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Sample records for acquired bacterial sepsis

  1. Bacterial Culture of Neonatal Sepsis

    AH Movahedian; R Moniri; Z Mosayebi

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal bacterial sepsis is one of the major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. This retrospective study was performed to determine the incidence of bacterial sepsis with focus on Gram negative organisms in neonates admitted at Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, during a 3-yr period, from September 2002 to September 2005. Blood culture was performed on all neonates with risk factors or signs of suggestive sepsis. Blood samples were cultured using brain heart infusion (BHI) broth accordi...

  2. Bacterial Culture of Neonatal Sepsis

    AH Movahedian

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal bacterial sepsis is one of the major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. This retrospective study was performed to determine the incidence of bacterial sepsis with focus on Gram negative organisms in neonates admitted at Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, during a 3-yr period, from September 2002 to September 2005. Blood culture was performed on all neonates with risk factors or signs of suggestive sepsis. Blood samples were cultured using brain heart infusion (BHI broth according to standard method. From the 1680 neonates 36% had positive blood culture for Pseudomans aeruginosa, 20.7% for Coagulase negative Staphylococci, and 17% for Klebsiella spp. Gram-negative organisms accounted for 72.1% of all positive cultures. The overall mortality rate was 19.8% (22 /111 of whom 63.6% (14 /22 were preterm. Pseudomona aeruginosa and Klebsiella spp. showed a high degree of resistance to commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin, gentamicin as well as third generation cephalosporins. Continued local surveillance studies are urged to monitor emerging antimicrobial resistance and to guide interventions to minimize its occurrence.

  3. Aetiology of community-acquired neonatal sepsis in low- and middle-income countries

    Donald Waters

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available 99% of the approximate 1 million annual neonatal deaths from life-threatening invasive bacterial infections occur in developing countries, at least 50% of which are from home births or community settings. Data concerning aetiology of sepsis in these settings are necessary to inform targeted therapy and devise management guidelines. This review describes and analyses the bacterial aetiology of community-acquired neonatal sepsis in developing countries.

  4. Procalcitonin in sepsis and bacterial infections

    Abhijit Chaudhury

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation of sepsis and systemic bacterial infections from other causes of systemic inflammatory response is crucial from the therapeutic point of view. The clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific and traditional biomarkers like white cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein are not sufficiently sensitive or specific to guide therapeutic decisions. Procalcitonin (PCT is considered a reliable marker for the diagnosis and prognosis of moderate to severe bacterial infections, and it has also been evaluated to guide the clinicians in the rational usage of antibiotics. This review describes the diagnostic and prognostic role of PCT as a biomarker in various clinical settings along with the laboratory aspects and its usefulness in risk stratification and antibiotic stewardship.

  5. Characteristics of bacterial sepsis among patients with visceral leishmaniasis

    Mengistu; Endris; Yegnasew; Takele; Desalegn; Woldeyohannes; Chandrashekhar; Unakal; Feleke; Moges; Moges; Tiruneh; Ermias; Diro

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the major causes and predictors of death in patients with visceral leishmaniasis(VL).Globally,incidence rate of sepsis ranged from 56-91 cases per 100000 people,with a mortality rate of 30%.Incidence of sepsis has been raised due to aging of the population and the higher incidence of immunosuppressive conditions such as HIV.VL and others.The prevalence of sepsis was reported from 4.2%to 32.3%and 14.1%in VL and VL-HIV coinfectcd patients,respectively.The mortality rate of VL patients with sepsis is greater than50%.Factors associated with sepsis in VL patients are immune suppression,pancytopenia.HIV co-infection,age 40 years old,indwelling of central venous lines and hospitalization.Although antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were not well reported,both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from patients with VL.So far.limited information is available on sepsis in VL.especially in VL-HIV coinfected patients.Therefore,further studies about sepsis prevalence,causative agents and their antibiotic patterns,and associated factors among VL and VL-HIV coinfectcd patients arc necessary.This review provides information about bacterial sepsis in patients with VL.

  6. Characteristics of bacterial sepsis among patients with visceral leishmaniasis

    Mengistu Endris; Yegnasew Takele; Desalegn Woldeyohannes; Chandrashekhar Unakal; Feleke Moges; Moges Tiruneh; Ermias Diro

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the major causes and predictors of death in patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Globally, incidence rate of sepsis ranged from 56-91 cases per 100000 people, with a mortality rate of 30%. Incidence of sepsis has been raised due to aging of the population and the higher incidence of immunosuppressive conditions such as HIV, VL and others. The prevalence of sepsis was reported from 4.2% to 32.3% and 14.1% in VL and VL-HIV coinfected patients, respectively. The mortality rate of VL patients with sepsis is greater than 50%. Factors associated with sepsis in VL patients are immune suppression, pancytopenia, HIV co-infection, age 40 years old, indwelling of central venous lines and hospitalization. Although antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were not well reported, both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from patients with VL. So far, limited information is available on sepsis in VL, especially in VL-HIV coinfected patients. Therefore, further studies about sepsis prevalence, causative agents and their antibiotic patterns, and associated factors among VL and VL-HIV coinfected patients are necessary. This review provides information about bacterial sepsis in patients with VL.

  7. Discharge diagnoses versus medical record review in the identification of community-acquired sepsis

    Henry E. Wang; Addis, Dylan R; Donnelly, John P.; Shapiro, Nathan I.; Griffin, Russell L.; Safford, Monika M.; Baddley, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We evaluated the accuracy of hospital discharge diagnoses in the identification of community-acquired sepsis and severe sepsis. Methods We reviewed 379 serious infection hospitalizations from 2003 to 2012 from the national population-based reasons for geographic and racial differences in stroke (REGARDS) cohort. Through manual review of medical records, we defined criterion-standard community-acquired sepsis events as the presence of a serious infection on hospital presentation w...

  8. ALGORITHM FOR POST-BURN BACTERIAL SEPSIS DIAGNOSIS

    Guzenko, B. V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with extensive deep burns the most severe of all infectious and inflammatory complications is sepsis which causes high death rate.The purpose of our work was to develop the algorithm of bacterial sepsis diagnosis in patients with severe burn disease.Materials and methods. The study involved 140 burned patients divided into two groups: Group 1 – 78 patients who underwent necrectomy within 3-7 days after the burn, Group 2  (control) – 62 patients with necrectomy perfor...

  9. Epidemiological Study of Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Conjunctivitis in a Level III Neonatal Unit

    Catarina Dias; Márcia Gonçalves; Anabela João

    2013-01-01

    Background. Conjunctivitis is one of the most frequently occurring hospital-acquired infections among neonates, although it is less studied than potentially life-threatening infections, such as sepsis and pneumonia. Objectives. The aims of our work were to identify epidemiologic characteristics, pathogens, and susceptibility patterns of bacterial hospital-acquired conjunctivitis (HAC) in a level III neonatal unit. Materials and Methods. Data were collected retrospectively from patient charts ...

  10. Clavanin bacterial sepsis control using a novel methacrylate nanocarrier

    Saúde ACM

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Amanda CM Saúde,1 Alicia S Ombredane,1 Osmar N Silva,1 João ARG Barbosa,1,2 Susana E Moreno,3 Ana Claudia Guerra Araujo,4 Rosana Falcão,4 Luciano P Silva,4 Simoni C Dias,1 Octávio L Franco1,3 1Programa de Pós Graduação em Ciências Genômicas e Biotecnologia, Centro de Análises Proteômicas e Bioquímicas, Universidade Católica de Brasília, Brasília, FD, Brazil; 2Laboratório de Biofísica-Departamento de Biologia Celular-IB, Universidade de Brasília – UNB, DF, Brazil; 3Universidade Católica Dom Bosco – UCDB, Campo Grande, MS, Brazil; 4Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária – EMBRAPA – Recursos Genéticos e Biotecnologia, Brasília, DF, Brazil Abstract: Controlling human pathogenic bacteria is a worldwide problem due to increasing bacterial resistance. This has prompted a number of studies investigating peptides isolated from marine animals as a possible alternative for control of human pathogen infections. Clavanins are antimicrobial peptides isolated from the marine tunicate Styela clava, showing 23 amino acid residues in length, cationic properties, and also high bactericidal activity. In spite of clear benefits from the use of peptides, currently 95% of peptide properties have limited pharmaceutical applicability, such as low solubility and short half-life in the circulatory system. Here, nanobiotechnology was used to encapsulate clavanin A in order to develop nanoantibiotics against bacterial sepsis. Clavanin was nanostructured using EUDRAGIT® L 100-55 and RS 30 D solution (3:1 w:w. Atomic force, scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering showed nanoparticles ranging from 120 to 372 nm in diameter, with a zeta potential of -7.16 mV and a polydispersity index of 0.123. Encapsulation rate of 98% was assessed by reversed-phase chromatography. In vitro bioassays showed that the nanostructured clavanin was partially able to control development of Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and

  11. Immature-to-total neutrophil ratio as an early diagnostic tool of bacterial neonatal sepsis

    DarnifayantI

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Bacterial sepsis is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment for the condition can reduce mortality rates. Blood cultures are the gold standard to diagnose bacterial sepsis, but they require 3-5 days for results, whilst the disease may progress rapidly in neonates. Examination of immature-to-total neutrophil ratio (I/T ratio in peripheral blood smears is a quicker and less expensive method to diagnose bacterial sepsis in neonates. Some studies found the sensitivity of I/T ratio to be 88%-90% in predicting bacterial spesis. Objective To assess the usefulness of the I/T ratio as an early diagnostic tool for neonatal bacterial sepsis. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted from February to March 2011. Subjects were collected by consecutive sampling. Fifty-three neonates suspected to have bacterial sepsis in the Perinatology Unit at H. Adam Malik Hospital were included. Subjects underwent routine blood examinations, C-reactive protein level measurements, blood cultures, and peripheral blood smears. All statistical analyses were conducted with SPSS (version 16.0 for Windows. Results Of the 53 subjects, 26 had bacterial sepsis based on blood cultures. The I/T ratio had a sensitivity of 88.46%, specificity 81.84%, positive predictive value 82.14%, and negative predictive value 88%. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed a cut-off point of 83.3 (95%CI 71.3 to 95.3%. Conclusion The I/T ratio may be a good alternative to blood cultures as an early indicator of bacterial neonatal sepsis, as it is faster, less expensive and has good sensitivity and specificity. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:153-7.].

  12. TLR2-induced IL-10 production impairs neutrophil recruitment to infected tissues during neonatal bacterial sepsis.

    Andrade, Elva B; Alves, Joana; Madureira, Pedro; Oliveira, Liliana; Ribeiro, Adília; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Ferreira, Paula

    2013-11-01

    Sepsis is the third most common cause of neonatal death, with Group B Streptococcus (GBS) being the leading bacterial agent. The pathogenesis of neonatal septicemia is still unsolved. We described previously that host susceptibility to GBS infection is due to early IL-10 production. In this study, we investigated whether triggering TLR2 to produce IL-10 is a risk factor for neonatal bacterial sepsis. We observed that, in contrast to wild-type (WT) pups, neonatal TLR2-deficient mice were resistant to GBS-induced sepsis. Moreover, if IL-10 signaling were blocked in WT mice, they also were resistant to sepsis. This increased survival rate was due to an efficient recruitment of neutrophils to infected tissues that leads to bacterial clearance, thus preventing the development of sepsis. To confirm that IL-10 produced through TLR2 activation prevents neutrophil recruitment, WT pups were treated with the TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4 prior to nebulization with the neutrophil chemotactic agent LTB4. Neutrophil recruitment into the neonatal lungs was inhibited in pups treated with Pam3CSK4. However, the migration was restored in Pam3CSK4-treated pups when IL-10 signaling was blocked (either by anti-IL-10R mAb treatment or by using IL-10-deficient mice). Our findings highlight that TLR2-induced IL-10 production is a key event in neonatal susceptibility to bacterial sepsis. PMID:24078699

  13. CB2 cannabinoid receptors contribute to bacterial invasion and mortality in polymicrobial sepsis.

    Balázs Csóka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sepsis is a major healthcare problem and current estimates suggest that the incidence of sepsis is approximately 750,000 annually. Sepsis is caused by an inability of the immune system to eliminate invading pathogens. It was recently proposed that endogenous mediators produced during sepsis can contribute to the immune dysfunction that is observed in sepsis. Endocannabinoids that are produced excessively in sepsis are potential factors leading to immune dysfunction, because they suppress immune cell function by binding to G-protein-coupled CB(2 receptors on immune cells. Here we examined the role of CB(2 receptors in regulating the host's response to sepsis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The role of CB(2 receptors was studied by subjecting CB(2 receptor wild-type and knockout mice to bacterial sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture. We report that CB(2 receptor inactivation by knockout decreases sepsis-induced mortality, and bacterial translocation into the bloodstream of septic animals. Furthermore, CB(2 receptor inactivation decreases kidney and muscle injury, suppresses splenic nuclear factor (NF-kappaB activation, and diminishes the production of IL-10, IL-6 and MIP-2. Finally, CB(2 receptor deficiency prevents apoptosis in lymphoid organs and augments the number of CD11b(+ and CD19(+ cells during CLP. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our results establish for the first time that CB(2 receptors are important contributors to septic immune dysfunction and mortality, indicating that CB(2 receptors may be therapeutically targeted for the benefit of patients suffering from sepsis.

  14. Chronic filarial infection provides protection against bacterial sepsis by functionally reprogramming macrophages.

    Fabian Gondorf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helminths immunomodulate their hosts and induce a regulatory, anti-inflammatory milieu that prevents allergies and autoimmune diseases. Helminth immunomodulation may benefit sepsis outcome by preventing exacerbated inflammation and severe pathology, but the influence on bacterial clearance remains unclear. To address this, mice were chronically infected with the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis (L.s. and the outcome of acute systemic inflammation caused by i.p. Escherichia coli injection was determined. L.s. infection significantly improved E. coli-induced hypothermia, bacterial clearance and sepsis survival and correlated with reduced concentrations of associated pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and a less pronounced pro-inflammatory macrophage gene expression profile. Improved sepsis outcome in L.s.-infected animals was mediated by macrophages, but independent of the alternatively activated macrophage subset. Endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria that are present in most human pathogenic filariae, as well as L.s., signal via TLR2 and modulate macrophage function. Here, gene expression profiles of peritoneal macrophages from L.s.-infected mice revealed a downregulation of genes involved in TLR signaling, and pulsing of macrophages in vitro with L.s. extract reduced LPS-triggered activation. Subsequent transfer improved sepsis outcome in naïve mice in a Wolbachia- and TLR2-dependent manner. In vivo, phagocytosis was increased in macrophages from L.s.-infected wild type, but not TLR2-deficient animals. In association, L.s. infection neither improved bacterial clearance in TLR2-deficient animals nor ameliorated E. coli-induced hypothermia and sepsis survival. These results indicate that chronic L.s. infection has a dual beneficial effect on bacterial sepsis, reducing pro-inflammatory immune responses and improving bacterial control. Thus, helminths and their antigens may not only improve the outcome of autoimmune and allergic diseases

  15. Bacterial Etiology and Antibiotic Sensitivity Patterns of Early-Late Onset Neonatal Sepsis among Newborns in Shiraz, Iran 2004-2007

    Mozhgan Shahian; Narjes Pishva; Mehdi Kalani

    2010-01-01

    Background: Neonatal sepsis is a major cause of mortalityand morbidity, especially in developing countries. The goal ofthe present study was to determine the bacterial etiology andantibiotic sensitivity patterns of neonatal sepsis.Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted on 208neonates admitted with clinically suspected sepsis over a periodof 30 months. Sepsis was divided into early onset sepsis(EOS, ≤5 days of age) and late onset sepsis (LOS, >5 days ofage). The two groups were furt...

  16. Effect of bacterial sepsis on gluconeogenic capacity in the rat

    Since sepsis places increased demands on the host for energy and on other substrates for tissue repair and host defense, hepatic gluconeogenesis is critical for the host's adaptation to sepsis. Substrate-stimulated gluconeogenesis (i.e., gluconeogenic capacity) was assessed by the alanine load method in mannoheptulose-pretreated rats made septic by cecal ligation after laparotomy, as well as by cecal ligation and puncture after laparotomy. Fasted rats subjected to laparotomy only (sham-ligated) and fasted, nonoperated rats (controls) were investigated simultaneously. Following an overnight (-18 to 0 hr) fast, nonoperated animals converted 17.9 +/- 1.5% of [14C]alanine to [14C]glucose. Continued fasting in nonoperated animals resulted in enhanced (P less than 0.05) gluconeogenic capacity (6 hr = 27.2 +/- 3.0%; 24 hr = 26.2 +/- 1.9%; and 48 hr = 28.5 +/- 2.6%) relative to Time 0. Laparotomy alone (sham ligation) delayed the fasting-induced increase (P less than 0.05) in gluconeogenesis capacity (6 hr = 21.1 +/- 1.2%; 24 hr = 18.5 +/- 1.3%; 48 hr = 27.8 +/- 1.0%) relative to Time 0. In contrast, postoperative sepsis produced a sustained depression (P less than 0.05) of gluconeogenic capacity relative to nonoperated sham-ligated controls at 48 hr (cecal ligation, 18.4 +/- 1.4%; and cecal ligation and puncture, 18.8 +/- 1.2%). Thus, (1) fasting enhances hepatic gluconeogenic capacity; (2) surgical trauma transiently blunts the gluconeogenic response to fasting; and (3) sepsis undermines the gluconeogenic response to fasting

  17. Short- and long-term mortality in patients with community-acquired severe sepsis and septic shock

    Storgaard, Merete; Hallas, Jesper; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Severe sepsis and septic shock have a high 30-day mortality (10-50%), but the long-term mortality is not well described. The purpose of this study was to describe long-term mortality among patients with community-acquired severe sepsis or septic shock compared to a population-based re......Background: Severe sepsis and septic shock have a high 30-day mortality (10-50%), but the long-term mortality is not well described. The purpose of this study was to describe long-term mortality among patients with community-acquired severe sepsis or septic shock compared to a population...... follow-up. Among septic patients who survived the first 30 days, the mortality hazard ratio was 2.7 (95% CI 1.7-4.3) until day 365, and among septic patients who survived the first year, the 1-4 y mortality hazard ratio was 2.3 (95% CI 1.7-3.3), compared to the community-based reference persons...... (multivariate Cox regression controlling for age, sex, and Charlson comorbidity index). Conclusions: Patients with severe sepsis and septic shock who survived the first 30 days had a 2.7 times higher mortality hazard in the first year and a 2.3 times higher mortality hazard in the next 3 y, compared to persons...

  18. Plasma Bacterial and Mitochondrial DNA Distinguish Bacterial Sepsis from Sterile SIRS and Quantify Inflammatory Tissue Injury in Nonhuman Primates

    Sursal, Tolga; Stearns-Kurosawa, Deborah J.; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Oh, Sun-Young; Sun, Shiqin; Kurosawa, Shinichiro; Hauser, Carl J

    2013-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a fundamental host response common to bacterial infection and sterile tissue injury. SIRS can cause organ dysfunction and death but its mechanisms are incompletely understood. Moreover, SIRS can progress to organ failure or death despite being sterile or after control of the inciting infection. Biomarkers discriminating between sepsis, sterile SIRS and post-infective SIRS would therefore help direct care. Circulating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) ...

  19. Procalcitonin for detecting community-acquired bacterial pneumonia

    Devi Gusmaiyanto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age. Pneumonia can be of bacterial or viral origin. It is difficult to distinguish between these two agents based on clinical manifestations, as well as radiological and laboratory examinations. Furthermore, bacterial cultures take time to incubate and positive results may only be found in 10-30% of bacterial pneumonia cases. Procalcitonin has been used as a marker to distinguish etiologies, as bacterial infections tend to increase serum procalcitonin levels. Objective To determine the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of procalcitonin in community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. Method This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Pediatric Health Department of Dr. M. Djamil Hospital, Padang. Subjects were selected by consecutive sampling. Procalcitonin measurements and PCR screening were performed on blood specimens from 32 pneumonia patients and compared. Results Of the 32 subjects, most were boys (56.25%, under 5 years of age (99%, and had poor nutritional status (68.75%. Using a cut-off point of 0.25 ng/mL, procalcitonin level had a sensitivity of 92%, specificity 50%, positive predictive value 88%, and negative predictive value 60% for diagnosing bacterial pneumonia. Using a cut-off point of 0.5 ng/mL, procalcitonin level had a specificity of 46%, specificity 83%, positive predictive value 91%, and negative predictive value 25%. Conclusion A cut-off point of 0.25 ng/mL of procalcitonin level may be more useful to screen for bacterial pneumonia than a cut-off point of 0.5 ng / mL. However, if the 0.25 ng/mL cut-off point is used, careful monitoring will be required for negative results, as up to 40% may actually have bacterial pneumonia. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:65-9.].

  20. Does C-reactive protein independently predict mortality in adult community-acquired bacteremia patients with known sepsis severity?

    Gradel, Kim O; Jensen, Thøger G; Kolmos, Hans J;

    2013-01-01

    characteristic curve (AUC) to evaluate 30-day mortality in four models: (i) age, gender, comorbidity, bacteria, and ward. (ii) Model 1 and sepsis severity. (iii) Model 1 and CRP. (iv) Model 1, sepsis severity, and CRP. Altogether, 416 of 1999 patients died within 30 days. CRP independently predicted 30-day...... mortality [Model 4, odds ratio (95% CIs) for 100 mg/L: 1.16 (1.06-1.27)], but it did not contribute to the AUC (Model 2 vs Model 4: p = 0.31). In the 963 non-severe sepsis patients, CRP independently predicted 30-day mortality [Model 4: 1.42 (1.20-1.69)] and it increased the AUC (Model 2 vs Model 4: p = 0......We evaluated whether sepsis severity and C-reactive protein (CRP) level on admission prognostically corroborated or annulled each other in adult patients with incident community-acquired bacteremia (Funen, Denmark, 2000-2008). We used logistic regression and area under the receiver operating...

  1. Multiplex cytokine analyses in dogs with pyometra suggest involvement of KC-like chemokine in canine bacterial sepsis.

    Karlsson, Iulia; Hagman, Ragnvi; Johannisson, Anders; Wang, Liya; Södersten, Fredrik; Wernersson, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Clinical diagnostic criteria for sepsis (systemic inflammatory response syndrome caused by infection) are unspecific and, therefore, biomarkers for sepsis diagnosis are needed for appropriate treatment and patient survival. Pyometra, a common disease caused by bacterial infection of the uterus, results in sepsis in nearly 60% of cases in dogs. We used dogs with pyometra as a natural model for sepsis and collected serum samples from 39 dogs, of which 22 with pyometra and 17 healthy controls. Dogs with pyometra were further grouped into dogs with sepsis (n=18) and without sepsis (n=4). Serum concentrations of a panel of cytokines, including keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC)-like, granulocyte-macrophages colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-15, IL-18, chemokine C-X-C motif ligand (CXCL)10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, were measured using multiplex analyses. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were determined using an automated immunoturbidimetric assay. In addition to physical examination hematological and serum biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the overall status of the dogs. Significantly higher concentrations of KC-like (757 vs 304 pg/ml) were detected in dogs with pyometra as compared to healthy dogs. Within the pyometra group, dogs with sepsis compared to dogs without sepsis had a higher KC-like concentration (873 vs 300 pg/ml). Hemoglobin levels were significantly lower in dogs with pyometra compared to healthy dogs, regardless of the presence or absence of sepsis, and correlated negatively with KC-like. KC-like concentrations correlated positively with CRP, number of hospitalization days, number of monocytes, concentrations of IL-8, and percentage band neutrophils. Our data suggest that bacterial infection triggers the expression of KC-like and further studies are warranted of KC-like as a possible biomarker for diagnosing sepsis and uterine bacterial infection in dogs. PMID:26837616

  2. Procalcitonin for detecting community-acquired bacterial pneumonia

    Devi Gusmaiyanto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity andmortality in children under five years of age. Pneumonia can be ofbacterial or viral origin. It is difficult to distinguish between thesetwo agents based on clinical manifestations, as well as radiologicaland laboratory examinations. Furthermore, bacterial cultures taketime to incubate and positive results may only be found in 10-30%of bacterial pneumonia cases. Procalcitonin has been used as amarker to distinguish etiologies, as bacterial infections tend toincrease serum procalcitonin levels.Objective To determine the sensitivity, specificity, positivepredictive value and negative predictive value of procalcitoninin community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.Method This cross-sectional study was conducted in thePediatric Health Department of Dr. M. Djamil Hospital, Padang.Subjects were selected by consecutive sampling. Procalcitoninmeasurements and PCR screening were performed on bloodspecimens from 32 pneumonia patients and compared.Results Of the 32 subjects, most were boys (56.25%, under 5years of age (99%, and had poor nutritional status (68.75%.Using a cut-off point of 0.25 ng/mL, procalcitonin level hada sensitivity of 92%, specificity 50%, positive predictive value 88%, and negative predictive value 60% for diagnosing bacterial pneumonia. Using a cut-off point of 0.5 ng/mL, procalcitonin level had a specificity of 46%, specificity 83%, positive predictive value 91%, and negative predictive value 25%.Conclusion A cut-off point of 0.25 ng/mL of procalcitonin level may be more useful to screen for bacterial pneumonia than a cutoff point of 0.5 ng / mL. However, if the 0.25 ng/mL cut-off point is used, careful monitoring will be required for negative results, as up to 40% may actually have bacterial pneumonia. [PaediatrIndones. 2015;55:65-9.].

  3. Gut origin of sepsis: a prospective study investigating associations between bacterial translocation, gastric microflora, and septic morbidity

    MacFie, J; O'Boyle, C; Mitchell, C.; Buckley, P.; Johnstone, D.; Sudworth, P.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To investigate the "gut origin of sepsis" hypothesis.
METHODS—Prospective controlled study of 279 surgical patients in which cultures of nasogastric aspirates were compared with those obtained from mesenteric lymph nodes taken at laparotomy and the organisms cultured from subsequent septic complications. Bacterial translocation was confirmed if positive cultures were obtained from mesenteric lymph nodes. Postoperative sepsis was defined as any positive culture in the postoperative period...

  4. Plasma procalcitonin level as a predictor of treatment response in ICU patients with bacterial sepsis

    Mobaien AR

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Sepsis is one of the most important causes of mortality in severely ill ICU patients. At least, a part of high mortality rate in sepsis patients is due to less specific clinical symptoms for prompt diagnosis. Recently some studies report that serum levels of procalcitonin will increase in these patients but changes of serum levels following treatments is not known. This study was designed to determin procalcitonin levels in patients with bacterial infectious disease in ICU, initially and during therapy and compare the levels during response to treatment. "n"nMethods: This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on ICU patients with infectious diseases, blood specimen collected on day 1 and then in days 3 and 7 of ICU admission. The semi-quantitative PCT-Q test was performed. "n"nResults: Thirty five patients, 22(62.9 % men and 13(37.1% women, were enrolled in this study. 18(51.4% patients died. Procalcitonin level in most patients in admission day was more than 10 ng/ml [16 (45.7%] but in patients that react to treatment, decline to lower than 0.5 ng/ml [14(77.8%]. Mean rank of procalcitonin level from 1.14 ng/ml in first day reached to 2.72 ng/ml in seventh day (p<0.0001. "n"nConclusions: This study showed that serum procalcitonin levels in ICU patients with bacterial sepsis significantly decrease following response to treatment. The measurement of serum procalcitonin in ICU patients with bacterial infectious diseases at first arrival day and following treatment is recommended.

  5. Toll-like receptor 4 decoy, TOY, attenuates gram-negative bacterial sepsis.

    Keehoon Jung

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane glycolipid, induces sepsis through its interaction with myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4. To block interaction between LPS/MD-2 complex and TLR4, we designed and generated soluble fusion proteins capable of binding MD-2, dubbed TLR4 decoy receptor (TOY using 'the Hybrid leucine-rich repeats (LRR technique'. TOY contains the MD-2 binding ectodomain of TLR4, the LRR motif of hagfish variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR, and the Fc domain of IgG1 to make it soluble, productive, and functional. TOY exhibited strong binding to MD-2, but not to the extracellular matrix (ECM, resulting in a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in vivo. TOY significantly extended the lifespan, when administered in either preventive or therapeutic manners, in both the LPS- and cecal ligation/puncture-induced sepsis models in mice. TOY markedly attenuated LPS-triggered NF-kappaB activation, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and thrombus formation in multiple organs. Taken together, the targeting strategy for sequestration of LPS/MD-2 complex using the decoy receptor TOY is effective in treating LPS- and bacteria-induced sepsis; furthermore, the strategy used in TOY development can be applied to the generation of other novel decoy receptor proteins.

  6. Prevalence and bacterial susceptibility of hospital acquired urinary tract infection

    Dias Neto José Anastácio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Urinary tract infection is the most common nosocomially acquired infection. It is important to know the etiology and antibiotic susceptibility infectious agents to guide the initial empirical treatment. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of bacterial strains and their antibiotic susceptibility in nosocomially acquired urinary tract infection in a university hospital between January and June 2003. METHODS: We analyzed the data of 188 patients with positive urine culture (= 10(5 colony-forming units/mL following a period of 48 hours after admission. RESULTS: Half of patients were male. Mean age was 50.26 ± 22.7 (SD, range 3 months to 88 years. Gram-negative bacteria were the agent in approximately 80% of cases. The most common pathogens were E. coli (26%, Klebsiella sp. (15%, P. aeruginosa (15% and Enterococcus sp. (11%. The overall bacteria susceptibility showed that the pathogens were more sensible to imipenem (83%, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides; and were highly resistant to ampicillin (27% and cefalothin (30%. It is important to note the low susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (42% and norfloxacin (43%. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that if one can not wait the results of urine culture, the best choices to begin empiric treatment are imipenem, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides. Cefalothin and ampicillin are quite ineffective to treat these infections.

  7. Early-onset sepsis in a neonatal intensive care unit in Beni Suef, Egypt: bacterial isolates and antibiotic resistance pattern

    Fahmey, Sameh Samir

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify the frequency of bacterial isolates in early-onset neonatal sepsis (EONS) and their antimicrobial resistance pattern. Methods A retrospective study of EONS was conducted at the Beni Suef University Hospital from September 2008 to September 2012. A case of EONS was defined as an infant who had clinical signs of infection or who was born to a mother with risk factors for infection, and in whom blood culture obtained within 72 hours of life grew a bacterial pathogen. Results ...

  8. Procalcitonin for detecting community-acquired bacterial pneumonia

    Devi Gusmaiyanto; Finny Fitry Yani; Efrida Efrida; Rizanda Machmud

    2016-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity andmortality in children under five years of age. Pneumonia can be ofbacterial or viral origin. It is difficult to distinguish between thesetwo agents based on clinical manifestations, as well as radiologicaland laboratory examinations. Furthermore, bacterial cultures taketime to incubate and positive results may only be found in 10-30%of bacterial pneumonia cases. Procalcitonin has been used as amarker to distinguish etiologies, as bacterial...

  9. The effect of pomegranate extract on survival and peritoneal bacterial load in cecal ligation and perforation model of sepsis in rats

    Sanaz Tavasoli

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Our study demonstrates for the first time that pomegranate extract could increase mortality rate via increasing peritoneal cavity bacterial load, in CLP sepsis model. More studies to assess mechanisms of this effect are warranted.

  10. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    K.S. Adriani

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and occurs when bacteria invade the subarachnoid space. The meninges are the protective membranes that surround the brain and the spinal cord. Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening disease because the proximity of the infection to the brai

  11. Intensive care unit—acquired weakness (ICUAW) and muscle wasting in critically ill patients with severe sepsis and septic shock

    Schefold, Joerg C; Bierbrauer, Jeffrey; Weber-Carstens, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    Sepsis presents a major health care problem and remains one of the leading causes of death within the intensive care unit (ICU). Therapeutic approaches against severe sepsis and septic shock focus on early identification. Adequate source control, administration of antibiotics, preload optimization by fluid resuscitation and further hemodynamic stabilisation using vasopressors whenever appropriate are considered pivotal within the early—golden—hours of sepsis. However, organ dysfunction develo...

  12. Dexamethasone in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    D. van de Beek; J. de Gans

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis in adults is a severe disease with high fatality and morbidity rates. Experimental studies have shown that the inflammatory response in the subarachnoid space is associated with an unfavourable outcome. In these experiments, corticosteroids, and in particular dexamethasone, were

  13. CD64 and Group II Secretory Phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IIA) as Biomarkers for Distinguishing Adult Sepsis and Bacterial Infections in the Emergency Department

    Tan, Toh Leong; Ahmad, Nurul Saadah; Nasuruddin, Dian Nasriana; Ithnin, Azlin; Tajul Arifin, Khaizurin; Zaini, Ida Zarina; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Early diagnosis of sepsis and bacterial infection is imperative as treatment relies on early antibiotic administration. There is a need to develop new biomarkers to detect patients with sepsis and bacterial infection as early as possible, thereby enabling prompt antibiotic treatment and improving the survival rate. Methods Fifty-one adult patients with suspected bacterial sepsis on admission to the Emergency Department (ED) of a teaching hospital were included into the study. All relevant cultures and serology tests were performed. Serum levels for Group II Secretory Phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IIA) and CD64 were subsequently analyzed. Results and Discussion Sepsis was confirmed in 42 patients from a total of 51 recruited subjects. Twenty-one patients had culture-confirmed bacterial infections. Both biomarkers were shown to be good in distinguishing sepsis from non-sepsis groups. CD64 and sPLA2-IIA also demonstrated a strong correlation with early sepsis diagnosis in adults. The area under the curve (AUC) of both Receiver Operating Characteristic curves showed that sPLA2-IIA was better than CD64 (AUC = 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.83–0.97 and AUC = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.82–0.99, respectively). The optimum cutoff value was 2.13μg/l for sPLA2-IIA (sensitivity = 91%, specificity = 78%) and 45 antigen bound cell (abc) for CD64 (sensitivity = 81%, specificity = 89%). In diagnosing bacterial infections, sPLA2-IIA showed superiority over CD64 (AUC = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.85–0.96, and AUC = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.93–1.00, respectively). The optimum cutoff value for bacterial infection was 5.63μg/l for sPLA2-IIA (sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 94%) and 46abc for CD64 (sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 83%). Conclusions sPLA2-IIA showed superior performance in sepsis and bacterial infection diagnosis compared to CD64. sPLA2-IIA appears to be an excellent biomarker for sepsis screening and for diagnosing bacterial infections, whereas CD64 could be used for

  14. Sepse por Staphylococus aureus resistente à meticilina adquirida na comunidade no sul do Brasil Sepsis due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in southern Brazil

    Luciane Cristina Gelatti

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus resistente à meticilina foi inicialmente descrito como um típico microrganismo adquirido em infecções nosocomiais. No entanto, nos últimos anos Staphylococcus aureus resistente à meticilina adquirido na comunidade é causa de infecções de pele e tecidos moles, mas infecções graves como pneumonia e sepse podem ocorrer. Este relato descreve um caso de sepse em criança, complicado com pneumonia secundária a lesão em partes moles por Staphylococcus aureus resistente à meticilina adquirido na comunidade no Sul do Brasil. O paciente foi atendido em Unidade de Emergência com história de ferimento provocado por trauma em membro inferior que evoluiu para celulite, pneumonia e sepse.Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was initially described as a typical microorganism acquired in nosocomial infections. However, over recent years, community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has been a cause of skin and soft-tissue infections. Serious infections such as pneumonia and sepsis can also occur. This report describes a case of sepsis in a child that was complicated by pneumonia secondary to soft tissue lesions that were due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in southern Brazil. The patient was attended at the Emergency Unit with a history of injury caused by lower-limb trauma that evolved to cellulitis, pneumonia and sepsis.

  15. 75 FR 73107 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated...

    2010-11-29

    ... Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY... Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' The purpose of... antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of hospital- acquired bacterial pneumonia (HABP) and...

  16. Risk factors for hospitalization due to community-acquired sepsis - a population-based case-control study

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Pottegård, Anton; Laursen, Christian B;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to estimate risk factors for hospitalization due to sepsis and to determine whether these risk factors vary by age and gender. METHODS: We performed a population-based case-control study of all adult patients admitted to a medical ED from September 2010.......3%) were male. 621 (36.3%) patients were admitted with sepsis, 1071 (62.5%) with severe sepsis and 21 (1.2%) with septic shock. Episodes with sepsis of any severity were associated with older age (85+ years adjusted OR 6.02 [95%CI: 5.09-7.12]), immunosuppression (4.41 [3.83-5.09]), alcoholism...

  17. Plasma bacterial and mitochondrial DNA distinguish bacterial sepsis from sterile systemic inflammatory response syndrome and quantify inflammatory tissue injury in nonhuman primates.

    Sursal, Tolga; Stearns-Kurosawa, Deborah J; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Oh, Sun-Young; Sun, Shiqin; Kurosawa, Shinichiro; Hauser, Carl J

    2013-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a fundamental host response common to bacterial infection and sterile tissue injury. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome can cause organ dysfunction and death, but its mechanisms are incompletely understood. Moreover, SIRS can progress to organ failure or death despite being sterile or after control of the inciting infection. Biomarkers discriminating between sepsis, sterile SIRS, and postinfective SIRS would therefore help direct care. Circulating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a damage-associated molecular pattern reflecting cellular injury. Circulating bacterial 16S DNA (bDNA) is a pathogen-associated pattern (PAMP) reflecting ongoing infection. We developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays to quantify these markers, and predicting their plasma levels might help distinguish sterile injury from infection. To study these events in primates, we assayed banked serum from Papio baboons that had undergone a brief challenge of intravenous Bacillus anthracis delta Sterne (modified to remove toxins) followed by antibiotics (anthrax) that causes organ failure and death. To investigate the progression of sepsis to "severe" sepsis and death, we studied animals where anthrax was pretreated with drotrecogin alfa (activated protein C), which attenuates sepsis in baboons. We also contrasted lethal anthrax bacteremia against nonlethal E. coli bacteremia and against sterile tissue injury from Shiga-like toxin 1. Bacterial DNA and mtDNA levels in timed samples were correlated with blood culture results and assays of organ function. Sterile injury by Shiga-like toxin 1 increased mtDNA, but bDNA was undetectable: consistent with the absence of infection. The bacterial challenges caused parallel early bDNA and mtDNA increases, but bDNA detected pathogens even after bacteria were undetectable by culture. Sublethal E. coli challenge only caused transient rises in mtDNA consistent with a self-limited injury. In lethal

  18. Community acquired urinary tract infection: etiology and bacterial susceptibility

    Dias Neto José Anastácio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Urinary tract infections (UTI are one of the most common infectious diseases diagnosed. UTI account for a large proportion of antibacterial drug consumption and have large socio-economic impacts. Since the majority of the treatments begins or is done completely empirically, the knowledge of the organisms, their epidemiological characteristics and their antibacterial susceptibility that may vary with time is mandatory. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of uropathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility of the community acquired UTI diagnosed in our institution and to provide a national data. METHODS: We analyzed retrospectively the results of urine cultures of 402 patients that had community acquired urinary tract infection in the year of 2003. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients in this study was 45.34 ± 23.56 (SD years. There were 242 (60.2% females and 160 (39.8% males. The most commonly isolated organism was Escherichia coli (58%. Klebsiella sp. (8.4% and Enterococcus sp.(7.9% were reported as the next most common organisms. Of all bacteria isolated from community acquired UTI, only 37% were sensitive to ampicillin, 51% to cefalothin and 52% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The highest levels of susceptibility were to imipenem (96%, ceftriaxone (90%, amikacin (90%, gentamicin (88%, levofloxacin (86%, ciprofloxacin (73%, nitrofurantoin (77% and norfloxacin (75%. CONCLUSION: Gram-negative agents are the most common cause of UTI. Fluoroquinolones remains the choice among the orally administered antibiotics, followed by nitrofurantoin, second and third generation cephalosporins. For severe disease that require parenteral antibiotics the choice should be aminoglycosides, third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones or imipenem, which were the most effective.

  19. Bacterial Etiology and Antibiotic Sensitivity Patterns of Early-Late Onset Neonatal Sepsis among Newborns in Shiraz, Iran 2004-2007

    Mozhgan Shahian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal sepsis is a major cause of mortalityand morbidity, especially in developing countries. The goal ofthe present study was to determine the bacterial etiology andantibiotic sensitivity patterns of neonatal sepsis.Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted on 208neonates admitted with clinically suspected sepsis over a periodof 30 months. Sepsis was divided into early onset sepsis(EOS, ≤5 days of age and late onset sepsis (LOS, >5 days ofage. The two groups were further divided into proven (culturepositive ± abnormal markers and probable (culture negative +abnormal markers subgroups. Blood culture was performedusing Bactec.Results: Of 208 cases, 90 had neonatal sepsis consisting of 38(26 proven presented as EOS and 52 (42 proven as LOS. In theEOS, Escherichia coli (E. coli was the most common organismfollowed by klebsiella spp, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus.As for LOS, Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CONS were themost common organism followed by Enterococcus spp, S.aureus. The antibiogram on the isolated E. coli and klebsiella spprevealed a greater combined sensitivity to cefotaxime. Coagulase-negative staphylococci and S. aureus had 100% and Enterococcusspp 90% sensitivity to vancomycin.Conclusion: Escherichia coli and CONS were the most commonorganisms causing EOS and LOS, respectively. Since theantibiotic sensitivity patterns of these organisms are changed,it seems necessary to conduct bacterial etiology studies and todetermine antibiotic sensitivity patterns periodically in orderto promote the empirical therapy.Iran J Med Sci 2010; 35(4: 293-298.

  20. Surveillance of acute community acquired urinary tract bacterial infections

    Sibanarayan Rath; Rabindra N. Padhy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To record the antibiotic resistance of community acquired uropathogens over a period of 24 months (May 2011-April 2012). Methods: Urine samples from patients of outpatient department (OPD) were used for isolating urinary tract infection (UTI)-causing bacteria that were cultured on suitable selective media and identified by biochemical tests. Their antibiograms were ascertained by Kirby-Bauer’s disc diffusion method, using 17 antibiotics of 5 different classes. Results: From 2137 urine samples 1332 strains of pathogenic bacteria belonging to 11 species were isolated. Two Gram-positives, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis and nine Gram-negatives, Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter sp., Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated. Both S. aureus and E. faecalis were vancomycin resistant, and resistant-strains of all pathogens increased in each 6-month period of study. Particularly, all Gram-negatives were resistant to nitrofurantoin and co-trimoxazole, the most preferred antibiotics of empiric therapy for UTI, but were moderately resistant to gentamicin, ampicillin, amoxyclav, ofloxacin and gatifloxacin. Most Gram-negatives produced extended spectrum β-lactamase. Conclusions: It was concluded that periodic surveillance of pathogens is an essential corollary in effective health management in any country, as empiric therapy is a common/essential practice in effective clinical management.

  1. Differentiation of bacterial and non-bacterial community-acquired pneumonia by thin-section computed tomography

    Background and objective: The management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) depends, in part, on the identification of the causative agents. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of thin-section computed tomography (CT) in differentiating bacterial and non-bacterial pneumonia. Patients and methods: Thin-section CT studies were prospectively examined in hospitalized CAP patients within 2 days of admission, followed by retrospective assessment by two pulmonary radiologists. Thin-section CT findings on the pneumonias caused by each pathogen were examined, and two types of pneumonias were compared. Using multivariate logistic regression analyses, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were produced. Results: Among 183 CAP episodes (181 patients, 125 men and 56 women, mean age ± S.D.: 61.1 ± 19.7) examined by thin-section CT, the etiologies of 125 were confirmed (94 bacterial pneumonia and 31 non-bacterial pneumonia). Centrilobular nodules were specific for non-bacterial pneumonia and airspace nodules were specific for bacterial pneumonia (specificities of 89% and 94%, respectively) when located in the outer lung areas. When centrilobular nodules were the principal finding, they were specific but lacked sensitivity for non-bacterial pneumonia (specificity 98% and sensitivity 23%). To distinguish the two types of pneumonias, centrilobular nodules, airspace nodules and lobular shadows were found to be important by multivariate analyses. ROC curve analysis discriminated bacterial pneumonia from non-bacterial pneumonia among patients without underlying lung diseases, yielding an optimal point with sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 79%, respectively, but was less effective when all patients were analyzed together (70% and 84%, respectively). Conclusion: Thin-section CT examination was applied for the differentiation of bacterial and non-bacterial pneumonias. Though showing some potential, this examination at the present time would not

  2. Activation of Bacteroides fragilis toxin by a novel bacterial protease contributes to anaerobic sepsis in mice.

    Choi, Vivian M; Herrou, Julien; Hecht, Aaron L; Teoh, Wei Ping; Turner, Jerrold R; Crosson, Sean; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2016-05-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the leading cause of anaerobic bacteremia and sepsis. Enterotoxigenic strains that produce B. fragilis toxin (BFT, fragilysin) contribute to colitis and intestinal malignancy, yet are also isolated in bloodstream infection. It is not known whether these strains harbor unique genetic determinants that confer virulence in extra-intestinal disease. We demonstrate that BFT contributes to sepsis in mice, and we identify a B. fragilis protease called fragipain (Fpn) that is required for the endogenous activation of BFT through the removal of its auto-inhibitory prodomain. Structural analysis of Fpn reveals a His-Cys catalytic dyad that is characteristic of C11-family cysteine proteases that are conserved in multiple pathogenic Bacteroides spp. and Clostridium spp. Fpn-deficient, enterotoxigenic B. fragilis has an attenuated ability to induce sepsis in mice; however, Fpn is dispensable in B. fragilis colitis, wherein host proteases mediate BFT activation. Our findings define a role for B. fragilis enterotoxin and its activating protease in the pathogenesis of bloodstream infection, which indicates a greater complexity of cellular targeting and activity of BFT than previously recognized. The expression of fpn by both toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains suggests that this protease may contribute to anaerobic sepsis in ways that extend beyond its role in toxin activation. It could thus potentially serve as a target for disease modification. PMID:27089515

  3. High mobility group box-1 protein in patients with suspected community-acquired infections and sepsis: a prospective study

    Gaïni, Shahin; Pedersen, Svend Stenvang; Koldkjaer, Ole Graesbøll;

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sepsis is a serious condition with a significant morbidity and mortality. New insight into the immunopathogenesis of sepsis could promote the development of new strategies for diagnosis and therapy. High mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) has been known for many years as a nuclear...... a department of internal medicine were included in the study in a prospective manner. Demographic data, comorbidity, routine biochemistry, microbiological data, infection focus, severity score, and mortality on day 28 were recorded. Plasma and serum were sampled at the time of admission. HMGB1...... non-infected patients and all infected patients, the area under the curve for HMGB1 was 0.59 (P < 0.0001). HMGB1 correlated only weakly to levels of white blood cell count, neutrophils, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, procalcitonin, and lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (P < 0.001). HMGB1 did not...

  4. Hydrocephalus is a rare outcome in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    Bodilsen, Jacob; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Nielsen, Henrik I

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM) continues to have a high mortality rate and often results in severe sequelae among survivors. Lately, an increased effort has been focused on describing the neurological complications of meningitis including hydrocephalus. To aid in this ...... neurosurgical interventions. Our findings are comparable with a recent Dutch national prospective study....

  5. Arthritis in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis: a prospective cohort study

    M. Weisfelt; D. van de Beek; L. Spanjaard; J. de Gans

    2006-01-01

    Background: Although the coexistence of bacterial meningitis and arthritis has been noted in several studies, it remains unclear how often both conditions occur simultaneously. Methods: We evaluated the presence of arthritis in a prospective nationwide cohort of 696 episodes of community-acquired ba

  6. Sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock: changes in incidence, pathogens and outcomes

    Martin, Greg S

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis has been around since the dawn of time, having been described for more than 2000 years, although clinical definitions are recent. The consensus sepsis definitions have permitted worldwide epidemiological studies of sepsis to be conducted. We now recognize the common nature of sepsis and the consistency of its disease – particularly severe sepsis and septic shock. The incidence of sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock continues to increase, and although Gram-positive bacterial pathogen...

  7. Inflammatory response in mixed viral-bacterial community-acquired pneumonia

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of mixed pneumonia (virus + bacteria) in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been described in recent years. However, it is not known whether the systemic inflammatory profile is different compared to monomicrobial CAP. We wanted to investigate this profile of mixed viral-bacterial infection and to compare it to monomicrobial bacterial or viral CAP. Methods We measured baseline serum procalcitonin (PCT), C reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cell (WBC) count in 171 patients with CAP with definite etiology admitted to a tertiary hospital: 59 (34.5%) bacterial, 66 (39.%) viral and 46 (27%) mixed (viral-bacterial). Results Serum PCT levels were higher in mixed and bacterial CAP compared to viral CAP. CRP levels were higher in mixed CAP compared to the other groups. CRP was independently associated with mixed CAP. CRP levels below 26 mg/dL were indicative of an etiology other than mixed in 83% of cases, but the positive predictive value was 45%. PCT levels over 2.10 ng/mL had a positive predictive value for bacterial-involved CAP versus viral CAP of 78%, but the negative predictive value was 48%. Conclusions Mixed CAP has a different inflammatory pattern compared to bacterial or viral CAP. High CRP levels may be useful for clinicians to suspect mixed CAP. PMID:25073709

  8. Lipopolysaccharide Clearance, Bacterial Clearance, and Systemic Inflammatory Responses Are Regulated by Cell Type–Specific Functions of TLR4 during Sepsis

    Deng, Meihong; Scott, Melanie J.; Loughran, Patricia; Gibson, Gregory; Sodhi, Chhinder; Watkins, Simon; Hackam, David; Billiar, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    The morbidity associated with bacterial sepsis is the result of host immune responses to pathogens, which are dependent on pathogen recognition by pattern recognition receptors, such as TLR4. TLR4 is expressed on a range of cell types, yet the mechanisms by which cell-specific functions of TLR4 lead to an integrated sepsis response are poorly understood. To address this, we generated mice in which TLR4 was specifically deleted from myeloid cells (LysMTLR4KO) or hepatocytes (HCTLR4KO) and then...

  9. Xylitol-supplemented nutrition enhances bacterial killing and prolongs survival of rats in experimental pneumococcal sepsis

    Svanberg Martti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xylitol has antiadhesive effects on Streptococcus pneumoniae and inhibits its growth, and has also been found to be effective in preventing acute otitis media and has been used in intensive care as a valuable source of energy. Results We evaluated the oxidative burst of neutrophils in rats fed with and without xylitol. The mean increase in the percentage of activated neutrophils from the baseline was higher in the xylitol-exposed group than in the control group (58.1% vs 51.4%, P = 0.03 for the difference and the mean induced increase in the median strength of the burst per neutrophil was similarly higher in the xylitol group (159.6 vs 140.3, P = 0.04. In two pneumococcal sepsis experiments rats were fed either a basal powder diet (control group or the same diet supplemented with 10% or 20% xylitol and infected with an intraperitoneal inoculation of S. pneumoniae after two weeks. The mean survival time was 48 hours in the xylitol groups and 34 hours in the control groups (P Conclusion Xylitol has beneficial effects on both the oxidative killing of bacteria in neutrophilic leucocytes and on the survival of rats with experimental pneumococcal sepsis.

  10. Xylitol-supplemented nutrition enhances bacterial killing and prolongs survival of rats in experimental pneumococcal sepsis

    Renko, Marjo; Valkonen, Päivi; Tapiainen, Terhi; Kontiokari, Tero; Mattila, Pauli; Knuuttila, Matti; Svanberg, Martti; Leinonen, Maija; Karttunen, Riitta; Uhari, Matti

    2008-01-01

    Background Xylitol has antiadhesive effects on Streptococcus pneumoniae and inhibits its growth, and has also been found to be effective in preventing acute otitis media and has been used in intensive care as a valuable source of energy. Results We evaluated the oxidative burst of neutrophils in rats fed with and without xylitol. The mean increase in the percentage of activated neutrophils from the baseline was higher in the xylitol-exposed group than in the control group (58.1% vs 51.4%, P = 0.03 for the difference) and the mean induced increase in the median strength of the burst per neutrophil was similarly higher in the xylitol group (159.6 vs 140.3, P = 0.04). In two pneumococcal sepsis experiments rats were fed either a basal powder diet (control group) or the same diet supplemented with 10% or 20% xylitol and infected with an intraperitoneal inoculation of S. pneumoniae after two weeks. The mean survival time was 48 hours in the xylitol groups and 34 hours in the control groups (P < 0.001 in log rank test). Conclusion Xylitol has beneficial effects on both the oxidative killing of bacteria in neutrophilic leucocytes and on the survival of rats with experimental pneumococcal sepsis. PMID:18334022

  11. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Bacterial Strains Isolated From Patients with Community Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in Mersin

    Ozlem Kandemir; Alper Akdag; Ahmet Oner Kurt

    2012-01-01

    AIM: This study objected to determination of distribution of bacterial agents, resistance proportions in community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) in center of Mersin province and objected to regional treatment guide towards to our evidence. MATERIAL AND METHOD: In this study, included patients of pre-diagnosed as UTI based on clinical and laboratory in 11 health care centers between 11/01/2008–07/01/2009. Health care centers were checked for as daily and delivered appropriate ur...

  12. Adhesion molecule levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in children with bacterial meningitis and sepsis

    Soad M Jaber

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Adhesion molecules play a role in leukocyte recruitment during central nervous system (CNS inflammation. Aim: This study was designed to compare serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF concentrations of adhesion molecules in children with meningitis and sepsis, and to evaluate their sources. Setting : This study was carried out at Pediatric Department, King Abdulaziz University Hospital from January 2007 to June 2008. Design: Serum and CSF samples were collected on admission from meningitis (n = 40, sepsis (n = 20 patients, and sera from controls (n = 20. Materials and Methods : Endothelial (E, leukocyte (L, platelet (P selectins intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecules-1 (VCAM-1 were measured using ELISA. Statistics : ANOVA and Spearman′s correlations were used. Adhesion molecules with albumin concentration were estimated in CSF/serum to calculate concentration quotients. Results : In meningitis, serum sE-, sL-, sP-selectins sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 levels were higher than controls. Compared to sepsis, serum sE-selectin, sL-selectin, sVCAM-1, CSF-sL-selectin, CSF-sVCAM-1, VCAM-1 ratio and index were higher, while serum sP-selectin was lower than meningitis. sE-selectin ratio, CSF sICAM-1 were higher in meningitis with positive than negative culture. The sE-selectin index was higher in meningitis with neurological complication than those without it. In meningitis, correlation was found between CSF protein and CSF white blood cell counts (WBCs, CSF sICAM-1, CSF sVCAM-1 and between CSF sE-selectin and CSF sICAM-1. Conclusions : This study supports the role of adhesion molecules especially sL-selectin, sVCAM-1 in meningitis and suggests further research to determine their use as biomarkers for meningitis and use of their antagonists as therapeutic for CNS inflammation. The presence of discrepancy of CSF/serum ratios for molecules of same molecular weight suggest intrathecal shedding in addition to

  13. Focal parenchymal lesions in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a clinico-radiological study

    Katchanov, Juri [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); University Hospital Charite, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Siebert, Eberhard; Klingebiel, Randolf [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neuroradiology, Berlin (Germany); Endres, Matthias [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Here, we analyzed the frequency, morphological pattern, and imaging characteristics of focal lesions as a consequence of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We hypothesized that diffusion-weighted imaging combined with contrast-enhanced imaging, serial scanning, and multimodal vascular studies would provide further insight into the pathological basis of such parenchymal lesions in bacterial meningitis. We reviewed clinical and imaging data (i.e., magnetic resonance tomography, magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography angiography, digital subtraction angiography) of 68 adult patients admitted to our neurological intensive care unit between March 1998 and February 2009 with the diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We identified seven patients with parenchymal lesions. These lesions could be attributed to four morphological patterns: (1) territorial cerebral ischemia, (2) perforating vessels ischemia, (3) ischemia of presumed cardiac origin, and (4) isolated cortical lesions. Whereas the patterns (1) and (2) were associated with vasculopathy of large- and medium-sized vessels (as shown by cerebral vascular imaging), vessel imaging in (3) and (4) did not show abnormal findings. Our study implies that parenchymal lesions in acute bacterial meningitis are mainly ischemic and due to involvement of large-, medium-, and small-sized arteries of the brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging combined with conventional, CT-, or MR-based cerebral angiography revealed the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in the majority of patients. Furthermore, we detected two patients with isolated bilateral cortical involvement and normal vessel imaging. These lesions might represent ischemia due to the involvement of small pial and intracortical arteries. (orig.)

  14. Focal parenchymal lesions in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a clinico-radiological study

    Here, we analyzed the frequency, morphological pattern, and imaging characteristics of focal lesions as a consequence of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We hypothesized that diffusion-weighted imaging combined with contrast-enhanced imaging, serial scanning, and multimodal vascular studies would provide further insight into the pathological basis of such parenchymal lesions in bacterial meningitis. We reviewed clinical and imaging data (i.e., magnetic resonance tomography, magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography angiography, digital subtraction angiography) of 68 adult patients admitted to our neurological intensive care unit between March 1998 and February 2009 with the diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We identified seven patients with parenchymal lesions. These lesions could be attributed to four morphological patterns: (1) territorial cerebral ischemia, (2) perforating vessels ischemia, (3) ischemia of presumed cardiac origin, and (4) isolated cortical lesions. Whereas the patterns (1) and (2) were associated with vasculopathy of large- and medium-sized vessels (as shown by cerebral vascular imaging), vessel imaging in (3) and (4) did not show abnormal findings. Our study implies that parenchymal lesions in acute bacterial meningitis are mainly ischemic and due to involvement of large-, medium-, and small-sized arteries of the brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging combined with conventional, CT-, or MR-based cerebral angiography revealed the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in the majority of patients. Furthermore, we detected two patients with isolated bilateral cortical involvement and normal vessel imaging. These lesions might represent ischemia due to the involvement of small pial and intracortical arteries. (orig.)

  15. [Sepsis in Emergency Medicine].

    Christ, Michael; Geier, Felicitas; Bertsch, Thomas; Singler, Katrin

    2016-07-01

    Sepsis is defined as "life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host-response to infection". Presence of organ dysfunction is associated with a mortality of 10% and higher in hospitalized sepsis patients.Introduction of standards in diagnosis and treatment of sepsis in intensive care units has not considerably reduced sepsis mortality. About 80% of patients with sepsis are transferred to intensive care units from usual care wards and emergency departments. Thus, it is tempting to speculate whether opportunities for further improvement of sepsis management exist outside of intensive care units. Performing a "quick sequential organ assessment" (qSOFA; two of following criteria have to be present: respiratory rate >22/min; sytolic blood pressure <100mmHg; altered mental status) supports to identify patients with suspicion of an infection and an increased risk of death within the hospital. Subsequent treatment according to current guidelines on sepsis management will reduce in-hospital mortality of sepsis patients. Indeed, we were able to show a substantial decrease of in-hospital mortality of about 20% in patients presenting with community acquired pneumonia to the emergency department.In summary, decision of further management of sepsis patients has to be done outside intensive care units at the time of initial presentation to professional care givers. Sepsis management in acute care settings should include a structured and standardized protocol to further improve survival in affected patients with even mild organ dysfunction. PMID:27464279

  16. Comparison of rhizosphere bacterial communities in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants for systemic acquired resistance.

    Hein, John W; Wolfe, Gordon V; Blee, Kristopher A

    2008-02-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible systemic plant defense against a broad spectrum of plant pathogens, with the potential to secrete antimicrobial compounds into the soil. However, its impact on rhizosphere bacteria is not known. In this study, we examined fingerprints of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to determine the effect of SAR on bacterial community structure and diversity. We compared Arabidopsis mutants that are constitutive and non-inducible for SAR and verified SAR activation by measuring pathogenesis-related protein activity via a beta-glucoronidase (GUS) reporter construct driven by the beta-1-3 glucanase promoter. We used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of MspI- and HaeIII-digested 16S rDNA to estimate bacterial rhizosphere community diversity, with Lactobacillus sp. added as internal controls. T-RFLP analysis showed a clear rhizosphere effect on community structure, and diversity analysis of both rhizosphere and bulk soil operational taxonomic units (as defined by terminal restriction fragments) using richness, Shannon-Weiner, and Simpson's diversity indices and evenness confirmed that the presence of Arabidopsis roots significantly altered bacterial communities. This effect of altered soil microbial community structure by plants was also seen upon multivariate cluster analysis of the terminal restriction fragments. We also found visible differences in the rhizosphere community fingerprints of different Arabidopsis SAR mutants; however, there was no clear decrease of rhizosphere diversity because of constitutive SAR expression. Our study suggests that SAR can alter rhizosphere bacterial communities, opening the door to further understanding and application of inducible plant defense as a driving force in structuring soil bacterial assemblages. PMID:17619212

  17. Ischemic stroke induces gut permeability and enhances bacterial translocation leading to sepsis in aged mice

    Verma, Rajkumar; Venna, Venugopal R.; Liu, Fudong; Chauhan, Anjali; Koellhoffer, Edward; Patel, Anita; Ricker, Austin; Maas, Kendra; Graf, Joerg; McCullough, Louise D.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is an important risk factor for post-stroke infection, which accounts for a large proportion of stroke-associated mortality. Despite this, studies evaluating post-stroke infection rates in aged animal models are limited. In addition, few studies have assessed gut microbes as a potential source of infection following stroke. Therefore we investigated the effects of age and the role of bacterial translocation from the gut in post-stroke infection in young (8-12 weeks) and aged (18-20 months) C57Bl/6 male mice following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) or sham surgery. Gut permeability was examined and peripheral organs were assessed for the presence of gut-derived bacteria following stroke. Furthermore, sickness parameters and components of innate and adaptive immunity were examined. We found that while stroke induced gut permeability and bacterial translocation in both young and aged mice, only young mice were able to resolve infection. Bacterial species seeding peripheral organs also differed between young (Escherichia) and aged (Enterobacter) mice. Consequently, aged mice developed a septic response marked by persistent and exacerbated hypothermia, weight loss, and immune dysfunction compared to young mice following stroke. PMID:27115295

  18. Influence of dietary nucleotide restriction on bacterial sepsis and phagocytic cell function in mice.

    Kulkarni, A D; Fanslow, W C; Drath, D B; Rudolph, F B; Van Buren, C T

    1986-02-01

    Although enzyme defects in purine metabolism have revealed the importance of these substrates to maintenance of a normal immune response, the role of exogenous nucleotides on the cells that mediate the host defense system has remained largely unexplored. Recent investigations have revealed that dietary nucleotides are vital to the maintenance of cell-mediated responses to antigen stimulation. To test the influence of dietary nucleotide deprivation on resistance to infection, Balb/c mice were maintained on chow, a nucleotide-free (NF) diet, or an NF diet repleted with adenine, uracil, or RNA. Mice on the NF diet suffered 100% mortality following intravenous challenge with Staphylococcus aureus, while chow-fed and RNA- or uracil-repleted mice demonstrated significantly greater resistance to this bacterial challenge. Macrophages from mice on the NF diet had decreased phagocytic activity as measured by uptake of radiolabeled bacteria compared with mice maintained on the NF diet supplemented with adenine, uracil, or RNA. No change in S aureus antibody response was noted on the various diets. Although the mechanism of this suppression of nonspecific immunity remains unclear, provision of nucleotides to defined diets appears vital to maintain host resistance to bacterial challenge. PMID:3947217

  19. LOX-1 Deletion Improves Neutrophil Responses, Enhances Bacterial Clearance, and Reduces Lung Injury in a Murine Polymicrobial Sepsis Model ▿

    Wu, Zhuang; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Kurdowska, Anna K.; Ji, Hong-Long; Idell, Steven; Fu, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory tissue injury and immunosuppression are the major causes of death in sepsis. Novel therapeutic targets that can prevent excessive inflammation and improve immune responses during sepsis could be critical for treatment of this devastating disease. LOX-1 (lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1), a membrane protein expressed in endothelial cells, has been known to mediate vascular inflammation. In the present study, we demonstrated that LOX-1 deletion markedly impro...

  20. Differential regulation of horizontally acquired and core genome genes by the bacterial modulator H-NS.

    Rosa C Baños

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal acquisition of DNA by bacteria dramatically increases genetic diversity and hence successful bacterial colonization of several niches, including the human host. A relevant issue is how this newly acquired DNA interacts and integrates in the regulatory networks of the bacterial cell. The global modulator H-NS targets both core genome and HGT genes and silences gene expression in response to external stimuli such as osmolarity and temperature. Here we provide evidence that H-NS discriminates and differentially modulates core and HGT DNA. As an example of this, plasmid R27-encoded H-NS protein has evolved to selectively silence HGT genes and does not interfere with core genome regulation. In turn, differential regulation of both gene lineages by resident chromosomal H-NS requires a helper protein: the Hha protein. Tight silencing of HGT DNA is accomplished by H-NS-Hha complexes. In contrast, core genes are modulated by H-NS homoligomers. Remarkably, the presence of Hha-like proteins is restricted to the Enterobacteriaceae. In addition, conjugative plasmids encoding H-NS variants have hitherto been isolated only from members of the family. Thus, the H-NS system in enteric bacteria presents unique evolutionary features. The capacity to selectively discriminate between core and HGT DNA may help to maintain horizontally transmitted DNA in silent form and may give these bacteria a competitive advantage in adapting to new environments, including host colonization.

  1. NF-κB Inhibition after Cecal Ligation and Puncture Reduces Sepsis-Associated Lung Injury without Altering Bacterial Host Defense

    Hui Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Since the NF-κB pathway regulates both inflammation and host defense, it is uncertain whether interventions targeting NF-κB would be beneficial in sepsis. Based on the kinetics of the innate immune response, we postulated that selective NF-κB inhibition during a defined time period after the onset of sepsis would reduce acute lung injury without compromising bacterial host defense. Methods. Mice underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. An NF-κB inhibitor, BMS-345541 (50 µg/g mice, was administered by peroral gavage beginning 2 hours after CLP and repeated at 6 hour intervals for 2 additional doses. Results. Mice treated with BMS-345541 after CLP showed reduced neutrophilic alveolitis and lower levels of KC in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared to mice treated with CLP+vehicle. In addition, mice treated with CLP+BMS had minimal histological evidence of lung injury and normal wet-dry ratios, indicating protection from acute lung injury. Treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor did not affect the ability of cultured macrophages to phagocytose bacteria and did not alter bacterial colony counts in blood, lung tissue, or peritoneal fluid at 24 hours after CLP. While BMS-345541 treatment did not alter mortality after CLP, our results showed a trend towards improved survival. Conclusion. Transiently blocking NF-κB activity after the onset of CLP-induced sepsis can effectively reduce acute lung injury in mice without compromising bacterial host defense or survival after CLP.

  2. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Bacterial Strains Isolated From Patients with Community Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in Mersin

    Ozlem Kandemir

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study objected to determination of distribution of bacterial agents, resistance proportions in community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI in center of Mersin province and objected to regional treatment guide towards to our evidence. MATERIAL AND METHOD: In this study, included patients of pre-diagnosed as UTI based on clinical and laboratory in 11 health care centers between 11/01/2008–07/01/2009. Health care centers were checked for as daily and delivered appropriate urine samples for this study which collected sterile urine collection bottles. Urine samples were cultured including ≥leukocyte/mm3 with thoma slides, as a result of culture, samples of being on one type bacterial growth and ≥105 cfu/mL have done statically analysis. RESULTS: Totally 480 samples were collected and 311 (64.8% of them evaluated to as statistic significant. In bacterial culture analysis, E. coli (80.7% was the most commonly identified and as descending order found to Klepsiella spp. (8.7%, CNS (7.8%, Proteus spp. (1.9%, Enterobacter spp. (0.6%, and Pseudomonas spp. (0.3%. ESBL was determined to 10.0% of E. coli isolates, 3.7% of Klepsiella spp. isolates and also IBL was determined in two Enterobacter spp. isolates. Oxacillin resistance in CNS isolates was found as 12.5%. Imipenem resistance in Gram negative uropatogens was not detected and resistant rates were detected; 0.3% in amikacin, 0.7% in cefoperazone/sulbactam, 2.8% in cefoxitin, 6.3% in nitrofurantoin, 10.8% in ceftriaxone, 16.7% in ciprofloxacin, 16.7% in cefuroxime, 42.2% in cotrimoxazole, 97.6 % in amoxicillin clavulanic acid, and 94.4% in ampicillin sulbactam. There were no detected to resistance to glycopeptides and linezolid in gram positive agents. CONCLUSION: Ampicillin, ampicillin sulbactam, amoxicillin clavulanic acid, and cotrimoxazole antibiotics were out of the being preference for reason of resistance rates in UTI empirical treatment in our region. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012

  3. Value of rapid aetiological diagnosis in optimization of antimicrobial treatment in bacterial community acquired pneumonia.

    Mareković, Ivana; Plecko, Vanda; Boras, Zagorka; Pavlović, Ladislav; Budimir, Ana; Bosnjak, Zrinka; Puretić, Hrvoje; Zele-Starcević, Lidija; Kalenić, Smilja

    2012-06-01

    In 80 adult patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP) conventional microbiological methods, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were performed and the appropriateness of the empirical antimicrobial treatment was evaluated according to bacterial pathogen detected. The aetiology was determined in 42 (52.5%) patients, with Streptococcus pneumoniae as the most common pathogen. PCR applied to bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) provided 2 and PCR on sputum samples 1 additional aetiological diagnosis of CAP The mean CRP values in the S. pneumoniae group were not significantly higher than in the group with other aetiological diagnoses (166.89 mg/L vs. 160.11 mg/L, p = 0.457). In 23.8% (10/42) of patients with determined aetiology, the empirical antimicrobial treatment was inappropriate. PCR tests need further investigation, particularly those for the atypical pathogens, as they are predominant in inappropriately treated patients. Our results do not support the use of CRP as a rapid test to guide the antimicrobial treatment in patients with CAP. PMID:22856222

  4. Advancement in the research of early detection of bacterial nucleic acid in molecular diagnosis of sepsis%脓毒症早期细菌核酸分子诊断研究进展

    刘潇; 任辉; 彭代智

    2013-01-01

    Early diagnosis of sepsis helps make effective clinical decisions and improve the survival rate of patients with severe infection.However,the timely and accurate diagnosis of sepsis is still a great challenge in clinic.In order to settle the very problem,the scientists in the world have made a lot of ex ploration and research in the field of rapid molecular identification of pathogens.Nowadays,the nucleic acid detection of sepsis is mainly composed of 3 types of methodological strategies,either based on positive blood culture,single colonies,or directly on blood specimens.This paper presents a comprehensive overview of advances in the research of early detection of bacterial nucleic acid as molecular diagnosis of sepsis.

  5. Examination of enzymes concentration in the blood of rats with sepsis caused by mixed and pure bacterial cultures

    Stojanović Dragica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinical form of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP was caused in order to monitor the concentration of enzymes (alanine aminotransferase - ALT, aspartate aminotransferase - AST, lactate dehydrogenase - LDH, amylase and creatine kinase - CK in the rat blood. Experiments were performed on male Wistar rats, weighing on average 215±25 g. The rats were divided into four groups. In the first three groups (n=28 per group, sepsis was induced by pure culture of Escherichia coli (EC or Staphylococcus aureus (SA and mixed culture (MK of caecum, while the fourth group included 20 control rats who underwent an abdominal incision. Blood was taken in time intervals of 12, 24, 72 and 120 hours. During the experimental protocol, we identified significant changes of all monitored enzymes in the serum of infected rats. After a period of 12 hours there was a significant increase in ALT (all rats with sepsis, AST and LDH (rats in the MK group levels, while a decrease was noted in the concentration of amylase (EC, SA. Similarly, 24 hours after the CLP procedure, a significant decrease of amylase (MK and AST (SA was recorded, while serum LDH level varied significantly from elevated (EC, SA to reduced (MC values. Finally, at the time intervals of 72 and 120 hours the concentration of nearly all monitored enzymes has shown a decline, while significance was noted in lowering of ALT (MK, AST (SA, EC and amylase (SA levels. Statistical significance could not be observed in the change of CK levels at any of examined time points. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31071 i br. TR 31079

  6. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression. PMID:26962942

  7. Susceptibility of bacterial etiological agents to commonly-used antimicrobial agents in children with sepsis at the Tamale Teaching Hospital

    Acquah, Samuel EK; Quaye, Lawrence; Sagoe, Kenneth; Juventus B. Ziem; Bromberger, Patricia I; Amponsem, Anthony A

    2013-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infections in neonates and infants are life-threatening emergencies. Identification of the common bacteria causing such infections and their susceptibility patterns will provide necessary information for timely intervention. This study is aimed at determining the susceptibilities of bacterial etiological agents to commonly-used antimicrobial agents for empirical treatment of suspected bacterial septicaemia in children. Methods This is a hospital based retrospective anal...

  8. A prospective treatment for sepsis

    Shahidi Bonjar, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Mohammad Rashid Shahidi Bonjar,1 Leyla Shahidi Bonjar2 1School of Dentistry, 2College of Pharmacy, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran Abstract: The present paper proposes a prospective auxiliary treatment for sepsis. There exists no record in the published media on the subject. As an auxiliary therapy, efficacious extracorporeal removal of sepsis-causing bacterial antigens and their toxins (BATs) from the blood of septic patients is discussed. The principa...

  9. A prospective treatment for sepsis

    Shahidi Bonjar MR; Shahidi Bonjar L

    2015-01-01

    Mohammad Rashid Shahidi Bonjar,1 Leyla Shahidi Bonjar2 1School of Dentistry, 2College of Pharmacy, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran Abstract: The present paper proposes a prospective auxiliary treatment for sepsis. There exists no record in the published media on the subject. As an auxiliary therapy, efficacious extracorporeal removal of sepsis-causing bacterial antigens and their toxins (BATs) from the blood of septic patients is discussed. The principal compon...

  10. Bedside Evaluation of Cerebral Energy Metabolism in Severe Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Schulz, Mette; Jacobsen, Anne;

    2015-01-01

    this technique may separate ischemia and non-ischemic mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study is a retrospective interpretation of biochemical data obtained in a series of patients with severe community-acquired meningitis. METHODS: Cerebral energy metabolism was monitored in 15 patients with...... severe community-acquired meningitis utilizing intracerebral microdialysis and bedside biochemical analysis. According to previous studies, cerebral ischemia was defined as lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio >30 with intracerebral pyruvate level <70 µmol L(-1). Non-ischemic mitochondrial dysfunction was defined...... 5 patients classified as non-ischemic mitochondrial dysfunction, and in 2 patients (3 catheters) classified as ischemia. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with severe community-acquired meningitis, compromised cerebral energy metabolism occurs frequently and was diagnosed in 7 out of 15 cases. A biochemical...

  11. The risk of acquiring bacterial meningitis following surgery in Denmark, 1996-2009

    Howitz, M F; Homøe, P

    2014-01-01

    procedure; second, we scrutinized notified bacterial meningitis cases to see if the clinician suspected a surgical procedure to be the aetiology. We found that ear, nose and throat surgery had an 11-fold, and neurosurgery a sevenfold, increased risk compared to the reference group in the first 10 days...

  12. Clinical evaluation of the role of ceftaroline in the management of community acquired bacterial pneumonia

    Maselli DJ

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Diego J Maselli1, Juan F Fernandez1, Christine Y Whong2, Kelly Echevarria1,3, Anoop M Nambiar1,3, Antonio Anzueto1,3, Marcos I Restrepo1,3,41University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, 2Memorial Hermann – Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, 3South Texas Veterans Health Care System Audie l Murphy Division, San Antonio, TX, 4Veterans Evidence Research Dissemination and Implementation Center (VERDICT, San Antonio, TX, USAAbstract: Ceftaroline fosamil (ceftaroline was recently approved for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and complicated skin infections. This newly developed cephalosporin possesses a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Most importantly, ceftaroline demonstrates potent in vitro antimicrobial activity against multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. In two Phase III, double-blinded, randomized, prospective trials (FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2, ceftaroline was shown to be non-inferior to ceftriaxone for the treatment of CAP in hospitalized patients. Ceftaroline exhibits low resistance rates and a safety profile similar to that of other cephalosporins. In this review, we will evaluate the pharmacological characteristics, safety, antimicrobial properties, and efficacy of ceftaroline and its applications in the treatment of CAP.Keywords: s. pneumoniae, s. aureus, cephalosporins, pneumonia, ceftaroline, community acquired pneumonia

  13. Clinical evaluation of the role of ceftaroline in the management of community acquired bacterial pneumonia

    Maselli, Diego J; Fernandez, Juan F; Whong, Christine Y; Echevarria, Kelly; Nambiar, Anoop M; Anzueto, Antonio; Restrepo, Marcos I

    2012-01-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil (ceftaroline) was recently approved for the treatment of community- acquired pneumonia (CAP) and complicated skin infections. This newly developed cephalosporin possesses a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Most importantly, ceftaroline demonstrates potent in vitro antimicrobial activity against multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. In two Phase III, double-blinded, randomized, prospective trials (FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2), ceftaroline was shown to be non-inferior to ceftriaxone for the treatment of CAP in hospitalized patients. Ceftaroline exhibits low resistance rates and a safety profile similar to that of other cephalosporins. In this review, we will evaluate the pharmacological characteristics, safety, antimicrobial properties, and efficacy of ceftaroline and its applications in the treatment of CAP. PMID:22355258

  14. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    Jones, Travis M; Johnson, Steven W; DiMondi, V Paul; Wilson, Dustin T

    2016-01-01

    JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. PMID:27354817

  15. Current concept of abdominal sepsis: WSES position paper

    Sartelli, Massimo; Catena, Fausto; Di Saverio, Salomone; Ansaloni, Luca; Malangoni, Mark; Moore, Ernest E; Moore, Frederick A; Ivatury, Rao; Coimbra, Raul; Leppaniemi, Ari; Biffl, Walter; Kluger, Yoram; Fraga, Gustavo P; Ordonez, Carlos A.; Marwah, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Although sepsis is a systemic process, the pathophysiological cascade of events may vary from region to region. Abdominal sepsis represents the host’s systemic inflammatory response to bacterial peritonitis. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality rates, and is the second most common cause of sepsis-related mortality in the intensive care unit. The review focuses on sepsis in the specific setting of severe peritonitis.

  16. Cytokines as diagnostic biomarkers in canine pyometra and sepsis

    Karlsson, Iulia

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a syndrome with high morbidity, mortality and astronomical health care costs and it is challenging to diagnose both in humans and animals due to the lack of suitable diagnostic biomarkers. Although several types of proteins have been suggested as diagnostic biomarkers of sepsis, none of them were shown to be reliable for routine use in the clinical practice. Dogs with uterine bacterial infection called pyometra often develop sepsis and have been suggested as a natural model of sepsi...

  17. Bacterial Meningitis

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... serious disease. Laboratory Methods for the Diagnosis of Meningitis This manual summarizes laboratory methods used to isolate, ...

  18. Model of sepsis (Caecal Ligation and Puncture in rats caused by mixed and pure bacterial cultures and changes in white blood cell counts

    Stojanović Dragica

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of leucocytes and immunocompetent cells, was investigated during a clinical form of sepsis in rats. The experiments were carried out on 104 male rats, Wistar strain, of body weight 190 to 240 g. The rats were divided into four groups: three with 28 animals and one control group with 20 animals. The animals were killed 12, 24, 72 or 120 hours after surgical intervention. This consisted of caecal ligation and puncture (CLP, with inoculation of mixed bacteria or pure cultures of Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus. They induced similar changes in the total leukocyte counts and percentages of different white blood cells. The significant leucopenia in the first half (early sepsis of the examined period preceded significant leukosis in the rats with sepsis in the second half of the experiment (late sepsis. Also there were significant alterations in the numbers of granulocytes and agranulocytes. Neutrophilia and lymphopenia dominated during the whole period.

  19. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    Jones TM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Travis M Jones,1,2 Steven W Johnson,1,3 V Paul DiMondi,1,4 Dustin T Wilson,1,2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Campbell University, Buies Creek, 2Department of Pharmacy, Duke University Hospital, Durham, 3Department of Pharmacy, Forsyth Medical Center, Novant Health, Winston-Salem, 4Department of Pharmacy, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. Keywords: JNJ-Q2, fluoroquinolone, ABSSSI, CABP, MRSA

  20. Therapy-refractory Panton Valentine Leukocidin-positive community-acquired methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus sepsis with progressive metastatic soft tissue infection: a case report

    Schefold Joerg C

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of fulminant multiple organ failure including the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS, haemodynamic, and renal failure due to community-acquired methicillin-sensitive Panton Valentine Leukocidin (PVL positive spa-type 284 (ST121 Staphylococcus aureus septic shock. The patient's first clinical symptom was necrotizing pneumonia. Despite organism-sensitive triple antibiotic therapy with linezolid, imipenem and clindamycin from the first day of treatment, progressive abscess formation in multiple skeletal muscles was observed. As a result, repeated surgical interventions became necessary. Due to progressive soft tissue infection, the anti-microbial therapy was changed to a combination of clindamycin and daptomycin. Continued surgical and antimicrobial therapy finally led to a stabilisation of the patients' condition. The clinical course of our patient underlines the existence of a "PVL-syndrome" which is independent of in vitro Staphylococcus aureus susceptibility. The PVL-syndrome should not only be considered in patients with soft tissue or bone infection, but also in patients with pneumonia. Such a condition, which may easily be mistaken for uncomplicated pneumonia, should be treated early, aggressively and over a long period of time in order to avoid relapsing infection.

  1. Differential Paradigms in Animal Models of Sepsis.

    Kingsley, S Manoj Kumar; Bhat, B Vishnu

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is a serious clinical problem involving complex mechanisms which requires better understanding and insight. Animal models of sepsis have played a major role in providing insight into the complex pathophysiology of sepsis. There have been various animal models of sepsis with different paradigms. Endotoxin, bacterial infusion, cecal ligation and puncture, and colon ascendens stent peritonitis models are the commonly practiced methods at present. Each of these models has their own advantages and also confounding factors. We have discussed the underlying mechanisms regulating each of these models along with possible reasons why each model failed to translate into the clinic. In animal models, the timing of development of the hemodynamic phases and the varied cytokine patterns could not accurately resemble the progression of clinical sepsis. More often, the exuberant and transient pro-inflammatory cytokine response is only focused in most models. Immunosuppression and apoptosis in the later phase of sepsis have been found to cause more damage than the initial acute phase of sepsis. Likewise, better understanding of the existing models of sepsis could help us create a more relevant model which could provide solution to the currently failed clinical trials in sepsis. PMID:27432263

  2. Atrofia mucosa/translocação bacteriana na sepse experimental em ratos Wistar Mucosal atrophy/bacterial translocation in experimental sepsis in Wistar rats

    Armando José d'Acampora

    2004-10-01

    jejunum were processed histologically for morphometric measure of the total thickness of the jejujum's wall in comparison to the thickness of the mucosa + submucosa layer. RESULTS: In blood culture, there was growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli in 90% and 52,5% of the animals, respectively. In the peritoneal culture, there was growth of P aeruginosa, E.coli and Klebsiella sp in 87,5%, 85% and 5% of the animals. About the histological analysis and the thickness of the mucosa + submucosa's layer, there was not significant alteration. CONCLUSION: Acute sepsis did not develop any thickness alteration in the small intestine's mucosa layer. Bacterial translocation can not be a direct consequence produced by mucosal intestinal injury.

  3. Neonatal sepsis

    Angelica Dessì

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper on neonatal sepsis, after a short presentation of etiopathogenesis and physiopathology, we will briefly present the clinical picture, the diagnosis and the therapy. Concerning diagnosis, we will focus our attention on procalcitonin (PCT, serum amyloid A (SAA, presepsin (sCD14 and metabolomics. Three practical tables complete the review. Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  4. Endotoxin dosage in sepsis

    Vincenzo Rondinelli

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endotoxin, a component of the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of septic shock and multiple organ failure (MOF. Its entry into the bloodstream stimulates monocytes/macrophages which once activated produce and release cytokines, nitric oxide and other mediators that induce systemic inflammation, endothelial damage, organ dysfunction, hypotension (shock and MOF.The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of a quantitative test for the dosage of endotoxin to determine the risk of severe Gram-negative sepsis. Materials and methods. In the period January 2009 - June 2011 we performed 897 tests for 765 patients, mostly coming from the emergency room and intensive care, of which 328 (43% women (mean age 53 and 437 (57% male (mean age 49. Fifty-nine patients, no statistically significant difference in sex, were monitored by an average of two determinations of EA.All patients had procalcitonin values significantly altered.The kit used was EAA (Endotoxin Activity Assay Estor Company, Milan, which has three ranges of endotoxin activity (EA: low risk of sepsis if <0.40 units, medium if between 0.40 and 0.59; high if 0.60. Results. 78 out of 765 patients (10% had a low risk, 447 (58% a medium risk and 240 (32% a high risk.The dosage of EA, combined with that of procalcitonin, has allowed a more targeted antibiotic therapy. Six patients in serious clinical conditions were treated by direct hemoperfusion with Toraymyxin, a device comprising a housing containing a fiber polypropylene and polystyrene with surface-bound polymyxin B, an antibiotic that removes bacterial endotoxins from the blood. Conclusions.The test is useful in risk stratification as well as Gram negative sepsis, to set and monitor targeted therapies, also based on the neutralization of endotoxin.

  5. Clinical analysis of cases of neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae sepsis.

    Zeng, S J; Tang, X S; Zhao, W L; Qiu, H X; Wang, H; Feng, Z C

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of antibiotic resistance, pathogenic bacteria have become a major threat in cases of neonatal sepsis; however, guidelines for treatment have not yet been standardized. In this study, 15 cases of neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae sepsis from our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Of these, nine cases showed early-onset and six cases showed late-onset sepsis. Pathogens were characterized by genotyping and antibiotic sensitivity tests on blood cultures. Results demonstrated that in cases with early-onset sepsis, clinical manifestations affected mainly the respiratory tract, while late-onset sepsis was accompanied by intracranial infection. Therefore, we suggest including a cerebrospinal fluid examination when diagnosing neonatal sepsis. Bacterial genotyping indicated the bacteria were mainly type Ib, Ia, and III S. agalactiae. We recommend treatment with penicillin or ampicillin, since bacteria were resistant to clindamycin and tetracycline. In conclusion, our results provide valuable information for the clinical treatment of S. agalactiae sepsis in neonatal infants. PMID:27323190

  6. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran.

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients' medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients' outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  7. Moraxella catarrhalis sepsis

    Paola Gualdi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Moraxella catarrhalis is a Gram-negative aerobic diplococcus, commensal of the oro-pharingeal cavity, actually playing an emerging role in the upper respiratory tract infections together with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. This study reports the case of a twoyearold child who was admitted into hospital with fever, headache and vomit. The chest radiograph showed signs of basal lung involvementmaking the clinical suspicion of bacterial infectionlikely. From blood culture a Moraxella catarrhalis strain was isolated. In young children M. catarrhalis is known to cause otitis media and sinusitis, but only rarely bacteremia. In this case the child showed a clinical picture of lung infection and consequent sepsis due to M. catarrhalis.

  8. Rasio Neutrofil Imatur Dengan Neutrofil Total Dalam Menegakkan Diagnosis Dini Sepsis Bakterialis Pada Neonatus

    Darnifayanti

    2013-01-01

    Background. Bacterial sepsis is the main cause morbidity and mortality in neonates. Early diagnostic and appropriate treatment can reduce the mortality rate. Gold standard to diagnose bacterial sepsis is blood culture, but it needed 3-5 day for the results, but the disease may progress rapidly in neonates. Examination of ratio immature to total neutrophil in peripheral blood smear is a quick and cheaper method to diagnose sepsis bacterial in neonates. Some studies found that sensitivity of ra...

  9. Model of sepsis (Caecal Ligation and Puncture) in rats caused by mixed and pure bacterial cultures and changes in white blood cell counts

    Stojanović Dragica; Ašanin Ružica; Maličević Živorad; Vidić Branka M.

    2004-01-01

    The number of leucocytes and immunocompetent cells, was investigated during a clinical form of sepsis in rats. The experiments were carried out on 104 male rats, Wistar strain, of body weight 190 to 240 g. The rats were divided into four groups: three with 28 animals and one control group with 20 animals. The animals were killed 12, 24, 72 or 120 hours after surgical intervention. This consisted of caecal ligation and puncture (CLP), with inoculation of mixed bacteria or pure cultures of Esch...

  10. Translocation of gut flora and its role in sepsis

    Vaishnavi, C

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial translocation is the invasion of indigenous intestinal bacteria through the gut mucosa to normally sterile tissues and the internal organs. Sometimes instead of bacteria, inflammatory compounds are responsible for clinical symptoms as in systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). The difference between sepsis and SIRS is that pathogenic bacteria are isolated from patients with sepsis but not with those of SIRS. Bacterial translocation occurs more frequently in patients with int...

  11. The clinical utility of induced sputum for the diagnosis of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia in HIV-infected patients: a prospective cross-sectional study

    Rosemeri Maurici da Silva

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial pneumonias have been overcoming pneumocytosis in frequency. Controversy still remains about how to manage immunocompromised patients and those with lung diseases. Sputum analysis is a noninvasive and simple method, and when interpreted according to specific criteria it may help with diagnosis. We conducted a study to evaluate sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predicted values, and the accuracy of induced sputum (IS for bacterial community-acquired pneumonia diagnosis in HIV-positive patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This cross sectional study evaluated a diagnostic procedure in a reference hospital for HIV patients in Florianópolis, SC, Brazil. From January 1, 2001 to September 30, 2002, 547 HIV-positive patients were analyzed and 54 inpatients with pulmonary infection were selected. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB were considered the gold standards. Gram stains and quantitative cultures of IS and BAL were obtained. The cut-offs for quantitative cultures were 10(6 CFU/mL for IS and 10(4 CFU/mL for BAL. RESULTS: The mean age was 35.7 years, 79.6% were males and 85.2% were caucasians. The mean lymphocyte count was 124.8/mm³. Bacterial pneumonia was diagnosed in 20 patients. The most prevalent bacteria was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Considering IS for the diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia, sensitivity was 60%, specificity 40%, the positive predictive value was 80%, negative predictive value 20% and accuracy 56%. CONCLUSION: IS with quantitative culture can be helpful for the diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia in HIV-positive patients.

  12. Hemodynamic Support in Sepsis

    Fatih Yildiz; Emre Karakoc

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is called systemic inflammatory response syndrome due to infection. When added to organs failure and perfusion abnormality is defined in severe sepsis, Hypotension that do not respond to fluid therapy is as defined septic shock. Fluid resuscitation is a most important parts of the treatment in patients with septic shock. Ongoing hypotension that despite of the adequate fluid therapy, vasopressor support initiation is required. Sepsis and septic shock, hemodynamic support is often under...

  13. Advances in understanding sepsis

    Shimaoka, M.; Park, E J

    2008-01-01

    Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, is a leading cause of death in intensive care units. Recent investigations into the pathogenesis of sepsis reveal a biphasic inflammatory process. An early phase is characterized by pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. tumour necrosis factor-α), whereas a late phase is mediated by an inflammatory high-mobility group box 1 and an anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. Inflammation aberrantly activates coagulation cascades as sepsis progresses. This...

  14. Postoperative Immundepression und Sepsis

    Hinrichs, Carl

    2010-01-01

    With an incidence of about 200/100 000 citizens per year is sepsis one of the most frequent diseases in Germany. Despite of progress in the treatment of sepsis, lethality still remains high. The development of sepsis is characterized by a dysbalance of pro- and antiinflammatory mechanisms due to invading microorganisms. Resulting from this dysregulation of the immune sytem, the host defense against pathogens often is impaired. Similar immunologic changes can be found not only after infection ...

  15. Animal models of sepsis

    Fink, Mitchell P.

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis remains a common, serious, and heterogeneous clinical entity that is difficult to define adequately. Despite its importance as a public health problem, efforts to develop and gain regulatory approval for a specific therapeutic agent for the adjuvant treatment of sepsis have been remarkably unsuccessful. One step in the critical pathway for the development of a new agent for adjuvant treatment of sepsis is evaluation in an appropriate animal model of the human condition. Unfortunately, ...

  16. Joint inversion of crosshole radar and seismic traveltimes acquired at the South Oyster BacterialTransport Site

    Linde, Niklas; Tryggvason, Ari; Peterson, John; Hubbard, Susan

    2008-04-15

    The structural approach to joint inversion, entailing common boundaries or gradients, offers a flexible way to invert diverse types of surface-based and/or crosshole geophysical data. The cross-gradients function has been introduced as a means to construct models in which spatial changes in two models are parallel or anti-parallel. Inversion methods that use such structural constraints also provide estimates of non-linear and non-unique field-scale relationships between model parameters. Here, we invert jointly crosshole radar and seismic traveltimes for structurally similar models using an iterative non-linear traveltime tomography algorithm. Application of the inversion scheme to synthetic data demonstrates that it better resolves lithological boundaries than the individual inversions. Tests of the scheme on observed radar and seismic data acquired within a shallow aquifer illustrate that the resultant models have improved correlations with flowmeter data than with models based on individual inversions. The highest correlation with the flowmeter data is obtained when the joint inversion is combined with a stochastic regularization operator, where the vertical integral scale is estimated from the flowmeter data. Point-spread functions shows that the most significant resolution improvements of the joint inversion is in the horizontal direction.

  17. Revising definitions of sepsis

    Drewry, Anne M; Hotchkiss, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional definition of sepsis requires the presence of at least two systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria in addition to a suspected or proven infection. A recent large retrospective study, however, suggests that the requirement for two SIRS criteria excludes one in eight patients with severe sepsis.

  18. Frequency of escherichia coli in patients with community acquired urinary tract infection and their resistance pattern against some commonly used anti bacterials

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a very common health problem and Escherichia coli (E coli) are the most common organisms associated with community acquired UTI. Unfortunately these bacteria have developed extensive resistance against most of the commonly used anti-bacterials. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and resistance pattern of E coli in patients of community acquired UTI in an area in northern part of Pakistan. Methods: Urine specimens were collected from patients who were clinically diagnosed as community acquired UTI. Urine routine examination (Urine RE) was done and samples positive for UTI (Pus cells >10/High Power Field) were included in the study. These samples were inoculated on Eosin Methylene Blue (EMB) agar plates and incubated at 37 degree C for 36 hours. Suspected colonies were then inoculated further on EMB plates for pure cultures of E coli characterized by certain morphological characteristics. IMViC was applied for the confirmation of E coli. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility tests of E coli were performed with standardized commercial susceptibility discs (OXOID). Results: Out of 50 specimens, positive for UTI by urine RE, 20 showed pure growth of E coli on culture (40%). The majority of the isolates (28%; n=14) were from women while only 12% (n=6) were from men. Escherichia coli showed a high rate of resistance towards Ampicillin (90%), Tetracycline (70%), Erythromycin (70%) and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (55%). Sparfloxacin showed better results (45%) than ciprofloxacin (50%). Out of 20 E coli isolates, two (10%) were resistant to all the antibacterials except chloramphenicol, eight isolates (40%) showed resistance to six or more than six while 14 (70%) were resistant to four or more than four drugs. Conclusion: Rate of resistance of E coli against commonly used antibacterials was quite high and majority of the strains showed multidrug resistance. (author)

  19. Diabetes does not influence activation of coagulation, fibrinolysis or anticoagulant pathways in Gram-negative sepsis (melioidosis)

    G.C.K.W. Koh; J.C.M. Meijers; R.R. Maude; D. Limmathurotsakul; N.P.J. Day; S.J. Peacock; T. van der Poll; W.J. Wiersinga

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a disturbance of the haemostatic balance and is an important risk factor for sepsis, but the influence of diabetes on the pathogenesis of sepsis remains unclear. Melioidosis (Burkholderia pseudomallei infection) is a common cause of community-acquired sepsis in Southeast

  20. Etiology and antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial pathogens responsible for community-acquired urinary tract infections in Poland.

    Stefaniuk, E; Suchocka, U; Bosacka, K; Hryniewicz, W

    2016-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are some of the most common infections in both community and hospital settings infections. With their high rate of incidence, recurrence, complications, diverse etiologic agents, as well as growing antibiotic resistance, UTIs have proven to be a serious challenge for medical professionals. The aim of this study was to obtain data on the susceptibility patterns of pathogens responsible for UTIs in Poland to currently used antibiotics. A total of 396 bacterial isolates were collected between March and May 2013 from 41 centers in all regions of Poland. The majority of isolates were from adult patients (96.2 %); 144 (37.8 %) patients were diagnosed with uncomplicated UTI, while the remaining 237 (62.2 %) had a complicated infection. The most prevalent pathogen was Escherichia coli (71.4 %), followed by Klebsiella spp. (10.8 %) and the Proteae group (7.6 %). Escherichia coli was responsible for 80.6 % of cases of uncomplicated and 65.8 % of complicated infections. Only 65.8 % of E. coli isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin (uncomplicated 75.9 %, complicated 58.3 %), 64.0 % to nitrofurantoin (67.2 %, 62.8 %), 65.1 % to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (68.1 %, 62.8 %), and 66.4 % to fosfomycin (77.6 %, 62.2 %). Among E. coli isolates from all UTIs, only 43.4 % were susceptible to ampicillin, with 47.4 % from uncomplicated compared with 40.4 % from complicated infections; 88.2 % to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (91.4 % vs. 85.9 % complicated); 90.1 % to cefuroxime (93.1 %, 87.8 %); and 94.1 % to cefotaxime (98.2 %, 91.0 %). Thirty-five strains (10.4 %) were capable of producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). This study demonstrates an increase in multidrug-resistant strains, especially among the leading pathogens associated with UTIs, including E. coli, Klebsiella spp., and Proteus spp. PMID:27189078

  1. Detection of respiratory viral and bacterial pathogens causing pediatric community-acquired pneumonia in Beijing using real-time PCR

    Tie-Gang Zhang; Ai-Hua Li; Min Lyu; Meng Chen; Fang Huang; Jiang Wu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the etiology and prevalence of pediatric CAP in Beijing using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Methods: Between February 15, 2011 and January 18, 2012, 371 pediatric patients with CAP were enrolled at Beijing Children's Hospital. Sixteen respiratory viruses and two bacteria were detected from tracheal aspirate specimens using commercially available multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) kits. Results: A single viral pathogen was detected in 35.3%of enrolled patients, multiple viruses in 11.6%, and virus/bacteria co-infection in 17.8%. In contrast, only 6.5%of patients had a single bacterial pathogen and 2.2%were infected with multiple bacteria. The etiological agent was unknown for 26.7% of patients. The most common viruses were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (43.9%), rhinovirus (14.8%), parainfluenza virus (9.4%), and adenovirus (8.6%). In patients under three years of age, RSV (44.6%), rhinovirus (12.8%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (9.9%) were the most frequent pathogens. In children aged 3e7 years, S. pneumoniae (38.9%), RSV (30.6%), Haemophilus influenzae (19.4%), and adenovirus (19.4%) were most prevalent. Finally in children over seven years, RSV (47.3%), S. pneumoniae (41.9%), and rhinovirus (21.5%) infections were most frequent. Conclusions: Viral pathogens, specifically RSV, were responsible for the majority of CAP in pediatric patients. However, both S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae contributed as major causes of disease. Commercially available multiplexing real-time PCR allowed for rapid detection of the etiological agent. Copyright © 2015, Chinese Medical Association Production. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of KeAi Communications Co., Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  2. PROCALCITONIN AS A MARKER FOR EARLY DIAGNOSIS OF SEPSIS

    Rahim Raoofi; Zahra Salmani; Fatemh Moradi; Abdolrerza Sotoodeh; Saeed Sobhanian

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a critical condition often caused by bacterial infection and associated with death and mortality. The prognosis of this disease depends on early diagnosis and proper treatment. Definite diagnosis of sepsis is positive blood culture and this test needs a long time to perform, so other biochemical parameters such as procalcitonin serum level has been introduced. To determine sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of procalcitonin serum level at first time and...

  3. Membrane TLR Signaling Mechanisms in the Gastrointestinal Tract during Sepsis

    Buchholz, Bettina M.; Bauer, Anthony J

    2010-01-01

    Our bacterial residents are deadly Janus-faced indwellers which can lead to a septic-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ failure. Over half of ICU patients suffer from infections and sepsis remains among the top ten causes of death in the United States. Severe ileus frequently accompanies sepsis setting up an insidious cycle of gut-derived microbial translocation and the copious intestinal production of potent systemic inflammatory mediators. Few therapeutic adv...

  4. New biomarkers for sepsis

    Li-xin XIE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a higher sepsis rate in the intensive care unit (ICU patients, which is one of the most important causes for patient death, but the sepsis lacks specific clinical manifestations. Exploring sensitive and specific molecular markers for infection that accurately reflect infection severity and prognosis is very clinically important. In this article, based on our previous study, we introduce some new biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis and predicting the prognosis and severity of sepsis. Increase of serum soluble(s triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1 suggests a poor prognosis of septic patients, and changes of locus rs2234237 of sTREM-1 may be the one of important mechanisms. Additionally, urine sTREM-1 can provide an early warning of possible secondary acute kidney injury (AKI in sepsis patients. Serum sCD163 level was found to be a more important factor than procalcitonin (PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP in prognosis of sepsis, especially severe sepsis. Moreover, urine sCD163 also shows excellent performance in the diagnosis of sepsis and sepsis-associated AKI. Circulating microRNAs, such as miR-150, miR-297, miR-574-5p, miR -146a , miR-223, miR -15a and miR-16, also play important roles in the evaluation of status of septic patients. In the foreseeable future, newly-emerging technologies, including proteomics, metabonomics and trans-omics, may exert profound effects on the discovery of valuable biomarkers for sepsis.

  5. Sepsis and membrane receptors

    段朝霞; 朱佩芳; 蒋建新

    2005-01-01

    @@ Sepsis and septic shock remains to be the major clinical problem for infectious disease specialists although our understanding of the pathophysiology of this syndrome has been improved greatly over the past 5 years.

  6. Hemodynamic Support in Sepsis

    Fatih Yildiz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is called systemic inflammatory response syndrome due to infection. When added to organs failure and perfusion abnormality is defined in severe sepsis, Hypotension that do not respond to fluid therapy is as defined septic shock. Fluid resuscitation is a most important parts of the treatment in patients with septic shock. Ongoing hypotension that despite of the adequate fluid therapy, vasopressor support initiation is required. Sepsis and septic shock, hemodynamic support is often understood as the hemodynamic support. The different approaches to the development of methods to track and objective comes up. Patients with severe sepsis and septic shock should be follow in the intensive care unit and rapid fluid replacement and effectual hemodynamic support should be provided.

  7. All that seems sepsis is not sepsis

    Vivek S Guleria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (CAPS resembles severe sepsis in its acute presentation, with features of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS leading to multiple organ dysfunction. Infections are the best known triggers of CAPS. This emphasizes the need for early diagnosis and aggressive treatment as the mortality is as high as 50%. We present a 42-year-old woman who developed SIRS postoperatively and was eventually diagnosed as CAPS.

  8. Experimental models of sepsis and septic shock: an overview

    Garrido Alejandra G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients and trauma victims, mainly due to sepsis-induced multiple organ dysfunction. In contrast to preclinical studies, most clinical trials of promising new treatment strategies for sepsis have fails to demonstrate efficacy. Although many reasons could account for this discrepancy, the misinterpretation of preclinical data obtained from experimental studies, and especially the use of animal models that do not adequately mimic human sepsis may have been contributing factors. In this review, the benefits and limitations of various animal models of sepsis are discussed to clarify the extend to which findings are relevant to human sepsis, particularly with respect to the subsequent design and execution of clinical trials. Such models include intravascular infusion of endotoxin or live bacteria, bacterial peritonitis, cecal ligation and perforation, soft tissue infection, pneumonia or meningitis models, using different animal species including rats, mice, rabbits, dogs, pigs, sheep and nonhuman primates. Despite several limitations, animal models remain essential in the development of all new therapies for sepsis and septic shock, because they provide fundamental information about the pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and mechanism of drug action that cannot be duplicated by other methods. New therapeutic agents should be studies in infection models, even after the initiation of the septic process. Furthermore, debility conditions need to be reproduced to avoid the exclusive use of healthy animals, which often do not represent the human septic patient.

  9. Harmful molecular mechanisms in sepsis

    Rittirsch, Daniel; Flierl, Michael A; Ward, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Sepsis and sepsis-associated multi-organ failure are major challenges for scientists and clinicians and are a tremendous burden for health-care systems. Despite extensive basic research and clinical studies, the pathophysiology of sepsis is still poorly understood. We are now beginning to understand that sepsis is a heterogeneous, dynamic syndrome caused by imbalances in the ‘inflammatory network’. In this Review, we highlight recent insights into the molecular interactions that occur during ...

  10. "Neonatal Sepsis due to Klebsiella: Frequency, Outcome and Antibiotic Sensitivity"

    E Malakan Rad

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. The most common pathogens of bacterial sepsis and antibiotic sensitivity patterns vary in different parts of the world. The aim of this study was to determine the most common pathogens and outcome of neonatal sepsis and also antibiotic sensitivity patterns of Klebsiella species. A retrospective descriptive study was carried out. The study was performed at a neonatal care unit in Kashan between October 2000 to October 2003.Only those neonates with positive blood culture were included. Patients with Klebsiella septicemia were categorized into two groups of early and late-onset sepsis. Patterns of the antibiotic resistance of the bacterial isolates were studied by disc diffusion technique. Frequencies and Fisher’s Exact test was used to compare the early-onset outcome versus late –onset outcome. One hundred and thirty –six neonates had positive blood cultures out of 453 cases. The most common pathogens were Pseudomonas, Klebsiella and coagulase negative Staphylococci respectively. Overall crude mortality rate was 39% (Pseudomonas was the predominant cause. All Klebsiella species were resistant to ampicillin. Twenty-three percent of Klebsiella species were multiresistant considering our most common etiologic pathogens of bacterial sepsis and the significant number of resistant bacteria to ampicillin and gentamicin; it seems prudent to consider revising the present choice of empirical antibiotic treatment.

  11. The UK joint specialist societies guideline on the diagnosis and management of acute meningitis and meningococcal sepsis in immunocompetent adults.

    McGill, F; Heyderman, R S; Michael, B D; Defres, S; Beeching, N J; Borrow, R; Glennie, L; Gaillemin, O; Wyncoll, D; Kaczmarski, E; Nadel, S; Thwaites, G; Cohen, J; Davies, N W S; Miller, A; Rhodes, A; Read, R C; Solomon, T

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial meningitis and meningococcal sepsis are rare conditions with high case fatality rates. Early recognition and prompt treatment saves lives. In 1999 the British Infection Society produced a consensus statement for the management of immunocompetent adults with meningitis and meningococcal sepsis. Since 1999 there have been many changes. We therefore set out to produce revised guidelines which provide a standardised evidence-based approach to the management of acute community acquired meningitis and meningococcal sepsis in adults. A working party consisting of infectious diseases physicians, neurologists, acute physicians, intensivists, microbiologists, public health experts and patient group representatives was formed. Key questions were identified and the literature reviewed. All recommendations were graded and agreed upon by the working party. The guidelines, which for the first time include viral meningitis, are written in accordance with the AGREE 2 tool and recommendations graded according to the GRADE system. Main changes from the original statement include the indications for pre-hospital antibiotics, timing of the lumbar puncture and the indications for neuroimaging. The list of investigations has been updated and more emphasis is placed on molecular diagnosis. Approaches to both antibiotic and steroid therapy have been revised. Several recommendations have been given regarding the follow-up of patients. PMID:26845731

  12. Nutrition and sepsis.

    Cohen, Jonathan; Chin, w Dat N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of nutritional support in critically ill patients with sepsis has received much attention in recent years. However, many of the studies have produced conflicting results. As for all critically ill patients, nutritional support, preferably via the enteral route, should be commenced once initial resuscitation and adequate perfusion pressure is achieved. Where enteral feeding is impossible or not tolerated, parenteral nutrition (either as total or complimentary therapy) may safely be administered. Most positive studies relating to nutritional support and sepsis have been in the setting of sepsis prevention. Thus, the administration of standard nutrition formulas to critically ill patients within 24 h of injury or intensive care unit admission may decrease the incidence of pneumonia. Both arginine-supplemented enteral diets, given in the perioperative period, and glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition have been shown to decrease infections in surgical patients. Parenteral fish oil lipid emulsions as well as probiotics given in the perioperative period may also reduce infections in patients undergoing major abdominal operations, such as liver transplantation. There is little support at the present time for the positive effect of specific pharmaconutrients, in particular fish oil, probiotics, or antioxidants, in the setting of established sepsis. More studies are clearly required on larger numbers of more homogeneous groups of patients. PMID:23075593

  13. Glucocorticosteroids for sepsis

    Volbeda, M; Wetterslev, J; Gluud, C;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Glucocorticosteroids (steroids) are widely used for sepsis patients. However, the potential benefits and harms of both high and low dose steroids remain unclear. A systematic review of randomised clinical trials with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis (TSA) might shed light...

  14. Sepsis: pathophysiology and clinical management.

    Gotts, Jeffrey E; Matthay, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock represent increasingly severe systemic inflammatory responses to infection. Sepsis is common in the aging population, and it disproportionately affects patients with cancer and underlying immunosuppression. In its most severe form, sepsis causes multiple organ dysfunction that can produce a state of chronic critical illness characterized by severe immune dysfunction and catabolism. Much has been learnt about the pathogenesis of sepsis at the molecular, cell, and intact organ level. Despite uncertainties in hemodynamic management and several treatments that have failed in clinical trials, investigational therapies increasingly target sepsis induced organ and immune dysfunction. Outcomes in sepsis have greatly improved overall, probably because of an enhanced focus on early diagnosis and fluid resuscitation, the rapid delivery of effective antibiotics, and other improvements in supportive care for critically ill patients. These improvements include lung protective ventilation, more judicious use of blood products, and strategies to reduce nosocomial infections. PMID:27217054

  15. Pathogen diagnosis of children sepsis by LAMP technology

    Yu-Cai Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore a rapid diagnostic method in neonatal sepsis and bacterial meningitis. Methods:The primers were designed and synthesized based on16S rRNA gene of Staphylococcus aureus.Four specimens ofStaphylococcus aureus,16 specimens of coagulase-negativeStaphylococci,2 specimens ofEnterococci,3 specimens ofStreptococcus,1 specimen ofMicrococcus,3 specimens ofEscherichia coli,4 specimens ofKlebsiella pneumoniae,3 specimens ofPseudomonas aeruginosa,2 specimens ofEnterobacter cloacae, and5 specimens of Acinetobacterwere tested by loop-mediated isothermal amplification(LAMP) assay.A total of118 clinical specimens of sepsis and non-sepsis were collected and detected with bothLAMP assay and blood culture.Results:By designing primers specific forStaphylococcus aureus, specimens containing different kinds of pathogens were carried out byLAMP assay, and our data showed LAMP technology for the specific detection ofStaphylococcus aureus in samples was successfully established.All clinical specimens of sepsis and non-sepsis were tested by both blood cultures andLAMP, and our data showed that compared wit blood culture method, theLAMP technology showed significantly high detection rate(P <0.01).Conclusions:As a quick and easy detection ofStaphylococcus aureus, theLAMP technology was successfully established, laid the foundation for the diagnosis and treatment of childrenStaphylococcus aureus sepsis, and showed great promotion and application value.

  16. Prevalence of Multidrug Resistant Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Gram-Negative Bacteria in Neonatal Sepsis

    Ali Peirovifar; Mohammad Ahangarzadeh Rezaee; Manizheh Mostafa Gharehbaghi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Neonatal sepsis with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing microorganisms is recognized increasingly in recent years. ESBL can be produced by various bacterial strains. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of ESBL producing pathogens in neonatal sepsis and its impact on clinical outcome. Materials and Methods: A study was carried out from Jan 2012 to Jan 2013 in a referral university hospital. All neonates who had diagnosed as sepsis were enrolled in...

  17. Myocardial protection in sepsis

    Shakar, Simon; Brian D Lowes

    2008-01-01

    Sepsis with myocardial dysfunction is seen commonly. Beta-blockers have been used successfully to treat chronic heart failure based on the premise that chronically elevated adrenergic drive is detrimental to the myocardium. However, recent reports on the acute use of beta-blockers in situations with potential hemodynamic compromise have shown the risks associated with this approach. In critical situations, the main effect of adrenergic activation is to support cardiovascular function. Caution...

  18. ERCP Related Sepsis

    Iffet Palabıyıkoglu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic procedures performed worldwide have increased considerably in recent years. In addition to diagnosis, many cases previously necessitating surgery now often can be carried out by endoscopic techniques. However, endoscopy has introduced its own infection risk. Most reports of gastrointestinal endoscopy-associated infection describe sepsis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP in patients with biliary tract obstruction. During this study, which was conducted by Infection Control Committee of Ankara University Hospital, 13 out of 1147 (1.1% and 17 out of 922 patients (1.8% had ERCP related sepsis in 2002 and 2003 respectively, at the ERCP Unit of Gastroenterology Department. Sepsis-caused mortality were 23.1 and 29.4% in 2002 and 2003 respectively. The first four causative agents were Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp, Klebsiella spp and Enterobacter spp. Type and frequency of the causative agents remind that both endogenous and exogenous mechanisms are together responsible for the infections emerging from ERCP Unit. Besides, increasing isolation of Pseudomonas spp. brings out the strong need for re-evaluation of infection control measures, mainly effective cleansing and disinfection of endoscopes.

  19. Intranasal vaccination with adjuvant-free S. aureus antigens effectively protects mice against experimental sepsis.

    Stegmiller, Nataly Pescinalli; Barcelos, Estevão Carlos; Leal, Janine Miranda; Covre, Luciana Polaco; Donatele, Dirlei Molinari; de Matos Guedes, Herbet Leonel; Cunegundes, Marco Cesar; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Gomes, Daniel Cláudio Oliviera

    2016-06-24

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a Gram-positive coccal bacterium comprising part of the human skin, nares and gastrointestinal tract normal microbiota. It is also an important cause of nosocomial/community-acquired infections in humans and animals, which can cause a diverse array of infections, including sepsis, which is a progressive systemic inflammation response syndrome that is frequently fatal. The emergence of drug-resistant strains and the high toxicity of the treatments used for these infections point out the need to develop an effective, inexpensive and safe vaccine that can be used prophylactically. In this work, we used an experimental sepsis model to evaluate the effectiveness of whole antigens from S. aureus (SaAg) given by the intranasal route to induce protective immunity against S. aureus infection in mice. BALB/c mice were vaccinated via intranasal or intramuscular route with two doses of SaAg, followed by biocompatibility and immunogenicity evaluations. Vaccinated animals did not show any adverse effects associated with the vaccine, as determined by transaminase and creatinine measurements. Intranasal, but not intramuscular vaccination with SaAg led to a significant reduction in IL-10 production and was associated with increased level of IFN-γ and NO. SaAg intranasal vaccination was able to prime cellular and humoral immune responses and inducing a higher proliferation index and increased production of specific IgG1/IgG2, which contributed to decrease the bacterial load in both liver and the spleen and improve survival during sepsis. These findings present the first evidence of the effectiveness of whole Ag intranasal-based vaccine administration, which expands the vaccination possibilities against S. aureus infection. PMID:27091687

  20. Development of Immunopathobiogenesis on SIRS-Sepsis

    A Guntur Hermawan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, sepsis has been diagnosed according to consensus guidelines established in 1991 as an infection in addition to the symptoms of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS. In addition to the previous criteria, the 2001 conference added several new diagnostic criteria for sepsis. Of particular interest was the inclusion of the biomarkers procalcitonin (PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP, despite the overall conclusion that it was premature to use biomarkers for sepsis diagnosis. The primary recommendation of the panel was the implementation of the Predisposition, insult Infection, Response, and Organ dysfunction (PIRO.The immune system has traditionally been devided into innate and adaptive components, each of which has a different role and function in defending the host against infectious agents. Stimulation of different TLRs induces distinct patterns of gene expression, which not only leads to the activation of innate immunity but also increasing evidence supports an additional critical role for TLRs in orchestrating the development of adaptive immune responses. The superantigens are able to induce toxic shock syndrome and can sometimes cause multiple organ failure via adaptive immune system. The superantigenic activity of the bacterial exotoxins can be attributed to their ability to cross-link major histocompatibility complex class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells outside the peptide groove with T-cell receptors to form a trimolecular complex. This trimolecular interaction leads to uncontrolled release of a number of proinflammatory cytokines. Proinflammatory cytokines especially IFN-γ and TNF-α, the key cytokines causing toxic shock syndrome. KEYWORDS: sepsis, innate immunity, adaptive.

  1. Maternal Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    Chebbo, Ahmad; Tan, Susanna; Kassis, Christelle; Tamura, Leslie; Carlson, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    The year 2015 marked the 200th anniversary of the birth of Ignaz Semmelweis, the Hungarian physician who identified unhygienic practices of physicians as a major cause of childbed fever or puerperal sepsis. Although such practices have largely disappeared as a factor in the development of chorioamnionitis and postpartum or puerperal endometritis, it is appropriate that this article on sepsis in pregnancy acknowledges his contributions to maternal health. This review describes the incidence and mortality of sepsis in pregnancy, methods to identify and define sepsis in this population, including scoring systems, causes, and sites of infection during pregnancy and parturition and management guidelines. PMID:26600449

  2. Unrevealing culture-negative severe sepsis

    de Prost, Nicolas; Razazi, Keyvan; Brun-Buisson, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis involves a wide array of sources and microorganisms, only a fraction of which are microbiologically documented. Culture-negative sepsis poses special diagnostic challenges to both clinicians and microbiologists and further questions the validity of sepsis definitions.

  3. New paradigms in sepsis: from prevention to protection of failing microcirculation.

    Hawiger, J; Veach, R A; Zienkiewicz, J

    2015-10-01

    Sepsis, also known as septicemia, is one of the 10 leading causes of death worldwide. The rising tide of sepsis due to bacterial, fungal and viral infections cannot be stemmed by current antimicrobial therapies and supportive measures. New paradigms for the mechanism and resolution of sepsis and consequences for sepsis survivors are emerging. Consistent with Benjamin Franklin's dictum 'an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure', sepsis can be prevented by vaccinations against pneumococci and meningococci. Recently, the NIH NHLBI Panel redefined sepsis as 'severe endothelial dysfunction syndrome in response to intravascular and extravascular infections causing reversible or irreversible injury to the microcirculation responsible for multiple organ failure'. Microvascular endothelial injury underlies sepsis-associated hypotension, edema, disseminated intravascular coagulation, acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury. Microbial genome products trigger 'genome wars' in sepsis that reprogram the human genome and culminate in a 'genomic storm' in blood and vascular cells. Sepsis can be averted experimentally by endothelial cytoprotection through targeting nuclear signaling that mediates inflammation and deranged metabolism. Endothelial 'rheostats' (e.g. inhibitors of NF-κB, A20 protein, CRADD/RAIDD protein and microRNAs) regulate endothelial signaling. Physiologic 'extinguishers' (e.g. suppressor of cytokine signaling 3) can be replenished through intracellular protein therapy. Lipid mediators (e.g. resolvin D1) hasten sepsis resolution. As sepsis cases rose from 387 330 in 1996 to 1.1 million in 2011, and are estimated to reach 2 million by 2020 in the US, mortality due to sepsis approaches that of heart attacks and exceeds deaths from stroke. More preventive vaccines and therapeutic measures are urgently needed. PMID:26190521

  4. Alcoholic leukopenic pneumococcal sepsis.

    Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Shaheen, Khaldoon; Alraies, M Chadi

    2013-04-01

    Alcohol abuse has been associated with an increased mortality and morbidity due to increased aspiration, delirium tremens, and seizures. The association of pneumococcal lung infections and leukopenia in the setting of alcohol abuse are rarely reported; however, when present, severe lung infections can happen with severe lung injury and poor response to conventional therapy and ultimately, death. We are reporting a case of 55-year-old-man presented with shortness of breath, cough and altered mental status and eventually found with severe pneumococcal lung infection in the setting of leukopenia and long-term alcohol abuse representing alcoholic leukopenic pneumococcal sepsis syndrome. PMID:23930244

  5. Highly Efficient F, Cu doped TiO2 anti-bacterial visible light active photocatalytic coatings to combat hospital-acquired infections

    Leyland, Nigel S.; Podporska-Carroll, Joanna; Browne, John; Hinder, Steven J.; Quilty, Brid; Pillai, Suresh C.

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial infections are a major threat to the health of patients in healthcare facilities including hospitals. One of the major causes of patient morbidity is infection with Staphylococcus aureus. One of the the most dominant nosocomial bacteria, Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been reported to survive on hospital surfaces (e.g. privacy window glasses) for up to 5 months. None of the current anti-bacterial technology is efficient in eliminating Staphylococcus aureus. A novel transparent, immobilised and superhydrophilic coating of titanium dioxide, co-doped with fluorine and copper has been prepared on float glass substrates. Antibacterial activity has demonstrated (by using Staphylococcus aureus), resulting from a combination of visible light activated (VLA) photocatalysis and copper ion toxicity. Co-doping with copper and fluorine has been shown to improve the performance of the coating, relative to a purely fluorine-doped VLA photocatalyst. Reductions in bacterial population of log10 = 4.2 under visible light irradiation and log10 = 1.8 in darkness have been achieved, compared with log10 = 1.8 under visible light irradiation and no activity, for a purely fluorine-doped titania. Generation of reactive oxygen species from the photocatalytic coatings is the major factor that significantly reduces the bacterial growth on the glass surfaces.

  6. [Indication of neuro-imaging for the initial management and the follow-up of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis].

    Béquet, D; de Broucker, T

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar puncture is the best way to prove bacterial meningitis. It should be performed without any delay if the diagnosis is suspected. Herniation is a rare complication of LP. CT is normal in most cases of purulent meningitis, including those complicated by a subsequent herniation; normal CT results does not mean that performing a LP is safe. Three main clinical features can help determine which patient is at risk of herniation and should have a CT before LP. This risk has to be determined rapidly in the emergency ward while assessing anamnestic data, localization signs or symptoms, and level of consciousness. Cranial imaging (mainly MRI) is useful in the course of bacterial meningitis. Patients who do not respond well to treatment or with atypical presentation, persistence of fever, or new neurological signs should undergo brain imaging; MRI and CT may identify subdural effusions, brain abscesses, empyemas, hydrocephaly, or brain parenchymal changes (cerebritis, infarction, hemorrhage). CT and MRI are useful to screen for an ENT cause of bacterial meningitis, and mandatory in case of pneumococcal meningitis. Numerous MRI sequences are useful to identify bacterial meningitis complications: SE T1 without and with gadolinium injection, SE T2, FLAIR, gradient-echo T2, diffusion weighted imaging, MR angiography. PMID:19398288

  7. Development of an anti-endotoxin vaccine for sepsis.

    Cross, Alan S

    2010-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) is an important initiator of sepsis, a clinical syndrome that is a leading cause of death in intensive care units. Vaccines directed against core LPS structures that are widely conserved among Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) have been developed for the treatment and/or prevention of sepsis. Killed whole bacterial vaccines (E. coli O111:B4, J5 [Rc chemotype] mutant and S. minnesota, Re chemotype) protected mice against experimental sepsis. Human J5 immune antisera reduced the mortality from GNB sepsis in a large controlled clinical trial; however, subsequent clinical studies with antiendotoxin antibodies did not demonstrate protective efficacy in sepsis. Multiple clinical studies have since demonstrated a correlation between the level of circulating antibodies to LPS core and morbidity and mortality in different clinical settings. We therefore developed a subunit vaccine by combining detoxified J5 LPS (J5 dLPS) with the outer membrane protein (OMP) from group B N. meningitidis. This vaccine was highly efficacious in experimental models of sepsis and progressed to phase 1 clinical trial. While well-tolerated, this vaccine induced only 3-4-fold increases in anti-J5 dLPS antibody. Addition of the TLR9 agonist, oligodeoxynucleotide with a CpG motif, as adjuvant to the vaccine increased antibody levels in mice and the vaccine/CpG combination will progress to phase 1 human study. Additional vaccines in which the core glycolipid was either conjugated to carrier protein or incorporated into liposomes have been developed, but have not progressed to clinical trial. Should an antiendotoxin vaccine become available, a new immunization strategy directed towards distinct populations at risk will be required. PMID:20593272

  8. Predicting treatment failure in severe sepsis and septic shock: looking for the Holy Grail

    2013-01-01

    Procalcitonin has been proposed as a specific biomarker of bacterial infections and has been related to the severity of sepsis. The prognostic ability of the initial concentrations of procalcitonin in sepsis is controversial. Some studies find higher initial concentrations in non-survivors but others find no differences. Prognostic assessment based on follow-up of procalcitonin levels may be better than evaluation of the initial levels of procalcitonin. The persistence of elevated procalcitonin levels is indicative of poor prognosis and is associated with mortality. Procalcitonin kinetics could be a tool for assessing the evolution of severe sepsis and sepsis shock. Procalcitonin should find its place as a biomarker for predicting treatment failure of severe sepsis and septic shock. PMID:24004571

  9. Role of Pore-Forming Toxins in Neonatal Sepsis

    Andreas F.-P. Sonnen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein toxins are important virulence factors contributing to neonatal sepsis. The major pathogens of neonatal sepsis, group B Streptococci, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, secrete toxins of different molecular nature, which are key for defining the disease. Amongst these toxins are pore-forming exotoxins that are expressed as soluble monomers prior to engagement of the target cell membrane with subsequent formation of an aqueous membrane pore. Membrane pore formation is not only a means for immediate lysis of the targeted cell but also a general mechanism that contributes to penetration of epithelial barriers and evasion of the immune system, thus creating survival niches for the pathogens. Pore-forming toxins, however, can also contribute to the induction of inflammation and hence to the manifestation of sepsis. Clearly, pore-forming toxins are not the sole factors that drive sepsis progression, but they often act in concert with other bacterial effectors, especially in the initial stages of neonatal sepsis manifestation.

  10. PROCALCITONIN AS A MARKER FOR EARLY DIAGNOSIS OF SEPSIS

    Rahim Raoofi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a critical condition often caused by bacterial infection and associated with death and mortality. The prognosis of this disease depends on early diagnosis and proper treatment. Definite diagnosis of sepsis is positive blood culture and this test needs a long time to perform, so other biochemical parameters such as procalcitonin serum level has been introduced. To determine sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of procalcitonin serum level at first time and 72 h after admission and to compare it with blood culture test for diagnosis of sepsis. Blood sample for blood culture, prepheral blood smear at first time and procalcitonin serum level measuring by semi quantitative method at first and 72 h after admission were sampled. Nine patients had positive blood cultures. Peripheral blood smear was positive in 38 patients, (29 patients: gram stain positive, 6 patients: gram stain negative and 3 patients: both gram positive and gram negative. At first time 76.8% had positive procalcitonin (>0.5 ng mL-1 and after 72 h 65% of patients had positive procalcitonin. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of procalcitonin at the first time were 100, 16,16 and 100% and for procalcitonin after 72 h respectively were 75, 35, 15 and 90%. This study showed that sensitivity of procalcitonin serum level can be used for diagnosis of sepsis. Procalcitonin increased as severity of sepsis and this study suggests high serum level of procalcitonin after 72 h might indicate poor outcome.

  11. Neonatal sepsis by Campylobacter jejuni : Genetically proven transmission from a household puppy

    Wolfs, TFW; Duim, B; Geelen, SPM; Rigter, A; Thomson-Carter, F; Fleer, A; Wagenaar, JA

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of neonatal Campylobacter jejuni sepsis in a 3-week-old infant who acquired the infection through transmission from a recently acquired household puppy. Genotyping of Campylobacter strains obtained from puppy and child resulted in highly homogenous findings. This represents the firs

  12. Etiology and antibacterial susceptibility pattern of community-acquired bacterial ocular infections in a tertiary eye care hospital in south India

    Bharathi M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To identify the etiology, incidence and prevalence of ocular bacterial infections, and to assess the in vitro susceptibility of these ocular bacterial isolates to commonly used antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of consecutive samples submitted for microbiological evaluation from patients who were clinically diagnosed with ocular infections and were treated at a tertiary eye care referral center in South India between January 2002 and December 2007. Results: A total of 4417 ocular samples was submitted for microbiological evaluation, of which 2599 (58.8% had bacterial growth, 456 (10.3% had fungal growth, 15 (0.34% had acanthamoebic growth, 14 (0.32% had mixed microbial growth and the remaining 1333 (30.2% had negative growth. The rate of culture-positivity was found to be 88% (P < 0.001 in eyelids′ infection, 70% in conjunctival, 69% in lacrimal apparatus, 67.4% in corneal, 51.6% in intraocular tissues, 42.9% in orbital and 39.2% in scleral infections. The most common bacterial species isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (26.69% followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (22.14%. Sta. aureus was more prevalent more in eyelid infections (51.22%; P = 0.001 coagulase-negative staphylococci in endophthalmitis (53.1%; P = 0.001, Str. pneumoniae in lacrimal apparatus and corneal infections (64.19%; P = 0.001, Corynebacterium species in blepharitis and conjunctivitis (71%; P = 0.001, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in keratitis and dacryocystitis (66.5%; P = 0.001, Haemophilus species in dacryocystitis and conjunctivitis (66.7%; P = 0.001, Moraxella lacunata in blepharitis (54.17%; P = 0.001 and Moraxella catarrhalis in dacryocystitis (63.83%; P = 0.001. The largest number of gram-positive isolates was susceptible to moxifloxacin (98.7% and vancomycin (97.9%, and gram-negative isolates to amikacin (93.5% and gatifloxacin (92.7%. Conclusions: Gram-positive cocci were the most frequent bacteria isolated from ocular infections and were

  13. Epidemiology of sepsis in Norway in 1999

    Flaatten, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis and severe sepsis are asociated with high hospital mortality. Little is known about the occurrence of sepsis in general hospital populations. The goal of the present study was to reveal the epidemiology of sepsis in Norwegian hospitals over 1 year. Methods Patients admitted to all Norwegian hospitals during 1999 (n = 700,107) were analyzed by searching the database of the Norwegian Patient Registry for markers of sepsis, using International Classification of Diseases (ICD)...

  14. Gasmin (BV2-5), a polydnaviral-acquired gene in Spodoptera exigua. Trade-off in the defense against bacterial and viral infections.

    Gasmi, Laila; Jakubowska, Agata K; Herrero, Salvador

    2016-03-01

    Thousands of Hymenopteran endoparasitoids have developed a unique symbiotic relationship with viruses named polydnavirus (PDVs). These viruses immunocompromise the lepidopteran host allowing the survival of the wasp eggs. In a previous work, we have shown the horizontal transfer of some polydnaviral genes into the genome of the Lepidoptera, Spodoptera exigua. One of these genes, BV2-5 (named gasmin) interferes with actin polymerization, negatively affecting the multiplication of baculovirus in cell culture. In this work, we have focused in the study of the effect of Gasmin expression on different aspects of the baculovirus production. In addition, and since actin polymerization is crucial for phagocytosis, we have studied the effect of Gasmin expression on the larval interaction with bacterial pathogens. Over-expression of Gasmin on hemocytes significantly reduces their capacity to phagocytize the pathogenic bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis. According to these results, gasmin domestication negatively affects baculovirus replication, but increases larvae susceptibility to bacterial infections as pay off. Although the effect of Gasmin on the insect interaction with other pathogens or parasitoids remain unknown, the opposite effects described here could shape the biological history of this species based on the abundance of certain type of pathogens as suggested by the presence of truncated forms of this protein in several regions of the world. PMID:26658027

  15. Radiologic findings of neonatal sepsis

    To review the simple radiographic and sonographic findings in infants with neonatal sepsis. We retrospectively analyzed simple chest and abdominal radiographs, and brain sonograms in 36 newborn infants (preterm : term=23 :13). With neonatal sepsis diagnosed by blood culture and clinical manifestations. Pulmonary parenchymal infiltrate excluding respiratory distress syndrome and pulmonary edema or atelectasis was found in 22 infants (61%). Paralytic ileus, hepatosplenomegaly, and necrotizing enterocolitis were present in 18(50%), 9(25%), and 1(3%) infants, respectively, while skeletal changes suggesting osteomyelitis were found in three. Brain sonography was performed in 29 infants and in four, abnormalities were seen ; these comprised three germinal matrix hemorrhages and one intraparenchymal hemorrhage. In six patients(17%) radiologic examinations revealed no abnormality. In patients with neonatal sepsis, pulmonary infiltrates and paralytic ileus were common abnormalities. Although these were nonspecific, radiologic findings may be used to supplement clinical and laboratory findings in diagnosing neonatal sepsis and planning its treatment

  16. Radiologic findings of neonatal sepsis

    Kim, Sam Soo; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Guk Myeong; Jung, Hye Won [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hye Kyung; Han, Bokyung Kim; Lee, Nam Yong [Sansung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    To review the simple radiographic and sonographic findings in infants with neonatal sepsis. We retrospectively analyzed simple chest and abdominal radiographs, and brain sonograms in 36 newborn infants (preterm : term=23 :13). With neonatal sepsis diagnosed by blood culture and clinical manifestations. Pulmonary parenchymal infiltrate excluding respiratory distress syndrome and pulmonary edema or atelectasis was found in 22 infants (61%). Paralytic ileus, hepatosplenomegaly, and necrotizing enterocolitis were present in 18(50%), 9(25%), and 1(3%) infants, respectively, while skeletal changes suggesting osteomyelitis were found in three. Brain sonography was performed in 29 infants and in four, abnormalities were seen ; these comprised three germinal matrix hemorrhages and one intraparenchymal hemorrhage. In six patients(17%) radiologic examinations revealed no abnormality. In patients with neonatal sepsis, pulmonary infiltrates and paralytic ileus were common abnormalities. Although these were nonspecific, radiologic findings may be used to supplement clinical and laboratory findings in diagnosing neonatal sepsis and planning its treatment.

  17. Membrane TLR signaling mechanisms in the gastrointestinal tract during sepsis.

    Buchholz, B M; Bauer, A J

    2010-03-01

    Our bacterial residents are deadly Janus-faced indwellers that can lead to a sepsis-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ failure. Over half of ICU patients suffer from infections and sepsis remains one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide. Severe ileus frequently accompanies sepsis setting up an insidious cycle of gut-derived microbial translocation and the copious intestinal production of potent systemic inflammatory mediators. Few therapeutic advances have occurred to prevent/treat the sequelae of sepsis. Here, we selectively review studies on cellular membrane-bound Toll-like receptor (TLR) mechanisms of ileus. Virtually, no data exist on Gram-positive/TLR2 signaling mechanisms of ileus; however, TLR2 is highly inducible by numerous inflammatory mediators and studies using clinically relevant scenarios of Gram-positive sepsis are needed. Specific Gram-negative/TLR4 signaling pathways are being elucidated using a 'reverse engineering' approach, which has revealed that endotoxin-induced ileus is dually mediated by classical leukocyte signaling and by a MyD88-dependent non-bone marrow-derived mechanism, but the specific roles of individual cell populations are still unknown. Like TLR2, little is also know of the role of flagellin/TLR5 signaling in ileus. But, much can be learned by understanding TLR signaling in other systems. Clearly, the use of polymicrobial models provides important clinical relevancy, but the simultaneous activation of virtually all pattern recognition receptors makes it impossible to discretely study specific pathways. We believe that the dissection of individual TLR pathways within the gastrointestinal tract, which can then be intelligently reassembled in a meaningful manner, will provide insight into treatments for sepsis. PMID:20377787

  18. Optical detection of sepsis markers using liquid crystal based biosensors

    McCamley, Maureen K.; Artenstein, Andrew W.; Opal, Steven M.; Crawford, Gregory P.

    2007-02-01

    A liquid crystal based biosensor for the detection and diagnosis of sepsis is currently in development. Sepsis, a major clinical syndrome with a significant public health burden in the US due to a large elderly population, is the systemic response of the body to a localized infection and is defined as the combination of pathologic infection and physiological changes. Bacterial infections are responsible for 90% of cases of sepsis in the US. Currently there is no bedside diagnostic available to positively identify sepsis. The basic detection scheme employed in a liquid crystal biosensor contains attributes that would find value in a clinical setting, especially for the early detection of sepsis. Utilizing the unique properties of liquid crystals, such as birefringence, a bedside diagnostic is in development which will optically report the presence of biomolecules. In a septic patient, an endotoxin known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is released from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and can be found in the blood stream. It is hypothesized that this long chained molecule will cause local disruptions to the open surface of a sensor containing aligned liquid crystal. The bulk liquid crystal ampli.es these local changes at the surface due to the presence of the sepsis marker, providing an optical readout through polarizing microscopy images. Liquid crystal sensors consisting of both square and circular grids, 100-200 μm in size, have been fabricated and filled with a common liquid crystal material, 5CB. Homeotropic alignment was confirmed using polarizing microscopy. The grids were then contacted with either saline only (control), or saline with varying concentrations of LPS. Changes in the con.guration of the nematic director of the liquid crystal were observed through the range of concentrations tested (5mg/mL - 1pg/mL) which have been confirmed by a consulting physician as clinically relevant levels.

  19. Management of Community -Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Children%社区获得性急性细菌性脑膜炎患儿的管理

    郭虎; 郑帼

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis(BM) is a common pediatric infectious disease of the nervous system,which often affect the psychomotor development of children, the correct diagnosis and treatment had always been a challenge. The United States, Europe, Canada, France, England had issued guidelines for the management of BM in 2004 - 2010, which were important reference value for guiding clinicians dealing with BM.%细菌性脑膜炎(BM)是小儿常见的神经系统感染性疾病之一,常影响小儿精神运动发育,其正确的诊断和治疗一直是个挑战;美国、欧洲、加拿大、法国、英国先后于2004 - 2010年发布了BM治疗指南,对于指导临床医师处理BM有重要的参考价值.

  20. Acquired Techniques

    Lunde Nielsen, Espen; Halse, Karianne

    2013-01-01

    Acquired Techniques - a Leap into the Archive, at Aarhus School of Architecture. In collaboration with Karianne Halse, James Martin and Mika K. Friis. Following the footsteps of past travelers this is a journey into tools and techniques of the architectural process. The workshop will focus upon...

  1. Acquired blepharoptosis

    Oosterhuis, HJGH

    1996-01-01

    A review is given of the aetiology and possible treatment of acquired (non-congenital) blepharoptosis, which is a common but not specific sign of neurological disease: The diagnostic categories of upper eyelid drooping are scheduled as (a) pseudo-ptosis due to a local process or overactivity of eye

  2. Oral ofloxacin therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis in mice after irradiation

    Death subsequent to whole-body irradiation is associated with gram-negative bacterial sepsis. The effect of oral therapy with the new quinolone ofloxacin for orally acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection was tested in B6D2F1 mice exposed to 7.0 Gy of bilateral radiation from 60Co. A dose of 10(7) organisms was given orally 2 days after irradiation, and therapy was started 1 day later. Only 4 of 20 untreated mice (20%) survived for at least 30 days compared with 19 of 20 mice (95%) treated with ofloxacin (P less than 0.005). P. aeruginosa was isolated from the livers of 21 to 28 untreated mice (75%), compared with only 2 of 30 treated mice (P less than 0.005). Ofloxacin reduced colonization of the ileum by P. aeruginosa; 24 of 28 untreated mice (86%) harbored the organisms, compared with only 5 of 30 (17%) with ofloxacin (P less than 0.005). This experiment was replicated twice, and similar results were obtained. These data illustrate the efficacy of the quinolone ofloxacin for oral therapy of orally acquired P. aeruginosa infection in irradiated hosts

  3. Oral ofloxacin therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis in mice after irradiation

    Brook, I.; Ledney, G.D. (Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Death subsequent to whole-body irradiation is associated with gram-negative bacterial sepsis. The effect of oral therapy with the new quinolone ofloxacin for orally acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection was tested in B6D2F1 mice exposed to 7.0 Gy of bilateral radiation from 60Co. A dose of 10(7) organisms was given orally 2 days after irradiation, and therapy was started 1 day later. Only 4 of 20 untreated mice (20%) survived for at least 30 days compared with 19 of 20 mice (95%) treated with ofloxacin (P less than 0.005). P. aeruginosa was isolated from the livers of 21 to 28 untreated mice (75%), compared with only 2 of 30 treated mice (P less than 0.005). Ofloxacin reduced colonization of the ileum by P. aeruginosa; 24 of 28 untreated mice (86%) harbored the organisms, compared with only 5 of 30 (17%) with ofloxacin (P less than 0.005). This experiment was replicated twice, and similar results were obtained. These data illustrate the efficacy of the quinolone ofloxacin for oral therapy of orally acquired P. aeruginosa infection in irradiated hosts.

  4. Reactivation of multiple viruses in patients with sepsis.

    Andrew H Walton

    Full Text Available A current controversy is whether patients with sepsis progress to an immunosuppressed state. We hypothesized that reactivation of latent viruses occurred with prolonged sepsis thereby providing evidence of clinically-relevant immunosuppression and potentially providing a means to serially-monitor patients' immune status. Secondly, if viral loads are markedly elevated, they may contribute to morbidity and mortality. This study determined if reactivation of herpesviruses, polyomaviruses, and the anellovirus TTV occurred in sepsis and correlated with severity. Serial whole blood and plasma samples from 560 critically-ill septic, 161 critically-ill non-septic, and 164 healthy age-matched patients were analyzed by quantitative-polymerase-chain-reaction for cytomegalovirus (CMV, Epstein-Barr (EBV, herpes-simplex (HSV, human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6, and TTV. Polyomaviruses BK and JC were quantitated in urine. Detectable virus was analyzed with respect to secondary fungal and opportunistic bacterial infections, ICU duration, severity of illness, and survival. Patients with protracted sepsis had markedly increased frequency of detectable virus. Cumulative viral DNA detection rates in blood were: CMV (24.2%, EBV (53.2%, HSV (14.1%, HHV-6 (10.4%, and TTV (77.5%. 42.7% of septic patients had presence of two or more viruses. The 50% detection rate for herpesviruses was 5-8 days after sepsis onset. A small subgroup of septic patients had markedly elevated viral loads (>104-106 DNA copies/ml blood for CMV, EBV, and HSV. Excluding TTV, DNAemia was uncommon in critically-ill non-septic patients and in age-matched healthy controls. Compared to septic patients without DNAemia, septic patients with viremia had increased fungal and opportunistic bacterial infections. Patients with detectable CMV in plasma had higher 90-day mortality compared to CMV-negative patients; p<0.05. Reactivation of latent viruses is common with prolonged sepsis, with frequencies similar to

  5. A comparison of high-mobility group-box 1 protein, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and procalcitonin in severe community-acquired infections and bacteraemia: a prospective study

    Gaïni, Shahin; Koldkjaer, Ole G; Møller, Holger J;

    2008-01-01

    immune response when the host is challenged by bacterial pathogens. Procalcitonin (PCT) has been suggested as a marker of severe bacterial infections and sepsis. The aim of the present study was to investigate levels of HMGB1, LBP and PCT in a well-characterised sepsis cohort. The study plan included...

  6. Improving the Odds of Surviving Sepsis

    ... Science Home Page Improving the Odds of Surviving Sepsis By Carolyn Beans Posted August 18, 2014 A ... it quickly and reduce its later effects. Detecting Sepsis Early Researchers aim to develop a tool that ...

  7. Fast Action Can Prevent Sepsis Death: CDC

    ... fullstory_160574.html Fast Action Can Prevent Sepsis Death: CDC Know the signs of extreme response to ... treated long before it causes severe illness or death, U.S. health officials report. Sepsis, or septicemia, occurs ...

  8. Procalcitonin as a marker of neonatal sepsis

    Nazeer Ahmad Jeergal; Rizwan-u-zama; Naushad Ali .N. Malagi; Faisal Farooqui; Sadashiva .B. Ukkali; Ravindra Naganoor; A.N. Thobbi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Neonatal sepsis is one of the commonest causes of neonatal mortality in the developing world. Procalcitonin (PCT) has emerged as the most studied and promising sepsis biomarker. Objective: To assess the role of procalcitonin (PCT) as a marker in the early diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of neonatal sepsis. Methods: Twenty five neonates with clinical (n=5), suspected (n=13) and proven sepsis (n=7) were evaluated. The PCT levels were measured by immunoluminoassay before and on ...

  9. Histological changes in neonatal sepsis

    Eleonora Obinu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most significant causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality is represented by neonatal sepsis that often manifests itself as a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS. The progression of SIRS usually leads to multiple organ dysfunction, occasionally culminating in multiple organ failure (MOF. The loss of endothelial barrier represents the unifying lesion of multiple organs in newborns affected by sepsis and the most important pathological change responsible for the evolution toward MOF in neonates. The aim of this study is to present the most important pathological changes occurring in neonatal sepsis.  Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  10. Bench-to-bedside review: the role of nitric oxide in sepsis.

    De Cruz, Sharon J; Kenyon, Nicholas J; Sandrock, Christian E

    2009-10-01

    Sepsis is a state of systemic inflammation directed at microbes or their toxins in blood or tissues. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of many vasoactive molecules released from a variety of cell types during sepsis. Almost two decades ago, NO emerged as a potential therapeutic target in sepsis. NO produced by the constitutive NO synthase (NOS) isoform (endothelial NOS and neuronal NOS) in the vascular endothelium and elsewhere acts as a nonadrenergic, noncholinergic neurotransmitter, an inhibitor of platelet aggregation and a vasodilator. During sepsis, activation of inducible NOS (iNOS) in the lung epithelium and other organs occurs, leading to NO overproduction. The result of excessive circulating NO is enhanced bacterial destruction, but also profound vasodilatation, activation of inflammatory cascades and depression of cardiac function. Trials of nonselective NOS inhibitors have shown increased mean arterial pressure, but also increased pulmonary artery pressure and reduced cardiac output. Small animal studies of iNOS selective inhibition have produced dichotomous results, but larger clinical studies assessing mortality are lacking. Inhaled NO has been touted as a therapeutic option to improve systemic oxygenation in the acute lung injury of sepsis (hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and pulmonary hypertension); however, studies of inhaled NO in acute respiratory distress syndrome have not shown survival efficacy. Further investigation into the role of NO in human sepsis, and the development of methods to assess NO balance in patients with sepsis is essential in this field. In this review, we outline the effects of NO in sepsis, and summarize the therapeutic outcomes of NOS inhibitors, and inhaled NO in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:20477340

  11. Characterization and modulation of the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis.

    Muenzer, Jared T; Davis, Christopher G; Chang, Kathy; Schmidt, Robert E; Dunne, W Michael; Coopersmith, Craig M; Hotchkiss, Richard S

    2010-04-01

    Sepsis continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Studies of patients and animal models have revealed that changes in the immune response during sepsis play a decisive role in the outcome. Using a clinically relevant two-hit model of sepsis, i.e., cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) followed by the induction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia, we characterized the host immune response. Second, AS101 [ammonium trichloro(dioxoethylene-o,o')tellurate], a compound that blocks interleukin 10 (IL-10), a key mediator of immunosuppression in sepsis, was tested for its ability to reverse immunoparalysis and improve survival. Mice subjected to pneumonia following CLP had different survival rates depending upon the timing of the secondary injury. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa at 4 days post-CLP had approximately 40% survival, whereas animals challenged at 7 days had 85% survival. This improvement in survival was associated with decreased lymphocyte apoptosis, restoration of innate cell populations, increased proinflammatory cytokines, and restoration of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production by stimulated splenocytes. These animals also showed significantly less P. aeruginosa growth from blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Importantly, AS101 improved survival after secondary injury 4 days following CLP. This increased survival was associated with many of the same findings observed in the 7-day group, i.e., restoration of IFN-gamma production, increased proinflammatory cytokines, and decreased bacterial growth. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that immunosuppression following initial septic insult increases susceptibility to secondary infection. However, by 7 days post-CLP, the host's immune system has recovered sufficiently to mount an effective immune response. Modulation of the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis may aid in the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:20100863

  12. Scintigraphic evaluation in musculoskeletal sepsis

    In this article, the mechanism of technetium, gallium, and indium-labeled white blood cell localization in septic processes is detailed, and the method of interpretation of these three isotopes with relationship to musculoskeletal infection is outlined. Specific clinical application of technetium, gallium, and indium-labeled white blood cell imaging for musculoskeletal sepsis is reviewed

  13. Diagnosing sepsis - The role of laboratory medicine.

    Fan, Shu-Ling; Miller, Nancy S; Lee, John; Remick, Daniel G

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is the host response to microbial pathogens resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. An accurate and timely diagnosis of sepsis allows prompt and appropriate treatment. This review discusses laboratory testing for sepsis because differentiating systemic inflammation from infection is challenging. Procalcitonin (PCT) is currently an FDA approved test to aid in the diagnosis of sepsis but with questionable efficacy. However, studies support the use of PCT for antibiotic de-escalation. Serial lactate measurements have been recommended for monitoring treatment efficacy as part of sepsis bundles. The 2016 sepsis consensus definitions include lactate concentrations >2mmol/L (>18mg/dL) as part of the definition of septic shock. Also included in the 2016 definitions are measuring bilirubin and creatinine to determine progression of organ failure indicating worse prognosis. Hematologic parameters, including a simple white blood cell count and differential, are frequently part of the initial sepsis diagnostic protocols. Several new biomarkers have been proposed to diagnose sepsis or to predict mortality, but they currently lack sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be considered as stand-alone testing. If sepsis is suspected, new technologies and microbiologic assays allow rapid and specific identification of pathogens. In 2016 there is no single laboratory test that accurately diagnoses sepsis. PMID:27387712

  14. Evaluation of procalcitonin for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis of vertical transmission

    López Sastre, José B; Solís, David Pérez; Serradilla, Vicente Roqués; Colomer, Belén Fernández; Cotallo, Gil D Coto

    2007-01-01

    Background The results of recent studies suggest the usefulness of PCT for early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis, with varying results. The aim of this prospective multicenter study was to determine the behavior of serum PCT concentrations in both uninfected and infected neonates, and to assess the value of this marker for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis of vertical transmission. Methods PCT was measured in 827 blood samples collected prospectively from 317 neonates admitted to 13 acute-care teaching hospitals in Spain over one year. Serum PCT concentrations were determined by a specific immunoluminometric assay. The diagnostic efficacy of PCT at birth and within 12–24 h and 36–48 h of life was evaluated calculating the sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio of positive and negative results. Results 169 asymptomatic newborns and 148 symptomatic newborns (confirmed vertical sepsis: 31, vertical clinical sepsis: 38, non-infectious diseases: 79) were studied. In asymptomatic neonates, PCT values at 12–24 h were significantly higher than at birth and at 36–48 h of life. Resuscitation at birth and chorioamnionitis were independently associated to PCT values. Neonates with confirmed vertical sepsis showed significantly higher PCT values than those with clinical sepsis. PCT thresholds for the diagnosis of sepsis were 0.55 ng/mL at birth (sensitivity 75.4%, specificity 72.3%); 4.7 ng/mL within 12–24 h of life (sensitivity 73.8%, specificity 80.8%); and 1.7 ng/mL within 36–48 h of life (sensitivity 77.6%, specificity 79.2%). Conclusion Serum PCT was moderately useful for the detection of sepsis of vertical transmission, and its reliability as a maker of bacterial infection requires specific cutoff values for each evaluation point over the first 48 h of life. PMID:17324267

  15. Hypolipidemia and Sepsis: It is The Hypolipidemia Not The Statins

    Elmehdawi RR

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To The Editor: I read with great interest the correspondence written by Mathew and Daniel [1], who have the same concerns regarding the potential risks of hypolipidemia [2]. However, Mathew and Daniel referred to the recently published systemic review by Falagas and his colleagues [3], who analyzed twenty studies that examined the use of statins in patients with septicemia and other different bacterial and viral infections. They concluded that statins may have a positive role in treatment of patients with sepsis and infection.

  16. Bacterial infections in patients with liver cirrhosis

    Preveden Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Liver cirrhosis is characterized by a reduced defensive reaction to bacterial infections and patients with cirrhosis are at increased risk of developing infections, sepsis and death. The most common bacterial infections in these patients are spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, urinary tract infection, pneumonia, skin and soft tissue infection and bacteremia. The most common causes are Gram negative bacteria. The aim of this study was to determi...

  17. Protective effect of Aloe vera on polymicrobial sepsis in mice.

    Yun, Nari; Lee, Chan-Ho; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2009-06-01

    Sepsis is an acute life-threatening clinical condition and remains the major cause of death in intensive care units. The primary pathophysiologic event central to the septic response is an overwhelming activation of the inflammatory system and countervailing response from the anti-inflammatory system. However, the cause of this perturbation has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we report that Aloe vera therapeutically reverses the lethality induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), a clinically relevant model of sepsis. The administration of Aloe vera ameliorated the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, as evidenced by the serum levels of biochemical parameters and histological changes. In order to investigate the pharmacological mechanism of Aloe vera, the levels of the cytokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and IL-6 were determined by ELISA at various time points. The increases in the levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 were attenuated by Aloe vera.In vivo administration of Aloe vera also markedly enhanced bacterial clearance. Our findings suggest that Aloe vera could be a potential therapeutic agent for the clinical treatment of sepsis. PMID:19298839

  18. Pelvic sepsis after stapled hemorrhoidopexy

    Remco JA van Wensen; Maarten H van Leuken; Koop Bosscha

    2008-01-01

    Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is a surgical procedure used worldwide for the treatment of grade Ⅲ and Ⅳ hemorrhoids in all age groups. However, life-threatening complications occur occasionally. The following case report describes the development of pelvic sepsis after stapled hemorrhoidopexy. A literature review of techniques used to manage major septic complications after stapled hemorrhoidopexy was performed. There is no standardized treatment currently available. Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is a safe, effective and time-efficient procedure in the hands of experienced colorectal surgeons.

  19. Serratia sepsis: a case report

    BAYKAN, Dr.Mahmut; Özerol, Dr. İ. Halil; KART, Dr.Hilal; BAYSAL, Dr.Bülent

    1994-01-01

    We refxirt a case of Serratia sepsis who developed in a boy whom 12 years old. Serratia organizms occur in soil, dairy products, water and sewage, as well as in the intestinal and upper respiratory tract of man and animals. The microorganism was long considered a harmless bacteria, but since 1960, it has been isolated with increasing frequency in human mostly in nosocomial infections. Serratia usually infect patients with debilitating disorders, or under treatment with broad-spectrum antimicr...

  20. The Inflammatory Response in Sepsis

    Bosmann, Markus; Ward, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis and its accompanying systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and the events that lead to multiorgan failure and death are poorly understood. It is known that, in septic humans and rodents, the development of SIRS is associated with a loss of the redox balance, but SIRS can also develop in non-infectious states. In addition, a hyperinflammatory state develops, together with impaired innate immune functions of phagocytes, immunosuppression, and complement ac...

  1. Biosensor of endotoxin and sepsis

    Shao, Yang; Wang, Xiang; Wu, Xi; Gao, Wei; He, Qing-hua; Cai, Shaoxi

    2001-09-01

    To investigate the relation between biosensor of endotoxin and endotoxin of plasma in sepsis. Method: biosensor of endotoxin was designed with technology of quartz crystal microbalance bioaffinity sensor ligand of endotoxin were immobilized by protein A conjugate. When a sample soliton of plasma containing endotoxin 0.01, 0.03, 0.06, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0Eu, treated with perchloric acid and injected into slot of quartz crystal surface respectively, the ligand was released from the surface of quartz crystal to form a more stable complex with endotoxin in solution. The endotoxin concentration corresponded to the weight change on the crystal surface, and caused change of frequency that occurred when desorbed. The result was biosensor of endotoxin might detect endotoxin of plasma in sepsis, measurements range between 0.05Eu and 0.5Eu in the stop flow mode, measurement range between 0.1Eu and 1Eu in the flow mode. The sensor of endotoxin could detect the endotoxin of plasm rapidly, and use for detection sepsis in clinically.

  2. Leptospirosis mimicking sepsis after orthopedic surgery: a case report

    C. S. Abboud

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of leptospirosis that occurred after elective surgery involving tendon transfer and shoulder arthroscopy. The disease mimicked hospital infection after orthopedic surgery and was at first misdiagnosed as post-operative sepsis. The patient was 60 year old female that developed sepsis with hypotension, shock, bleeding, jaundice and renal insufficiency 4 hours after surgery. Shock treatment procedures were performed and broad spectrum antibiotic therapy was used with coverage for bacteria acquired in hospitals. A careful investigation was carried out by the Hospital Infection Control Service in search of the possible source of the infection. After clinical evaluation by a specialist in infectious diseases, the hypothesis of leptospirosis was put forward based on clinical and epidemiological data. The hypothesis was later confirmed by the positive result of serological tests with the microagglutination method that yielded 1:800 and then 1:12,600 7 days later. This is the first reported case of leptospirosis manifest directly following surgery, mimicking postoperative sepsis.

  3. Important role for Toll-like receptor 9 in host defense against meningococcal sepsis

    Sjölinder, Hong; Mogensen, Trine; Kilian, Mogens;

    2008-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of meningitis and sepsis. The pathogenesis of meningococcal disease is determined by both bacterial virulence factors and the host inflammatory response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are prominent activators of the inflammatory response, and TLR2, -4, and -9...... have been reported to be involved in the host response to N. meningitidis. While TLR4 has been suggested to play an important role in early containment of infection, the roles of TLR2 and TLR9 in meningococcal disease are not well described. Using a model for meningococcal sepsis, we report that TLR9...

  4. The analysis of correlation between serum procalcitonin concentration and microbial infectionsin patients with sepsis

    孙胜男

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the diagnostic and predict value of procalcitonin (PCT) in ICU patients with sepsis and the correlation between PCT concentration and positive results of bacterial culture.Methods A total of 278patients with sepsis were admitted into emergency ICU,general ICU and respiratory ICU from October 2011 to September 2012.Of them,193 patients had definite microbial infection evidence.Serum PCT levels among groups of different pathogens were compared.The analysis of correlation between the PCT concentration of the

  5. Candida Sepsis Following Transcervical Chorionic Villi Sampling

    Israel Potasman; Roni Gonen; Alona Paz

    2001-01-01

    Background: The use of invasive devices and broad spectrum antibiotics has increased the rate of candidal superinfections.Candida sepsis associated with pregnancy is rare. Candida sepsis following chorionic villi sampling (CVS) has never been reported. Case: A 31-year-old pregnant woman presented with signs of sepsis one day after undergoing transcervical CVS. Blood culture and curettage material yielded C. albicans. She was treated with 400 mg of fluconazole daily for 4 weeks and completely ...

  6. Mobilization in Severe Sepsis: An Integrative Review

    Govindan, Sushant; Iwashyna, Theodore J.; Odden, Andrew; Flanders, Scott A; Chopra, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis is a leading cause of long-term morbidity in the United States. Up to half of severe sepsis is treated in non-intensive care unit (ICU) settings, making it applicable to hospitalist practice. Evidence has demonstrated benefits from physical therapy (PT) in myriad conditions; whether PT may benefit severe sepsis patients either within or outside the ICU is unknown. Therefore, we conduct a review of the literature to understand whether early mobilization improves outcomes in patie...

  7. Development and Implementation of Sepsis Alert Systems.

    Harrison, Andrew M; Gajic, Ognjen; Pickering, Brian W; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2016-06-01

    Development and implementation of sepsis alert systems is challenging, particularly outside the monitored intensive care unit (ICU) setting. Barriers to wider use of sepsis alerts include evolving clinical definitions of sepsis, information overload, and alert fatigue, due to suboptimal alert performance. Outside the ICU, barriers include differences in health care delivery models, charting behaviors, and availability of electronic data. Current evidence does not support routine use of sepsis alert systems in clinical practice. Continuous improvement in the afferent and efferent aspects will help translate theoretic advantages into measurable patient benefit. PMID:27229639

  8. Procalcitonin as a Marker of Neonatal Sepsis

    Mohmoud Hajiahmadi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis and appropriate treatment decreases the mortality and morbidity of these infants. The aim of this study was to assess the role of procalcitonin (PCT as a marker in the early diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of neonatal sepsis. Methods:Thirty-eight neonates with clinical (n=8, suspected (n=19 and proven sepsis (n=11 were evaluated. The PCT levels were measured by immunoluminoassay before and on day 5 of treatment. PTC levels of 0.5-2 ng/ml, 2.1-10 ng/ml and >10 ng/ml were considered as weakly positive, positive, and strongly positive, respectively. The sepsis screen tests and cultures of blood or other sterile body fluids in these three groups of infants were recorded. Findings:The levels of PCT in proven sepsis group were higher than that in other groups. Strongly positive PTC level was seen in none of 8 cases of clinical sepsis, 4 of 19 suspected and in 10 of 11 cases with proven sepsis. PCT levels were dramatically decreased in three groups on day 5 of treatment. Conclusion:The results show that the serum procalcitonin levels seem to be significantly increased in proven sepsis and decrease dramatically in all types of sepsis after appropriate treatment.

  9. Prospective evaluation of cases with neonatal sepsis

    H Alper Gürsu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: With this prospective study we aimed to evaluate 60 patients with neonatal sepsis. Material and Methods: Between 07 March 2003 and 31 January 2005, the newborns with neonatal sepsis were evaluated for clinical signs and symptoms, complaints, blood culture results, risk factors and mortality. Results: Thirty two (53.4% of 60 patients with sepsis were male and 28(46.6% female. Twenty eight (46.6% had early sepsis, while 32 (53.4% late. The most common complaints were fever, poor sucking reşex and respiratory distress. Depression in newborn reşexes, fever and hypotonia were the most common symptoms. The most common bacteria isolated in blood cultures with early onset sepsis were gram (- bacilli and staphylococci in the group with late onset most common bacteria were staphylococci and gram (- bacilli. The mortality rate was 21.4% and 18.8% in early and late sepsis respectively. Mortality was higher in early onset sepsis whereas meningitis was more frequent in late onset. Mortality in preterms was 24.3%, higher than in terms as 16.1%. Conclusion: Mortality is still high in neonatal sepsis. Prevention of risk factors predisposing to neonatal sepsis, like prematurity and delivery of low birth weight newborns early diagnosis and initiation of treatment, sufficient supportive therapy would help to reduce mortality.

  10. Advances in sepsis-associated liver dysfunction

    Dawei Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed liver dysfunction as an early event in sepsis. Sepsis-associated liver dysfunction is mainly resulted from systemic or microcirculatory disturbances, spillovers of bacteria and endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS, and subsequent activation of inflammatory cytokines as well as mediators. Three main cell types of the liver which contribute to the hepatic response in sepsis are Kupffer cells (KCs, hepatocytes and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs. In addition, activated neutrophils, which are also recruited to the liver and produce potentially destructive enzymes and oxygen-free radicals, may further enhance acute liver injury. The clinical manifestations of sepsis-associated liver dysfunction can roughly be divided into two categories: Hypoxic hepatitis and jaundice. The latter is much more frequent in the context of sepsis. Hepatic failure is traditionally considered as a late manifestation of sepsis-induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. To date, no specific therapeutics for sepsis-associated liver dysfunction are available. Treatment measure is mainly focused on eradication of the underlying infection and management for severe sepsis. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of liver response in sepsis may lead to further increase in survival rates.

  11. Genomic landscape of the individual host response and outcomes in sepsis: a prospective cohort study

    Davenport, Emma E; Burnham, Katie L; Radhakrishnan, Jayachandran; Humburg, Peter; Hutton, Paula; Mills, Tara C; Rautanen, Anna; Gordon, Anthony C; Garrard, Christopher; Hill, Adrian V S; Hinds, Charles J; Knight, Julian C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Effective targeted therapy for sepsis requires an understanding of the heterogeneity in the individual host response to infection. We investigated this heterogeneity by defining interindividual variation in the transcriptome of patients with sepsis and related this to outcome and genetic diversity. Methods We assayed peripheral blood leucocyte global gene expression for a prospective discovery cohort of 265 adult patients admitted to UK intensive care units with sepsis due to community-acquired pneumonia and evidence of organ dysfunction. We then validated our findings in a replication cohort consisting of a further 106 patients. We mapped genomic determinants of variation in gene transcription between patients as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Findings We discovered that following admission to intensive care, transcriptomic analysis of peripheral blood leucocytes defines two distinct sepsis response signatures (SRS1 and SRS2). The presence of SRS1 (detected in 108 [41%] patients in discovery cohort) identifies individuals with an immunosuppressed phenotype that included features of endotoxin tolerance, T-cell exhaustion, and downregulation of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II. SRS1 was associated with higher 14 day mortality than was SRS2 (discovery cohort hazard ratio (HR) 2·4, 95% CI 1·3–4·5, p=0·005; validation cohort HR 2·8, 95% CI 1·5–5·1, p=0·0007). We found that a predictive set of seven genes enabled the classification of patients as SRS1 or SRS2. We identified cis-acting and trans-acting eQTL for key immune and metabolic response genes and sepsis response networks. Sepsis eQTL were enriched in endotoxin-induced epigenetic marks and modulated the individual host response to sepsis, including effects specific to SRS group. We identified regulatory genetic variants involving key mediators of gene networks implicated in the hypoxic response and the switch to glycolysis that occurs in sepsis, including HIF1α and

  12. Sepsis induced immunosuppression: Implications for secondary infections and complications

    Krishna M Sundar; Mazen Sires

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is the commonest cause of admission to medical ICUs across the world. Mortality from sepsis continues to be high. Besides shock and multi-organ dysfunction occurring following the intense inflammatory reaction to sepsis, complications arising from sepsis-related immunoparalysis contribute to the morbidity and mortality from sepsis. This review explores the basis for sepsis related immune dysfunction and discusses its clinical implications for the treating intensivist. Recent trends ind...

  13. Five additions to the list of Sepsidae (Diptera) for Vietnam: Perochaeta cuirassa sp. n., Perochaeta lobo sp. n., Sepsis spura sp. n., Sepsis sepsi Ozerov, 2003 and Sepsis monostigma Thompson, 1869

    Yuchen Ang; Rudolf Meier

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A recent collecting trip to Vietnam yielded three new species and two new records of Sepsidae (Diptera) for the country. Here we describe two new species in the species-poor genus Perochaeta (Perochaeta cuirassa sp. n. andPerochaeta lobo sp. n.) and one to the largest sepsid genus Sepsis (Sepsis spura sp. n.) which is also found in Sumatra and Sulawesi. Two additional Sepsis species are new records for Vietnam (Sepsis sepsi Ozerov, 2003; Sepsis monostigma Thompson, 1869). We conclude...

  14. Regulation of chemokine receptor by Toll-like receptor 2 is critical to neutrophil migration and resistance to polymicrobial sepsis

    Alves-Filho, Jose C.; Freitas, Andressa; Souto, Fabricio O.; Spiller, Fernando; Paula-Neto, Heitor; Silva, Joao S.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Cunha, Fernando Q.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with sepsis have a marked defect in neutrophil migration. Here we identify a key role of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in the regulation of neutrophil migration and resistance during polymicrobial sepsis. We found that the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 was dramatically down-regulated in circulating neutrophils from WT mice with severe sepsis, which correlates with reduced chemotaxis to CXCL2 in vitro and impaired migration into an infectious focus in vivo. TLR2 deficiency prevented the down-regulation of CXCR2 and failure of neutrophil migration. Moreover, TLR2−/− mice exhibited higher bacterial clearance, lower serum inflammatory cytokines, and improved survival rate during severe sepsis compared with WT mice. In vitro, the TLR2 agonist lipoteichoic acid (LTA) down-regulated CXCR2 expression and markedly inhibited the neutrophil chemotaxis and actin polymerization induced by CXCL2. Moreover, neutrophils activated ex vivo by LTA and adoptively transferred into naïve WT recipient mice displayed a significantly reduced competence to migrate toward thioglycolate-induced peritonitis. Finally, LTA enhanced the expression of G protein–coupled receptor kinases 2 (GRK2) in neutrophils; increased expression of GRK2 was seen in blood neutrophils from WT mice, but not TLR2−/− mice, with severe sepsis. Our findings identify an unexpected detrimental role of TLR2 in polymicrobial sepsis and suggest that inhibition of TLR2 signaling may improve survival from sepsis. PMID:19234125

  15. Procalcitonin as an adjunctive biomarker in sepsis

    Mahua Sinha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis can sometimes be difficult to substantiate, and its distinction from non-infectious conditions in critically ill patients is often a challenge. Serum procalcitonin (PCT assay is one of the biomarkers of sepsis. The present study was aimed to assess the usefulness of PCT assay in critically ill patients with suspected sepsis. The study included 40 patients from the intensive care unit with suspected sepsis. Sepsis was confirmed clinically and/or by positive blood culture. Serum PCT was assayed semi-quantitatively by rapid immunochromatographic technique (within 2 hours of sample receipt. Among 40 critically ill patients, 21 had clinically confirmed sepsis. There were 12 patients with serum PCT ≥10 ng/ml (8, blood culture positive; 1, rickettsia; 2, post-antibiotic blood culture sterile; and 1, non-sepsis; 7 patients with PCT 2-10 ng/ml (4, blood culture positive; 1, falciparum malaria; 2, post-antibiotic blood culture sterile; 3 patients with PCT of 0.5 to 2 ng/ml (sepsis in 1 patient; and 18 patients with PCT < 0.5 ng/ml (sepsis in 2 patients. Patients with PCT ≥ 2 ng/ml had statistically significant correlation with the presence of sepsis (P<0.0001. The PCT assay revealed moderate sensitivity (86% and high specificity (95% at a cut-off ≥ 2 ng/ml. The PCT assay was found to be a useful biomarker of sepsis in this study. The assay could be performed and reported rapidly and provided valuable information before availability of culture results. This might assist in avoiding unwarranted antibiotic usage.

  16. A novel natural compound from garlic (Allium sativum L.) with therapeutic effects against experimental polymicrobial sepsis.

    Lee, Sung Kyun; Park, Yoo Jung; Ko, Min Jung; Wang, Ziyu; Lee, Ha Young; Choi, Young Whan; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-28

    Sepsis is a serious, life-threatening, infectious disease. In this study, we demonstrate that sucrose methyl 3-formyl-4-methylpentanoate (SMFM), a novel natural compound isolated from garlic (Allium sativum L.), markedly enhances survival rates by inhibiting lung inflammation in a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) experimental polymicrobial sepsis model. SMFM strongly reduced bacterial colony units from peritoneal fluid in CLP mice by stimulating the generation of reactive oxygen species. Lymphocyte apoptosis in spleens from CLP mice was also markedly decreased by SMFM administration. SMFM also significantly inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6, in CLP mice. Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of TNF-α and IL-6 were also strongly inhibited by SMFM in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that SMFM has therapeutic effects against polymicrobial sepsis that are mediated by enhanced microbial killing and blockage of cytokine storm. PMID:26166823

  17. Overexpression of the endothelial protein C receptor is detrimental during pneumonia-derived gram-negative sepsis (Melioidosis.

    Liesbeth M Kager

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR enhances anticoagulation by accelerating activation of protein C to activated protein C (APC and mediates anti-inflammatory effects by facilitating APC-mediated signaling via protease activated receptor-1. We studied the role of EPCR in the host response during pneumonia-derived sepsis instigated by Burkholderia (B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, a common form of community-acquired Gram-negative (pneumosepsis in South-East Asia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Soluble EPCR was measured in plasma of patients with septic culture-proven melioidosis and healthy controls. Experimental melioidosis was induced by intranasal inoculation of B. pseudomallei in wild-type (WT mice and mice with either EPCR-overexpression (Tie2-EPCR or EPCR-deficiency (EPCR(-/-. Mice were sacrificed after 24, 48 or 72 hours. Organs and plasma were harvested to measure colony forming units, cellular influxes, cytokine levels and coagulation parameters. Plasma EPCR-levels were higher in melioidosis patients than in healthy controls and associated with an increased mortality. Tie2-EPCR mice demonstrated enhanced bacterial growth and dissemination to distant organs during experimental melioidosis, accompanied by increased lung damage, neutrophil influx and cytokine production, and attenuated coagulation activation. EPCR(-/- mice had an unremarkable response to B. pseudomallei infection as compared to WT mice, except for a difference in coagulation activation in plasma. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Increased EPCR-levels correlate with accelerated mortality in patients with melioidosis. In mice, transgenic overexpression of EPCR aggravates outcome during Gram-negative pneumonia-derived sepsis caused by B. pseudomallei, while endogenous EPCR does not impact on the host response. These results add to a better understanding of the regulation of coagulation during severe (pneumosepsis.

  18. Sepsis neonatal por Estreptococos Pyogenes

    Gilberto Rodríguez-Herrera

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente masculino, recién nacido a término adecuado para la edad gestacional, quien nace por parto vaginal, con el antecedente de fiebre en la madre durante el periodo de postparto inmediato. Los padres consultan a los 2 días de vida pues le notan dificultad respiratoria, hipoactividad y rechazo a la leche materna. El paciente se interna y se aborda como una sepsis. Durante su estancia en el servicio de neonatología del Hospital Nacional de Niños asocia fallo respiratorio que amerita ventilación mecánica asistida por varios días en diferentes ocasiones, derrame pleural exudativo, convulsiones de origen hipóxico isquémico. Con reporte de hemocultivos positivos por Estreptococos pyogenes. El Estreptococos pyogenes o estreptococo β-hemolνtico del grupo A, fue un problema en los comienzos del siglo pasado, siendo frecuente en las infecciones puerperales y del reciιn nacido. En la actualidad es un germen sumamente raro en los procesos de sepsis neonatal.2 La gravedad de la enfermedad causada por este microorganismo en el periodo neonatal varνa desde una onfalitis crónica de bajo grado a una septicemia, una meningitis fulminante y la muerte.1 El presente artículo pretende hacer un resumen del paciente, con su evolución clínica, radiológica y además ejemplificar todas las complicaciones que tuvimos con este germen tan poco frecuente en la actualidad en sepsis neonatal.

  19. Sepsis neonatal por Estreptococos Pyogenes

    Gilberto Rodríguez-Herrera; Cinthya Ramírez-Navarro

    2009-01-01

    Se presenta el caso de un paciente masculino, recién nacido a término adecuado para la edad gestacional, quien nace por parto vaginal, con el antecedente de fiebre en la madre durante el periodo de postparto inmediato. Los padres consultan a los 2 días de vida pues le notan dificultad respiratoria, hipoactividad y rechazo a la leche materna. El paciente se interna y se aborda como una sepsis. Durante su estancia en el servicio de neonatología del Hospital Nacional de Niños asocia fallo respir...

  20. Think Sepsis. Time Matters. PSA (:60)

    2016-08-23

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the August 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Sepsis is a medical emergency and can happen quickly. Learn the signs of sepsis and how to prevent it.  Created: 8/23/2016 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 8/23/2016.

  1. Cytokine profile in elderly patients with sepsis

    Kumar Anil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Sepsis is a serious health problem in the elderly with a high degree of mortality. There is very limited data available in elderly subjects regarding the markers for sepsis. Development of good markers will help in overall management and prediction of sepsis. Objectives: Serial estimation of Interleukin-6 (IL-6 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha (TNF-α and their correlation with mortality in sepsis in elderly patients and to determine the influence of gender on cytokine production and mortality in elderly patients with sepsis. Settings and Design: The prospective study was conducted at our tertiary care center from April 2007 to September 2008. Elderly Patients satisfying the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS criteria were included. Methods and Material: TNF-α and IL-6 were estimated in 30 elderly patients admitted to our intensive care unit with SIRS and sepsis. The estimations were done on day 1, 3 and 7 of admission. Statistical Analysis Used: Student and paired ′t′ tests, and ANOVA, which were further followed up by post-hoc ′t′ tests with Bonferroni correction using SPSS. Results: Reducing levels of IL-6 levels from day 1 to 7 was found in the survivor group. TNF-α level was significantly low on day 1 in the nonsurvivor female group. Conclusions: Serial estimation of cytokines in elderly patients with sepsis will help in prediction of mortality. Female gender was an independent predictor of increased morality in critically ill patients with sepsis.

  2. Radiodiagnosis of lung syndrome in surgical sepsis

    The results of treatment of 23 patients with acute surgical sepsis were analysed. It was shown that the X-ray examination must be obligatory in surveillance of patients with purulent foci. Two roentgenological variants are possible in surgical sepsis: central and perepheric. X-ray examinations of chest organs should be conducted every 2-3 day

  3. Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress in sepsis

    Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Bailey, Damian M

    2011-01-01

    Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress may prove the molecular basis underlying brain dysfunction in sepsis. In the current review, we describe how sepsis-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) trigger lipid peroxidation chain reactions throughout the cerebrovasculature and surrounding...

  4. Thrombospondin-1 contributes to mortality in murine sepsis through effects on innate immunity.

    Sara McMaken

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 is involved in many biological processes, including immune and tissue injury response, but its role in sepsis is unknown. Cell surface expression of TSP-1 on platelets is increased in sepsis and could activate the anti-inflammatory cytokine transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ1 affecting outcome. Because of these observations we sought to determine the importance of TSP-1 in sepsis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed studies on TSP-1 null and wild type (WT C57BL/6J mice to determine the importance of TSP-1 in sepsis. We utilized the cecal ligation puncture (CLP and intraperitoneal E. coli injection (i.p. E. coli models of peritoneal sepsis. Additionally, bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs were used to determine phagocytic activity. TSP-1-/- animals experienced lower mortality than WT mice after CLP. Tissue and peritoneal lavage TGFβ1 levels were unchanged between animals of each genotype. In addition, there is no difference between the levels of major innate cytokines between the two groups of animals. PLF from WT mice contained a greater bacterial load than TSP-1-/- mice after CLP. The survival advantage for TSP-1-/- animals persisted when i.p. E. coli injections were performed. TSP-1-/- BMMs had increased phagocytic capacity compared to WT. CONCLUSIONS: TSP-1 deficiency was protective in two murine models of peritoneal sepsis, independent of TGFβ1 activation. Our studies suggest TSP-1 expression is associated with decreased phagocytosis and possibly bacterial clearance, leading to increased peritoneal inflammation and mortality in WT mice. These data support the contention that TSP-1 should be more fully explored in the human condition.

  5. Mitochondrial-derived N-formyl peptides: novel links between trauma, vascular collapse and sepsis.

    Wenceslau, C F; McCarthy, C G; Goulopoulou, S; Szasz, T; NeSmith, E G; Webb, R C

    2013-10-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in trauma patients despite aggressive treatment. Traumatic injury may trigger infective or non-infective systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. Sepsis and SIRS are accompanied by an inability to regulate the inflammatory response but the cause of this perturbation is still unknown. The major pathophysiological characteristic of sepsis is the vascular collapse (i.e., loss of control of vascular tone); however, at the cellular level the final mediator of extreme vasodilatation has yet to be identified. After trauma, cellular injury releases endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that activate the innate immune system. Mitochondrial DAMPs express at least two molecular signatures, N-formyl peptides and mitochondrial DNA that act on formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) and Toll-like receptor 9, respectively. N-Formyl peptides are potent immunocyte activators and, once released in the circulation, they induce modulation of vascular tone by cellular mechanisms that are not completely understood. We have observed that N-formyl peptides from bacterial (FMLP) and mitochondrial (FMIT) sources induce FPR-mediated vasodilatation in resistance arteries. Accordingly, we propose that tissue and cellular trauma induces the release of N-formyl peptides from mitochondria triggering inflammation and vascular collapse via activation of FPR and contributing to the development of sepsis. The proposed hypothesis provides clinically significant information linking trauma, mitochondrial N-formyl peptides and inflammation to vascular collapse and sepsis. If our hypothesis is true, it may lead to new strategies in the management of sepsis that can help clinicians effectively manage non-infectious and infectious inflammatory responses. PMID:23890799

  6. Shuffling bacterial metabolomes

    Thomason, Brendan; Read, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has a far more significant role than gene duplication in bacterial evolution. This has recently been illustrated by work demonstrating the importance of HGT in the emergence of bacterial metabolic networks, with horizontally acquired genes being placed in peripheral pathways at the outer branches of the networks.

  7. Epidemiology of Neonatal Sepsis and Implicated Pathogens: A Study from Egypt.

    Shehab El-Din, Eman M Rabie; El-Sokkary, Mohamed M Adel; Bassiouny, Mohamed Reda; Hassan, Ramadan

    2015-01-01

    Prospective analytic study was conducted in NICUs of three Egyptian Neonatal Network (EGNN) participants in Mansoura Hospitals in Egypt over a period of 18 months from March 2011 to August 2012. By using EGNN 28-day discharge form, all demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were recorded and studied. During the study period, 357 neonates were diagnosed as suspected sepsis with an incidence of 45.9% (357/778) among the admitted neonates at the three neonatal intensive care units. 344 neonates (sex ratio = 1.3:1) were enrolled in the study in which 152 (44.2%) were classified as early onset sepsis EOS (≤72 hr) and 192 (55.8%) as late onset sepsis LOS (>72 hr). Among the LOS cases, 33.9% (65/192) were caused by nosocomial infections. In 40.7% (140/344), sepsis was confirmed by positive blood culture. The total mortality rate for the proven neonatal sepsis was 51% (25/49) and 42.9% (39/91) for EOS and LOS, respectively. Coagulase negative staphylococci were predominant isolates in both EOS and LOS, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae. Most of the bacterial isolates had low sensitivity to the commonly used empiric antibiotics. However, 70.1% (89/127) exhibited multidrug resistance. Best sensitivities among Gram-positive isolates were found against imipenem, ciprofloxacin, vancomycin, and amikacin. PMID:26146621

  8. Epidemiology of Neonatal Sepsis and Implicated Pathogens: A Study from Egypt

    Eman M. Rabie Shehab El-Din

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prospective analytic study was conducted in NICUs of three Egyptian Neonatal Network (EGNN participants in Mansoura Hospitals in Egypt over a period of 18 months from March 2011 to August 2012. By using EGNN 28-day discharge form, all demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were recorded and studied. During the study period, 357 neonates were diagnosed as suspected sepsis with an incidence of 45.9% (357/778 among the admitted neonates at the three neonatal intensive care units. 344 neonates (sex ratio = 1.3:1 were enrolled in the study in which 152 (44.2% were classified as early onset sepsis EOS (≤72 hr and 192 (55.8% as late onset sepsis LOS (>72 hr. Among the LOS cases, 33.9% (65/192 were caused by nosocomial infections. In 40.7% (140/344, sepsis was confirmed by positive blood culture. The total mortality rate for the proven neonatal sepsis was 51% (25/49 and 42.9% (39/91 for EOS and LOS, respectively. Coagulase negative staphylococci were predominant isolates in both EOS and LOS, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae. Most of the bacterial isolates had low sensitivity to the commonly used empiric antibiotics. However, 70.1% (89/127 exhibited multidrug resistance. Best sensitivities among Gram-positive isolates were found against imipenem, ciprofloxacin, vancomycin, and amikacin.

  9. Effect of cannabidiol on sepsis-induced motility disturbances in mice: involvement of CB receptors and fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    de Filippis, D; Iuvone, T; d'amico, A; Esposito, G; Steardo, L; Herman, A G; Pelckmans, P A; de Winter, B Y; de Man, J G

    2008-08-01

    Sepsis is an inflammatory condition that is associated with reduced propulsive gastrointestinal motility (ileus). A therapeutic option to treat sepsis is to promote intestinal propulsion preventing bacterial stasis, overgrowth and translocation. Recent evidence suggests that anti-oxidants improve sepsis-induced ileus. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic component of Cannabis sativa, exerts strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects without binding to cannabinoid CB(1) or CB(2) receptors. Cannabidiol also regulates the activity of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) which is the main enzyme involved in endocannabinoid breakdown and which modulates gastrointestinal motility. Because of the therapeutic potential of cannabidiol in several pathologies, we investigated its effect on sepsis-induced ileus and on cannabinoid receptor and FAAH expression in the mouse intestine. Sepsis was induced by treating mice with lipopolysaccharides for 18 h. Sepsis led to a decrease in gastric emptying and intestinal transit. Cannabidiol further reduced gastrointestinal motility in septic mice but did not affect gastrointestinal motility in control mice. A low concentration of the CB(1) antagonist AM251 did not affect gastrointestinal motility in control mice but reversed the effect of cannabidiol in septic mice. Sepsis was associated with a selective upregulation of intestinal CB(1) receptors without affecting CB(2) receptor expression and with increased FAAH expression. The increase in FAAH expression was completely reversed by cannabidiol but not affected by AM251. Our results show that sepsis leads to an imbalance of the endocannabinoid system in the mouse intestine. Despite its proven anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, cannabidiol may be of limited use for the treatment of sepsis-induced ileus. PMID:18373655

  10. Evaluation of Serratia and Pseudomonas in hospital acquired infection

    Etemadi H; Zahedani Sh

    1996-01-01

    Hospital acquired infection have 2 origins: 1) Infections acquired from the hospitalization. 2) Infections that transmit from hospital personnel and those who referred to a hospital. According to the studies approximately half of hospital acquired infection is under the first group. Gram-negative bacilli is of prime importance from all bacteries that caused hospital acquired infection. There are 3 main ways spreading hospital acquired infections include: 1) Auto infections 2) Transmit infecti...

  11. Sepsis neonatal por Estreptococos Pyogenes Neonatal Sepsis by Streptococcus pyogenes

    Gilberto Rodríguez-Herrera

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente masculino, recién nacido a término adecuado para la edad gestacional, quien nace por parto vaginal, con el antecedente de fiebre en la madre durante el periodo de postparto inmediato. Los padres consultan a los 2 días de vida pues le notan dificultad respiratoria, hipoactividad y rechazo a la leche materna. El paciente se interna y se aborda como una sepsis. Durante su estancia en el servicio de neonatología del Hospital Nacional de Niños asocia fallo respiratorio que amerita ventilación mecánica asistida por varios días en diferentes ocasiones, derrame pleural exudativo, convulsiones de origen hipóxico isquémico. Con reporte de hemocultivos positivos por Estreptococos pyogenes. El Estreptococos pyogenes o estreptococo β-hemolνtico del grupo A, fue un problema en los comienzos del siglo pasado, siendo frecuente en las infecciones puerperales y del reciιn nacido. En la actualidad es un germen sumamente raro en los procesos de sepsis neonatal.2 La gravedad de la enfermedad causada por este microorganismo en el periodo neonatal varνa desde una onfalitis crónica de bajo grado a una septicemia, una meningitis fulminante y la muerte.1 El presente artículo pretende hacer un resumen del paciente, con su evolución clínica, radiológica y además ejemplificar todas las complicaciones que tuvimos con este germen tan poco frecuente en la actualidad en sepsis neonatal.We present herein the case of a newborn patient of appropriate gestational age weight ( 3700 grams, born by vaginal delivery, from a mother that had had 2 previous pregnancies (2 normal deliveries. During the immediate puerperium she had fever. The parents consulted at the age of 2 days, stating that they had noticed difficult breathing since his birth, hipoactivity and poor appetite. He was admitted to the hospital and underwent several studies searching for the origin and germ causing the sepsis. He developed respiratory failure and needed

  12. Similarly Lethal Strains of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Trigger Markedly Diverse Host Responses in a Zebrafish Model of Sepsis.

    Barber, Amelia E; Fleming, Brittany A; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2016-01-01

    In individuals with sepsis, the infecting microbes are commonly viewed as generic inducers of inflammation while the host background is considered the primary variable affecting disease progression and outcome. To study the effects of bacterial strain differences on the maladaptive immune responses that are induced during sepsis, we employed a novel zebrafish embryo infection model using extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) isolates. These genetically diverse pathogens are a leading cause of sepsis and are becoming increasingly dangerous because of the rise of multidrug-resistant strains. Zebrafish infected with ExPEC isolates exhibit many of the pathophysiological features seen in septic human patients, including dysregulated inflammatory responses (cytokine storms), tachycardia, endothelial leakage, and progressive edema. However, only a limited subset of ExPEC isolates can trigger a sepsis-like state and death of the host when introduced into the bloodstream. Mirroring the situation in human patients, antibiotic therapy reduced ExPEC titers and improved host survival rates but was only effective within limited time frames that varied, depending on the infecting pathogen. Intriguingly, we find that phylogenetically distant but similarly lethal ExPEC isolates can stimulate markedly different host transcriptional responses, including disparate levels of inflammatory mediators. These differences correlate with the amounts of bacterial flagellin expression during infection, as well as differential activation of Toll-like receptor 5 by discrete flagellar serotypes. Altogether, this work establishes zebrafish as a relevant model of key aspects of human sepsis and highlights the ability of genetically distinct ExPEC isolates to induce divergent host responses independently of baseline host attributes. IMPORTANCE Sepsis is a life-threatening systemic inflammatory condition that is initiated by the presence of microorganisms in the bloodstream. In the

  13. Sepsis

    ... infants labored or unusual breathing change in skin color (paler than usual or mildly bluish) or a rash listlessness or lethargy change in the sound of the baby's cry or excessive crying change ...

  14. Sepsis: emerging role of nitric oxide and selectins Sepse: o papel das selectinas e do óxido nítrico

    Abhijit Chandra; Perenlei Enkhbaatar; Yoshimitshu Nakano; Traber, Lillian D.; Traber, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    Sepsis-a state of systemic bacterial infection-often leads to multiorgan failure and is associated with high mortality despite the recent advances achieved in intensive care treatment. Many of the ill effects of sepsis are attributed to an abnormally enhanced host inflammatory response that leads to neutrophil recruitment and activation involving selectins, a class of adhesion molecules, in the initial stages. Nitric oxide and its various isoforms have also been implicated in various vascular...

  15. Prediction about severity and outcome of sepsis by proatrial

    Wang, Rui-Lan; KANG Fu-xin

    2010-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the most frequent causes of death in intensive care unit (ICU) patients worldwide. According to recent reports, the incidence of sepsis has been rising at a rate of 1.5%-8% per year.1 About 9% of the sepsis develops to serious sepsis and 3% to septic shock. Although great progress has been made in the treatment of sepsis, themortality of patients with severe sepsis is still as high as 30%- 70%.2-4 Moreover, the high expenditure of sepsis management has resulted in a heavy fin...

  16. In Critically Ill Patients, Serum Procalcitonin Is More Useful in Differentiating between Sepsis and SIRS than CRP, Il-6, or LBP

    Iwan A. Meynaar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the usefulness of serum procalcitonin (PCT, interleukin-6 (IL-6, lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP levels and C-reactive protein (CRP levels, in differentiating between systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS and sepsis in critically ill patients. Methods. In this single centre prospective observational study we included all consecutive patients admitted with SIRS or sepsis to the ICU. Blood samples for measuring CRP, PCT, IL-6 and LBP were taken every day until ICU discharge. Results. A total of 76 patients were included, 32 with sepsis and 44 with SIRS. Patients with sepsis were sicker on admission and had a higher mortality. CRP, PCT, IL-6 and LBP levels were significantly higher in patients with sepsis as compared to SIRS. With PCT levels in the first 24 hours after ICU admission 10 ng/mL, sepsis with bacterial infection was very likely (positive predictive value 88%. PCT was best at discriminating between SIRS and sepsis with the highest area under the ROC curve (0.95, 95% CI 0.90–0.99. Discussion. This study showed that PCT is more useful than LBP, CRP and IL-6 in differentiating sepsis from SIRS.

  17. Intravenous inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus in pigs induces severe sepsis as indicated by increased hypercoagulability and hepatic dysfunction

    Leifsson, Pall S.; Iburg, Tine; Jensen, Henrik E.; Agerholm, Jørgen S.; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Wiinberg, Bo; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Astrup, Lærke B.; Olsson, Anna E.; Skov, Mette G.; Aalbæk, Bent; Nielsen, Ole L.

    2010-01-01

    carried out and tissue samples were collected for bacteriology and histology. The onset of clinical disease was seen at 7-8 h after inoculation. The blood bacterial counts remained low throughout the study. All infected pigs developed sepsis characterized by fever, neutrophilia, increased levels of C...

  18. Multiplex real-time PCR and blood culture for identification of bloodstream pathogens in patients with suspected sepsis

    Westh, H; Lisby, G; Breysse, F;

    2009-01-01

    Severe sepsis is increasingly a cause of death. Rapid and correct initial antimicrobial treatment reduces mortality. The aetiological agent(s) cannot always be found in blood cultures (BCs). A novel multiplex PCR test (SeptiFast (alpha version)) that allows identification of 20 bacterial and fung...

  19. Polymorphic mononuclear neutrophils CD64 index for diagnosis of sepsis in postoperative surgical patients and critically ill patients

    Gerrits, J.H.; McLaughlin, P.M.; Nienhuis, B.N.; Smit, J.W.A.; Loef, B.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surface neutrophil CD64 expression is upregulated in patients with bacterial infection. As it was suggested that the CD64 index could be used to detect sepsis in hospitalized patients, we questioned whether the CD64 index could discriminate between septic patients and postoperative surgi

  20. Suspected sepsis: summary of NICE guidance

    Freitag, A.; Constanti, M.; O'Flynn, N; Faust, S.

    2016-01-01

    The UK Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman inquiry “Time to Act” found failures in the recognition, diagnosis, and early management of those who died from sepsis, which triggered this guidance. In sepsis the body’s immune and coagulation systems are switched on by an infection and cause one or more body organs to malfunction with variable severity. The condition is life threatening. Although most people with infection do not have and will not develop sepsis, non-specific signs and symp...

  1. Dysglycemia and Glucose Control During Sepsis.

    Plummer, Mark P; Deane, Adam M

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis predisposes to disordered metabolism and dysglycemia; the latter is a broad term that includes hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability. Dysglycemia is a marker of illness severity. Large randomized controlled trials have provided considerable insight into the optimal blood glucose targets for critically ill patients with sepsis. However, it may be that the pathophysiologic consequences of dysglycemia are dynamic throughout the course of a septic insult and also altered by premorbid glycemia. This review highlights the relevance of hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability in patients with sepsis with an emphasis on a rational approach to management. PMID:27229647

  2. Sepsis Resuscitation: Fluid Choice and Dose.

    Semler, Matthew W; Rice, Todd W

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is a common and life-threatening inflammatory response to severe infection treated with antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. Despite the central role of intravenous fluid in sepsis management, fundamental questions regarding which fluid and in what amount remain unanswered. Recent advances in understanding the physiologic response to fluid administration, and large clinical studies examining resuscitation strategies, fluid balance after resuscitation, colloid versus crystalloid solutions, and high- versus low-chloride crystalloids, inform the current approach to sepsis fluid management and suggest areas for future research. PMID:27229641

  3. Sepsis, venous return, and teleology.

    McNeilly, R G

    2014-11-01

    An understanding of heart-circulation interaction is crucial to our ability to guide our patients through an episode of septic shock. Our knowledge has advanced greatly in the last one hundred years. There are, however, certain empirical phenomena that may lead us to question the wisdom of our prevailing treatment algorithm. Three extreme but iatrogenically possible haemodynamic states exist. Firstly, inappropriately low venous return; secondly, overzealous arteriolar constriction; and finally, misguided inotropy and chronotropy. Following an unsuccessful fluid challenge, it would be logical to first set the venous tone, then set the cardiac rate and contractility, and finally set the peripheral vascular resistance. It is hypothesized that a combination of dihydroergotamine, milrinone and esmolol should be superior to a combination of noradrenaline and dobutamine for surviving sepsis. PMID:25245463

  4. Hubungan Nilai Mean Platelet Voulme (Mpv) Dengan Derajat Sepsis

    Ginting, Andi Raga

    2016-01-01

    Background:Sepsis is a major disease that affects millions of people worldwide every year. Almost all organs and systems were affected by sepsis. Hemostatic system is also affected. Easily accessible, inexpensive, and widely used laboratory tests that shows sepsis and the severity are important Purpose:To investigate the relationship of the MPV values with the degree of sepsis, correlation MPV with procalcitonin and the diagnostic value of MPV to diagnose sepsis. Method: A cross section...

  5. Prevention of bacterial infection and sepsis in acute severe pancreatitis.

    McClelland, P.; Murray, A; Yaqoob, M.; Van Saene, H. K.; Bone, J M; Mostafa, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1986 six patients with acute respiratory failure (requiring ventilation for at least 3 days) complicating acute pancreatitis were managed on the intensive care unit (median ventilation period 6 days; range 3-41 days). Between 1987 and 1989 nine similar patients were managed (median ventilation period 35 days, range 4-69 days), and a regimen of enteral tobramycin, polymyxin and amphotericin to selectively decontaminate the digestive tract (SDD) was introduced. Five of six pati...

  6. Unexplained fever in young children: how to manage severe bacterial infection

    Brook, Itzhak

    2003-01-01

    Fever with no clear source of infection in children under 3 years old carries a small but important risk of sepsis and meningitis. This review describes the bacterial causes of such infection and the appropriate management in different age groups

  7. Seeking Sepsis in the Emergency Department- Identifying Barriers to Delivery of the Sepsis 6.

    Bentley, James; Henderson, Susan; Thakore, Shobhan; Donald, Michael; Wang, Weijie

    2016-01-01

    The Sepsis 6 is an internationally accepted management bundle that, when initiated within one hour of identifying sepsis, can reduce morbidity and mortality. This management bundle was advocated by the Scottish Patient Safety Programme as part of its Acute Adult campaign launched in 2008 and adopted by NHS Tayside in 2012. Despite this, the Emergency Department (ED) of Ninewells Hospital, a tertiary referral centre and major teaching hospital in Scotland, was displaying poor success in the Sepsis 6. We therefore set out to improve compliance by evaluating the application of all aspects of the NHS Tayside Sepsis 6 bundle within one hour of ED triage time, to identify what human factors may influence achieving the one hour The Sepsis 6 bundle. This allowed us to tailor a number of specific interventions including educational sessions, regular audit and personal feedback and check list Sepsis 6 sticker. These interventions promoted a steady increase in compliance from an initial rate of 51.0% to 74.3%. The project highlighted that undifferentiated patients create a challenge in initiating the Sepsis 6. Pyrexia is a key human factor-trigger for recognising sepsis with initial nursing assessment being vital in recognition and identifying the best area (resus) of the department to manage severely septic patients. EDs need to recognise these challenges and develop educational and feedback plans for staff and utilise available resources to maximise the Sepsis 6 compliance. PMID:27239303

  8. Early neurovascular uncoupling in the brain during community acquired pneumonia

    Rosengarten, Bernhard; Krekel, Dennis; Kuhnert, Stefan; Schulz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis leads to microcirculatory dysfunction and therefore a disturbed neurovascular coupling in the brain. To investigate if the dysfunction is also present in less severe inflammatory diseases we studied the neurovascular coupling in patients suffering from community acquired pneumonia. Methods Patients were investigated in the acute phase of pneumonia and after recovery. The neurovascular coupling was investigated with a simultaneous electroencephalogram (EEG)-Doppler techniqu...

  9. Alert cell strategy in SIRS-induced vasculitis: sepsis and endothelial cells

    Matsuda, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis refers to systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure resulting from infection. Inflammatory receptors (e.g., Toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerization domain) recognize bacterial components as inflammatory ligands. These are expressed not only in leukocytes but also in major organs and vascular endothelial cells. “Alert cell” is defined as the cell that expresses the inflammatory receptor and intracellular signaling system to produce inflammatory mediators such ...

  10. Reduced motor neuron excitability is an important contributor to weakness in a rat model of sepsis.

    Nardelli, Paul; Vincent, Jacob A; Powers, Randall; Cope, Tim C; Rich, Mark M

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms by which sepsis triggers intensive care unit acquired weakness (ICUAW) remain unclear. We previously identified difficulty with motor unit recruitment in patients as a novel contributor to ICUAW. To study the mechanism underlying poor recruitment of motor units we used the rat cecal ligation and puncture model of sepsis. We identified striking dysfunction of alpha motor neurons during repetitive firing. Firing was more erratic, and often intermittent. Our data raised the possibility that reduced excitability of motor neurons was a significant contributor to weakness induced by sepsis. In this study we quantified the contribution of reduced motor neuron excitability and compared its magnitude to the contributions of myopathy, neuropathy and failure of neuromuscular transmission. We injected constant depolarizing current pulses (5s) into the soma of alpha motor neurons in the lumbosacral spinal cord of anesthetized rats to trigger repetitive firing. In response to constant depolarization, motor neurons in untreated control rats fired at steady and continuous firing rates and generated smooth and sustained tetanic motor unit force as expected. In contrast, following induction of sepsis, motor neurons were often unable to sustain firing throughout the 5s current injection such that force production was reduced. Even when firing, motor neurons from septic rats fired erratically and discontinuously, leading to irregular production of motor unit force. Both fast and slow type motor neurons had similar disruption of excitability. We followed rats after recovery from sepsis to determine the time course of resolution of the defect in motor neuron excitability. By one week, rats appeared to have recovered from sepsis as they had no piloerection and appeared to be in no distress. The defects in motor neuron repetitive firing were still striking at 2weeks and, although improved, were present at one month. We infer that rats suffered from weakness due to reduced

  11. Chronic kidney disease-induced HMGB1 elevation worsens sepsis and sepsis-induced acute kidney injury

    Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Huang, Yuning; Hu, Xuzhen; Zhou, Hua; Tsuji, Takayuki; Chen, Richard; Jeffrey B Kopp; Schnermann, Jürgen; Yuen, Peter S.T.; Star, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed that kidney dysfunction/interstitial fibrosis by folate predisposes mice to sepsis mortality (normal/sepsis: 15%; folate/sepsis: 90%); agents that increased survival in normal septic mice were ineffective in the two-stage model. We used a recently characterized 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx) mouse model of progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) to study how CKD impacts sepsis and acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by cecal ligation-puncture (CLP). CKD intensified sepsis severity (...

  12. Lipid Isolated from a Leishmania donovani Strain Reduces Escherichia coli Induced Sepsis in Mice through Inhibition of Inflammatory Responses

    Subhadip Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is the reflection of systemic immune response that manifests in the sequential inflammatory process in presence of infection. This may occur as a result of gram-negative bacterial sepsis including Escherichia coli infection that gives rise to excessive production of inflammatory mediators and causes severe tissue injuries. We have reported earlier that the lipid of attenuated Leishmania donovani suppresses the inflammatory responses in arthritis patients. Using heat killed E. coli stimulated macrophages, we have now investigated the effect of leishmanial total lipid (LTL isolated from Leishmania donovani (MHO/IN/1978/UR6 for amelioration of the inflammatory mediators and transcriptional factor with suppression of TLR4-CD14 expression. To evaluate the in vivo effect, E. coli induced murine sepsis model was used focusing on the changes in different parameter(s of lung injury caused by sepsis, namely, edema, vascular permeability, and pathophysiology, and the status of different cytokine-chemokine(s and adhesion molecule(s. Due to the effect of LTL, E. coli induced inflammatory cytokine-chemokine(s levels were significantly reduced in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid simultaneously. LTL also improved the lung injury and suppressed the cell adhesion molecules in lung tissue. These findings indicate that LTL may prove to be a potential anti-inflammatory agent and provide protection against gram-negative bacterial sepsis with pulmonary impairment.

  13. Hepatic blood flow in late sepsis patients

    Amany Abd El Maqsoud

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion Duplex ultrasound assessment was a useful bedside method for predicting mortality in late sepsis patients through estimation of HABF, with a reasonable predictive potential at a definite cutoff level.

  14. Thromboelastography in patients with severe sepsis

    Haase, Nicolai; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Wetterslev, Jørn;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the association between consecutively measured thromboelastographic (TEG) tracings and outcome in patients with severe sepsis. METHODS: Multicentre prospective observational study in a subgroup of the Scandinavian Starch for Severe Sepsis/Septic Shock (6S) Trial (NCT00962156......) comparing hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.42 vs. Ringer's acetate for fluid resuscitation in severe sepsis. TEG (standard and functional fibrinogen) was measured consecutively for 5 days, and clinical data including bleeding and death was retrieved from the trial database. Statistical analyses included Cox...... subsequent bleeding [HR 2.43 (1.16-5.07)] and possibly explained the excess bleeding with HES in the 6S trial. CONCLUSIONS: In our cohort of patients with severe sepsis, progressive hypocoagulability defined by TEG variables was associated with increased risk of death and increased risk of bleeding....

  15. Toll-like receptors in neonatal sepsis.

    O'Hare, Fiona M

    2013-06-01

    Toll-like receptors are vital transmembrane receptors that initiate the innate immune response to many micro-organisms. The discovery of these receptors has improved our understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and these receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple neonatal conditions such as sepsis and brain injury. Toll-like receptors, especially TLRs 2 and 4, are associated with necrotizing enterocolitis, periventricular leukomalacia and sepsis.

  16. Effect of chronic ethanol consumption in female rats subjected to experimental sepsis

    C.L. Castro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the interference of ethanol consumption by female rats with cytokines involved in the sepsis process and its correlation with mortality, the main outcome of sepsis. Female Wistar rats in estrus phase were evaluated in three experiments. Experiment 1 (n=40 was performed to determine survival rates. Experiment 2 (n=69 was designed for biochemical analysis, measurement of cytokine and estrogen levels before and after sepsis, and experiment 3 (n=10 was performed to evaluate bacterial growth by colony counts of peritoneal fluid. In all experiments, treated animals were exposed to a 10% ethanol/water solution (v/v as the single drinking source, while untreated animals were given tap water. After 4 weeks, sepsis was induced in the rats by ip injection of feces. In experiment 1, mortality in ethanol-exposed animals was delayed compared with those that drank water (48 h; P=0.0001. Experiment 2 showed increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and decreased interleukin-6 (IL-6 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor in septic animals exposed to ethanol compared to septic animals not exposed. Sepsis also increased TNF-α and IL-6 levels in both ethanol- and water-exposed groups. Biochemical analysis showed higher creatinine, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and decreased glucose levels in septic animals that were exposed to ethanol. In experiment 3, septic animals exposed to ethanol showed decreased numbers of colony-forming units than septic animals exposed to water. These results suggest that ethanol consumption delays the mortality of female rats in estrus phase after sepsis induction. Female characteristics, most probably sex hormones, may be involved in cytokine expression.

  17. Effect of chronic ethanol consumption in female rats subjected to experimental sepsis

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the interference of ethanol consumption by female rats with cytokines involved in the sepsis process and its correlation with mortality, the main outcome of sepsis. Female Wistar rats in estrus phase were evaluated in three experiments. Experiment 1 (n=40) was performed to determine survival rates. Experiment 2 (n=69) was designed for biochemical analysis, measurement of cytokine and estrogen levels before and after sepsis, and experiment 3 (n=10) was performed to evaluate bacterial growth by colony counts of peritoneal fluid. In all experiments, treated animals were exposed to a 10% ethanol/water solution (v/v) as the single drinking source, while untreated animals were given tap water. After 4 weeks, sepsis was induced in the rats by ip injection of feces. In experiment 1, mortality in ethanol-exposed animals was delayed compared with those that drank water (48 h; P=0.0001). Experiment 2 showed increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and decreased interleukin-6 (IL-6) and macrophage migration inhibitory factor in septic animals exposed to ethanol compared to septic animals not exposed. Sepsis also increased TNF-α and IL-6 levels in both ethanol- and water-exposed groups. Biochemical analysis showed higher creatinine, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and decreased glucose levels in septic animals that were exposed to ethanol. In experiment 3, septic animals exposed to ethanol showed decreased numbers of colony-forming units than septic animals exposed to water. These results suggest that ethanol consumption delays the mortality of female rats in estrus phase after sepsis induction. Female characteristics, most probably sex hormones, may be involved in cytokine expression

  18. Effect of chronic ethanol consumption in female rats subjected to experimental sepsis

    Castro, C.L. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Patologia, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Aguiar-Nemer, A.S. [Departamento de Nutrição, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Castro-Faria-Neto, H.C. [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barros, F.R. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Patologia, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Rocha, E.M.S. [Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Silva-Fonseca, V.A. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-12-10

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the interference of ethanol consumption by female rats with cytokines involved in the sepsis process and its correlation with mortality, the main outcome of sepsis. Female Wistar rats in estrus phase were evaluated in three experiments. Experiment 1 (n=40) was performed to determine survival rates. Experiment 2 (n=69) was designed for biochemical analysis, measurement of cytokine and estrogen levels before and after sepsis, and experiment 3 (n=10) was performed to evaluate bacterial growth by colony counts of peritoneal fluid. In all experiments, treated animals were exposed to a 10% ethanol/water solution (v/v) as the single drinking source, while untreated animals were given tap water. After 4 weeks, sepsis was induced in the rats by ip injection of feces. In experiment 1, mortality in ethanol-exposed animals was delayed compared with those that drank water (48 h; P=0.0001). Experiment 2 showed increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and decreased interleukin-6 (IL-6) and macrophage migration inhibitory factor in septic animals exposed to ethanol compared to septic animals not exposed. Sepsis also increased TNF-α and IL-6 levels in both ethanol- and water-exposed groups. Biochemical analysis showed higher creatinine, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and decreased glucose levels in septic animals that were exposed to ethanol. In experiment 3, septic animals exposed to ethanol showed decreased numbers of colony-forming units than septic animals exposed to water. These results suggest that ethanol consumption delays the mortality of female rats in estrus phase after sepsis induction. Female characteristics, most probably sex hormones, may be involved in cytokine expression.

  19. Murine Lung Cancer Increases CD4+ T Cell Apoptosis and Decreases Gut Proliferative Capacity in Sepsis.

    John D Lyons

    Full Text Available Mortality is significantly higher in septic patients with cancer than in septic patients without a history of cancer. We have previously described a model of pancreatic cancer followed by sepsis from Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in which cancer septic mice have higher mortality than previously healthy septic mice, associated with increased gut epithelial apoptosis and decreased T cell apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this represents a common host response by creating a new model in which both the type of cancer and the model of sepsis are altered.C57Bl/6 mice received an injection of 250,000 cells of the lung cancer line LLC-1 into their right thigh and were followed three weeks for development of palpable tumors. Mice with cancer and mice without cancer were then subjected to cecal ligation and puncture and sacrificed 24 hours after the onset of sepsis or followed 7 days for survival.Cancer septic mice had a higher mortality than previously healthy septic mice (60% vs. 18%, p = 0.003. Cancer septic mice had decreased number and frequency of splenic CD4+ lymphocytes secondary to increased apoptosis without changes in splenic CD8+ numbers. Intestinal proliferation was also decreased in cancer septic mice. Cancer septic mice had a higher bacterial burden in the peritoneal cavity, but this was not associated with alterations in local cytokine, neutrophil or dendritic cell responses. Cancer septic mice had biochemical evidence of worsened renal function, but there was no histologic evidence of renal injury.Animals with cancer have a significantly higher mortality than previously healthy animals following sepsis. The potential mechanisms associated with this elevated mortality differ significantly based upon the model of cancer and sepsis utilized. While lymphocyte apoptosis and intestinal integrity are both altered by the combination of cancer and sepsis, the patterns of these alterations vary greatly depending on

  20. Petechial Hemorrhage: A clinical diagnosis of neonatal Thrombocytopenia and sepsis

    Deepak Kumar sharma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A preterm female baby with birth weight of 1.5kg was referred to our hospital on day 6 for difficulty in breathing. Baby was admitted at birth for respiratory distress and feed intolerance to other hospital and in view of clinical deterioration baby was referred. Baby had thrombocytopenia with platelets counts of 11000/ mm3 and high CRP titer. Baby had petechial haemorrhagic spots all over the body with hepatosplenomegaly and sclerema (figure 1,2,3. Baby further platelets counts were 3000, 43000, 67000 and then normal. Baby was managed with antibiotics and platelets transfusion. Gradually baby counts improved and petechial spots disappeared. Discussion Neonatal Sepsis is a common complication in the neonatal intensive care unit. It is most common in the smallest and most premature infants in whom the clinical presentation can be subtle and nonspecific. Thrombocytopenia is the common manifestation of neonatal sepsis in sick babies(1. The manifestation can be seen in newborn as petechial spots over the body with predominance over chest and abdomen(2.Thrombocytopenia is seen in 18% to 35% of NICU patients, and in 73% of extremely low birth weight (ELBW infants(3. Bacterial,fungal and viral infection causes thrombocytopenia. Infection causes damage to vascular endothelium which increases the destruction of platelets and there removal by reticuloendothelial system(4

  1. Heme uptake in bacterial pathogens

    Contreras, Heidi; Chim, Nicholas; Credali, Alfredo; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the survival of organisms. Bacterial pathogens possess specialized pathways to acquire heme from their human hosts. In this review, we present recent structural and biochemical data that provide mechanistic insights into several bacterial heme uptake pathways, encompassing the sequestration of heme from human hemoproteins to secreted or membrane-associated bacterial proteins, the transport of heme across bacterial membranes, and the degradation of heme within...

  2. Prediction about severity and outcome of sepsis by proatrial

    WANG Rui-lan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is one of the most frequent causes of death in intensive care unit (ICU patients worldwide. According to recent reports, the incidence of sepsis has been rising at a rate of 1.5%-8% per year.1 About 9% of the sepsis develops to serious sepsis and 3% to septic shock. Although great progress has been made in the treatment of sepsis, themortality of patients with severe sepsis is still as high as 30%- 70%.2-4 Moreover, the high expenditure of sepsis management has resulted in a heavy financial burden to the government and patients.1 Therefore, howto estimatethe severity of sepsis early and apply targeted therapies timely is very important in the treatment of sepsis.

  3. Diagnostic Utility of Broad Range Bacterial 16S rRNA Gene PCR with Degradation of Human and Free Bacterial DNA in Bloodstream Infection Is More Sensitive Than an In-House Developed PCR without Degradation of Human and Free Bacterial DNA

    Petra Rogina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared a commercial broad range 16S rRNA gene PCR assay (SepsiTest to an in-house developed assay (IHP. We assessed whether CD64 index, a biomarker of bacterial infection, can be used to exclude patients with a low probability of systemic bacterial infection. From January to March 2010, 23 patients with suspected sepsis were enrolled. CD64 index, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein were measured on admission. Broad range 16S rRNA gene PCR was performed from whole blood (SepsiTest or blood plasma (IHP and compared to blood culture results. Blood samples spiked with Staphylococcus aureus were used to assess sensitivity of the molecular assays in vitro. CD64 index was lower in patients where possible sepsis was excluded than in patients with microbiologically confirmed sepsis (P=0.004. SepsiTest identified more relevant pathogens than blood cultures (P=0.008; in three patients (13% results from blood culture and SepsiTest were congruent, whereas in four cases (17.4% relevant pathogens were detected by SepsiTest only. In vitro spiking experiments suggested equal sensitivity of SepsiTest and IHP. A diagnostic algorithm using CD64 index as a decision maker to perform SepsiTest shows improved detection of pathogens in patients with suspected blood stream infection and may enable earlier targeted antibiotic therapy.

  4. Marine Compounds with Therapeutic Potential in Gram-Negative Sepsis

    Irina Yermak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the potential use of compounds, including lipid A, chitosan, and carrageenan, from marine sources as agents for treating endotoxemic complications from Gram-negative infections, such as sepsis and endotoxic shock. Lipid A, which can be isolated from various species of marine bacteria, is a potential antagonist of bacterial endotoxins (lipopolysaccharide (LPSs. Chitosan is a widespread marine polysaccharide that is derived from chitin, the major component of crustacean shells. The potential of chitosan as an LPS-binding and endotoxin-neutralizing agent is also examined in this paper, including a discussion on the generation of hydrophobic chitosan derivatives to increase the binding affinity of chitosan to LPS. In addition, the ability of carrageenan, which is the polysaccharide of red alga, to decrease the toxicity of LPS is discussed. We also review data obtained using animal models that demonstrate the potency of carrageenan and chitosan as antiendotoxin agents.

  5. A biomarker panel to discriminate between systemic inflammatory response syndrome SIRS and sepsis and sepsis severity

    Punyadeera, C.; Schneider, E. M.; Schaffer, D.; Hsu, H-Y.; Joos, T.O.; Kriebel, F; Weiss, M.; Verhaegh, W.F.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on initial efforts to discover putative biomarkers for differential diagnosis of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) vs. sepsis; and different stages of sepsis. In addition, we also investigated whether there are proteins that can discriminate between patients wh

  6. Comparative efficacy of novobiocin and amoxicillin in experimental sepsis caused by β-lactam-susceptible and highly resistant pneumococci

    Rodríguez-Cerrato, Violeta; Prado, Gema del; Huelves, Lorena; Naves, Plínio; Ruiz, Vicente; García, Ernesto; Ponte, Carmen; Soriano, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic alternatives are needed against infections caused by highly multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. Novobiocin, an old antibiotic, was tested in vitro and in a murine sepsis model against one amoxicillin-susceptible and three amoxicillin-resistant strains [minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) 8–64mg/L]. Novobiocin MICs for all strains were 0.25–0.5mg/L. In sepsis, novobiocin and amoxicillin were evaluated at 25, 50, 100 and 200mg/kg given at 1, 5, 24 and 48h post bacteri...

  7. Epidemic microclusters of blood-culture proven sepsis in very-low-birth weight infants: experience of the German Neonatal Network.

    Christoph Härtel

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We evaluated blood culture-proven sepsis episodes occurring in microclusters in very-low-birth-weight infants born in the German Neonatal Network (GNN during 2009-2010. METHODS: Thirty-seven centers participated in GNN; 23 centers enrolled ≥50 VLBW infants in the study period. Data quality was approved by on-site monitoring. Microclusters of sepsis were defined as occurrence of at least two blood-culture proven sepsis events in different patients of one center within 3 months with the same bacterial species. For microcluster analysis, we selected sepsis episodes with typically cross-transmitted bacteria of high clinical significance including gram-negative rods and Enterococcus spp. RESULTS: In our cohort, 12/2110 (0.6% infants were documented with an early-onset sepsis and 235 late-onset sepsis episodes (≥72 h of age occurred in 203/2110 (9.6% VLBW infants. In 182/235 (77.4% late-onset sepsis episodes gram-positive bacteria were documented, while coagulase negative staphylococci were found to be the most predominant pathogens (48.5%, 95%CI: 42.01-55.01. Candida spp. and gram-negative bacilli caused 10/235 (4.3%, 95%CI: 1.68% -6.83% and 43/235 (18.5% late-onset sepsis episodes, respectively. Eleven microclusters of blood-culture proven sepsis were detected in 7 hospitals involving a total 26 infants. 16/26 cluster patients suffered from Klebsiella spp. sepsis. The median time interval between the first patient's Klebsiella spp. sepsis and cluster cases was 14.1 days (interquartile range: 1-27 days. First patients in the cluster, their linked cases and sporadic sepsis events did not show significant differences in short term outcome parameters. DISCUSSION: Microclusters of infection are an important phenomenon for late-onset sepsis. Most gram-negative cluster infections occur within 30 days after the first patient was diagnosed and Klebsiella spp. play a major role. It is essential to monitor epidemic microclusters of sepsis in

  8. Svær sepsis og septisk shock

    Tønnesen, Else; Larsen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock are syndromes. The incidence of sepsis is as high as 35% and with mortality rates in the intensive care unit from 27% to 54% in sepsis and septic shock, respectively. Many new treatments have been tested but only few have been implemented in clinical practise....... The treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock is based on the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines developed by an international expert panel. Early diagnosis, optimization of haemodynamics, rapid identification of focus and adequate antibiotic treatment are the most important strategies....

  9. Designing a Pediatric Severe Sepsis Screening Tool

    Robert eSepanski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We sought to create a screening tool with improved predictive value for pediatric severe sepsis and septic shock that can be incorporated into the electronic medical record and actively screen all patients arriving at a pediatric Emergency Department (ED. Gold standard severe sepsis cases were identified using a combination of coded discharge diagnosis and physician chart review from 7,402 children who visited a pediatric ED over two months. The tool’s identification of severe sepsis was initially based on International Consensus Conference on Pediatric Sepsis (ICCPS parameters that were refined by an iterative, virtual process that allowed us to propose successive changes in sepsis detection parameters in order to optimize the tool’s predictive value based on receiver operating curve (ROC characteristics. Age-specific normal and abnormal values for heart rate (HR and respiratory rate (RR were empirically derived from 143,603 children seen in a second pediatric ED over three years. Univariate analyses were performed for each measure in the tool to assess its association with severe sepsis and to characterize it as an early or late indicator of severe sepsis. A split-sample was used to validate the final, optimized tool. The final tool incorporated age-specific thresholds for abnormal HR and RR and employed a linear temperature correction for each category. The final tool’s positive predictive value was 48.7%, a significant, nearly three-fold improvement over the original ICCPS tool. False positive Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS identifications were nearly six-fold lower.

  10. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  11. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Infectious diarrhea - bacterial gastroenteritis; Acute gastroenteritis; Gastroenteritis - bacterial ... Bacterial gastroenteritis can affect 1 person or a group of people who all ate the same food. It is ...

  12. Microbial profile in women with puerperal sepsis in Gadarif State, Eastern Sudan

    Mohamed Issa Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increasingly, women in rural areas in Sudan reported to hospital with puerperal sepsis. Aims: This study was design to identify the common pathogens causing puerperal sepsis and their susceptibility to current antibiotics. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 170 women from January 2011 through December 2012 who attended Hussein Mustafa Hospital for Obstetrics and Gynecology at Gadarif State, Sudan. We included patients if they met the criteria proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO for definition of puerperal sepsis. Results: Out of the 170 patients, 124 (72.9% were pathogen-positive samples. Out of 124 positive isolates, aerobes were the predominant isolates 77 (62.1% which included Staphylococcus aureus 49 (39.5%, Staphylococcus epidermidis 7(5.6%, and Listeria monocytogenes 21 (16.9%. The anaerobe isolates were Clostridium perfringens 34 (27.4% and Enterobactor cloacae 13 (10.5%. Standard biochemical test were for bacterial isolation. Higher rate of infections followed vaginal delivery compared to Cesarean section, 121 (97.6% and 3 (2.5%, respectively. All strains of Staph were sensitive to vancomycin, gentamicin, and ceftriaxone. C. perfringens were sensitive to ceftriaxone, penicillin, vancomycin, and metronidazole, while E. cloacae was sensitive to gentamicin and ceftriaxone. Conclusion: In this study, the main bacteriological isolates were S. aureus, S. epidermidis, L. monocytogenes, C. perfringens, and E. cloacae. Despite the limited resources in the developing countries, treatment based on cultures remains the only solution to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality rates following puerperal sepsis.

  13. Tolerization with BLP down-regulates HMGB1 a critical mediator of sepsis-related lethality.

    Coffey, J Calvin

    2012-02-03

    Tolerization with bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) affords a significant survival benefit in sepsis. Given that high mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1) is a recognized mediator of sepsis-related lethality, we determined if tolerization with BLP leads to alterations in HMGB1. In vitro, BLP tolerization led to a reduction in HMGB1 gene transcription. This was mirrored at the protein level, as HMGB1 protein expression and release were reduced significantly in BLP-tolerized human THP-1 monocytic cells. BLP tolerance in vivo led to a highly significant, long-term survival benefit following challenge with lethal dose BLP in C57BL\\/6 mice. This was associated with an attenuation of HMGB1 release into the circulation, as evidenced by negligible serum HMGB1 levels in BLP-tolerized mice. Moreover, HMGB1 levels in peritoneal macrophages from BLP-tolerized mice were reduced significantly. Hence, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1 protein synthesis and release. The improved survival associated with BLP tolerance could thus be explained by a reduction in HMGB1, were the latter associated with lethality in BLP-related sepsis. In testing this hypothesis, it was noted that neutralization of HMGB1, using anti-HMGB1 antibodies, abrogated BLP-associated lethality almost completely. To conclude, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1, thus offering a novel means of targeting the latter. HMGB1 is also a mediator of lethality in BLP-related sepsis.

  14. Mechanisms of Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    Yoseph, Benyam P; Klingensmith, Nathan J; Liang, Zhe; Breed, Elise R; Burd, Eileen M; Mittal, Rohit; Dominguez, Jessica A; Petrie, Benjamin; Ford, Mandy L; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2016-07-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction is thought to contribute to the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in sepsis. Although there are similarities in clinical course following sepsis, there are significant differences in the host response depending on the initiating organism and time course of the disease, and pathways of gut injury vary widely in different preclinical models of sepsis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the timecourse and mechanisms of intestinal barrier dysfunction are similar in disparate mouse models of sepsis with similar mortalities. FVB/N mice were randomized to receive cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham laparotomy, and permeability was measured to fluoresceinisothiocyanate conjugated-dextran (FD-4) six to 48 h later. Intestinal permeability was elevated following CLP at all timepoints measured, peaking at 6 to 12 h. Tight junction proteins claudin 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 13, and 15, Junctional Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A), occludin, and ZO-1 were than assayed by Western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry 12 h after CLP to determine potential mechanisms underlying increases in intestinal permeability. Claudin 2 and JAM-A were increased by sepsis, whereas claudin-5 and occludin were decreased by sepsis. All other tight junction proteins were unchanged. A further timecourse experiment demonstrated that alterations in claudin-2 and occludin were detectable as early as 1 h after the onset of sepsis. Similar experiments were then performed in a different group of mice subjected to Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Mice with pneumonia had an increase in intestinal permeability similar in timecourse and magnitude to that seen in CLP. Similar changes in tight junction proteins were seen in both models of sepsis although mice subjected to pneumonia also had a marked decrease in ZO-1 not seen in CLP. These results indicate that two disparate, clinically relevant models of sepsis

  15. Biomarkers for neonatal sepsis: recent developments

    Mally P

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pradeep Mally,1 Jie Xu,2 Karen D Hendricks-Muñoz2 1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA Abstract: As a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality, neonatal sepsis remains a significant global health challenge. Despite recent advances in the management of neonatal sepsis, including use of more potent antibiotics, timely identification continues to be a frequent and challenging problem in the management of the newborn or high-risk neonate in the neonatal intensive care unit. Lack of specific early objective diagnostic evaluations or specific signs and symptoms, especially in the preterm infant, impedes early identification. However, emerging technologies linked with enhanced understanding of the immature and developing neonatal immune system responses to early infection provide an opportunity to develop critically needed biomarkers to improve early identification in this high-risk population. This review will focus on the field of neonatal sepsis biomarker development, identifying current promising biomarkers that have been investigated and widely utilized, as well as provide insight into recent advances and the rapidly evolving technologies that are being exploited in biomarker development to improve diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis in neonatal sepsis. Keywords: biomarker, cytokines, neonatal sepsis, recent developments, morbidity, mortality, neonates

  16. Soluble L-selectin levels predict survival in sepsis

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Nielsen, Ole H; Strøm, Jens

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate serum soluble L-selectin as a prognostic factor for survival in patients with sepsis.......To evaluate serum soluble L-selectin as a prognostic factor for survival in patients with sepsis....

  17. Infection and T lymphocyte subpopulations: changes associated with bacteremia and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Fishman, J A; Martell, K M; Rubin, R H

    1983-01-01

    Patients with bacteremia, bacterial endocarditis, or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were prospectively studied using monoclonal antibody reagents to assess alterations in T-lymphocyte subpopulations. Patients with endocarditis had significantly higher ratios of T-helper (OKT4+) to T-suppressor-cytotoxic (OKT8+) cells than did patients with bacteremia alone. Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis patients had a mean ratio of 8.49 (range 4.73-22.36) while S aureus bacteremia had a mean ratio of 2.75 (range 2.15 to 3.21). Similar results were found with Staphylococcus epidermidis endocarditis (mean 1.62) and bacteremia (mean 1.23). Klebsiella pneumoniae endocarditis (5.10) and sepsis (4.32), and E coli bacteremia (2.15). Nine male patients with AIDS had markedly depressed ratios (mean 0.25, range 0.04 to 0.67) while eight male homosexuals with unexplained lymphadenopathy ("pre-AIDS") had normal or increased ratios. Bacteremic infections are associated with an increased OKT4+/OKT8+ ratio with the degree of increase dependent upon virulence, location, and duration of infection. The immunomodulating effects of infection are manifested in changes in T-cell subsets, and these measurements can be useful in clinical management. PMID:6094086

  18. Diabetes and sepsis outcomes - it is not all bad news

    Yende, S; Poll

    2009-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of developing infections and sepsis. In this issue of Critical Care Esper and colleagues report on a large survey, involving 12.5 million sepsis cases, that examined the impact of pre-existing diabetes on organ dysfunction during sepsis. Their main conclusion was that diabetes patients, relative to non-diabetics, were less likely to develop respiratory failure and more likely to develop renal failure during the course of sepsis.

  19. Performance improvement in the management of sepsis.

    Schorr, Christa

    2011-03-01

    Sepsis guidelines, although creating a base to allow change in health care practitioner behavior, do not, in and of themselves, effect change. Change only comes with institution of a PI program, converting a core of key goals of guideline recommendations to quality indicators, and giving feedback on performance. These quality indicators are tracked before or during (recommended approach) initiation of hospital-wide education to evaluate baseline performance. When combining multispecialty and multidisciplinary champions in the ED, hospital wards, ICU, and hospital administrative leadership with timely performance feedback, case failure analysis, and re-education, an opportunity to succeed in decreasing mortality in severe sepsis can be achieved. Sepsis bundle indicators require updating as new evidence emerges and new guidelines are published.(30,31) PMID:21316576

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction and resuscitation in sepsis.

    Ruggieri, Albert J; Levy, Richard J; Deutschman, Clifford S

    2010-07-01

    Sepsis is among the most common causes of death in patients in intensive care units in North America and Europe. In the United States, it accounts for upwards of 250,000 deaths each year. Investigations into the pathobiology of sepsis have most recently focused on common cellular and subcellular processes. One possibility would be a defect in the production of energy, which translates to an abnormality in the production of adenosine triphosphate and therefore in the function of mitochondria. This article presents a clear role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of sepsis. What is less clear is the teleology underlying this response. Prolonged mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired biogenesis clearly are detrimental. However, early inhibition of mitochondrial function may be adaptive. PMID:20643307

  1. Leukocyte counts in urine reflect the risk of concomitant sepsis in bacteriuric infants: A retrospective cohort study

    Harper Marvin B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When urine infections are missed in febrile young infants with normal urinalysis, clinicians may worry about the risk – hitherto unverified – of concomitant invasion of blood and cerebrospinal fluid by uropathogens. In this study, we determine the extent of this risk. Methods In a retrospective cohort study of febrile 0–89 day old infants evaluated for sepsis in an urban academic pediatric emergency department (1993–1999, we estimated rates of bacteriuric sepsis (urinary tract infections complicated by sepsis after stratifying infants by urine leukocyte counts higher, or lower than 10 cells/hpf. We compared the global accuracy of leukocytes in urine, leukocytes in peripheral blood, body temperature, and age for predicting bacteruric sepsis. The global accuracy of each test was estimated by calculating the area under its receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests compared count data. Medians for data not normally distributed were compared by the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results Two thousand two hundred forty-nine young infants had a normal screening dipstick. None of these developed bacteremia or meningitis despite positive urine culture in 41 (1.8%. Of 1516 additional urine specimens sent for formal urinalysis, 1279 had 0–9 leukocytes/hpf. Urine pathogens were isolated less commonly (6% vs. 76% and at lower concentrations in infants with few, compared to many urine leukocytes. Urine leukocytes (AUC: 0.94 were the most accurate predictors of bacteruric sepsis. Infants with urinary leukocytes Conclusion In young infants evaluated for fever, leukocytes in urine reflect the likelihood of bacteriuric sepsis. Infants with urinary tract infections missed because of few leukocytes in urine are at relatively low risk of invasive bacterial sepsis by pathogens isolated from urine.

  2. Implementatie van de Surviving Sepsis Campaign bundels : Monitoring van ervaringen

    Rensen, A.; Willems, A.; Stevens, N.; Zeegers, F.; Vloet, Lilian; Schouten, J.

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis komt vaak voor in ziekenhuizen. Ernstige sepsis is verantwoordelijk voor 10 - 20% van alle Intensive Care (IC) opnames en is de belangrijkste doodsoorzaak op niet-cardiale IC?s. De gemiddelde mortaliteit van volwassenen met ernstige sepsis op de IC is 33% en van volwassenen met septische shoc

  3. Indium 111 leucocyte scintigraphy in abdominal sepsis

    We have studied the clinical utility of indium 111 autologous leucocyte scintigraphy retrospectively in 45 patients presenting with suspected intra-abdominal sepsis. The sensitivity was 95% (21/22) and the specificity was 91% (21/23). Some 34 of the studies (17 positive and 17 negative) were considered helpful in furthering patient management (76%) and 8, unhelpful (18%). In 3, the study results were misleading and led to inappropriate treatment. Indium 111 scintigraphy, whether positive or negative, provides information in patients with suspected intra-abdominal sepsis upon which therapeutic decisions can be based. (orig.)

  4. Analysis of Comorbidity of the Patients Affected by Staphylococcal Bacteremia/Sepsis in the Last Ten Years

    Lukovac, Enra; Koluder-Cimic, Nada; Hadzovic-Cengic, Meliha; Baljic, Rusmir; Hadzic, Amir; Gojak, Refet

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY CONFLICT OF INTEREST: none declared. Introduction Staphylococcal bacteremia/sepsis is one of the most serious bacterial infections around the world. In individuals with pre-existing diseases, there is always an increased risk of infections occurring due to impaired immune system, a variety of drug therapy, exposure to a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure and frequent hospitalizations. Objectives To analyze the prevalence of comorbidity in a patient with the staphylococcal bacteremia/sepsis according to the diagnosis, the site of infection and according to the isolated agent. Patients and methods We analyzed the patients affected by the staphylococcal bacteremia/sepsis and treated in the Clinic for Infectious Diseases during a ten-year period. Results 87 patients were included, out of whom 20 (23%) with clinical signs of the bacteremia and 67 (77%) of sepsis. In the analyzed sample, in 36 (41.4%) were not registered comorbidity. Hospital infections are represented by the previous antibiotic, corticosteroid and chemo therapy, pressure ulcers, and different implants. In all comorbidity, the most common isolated bacteria was S. aureus primarily strain MSSA followed by MRSA strain which is more frequent in patients who were surgically treated (comorbidity–various implants). Conclusion The results suggest the importance of being mindful of the staphylococcal etiology of the bacteremia/sepsis in patients with comorbidities due to the selection of an adequate initial empirical therapy and reducing the risks of the septic shock. PMID:24493989

  5. Angiopoietin-2 enhances survival in experimental sepsis induced by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Tzepi, Ira-Maria; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Carrer, Dionyssia-Pinelopi; Tsaganos, Thomas; Claus, Ralf A; Vaki, Ilia; Pelekanou, Aimilia; Kotsaki, Antigone; Tziortzioti, Vassiliki; Topouzis, Stavros; Bauer, Michael; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Levels of circulating angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) increase in sepsis, raising the possibility that Ang-2 acts as a modulator in the sepsis cascade. To investigate this, experimental sepsis was induced in male C57BL6 mice by a multidrug-resistant isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa; survival was determined along with neutrophil tissue infiltration and release of proinflammatory cytokines. Survival was significantly increased either by pretreatment with recombinant Ang-2 2 h before or treatment with recombinant Ang-2 30 min after bacterial challenge. Likewise, Ang-2 pretreatment protected against sepsis-related death elicited by Escherichia coli; however, Ang-2 failed to provide protection in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged mice. The survival advantage of Ang-2 in response to P. aeruginosa challenge was lost in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-deficient mice or neutropenic mice. Infiltration of the liver by neutrophils was elevated in the Ang-2 group compared with saline-treated animals. Serum TNF-α levels were reduced by Ang-2, whereas those of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 remained unchanged. This was accompanied by lower release of TNF-α by stimulated splenocytes. When applied to U937 cells in vitro, heat-killed P. aeruginosa induced the secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α; low levels of exogenous TNF-α synergized with P. aeruginosa. This synergistic effect was abolished after the addition of Ang-2. These results put in evidence a striking protective role of Ang-2 in experimental sepsis evoked by a multidrug-resistant isolate of P. aeruginosa attributed to modulation of TNF-α production and changes in neutrophil migration. The protective role of Ang-2 is shown when whole microorganisms are used and not LPS, suggesting complex interactions with the host immune response. PMID:22859861

  6. Cardiovascular oscillations at the bedside: early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis using heart rate characteristics monitoring

    We have applied principles of statistical signal processing and nonlinear dynamics to analyze heart rate time series from premature newborn infants in order to assist in the early diagnosis of sepsis, a common and potentially deadly bacterial infection of the bloodstream. We began with the observation of reduced variability and transient decelerations in heart rate interval time series for hours up to days prior to clinical signs of illness. We find that measurements of standard deviation, sample asymmetry and sample entropy are highly related to imminent clinical illness. We developed multivariable statistical predictive models, and an interface to display the real-time results to clinicians. Using this approach, we have observed numerous cases in which incipient neonatal sepsis was diagnosed and treated without any clinical illness at all. This review focuses on the mathematical and statistical time series approaches used to detect these abnormal heart rate characteristics and present predictive monitoring information to the clinician

  7. CHANGES OF NITRIC OXIDE AND PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF NITRIC OXIDE INHIBITORS IN NEWBORN RATS WITH SEPSIS

    史源; 李华强; 潘捷; 沈际皋

    1995-01-01

    In a newborn rat model of sepsis, the changes of nitric oxide and the protective effects of methylene blue or/and dexaraethason were investigated. The results revealed that plasma nitric oxide levels were ele-cted at 6 h and peaked at 12 h after bacterial challenge. The treatment with methylene or/and dexam-etbasone was found to Munt hypoglycenua and hyperlacdcemla, to reduce the occurrence rate of loss ot re-sponse to pain, and to prolong the survival time. Moreover, therapy by dexamethasone was shown to de-crease the 24 h mortality. The results suggested that nitric coide play an important role during the course of fatal P. aeruginosa sepsis, hut it is clear that the clinical value of nitric oxide and its inhibitors need to be further studied.

  8. Leberversagen bei Sepsis und Multiorganversagen

    Kapral C

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Eine Störung der Leberfunktion wird bei etwa 20–25% der Patienten mit Organversagen im Rahmen einer schweren Entzündungsreaktion beobachtet. Obwohl der klinische Parameter hierfür – der Anstieg des Bilirubins – in der Regel erst nach Funktionsstörungen anderer Organe auftritt, zeigen sehr sensitive Nachweismethoden einer hepatalen Dysfunktion wie die Indozyangrünclearance, daß die Leberbeteiligung ein sehr frühes Ereignis darstellt. Ursache für die Funktionseinschränkung der Leber sind vor allem Zytokine, die großteils direkt in der Leber selbst auf die verschiedenen Stimuli (Endotoxine, Hypoxie usw. freigesetzt werden. Spezifische Therapiemaßnahmen zur Verbesserung der Leberfunktion stehen dem Kliniker derzeit nicht zur Verfügung. Es gilt auch hier der Grundsatz, daß durch eine frühzeitige Herdsanierung und effektive Kreislauftherapie die Zytokinaktivierung möglichst gering gehalten werden soll, um damit auch Organtoxizitäten zu vermindern. Die zur Verfügung stehenden, kreislaufaktiven Substanzen zeigen eine individuell nur schwer voraussagbare, sehr unterschiedliche Wirkung auf Kreislauf und Funktion der Leber. Einzig Adrenalin dürfte aufgrund der vorliegenden Untersuchungen eine eher ungünstige Wirkung haben und sollte daher nicht zur Anwendung kommen. In der letzten Zeit konnten jedoch durch neue Maßnahmen erste klinische Erfolge nachgewiesen werden, bzw. im Tierexperiment eine Verbesserung der Leberfunktion beobachtet werden. So konnte durch Normalisierung der Blutzuckerkonzentration bei Patienten mit Sepsis eine Verbesserung der Mortalität und auch Verbesserung der mitochondrialen Funktion von Leberzellen beobachtet werden. Durch die Gabe von N-Acetylcystein wurde in Studien an kleinen Fallzahlen eine günstige Wirkung beobachtet, größere Studien werden hier Klarheit schaffen. Ebenfalls in klinischer Erprobung ist die orale Gabe von Gallensäuren, die den Gallensäuregehalt des Darmes erhöhen und damit die

  9. Therapeutic Targets in Sepsis: Past, Present, and Future.

    Seeley, Eric J; Bernard, Gordon R

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotics and fluids have been standard treatment for sepsis since World War II. Many molecular mediators of septic shock have since been identified. In models of sepsis, blocking these mediators improved organ injury and decreased mortality. Clinical trials, however, have failed. The absence of new therapies has been vexing to clinicians, clinical researchers, basic scientists, and the pharmaceutical industry. This article examines the evolution of sepsis therapy and theorizes about why so many well-reasoned therapies have not worked in human trials. We review new molecular targets for sepsis and examine trial designs that might lead to successful treatments for sepsis. PMID:27229636

  10. Surviving Sepsis: Taming a Deadly Immune Response

    ... 5 affected people. It causes symptoms such as fever, chills, rapid breathing, and confusion. Anyone can get sepsis, ... other conditions. Medical personnel look for these signs: Fever or low body temperature (hypothermia) Chills Rapid heart rate Difficulty breathing Skin rash Confusion ...