one of the mechanisms of prolonged haloperidol-induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, we evaluate the protective effect of alpha lipoic acid against haloperidol-induced oxidative stress in the rat brain. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into control, alpha lipoic acid alone (100 mg/kg p.o for 21 days, haloperidol alone (2 mg/kg i.p for 21 days, and haloperidol with alpha lipoic acid groups (for 21 days. Haloperidol treatment significantly decreased levels of the brain antioxidant enzymes super oxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and concurrent treatment with alpha lipoic acid significantly reversed the oxidative effects of haloperidol. Histopathological changes revealed significant haloperidol-induced damage in the cerebral cortex, internal capsule, and substantia nigra. Alpha lipoic acid significantly reduced this damage and there were very little neuronal atrophy. Areas of angiogenesis were also seen in the alpha lipoic acid-treated group. In conclusion, the study proves that alpha lipoic acid treatment significantly reduces haloperidol-induced neuronal damage.

  12. The Neuroprotective Effect of Erythropoietin on Rotenone-Induced Neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells Through the Induction of Autophagy.

    Jang, Wooyoung; Kim, Hee Ju; Li, Huan; Jo, Kwang Deog; Lee, Moon Kyu; Yang, Hyun Ok

    2016-08-01

    Currently, the autophagy pathway is thought to be important for the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), and the modulation of autophagy may be a novel strategy for the treatment of this disease. Erythropoietin (EPO) has been reported to have neuroprotective effects through anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory mechanisms, and it has also been shown to modulate autophagy signaling in an oxygen toxicity model. Therefore, we investigated the effects of EPO on autophagy markers and evaluated its neuroprotective effect on rotenone-induced neurotoxicity. We adapted the rotenone-induced neurotoxicity model to SH-SY5Y cells as an in vitro model of PD. We measured cell viability using MTT and annexin V/propidium iodide assays and measured intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species. Immunofluorescence analysis was performed to measure the expression of LC3 and α-synuclein. Intracellular signaling proteins associated with autophagy were examined by immunoblot analysis. EPO mono-treatment increased the levels of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-independent/upstream autophagy markers, including Beclin-1, AMPK, and ULK-1. Rotenone treatment of SH-SY5Y cells reduced their viability, increased reactive oxygen species levels, and induced apoptosis and α-synuclein expression, and simultaneous exposure to EPO significantly reduced these effects. Rotenone enhanced mTOR expression and suppressed Beclin-1 expression, indicating suppression of the autophagy system. However, combined treatment with EPO restored Beclin-1 expression and decreased mTOR expression. EPO protects against rotenone-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells by enhancing autophagy-related signaling pathways. The experimental evidence for the EPO-induced neuroprotection against rotenone-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity may significantly impact the development of future PD treatment strategies. PMID:26156288

  13. Neuroprotective effect of renin angiotensin system blockers on experimentally induced Alzheimer's disease in rats

    Wafaa A. Hewedy

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: This study reports that candesartan and perindopril can reverse the free radical induced damages and resultant memory defects, and may suggest candesartan as worthy drugs for prevention of Abeta-P deposition in this animal model of AD. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(5.000: 853-859

  14. Paraquat induces oxidative stress and neuronal cell death; neuroprotection by water-soluble Coenzyme Q10

    Neuronal cell death induced by oxidative stress is correlated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and stroke. The causes of sporadic forms of age-related neurodegenerative diseases are still unknown. Recently, a correlation between paraquat exposure and neurodegenerative diseases has been observed. Paraquat, a nonselective herbicide, was once widely used in North America and is still routinely used in Taiwan. We have used differentiated Human Neuroblastoma (SHSY-5Y) cells as an in vitro model to study the mechanism of cell death induced by paraquat. We observed that paraquat-induced oxidative stress in differentiated SHSY-5Y cells as indicated by an increase in the production of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, apoptosis was evident as indicated by cellular and nuclear morphology and DNA fragmentation. Interestingly, pretreatment of SHSY-5Y cells with water-soluble Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) before paraquat exposure inhibited ROS generation. Pretreatment with CoQ10 also significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells and DNA fragmentation. We also analyzed the effect of paraquat and CoQ10 on isolated mitochondria. Our results indicated that treatment with paraquat induced the generation of ROS from isolated mitochondria and depolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Pretreatment with CoQ10 was able to inhibit ROS generation from isolated mitochondria as well as the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential. Our results indicate that water-soluble CoQ10 can prevent oxidative stress and neuronal damage induced by paraquat and therefore, can be used for the prevention and therapy of neurodegenerative diseases caused by environmental toxins

  15. Protection against hepatitis E virus infection by naturally acquired and vaccine-induced immunity.

    Zhang, J; Zhang, X-F; Zhou, C; Wang, Z-Z; Huang, S-J; Yao, X; Liang, Z-L; Wu, T; Li, J-X; Yan, Q; Yang, C-L; Jiang, H-M; Huang, H-J; Xian, Y-L; Shih, J W-K; Ng, M-H; Li, Y-M; Wang, J-Z; Zhu, F-C; Xia, N-S

    2014-06-01

    Immunity acquired from infection or vaccination protects humans from symptomatic hepatitis E. However, whether the risk of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is reduced by the immunity remains unknown. To understand this issue, a cohort with 12 409 participants randomized to receive the hepatitis E vaccine Hecolin(®) or placebo were serologically followed up for 2 years after vaccination. About half (47%) of participants were initially seropositive. A total of 139 infection episodes, evidenced by four-fold or greater rise of anti-HEV level or positive seroconversion, occurred in participants who received three doses of treatment. Risk of infection was highest among the baseline seronegative placebo group participants (2.04%). Pre-existing immunity and vaccine-induced immunity lower the risk significantly, to 0.52% and 0.30%, respectively. In conclusion, both vaccine-induced and naturally acquired immunity can effectively protect against HEV infection. PMID:24118636

  16. Drug-induced Hypothermia by 5HT1A Agonists Provide Neuroprotection in Experimental Stroke

    Johansen, Flemming Fryd; Hasseldam, Henrik; Nybro Smith, Matthias; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Drug-induced hypothermia reduces brain damage in animal stroke models and is an undiscovered potential in human stroke treatment. We studied hypothermia induced by the serotonergic agonists S14671 (1-[2-(2-thenoylamino)ethyl]-4[1-(7- methoxynaphtyl)]piperazine) and ipsapirone in a rat...... controls (P < .05). S14671 rats kept normothermic did not show infarct reduction (P > .05). The body temperature after stroke was reduced 1.0-3.0°C compared with controls for 20 hours with S14671 treatment and for 6 hours with ipsapirone treatment. In humans, ipsapirone reduced temperature in average with...... stroke model and in man by literature meta-analysis. METHODS: Rats had 60 minutes of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and then 7 days of survival. Body temperatures were monitored for 22 hours. Thirty minutes after MCAO, 1 group (n = 9) received bolus of S14671 (.75 mg/kg) and continuous infusion...

  17. Human Microglia Transplanted in Rat Focal Ischemia Brain Induce Neuroprotection and Behavioral Improvement

    Narantuya, Dashdemberel; NAGAI, Atsushi; Sheikh, Abdullah Md.; Masuda, Junichi; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Seung U Kim

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Microglia are resident immunocompenent and phagocytic cells of central nervous system (CNS), which produce various cytokines and growth factors in response to injury and thereby regulate disease pathology. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of microglial transplantation on focal cerebral ischemia model in rat. Methods Transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats was induced by the intraluminal filament technique. HMO6 cells, human micro...

  18. The indirect NMDAR inhibitor flupirtine induces sustained post-ischemic recovery, neuroprotection and angioneurogenesis

    Jaeger, Hanna M.; Pehlke, Jens R.; Kaltwasser, Britta; Kilic, Ertugrul; Bähr, Mathias; Hermann, Dirk M; Doeppner, Thorsten R

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation induces excitotoxicity, contributing to post-stroke brain injury. Hitherto, NMDAR deactivation failed in clinical trials due to insufficient pre-clinical study designs and drug toxicity. Flupirtine is an indirect NMDAR antagonist being used as analgesic in patients. Taking into account its tolerability profile, we evaluated effects of flupirtine on post-stroke tissue survival, neurological recovery and brain remodeling. Mice were exposed to str...

  19. Neuroprotective effect of Spirulina fusiform and amantadine in the 6-OHDA induced Parkinsonism in rats

    Chattopadhyaya, I.; Gupta, Sumeet; Mohammed, Asad; Mushtaq, N.; Chauhan, S.; Ghosh, Saikant

    2015-01-01

    Background Multi-factorial etiology exists in pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. The imbalance of anti-oxidant enzymes and dopamine level leads to Parkinsonism. The objective of this study was to assess the protective effect of Spirulina fusiform alone and in combination with amantadine against Parkinsonism effect in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced rat model. Methods S. fusiform was administered in different groups (500 mg/kg, once daily and twice daily) and a combination of sp...

  20. Antiapoptotic and neuroprotective role of Curcumin in Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced kindling model in rat.

    Saha, Lekha; Chakrabarti, Amitava; Kumari, Sweta; Bhatia, Alka; Banerjee, Dibyojyoti

    2016-02-01

    Kindling, a sub threshold chemical or electrical stimulation, increases seizure duration and enhances accompanied behavior until it reaches a sort of equilibrium state. The present study aimed to explore the effect of curcumin on the development of kindling in PTZ kindled rats and its role in apoptosis and neuronal damage. In a PTZ kindled Wistar rat model, different doses of curcumin (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg) were administrated orally one hour before the PTZ injections on alternate day during the whole kindling days. The following parameters were compared between control and experimental groups: the course of kindling, stages of seizures, Histopathological scoring of hippocampus, antioxidant parameters in the hippocampus, DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 expression in hippocampus, and neuron-specific enolase in the blood. One way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni post hoc analysis and Fischer's Exact test were used for statistical analyses. PTZ, 30 mg/kg, induced kindling in rats after 32.0 ± 1.4 days. Curcumin showed dose-dependent anti-seizure effect. Curcumin (300 mg/kg) significantly increased the latency to myoclonic jerks, clonic seizures as well as generalized tonic-clonic seizures, improved the seizure score and decreased the number of myoclonic jerks. PTZ kindling induced a significant neuronal injury, oxidative stress and apoptosis which were reversed by pretreatment with curcumin in a dose-dependent manner. Our study suggests that curcumin has a potential antiepileptogenic effect on kindling-induced epileptogenesis. PMID:26934781

  1. Red Lentil Extract: Neuroprotective Effects on Perphenazine Induced Catatonia in Rats

    Tarahomi, Shahram; Arzi, Ardeshir; Goudarzi, Mehdi; Bahadoram, Mohammad; Rashidi-Nooshabadi, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Parkinsonism is a neurodegenerative disease that is defined by certain symptoms such as muscle rigidity, impaired movement, catatonia, tremor and disorientation of body. Aim The aim was to investigate the effect of red lentil extract on perphenazine-induced Catatonia in model of rat. Materials and Methods This experimental study was done on 48 male albino rats (weight 180–200g) of the Sprague-Dawley strain. Animals were randomly divided into six groups and were pre-treated with a single dose of red lentil extract (200, 400, 800 and 1000 mg/kg), most effective dose of bromocriptine (30mg/kg) and normal saline (5ml/kg) via intraperitoneal (IP) route. perphenazine (5 mg/kg) was after 30 minutes, administered (IP) to induce catatonia. The scoring method of Morpurgo was used to determine the muscular rigidity of animals. Results The results showed that the 200mg/kg red lentil extract treated group had no significant reduction in catatonic responses after perphenazine administration in comparison with control group while the groups that received 800 and 1000mg/kg of red lentil extract showed significant difference (pextract of red lentil has protective effect on Catatonia induced by perphenazine in rats. So this extract may be probably beneficial for catatonia in Parkinsonism.

  2. Simian virus 40-induced disease in rhesus monkeys with simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Horvath, C J; Simon, M A; Bergsagel, D. J.; Pauley, D. R.; King, N W; Garcea, R L; Ringler, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) disease was diagnosed in four rhesus monkeys that died with SIV-induced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). One juvenile monkey seroconverted for SV40 6 months after inoculation with SIV and developed severe bilateral tubulointerstitial nephritis. In contrast, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) occurred in two adult monkeys that were seropositive for SV40 before SIV inoculation, as well as a third adult that was naturally infected with SIV and serop...

  3. Neuroprotective role of thymoquinone against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced dopaminergic cell death in primary mesencephalic cell culture

    Radad, Khaled S.; Al-Shraim, Mubarak M.; Moustafa, Mahmoud F.; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate potential mechanisms mediating the neuroprotective effect of thymoquinone (TQ) on dopaminergic neurons. Methods: This study was conducted in the Chemistry and Biochemistry Institute, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria between June and August 2013. Primary cultures were prepared from embryonic mouse mesencephala (OFI/SPF) at gestation day 14. Four sets of cultures were kept untreated, treated with TQ on the eighth day in vitro (DIV) for 4 days, treated with 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) on the tenth DIV for 48 hours and co-treated with thymoquinone and MPP+. On the twelfth DIV, cultures were subjected to immunohistochemistry against tyrosine hydroxylase and fluorescent staining using LysoTracker® Deep Red, 5,5’,6,6’-tetrachloro-1,1’,3,3’-tetraethyl benzimidazolylcarbocyanine (JC-1) and 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole stains. Results: The MPP+ decreased the number of dopaminergic neurons by 40%, and increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) into the culture medium. The TQ significantly rescued dopaminergic neurons and decreased the release of LDH at the concentrations of 0.1 and 1 µM. The TQ significantly shifted the red fluorescent intensity of the LysoTracker® Deep Red, increased the mitochondrial membrane potential as it increased the red:green florescent ratio of JC-1, and decreased MPP+-induced apoptotic cell death. Conclusion: The TQ protects dopaminergic neurons in primary mesencephalic culture by enhancing lysosomal degradation that clears damaged mitochondria and inhibits mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death. PMID:25630775

  4. Computational Insights into The Neuroprotective Action of Riluzole on 3-Acetylpyridine-Induced Ataxia in Rats

    Mahyar Janahmadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Intra-peritoneal administration of riluzole has been shown to preserve the membrane properties and firing characteristics of Purkinje neurons in a rat model of cerebellar ataxia induced by 3-acetylpyridine (3-AP. However, the exact mechanism(s by which riluzole restores the normal electrophysiological properties of Purkinje neurons is not completely understood. Changes in the conductance of several ion channels, including the BK channels, have been proposed as a neuro protective target of riluzole. In this study, the possible cellular effects of riluzole on Purkinje cells from 3-AP-induced ataxic rats that could be responsible for its neuro protective action have been investigated by computer simulations.Materials and Methods: This is a computational stimulation study. The simulation environment enabled a change in the properties of the specific ion channels as the possible mechanism of action of riluzole. This allowed us to study the resulted changes in the firing activity of Purkinje cells without concerns about its other effects and interfering parameters in the experiments. Simulations were performed in the NEURON environment (Version 7.1 in a time step of 25 μs; analyses were conducted using MATLAB r2010a (The Mathworks. Data were given as mean ± SEM. Statistical analyses were performed by the student’s t test, and differences were considered significant if p<0.05.Results: The computational findings demonstrated that modulation of an individual ion channel current, as suggested by previous experimental studies, should not be considered as the only possible target for the neuro protective effects of riluzole to restore the normal firing activity of Purkinje cells from ataxic rats.Conclusion: Changes in the conductance of several potassium channels, including voltage-gated potassium (Kv1, Kv4 and big Ca2+-activated K+ (BK channels may be responsible for the neuro protective effect of riluzole against 3-AP induced alterations in

  5. PUFA-induced neuroprotection against cerebral or spinal cord ischemia via the TREK-1 channel

    Heurteaux Catherine

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional interest of polyunsaturated fatty acids from omega-3, that are mainly present in vegetal and fish oils is now validated by the scientific community. Their beneficial effects have first been reported in coronary heart diseases. Many neurological and chronic diseases are often related to deficiencies in omega-3 and omega-6 and their derivatives. Polyunsaturated fatty acids from omega-3 family are essential to brain growth and cognitive functions. They are recently considered as factors of improvement in some mental diseases. Today, polyunsaturated fatty acids could play a key role in the prevention and/or or the treatment of cerebral diseases. With the development of in vitro and in vivo experimental models, it is now possible to demonstrate the PUFA-induced neuronal protection against major pathologies such as epileptic seizures, cerebral and spinal ischemia. The molecular mechanism of neuronal protection induced by polyunsaturated fatty acids and particularly alphalinolenic acid is now clarified. The alpha-linolenic target would be a potassium channel, TREK-1, which belongs to the new family of 2-P domain potassium channels (K-2P. The discovery of the physiopathological role of these K-2P channels can represent an important therapeutical challenge not only in cerebrovascular diseases and epilepsy, but also in psychiatry.

  6. Rosiglitazone activation of PPARγ-dependent pathways is neuroprotective in human neural stem cells against amyloid-beta-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    Chiang, Ming-Chang; Nicol, Christopher J; Cheng, Yi-Chuan; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Yen, Chia-Hui; Lin, Chien-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Neuronal cell impairment, such as that induced by amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein, is a process with limited therapeutic interventions and often leads to long-term neurodegeneration common in disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Interestingly, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor whose ligands control many physiological and pathologic processes, and may be neuroprotective. We hypothesized that rosiglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, would prevent Aβ-mediated effects in human neural stem cells (hNSCs). Here, we show that rosiglitazone reverses, via PPARγ-dependent downregulation of caspase 3 and 9 activity, the Aβ-mediated decreases in hNSC cell viability. In addition, Aβ decreases hNSC messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of 2 neuroprotective factors (Bcl-2 and CREB), but co-treatment with rosiglitazone significantly rescues these effects. Rosiglitazone co-treated hNSCs also showed significantly increased mitochondrial function (reflected by levels of adenosine triphosphate and Mit mass), and PPARγ-dependent mRNA upregulation of PGC1α and mitochondrial genes (nuclear respiratory factor-1 and Tfam). Furthermore, hNSCs co-treated with rosiglitazone were significantly rescued from Aβ-induced oxidative stress and correlates with reversal of the Aβ-induced mRNA decrease in oxidative defense genes (superoxide dismutase 1, superoxide dismutase 2, and glutathione peroxidase 1). Taken together, these novel findings show that rosiglitazone-induced activation of PPARγ-dependent signaling rescues Aβ-mediated toxicity in hNSCs and provide evidence supporting a neuroprotective role for PPARγ activating drugs in Aβ-related diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26973118

  7. Neuroprotective effect of peroxiredoxin 6 against hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell damage

    Kumar Anil

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to respond to changes in the extra-intracellular environment is prerequisite for cell survival. Cellular responses to the environment include elevating defense systems, such as the antioxidant defense system. Hypoxia-evoked reactive oxygen species (ROS-driven oxidative stress is an underlying mechanism of retinal ganglion cell (RGC death that leads to blinding disorders. The protein peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6 plays a pleiotropic role in negatively regulating death signaling in response to stressors, and thereby stabilizes cellular homeostasis. Results We have shown that RGCs exposed to hypoxia (1% or hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride display reduced expression of PRDX6 with higher ROS expression and activation of NF-κB. These cells undergo apoptosis, while cells with over-expression of PRDX6 demonstrate resistance against hypoxia-driven RGC death. The RGCs exposed to hypoxia either with 1% oxygen or cobalt chloride (0-400 μM, revealed ~30%-70% apoptotic cell death after 48 and 72 h of exposure. Western analysis and real-time PCR showed elevated expression of PRDX6 during hypoxia at 24 h, while PRDX6 protein and mRNA expression declined from 48 h onwards following hypoxia exposure. Concomitant with this, RGCs showed increased ROS expression and activation of NF-κB with IkB phosphorylation/degradation, as examined with H2DCF-DA and transactivation assays. These hypoxia-induced adverse reactions could be reversed by over-expression of PRDX6. Conclusion Because an abundance of PRDX6 in cells was able to attenuate hypoxia-induced RGC death, the protein could possibly be developed as a novel therapeutic agent acting to postpone RGC injury and delay the progression of glaucoma and other disorders caused by the increased-ROS-generated death signaling related to hypoxia.

  8. Caffeine neuroprotects against dexamethasone-induced anxiety-like behaviour in the Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Khor, Yee Min; Soga, Tomoko; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2013-01-15

    The early-life stress has critical impact on brain development which can lead to long-term effects on brain functions during adulthood. It has been reported that caffeine possesses a protective effect in neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, this study investigates the potential of caffeine to protect brain functions from adverse effects due to stress exposure during early-life development in the male zebrafish. In the first part of this study, synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone (DEX) (2-200 mg/L for 24 h) was used to induce stress effects in the zebrafish larvae from 4 to 5 days post-fertilisation (dpf) and the effect of DEX administration on zebrafish larvae on anxiety-like behaviour during adulthood in novel tank test was investigated. Next, the possible protective effect of caffeine pre-treatment (5-50 mg/L for 24 h from 3 to 4dpf) before DEX administration was studied. DEX-treated adult male zebrafish showed higher anxiety levels in behavioural tests, as seen in longer latency to enter the top part of the tank, lower transition numbers between the top and bottom parts with more time spent at the bottom and lesser time spent at the top and lower distance travelled at top part. The effect of DEX on anxiety-like behaviour was dose-dependent. Importantly, adult male zebrafish pre-treated with caffeine before DEX treatment did not show any anxiety-like behaviour. These results show that exposure to stress during early-life leads to anxiety-like behaviour in the adult male zebrafish but pre-treatment with caffeine protects from stress-induced anxiety. PMID:23044054

  9. Cognitive deficits and decreased locomotor activity induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes and neuroprotective effects of ascorbic acid

    Liu X

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Xudong Liu,1,* Yuchao Zhang,1,* Jinquan Li,1 Dong Wang,1 Yang Wu,1 Yan Li,2 Zhisong Lu,3 Samuel CT Yu,4 Rui Li,1 Xu Yang1 1Laboratory of Environmental Biomedicine, Hubei Key Laboratory of Genetic Regulation and Integrative Biology, College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan, People's Republic of China; 2Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region; 3Institute for Clean Energy and Advanced Materials, Southwest University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China; 4Division of Environment, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs have shown increasing promise in the field of biomedicine, especially in applications related to the nervous system. However, there are limited studies available on the neurotoxicity of SWCNTs used in vivo. In this study, neurobehavioral changes caused by SWCNTs in mice and oxidative stress were investigated. The results of ethological analysis (Morris water maze and open-field test, brain histopathological examination, and assessments of oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species [ROS], malondialdehyde [MDA], and glutathione [GSH], inflammation (nuclear factor κB, tumor necrosis factor a, interleukin-1β, and apoptosis (cysteine-aspartic acid protease 3 in brains showed that 6.25 and 12.50 mg/kg/day SWCNTs in mice could induce cognitive deficits and decreased locomotor activity, brain histopathological alterations, and increased levels of oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis in mouse brains; however, 3.125 mg/kg/day SWCNTs had zero or minor adverse effects in mice, and these effects were blocked by concurrent administration of ascorbic acid. Down-regulation of oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis were proposed to explain the neuroprotective effects of

  10. Chitosan nanoparticle-based neuronal membrane sealing and neuroprotection following acrolein-induced cell injury

    Shi Riyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly reactive aldehyde acrolein is a very potent endogenous toxin with a long half-life. Acrolein is produced within cells after insult, and is a central player in slow and progressive "secondary injury" cascades. Indeed, acrolein-biomolecule complexes formed by cross-linking with proteins and DNA are associated with a number of pathologies, especially central nervous system (CNS trauma and neurodegenerative diseases. Hydralazine is capable of inhibiting or reducing acrolein-induced damage. However, since hydralazine's principle activity is to reduce blood pressure as a common anti-hypertension drug, the possible problems encountered when applied to hypotensive trauma victims have led us to explore alternative approaches. This study aims to evaluate such an alternative - a chitosan nanoparticle-based therapeutic system. Results Hydralazine-loaded chitosan nanoparticles were prepared using different types of polyanions and characterized for particle size, morphology, zeta potential value, and the efficiency of hydralazine entrapment and release. Hydralazine-loaded chitosan nanoparticles ranged in size from 300 nm to 350 nm in diameter, and with a tunable, or adjustable, surface charge. Conclusions We evaluated the utility of chitosan nanoparticles with an in-vitro model of acrolein-mediated cell injury using PC -12 cells. The particles effectively, and statistically, reduced damage to membrane integrity, secondary oxidative stress, and lipid peroxidation. This study suggests that a chitosan nanoparticle-based therapy to interfere with "secondary" injury may be possible.

  11. Neuroprotective Role of a Novel Copper Chelator against Aβ42 Induced Neurotoxicity

    Sandeep Kumar Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease and associated with the extracellular deposits of amyloid-β peptide in hippocampus region. Metal ions like Cu, Fe and Zn are known to associate with the amyloid beta (Aβ at high concentration and interaction of these ions with soluble and aggregated forms of Aβ peptide help in development of AD. Here we showed Cu mediated neurotoxicity in the eye tissues of transgenic Drosophila expressing human amyloid β and its rescue through a novel Cu chelator. In this context, we have synthesised and characterized the compound L 2,6-Pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 2,6-bis[2-[(4-carboxyphenyl methylene] hydrazide] by Mass spectra (MS and Elemental analysis (EA. The Cu chelation potential of the compound L is tested in vivo in Drosophila. Oral administration of Copper to the transgenic larvae resulted in severe degeneration in eye tissues, which was rescued by the supplementation of compound L. The levels of anti-oxidant markers like SOD and MDA were measured in compound L treated flies and found a significant rescue (P<0.001. Further rescue of the eye degeneration phenotypes as revealed by SEM affirm the role of copper in Aβ toxicity. Hence, use of compound L, an amidoamine derivative, could be a possible therapeutic measure for Aβ induced neurotoxicity.

  12. A cellular lipidomic study on the Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and neuroprotective effects of EGCG by using UPLC/MS-based glycerolipids profiling and multivariate analysis.

    Zhang, Hongyang; Wang, Jing-Rong; Yau, Lee Fong; Ho, Hing Man; Chan, Chi Leung; Hu, Ping; Liu, Liang; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2012-10-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular lipid metabolism associated with β-amyloid peptide (Aβ)-induced neurotoxicity as well as the neuroprotective effect of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major polyphenol in green tea. An ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS)-based lipidomic approach was developed to screen and identify changes of the glycerolipids (GL) upon Aβ treatment with or without the presence of EGCG in PC12 cells. Principle component analysis (PCA) showed that the Aβ-treated group was well separated from the control group, whereas the EGCG group was closer to the control group. The GL levels were significantly elevated in Aβ-treated cells compared with the control group, but were restored near to normal levels after EGCG treatment. The elevated phosphatidylcholines (PCs) levels observed in the Aβ-treated PC12 cells were quite probably the integrated results of the reduced phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) activity and the enhanced activity of lysophospholipid acyltransferases. Moreover, an increased liberation of arachidonic acid (AA) from PCs was observed as another important response of PC12 cells to the Aβ aggregates, implying an active inflammatory process occurring in Aβ induced neurotoxicity. EGCG treatment can reverse the deregulated metabolism of PCs, which might be one of the biochemical mechanisms contributing to its neuroprotective effect. Collectively, results obtained from the current lipidomic analyses of PC12 cells provided important insight into the biochemical mechanisms underlying Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and neuro protective effects of EGCG. This is the first report of the lipidomic study on the neuroprotective effect of EGCG. PMID:23032920

  13. Electroacupuncture-Induced Neuroprotection against Cerebral Ischemia in Rats: Role of the Dopamine D2 Receptor

    Ming-Shu Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cerebral ischemia is known to produce brain damage and related behavioural deficits, including memory deficits and motor disorders. Evidence shows that EA significantly promotes recovery of neurological function and thus improves quality of life. Objective. Evidence exists for the involvement of catecholamines in human neuroplasticity. A better understanding of dopaminergic (DAergic modulation in this process will be important. Methods. A total of 72 adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were divided into 6 groups: normal, model, EA, spiperone group, EA + spiperone group, and pergolide. The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO model was used in all 6 groups except the normal group. A behavioural assessment was conducted at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after MCAO. The percent of brain infarct area was also determined 7 days after MCAO. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43 fluorescence double labeling was performed in the striatum. Results. In this study, we found that EA at Fengchi (GB20 acupoints resulted in marked improvements based on a behavioural assessment. Both TTC staining and GAP-43 immunofluorescence labeling results showed that EA treatment reduced ischemia injury and promoted neuroplasticity compared with the model group. The D2R-selective agonist, pergolide, showed similar results, but these results were reversed by the D2R-selective antagonist, spiperone. We also found that there were more colocalization and expression of GAP-43 and TH in the EA and pergolide groups than those in the other groups. Conclusion. These results suggest that the neuroplasticity induced by EA was mediated by D2 autoreceptors in DAergic neurons.

  14. Mentha piperita as a pivotal neuro-protective agent against gamma irradiation induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis: Mentha extract as a neuroprotective against gamma irradiation

    Hassan, Hanaa A.; Hafez, Hani S.; Goda, Mona S.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is classified as a potent carcinogen, and its injury to living cells, in particular to DNA, is due to oxidative stress enhancing apoptotic cell death. Our present study aimed to characterize and semi-quantify the radiation-induced apoptosis in CNS and the activity of Mentha extracts as neuron-protective agent. Our results through flow cytometry exhibited the significant disturbance and arrest in cell cycle in % of M1: SubG1 phase, M2: G0/1 phase of diploid cycle, M3: S phas...

  15. Neuroprotective Effect of Gui Zhi (Ramulus Cinnamomi on Ma Huang- (Herb Ephedra- Induced Toxicity in Rats Treated with a Ma Huang-Gui Zhi Herb Pair

    Fang-hao Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Herb Ephedra (Ma Huang in Chinese and Ramulus Cinnamomi (Gui Zhi in Chinese are traditional Chinese herbs, often used together to treat asthma, nose and lung congestion, and fever with anhidrosis. Due to the adverse effects of ephedrine, clinical use of Ma Huang is restricted. However, Gui Zhi extract has been reported to decrease spontaneous activity in rats and exert anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. The present study explored the possible inhibitory effect of Gui Zhi on Ma Huang-induced neurotoxicity in rats when the two herbs were used in combination. All Ma Huang and Ma Huang-Gui Zhi herb pair extracts were prepared using methods of traditional Chinese medicine and were normalized based on the ephedrine content. Two-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=6 rats/group were administered Ma Huang or the Ma Huang-Gui Zhi herb pair extracts for 7 days (ephedrine = 48 mg/kg, and locomotor activity was measured. After 7 days, oxidative damage in the prefrontal cortex was measured. Gui Zhi decreased hyperactivity and sensitization produced by repeated Ma Huang administration and attenuated oxidative stress induced by Ma Huang. The results of this study demonstrate the neuroprotective potential of Gui Zhi in Ma Huang-induced hyperactivity and oxidative damage in the prefrontal cortex of rats when used in combination.

  16. ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for glycyrrhizic acid-mediated neuroprotection against glutamate-induced toxicity in differentiated PC12 cells

    The present study focuses on the neuroprotective effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA, a major compound separated from Glycyrrhiza Radix, which is a crude Chinese traditional drug) against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in differentiated PC12 (DPC12) cells. The results showed that GA treatment improved cell viability and ameliorated abnormal glutamate-induced alterations in mitochondria in DPC12 cells. GA reversed glutamate-suppressed B-cell lymphoma 2 levels, inhibited glutamate-enhanced expressions of Bax and cleaved caspase 3, and reduced cytochrome C (Cyto C) release. Exposure to glutamate strongly inhibited phosphorylation of AKT (protein kinase B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs); however, GA pretreatment enhanced activation of ERKs but not AKT. The presence of PD98059 (a mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase [MEK] inhibitor) but not LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase [PI3K] inhibitor) diminished the potency of GA for improving viability of glutamate-exposed DPC12 cells. These results indicated that ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for the neuroprotective effect of GA against glutamate-induced toxicity in DPC12 cells. The present study provides experimental evidence supporting GA as a potential therapeutic agent for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

  17. ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for glycyrrhizic acid-mediated neuroprotection against glutamate-induced toxicity in differentiated PC12 cells

    Wang, D. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); The State Engineering Laboratory of AIDS Vaccine, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Guo, T.Q. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Wang, Z.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Lu, J.H.; Liu, D.P.; Meng, Q.F.; Xie, J. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Zhang, X.L. [Faculty of ScienceNational University of Singapore (Singapore); Liu, Y. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Teng, L.S. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); The State Engineering Laboratory of AIDS Vaccine, Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2014-07-25

    The present study focuses on the neuroprotective effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA, a major compound separated from Glycyrrhiza Radix, which is a crude Chinese traditional drug) against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in differentiated PC12 (DPC12) cells. The results showed that GA treatment improved cell viability and ameliorated abnormal glutamate-induced alterations in mitochondria in DPC12 cells. GA reversed glutamate-suppressed B-cell lymphoma 2 levels, inhibited glutamate-enhanced expressions of Bax and cleaved caspase 3, and reduced cytochrome C (Cyto C) release. Exposure to glutamate strongly inhibited phosphorylation of AKT (protein kinase B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs); however, GA pretreatment enhanced activation of ERKs but not AKT. The presence of PD98059 (a mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase [MEK] inhibitor) but not LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase [PI3K] inhibitor) diminished the potency of GA for improving viability of glutamate-exposed DPC12 cells. These results indicated that ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for the neuroprotective effect of GA against glutamate-induced toxicity in DPC12 cells. The present study provides experimental evidence supporting GA as a potential therapeutic agent for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Neuroprotective effects of vinpocetine and its major metabolite cis-apovincaminic acid on NMDA-induced neurotoxicity in a rat entorhinal cortex lesion model.

    Nyakas, Csaba; Felszeghy, Klára; Szabó, Róbert; Keijser, Jan N; Luiten, Paul G M; Szombathelyi, Zsolt; Tihanyi, Károly

    2009-01-01

    Vinpocetine (ethyl-apovincaminate, Cavinton), a synthetic derivative of the Vinca minor alkaloid vincamine, has been used now for decades for prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular diseases predisposing to development of dementia. Both vinpocetine and its main metabolite cis-apovincaminic acid (cAVA) exert a neuroprotective type of action. Bilateral N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced neurodegeneration in the entorhinal cortex of rat was used as a dementia model to confirm the neuroprotective action of these compounds in vivo. NMDA-lesioned rats were treated 60 min before lesion and throughout 3 postoperative days with a 10 mg/kg intraperitoneal dose of vinpocetine or cAVA. Behavioral tests started after termination of drug treatment and consisted of novel object recognition, social discrimination, and spontaneous alternation in a Y-maze, and spatial learning in the Morris water maze. At the end of behavioral testing brains were perfused with fixative and the size of the excitotoxic neuronal lesion and that of microglial activation around the lesion were assayed quantitatively on brain sections immunostained for neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN) and integrin CD11b, respectively. Entorhinal NMDA lesions impaired recognition of novel objects and the new social partner, and suppressed spontaneous alternation and spatial learning performance in the Morris maze. Both vinpocetine and cAVA effectively attenuated the behavioral deficits, and significantly decreased lesion size and the region of microglia activation. Both lesion-induced attention deficit and learning disabilities were markedly alleviated by vinpocetine and cAVA. The morphological findings corroborated the behavioral observations and indicated reduced lesion size and microglia activation especially after vinpocetine treatment which supports an in vivo neuroprotective mode of action of vinpocitine and a less potent action of cAVA. PMID:19492990

  19. Increased Mitochondrial DNA Induces Acquired Docetaxel Resistance in Head and Neck Cancer Cells

    Mizumachi, T; Suzuki, S; Naito, A; Carcel-Trullols, J; Evans, TT; Spring, PM; Oridate, N; Furuta, Y; Fukuda, S; Higuchi, M

    2008-01-01

    Docetaxel is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents against cancer; nevertheless, some patients develop resistance. Unfortunately, their causes and mechanisms remain unknown. We created docetaxel-resistant DRHEp2 from human laryngeal cancer HEp2 and investigated the roles of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and ROS on docetaxel resistance. DRHEp2 had greatly increased mtDNA content. Reduction of mtDNA content in DRHEp2 by ethidium bromide treatment reduced the resistance. These results indicate the possible roles of mtDNA-coded enzymes in mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) in resistant mechanisms. Oligomycin A, an Fo-ATPase inhibitor, eliminated docetaxel resistance in DRHEp2. In contrast, inhibitors of other MRC did not. RNA interference targeted to Fo-ATPase d-subunit restored docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity to DRHEp2. These results indicate the roles of Fo-ATPase for resistant mechanisms. Docetaxel induced ROS generation in HEp2 but not in DRHEp2 and antioxidant pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate eliminated docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting roles of ROS in docetaxel-induced cell death. Furthermore, inhibition of Fo-ATPase by Oligomycin A induced docetaxel–mediated ROS generation in DRHEp2. Taken together, DRHEp2 acquired docetaxel resistance through increasing Fo-ATPase, which led to diminish docetaxel-induced ROS generation and subsequently inhibited cell death. In conclusion, mtDNA plays an important role in developing docetaxel resistance through the reduction of ROS generation by regulating Fo-ATPase. PMID:17637738

  20. Presenilin 1 promotes trypsin-induced neuroprotection via the PAR2/ERK signaling pathway. Effects of presenilin 1 FAD mutations.

    Nikolakopoulou, Angeliki M; Georgakopoulos, Anastasios; Robakis, Nikolaos K

    2016-06-01

    Mutants of presenilin 1 (PS1) increase neuronal cell death causing autosomal-dominant familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). Recent literature shows that treatment of neuronal cultures with low concentrations of trypsin, a member of the serine family of proteases, protects neurons from toxic insults by binding to the proteinase-activated receptor 2 and stimulating survival kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2). Other studies show that PS1 is necessary for the neuroprotective activity of specific neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, against excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Here, we show that treatment of mouse cortical neuronal cultures with trypsin activates ERK1/2 and protects neurons against glutamate excitoxicity. The trypsin-dependent ERK activation and neuroprotection requires both alleles of PS1 because neither PS1 knockout nor PS1 hemizygous neuronal cultures can use exogenous trypsin to activate ERK1/2 or increase neuronal survival. The protective effect of PS1 does not depend on its γ-secretase activity because inhibitors of γ-secretase have no effect on trypsin-mediated neuroprotection. Importantly, cortical neuronal cultures either heterozygous or homozygous for PS1 FAD mutants are unable to use trypsin to activate ERK1/2 and rescue neurons from excitotoxicity, indicating that FAD mutants inhibit trypsin-dependent neuroprotection in an autosomal-dominant manner. Furthermore, our data support the theory that PS FAD mutants increase neurodegeneration by inhibiting the ability of neurons to use cellular factors as protective agents against toxic insults. PMID:27143420

  1. Neuroprotective Effects of Hesperidin, a Plant Flavanone, on Rotenone-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in a Cellular Model for Parkinson’s Disease

    Kuppusamy Tamilselvam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotenone a widely used pesticide that inhibits mitochondrial complex I has been used to investigate the pathobiology of PD both in vitro and in vivo. Studies have shown that the neurotoxicity of rotenone may be related to its ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to neuronal apoptosis. The current study was carried out to investigate the neuroprotective effects of hesperidin, a citrus fruit flavanol, against rotenone-induced apoptosis in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. We assessed cell death, mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS generation, ATP levels, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, reduced glutathione (GSH levels, and the activity of catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx using well established assays. Apoptosis was determined in normal, rotenone, and hesperidin treated cells, by measuring the protein expression of cytochrome c (cyt c, caspases 3 and 9, Bax, and Bcl-2 using the standard western blotting technique. The apoptosis in rotenone-induced SK-N-SH cells was accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, increased ROS generation, the depletion of GSH, enhanced activities of enzymatic antioxidants, upregulation of Bax, cyt c, and caspases 3 and 9, and downregulation of Bcl-2, which were attenuated in the presence of hesperidin. Our data suggests that hesperidin exerts its neuroprotective effect against rotenone due to its antioxidant, maintenance of mitochondrial function, and antiapoptotic properties in a neuroblastoma cell line.

  2. GSK-3 as a Target for Lithium-induced Neuroprotection against Excitotoxicity in Neuronal Cultures and Animal Models of Ischemic Stroke

    De-Maw eChuang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The mood stabilizer lithium inhibits glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 directly or indirectly by enhancing serine phosphorylation of both alpha and beta isoforms. Lithium robustly protected primary brain neurons from glutamate-induced excitotoxicity; these actions were mimicked by other GSK-3 inhibitors or silencing/inhibiting GSK-3alpha and/or beta isoforms. Lithium rapidly activated Akt to enhance GSK-3 serine phosphorylation and to block glutamate-induced Akt inactivation. Lithium also upregulated Bcl-2 and suppressed glutamate-induced p53 and Bax. Induction of BDNF was required for lithium’s neuroprotection to occur. BDNF promoter IV was activated by GSK-3 inhibition using lithium or other drugs, or through gene silencing/inactivation of either isoform. Further, lithium’s neuroprotective effects were associated with inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated calcium influx and downstream signaling. In rodent ischemic models, post-insult treatment with lithium decreased infarct volume, ameliorated neurological deficits and improved functional recovery. Upregulation of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70 and Bcl-2 as well as downregulation of p53 likely contributed to lithium’s protective effects. Delayed treatment with lithium improved functional MRI responses, which was accompanied by enhanced angiogenesis. Two GSK-3-regulated pro-angiogenic factors, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor were induced by lithium. Finally, lithium promoted migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs by upregulation of MMP-9 through GSK-3beta inhibition. Notably, transplantation of lithium-primed MSCs into ischemic rats enhanced MSC migration to the injured brain regions and improved the neurological performance. Several other GSK-3 inhibitors have also been reported to be beneficial in rodent ischemic models. Together, GSK-3 inhibition is a rational strategy to combat ischemic stroke and other excitotoxicity-related brain disorders.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of the Phellinus linteus ethyl acetate extract against H2O2-induced apoptotic cell death of SK-N-MC cells.

    Choi, Doo Jin; Cho, Sarang; Seo, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Hyang Burm; Park, Yong Il

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that neuronal cells are protected against oxidative stress-induced cell damage by antioxidants, such as polyphenolic compounds. Phellinus linteus (PL) has traditionally been used to treat various symptoms in East Asian countries. In the present study, we prepared an ethyl acetate extract from the fruiting bodies of PL (PLEA) using hot water extraction, ethanol precipitation, and ethyl acetate extraction. The PLEA contained polyphenols as its major chemical component, and thus, we predicted that it may exhibit antioxidant and neuroprotective effects against oxidative stress. The results showed that the pretreatment of human brain neuroblastoma SK-N-MC cells with the PLEA (0.1-5 μg/mL) significantly and dose-dependently reduced the cytotoxicity of H2O2 and the intracellular ROS levels and enhanced the expression of HO-1 (heme oxygenase-1) and antioxidant enzymes, such as CAT (catalase), GPx-1 (glutathione peroxidase-1), and SOD-1 and -2 (superoxide dismutase-1 and -2). The PLEA also directly scavenged free radicals. PLEA pretreatment also significantly attenuated DNA fragmentation and suppressed the mRNA expression and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 kinase, which are induced by oxidative stress and lead to cell death. PLEA pretreatment inhibited the activation of the apoptosis-related proteins caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. These results demonstrate that the PLEA has neuroprotective effects against oxidative stress (H2O2)-induced neuronal cell death via its antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties. PLEA should be investigated in an in vivo model on its potential to prevent or ameliorate neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26773779

  4. Lithium and neuroprotection

    2004-01-01

    Neuroprotection can be defined as medical prophylactic and therapeutic intervention aimed at neuronal tissue and function. Hardly any concept of neuroprotection has been convincingly efficient in man thus far. Lithium has been used for the treatment of manic depressive illness for 50 years, but the mechanisms by which this cation exerts its beneficial effects are not yet clear. The last five years several studies have indicated that lithium mediates neuroprotection. In this essay we ...

  5. Neuroprotective effects of adenosine isolated from Cordyceps cicadae against oxidative and ER stress damages induced by glutamate in PC12 cells.

    Olatunji, Opeyemi J; Feng, Yan; Olatunji, Oyenike O; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen; Su, Zhaoliang; Wang, Dujun; Yu, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    Glutamate has been proven to induce oxidative stress through the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased calcium overload which results in neuronal injury, development of neurodegenerative diseases and death. Adenosine is one of the bioactive nucleosides found in Cordyceps cicadae and it has displayed several pharmacological activities including neuroprotection. In this study, the protective effects of adenosine from C. cicadae against glutamate-induce oxidative stress in PC12 cells were evaluated. The exposure of PC12 cells to glutamate (5mM) induced the formation of ROS, increased Ca(2+) influx, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and up regulated the expression of pro-apoptotic factor Bax. However, pretreatment with adenosine markedly increased cell viability, decreased the elevated levels of ROS and Ca(2+) induced by glutamate. Furthermore adenosine increased the activities of GSH-Px and SOD, as well as retained mitochondria membrane potential (MMP), increased Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and reduced the expression of ERK, p38, and JNK. Overall, our results suggest that adenosine may be a promising potential therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27114365

  6. The neuroprotection of cannabidiol against MPP⁺-induced toxicity in PC12 cells involves trkA receptors, upregulation of axonal and synaptic proteins, neuritogenesis, and might be relevant to Parkinson's disease.

    Santos, Neife Aparecida Guinaim; Martins, Nádia Maria; Sisti, Flávia Malvestio; Fernandes, Laís Silva; Ferreira, Rafaela Scalco; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Santos, Antônio Cardozo

    2015-12-25

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa with potential to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Its neuroprotection has been mainly associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant events; however, other mechanisms might be involved. We investigated the involvement of neuritogenesis, NGF receptors (trkA), NGF, and neuronal proteins in the mechanism of neuroprotection of CBD against MPP(+) toxicity in PC12 cells. CBD increased cell viability, differentiation, and the expression of axonal (GAP-43) and synaptic (synaptophysin and synapsin I) proteins. Its neuritogenic effect was not dependent or additive to NGF, but it was inhibited by K252a (trkA inhibitor). CBD did not increase the expression of NGF, but protected against its decrease induced by MPP(+), probably by an indirect mechanism. We also evaluated the neuritogenesis in SH-SY5Y cells, which do not express trkA receptors. CBD did not induce neuritogenesis in this cellular model, which supports the involvement of trkA receptors. This is the first study to report the involvement of neuronal proteins and trkA in the neuroprotection of CBD. Our findings suggest that CBD has a neurorestorative potential independent of NGF that might contribute to its neuroprotection against MPP(+), a neurotoxin relevant to Parkinson's disease. PMID:26556726

  7. Antiangiogenic therapy of experimental cancer does not induce acquired drug resistance

    Boehm, Thomas; Folkman, Judah; Browder, Timothy; O'Reilly, Michael S.

    1997-11-01

    Acquired drug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of cancer. Of the more than 500,000 annual deaths from cancer in the United States, many follow the development of resistance to chemotherapy. The emergence of resistance depends in part on the genetic instability, heterogeneity and high mutational rate of tumour cells. In contrast, endothelial cells are genetically stable, homogenous and have a low mutational rate. Therefore, antiangiogenic therapy directed against a tumour's endothelial cells should, in principle, induce little or no drug resistance. Endostatin, a potent angiogenesis inhibitor, was administered to mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma, T241 fibrosarcoma or B16F10 melanoma. Treatment was stopped when tumours had regressed. Tumours were then allowed to re-grow and endostatin therapy was resumed. After 6, 4 or 2 treatment cycles, respectively, no tumours recurred after discontinuation of therapy. These experiments show that drug resistance does not develop in three tumour types treated with a potent angiogenesis inhibitor. An unexpected finding is that repeated cycles of antiangiogenic therapy are followed by prolonged tumour dormancy without further therapy.

  8. The Neuro-Protective Effect of the Methanolic Extract of Perilla frutescens var. japonicaand Rosmarinic Acid against H₂O₂-Induced Oxidative Stress in C6 Glial Cells.

    Lee, Ah Young; Wu, Ting Ting; Hwang, Bo Ra; Lee, Jaemin; Lee, Myoung-Hee; Lee, Sanghyun; Cho, Eun Ju

    2016-05-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are often associated with oxidative damage in neuronal cells. This study was conducted to investigate the neuro-protective effect of methanolic (MeOH) extract of Perilla frutescens var. japonica and its one of the major compounds, rosmarinic acid, under oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) in C6 glial cells. Exposure of C6 glial cells to H₂O₂ enhanced oxidative damage as measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance assays. The MeOH extract and rosmarinic acid prevented oxidative stress by increasing cell viability and inhibiting cellular lipid peroxidation. In addition, the MeOH extract and rosmarinic acid reduced H₂O₂-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) at the transcriptional level. Moreover, iNOS and COX-2 protein expression was down-regulated in H₂O₂-indcued C6 glial cells treated with the MeOH extract and rosmarinic acid. These findings suggest that P. frutescens var. japonica and rosmarinic acid could prevent the progression of neurodegenerative diseases through attenuation of neuronal oxidative stress. PMID:27133263

  9. Cudarflavone B Provides Neuroprotection against Glutamate-Induced Mouse Hippocampal HT22 Cell Damage through the Nrf2 and PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathways

    Dong-Sung Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative cell damage contributes to neuronal degeneration in many central nervous system (CNS diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and ischemia. Nrf2 signaling-mediated heme oxygenase (HO-1 expression acts against oxidants that are thought to play a key role in the pathogenesis of neuronal diseases. Cudraflavone B is a prenylated flavone isolated from C. tricuspidata which has shown anti-proliferative activity, mouse brain monoamine oxidase (MAO inhibitory effects, apoptotic actions in human gastric carcinoma cells and mouse melanoma cells, and hepatoprotective activity. In this study, cudraflavone B showed neuroprotective effects and reactive oxygen species (ROS inhibition against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity by inducing the expression of HO-1 in mouse hippocampal HT22 cells. Furthermore, cudraflavone B caused the nuclear accumulation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and increased the promoter activity of antioxidant response elements (ARE in mouse hippocampal HT22 cells. In addition, we found that the Nrf2-midiated HO-1 expression by cudraflavone B is involved in the cell protective response and ROS reductions, and cudraflavone B-induced expression of HO-1 was mediated through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway in HT22 cells. Our results demonstrated the potential application of naturally occurring cudraflavone B as a therapeutic agent from neurodegenerative disease.

  10. Mitochondria Related Pathway Is Essential for Polysaccharides Purified from Sparassis crispa Mediated Neuro-Protection against Glutamate-Induced Toxicity in Differentiated PC12 Cells

    Shuang Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to explore the neuro-protective effects of purified Sparassis crispa polysaccharides against l-glutamic acid (l-Glu-induced differentiated PC12 (DPC12 cell damages and its underlying mechanisms. The Sparassis crispa water extract was purified by a DEAE-52 cellulose anion exchange column and a Sepharose G-100 column. A fraction with a molecular weight of 75 kDa and a diameter of 88.9 nm, entitled SCWEA, was obtained. SCWEA was identified with a triple helix with (1→3-linked Rha in the backbone, and (1→2 linkages and (1→6 linkages in the side bone. Our results indicated that the pre-treatment of DPC12 cells with SCWEA prior to l-Glu exposure effectively reversed the reduction on cell viability (by 3-(4,5-cimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and reduced l-Glu-induced apoptosis (by Hoechst staining. SCWEA decreased the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species, blocked Ca2+ influx and prevented depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential in DPC12 cells. Furthermore, SCWEA normalized expression of anti-apoptotic proteins in l-Glu-explored DPC12 cells. These results suggested that SCWEA protects against l-Glu-induced neuronal apoptosis in DPC12 cells and may be a promising candidate for treatment against neurodegenerative disease.

  11. 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of vascular endothelial growth factor-induced neuroprotection following acute cerebral ischemia and reperfusion

    Li Yi; Haiou Zhang; Hao Lei; Li Wei

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has become generally accepted that measuring N-acetyI-L-aspartic acid through the use of 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) could be used to evaluate neuronal injury. OBJECTIVE: To study metabolic changes of N-acetyl-L-aspanic acid surrounding the acute cerebral ischcmia area following vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment using 1H-MRS imaging, and to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of VEGE.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomly controlled animal study, according to one-factor analysis of variance, was performed at the Shenzhen Hospital of Peking University and State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences from August 2003 to December 2005.MATERIALS: Twelve healthy, adult, Sprague Dawley rats were used to establish an ischemia/reperfusion model through the use of middle cerebral artery occlusion. The 4.7T superconducting nuclear magnetic resonance meter was provided by Brucker Company. VEGF164 was purchased from Shenzhen Jingmei Bioengineering Co., Ltd. Titus ancsthesia machine was purchased from Draeger Medical AG & Co. KG.METHODS: The rats were randomly divided into model control (n = 6) and VEGF-injected (n = 6) groups. All animals received 60-minute middle cerebral artery occlusion and 24-hour repcrfusion. Lateral cerebral ventricle injection was performed by stereotaxic technique at respective time points. The VEGF group received 0. 1 μ g/μ L VEGF (5 μL), and the model group received the same amount of normal saline, once daily for 3 days.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Metabolic changes of N-acetyl-L-aspartic acid and lactic acid following cerebral ischemia and reperfusion were detected using 1H-MRS, and the ischemic volume was measured.RESULTS: Twelve rats were included in the final analysis. =H-MRS results revealed that the ischemic volume increased in the control group compared with prior to injection (P < 0.01). In the

  12. Glaucoma: role of neuroprotective agents

    Achyut N. Pandey

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy, considered as the second leading cause of blindness worldwide. Glaucoma is characterized by selective death of retinal ganglion cells (RGC and a progressive loss of vision. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP is one of the most important risk factors for developing glaucoma and hence we mainly focus on lowering IOP to arrest the progression of glaucoma. However, many patients continue to demonstrate a clinically downhill course despite the control of initially raised IOP. In fact, some patients develop what is called normal tension glaucoma, not associated to an increased IOP. This emphasizes that several pressure-independent mechanisms are responsible for the development and progression of glaucomatous neuropathy and that high IOP and vascular insufficiency in the optic nerve head are only risk factors for the development of glaucoma, and are not the only target for the treatment of glaucoma. The reason is that the process of RGC death is thought to be biphasic, and the primary injury is followed by a slower secondary degeneration related to a noxious environment surrounding the apoptotic cells. This environment is characterized by changes in the extra-cellular ionic concentrations, increased amounts of free radicals, neurotrophins (NT depletion and increased glutamate-induced excitotoxicity due to high extra-cellular glutamate levels, which binds to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors leading to an abnormally high intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Neuroprotection is a process that attempts to preserve the remaining cells that are still vulnerable to damage, and the main aim of neuroprotective therapy is to employ pharmacologic or other means to attenuate the hostility of the environment surrounding the degenerating cells, or to supply the cells with the tools to deal with this aggression, providing resilience to the insult. Several agents have been reported neuroprotective in glaucoma, both in clinical assays

  13. Neuroprotective effects of nimodipine and MK-801 on acute infectious brain edema induced by injection of pertussis bacilli to neocortex of rats

    陈立华; 刘丽旭; 杨于嘉; 刘运生; 曹美鸿

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mechanism and type of acute infectious brain edema induced by injection of pertussis bacilli (PB) in rat neocortex, to study the neuroprotective effect of non-competitive antagonist of N-methl-D-aspartate ( NMDA ) receptor ( MK-801 ) and antagonist of Ca2+ channels ( nimodipine )on brain edema, and to investigate the relationship between percentage of water content and cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in synaptosomes or content of Evans Blue (EB).Methods: 95 SD rats were randomly divided into five groups, ie, normal control group, sham-operated control group, PB group, nimodipine treatment group and MK-801 pretreatment group. The acute infectious brain edema was induced by injection of PB into the rats. Quantitative measurements of water content and the concentration of EB were performed. [Ca2+]i was determined in calcium fluorescent indication Fura-2/AM loaded neuronal synaptosome with a spectrofluorophotometer. To observe the effect of MK-801 and nimodipine, we administered MK-801 48 hours and 24 hours before the injection of PB in MK-801 pretreatment group, and nimodipine after the injection of PB in nimodipine treatment group. The specific binding of NMDA receptor was measured with [3H]-MK-801 in the neuronal membrane of cerebral cortex. Results: The levels of water content and EB content of brain tissues, and [Ca2+]i in the neuronal synaptosomes increased more significantly in the PB-injected cerebral hemisphere in the PB group than those of normal control group and sham-operated control group (P0.05). Conclusions: The changes in the permeability of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and Ca2+-overload may participate in the pathogenesis of infectious brain edema. Treatment with nimodipine can dramatically reduce the damage of brain edema and demonstrate neuroprotective effect on brain edema by inhibiting the excess of Ca2+ influx and reducing the permeability of BBB. MK-801 pretreatment may inhibit the delayed Ca2+ influx into

  14. Neuroprotection by flavonoids

    Dajas F.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The high morbidity, high socioeconomic costs and lack of specific treatments are key factors that define the relevance of brain pathology for human health and the importance of research on neuronal protective agents. Epidemiological studies have shown beneficial effects of flavonoids on arteriosclerosis-related pathology in general and neurodegeneration in particular. Flavonoids can protect the brain by their ability to modulate intracellular signals promoting cellular survival. Quercetin and structurally related flavonoids (myricetin, fisetin, luteolin showed a marked cytoprotective capacity in in vitro experimental conditions in models of predominantly apoptotic death such as that induced by medium concentrations (200 µM of H2O2 added to PC12 cells in culture. Nevertheless, quercetin did not protect substantia nigra neurons in vivo from an oxidative insult (6-hydroxydopamine, probably due to difficulties in crossing the blood-brain barrier. On the other hand, treatment of permanent focal ischemia with a lecithin/quercetin preparation decreased lesion volume, showing that preparations that help to cross the blood-brain barrier may be critical for the expression of the effects of flavonoids on the brain. The hypothesis is advanced that a group of quercetin-related flavonoids could become lead molecules for the development of neuroprotective compounds with multitarget anti-ischemic effects.

  15. Minocycline for Acute Neuroprotection

    Elewa, Hazem F.; Hilali, Hend; Hess, David C.; Machado, Livia S.; Fagan, Susan C.

    2006-01-01

    Minocycline is a widely used tetracycline antibiotic. It has been used for decades in the treatment of various gram-positive and gram-negative infections. More recently, minocycline has been shown to have neuroprotective properties in different animal models of acute neurological injury. As a neuroprotective agent, minocycline has the potential to be superior to most of the previously tried agents. In addition to its high blood-brain barrier penetration, minocycline is also a safe compound co...

  16. Prospects for Minocycline Neuroprotection

    Plane, Jennifer M.; Shen, Yan; Pleasure, David E.; Deng, Wenbin

    2010-01-01

    Minocycline is a clinically available antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drug that also demonstrates neuroprotective properties in a variety of experimental models of neurological diseases. There have thus far been more than 300 publications on minocycline neuroprotection, including a growing number of human studies. Our objective is to critically review the biological basis and translational potential of this action of minocycline on the nervous system.

  17. An investigation of the neuroprotective effects of Curcumin in a model of Homocysteine - induced oxidative stress in the rat’s brain

    A Ataie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "n  "nBackground and the purpose of the study: Aging is the major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of them. Oxidative stress can induce neuronal damages and modulate intracellular signaling, ultimately leading to neuronal death by apoptosis or necrosis. In this study, the possible antioxidant and neuroprotective properties of the natural polyphenolic antioxidant compound, curcumin against homocysteine (Hcy neurotoxicity was investigated. "nMethods: Curcumin (5, 15, 45 mg/kg was injected intraperitonealy (i.p. once daily for a period of 10 days beginning 5 days prior to Hcy (0.2 μmol/μl intracerebroventricular (i.c.v injection in rats. Biochemical and behavioral studies, including passive avoidance learning and locomotor activity tests were studied 24 hrs after the last curcumin or its vehicle injection. The cell density of hippocampus layers and apoptosis in rats' hippocampi by immunohistochical methods were also studied. Results and major conclusion:Results indicated that Hcy could induce lipid peroxidation and increase Malondialdehyde (MDA and Super Oxide Anion (SOA levels in rat's brain.Additionally, Hcy impaired memory retention in passive avoidance learning test. However, curcumin decreased MDA and SOA levels significantly and improved learning and memory in rats. On the other hand Hcy could induce cell death and apoptosis in rats' hippocampi which was inhibited by curcumin. These results suggest that Hcy may induce lipid peroxidation in rat's brain. and polyphenol treatment (curcumin improves learning and memory deficits by protecting the nervous system against Oxidative stress.

  18. Maximizing neuroprotection: where do we stand?

    Kuffler DP

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Damien P KufflerInstitute of Neurobiology, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto RicoAbstract: Brain and spinal cord traumas include blunt and penetrating trauma, disease, and required surgery. Such traumas trigger events such as inflammation, infiltration of inflammatory and other cells, oxidative stress, acidification, excitotoxicity, ischemia, and the loss of calcium homeostasis, all of which cause neurotoxicity and neuron death. To prevent trauma-induced neurological deficits and death, each of the many neurotoxic events that occur in parallel or sequentially must be minimized or prevented. Although neuroprotective techniques have been developed that block single neurotoxic events, most provide only limited neuroprotection and are only applied singly. However, because many neurotoxicity triggers arise from common events, an approach for invoking more effective neuroprotection is to apply multiple neuroprotective methods simultaneously before the many neurotoxic triggers and cascades are initiated and become irreversible. This paper first discusses some triggers of neurotoxicity and neuroprotective mechanisms that block them, including hypothermia, alkalinization, and the administration of adenosine. It then examines how the simultaneous application of these techniques provides significantly greater neuroprotection than is provided by any technique alone. The paper also stresses the importance of determining whether the neuroprotection provided by these techniques can be further enhanced by combining them with additional techniques, such as the systemic administration of glucocorticoids. Finally, the paper stresses the absolute critical importance of applying these techniques within the “golden hour” following trauma, before the many neurotoxic events and cascades are manifest and before the neurotoxic cascades become irreversible.Keywords: adenosine, hypothermia, alkalinization, glucocorticoids

  19. A novel in vivo model of focal light emitting diode-induced cone-photoreceptor phototoxicity: neuroprotection afforded by brimonidine, BDNF, PEDF or bFGF.

    Arturo Ortín-Martínez

    Full Text Available We have investigated the effects of light-emitting diode (LED-induced phototoxicity (LIP on cone-photoreceptors and their protection with brimonidine (BMD, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF. In anesthetized, dark adapted, adult albino rats a blue (400 nm LED was placed perpendicular to the cornea (10 sec, 200 lux and the effects were investigated using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT and/or analysing the retina in oriented cross-sections or wholemounts immune-labelled for L- and S-opsin and counterstained with the nuclear stain DAPI. The effects of topical BMD (1% or, intravitreally injected BDNF (5 µg, PEDF (2 µg, CNTF (0.4 µg or bFGF (1 µg after LIP were examined on wholemounts at 7 days. SD-OCT showed damage in a circular region of the superotemporal retina, whose diameter varied from 1,842.4±84.5 µm (at 24 hours to 1,407.7±52.8 µm (at 7 days. This region had a progressive thickness diminution from 183.4±5 µm (at 12 h to 114.6±6 µm (at 7 d. Oriented cross-sections showed within the light-damaged region of the retina massive loss of rods and cone-photoreceptors. Wholemounts documented a circular region containing lower numbers of L- and S-cones. Within a circular area (1 mm or 1.3 mm radius, respectively in the left and in its corresponding region of the contralateral-fellow-retina, total L- or S-cones were 7,118±842 or 661±125 for the LED exposed retinas (n = 7 and 14,040±1,860 or 2,255±193 for the fellow retinas (n = 7, respectively. BMD, BDNF, PEDF and bFGF but not CNTF showed significant neuroprotective effects on L- or S-cones. We conclude that LIP results in rod and cone-photoreceptor loss, and is a reliable, quantifiable model to study cone-photoreceptor degeneration. Intravitreal BDNF, PEDF or bFGF, or topical BMD afford significant cone neuroprotection in this model.

  20. [Neuroprotective activity of the proline-containing dipeptide noopept on the model of brain ischemia induced by the middle cerebral artery occlusion].

    Gavrilova, S A; Us, K S; Ostrovskaia, R U; Koshelev, V B

    2006-01-01

    The influence of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester, GVS-111) on the extent of ischemic cortical stroke was investigated in experiments on white mongrel male rats with ischemia induced by a combination of the middle cerebral artery occlusion with ipsilateral common carotid artery ligation. Animals were treated with noopept (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) according to the following schedule: 15 min and 2, 24, and 48 h after the occlusion. Test rats were decapitated 72 h after occlusion, brains were extracted and frozen, and thin brain slices were stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. The slices were scanned and processed using Auc 1 computer program, which estimates the percentage of damaged area relative to that of the whole ipsilateral hemisphere. The conditions of coagulation the distal segment of middle cerebral artery were selected, which caused necrosis localized in the fronto-parietal and dorso-lateral regions of the brain cortex without any damage of subcortical structures. The extent of the brain damage in control group (treated by saline) was 18.6%, while that in the group treated with noopept was 12.2%, thus demonstrating a decrease in the infarction area by 34.5% (p noopept efficacy on the model of the extensive ischemic injury of brain cortex show that this drug has good prospects for use in the neuroprotective treatment of stroke. PMID:16995431

  1. Naringin treatment induces neuroprotective effects in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease in vivo, but not enough to restore the lesioned dopaminergic system.

    Kim, Heung Deok; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-02-01

    We recently reported that treatment with naringin, a major flavonoid found in grapefruit and citrus fruits, attenuated neurodegeneration in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) in vivo. In order to investigate whether its effects are universally applied to a different model of PD and whether its treatment induces restorative effects on the lesioned nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) projection, we observed the effects of pre-treatment or post-treatment with naringin in a mouse model of PD. For neuroprotective effects, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was unilaterally injected into the striatum of mouse brains for a neurotoxin model of PD in the presence or absence of naringin by daily intraperitoneal injection. Our results showed that naringin protected the nigrostriatal DA projection from 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, similar to the effects in rat brains, this treatment induced the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is well known as an important survival factor for DA neurons, and inhibited microglial activation in the substantia nigra (SN) of mouse brains treated with 6-OHDA. However, there was no significant change of DA phenotypes in the SN and striatum post-treated with naringin compared with 6-OHDA-lesioned mice, despite the treatment being continued for 12 weeks. These results suggest that post-treatment with naringin alone may not be enough to restore the nigrostriatal DA projection in a mouse model of PD. However, our results apparently suggest that naringin is a beneficial natural product to prevent DA degeneration, which is involved in PD. PMID:26878791

  2. Abacavir-induced reversible Fanconi syndrome with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Ahmad M

    2006-01-01

    There are several reports of Fanconi syndrome (FS) with or without nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, treated with various antiretroviral medications like cidofovir, adefovir, didenosine and tenofovir. But neither FS nor NDI has been documented with abacavir therapy. We are reporting the first case of abacavir-induced reversible FS with NDI in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, who recovered completely with suppo...

  3. Neuroprotection in glaucoma

    Azadeh Doozandeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a degenerative optic neuropathy characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC loss and visual field defects. It is known that in some glaucoma patients, death of RGCs continues despite intraocular pressure (IOP reduction. Neuroprotection in the field of glaucoma is defined as any treatment, independent of IOP reduction, which prevents RGC death. Glutamate antagonists, ginkgo biloba extract, neurotrophic factors, antioxidants, calcium channel blockers, brimonidine, glaucoma medications with blood regulatory effect and nitric oxide synthase inhibitors are among compounds with possible neuroprotective activity in preclinical studies. A few agents (such as brimonidine or memantine with neuroprotective effects in experimental studies have advanced to clinical trials; however the results of clinical trials for these agents have not been conclusive. Nevertheless, lack of compelling clinical evidence has not prevented the off-label use of some of these compounds in glaucoma practice. Stem cell transplantation has been reported to halt experimental neurodegenerative disease processes in the absence of cell replacement. It has been hypothesized that transplantation of some types of stem cells activates multiple neuroprotective pathways via secretion of various factors. The advantage of this approach is a prolonged and targeted effect. Important concerns in this field include the secretion of unwanted harmful mediators, graft survival issues and tumorigenesis. Neuroprotection in glaucoma, pharmacologically or by stem cell transplantation, is an interesting subject waiting for broad and multidisciplinary collaborative studies to better clarify its role in clinical practice.

  4. The inhibition of transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 contributed to neuroprotection via inflammatory reaction in pilocarpine-induced rats with epilepsy.

    Tian, Q; Xiao, Q; Yu, W; Gu, M; Zhao, N; Lü, Y

    2016-06-14

    Recently, more and more studies support that inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Although TGFβ signaling is involved in epileptogenesis, whether TGFβ-associated neuroinflammation is sufficient to regulate epilepsy remains unknown to date. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor-α receptor-associated factor-6 (TRAF6), transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), which are the key elements of TGFβ-associated inflammation, is still unclear in epilepsy. Therefore, the present study aimed to explore the role of TRAF6 and TAK1 in pilocarpine-induced epileptic rat model. Firstly, the gene levels and protein expression of TRAF6 and TAK1 were detected in different time points after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). 5z-7-oxozeaenol treatment (TAK1 antagonist) was then performed; the changes in TRAF6, TAK1, phosphorylated-TAK1 (P-TAK1), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels, neuronal survival and apoptosis, and seizure activity were detected. Our results showed that expressions of TRAF6 were increased after SE, reached the peak in 7day, maintained at the high level to 30days, and the TAK1, P-TAK1 levels were increased after SE following time. After 5z-7-oxozeaenol treatment in epileptic rats, TRAF6-TAK1-P-TAK1 signaling protein expressions were reduced, inflammatory cytokine IL-1β expression was decreased, neuron survival index was improved, the neuron apoptosis index was decreased and seizure durations were alleviated. In conclusion, the expression of TRAF6 and TAK1 are related to the progression of epilepsy. TAK1 might be a potential intervention target for the treatment of epilepsy via neuroprotection. PMID:27012613

  5. Neuroprotection by sodium ferulate against glutamate-induced apoptosis is mediated by ERK and P13 kinase pathways

    Ying JIN; En-zhi YAN; Ying FAN; Xiao-li GUO; Yan-jie ZHAO; Zhi-hong ZONG; Zhuo LIU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether sodium ferulate (SF) can protect cortical neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity and the mechanisms responsible for this protection. Methods: Cultured cortical neurons were incubated with 50 μmol/L glutamate for either 30 min or 24 h, with or without pre-incubation with SF (100, 200, and 500 μmol/L, respectively). LY294002, wortmannin, PD98059, and U0126 were added respectively to the cells 1 h prior to SF treatment. After incubation with glutamate for 24 h, neuronal apoptosis was quantified by scoring the per- centage of ceils with apoptotic nuclear morphology after Hoechst 33258 staining. After incubation with glutamate for either 30 min or 24 h, cellular extracts were prepared for Western blotting of active caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), μ-calpain, Bcl-2, phospho-Akt, phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 pro- tein kinase (p70S6K), phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1/2) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Results: SF reduced glutamate-evoked apoptotic morphology, active caspase-3 protein expression, and PARP cleavage and inhibited the glutamate-induced upregulation of the μ-calpain protein level. The inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and the MEK/ERK1/2 pathways partly abrogated the protective effect ot SF against glutamate-induced neuronal apoptosis. SF prevented the glutamate-induced decrease in the activity of the PI3K/Akt/p70S6K and the MEK/ERK1/2 pathways. Moreover, incubation of cortical neurons with SF for 30 min inhibited the reduction of the Bcl-2 expression induced by glutamate. Conclusion: The results indicate that PI3K/Akt/p70S6K and the MEK/ERK signaling pathways play important roles in the protective effect of SF against glutamate toxicity in cortical neurons.

  6. Detection of antibodies to single-stranded DNA in naturally acquired and experimentally induced viral hepatitis

    A sensitive ''Farr'' assay, utilizing 125I-labelled DNA was developed for detecting antibody to single-stranded DNA (anti-ssDNA). The test was shown to be specific and as sensitive as assays using 14C-labelled DNA, for the detection of antibody in patients with connective tissue diseases. Groups of sera from patients with naturally acquired viral hepatitis and experimentally infected chimpanzees were tested for anti-ssDNA by the 125I assay and by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP). No consistent pattern was observed with either technique, indicating the elevated levels of this antibody are not as reliable markers of parenchymal liver damage as had been previously suggested

  7. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effect of (S)-3,4-dicarboxyphenylglycine against seizures induced in immature rats by homocysteic acid

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Druga, Rastislav; Haugvicová, Renata; Mareš, Pavel; Otáhal, Jakub

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 4 (2008), s. 665-675. ISSN 0028-3908 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/02/1238; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : DL-homocysteic acid induced seizures * mGluR8 agonist (S)-3,4-DCPG * protection Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.383, year: 2008

  8. Dopamine as a potent inducer of cellular glutathione and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 in PC12 neuronal cells: a potential adaptive mechanism for dopaminergic neuroprotection.

    Jia, Zhenquan; Zhu, Hong; Misra, Bhaba R; Li, Yunbo; Misra, Hara P

    2008-11-01

    Dopamine auto-oxidation and the consequent formation of reactive oxygen species and electrophilic quinone molecules have been implicated in dopaminergic neuronal cell death in Parkinson's disease. We reported here that in PC12 dopaminergic neuronal cells dopamine at noncytotoxic concentrations (50-150 muM) potently induced cellular glutathione (GSH) and the phase 2 enzyme NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), two critical cellular defenses in detoxification of ROS and electrophilic quinone molecules. Incubation of PC12 cells with dopamine also led to a marked increase in the mRNA levels for gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) and NQO1. In addition, treatment of PC12 cells with dopamine resulted in a significant elevation of GSH content in the mitochondrial compartment. To determine whether treatment with dopamine at noncytotoxic concentrations, which upregulated the cellular defenses could protect the neuronal cells against subsequent lethal oxidative and electrophilic injury, PC12 cells were pretreated with dopamine (150 muM) for 24 h and then exposed to various cytotoxic concentrations of dopamine or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We found that pretreatment of PC12 cells with dopamine at a noncytotoxic concentration led to a remarkable protection against cytotoxicity caused by dopamine or 6-OHDA at lethal concentrations, as detected by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium reduction assay. In view of the critical roles of GSH and NQO1 in protecting against dopaminergic neuron degeneration, the above findings implicate that upregulation of both GSH and NQO1 by dopamine at noncytotoxic concentrations may serve as an important adaptive mechanism for dopaminergic neuroprotection. PMID:18368484

  9. Neuroprotection in glaucoma.

    Kaushik S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, glaucoma is recognised as an optic neuropathy. Selective death of retinal ganglion cells (RGC is the hallmark of glaucoma, which is also associated with structural changes in the optic nerve head. The process of RGC death is thought to be biphasic: a primary injury responsible for initiation of damage that is followed by a slower secondary degeneration related to noxious environment surrounding the degenerating cells. For example, retinal ishaemia may establish a cascade of changes that ultimately result in cell death: hypoxia leads to excitotoxic levels of glutamate, which cause a rise in intra-cellular calcium, which in turn, leads to neuronal death due to apoptosis or necrosis. Neuroprotection is a process that attempts to preserve the cells that were spared during the initial insult, but are still vulnerable to damage. Although not yet available, a neuroprotective agent would be of great use in arresting the progression of glaucoma. There is evidence that neuroprotection can be achieved both pharmacologically and immunologically. Pharmacological intervention aims at neutralising some of the effects of the nerve-derived toxic factors, thereby increasing the ability of the spared neurons to cope with stressful conditions. On the other hand, immunological interventions boost the body′s own repair mechanisms for counteracting the toxic effects of various chemicals generated during the cascade. This review, based on a literature search using MEDLINE, focuses on diverse cellular events associated with glaucomatous neurodegeneration, and discusses some pharmacological agents believed to have a neuroprotective role in glaucoma.

  10. Detection of antibodies to single-stranded DNA in naturally acquired and experimentally induced viral hepatitis

    Gust, I.D.; Feinstone, S.M.; Purcell, R.H.; Alter, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitive ''Farr'' assay, utilizing /sup 125/I-labelled DNA was developed for detecting antibody to single-stranded DNA (anti-ssDNA). The test was shown to be specific and as sensitive as assays using /sup 14/C-labelled DNA, for the detection of antibody in patients with connective tissue diseases. Groups of sera from patients with naturally acquired viral hepatitis and experimentally infected chimpanzees were tested for anti-ssDNA by the /sup 125/I assay and by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP). No consistent pattern was observed with either technique, indicating the elevated levels of this antibody are not as reliable markers of parenchymal liver damage as had been previously suggested.

  11. Neuroprotective role of antioxidant and pyranocarboxylic acid derivative against AlCl3 induced Alzheimer’s disease in rats

    Sarabjeet Singh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess potential of quercetin and etodolac to treat oxidative stress in neuronal death and inflammation in Alzheimer’s disease of AlCl3 induced rat models. All results of this AlCl3 model are compared with those obtained in controls. Methods: Wistar rats, housed in a controlled environment were treated with aluminum chloride (4.2 mg/kg of body weight, i.p. for 28 d rather than oral to ensure neurotoxic concentration in hippocampus and hypothalamic region, part highly active in memory control and cognition, while control group was injected with saline. Estimation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance, superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione and acetylcholine levels gave estimation of neuronal damage. Low (20 mg/kg and 25 mg/kg and high (40 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg doses of quercetin and etodolac were administered to the test groups respectively. Histopathology study was conducted to perform relative study. Results: Co-administration of quercetin and etodolac either alone or in combination prevented the changes in biochemical markers of Alzheimer’s disease, but significant results (P<0.05 were seen when a combination of two was administered at low dose levels. Good correlation was developed between chemical estimations and histopathology study. Conclusions: Our findings suggest a combined role of anti-oxidant and cyclooxygenase inhibitor in protection of neural degeneration and inflammation due to oxidative stress.

  12. Neuroprotective Effect of a DJ-1 Based Peptide in a Toxin Induced Mouse Model of Multiple System Atrophy.

    Micaela Johanna Glat

    Full Text Available Multiple System Atrophy (MSA is a sporadic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia and dysautonomia, in various combinations. In MSA with parkinsonism (MSA-P, the degeneration is mainly restricted to the substantia nigra pars compacta and putamen. Studies have identified alterations in DJ-1 (PARK7, a key component of the anti-oxidative stress response, in Parkinson's disease (PD and MSA patients. Previously we have shown that a short DJ-1-based peptide named ND-13, protected cultured cells against neurotoxic insults and improved behavioral outcome in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD. In this study, we used the 3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP-induced mouse model of MSA and treated the animals with ND-13 in order to evaluate its therapeutic effects. Our results show that ND-13 protects cultured cells against oxidative stress generated by the mitochondrial inhibitor, 3-NP. Moreover, we show that ND-13 attenuates nigrostriatal degeneration and improves performance in motor-related behavioral tasks in 3-NP-treated mice. Our findings suggest a rationale for using ND-13 as a promising therapeutic approach for treatment of MSA.

  13. Neuroprotective Effect of a DJ-1 Based Peptide in a Toxin Induced Mouse Model of Multiple System Atrophy

    Glat, Micaela Johanna; Ben-Zur, Tali; Barhum, Yael; Offen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) is a sporadic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia and dysautonomia, in various combinations. In MSA with parkinsonism (MSA-P), the degeneration is mainly restricted to the substantia nigra pars compacta and putamen. Studies have identified alterations in DJ-1 (PARK7), a key component of the anti-oxidative stress response, in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and MSA patients. Previously we have shown that a short DJ-1-based peptide named ND-13, protected cultured cells against neurotoxic insults and improved behavioral outcome in animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In this study, we used the 3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP)-induced mouse model of MSA and treated the animals with ND-13 in order to evaluate its therapeutic effects. Our results show that ND-13 protects cultured cells against oxidative stress generated by the mitochondrial inhibitor, 3-NP. Moreover, we show that ND-13 attenuates nigrostriatal degeneration and improves performance in motor-related behavioral tasks in 3-NP-treated mice. Our findings suggest a rationale for using ND-13 as a promising therapeutic approach for treatment of MSA. PMID:26901405

  14. Decreased striatal RGS2 expression is neuroprotective in Huntington's disease (HD and exemplifies a compensatory aspect of HD-induced gene regulation.

    Tamara Seredenina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The molecular phenotype of Huntington's disease (HD is known to comprise highly reproducible changes in gene expression involving striatal signaling genes. Here we test whether individual changes in striatal gene expression are capable of mitigating HD-related neurotoxicity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used protein-encoding and shRNA-expressing lentiviral vectors to evaluate the effects of RGS2, RASD2, STEP and NNAT downregulation in HD. Of these four genes, only RGS2 and RASD2 modified mutant htt fragment toxicity in cultured rat primary striatal neurons. In both cases, disease modulation was in the opposite of the predicted direction: whereas decreased expression of RGS2 and RASD2 was associated with the HD condition, restoring expression enhanced degeneration of striatal cells. Conversely, silencing of RGS2 or RASD2 enhanced disease-related changes in gene expression and resulted in significant neuroprotection. These results indicate that RGS2 and RASD2 downregulation comprises a compensatory response that allows neurons to better tolerate huntingtin toxicity. Assessment of the possible mechanism of RGS2-mediated neuroprotection showed that RGS2 downregulation enhanced ERK activation. These results establish a novel link between the inhibition of RGS2 and neuroprotective modulation of ERK activity. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings both identify RGS2 downregulation as a novel compensatory response in HD neurons and suggest that RGS2 inhibition might be considered as an innovative target for neuroprotective drug development.

  15. Overexpression of P-glycoprotein induces acquired resistance to imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    Xing-Xiang Peng; Amit K. Tiwari; Hsiang-Chun Wu; Zhe-Sheng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib,a breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-Abelson murine leukemia (ABL) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI),has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML).However,development of multidrug resistance(MDR) limits the use of imatinib.In the present study,we aimed to investigate the mechanisms of cellular resistance to imatinib in CML.Therefore,we established an imatinib-resistant human CML cell line (K562-imatinib) through a stepwise selection process.While characterizing the phenotype of these cells,we found that K562-imatinib cells were 124.6-fold more resistant to imatinib than parental K562 cells.In addition,these cells were cross-resistant to second- and third-generation BCR-ABL TKIs.Western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) demonstrated that P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and MDR1 mRNA levels were increased in K562-imatinib cells.In addition,accumulation of [14C]6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) was decreased,whereas the ATP-dependent efflux of [14C] 6-MP and [3H]methotrexate transport were increased in K562-imatinib cells.These data suggest that the overexpression of P-gp may play a crucial role in acquired resistance to imatinib in CML K562-imatinib cells.

  16. Vitamin E Suppression of Microglial Activation Is Neuroprotective

    Li, Yuekui; Liu, Ling; Barger, Steven W.; Mrak, Robert E; Griffin, W Sue T

    2001-01-01

    Neurotoxic microglial-neuronal interactions have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, and vitamin E has been shown to have direct neuroprotective effects. To determine whether vitamin E also has indirect neuroprotective effects through suppression of microglial activation, we used a microglial-neuronal coculture. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment of a microglial cell line (N9) induced a time-dependent activation of both p38 mi...

  17. A novel elicitor protein from Phytophthora parasitica induces plant basal immunity and systemic acquired resistance.

    Chang, Yi-Hsuan; Yan, Hao-Zhi; Liou, Ruey-Fen

    2015-02-01

    The interaction between Phytophthora pathogens and host plants involves the exchange of complex molecular signals from both sides. Recent studies of Phytophthora have led to the identification of various apoplastic elicitors known to trigger plant immunity. Here, we provide evidence that the protein encoded by OPEL of Phytophthora parasitica is a novel elicitor. Homologues of OPEL were identified only in oomycetes, but not in fungi and other organisms. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that OPEL is expressed throughout the development of P. parasitica and is especially highly induced after plant infection. Infiltration of OPEL recombinant protein from Escherichia coli into leaves of Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Samsun NN) resulted in cell death, callose deposition, the production of reactive oxygen species and induced expression of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity markers and salicylic acid-responsive defence genes. Moreover, the infiltration conferred systemic resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens, including Tobacco mosaic virus, the bacteria wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and P. parasitica. In addition to the signal peptide, OPEL contains three conserved domains: a thaumatin-like domain, a glycine-rich protein domain and a glycosyl hydrolase (GH) domain. Intriguingly, mutation of a putative laminarinase active site motif in the predicted GH domain abolished its elicitor activity, which suggests enzymatic activity of OPEL in triggering the defence response. PMID:24965864

  18. Breast cancer cells with acquired antiestrogen resistance are sensitized to cisplatin-induced cell death

    Yde, Christina Westmose; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Stenvang, Jan

    2007-01-01

    future breast cancer treatment. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the chemotherapeutic compound cisplatin using a panel of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cell lines established from the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. We show that the antiestrogen-resistant cells are...... parental MCF-7 cells. Our data show that Bcl-2 can protect antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells from cisplatin-induced cell death, indicating that the reduced expression of Bcl-2 in the antiestrogen-resistant cells plays a role in sensitizing the cells to cisplatin treatment.......Antiestrogens are currently used for treating breast cancer patients who have estrogen receptor-positive tumors. However, patients with advanced disease will eventually develop resistance to the drugs. Therefore, compounds effective on antiestrogen-resistant tumors will be of great importance for...

  19. Chemotherapeutic Drug-Induced ABCG2 Promoter Demethylation as a Novel Mechanism of Acquired Multidrug Resistance

    Eran E. Bram

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available ABCG2 is an efflux transporter conferring multidrug resistance (MDR on cancer cells. However, the initial molecular events leading to its up-regulation in MDR tumor cells are poorly understood. Herein, we explored the impact of drug treatment on the methylation status of the ABCG2 promoter and consequent reactivation of ABCG2 gene expression in parental tumor cell lines and their MDR sublines. We demonstrate that ABCG2 promoter methylation is common in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL lines, also present in primary T-ALL lymphoblast specimens. Furthermore, drug selection with sulfasalazine and topotecan induced a complete demethylation of the ABCG2 promoter in the T-ALL and ovarian carcinoma model cell lines CCRF-CEM and IGROV1, respectively. This resulted in a dramatic induction of ABCG2 messenger RNA levels (235- and 743-fold, respectively and consequent acquisition of an ABCG2-dependent MDR phenotype. Quantitative genomic polymerase chain reaction and ABCG2 promoter-luciferase reporter assay did not reveal ABCG2 gene amplification or differential transcriptional trans-activation, which could account for ABCG2 up-regulation in these MDR cells. Remarkably, mimicking cytotoxic bolus drug treatment through 12- to 24-hour pulse exposure of ABCG2-silenced leukemia cells, to clinically relevant concentrations of the chemotherapeutic agents daunorubicin and mitoxantrone, resulted in a marked transcriptional up-regulation of ABCG2. Our findings establish that antitumor drug-induced epigenetic reactivation of ABCG2 gene expression in cancer cells is an early molecular event leading to MDR. These findings have important implications for the emergence, clonal selection, and expansion of malignant cells with the MDR phenotype during chemotherapy.

  20. A Pilot Study for the Neuroprotective Effect of Gongjin-dan on Transient Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion-Induced Ischemic Rat Brain

    Yun-Young Sunwoo; Sang In Park; Yong-An Chung; Jisoo Lee; Moon-Seo Park; Kyung-Sool Jang; Lee-So Maeng; Dong-Kyu Jang; Ruth Im; Yu Jin Jung; Soon A. Park; Eun-Sun Kang; Min-Wook Kim; Young-Min Han

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether gongjin-dan improves functional recovery and has neuroprotective effects on reducing the infarct volume after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Infarct volume was measured using TTC staining and glucose utilization by F-18 FDG PET. Functional improvement was evaluated with the Rota-rod, treadmill, Garcia score test, and adhesive removal test. At 14 days after MCAo, neuronal cell survival, astrocytes expansion, and apoptosis were assessed...

  1. Paraquat induces oxidative stress, neuronal loss in substantia nigra region and Parkinsonism in adult rats: Neuroprotection and amelioration of symptoms by water-soluble formulation of Coenzyme Q10

    Sridhar TS

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease, for which currently there is no cure, develops as a result of progressive loss of dopamine neurons in the brain; thus, identification of any potential therapeutic intervention for disease management is of a great importance. Results Here we report that prophylactic application of water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 could effectively offset the effects of environmental neurotoxin paraquat, believed to be a contributing factor in the development of familial PD. In this study we utilized a model of paraquat-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in adult rats that received three weekly intra-peritoneal injections of the herbicide paraquat. Histological and biochemical analyses of rat brains revealed increased levels of oxidative stress markers and a loss of approximately 65% of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra region. The paraquat-exposed rats also displayed impaired balancing skills on a slowly rotating drum (rotorod evidenced by their reduced spontaneity in gait performance. In contrast, paraquat exposed rats receiving a water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 in their drinking water prior to and during the paraquat treatment neither developed neurodegeneration nor reduced rotorod performance and were indistinguishable from the control paraquat-untreated rats. Conclusion Our data confirmed that paraquat-induced neurotoxicity represents a convenient rat model of Parkinsonian neurodegeneration suitable for mechanistic and neuroprotective studies. This is the first preclinical evaluation of a water-soluble coenzyme Q10 formulation showing the evidence of prophylactic neuroprotection at clinically relevant doses.

  2. A Pilot Study for the Neuroprotective Effect of Gongjin-dan on Transient Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion-Induced Ischemic Rat Brain

    Yun-Young Sunwoo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated whether gongjin-dan improves functional recovery and has neuroprotective effects on reducing the infarct volume after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo. Infarct volume was measured using TTC staining and glucose utilization by F-18 FDG PET. Functional improvement was evaluated with the Rota-rod, treadmill, Garcia score test, and adhesive removal test. At 14 days after MCAo, neuronal cell survival, astrocytes expansion, and apoptosis were assessed by immunohistofluorescence staining in the peri-infarct region. Also, the expression of neurotrophic factors and inflammatory cytokines such as VEGF, BDNF, Cox-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-1α was measured in ischemic hemisphere regions. The gongjin-dan-treated group showed both reduced infarct volume and increased glucose utilization. Behavior tests demonstrated a significant improvement compared to the control. Also in the gongjin-dan treated group, NeuN-positive cells were increased and number of astrocytes, microglia, and apoptotic cells was significantly decreased compared with the control group in the ischemic peri-infarct area. Furthermore, the expression of VEGF and BDNF was increased and level of Cox-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-1α was decreased. These results suggest that gongjin-dan may improve functional outcome through the rapid restoration of metabolism and can be considered as a potential neuroprotective agent.

  3. Schistosoma mansoni: is acquired immunity induced by highly x-irradiated cercariae dependent on the size of the challenging dose

    Hsue, S.Y.; Hsue, H.F.; Osborne, J.W.; Johnson, S.C.

    1982-04-01

    A high degree of immunity, as shown by a 91% reduction of the number of worms recovered was found in five groups of mice that were immunized five times with highly X-irradiated cercariae and then challenged with 10, 20, 50, 100, or 500 normal Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in worm reduction in immunized mice challenged with different numbers of cercariae; consequently the immunity induced by this immunization method did not appear to be challenge-dose-dependent. However, the results also showed that when immunized mice were challenged with 500, 100, 50, 20, and 10 cercariae, 0, 13, 26, 56, and 68%, respectively, of the experimental animals were free of worms. Thus, the percentage of worm-negative cases increased as the number of challenge cercariae decreased. When viewed in this manner, the acquired immunity may be considered challenge-dose-dependent as well. If this method of vaccination is used for schistosomiasis control, we may anticipate that in both hypo- and hyperendemic areas, the intensity of infection and the severity of the disease will be reduced owing to a reduction in worms burdens, and in hypoendemic areas, there will be a number of worm-free cases.

  4. Schistosoma mansoni: is acquired immunity induced by highly x-irradiated cercariae dependent on the size of the challenging dose

    A high degree of immunity, as shown by a 91% reduction of the number of worms recovered was found in five groups of mice that were immunized five times with highly X-irradiated cercariae and then challenged with 10, 20, 50, 100, or 500 normal Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in worm reduction in immunized mice challenged with different numbers of cercariae; consequently the immunity induced by this immunization method did not appear to be challenge-dose-dependent. However, the results also showed that when immunized mice were challenged with 500, 100, 50, 20, and 10 cercariae, 0, 13, 26, 56, and 68%, respectively, of the experimental animals were free of worms. Thus, the percentage of worm-negative cases increased as the number of challenge cercariae decreased. When viewed in this manner, the acquired immunity may be considered challenge-dose-dependent as well. If this method of vaccination is used for schistosomiasis control, we may anticipate that in both hypo- and hyperendemic areas, the intensity of infection and the severity of the disease will be reduced owing to a reduction in worms burdens, and in hypoendemic areas, there will be a number of worm-free cases

  5. Neuroprotective therapies for glaucoma

    Song W

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wei Song, Ping Huang, Chun Zhang Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Glaucoma is the second leading cause for blindness worldwide. It is mainly caused by glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON characterized by retinal ganglion cell loss, which leads to visual field defect and blindness. Up to now, the main purpose of antiglaucomatous therapies has been to lower intraocular pressure (IOP through surgeries and medications. However, it has been found that progressive GON is still present in some patients with effective IOP decrease. Therefore, risk factors other than IOP elevation, like neurotrophin deprivation and excitotoxicity, contribute to progressive GON. Novel approaches of neuroprotection may be more effective for preserving the function of the optic nerve. Keywords: glaucoma, glaucomatous optic neuropathy, retinal ganglion cells, neuro­protection

  6. Neuroprotective potential of phytochemicals

    G Phani Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive dysfunction is a major health problem in the 21st century, and many neuropsychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative disorders, such as schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer′s Disease dementia, cerebrovascular impairment, seizure disorders, head injury and Parkinsonism, can be severly functionally debilitating in nature. In course of time, a number of neurotransmitters and signaling molecules have been identified which have been considered as therapeutic targets. Conventional as well newer molecules have been tried against these targets. Phytochemicals from medicinal plants play a vital role in maintaining the brain′s chemical balance by influencing the function of receptors for the major inhibitory neurotransmitters. In traditional practice of medicine, several plants have been reported to treat cognitive disorders. In this review paper, we attempt to throw some light on the use of medicinal herbs to treat cognitive disorders. In this review, we briefly deal with some medicinal herbs focusing on their neuroprotective active phytochemical substances like fatty acids, phenols, alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, terpenes etc. The resistance of neurons to various stressors by activating specific signal transduction pathways and transcription factors are also discussed. It was observed in the review that a number of herbal medicines used in Ayurvedic practices as well Chinese medicines contain multiple compounds and phytochemicals that may have a neuroprotective effect which may prove beneficial in different neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Though the presence of receptors or transporters for polyphenols or other phytochemicals of the herbal preparations, in brain tissues remains to be ascertained, compounds with multiple targets appear as a potential and promising class of therapeutics for the treatment of diseases with a multifactorial etiology.

  7. Neuroprotective Effects of Marine Algae

    Se-Kwon Kim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The marine environment is known as a rich source of chemical structures with numerous beneficial health effects. Among marine organisms, marine algae have been identified as an under-exploited plant resource, although they have long been recognized as valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds. Presently, several lines of studies have provided insight into biological activities and neuroprotective effects of marine algae including antioxidant, anti-neuroinflammatory, cholinesterase inhibitory activity and the inhibition of neuronal death. Hence, marine algae have great potential to be used for neuroprotection as part of pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals and functional foods. This contribution presents an overview of marine algal neuroprotective effects and their potential application in neuroprotection.

  8. Nucleotides in neuroregeneration and neuroprotection.

    Miras-Portugal, M Teresa; Gomez-Villafuertes, Rosa; Gualix, Javier; Diaz-Hernandez, Juan Ignacio; Artalejo, Antonio R; Ortega, Felipe; Delicado, Esmerilda G; Perez-Sen, Raquel

    2016-05-01

    Brain injury generates the release of a multitude of factors including extracellular nucleotides, which exhibit bi-functional properties and contribute to both detrimental actions in the acute phase and also protective and reparative actions in the later recovery phase to allow neuroregeneration. A promising strategy toward restoration of neuronal function is based on activation of endogenous adult neural stem/progenitor cells. The implication of purinergic signaling in stem cell biology, including regulation of proliferation, differentiation, and cell death has become evident in the last decade. In this regard, current strategies of acute transplantation of ependymal stem/progenitor cells after spinal cord injury restore altered expression of P2X4 and P2X7 receptors and improve functional locomotor recovery. The expression of both receptors is transcriptionally regulated by Sp1 factor, which plays a key role in the startup of the transcription machinery to induce regeneration-associated genes expression. Finally, general signaling pathways triggered by nucleotide receptors in neuronal populations converge on several intracellular kinases, such as PI3K/Akt, GSK3 and ERK1,2, as well as the Nrf-2/heme oxigenase-1 axis, which specifically link them to neuroprotection. In this regard, regulation of dual specificity protein phosphatases can become novel mechanism of actions for nucleotide receptors that associate them to cell homeostasis regulation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26359530

  9. Differential neuroprotective activity of two different grape seed extracts.

    Keishi Narita

    Full Text Available Glutamate excitotoxicity is one of the major events that takes place during various neurotoxic injuries such as brain ischemia. We prepared grape seed extracts, from two different varieties, containing high amounts of polyphenols but little resveratrol. Their neuroprotective effects were investigated using primary culture of neonatal mouse hippocampal neurons treated with an excitotoxic concentration of glutamate. Koshu, a white, local variety of V. vinifera, alleviated the acute inactivation of Erk1/2 and dendrite retraction in cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to a toxic concentration of glutamate (1.0 ng/ml. By contrast, Muscat Bailey A, a red, hybrid variety (Muscat Humburg × Bailey, failed to show any neuroprotective effect. Unlike brain-derived neurotrophic factor and other neuroprotective cytokines, Koshu extract did not induce Akt phosphorylation. Koshu extract also augmented neuron survival rate 24 hours after glutamate toxicity. The comparison of polyphenols between the two samples by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry demonstrated that Koshu had higher amounts of low molecular weight polyphenols along with several Koshu-specific procyanidin oligomers. These data suggest the presence of high affinity molecular targets for polyphenols in hippocampal neurons, which induce neuroprotective effects in a manner different from BDNF, and the importance of low molecular weight polyphenols and/or procyanidin oligomers for neuroprotection.

  10. α-Linolenic Acid, A Nutraceutical with Pleiotropic Properties That Targets Endogenous Neuroprotective Pathways to Protect against Organophosphate Nerve Agent-Induced Neuropathology

    Tetsade Piermartiri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available α-Linolenic acid (ALA is a nutraceutical found in vegetable products such as flax and walnuts. The pleiotropic properties of ALA target endogenous neuroprotective and neurorestorative pathways in brain and involve the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a major neuroprotective protein in brain, and downstream signaling pathways likely mediated via activation of TrkB, the cognate receptor of BDNF. In this review, we discuss possible mechanisms of ALA efficacy against the highly toxic OP nerve agent soman. Organophosphate (OP nerve agents are highly toxic chemical warfare agents and a threat to military and civilian populations. Once considered only for battlefield use, these agents are now used by terrorists to inflict mass casualties. OP nerve agents inhibit the critical enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE that rapidly leads to a cholinergic crisis involving multiple organs. Status epilepticus results from the excessive accumulation of synaptic acetylcholine which in turn leads to the overactivation of muscarinic receptors; prolonged seizures cause the neuropathology and long-term consequences in survivors. Current countermeasures mitigate symptoms and signs as well as reduce brain damage, but must be given within minutes after exposure to OP nerve agents supporting interest in newer and more effective therapies. The pleiotropic properties of ALA result in a coordinated molecular and cellular program to restore neuronal networks and improve cognitive function in soman-exposed animals. Collectively, ALA should be brought to the clinic to treat the long-term consequences of nerve agents in survivors. ALA may be an effective therapy for other acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Acquired Techniques

    Lunde Nielsen, Espen; Halse, Karianne

    2013-01-01

    Acquired Techniques - a Leap into the Archive, at Aarhus School of Architecture. In collaboration with Karianne Halse, James Martin and Mika K. Friis. Following the footsteps of past travelers this is a journey into tools and techniques of the architectural process. The workshop will focus upon...

  12. Acquired blepharoptosis

    Oosterhuis, HJGH

    1996-01-01

    A review is given of the aetiology and possible treatment of acquired (non-congenital) blepharoptosis, which is a common but not specific sign of neurological disease: The diagnostic categories of upper eyelid drooping are scheduled as (a) pseudo-ptosis due to a local process or overactivity of eye

  13. Microglia and neuroprotection.

    Chen, Zhihong; Trapp, Bruce D

    2016-01-01

    Microglia were first identified over a century ago, but our knowledge about their ontogeny and functions has significantly expanded only recently. Microglia colonize the central nervous system (CNS) in utero and play essential roles in brain development. Once neural development is completed, microglia function as the resident innate immune cells of the CNS by surveying their microenvironment and becoming activated when the CNS is challenged by infection, injury, or disease. Despite the traditional view of microglia as being destructive in neurological diseases, recent studies have shown that microglia maintain CNS homeostasis and protect the CNS under various pathological conditions. Microglia can be prophylactically activated by modeling infection with systemic lipopolysaccharide injections and these activated microglia can protect the brain from traumatic injury through modulation of neuronal synapses. Microglia can also protect the CNS by promoting neurogenesis, clearing debris, and suppressing inflammation in diseases such as stroke, autism, and Alzheimer's. Microglia are the resident innate immune cells of the CNS. Despite the traditional view of microglia as being destructive in neurological diseases, recent studies have shown that they maintain tissue homeostasis and protect the CNS under various pathological conditions. They achieve so by clearing debris, promoting neurogenesis, suppressing inflammation and stripping inhibitory synapses. This review summarizes recent advances of our understanding on the multi-dimensional neuroprotective roles of microglia. PMID:25693054

  14. Is longer sevoflurane preconditioning neuroprotective in permanent focal cerebral ischemia?

    Qiu, Caiwei; Sheng, Bo; Wang, Shurong; Liu, Jin

    2013-08-15

    Sevoflurane preconditioning has neuroprotective effects in the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion model. However, its influence on permanent cerebral ischemia remains unclear. In the present study, the rats were exposed to sevoflurane for 15, 30, 60, and 120 minutes, followed by induction of permanent cerebral ischemia. Results demonstrated that 30- and 60-minute sevoflurane preconditioning significantly reduced the infarct volume at 24 hours after cerebral ischemia, and 60-minute lurane preconditioning additionally reduced the number of TUNEL- and caspase-3-positive cells in the ischemic penumbra. However, 120-minute sevoflurane preconditioning did not show evident neuroprotective effects. Moreover, 60-minute sevoflurane preconditioning significantly attenuated neurological deficits and infarct volume in rats at 4 days after cerebral ischemia. These findings indicated that 60-minute sevoflurane preconditioning can induce the best neuroprotective effects in rats with permanent cerebral ischemia through the inhibition of apoptosis. PMID:25206521

  15. Exercise-Induced Neuroprotection of Hippocampus in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice via Upregulation of Mitochondrial 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase

    Hai Bo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving mitochondrial function has been proposed as a reasonable therapeutic strategy to reduce amyloid-β (Aβ load and to modify the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, the relationship between mitochondrial adaptation and brain neuroprotection caused by physical exercise in AD is poorly understood. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of long-term treadmill exercise on mitochondrial 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1 level, mtDNA oxidative damage, and mitochondrial function in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD. In the present study, twenty weeks of treadmill training significantly improved the cognitive function and reduced the expression of Aβ-42 in APP/PS1 transgenic (Tg mice. Training also ameliorated mitochondrial respiratory function by increasing the complexes I, and IV and ATP synthase activities, whereas it attenuated ROS generation and mtDNA oxidative damage in Tg mice. Furthermore, the impaired mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and mitochondrial OGG1 activities seen in Tg mice were restored with training. Acetylation level of mitochondrial OGG1 and MnSOD was markedly suppressed in Tg mice after exercise training, in parallel with increased level of SIRT3. These findings suggest that exercise training could increase mtDNA repair capacity in the mouse hippocampus, which in turn would result in protection against AD-related mitochondrial dysfunction and phenotypic deterioration.

  16. [Effect of the novel nootropic and neuroprotective dipeptide noopept on the streptozotocin-induced model of sporadic Alzheimer disease in rats].

    Ostrovskaia, R U; Tsaplina, A P; Vakhitova, Iu V; Salimgareeva, M Kh; Iamidanov, R S

    2010-01-01

    Streptozotocin-intracerebroventricularly treated rats are proposed as an experimental model of sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD). Diabetogenic toxin streptozotocin (STZ) administered in both cerebral ventricles in a dose of 3 mg/kg decreases the expression of NGF and BDNF mainly in the hippocampus and increases the content of malonic dialdehyde (MDA)--a product of lipid peroxidation--in the brain tissues. These metabolic changes are accompanied by a pronounced cognitive deficiency, which is manifested by long-term memory deterioration in the passive avoidance test. These manifestations of pathology are not accompanied by hyperglycemia in the case of intraventricular STZ administration, in contrast to the systemic (in particular, intraperitoneal) route of introduction that causes a pronounced increase in the blood glucose level. These results are consistent with the existing notions that (i) STZ administered intraventricularly provokes a complex of changes imitating the sporadic AD and (ii) this disease can be considered as a manifestation of type-III diabetes. The new original cognition enhancing and neuroprotective dipeptide noopept decreases the aforementioned metabolic changes and the accompanying long-term deterioration of the memory. Previously, this systemically active dipeptide was shown to be capable of increasing expression of NGF and BDNF in the hippocampus, stimulating the antibody production to beta-amyloid, inhibiting the lipid peroxidation, activating the endogenous antioxidant systems, and decreasing the rate of glutamate release (cholinopositive effect). Taken together, these data indicate that noopept can be considered as a multipotent substance acting upon several important pathogenic chainsof the sporadic AD. PMID:20184279

  17. Sleep Deprivation-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown and Brain Dysfunction are Exacerbated by Size-Related Exposure to Ag and Cu Nanoparticles. Neuroprotective Effects of a 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonist Ondansetron.

    Sharma, Aruna; Muresanu, Dafin F; Lafuente, José V; Patnaik, Ranjana; Tian, Z Ryan; Buzoianu, Anca D; Sharma, Hari S

    2015-10-01

    Military personnel are often subjected to sleep deprivation (SD) during combat operations. Since SD is a severe stress and alters neurochemical metabolism in the brain, a possibility exists that acute or long-term SD will influence blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and brain pathology. This hypothesis was examined in young adult rats (age 12 to 14 weeks) using an inverted flowerpot model. Rats were placed over an inverted flowerpot platform (6.5 cm diameter) in a water pool where the water levels are just 3 cm below the surface. In this model, animals can go to sleep for brief periods but cannot achieve deep sleep as they would fall into water and thus experience sleep interruption. These animals showed leakage of Evans blue in the cerebellum, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, parietal, temporal, occipital, cingulate cerebral cortices, and brain stem. The ventricular walls of the lateral and fourth ventricles were also stained blue, indicating disruption of the BBB and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). Breakdown of the BBB or the BCSFB fluid barrier was progressive in nature from 12 to 48 h but no apparent differences in BBB leakage were seen between 48 and 72 h of SD. Interestingly, rats treated with metal nanoparticles, e.g., Cu or Ag, showed profound exacerbation of BBB disruption by 1.5- to 4-fold, depending on the duration of SD. Measurement of plasma and brain serotonin showed a close correlation between BBB disruption and the amine level. Repeated treatment with the serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron (1 mg/kg, s.c.) 4 and 8 h after SD markedly reduced BBB disruption and brain pathology after 12 to 24 h SD but not following 48 or 72 h after SD. However, TiO2-nanowired ondansetron (1 mg/kg, s.c) in an identical manner induced neuroprotection in rats following 48 or 72 h SD. However, plasma and serotonin levels were not affected by ondansetron treatment. Taken together, our observations are the first to show that (i) SD could induce BBB

  18. Evaluation of neuroprotective effect of flupirtine in brain of albino rats

    Elango P

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: This study represents the neuroprotective characteristics of flupiritne against the excitotoxicity induced by NMDA in an in vivo rat models. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(1.000: 135-141

  19. Neuroprotective effects of Arctium lappa L. roots against glutamate-induced oxidative stress by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38, JNK and ERK 1/2 MAPKs in PC12 cells.

    Tian, Xing; Sui, Shuang; Huang, Jin; Bai, Jun-Peng; Ren, Tian-Shu; Zhao, Qing-Chun

    2014-07-01

    Many studies have shown that glutamate-induced oxidative stress can lead to neuronal cell death involved in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. In this work, protective effects of ethyl acetate extract (EAE) of Arctium lappa L. roots against glutamate-induced oxidative stress in PC12 cells were evaluated. Also, the effects of EAE on antioxidant system, mitochondrial pathway, and signal transduction pathway were explored. Pretreatment with EAE significantly increased cell viability, activities of GSH-Px and SOD, mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced LDH leakage, ROS formation, and nuclear condensation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, western blot results revealed that EAE increased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and inhibited the up-regulation of caspase-3, release of cytochrome c, phosphorylation of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2). Therefore, our results indicate that EAE may be a promising neuroprotective agent for the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases implicated with oxidative stress. PMID:24956398

  20. Neuroprotective effect of a triterpenoid saponin isolated from Momordica cymbalaria Fenzl in diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    Raju B Koneri; Suman Samaddar; Simi, S. M.; Srinivas T Rao

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the neuroprotective potential of a saponin isolated from the roots of Momordica cymbalaria against peripheral neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: A steroidal saponin (SMC) was isolated from M. cymbalaria Fenzl and purified by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography. Diabetes was induced in male Wister rats by injecting streptozotocin 45 mg/kg. Diabetic rats were divided into six groups for neuroprotective effect...

  1. Mitochondrial preconditioning: a potential neuroprotective strategy

    Cristina Carvalho

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria have long been known as the powerhouse of the cell. However, these organelles are also pivotal players in neuronal cell death. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent feature of chronic brain disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, and cerebral ischemic stroke. Data derived from morphologic, biochemical and molecular genetic studies indicate that mitochondria constitute a convergence point for neurodegeneration. Conversely, mitochondria have also been implicated in the neuroprotective signaling processes of preconditioning. Despite the precise molecular mechanisms underlying preconditioning-induced brain tolerance are still unclear, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels activation have been shown to be involved in the preconditioning phenomenon. This review intends to discuss how mitochondrial malfunction contributes to the onset and progression of cerebral ischemic stroke and Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, two major neurodegenerative disorders. The role of mitochondrial mechanisms involved in the preconditioning-mediated neuroprotective events will be also discussed. Mitochondrial targeted preconditioning may represent a promising therapeutic weapon to fight neurodegeneration.

  2. Clinical trials for neuroprotection in ALS.

    Siciliano, G; Carlesi, C; Pasquali, L; Piazza, S; Pietracupa, S; Fornai, F; Ruggieri, S; Murri, L

    2010-07-01

    Owing to uncertainty on the pathogenic mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) riluzole remains the only available therapy, with only marginal effects on disease survival. Here we review some of the recent advances in the search for disease-modifying drugs for ALS based on their putative neuroprotective effetcs. A number of more or less established agents have recently been investigated also in ALS for their potential role in neuroprotection and relying on antiglutamatergic, antioxidant or antiapoptotic strategies. Among them Talampanel, beta-lactam antibiotics, Coenzyme Q10, and minocycline have been investigated. Progress has also been made in exploiting growth factors for the treatment of ALS, partly due to advances in developing effective delivery systems to the central nervous system. A number of new therapies have also been identified, including a novel class of compounds, such as heat-shock protein co-inducers, which upregulate cell stress responses, and agents promoting autophagy and mitochondriogenesis, such as lithium and rapamycin. More recently, alterations of mRNA processing were described as a pathogenic mechanism in genetically defined forms of ALS, as those related to TDP-43 and FUS-TLS gene mutations. This knowledge is expected to improve our understanding of the pathogenetic mechanism in ALS and developing more effective therapies. PMID:20406180

  3. Plasmodesmata-located protein overexpression negatively impacts the manifestation of systemic acquired resistance and the long-distance movement of Defective in Induced Resistance1 in Arabidopsis.

    Carella, P; Isaacs, M; Cameron, R K

    2015-03-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant defence response that provides immunity to distant uninfected leaves after an initial localised infection. The lipid transfer protein (LTP) Defective in Induced Resistance1 (DIR1) is an essential component of SAR that moves from induced to distant leaves following a SAR-inducing local infection. To understand how DIR1 is transported to distant leaves during SAR, we analysed DIR1 movement in transgenic Arabidopsis lines with reduced cell-to-cell movement caused by the overexpression of Plasmodesmata-Located Proteins PDLP1 and PDLP5. These PDLP-overexpressing lines were defective for SAR, and DIR1 antibody signals were not observed in phloem sap-enriched petiole exudates collected from distant leaves. Our data support the idea that cell-to-cell movement of DIR1 through plasmodesmata is important during long-distance SAR signalling in Arabidopsis. PMID:25296648

  4. Metallothionein-I+II in neuroprotection

    Pedersen, Mie Ø; Jensen, Rikke; Pedersen, Dan S;

    2009-01-01

    Metallothionein (MT)-I+II synthesis is induced in the central nervous system (CNS) in response to practically any pathogen or disorder, where it is increased mainly in reactive glia. MT-I+II are involved in host defence reactions and neuroprotection during neuropathological conditions, in which MT......-I+II decrease inflammation and secondary tissue damage (oxidative stress, neurodegeneration, and apoptosis) and promote post-injury repair and regeneration (angiogenesis, neurogenesis, neuronal sprouting and tissue remodelling). Intracellularly the molecular MT-I+II actions involve metal ion control and...... neurons by signal transduction through the low-density lipoprotein family of receptors on the cell surface involving lipoprotein receptor-1 (LRP1) and megalin (LRP2). In this review we discuss the newest data on cerebral MT-I+II functions following brain injury and experimental autoimmune...

  5. Unconventional neurotransmitters, neurodegeneration and neuroprotection

    M. Leonelli; A.S. Torrão; L.R.G. Britto

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are also involved in functions other than conventional signal transfer between nerve cells, such as development, plasticity, neurodegeneration, and neuroprotection. For example, there is a considerable amount of data indicating developmental roles for the glutamatergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic, GABA-ergic, and ATP/adenosine systems. In this review, we discuss the existing literature on these "new" functions of neurotransmitters in relation to some unconventional neurotrans...

  6. Neuroprotective Effects of Marine Algae

    Se-Kwon Kim; Ratih Pangestuti

    2011-01-01

    The marine environment is known as a rich source of chemical structures with numerous beneficial health effects. Among marine organisms, marine algae have been identified as an under-exploited plant resource, although they have long been recognized as valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds. Presently, several lines of studies have provided insight into biological activities and neuroprotective effects of marine algae including antioxidant, anti-neuroinflammatory, choline...

  7. Evidence for different mechanisms of ‘unhooking’ for melphalan and cisplatin-induced DNA interstrand cross-links in vitro and in clinical acquired resistant tumour samples

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are critical lesions produced by several cancer chemotherapy agents including platinum drugs and nitrogen mustards. We have previously shown in haematological (multiple myeloma) and solid tumours (ovarian cancer) that clinical sensitivity to such agents can result from a defect in DNA ICL processing leading to their persistence. Conversely, enhanced repair can result in clinical acquired resistance following chemotherapy. The repair of ICLs is complex but it is assumed that the ‘unhooking’ step is common to all ICLs. Using a modification of the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay we measured the formation and unhooking of melphalan and cisplatin-induced ICLs in cell lines and clinical samples. DNA damage response in the form of γ-H2AX foci formation and the formation of RAD51 foci as a marker of homologous recombination were also determined. Real-time PCR of 84 genes involved in DNA damage signalling pathways was also examined pre- and post-treatment. Plasma cells from multiple myeloma patients known to be clinically resistant to melphalan showed significant unhooking of melphalan-induced ICLs at 48 hours, but did not unhook cisplatin-induced ICLs. In ovarian cancer cells obtained from patients following platinum-based chemotherapy, unhooking of cisplatin-induced ICLs was observed at 48 hours, but no unhooking of melphalan-induced ICLs. In vitro, A549 cells were proficient at unhooking both melphalan and cisplatin-induced ICLs. γ-H2AX foci formation closely followed the formation of ICLs for both drugs, and rapidly declined following the peak of formation. RPMI8226 cells unhooked melphalan, but not cisplatin-induced ICLs. In these cells, although cross-links form with cisplatin, the γ-H2AX response is weak. In A549 cells, addition of 3nM gemcitabine resulted in complete inhibition of cisplatin-induced ICL unhooking but no effect on repair of melphalan ICLs. The RAD51 foci response was both drug and cell line

  8. Glucocorticoid receptor is involved in the neuroprotective effect of ginsenoside Rg1 against inflammation-induced dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in substantia nigra.

    Sun, Xian-Chang; Ren, Xiao-Fan; Chen, Lei; Gao, Xian-Qi; Xie, Jun-Xia; Chen, Wen-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating clinical and experimental evidence suggests that chronic neuroinflammation is associated with dopaminergic neuronal death in Parkinson's disease (PD). Ginsenoside Rg1, the most active components of ginseng, possesses a variety of biological effects on the central nervous system, cardiovascular system and immune system. The present study aimed to evaluate the protective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglia activation and dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in rat substantia nigra (SN) and its potential mechanisms. Treatment with Rg1 could ameliorate the apomorphine-induced rotational behavior in LPS-lesioned rats. GR antagonist RU486 partly abolished the protective effect of Rg1. Rg1 treatment significantly attenuated LPS-induced loss of tyrosin hydroxlase (TH) positive neurons in substantial nigra par compacta (SNpc) and decreased content of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites in striatum of the lesioned side. Meanwhile, Rg1 significantly inhibited LPS-induced microglial activation and production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and nitric oxide (NO). These effects were abolished by co-treatment with RU486. In addition, Rg1 treatment significantly inhibited the LPS-induced phosphorylation of IκB, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) in the lesioned side of substantial nigra. These effect could be also partly blocked by RU486. Taken together, these data indicate that Rg1 has protective effects on mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons from LPS-induced microglia inflammation. GR signaling pathway might be involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of Rg1. PMID:26455404

  9. Neuroprotective Effects of a Variety of Pomegranate Juice Extracts against MPTP-Induced Cytotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in Human Primary Neurons

    Nady Braidy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP is an environmental toxin which selectively induces oxidative damage and mitochondrial and proteasomal dysfunctions to dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra leading to Parkinsonian syndrome in animal models and humans. MPTP is one of the most widely used in vitro models to investigate the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD and, screen for novel therapeutic compounds that can slow down or ameliorate this progressive degenerative disease. We investigated the therapeutic effect of pomegranate juice extracts (PJE, Helow, Malasi, Qusum, and Hamadh against MPTP-induced neurotoxicity in primary human neurons by examining extracellular LDH activity, intracellular NAD+ and ATP levels, and endogenous antioxidant levels including lipid peroxidation products, catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx activities, and reduced glutathione (GSH levels. MPTP induced a reduction in SOD and GPx activities and intracellular NAD+, ATP, and GSH levels parallel to an increase in extracellular LDH and CAT activities, although lipid peroxidation was not altered. We report that helow and malasi can ameliorate MPTP-induced neurotoxicity by attenuating the observed changes in redox function to a greater extent than qusum and hamedh. Selected PJE varieties may exhibit properties which may be of therapeutic value to slow down age-related degeneration and neurodegeneration in particular.

  10. Concentrations of Nitric Oxide in Rat Brain Tissues after Diffuse Brain Injury and Neuroprotection by the Selective Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor Aminoguanidine

    Yi-bao Wang; Shao-wu Ou; Guang-yu Li; Yun-hui Liu

    2005-01-01

    @@ To investigate the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and the selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG) on trauma, we explored the concentrations of nitric oxide in rat brain tissues at different time stamps after diffuse brain injury (DBI) with or without AG treatment.

  11. Bacillus cereus AR156 activates PAMP-triggered immunity and induces a systemic acquired resistance through a NPR1-and SA-dependent signaling pathway.

    Niu, Dongdong; Wang, Xiujuan; Wang, Yanru; Song, Xiaoou; Wang, Jiansheng; Guo, Jianhua; Zhao, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Induced resistance responses play a potent role in plant defense system against pathogen attack. Bacillus cereus AR156 is a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that installs induced systemic resistance (ISR) to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) in Arabidopsis. Here, we show that AR156 leaf infiltration enhances disease resistance in Arabidopsis through the activation of a systemic acquired resistance (SAR). PR1 protein expression and reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst are strongly induced in plants treated with AR156 and inoculated with Pst than that in plants inoculated with Pst only. Moreover, AR156 can trigger SAR in jar1 or ein2 mutants, but not in the NahG transgenic and NPR1 mutant plants. Our results indicate that AR156-induced SAR depends on SA-signaling pathway and NPR1, but not JA and ET. Also, AR156-treated plants are able to rapidly activate MAPK signaling and FRK1 gene expression, which are involved in pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). Altogether, our results indicate that AR156 can induce SAR by the SA-signaling pathways in an NPR1-dependent manner and involves multiple PTI components. PMID:26616055

  12. The neuroprotective potential of flavonoids: a multiplicity of effects

    Vauzour, David; Vafeiadou, Katerina; Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Rendeiro, Catarina; Spencer, Jeremy P.E.

    2008-01-01

    Flavonoids exert a multiplicity of neuroprotective actions within the brain, including a potential to protect neurons against injury induced by neurotoxins, an ability to suppress neuroinflammation, and the potential to promote memory, learning and cognitive function. These effects appear to be underpinned by two common processes. Firstly, they interact with critical protein and lipid kinase signalling cascades in the brain leading to an inhibition of apoptosis triggered by neurotoxic species...

  13. Are Dopamine Agonists Neuroprotective in Parkinson′s Disease?

    2002-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) agonists are playing increasingly important role in the treatment of not only advanced Parkinson′s disease (PD) and in PD patient with levodopa (L-DOPA)-induced motor fluctuations,but also in early treatment of the disease.This shift has been largely due to the demonstrated L-DOPA-sparing effect of DA agonists and their putative neuroprotective effect,based largely on experimental in vitro and in vivo studies.In this article we review the evidence of neuroprotection by DA agonists pramipexole,ropinirole,pergolide,bromocriptine and apomorphine in cell cultures and animal models of nigral injury.Most of the studies suggest that DA agonists exert their neuroprotection via directly scavenging free radicals or increasing the activities of radical-scavenging enzymes,and enhancing neurotrophic activity.The finding that pramipexole can normalize mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibit activity of caspase-3 in cytoplasmic hybrid cells made from mitochondrial DNA of nonfamilial Alzheimer′s disease patients,however,suggests even a broader implication for the neuroprotective role of DA agonists.Although the clinical evidence for neuroprotection by DA agonists is still limited,the preliminary results from several on-going clinical trials are promising.Several longitudinal studies are currently in progress designed to demonstrate a delay or slowing of progresion of PD using various surrogate markers of neuronal degeneration such as 18 F-L-DOPA PET and 123 I β-CIT SPECT.The results of these experimental and clinical studies will improve our understanding of the action of DA agonists and provide critical information needed for planning future therapeutic strategies in PD and related neurodegenerative disorders.``

  14. Are Dopamine Agonists Neuroprotective in Parkinson‘s disease?

    乐卫东; Jank.J

    2002-01-01

    Dopamine(DA) agonists are playing increasingly important role in the treatment of not only advanced Parkinson's disease(PD) and in PD patient with levodopa(L-DO-PA)-induced motor fluctuations,but also in early treatment of the disease.This shift has been largely due to the demonstrated L-DOPA-sparing effect of DA agonists and their putative neuroprotective effect,based largely on experimental in vitro and in vivo studies.In this article we review the evidence of neuroprotection by DA agonists pramipexole,ropinirole,pergolide,bromocriptine and apomorphine in cell cultures and animal models of nigral injury.Most of the studies suggest that DA agonists exert their neuroprotection via directly scavenging free radicals or increasing the activities of radical-scavenging enzymes,and enhancing neurotrophic activity.The finding that pramipexole can normalize mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibit activity of caspase-3 in cytoylasmic hybrid cells made from mitochondrial DNA of nonfamilial Alzheimer's disease patients,however,suggests even a broader implication for the neuroprotective role of DA agonists.Although the clinical evidence for neuroprotection by DA agonists is still limited,the preliminary results from several on-going clinal trials are promising.Several longitudinal studies are currently in progress designed to demonstrate a delay or slowing of progresion of PD using various surrogate markers of neuronal degeneration such as18F-L-DOPA PET and123I β-CIT SPECT.The results of these experimental and clinical studies will improve our understanding of the action of DA agonists and provide critical information needed for planning future therapeutic strategies in PD and related neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression

    Chung-Hsiang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR, which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA- induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treatment in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Furthermore, oral UR for 6 weeks significantly attenuated the overexpression of astrocyte proliferation and S100B proteins but not γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA receptors. These results indicate that oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate mossy fiber sprouting, astrocyte proliferation, and S100B protein overexpression and increase neuronal survival in KA-induced epileptic rat hippocampus

  16. Neuroprotective effects of piperine on the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced Parkinson's disease mouse model.

    Yang, Wei; Chen, Yu-Hua; Liu, Hao; Qu, Hong-Dang

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is second only to Alzheimer's disease as the most common and debilitating age-associated neurodegenerative disorder. Currently, no therapy has been shown to unequivocally retard or arrest the progression of the disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of piperine on the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6‑tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced Parkinson's mouse model. For MPTP treatment, the animals received repeated intraperitoneal injections (i.p.) of MPTP (30 mg/kg) solution for 7 days. Piperine (10 mg/kg) was administered orally for 15 days including 8 days of pretreatment. Motor behavior analysis was conducted with the rotarod test. The Morris water maze (MWM) was used to assess the cognitive learning ability of the mice. A histological examination was subsequently conducted. The results ddemonstrate that piperine treatment attenuated MPTP-induced deficits in motor coordination and cognitive functioning. Piperine also prevented MPTP-induced decreases in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells in the substantia nigra. Additionally, piperine reduced the number of activated microglia, expression of cytokine IL-1β, and oxidative stress following MPTP treatment. An anti-apoptotic property of piperine was identified by maintaining the balance of Bcl-2/Bax. In conclusion, the results show that piperine exerts a protective effect on dopaminergic neurons via antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory mechanisms in an MPTP-induced mouse model of PD. Thus, piperine is a potential therapeutic treatment for PD. PMID:26648012

  17. Low-Level Stress Induces Production of Neuroprotective Factors in Wild-Type but Not BDNF+/- Mice: Interleukin-10 and Kynurenic Acid

    Dugan, Allison M.; Parrott, Jennifer M.; Redus, Laney; Hensler, Julie G.; O’Connor, Jason C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) deficiency confers vulnerability to stress, but the mechanisms are unclear. BDNF+/- mice exhibit behavioral, physiological, and neurochemical changes following low-level stress that are hallmarks of major depression. After immune challenge, neuroinflammation-induced changes in tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway mediate depressive-like behaviors. Methods: We hypothesized that BDNF+/- mice would be more susceptible to stress-i...

  18. Inhibition of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress is Involved in the Neuroprotective Effect of bFGF in the 6-OHDA-Induced Parkinson's Disease Model.

    Cai, Pingtao; Ye, Jingjing; Zhu, Jingjing; Liu, Dan; Chen, Daqing; Wei, Xiaojie; Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Zhouguang; Zhang, Hongyu; Cao, Guodong; Xiao, Jian; Ye, Junming; Lin, Li

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with complicated pathophysiologic mechanisms. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress appears to play a critical role in the progression of PD. We demonstrated that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), as a neurotropic factor, inhibited ER stress-induced neuronal cell apoptosis and that 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced ER stress was involved in the progression of PD in rats. bFGF administration improved motor function recovery, increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neuron survival, and upregulated the levels of neurotransmitters in PD rats. The 6-OHDA-induced ER stress response proteins were inhibited by bFGF treatment. Meanwhile, bFGF also increased expression of TH. The administration of bFGF activated the downstream signals PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2 in vivo and in vitro. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2 pathways by specific inhibitors partially reduced the protective effect of bFGF. This study provides new insight towards bFGF translational drug development for PD involving the regulation of ER stress. PMID:27493838

  19. Neuroprotective Effects of Engineered Polymeric Nasal Microspheres Containing Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin on β-Amyloid (1-42)-Induced Toxicity.

    Yalcin, Ayfer; Soddu, Elena; Turunc Bayrakdar, Ezgi; Uyanikgil, Yigit; Kanit, Lutfiye; Armagan, Guliz; Rassu, Giovanna; Gavini, Elisabetta; Giunchedi, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) plaques are the key neurotoxic assemblies in Alzheimer disease. It has been suggested that an interaction occurs between membrane cholesterol and Aβ aggregation in the brain. Cyclodextrins can remove cholesterol from cell membranes and change receptor function. This study aimed to investigate the effect of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-CD) polymeric microspheres, based on chitosan or sodium alginate, on the levels of lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species production, and mitochondrial function in brain synaptosomes. The effect of microspheres on DNA fragmentation, the expression of Bcl-2, Bax, and Apex1 mRNAs in rat hippocampus after Aβ(1-42) peptide-induced neurotoxicity was also evaluated. Comparison with HP-CD raw material was performed. Aβ(1-42) treatment significantly decreased the mitochondrial activity of Apex1 and Bcl-2 mRNAs, induced DNA fragmentation, and increased mRNA levels of Bax. Treatment with HP-CD microspheres against Aβ(1-42) significantly reduced DNA fragmentation and increased the Bcl-2/Bax mRNA ratio and mitochondrial function. In addition, HP-CD microspheres used against Aβ(1-42) decreased the levels of lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species production. These results indicate that nasally administered spray-dried HP-CD microspheres are able to provide protection against Aβ(1-42)-induced neurotoxicity, due to the suppressed levels of oxidative stress and apoptotic signals in the rat hippocampus. PMID:27353207

  20. Neuroprotective Effect of Portulaca oleraceae Ethanolic Extract Ameliorates Methylmercury Induced Cognitive Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Cerebellum and Cortex of Rat Brain.

    Sumathi, Thangarajan; Christinal, Johnson

    2016-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is highly toxic, and its principal target tissue in human is the nervous system, which has made MeHg intoxication a public health concern for many decades. Portulaca oleraceae (purslane), a member of the Portulacaceae family, is widespread as a weed and has been ranked the eighth most common plant in the world. In this study, we sought for potential beneficial effects of Portulaca oleracea ethanolic extract (POEE) against the neurotoxicity induced by MeHg in cerebellum and cortex of rats. Male Wistar rats were administered with MeHg orally at a dose of 5 mg/kg b.w. for 21 days. Experimental rats were given MeHg and also administered with POEE (4 mg/kg, orally) 1 h prior to the administration of MeHg for 21 days. After MeHg exposure, we determine the mercury concentration by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS); mercury content was observed high in MeHg-induced group. POEE reduced the mercury content. We also observed that the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and the level of glutathione were reduced. The levels of glutathione reductase and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance were found to be increased. The above biochemical changes were found to be reversed with POEE. Behavioral changes like decrease tail flick response, longer immobility time, and decreased motor activity were noted down during MeHg exposure. POEE pretreatment offered protection from these behavioral changes. MeHg intoxication also caused histopathological changes in cerebellum and cortex, which was found to be normalized by treatment with POEE. The present results indicate that POEE has protective effect against MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26563420

  1. Attenuating effect of seeds of Adenanthera pavonina aqueous extract in neuropathic pain in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats: an evidence of neuroprotective effects

    Ramdas B Pandhare

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to investigate the attenuating effects of Adenanthera pavonina L., Leguminosae-Mimosaceae seeds aqueous extract (APSAE, in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic neuropathy in rats. APSAE (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg per day was given to diabetic rats for twelve weeks. Cold and hot water tail immersion tests, photoactometer and Rota-rod tests were performed to assess degree of colder, thermal, spontaneous motor activity and motor co-ordination changes respectively at different time intervals i.e., week 0, 4, 8 and 12. Tissue superoxide anion and total calcium levels were determined after twelve weeks to assess biochemical alterations. Histopathological evaluations of sciatic nerve were also performed to assess nerve damage. APSAE treatment increased tail flick latency significantly in diabetic rats. APSAE also reduced superoxide anion and total calcium levels. These results suggested that APSAE has attenuated development of diabetic neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats when compared with pregabalin (10 mg/kg, p.o. and could be beneficial in preventing the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  2. Pretreatment with Rhodiola Rosea Extract Reduces Cognitive Impairment Induced by Intracerebroventricular Streptozotocin in Rats: Implication of Anti-oxidative and Neuroprotective Effects

    ZE-QIANG QU; YAN ZHOU; YUAN-SHAN ZENGt; YAN LI; PETER CHUNG

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the pretreatment effects of Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) extract on cognitive dysfunction, oxidative stress in hippocampus and hippocampal neuron injury in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with R. rosea extract at doses of 1.5, 3.0, and 6.0 g/kg for 3 weeks, followed by bilateral intracerebroventricular injection with streptozotocin (1.5 mg/kg) on days 1 and 3. Behavioral alterations were monitored after 2 weeks from the lesion using Morris water maze task. Three weeks after the lesion, the rats were sacrificed for measuring the malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione reductase (GR) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in hippocampus and histopathology of hippocampal neurons. Results The MDA level was significantly increased while the GR and GSH levels were significantly decreased with striking impairments in spatial learning and memory and severe damage to hippocampal neurons in the model rat induced by intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin. These abnormalities were significantly improved by pretreatment with R. rosea extract (3.0 g/kg). Conclusion R. rosea extract can protect rats against cognitive deficits, neuronal injury and oxidative stress induced by intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin, and may be used as a potential agent in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD.

  3. NEUROPROTECTIVE EFFECT OF HYDROALCOHOLIC EXTRACT OF ARECA CATECHU LINN ON β-AMYLOID (25-35 INDUCED COGNITIVE DYSFUNCTION IN MICE

    R. Kannan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia in elderly. There is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s disease. But some category of drugs like AchE inhibitors and NMDA antagonists were used along with some antioxidants and some other supportive therapy. There is a possibility to slow down the brain’s degeneration caused by Alzheimer’s with natural treatments. In the present study animals were divided randomly into five groups of six animals each. Group I animals were given 0.1 % w/v CMC orally by using intra-gastric catheter at dose (10 ml/kg, Group III and Group IV animals were pretreated with hydroalcoholic extract of Areca catechu Linn (HAEAC for a period of 3 weeks (200 and 400 mg/ kg b.w and Group V animals were treated with donepezil (1.5 mg/kg/b.w i.p and were kept in light/dark cycle. During this period the animals were trained in water-maze, Y-maze, exploratory behaviour and passive avoidance apparatus for memory. Amnesia is induced by intra cerebro ventricular injection (I.C.V of β-amyloid (25-35. I.C.V injection for the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th groups were performed on the 21st day of the pretreated animals and continued for 5 days. The last dose was given 60 minutes prior to behavioral testing and on 30th day scarification of animals was done for in-vitro studies. Hydroalcoholic extract of Areca catechu Linn showed significant protective effect on neurodegeneration and also showed improvement on memory retention activity when compared with β-amyloid (25-35 induced animals (Group II.

  4. Hepatitis por citomegalovirus. Importancia del momento de contagio Cytomegalovirus induced hepatitis. Importance of when the infection is acquired

    R. Torres Peral

    2013-01-01

    one week ago. No acolia, coluria or infections were noted at that time. The patient was born at a gestational age of 36 weeks and the weight at birth was below 10 th percentile. The physical exam at admission revealed a pale-icteric skin and 3-5 cm esplenomegaly without hepatomegaly. The laboratory tests showed a cholestatic hepatitis with positive serology for CMV (IgM. After extrahepatic billiary atresia was ruled out and the PCR for CMV, in urine and serum, confirmed the infectious etiology, we started the treatment with intravenous Ganciclovir. The dried blood of metabolic tests was recovered in order to identify the congenital or acquired origin of the infection. Due to the clinical response and the negative result of the dried blood CMV PCR, we finished the treatment 6 weeks later. As side effect, we observed a mild leukopenia which had a good response to the treatment. Conclusions. In CMV infection is essential to identify the transmission´s time in order to establish the long-term prognosis. It is well known that the higher risk to develop sequels is joined to congenital infections;. being those that affect neurodevelopment the most frequent. Despite the infectious origin of our patient´s symptoms, extrahepatic biliary atresia must be ruled out because of the association with viral infections. 

  5. Neuroprotective effect of preoperatively induced mild hypothermia as determined by biomarkers and histopathological estimation in a rat subdural hematoma decompression model

    Yokobori, Shoji; Gajavelli, Shyam; Mondello, Stefania; Mo-Seaney, Jixiang; Hayes, Ronald L; Bramlett, Helen M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Bullock, M. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Object In traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients, hypothermia therapy has not shown efficacy in multicenter clinical trials. With the post-hoc data from the latest clinical trial (NABIS:H II), we hypothesized that hypothermia may be beneficial in the rat acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) model by blunting the effects of ischemic/ reperfusional (I/R) injury. The major aim of our study was to test the efficacy of temperature management in reducing brain damage after ASDH. Methods Rats were induced with ASDH and placed into (1) Normothermia group (37°C) (2) Early hypothermia group; head and body temperature reduced to 33°C at 30 minutes prior to craniotomy (3) Late hypothermia group; temperature was lowered to 33°C at 30 minutes after decompression (4) Sham group; no ASDH and underwent only craniotomy with normothermia. To assess of neuronal and glial cell damage, we analyzed microdialysate (MD ; using 100kD probe) concentrations of: glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1). Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) positive neurons and injury volume with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining were also measured. Results In the early phase of reperfusion (30min- 2.5 hrs after decompression), extracellular UCH-L1 in the early hypothermia group was significantly lower than in the normothermia. (Early; 4.9±1.0 ng/dl, Late; 35.2±12.1 ng/dl, Normo; 50.20± 28.3 ng/dl, Sham; 3.1±1.3 ng/dl, Early vs Normo; p 2.5hrs after decompression), extracellular GFAP in the early hypothermia group was also lower than in the normothermia and late hypothermia groups (Early; 5.5±2.9 ng/dl, Late; 7.4±3.4 ng/dl, Normo; 15.3±8.4 ng/dl, Sham; 3.3±1.0 ng/dl, Normo vs Sham; p group was significantly smaller than in normothermia group (Normo vs Early: 774,588 ± 162,173 vs 180,903 ± 42,212, pgroup in which hypothermia was induced before craniotomy and cerebral reperfusion (115.2±15.4 mm3 in early hypothermia group, 344.7±29.1 mm3 in late

  6. Neurotropic and neuroprotective activities of the earthworm peptide Lumbricusin

    Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ik Hwan; Nam, Seung Taek; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Daejin University, Pocheon, Gyeonggido 487-711 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae Sam [Department of Agricultural Biology, National Academy of Agricultural Science, RDA, Suwon 441-707 (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Heon [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Jungwon University, Goesan, Chungcheongbukdo 367-700 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun [School of Life Sciences, KNU Creative Bioresearch Group (BK21 Plus Program), College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daehak-ro 80, Buk-gu, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Il [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho, E-mail: hokim@daejin.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Daejin University, Pocheon, Gyeonggido 487-711 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-06

    Highlights: • 11-mer peptide Lumbricusin, a defensin like peptide, is isolated from earthworm. • We here demonstrated that Lumbricusin has neurotropic and neuroprotective effects. • p27 degradation by Lumbricusin mediates effects of Lumbricusin on neuronal cells. - Abstract: We recently isolated a polypeptide from the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris that is structurally similar to defensin, a well-known antibacterial peptide. An 11-mer antibacterial peptide (NH{sub 2}-RNRRWCIDQQA), designated Lumbricusin, was synthesized based on the amino acid sequence of the isolated polypeptide. Since we previously reported that CopA3, a dung beetle peptide, enhanced neuronal cell proliferation, we here examined whether Lumbricusin exerted neurotropic and/or neuroprotective effects. Lumbricusin treatment induced a time-dependent increase (∼51%) in the proliferation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Lumbricusin also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and decreased viability induced by treatment with 6-hydroxy dopamine, a Parkinson’s disease-mimicking agent. Immunoblot analyses revealed that Lumbricusin treatment increased ubiquitination of p27{sup Kip1} protein, a negative regulator of cell-cycle progression, in SH-SY5Y cells, and markedly promoted its degradation. Notably, adenoviral-mediated over-expression of p27{sup Kip1} significantly blocked the antiapoptotic effect of Lumbricusin in 6-hydroxy dopamine-treated SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that promotion of p27{sup Kip1} degradation may be the main mechanism underlying the neuroprotective and neurotropic effects of Lumbricusin.

  7. Neuroprotection Induced by Preconditioning with Prolonged and Intermittent Normobaric Hyperoxia Upregulate TNF-α Converting Enzyme and Increase NF-kB Activity in the Rat Stroke Model

    MR. Bigdeli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ischemic preconditioning (IPC is an endogenous phenomenon that caninduce ischemic tolerance (IT in variety of organs such as brain. In this study, weexamined the intermittent and prolonged dose of normobaric hyperoxia (NBHOin neurologic deficit scores, NF-kB activity, and TNF-α converting enzyme (TACEexpression.Materials and Methods: The rats were divided to four main groups. First twogroups were exposed to HO divided in prolonged (24hrs; PrHO and intermittent(4h×6 days; InHO groups. Second two groups acted as control groups and theywere exposed to 21% oxygen with the following condition: in the same chamber(room air, RA, continuously (24hrs; Pr RA and discontinuously (4h×6days; InRA.Each group was subdivided to three subgroups. After 24hrs, first subgroup wassubjected to 60mins MCAO followed by 24hrs of reperfusion. Then, IT, induced byInHO and PrHO, was measured by neurologic deficit scores and infarct volume.Second and third subgroups were respectively called sham-operated subgroup andintact subgroup designed to assess the effect of HO on NF-kB activity and TNF-αconverting enzyme expression.Results: Our findings indicate that InHO and PrHO are involved in the induction ofIT. Pretreatment with InHO and PrHO reduce neurologic deficit scores and infarctvolume significantly. InHO and PrHO increase NF-kB activity and TNF-α convertingenzyme expression with different degrees. Also, InHO with ischemia increase NF-kBactivity and TNF-α converting enzyme expression significantly.Conclusion: Although further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms ofischemic tolerance, InHO and PrHO seem partly to exert their effects via increasingNF-kB activity and up regulation of TNF-α converting enzyme.

  8. Paracrine effect of carbon monoxide - astrocytes promote neuroprotection through purinergic signaling in mice.

    Queiroga, Cláudia S F; Alves, Raquel M A; Conde, Sílvia V; Alves, Paula M; Vieira, Helena L A

    2016-08-15

    The neuroprotective role of carbon monoxide (CO) has been studied in a cell-autonomous mode. Herein, a new concept is disclosed - CO affects astrocyte-neuron communication in a paracrine manner to promote neuroprotection. Neuronal survival was assessed when co-cultured with astrocytes that had been pre-treated or not with CO. The CO-pre-treated astrocytes reduced neuronal cell death, and the cellular mechanisms were investigated, focusing on purinergic signaling. CO modulates astrocytic metabolism and extracellular ATP content in the co-culture medium. Moreover, several antagonists of P1 adenosine and P2 ATP receptors partially reverted CO-induced neuroprotection through astrocytes. Likewise, knocking down expression of the neuronal P1 adenosine receptor A2A-R (encoded by Adora2a) reverted the neuroprotective effects of CO-exposed astrocytes. The neuroprotection of CO-treated astrocytes also decreased following prevention of ATP or adenosine release from astrocytic cells and inhibition of extracellular ATP metabolism into adenosine. Finally, the neuronal downstream event involves TrkB (also known as NTRK2) receptors and BDNF. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of TrkB receptors reverts neuroprotection triggered by CO-treated astrocytes. Furthermore, the neuronal ratio of BDNF to pro-BDNF increased in the presence of CO-treated astrocytes and decreased whenever A2A-R expression was silenced. In summary, CO prevents neuronal cell death in a paracrine manner by targeting astrocytic metabolism through purinergic signaling. PMID:27383770

  9. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease.

    Naranjo, José R; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C; Arrabal, María D; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-02-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD. PMID:26752648

  10. Molecular Basis for Certain Neuroprotective Effects of Thyroid Hormone

    Paul Davis

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of brain damage that is common to ischemia-reperfusion inury and brain trauma includes disordered neuronal and glial cell energetics, intracellular acidosis, calcium toxicity, extracellular excitotoxic glutamate accumulation and dysfunction of the cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum. Thyroid hormone isoforms, 3, 5, 3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3 and L-thyroxine (T4, have nongenomic and genomic actions that are relevant to repair of certain features of the pathophysiology of brain damage. Thyroid hormone can nongenomically repair intracullar H+ accumulation by stimulation of the Na+/H+ exchanger and can support desirably low [Ca2+]i.c. by activation of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase. Thyroid hormone nongenomically stimulates astrocyte glutamate uptake, an action that protects both glial cells and neurons. The hormone supports the integrity of the cytoskeleton by its effect on actin. Several proteins linked to thyroid hormone action are also neuroprotective. For example, the hormone stimulates expression of the seladin-1 gene whose gene product is anti-apoptotic and is potentially protection in the setting of neurodegeneration. Transthyretin (TTR is a serum transport protein for T4 that is important to blood-brain barrier transfer of the hormone and TTR has also been found to be neuroprotective in the setting of ischemia. Finally, the interesting thyronamine derivatives of T4 have been shown to protect against ischemic brain damage through their ability to induce hypothermia in the intact organism. Thus, thyroid hromone or hormone derivatives have experimental promise as neuroprotective agents.

  11. Neuroprotection and its molecular mechanism following spinal cord injury

    Nai-Kui Liu; Xiao-Ming Xu

    2012-01-01

    Acute spinal cord injury initiates a complex cascade of molecular events termed 'secondary injury', which leads to progressive degeneration ranging from early neuronal apoptosis at the lesion site to delayed degeneration of intact white matter tracts, and, ultimately, expansion of the initial injury. These secondary injury processes include, but are not limited to, inflammation, free radical-induced cell death, glutamate excitotoxicity, phospholipase A2 activation, and induction of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, which are important targets in developing neuroprotective strategies for treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, a number of studies have shown promising results on neuroprotection and recovery of function in rodent models of spinal cord injury using treatments that target secondary injury processes including inflammation, phospholipase A2 activation, and manipulation of the PTEN-Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. The present review outlines our ongoing research on the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection in experimental spinal cord injury and briefly summarizes our earlier findings on the therapeutic potential of pharmacological treatments in spinal cord injury.

  12. Activating transcription factor 6 derepression mediates neuroprotection in Huntington disease

    Naranjo, José R.; Zhang, Hongyu; Villar, Diego; González, Paz; Dopazo, Xose M.; Morón-Oset, Javier; Higueras, Elena; Oliveros, Juan C.; Arrabal, María D.; Prieto, Angela; Cercós, Pilar; González, Teresa; De la Cruz, Alicia; Casado-Vela, Juan; Rábano, Alberto; Valenzuela, Carmen; Gutierrez-Rodriguez, Marta; Li, Jia-Yi; Mellström, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated protein and Ca2+ homeostasis underlie synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD); however, the factors that disrupt homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we determined that expression of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, is reduced in murine in vivo and in vitro HD models and in HD patients. DREAM downregulation was observed early after birth and was associated with endogenous neuroprotection. In the R6/2 mouse HD model, induced DREAM haplodeficiency or blockade of DREAM activity by chronic administration of the drug repaglinide delayed onset of motor dysfunction, reduced striatal atrophy, and prolonged life span. DREAM-related neuroprotection was linked to an interaction between DREAM and the unfolded protein response (UPR) sensor activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Repaglinide blocked this interaction and enhanced ATF6 processing and nuclear accumulation of transcriptionally active ATF6, improving prosurvival UPR function in striatal neurons. Together, our results identify a role for DREAM silencing in the activation of ATF6 signaling, which promotes early neuroprotection in HD. PMID:26752648

  13. Creatinyl amino acids: new hybrid compounds with neuroprotective activity.

    Burov, Sergey; Leko, Maria; Dorosh, Marina; Dobrodumov, Anatoliy; Veselkina, Olga

    2011-09-01

    Prolonged oral creatine administration resulted in remarkable neuroprotection in experimental models of brain stroke. However, because of its polar nature creatine has poor ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) without specific creatine transporter (CRT). Thus, synthesis of hydrophobic derivatives capable of crossing the BBB by alternative pathway is of great importance for the treatment of acute and chronic neurological diseases including stroke, traumatic brain injury and hereditary CRT deficiency. Here we describe synthesis of new hybrid compounds-creatinyl amino acids, their neuroprotective activity in vivo and stability to degradation in different media. The title compounds were synthesized by guanidinylation of corresponding sarcosyl peptides or direct creatine attachment using isobutyl chloroformate method. Addition of lipophilic counterion (p-toluenesulfonate) ensures efficient creatine dissolution in DMF with simultaneous protection of guanidino group towards intramolecular cyclization. It excludes the application of expensive guanidinylating reagents, permits to simplify synthetic procedure and adapt it to large-scale production. The biological activity of creatinyl amino acids was tested in vivo on ischemic stroke and NaNO(2) -induced hypoxia models. One of the most effective compounds-creatinyl-glycine ethyl ester increases life span of experimental animals more than two times in hypoxia model and has neuroprotective action in brain stroke model when applied both before and after ischemia. These data evidenced that creatinyl amino acids can represent promising candidates for the development of new drugs useful in stroke treatment. PMID:21644247

  14. The acquired radioresistance in HeLa cells under conditions mimicking hypoxia was attenuated by a decreased expression of HIF subunit genes induced by RNA interference

    The cancer cells residing in the hypoxic layer are resistant to radiation and these are ones responsible for cancer recurrence after radiation therapy. One of the reasons why hypoxic cancer cells acquire radioresistance may be attributable to changes in the gene expression profile by the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). However, the details underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of knockdown of HIF subunit genes to elucidate how HIF subunit genes may be involved in the radioresistance acquired by HeLa cells following exposure to a hypoxia mimic. Interestingly, HIF-1α and HIF-2α seemed mutually complementary for each other when either of them was suppressed. We thus suppressed the expression of both genes simultaneously. To do this, we developed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting a high homology region between HIF-1α and HIF-2α. It was shown that the expression of the shRNA effectively suppressed the acquisition of radioresistance following the hypoxia mimic. Moreover, it was confirmed that suppression of both subunits resulted in the downregulation of stem cell markers and the suppression of spheroid formation during the hypoxia mimicking-conditions. This shRNA-mediated knockdown method targeting a common region shared by a family of genes may offer a new candidate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Incubation with CoCl2 confers radioresistance to HeLa cells. • Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α are involved in the acquisition of radioresistance. • An shRNA to a homology region of HIF-1α and HIF-2α suppressed the radioresistance. • The shRNA decreased cells with stem cell markers and a stem cell phenotype

  15. The acquired radioresistance in HeLa cells under conditions mimicking hypoxia was attenuated by a decreased expression of HIF subunit genes induced by RNA interference

    Doi, Nobutaka [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); New Products Research & Development, Gene Engineering Division, NIPPON GENE Co., Ltd. (Japan); Ogawa, Ryohei, E-mail: ogawa@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Cui, Zheng-Guo [Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama (Japan); Morii, Akihiro; Watanabe, Akihiko [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama (Japan); Kanayama, Shinji; Yoneda, Yuko [New Products Research & Development, Gene Engineering Division, NIPPON GENE Co., Ltd. (Japan); Kondo, Takashi [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    The cancer cells residing in the hypoxic layer are resistant to radiation and these are ones responsible for cancer recurrence after radiation therapy. One of the reasons why hypoxic cancer cells acquire radioresistance may be attributable to changes in the gene expression profile by the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). However, the details underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of knockdown of HIF subunit genes to elucidate how HIF subunit genes may be involved in the radioresistance acquired by HeLa cells following exposure to a hypoxia mimic. Interestingly, HIF-1α and HIF-2α seemed mutually complementary for each other when either of them was suppressed. We thus suppressed the expression of both genes simultaneously. To do this, we developed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting a high homology region between HIF-1α and HIF-2α. It was shown that the expression of the shRNA effectively suppressed the acquisition of radioresistance following the hypoxia mimic. Moreover, it was confirmed that suppression of both subunits resulted in the downregulation of stem cell markers and the suppression of spheroid formation during the hypoxia mimicking-conditions. This shRNA-mediated knockdown method targeting a common region shared by a family of genes may offer a new candidate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Incubation with CoCl{sub 2} confers radioresistance to HeLa cells. • Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α are involved in the acquisition of radioresistance. • An shRNA to a homology region of HIF-1α and HIF-2α suppressed the radioresistance. • The shRNA decreased cells with stem cell markers and a stem cell phenotype.

  16. p53 isoforms regulate astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection and neurodegeneration.

    Turnquist, C; Horikawa, I; Foran, E; Major, E O; Vojtesek, B; Lane, D P; Lu, X; Harris, B T; Harris, C C

    2016-09-01

    Bidirectional interactions between astrocytes and neurons have physiological roles in the central nervous system and an altered state or dysfunction of such interactions may be associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Astrocytes exert structural, metabolic and functional effects on neurons, which can be either neurotoxic or neuroprotective. Their neurotoxic effect is mediated via the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) involving pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-6), while their neuroprotective effect is attributed to neurotrophic growth factors (e.g., NGF). We here demonstrate that the p53 isoforms Δ133p53 and p53β are expressed in astrocytes and regulate their toxic and protective effects on neurons. Primary human astrocytes undergoing cellular senescence upon serial passaging in vitro showed diminished expression of Δ133p53 and increased p53β, which were attributed to the autophagic degradation and the SRSF3-mediated alternative RNA splicing, respectively. Early-passage astrocytes with Δ133p53 knockdown or p53β overexpression were induced to show SASP and to exert neurotoxicity in co-culture with neurons. Restored expression of Δ133p53 in near-senescent, otherwise neurotoxic astrocytes conferred them with neuroprotective activity through repression of SASP and induction of neurotrophic growth factors. Brain tissues from AD and ALS patients possessed increased numbers of senescent astrocytes and, like senescent astrocytes in vitro, showed decreased Δ133p53 and increased p53β expression, supporting that our in vitro findings recapitulate in vivo pathology of these neurodegenerative diseases. Our finding that Δ133p53 enhances the neuroprotective function of aged and senescent astrocytes suggests that the p53 isoforms and their regulatory mechanisms are potential targets for therapeutic intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27104929

  17. [Evolution of the neuroprotection concept].

    Ostrovskaia, R U

    2003-01-01

    Although the modern concept of neuroprotection has been formulated quite recently, the basis of this approach was laid about four decades ago when Zakusov initiated the study of mechanisms involved in the neuroprotector action of GABA shunt metabolites (in particular, alpha-hydroxybutyric acid and succinic semialdehyde) during hypoxia. It was suggested to consider these agents as a system of endogenous neuroprotectors. The interest of Zakusov in endogenous regulators (including oligopeptides) had stimulated research in this direction and gave impact to the investigations of A. P. Skoldinov and T. A. Gudasheva initiated in the early 1980s. Proceeding from the original concept of the possibility of imitation of the action of neurotropic agents by their structural-conformational oligopeptide analogs, a number of biologically active stable dipeptides were obtained, based on pyroglutamate and proline, and high specific bioaccessibility of these dipeptides for the brain was established. Our investigations showed that these compounds not only possess nootropic activity (in a dose 1000 times lower than that of piracetam), but produce a pronounced neuroprotector action as well. Most thoroughly studied in this respect were substituted acyl-prolyl dipeptides, in particular, the drug noopept exhibiting a combined neuroprotector effect both in vitro and in vivo. Noopept decreases the extent of necrotic damage caused by photoinduced thrombosis of cortical blood vessels. It was established that the neuroprotector effect of noopept is related to its action upon the well-known "triad", whereby the drug reduces neurotoxic effects of excess extracellular calcium, glutamate, and free radicals. Two additional components of the neuroprotector action of noopept are related to the antiinflammatory and antithrombotic activity. The prospects of using direct and indirect action upon neurotrophin system for neuroprotection purposes are considered. Taking into account common secondary

  18. Potential neuroprotective effects of cinnamon

    Rebecca Crews Stavinoha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases involves complex interactions between multiple mechanisms, including but not limited to oxidative stress, inflammation, and proteotoxicity, which have yet to be ameliorated by pharmaceutical drugs with single targets. Natural products have been recognized for their health promoting effects for thousands of years. Plants produce a vast collection of secondary products, such as alkaloids, phenolic compounds, and terpenes that have shown health benefits in a variety of conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative diseases. In the search for more effective and safe treatment options for neurodegenerative diseases, several dietary sources of phytochemicals have been investigated. Historical usage in traditional medicine, along with modern research has identified several key products with potential benefits in neurodegenerative diseases. Among the dietary sources, cinnamon shows particular merit as a therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative diseases. Accumulating evidence suggesting neuroprotective effects via modulation of various risk factors relevant to neurodegeneration has been reviewed here. Industrial relevance. Cinnamon has been cherished for its health-promoting effects for thousands of years. Today, while modern medicine provides critical pharmaceutical agents that have assisted in ameliorating many diseases and extended the average lifespan significantly in the past century, these agents are associated with many side effects and expenses. As such, the search for efficient therapies with limited side effects is a significant target of research. Cinnamon, as a rich source of phytochemicals and long history in traditional medicine, has been a popular spice in recent decades for investigations elucidating its health-promoting effects. This review evaluates the therapeutic potential of cinnamon in ameliorating the risk factors responsible for the development

  19. Neuroprotective peptides related to Alzheimer's disease

    Slaninová, Jiřina; Borovičková, Lenka; Krejčová, G.; Patočka, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 10, S (2004), s. H33. ISSN 1075-2617. [Hellenic Forum on Bioactive Peptides /4./. 22.04.2004-24.04.2004, Patras-Hellas] Keywords : neuroprotective peptides * Alzheimer's disease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  20. Neuroprotective effects of nimodipine and nifedipine in the NGF-differentiated PC12 cells exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation or trophic withdrawal.

    Lecht, Shimon; Rotfeld, Elena; Arien-Zakay, Hadar; Tabakman, Rinat; Matzner, Henry; Yaka, Rami; Lelkes, Peter I; Lazarovici, Philip

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the neuroprotective properties of the L-type Ca²⁺ channel blockers, nimodipine and nifedipine, using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 neuronal cultures exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and trophic withdrawal-induced cell death. Nimodipine (1-100 μM) conferred 65±13% neuroprotection upon exposure to OGD and 35±6% neuroprotection towards different trophic withdrawal-induced cell death measured by lactate dehydrogenase and caspase 3 activities. The time window of nimodipine conferred neuroprotection was detected during the first 5h but not at longer OGD exposures. Nifedipine (1-100 μM), to a lower potency than nimodipine, conferred 30-55±8% neuroprotection towards OGD in PC12 cells and 29±5% in rat hypocampal slices, and 10±3% neuroprotection at 100 μM towards trophic withdrawal-induced PC12 cell death. The ability to demonstrate that nimodipine conferred neuroprotection in a narrow therapeutic time-window indicates that the OGD PC12 model mimics the in vivo models and therefore suitable for neuroprotective drug discovery and development. PMID:22677442

  1. In Vitro Neuroprotective Activities of Compounds from Angelica shikokiana Makino

    Amira Mira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Angelica shikokiana is widely marketed in Japan as a dietary food supplement. With a focus on neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, the aerial part was extracted and through bio-guided fractionation, fifteen compounds [α-glutinol, β-amyrin, kaempferol, luteolin, quercetin, kaempferol-3-O-glucoside, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, methyl chlorogenate, chlorogenic acid, hyuganin E, 5-(hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde, β-sitosterol-3-O-glucoside, adenosine (isolated for the first time from A. shikokiana, isoepoxypteryxin and isopteryxin] were isolated. Isolated compounds were evaluated for in vitro neuroprotection using acetylcholine esterase inhibitory, protection against hydrogen peroxide and amyloid β peptide (Aβ25-35-induced neurotoxicity in neuro-2A cells, scavenging of hydroxyl radicals and intracellular reactive oxygen species and thioflavin T assays. Quercetin showed the strongest AChE inhibition (IC50 value = 35.5 µM through binding to His-440 and Tyr-70 residues at the catalytic and anionic sites of acetylcholine esterase, respectively. Chlorogenic acid, its methyl ester, quercetin and luteolin could significantly protect neuro-2A cells against H2O2-induced neurotoxicity and scavenge hydroxyl radical and intracellular reactive oxygen species. Kaempferol-3-O-rutinoiside, hyuganin E and isoepoxypteryxin significantly decreased Aβ25-35-induced neurotoxicity and Th-T fluorescence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report about neuroprotection of hyuganin E and isoepoxypteryxin against Aβ25-35-induced neurotoxicity.

  2. Intravitreal injection of forskolin, homotaurine, and L-carnosine affords neuroprotection to retinal ganglion cells following retinal ischemic injury

    Russo, Rossella; Adornetto, Annagrazia; Cavaliere, Federica; Varano, Giuseppe Pasquale; Rusciano, Dario; Morrone, Luigi Antonio; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana; Bagetta, Giacinto; Nucci, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death is the final event leading to visual impairment in glaucoma; therefore, identification of neuroprotective strategies able to slow down or prevent the process is one of the main challenges for glaucoma research. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective potential of RGC death induced by the in vivo transient increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) of a combined treatment with forskolin, homotaurine, and L-carnosine. Forskolin (7beta-...

  3. Non-invasive whole-body plethysmograph for assessment and prediction of radiation-induced lung injury using simultaneously acquired nitric oxide and lung volume measurements

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a prevalent side effect in patients who undergo thoracic irradiation as part of their cancer treatment. Preclinical studies play a major role in understanding disease onset under controlled experimental conditions. The aim of this work is to develop a single-chambered optimized, non-invasive, whole-body plethysmograph prototype for unrestrained small animal lung volume measurements for preclinical RILI studies. The system is also designed to simultaneously obtain nitric oxide (NO) measurements of the expired breath. The device prototype was tested using computer simulations, phantom studies and in vivo measurements in experimental animal models of RILI. The system was found to improve resemblance to true breathing signal characteristics as measured by improved skewness (21.83%) and kurtosis (51.94%) in addition to increased overall signal sensitivity (3.61%) of the acquired breath signal, when compared to matching control data. NO concentration data was combined with breath measurements in order to predict early RILI onset. The system was evaluated using serial weekly measurements in hemi-thorax irradiated rats (n = 8) yielding a classification performance of 50.0%, 62.5%, 87.5% using lung volume only, NO only, and combined measurements of both, respectively. Our results indicate that improved performance could be achieved when measurements of lung volume are combined with those of NO. This would provide the overall plethysmography system with the ability to provide useful diagnostic and prognostic information for preclinical and, potentially, clinical thoracic dose escalation studies. (paper)

  4. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  5. Natural host genetic resistance to lentiviral CNS disease: a neuroprotective MHC class I allele in SIV-infected macaques.

    Joseph L Mankowski

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection frequently causes neurologic disease even with anti-retroviral treatment. Although associations between MHC class I alleles and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS have been reported, the role MHC class I alleles play in restricting development of HIV-induced organ-specific diseases, including neurologic disease, has not been characterized. This study examined the relationship between expression of the MHC class I allele Mane-A*10 and development of lentiviral-induced central nervous system (CNS disease using a well-characterized simian immunodeficiency (SIV/pigtailed macaque model. The risk of developing CNS disease (SIV encephalitis was 2.5 times higher for animals that did not express the MHC class I allele Mane-A*10 (P = 0.002; RR = 2.5. Animals expressing the Mane-A*10 allele had significantly lower amounts of activated macrophages, SIV RNA, and neuronal dysfunction in the CNS than Mane-A*10 negative animals (P<0.001. Mane-A*10 positive animals with the highest CNS viral burdens contained SIV gag escape mutants at the Mane-A*10-restricted KP9 epitope in the CNS whereas wild type KP9 sequences dominated in the brain of Mane-A*10 negative animals with comparable CNS viral burdens. These concordant findings demonstrate that particular MHC class I alleles play major neuroprotective roles in lentiviral-induced CNS disease.

  6. Using the endocannabinoid system as a neuroprotective strategy in perinatal hypoxic- ischemic brain injury

    Lara-Celador, I.; Go(n)i-de-Cerio, F.; Antonia Alvarez; Enrique Hilario

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important causes of brain injury in the neonatal period is a perinatal hypoxic- ischemic event. This devastating condition can lead to long-term neurological deficits or even death. After hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, a variety of specific cellular mechanisms are set in motion, triggering cell damage and finally producing cell death. Effective therapeutic treatments against this phenomenon are still unavailable because of complex molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. After a thorough understanding of the mechanism underlying neural plasticity following hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, various neuroprotective therapies have been developed for alleviating brain injury and improving long-term outcomes. Among them, the endocannabinoid system emerges as a natural system of neuroprotection. The endocannabinoid system modulates a wide range of physiological processes in mammals and has demonstrated neuroprotective effects in different paradigms of acute brain injury, acting as a natural neuroprotectant. The aim of this review is to study the use of different therapies to induce long-term therapeutic effects after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, and analyze the important role of the endocannabinoid system as a new neuroprotective strategy against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

  7. The clinical utility of induced sputum for the diagnosis of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia in HIV-infected patients: a prospective cross-sectional study

    Rosemeri Maurici da Silva

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial pneumonias have been overcoming pneumocytosis in frequency. Controversy still remains about how to manage immunocompromised patients and those with lung diseases. Sputum analysis is a noninvasive and simple method, and when interpreted according to specific criteria it may help with diagnosis. We conducted a study to evaluate sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predicted values, and the accuracy of induced sputum (IS for bacterial community-acquired pneumonia diagnosis in HIV-positive patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This cross sectional study evaluated a diagnostic procedure in a reference hospital for HIV patients in Florianópolis, SC, Brazil. From January 1, 2001 to September 30, 2002, 547 HIV-positive patients were analyzed and 54 inpatients with pulmonary infection were selected. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB were considered the gold standards. Gram stains and quantitative cultures of IS and BAL were obtained. The cut-offs for quantitative cultures were 10(6 CFU/mL for IS and 10(4 CFU/mL for BAL. RESULTS: The mean age was 35.7 years, 79.6% were males and 85.2% were caucasians. The mean lymphocyte count was 124.8/mm³. Bacterial pneumonia was diagnosed in 20 patients. The most prevalent bacteria was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Considering IS for the diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia, sensitivity was 60%, specificity 40%, the positive predictive value was 80%, negative predictive value 20% and accuracy 56%. CONCLUSION: IS with quantitative culture can be helpful for the diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia in HIV-positive patients.

  8. Neuroprotection of aucubin in primary diabetic encephalopathy

    2008-01-01

    Hippocampal neuronal apoptosis accompanied by impairment of cognitive function occurs in primary diabetic encephalopathy. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective mechanism of the iridoid glycoside, aucubin, using rats (n=8). Diabetes mellitus was induced in the rats by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg body weight). After 65 d, half of the DM rats were administered aucubin (5 mg/kg; i.p.) for 15 d, yielding treatment DM+A. A third group of rats received no strepto- zotocin or aucibin, and served as controls (CON). Encephalopathy was assessed using Y-maze be- havioral testing. Rats were euthanized on Day 87, and hippocampi were excised for visual (light and transmission electron microscopic) and immunochemical (Western blot; immunohistochemical) as- sessments of the CA1 subfield for apoptosis and expression of regulatory proteins Bcl-2 and Bax. Treatment responses to all the parameters examined (body weight, plasma glucose, Y-maze error rates, pyramidal cell ultrastructure, proportions of apoptotic cells, levels of expression of Bcl-2 and Bax, and survivability of neuronal cells) were identical: there were highly significant differences between DM and CON groups (P<0.001), but the effects were significantly moderated (P<0.01) in DM+A compared with DM. These findings confirm the association of apoptosis with the encephalopathic effects of diabetes mellitus, and suggest a major role of the expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bax in the regulation of apop- totic cell death. All of the results suggest that aucubin could effectively inhibit apoptosis by modulating the expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax genes.

  9. Neuroprotection of aucubin in primary diabetic encephalopathy

    XUE HongYu; JIN LiJi; JIN Lei; ZHANG Peng; LI DanQing; XIA YanQiu; LU YaNan; XU YongPing

    2008-01-01

    Hippocampal neuronal apoptosis accompanied by impairment of cognitive function occurs in primary diabetic encephalopathy. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective mechanism of the iridoid glycoside, aucubin, using rats (n=8). Diabetes mellitus was induced in the rats by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg body weight). After 65 d, half of the DM rats were administered aucubin (5 mg/kg;i.p.) for 15 d, yielding treatment DM+A. A third group of rats received no strepto-zotocin or aucibin, and served as controls (CON). Encephalopathy was assessed using Y-maze be-havioral testing. Rats were euthanized on Day 87, and hippocampi were excised for visual (light and transmission electron microscopic) and immunochemical (Western blot;immunohistochemical) as-sessments of the CA1 subfield for apoptosis and expression of regulatory proteins Bcl-2 and Bax. Treatment responses to all the parameters examined (body weight, plasma glucose, Y-maze error rates, pyramidal cell ultrastructure, proportions of apoptotic cells, levels of expression of Bcl-2 and Bax, and survivability of neuronal cells) were identical: there were highly significant differences between DM and CON groups (P<0.001), but the effects were significantly moderated (P<0.01) in DM+A compared with DM. These findings confirm the association of apoptosis with the encephalopathic effects of diabetes mellitus, and suggest a major role of the expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bax in the regulation of apop-totic cell death. All of the results suggesf that aucubin could effectively inhibit apoptosis by modulating the expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax genes.

  10. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis and its receptor fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 have a neuroprotective effect in the central nervous system

    Echeverry Ramiro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral cortical neurons have a high vulnerability to the harmful effects of hypoxia. However, the brain has the ability to detect and accommodate to hypoxic conditions. This phenomenon, known as preconditioning, is a natural adaptive process highly preserved among species whereby exposure to sub-lethal hypoxia promotes the acquisition of tolerance to a subsequent lethal hypoxic injury. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK and its receptor fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14 are found in neurons and their expression is induced by exposure to sub-lethal hypoxia. Accordingly, in this work we tested the hypothesis that the interaction between TWEAK and Fn14 induces tolerance to lethal hypoxic and ischemic conditions. Methods Here we used in vitro and in vivo models of hypoxic and ischemic preconditioning, an animal model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and mice and neurons genetically deficient in TWEAK, Fn14, or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α to investigate whether treatment with recombinant TWEAK or an increase in the expression of endogenous TWEAK renders neurons tolerant to lethal hypoxia. We used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to study the effect of TWEAK on the expression of neuronal TNF-α, Western blot analysis to investigate whether the effect of TWEAK was mediated by activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and immunohistochemical techniques and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis to study the effect of TWEAK on apoptotic cell death. Results We found that either treatment with recombinant TWEAK or an increase in the expression of TWEAK and Fn14 induce hypoxic and ischemic tolerance in vivo and in vitro. This protective effect is mediated by neuronal TNF-α and activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 pathway via phosphorylation and inactivation of the B-cell lymphoma 2-associated death promoter

  11. Effects of Vinpocetine on mitochondrial function and neuroprotection in primary cortical neurons.

    Tárnok, K; Kiss, E; Luiten, P G M; Nyakas, C; Tihanyi, K; Schlett, K; Eisel, U L M

    2008-12-01

    Vinpocetine (ethyl apovincaminate), a synthetic derivative of the Vinca minor alkaloid vincamine, is widely used for the treatment of cerebrovascular-related diseases. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying its action is to protect against the cytotoxic effects of glutamate overexposure. Glutamate excitotoxicity leads to the disregulation of mitochondrial function and neuronal metabolism. As Vinpocetine has a binding affinity to the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) involved in the mitochondrial transition pore complex, we investigated whether neuroprotection can be at least partially due to Vinpocetine's effects on PBRs. Neuroprotective effects of PK11195 and Ro5-4864, two drugs with selective and high affinity to PBR, were compared to Vinpocetine in glutamate excitotoxicity assays on primary cortical neuronal cultures. Vinpocetine exerted a neuroprotective action in a 1-50microM concentration range while PK11195 and Ro5-4864 were only slightly neuroprotective, especially in high (>25microM) concentrations. Combined pretreatment of neuronal cultures with Vinpocetine and PK11195 or Ro5-4864 showed increased neuroprotection in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that the different drugs may have different targets. To test this hypothesis, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) of cultured neurons was measured by flow cytometry. 25microM Vinpocetine reduced the decrease of mitochondrial inner membrane potential induced by glutamate exposure, but Ro5-4864 in itself was found to be more potent to block glutamate-evoked changes in MMP. Combination of Ro5-4864 and Vinpocetine treatment was found to be even more effective. In summary, the present results indicate that the neuroprotective action of vinpocetine in culture can not be explained by its effect on neuronal PBRs alone and that additional drug targets are involved. PMID:18793690

  12. The neuroprotective mechanism of brain ischemic preconditioning

    Xiao-qian LIU; Rui SHENG; Zheng-hong QIN

    2009-01-01

    Brain ischemia is one of the most common causes of death and the leading cause of adult disability in the world. Brain ischemic pre- conditioning (BIP) refers to a transient, sublethal ischemia which results in tolerance to later, otherwise lethal, cerebral ischemia. Many attempts have been made to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotection offered by ischemic preconditioning. Many studies have shown that neuroprotective mechanisms may involve a series of molecular regulatory pathways including activation of the N-methyI-D-aspartate (NMDA) and adenosine receptors; activation of intracellular signaling pathways such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) and other protein kinases; upregulation of Bcl-2 and heat shock proteins (HSPs); and activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and the autophagic-lysosomal pathway. A better understanding of the processes that lead to cell death after stroke as well as of the endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms by which BIP protects against brain ischemic insults could help to develop new therapeutic strategies for this devastating neurological disease. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the neuroprotective mechanisms of BIP and to discuss the possibility of mimicking ischemic preconditioning as a new strategy for preventive treatment of ischemia.

  13. Neuroprotection in a novel mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Katie Lidster

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an immune-mediated, demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease that currently lacks any neuroprotective treatments. Innovative neuroprotective trial designs are required to hasten the translational process of drug development. An ideal target to monitor the efficacy of strategies aimed at treating multiple sclerosis is the visual system, which is the most accessible part of the human central nervous system. A novel C57BL/6 mouse line was generated that expressed transgenes for a myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific T cell receptor and a retinal ganglion cell restricted-Thy1 promoter-controlled cyan fluorescent protein. This model develops spontaneous or induced optic neuritis, in the absence of paralytic disease normally associated with most rodent autoimmune models of multiple sclerosis. Demyelination and neurodegeneration could be monitored longitudinally in the living animal using electrophysiology, visual sensitivity, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography all of which are relevant to human trials. This model offers many advantages, from a 3Rs, economic and scientific perspective, over classical experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models that are associated with substantial suffering of animals. Optic neuritis in this model led to inflammatory damage of axons in the optic nerve and subsequent loss of retinal ganglion cells in the retina. This was inhibited by the systemic administration of a sodium channel blocker (oxcarbazepine or intraocular treatment with siRNA targeting caspase-2. These novel approaches have relevance to the future treatment of neurodegeneration of MS, which has so far evaded treatment.

  14. Neuroprotective and Cytotoxic Phthalides from Angelicae Sinensis Radix

    Wenxia Gong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Seven phthalides, including a new dimeric one named tokinolide C (7, were isolated from Angelicae Sinensis Radix and characterized. The structures of these compounds were elucidated on the basis of comprehensive analysis of spectroscopic data and comparison with literature data. All of the compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activities against the A549, HCT-8, and HepG2 cancer cell lines. Riligustilide (4 showed cytotoxicity against three cancer cell lines, with IC50 values of 13.82, 6.79, and 7.92 μM, respectively. Tokinolide A (6 and tokinolide C (6 exerted low cytotoxicity in these cancer cell lines, while the remaining compounds were inactive. Flow cytometry analysis was employed to evaluate the possible mechanism of cytotoxic action of riligustilide (4. We observed that compound 4 was able to arrest the cell cycle in the G1, S phases and induce apoptosis in a time-dependent manner in HCT-8 cell lines. In addition, these compounds were evaluated for neuroprotective effect against SH-SY5Y cells injured by glutamate. The result showed that ligustilide (1, Z-butylidenephthalide (3 and tokinolide A (6 exhibited significant neuroprotective effects.

  15. Neuroprotective effects of rutaecarpine on cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury**

    Chunlin Yan; Ji Zhang; Shu Wang; Guiping Xue; Yong Hou

    2013-01-01

    Rutaecarpine, an active component of the traditional Chinese medicine Tetradium ruticarpum, has been shown to improve myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. Because both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are forms of ischemic vascular disease, they are closely related. We hypothesized that rutaecarpine also has neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. A cerebral ischemia reperfusion model was established after 84, 252 and 504 µg/kg carpine were given to mice via intraperitoneal injection, daily for 7 days. Results of the step through test, 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride dyeing and oxidative stress indicators showed that rutae-carpine could improve learning and memory ability, neurological symptoms and reduce infarction volume and cerebral water content in mice with cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Rutaecarpine could significantly decrease the malondialdehyde content and increase the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in mouse brain. Therefore, rutaecarpine could improve neu-rological function fol owing injury induced by cerebral ischemia reperfusion, and the mechanism of this improvement may be associated with oxidative stress. These results verify that rutaecarpine has neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia reperfusion in mice.

  16. Neuroprotective and Cytotoxic Phthalides from Angelicae Sinensis Radix.

    Gong, Wenxia; Zhou, Yuzhi; Li, Xiao; Gao, Xiaoxia; Tian, Junsheng; Qin, Xuemei; Du, Guanhua

    2016-01-01

    Seven phthalides, including a new dimeric one named tokinolide C (7), were isolated from Angelicae Sinensis Radix and characterized. The structures of these compounds were elucidated on the basis of comprehensive analysis of spectroscopic data and comparison with literature data. All of the compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activities against the A549, HCT-8, and HepG2 cancer cell lines. Riligustilide (4) showed cytotoxicity against three cancer cell lines, with IC50 values of 13.82, 6.79, and 7.92 μM, respectively. Tokinolide A (6) and tokinolide C (6) exerted low cytotoxicity in these cancer cell lines, while the remaining compounds were inactive. Flow cytometry analysis was employed to evaluate the possible mechanism of cytotoxic action of riligustilide (4). We observed that compound 4 was able to arrest the cell cycle in the G1, S phases and induce apoptosis in a time-dependent manner in HCT-8 cell lines. In addition, these compounds were evaluated for neuroprotective effect against SH-SY5Y cells injured by glutamate. The result showed that ligustilide (1), Z-butylidenephthalide (3) and tokinolide A (6) exhibited significant neuroprotective effects. PMID:27128890

  17. Neuroprotective Effect against Cerebral Ischemia of Passiflora foetida

    Jintanaporn Wattanathorn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Although cerebral ischemia induced by stroke has been regarded as the important problem worldwide, the therapeutic efficacy is still inadequate. Since the free radicals are implicated in the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, the prophylactic protection against stroke with neuroprotective agent possessing antioxidant effect has gained much attention. Therefore, this study was designed to determine whether the alcoholic extract of Passiflora foeida, a plant possessing antioxidant activity, could protect against brain damage and impairment in the cerebral ischemia induced by the occlusion of Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO. Approach: Male Wistar rats, weighing 300-350 g, were orally given the extract once daily at doses of 25, 100 and 400 mg kg-1 BW at a period of 2 weeks before and 3 weeks after the occlusion of right Middle Cerebral Artery (MCAO. The animals were assessed the cerebral infarction volume at 24 h after occlusion while the neurological score and % of foot withdrawal reflex in respond to mechanical stimuli were performed after single dose and every 7 days throughout the experimental period. Results: Rats subjected to P.foetida at dose of 25 mg kg-1 BW significantly decreased brain infarct volume both in cortical and sub cortical structures. The increasing doses further to 100 and 400 mg kg-1 BW could produce the significant reduction only in cerebral cortex. In addition, it was found that the plant extract could enhance neurological score and improved sensory response to both mechanical and temperature stimuli. Conclusion: The current study clearly demonstrates the neuroprotective effect of P.foetida. Therefore P.foetida may provide the advantage as functional food to protect against cerebral ischemia induced by stroke. However, further researches about possible active ingredient and the precise underlying mechanism are still necessary.

  18. Neuroprotective effect of the endogenous neural peptide apelin in cultured mouse cortical neurons

    The adipocytokine apelin and its G protein-coupled APJ receptor were initially isolated from a bovine stomach and have been detected in the brain and cardiovascular system. Recent studies suggest that apelin can protect cardiomyocytes from ischemic injury. Here, we investigated the effect of apelin on apoptosis in mouse primary cultures of cortical neurons. Exposure of the cortical cultures to a serum-free medium for 24 h induced nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic death; apelin-13 (1.0-5.0 nM) markedly prevented the neuronal apoptosis. Apelin neuroprotective effects were mediated by multiple mechanisms. Apelin-13 reduced serum deprivation (SD)-induced ROS generation, mitochondria depolarization, cytochrome c release and activation of caspase-3. Apelin-13 prevented SD-induced changes in phosphorylation status of Akt and ERK1/2. In addition, apelin-13 attenuated NMDA-induced intracellular Ca2+ accumulation. These results indicate that apelin is an endogenous neuroprotective adipocytokine that may block apoptosis and excitotoxic death via cellular and molecular mechanisms. It is suggested that apelins may be further explored as a potential neuroprotective reagent for ischemia-induced brain damage.

  19. A Case of Acquired Rifampin Resistance in Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-Induced Cystitis: Necessity for Treatment Guidelines

    Joyce N Wolfe

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of presumed bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG cystitis in an elderly female patient following direct intravesical BCG instillation treatment for papillary transitional cell carcinoma is reported. The organism cultured from urine samples was eventually identified as a rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium bovis BCG isolate. Because the patient had received rifampin monotherapy during the course of treatment for presumed BCG disease, the clinical picture favoured acquired rifampin resistance. Sequencing of the target gene for rifampin (rpoB confirmed a known mutation responsible for conferring high levels of resistance to both rifampin and rifabutin (Ser531Tyr. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of M bovis BCG disease in a non-HIV patient where the organism had acquired drug resistance to rifampin, and the second reported case of M bovis BCG that had acquired drug resistance. The present case demonstrates the necessity to re-evaluate appropriate guidelines for the effective treatment of BCG disease.

  20. Tadalafil enhances the neuroprotective effects of ischemic postconditioning in mice, probably in a nitric oxide associated manner.

    Gulati, Puja; Singh, Nirmal

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the modulatory effect of tadalafil, a selective phosphodiesterase (PDE-5) inhibitor, on the neuroprotective effects of ischemic postconditioning (iPoCo) in mice. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO) for 12 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h was employed to produce ischemia and reperfusion induced cerebral injury. Cerebral infarct size was measured using TTC staining. Memory was assessed using the Morris water maze test. Degree of motor incoordination was evaluated using inclined beam-walking, rota-rod, and lateral push tests. Brain nitrite/nitrate, acetylcholinesterase activity, TBARS, and glutathione levels were also estimated. BCAO followed by reperfusion produced a significant increase in cerebral infarct size, brain nitrite/nitrate and TBARS levels, and acetylcholinesterase activity along with a reduction in glutathione. Marked impairment of memory and motor coordination was also noted. iPoCo consisting of 3 episodes of 10 s carotid artery occlusion and reperfusion instituted immediately after BCAO significantly decreased infarct size, memory impairment, motor incoordination, and altered biochemistry. Pretreatment with tadalafil mimicked the neuroprotective effects of iPoCo. The tadalafil-induced neuroprotective effects were significantly attenuated by l-NAME, a nonselective NOS inhibitor. We concluded that tadalafil mimics the neuroprotective effects of iPoCo, probably through a nitric oxide dependent pathway, and PDE-5 could be a target of interest with respect to the neuroprotective mechanism of iPoCo. PMID:24784472

  1. Male/female differences in neuroprotection and neuromodulation of brain dopamine.

    Mélanie eBourque

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a sex difference in Parkinson’s disease is observed in several variables, including susceptibility of the disease, age at onset and symptoms. These differences between men and women represent a significant characteristic of Parkinson’s disease which suggests that estrogens may exert beneficial effects against the development and the progression of the disease. This paper reviews the neuroprotective and neuromodulator effect of 17β-estradiol and progesterone as compared to androgens in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system of both female and male rodents. The 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP mice model of Parkinson’s disease and methamphetamine toxicity faithfully reproduce the sex differences of Parkinson’s disease in that endogenous estrogen levels appear to influence the vulnerability to toxins targeting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. Exogenous 17β-estradiol and/or progesterone treatments show neuroprotective properties against nigrostriatal dopaminergic toxins while androgens fail to induce beneficial effect. Sex steroids treatments show males and females difference in their neuroprotective action against methamphetamine toxicity. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic structure and function, as well as the distribution of estrogen receptors, show sex difference and may influence the susceptibility to the toxins and the response to sex steroids. Genomic and non-genomic actions of 17β-estradiol converge to promote survival factors and the presence of both estrogen receptors α and β are critical to 17β-estradiol neuroprotective action against MPTP toxicity.

  2. Neuroactive gonadal drugs for neuroprotection in male and female models of Parkinson's disease.

    Litim, Nadhir; Morissette, Marc; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2016-08-01

    The existence of sex differences in Parkinson's disease (PD) incidence is well documented with greater prevalence and earlier age at onset in men than in women. These reported sex differences could be related to estrogen exposure. In PD animal models, estrogen is well documented to be neuroprotective against dopaminergic neuron loss induced by neurotoxins. Using the 1-methyl 4-phenyl-1,2,3,6 tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model, we showed that several compounds are neuroprotective on dopaminergic neurons including estrogen, the selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene, progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) agonist PPT as well as the G protein-coupled membrane estrogen receptor (GPER1) specific agonist G1. Accumulating evidence suggests that GPER1 could be implicated in the neuroprotective effects of estrogen, raloxifene and G1 in collaboration with ERα. We recently reported that the 5α-reductase inhibitor Dutasteride is also neuroprotective and could bring an alternative to estrogens for therapy in male. Additional studies are needed to optimize therapies with these gonadal drugs into safe personalized treatments according to sex for treatment of PD. PMID:26708712

  3. Neuroprotective Effects of Citicoline in in Vitro Models of Retinal Neurodegeneration

    Andrea Matteucci

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, citicoline has been the object of remarkable interest as a possible neuroprotectant. The aim of this study was to investigate if citicoline affected cell survival in primary retinal cultures and if it exerted neuroprotective activity in conditions modeling retinal neurodegeneration. Primary retinal cultures, obtained from rat embryos, were first treated with increasing concentrations of citicoline (up to 1000 µM and analyzed in terms of apoptosis and caspase activation and characterized by immunocytochemistry to identify neuronal and glial cells. Subsequently, excitotoxic concentration of glutamate or High Glucose-containing cell culture medium (HG was administered as well-known conditions modeling neurodegeneration. Glutamate or HG treatments were performed in the presence or not of citicoline. Neuronal degeneration was evaluated in terms of apoptosis and loss of synapses. The results showed that citicoline did not cause any damage to the retinal neuroglial population up to 1000 µM. At the concentration of 100 µM, it was able to counteract neuronal cell damage both in glutamate- and HG-treated retinal cultures by decreasing proapoptotic effects and contrasting synapse loss. These data confirm that citicoline can efficiently exert a neuroprotective activity. In addition, the results suggest that primary retinal cultures, under conditions inducing neurodegeneration, may represent a useful system to investigate citicoline neuroprotective mechanisms.

  4. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9......Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  5. Wine Polyphenols: Potential Agents in Neuroprotection

    Abdelkader Basli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous studies indicating that a moderate consumption of red wine provides certain health benefits, such as the protection against neurodegenerative diseases. This protective effect is most likely due to the presence of phenolic compounds in wine. Wine polyphenolic compounds are well known for the antioxidant properties. Oxidative stress is involved in many forms of cellular and molecular deterioration. This damage can lead to cell death and various neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s diseases. Extensive investigations have been undertaken to determine the neuroprotective effects of wine-related polyphenols. In this review we present the neuroprotective abilities of the major classes of wine-related polyphenols.

  6. Nutraceutical Antioxidants as Novel Neuroprotective Agents

    Linseman, Daniel A.; Kelsey, Natalie A.; Wilkins, Heather M.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of antioxidant compounds derived from natural products (nutraceuticals) have demonstrated neuroprotective activity in either in vitro or in vivo models of neuronal cell death or neurodegeneration, respectively. These natural antioxidants fall into several distinct groups based on their chemical structures: (1) flavonoid polyphenols like epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) from green tea and quercetin from apples; (2) non-flavonoid polyphenols such as curcumin from tumeric and resverat...

  7. Progesterone as a neuroprotectant in stroke

    Wong, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone has been shown to be neuroprotective in a number of central nervous system injury models, including cerebral ischaemia. There is still a lack of understanding behind progesterone’s neuropotective properties, and the purpose of this project is to clarify some of these issues. Osmotic mini-pump infusion was hypothesised to more effective in delivering progesterone to the target organ of the brain, when compared to a bolus intraperitoneal injection. Progesterone pharmacokinetic p...

  8. Neuritogenic and neuroprotective activities of fruit residues.

    Tadtong, Sarin; Kanlayavattanakul, Mayuree; Lourith, Nattaya

    2013-11-01

    Neuritogenic and neuroprotective activities of litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn., Sapindaceae) and salacca (Salacca edulis Reinw., Arecaceae) pericarp, and sapodilla (Achras sapota L., Sapotaceae) and tamarind Srichompu cultivar (Tamarindus indica L., Caesalpiniaceae) seed coat extracts were evaluated on cultured cholinergic P19-derived neurons. All the extracts, at a very low concentration (1 ng/mL of litchi and salacca pericarp extracts, 10 ng/mL of sapodilla and 100 ng/mL of tamarind seed coat extracts), enhanced the survival of cultured neurons (% viability more than 100%) by XTT reduction assay. The extracts were further evaluated for their neuritogenicity by observing cell morphology by phase-contrast microscopy and neuroprotective activity in serum deprivation and pre- and co-administration of hydrogen peroxide models. The phase-contrast micrographs displayed that all of the extracts possessed neurogenic activity by promoting the neurite outgrowth of the cultured neurons. Moreover, these extracts can protect neurons from oxidative stress-caused cell death in a serum deprivation model, and prevent and protect neuron cells from the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide. In this study we assured that the neuritogenic and neuroprotective activities of these extracts derived from the phenolic components and flavonoids contained in the extracts by acting as signaling molecules to enhance neuron survival and promote neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that all of the extracts are potentially sources of neuritogenic and neuroprotective components which might be used either as pharmaceutical products or dietary supplements for neurodegenerative disorder patients, for example, those suffering from Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24427947

  9. Carbamylated Erythropoietin: A Prospective Drug Candidate for Neuroprotection

    Jianmin Chen; Zheng Yang; Xiao Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Carbamylated erythropoietin (cEpo), which is neuroprotective but lacks hematopoietic activity, has been attracting rising concerns. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the process of neuroprotection of cEpo are not well known. Based on several recent reports, the neuroprotective effects of cEpo are illustrated, and signaling pathways involved in the different effects of erythropoietin and cEpo are discussed. These newly reported researches may shed new light on the deve...

  10. Neuroprotective Effect of Arctigenin via Upregulation of P-CREB in Mouse Primary Neurons and Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells

    Tingguo Kang; Jingxian Yang; Yaping Yan; Guangxian Zhang; Haiguang Hao; Dong Sun; Yv Hu; Dan Zhao; Yang Xia; Xiaodan Zhang; Wenbo Liang; Lu Ren; Qingping Wen; Nan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Arctigenin (Arc) has been shown to act on scopolamine-induced memory deficit mice and to provide a neuroprotective effect on cultured cortical neurons from glutamate-induced neurodegeneration through mechanisms not completely defined. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Arc on H89-induced cell damage and its potential mechanisms in mouse cortical neurons and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We found that Arc prevented cell viability loss induced by H89 in human SH-SY5Y cells...