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Sample records for acoustically induced vibration

  1. CFD Simulation of Acoustic-Induced Vibration in Main Steam Line of APR1400

    Lim, Sang Gyu; Kim, Tae Jun; Kim, Han Gon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In recently, many boiling water reactors (BWRs) implement extended power uprate (EPU) to increase economic benefits. After EPU, Quad Cities power plant has been experienced damage of steam dryers due to acoustic-induced vibration. Acoustic resonance is produced by the interaction between the sound field and an unstable shear layer when the dry steam flows across the closed branch pipes such as safety relief valve(SRV). The unsteady vortices are separated at the leading edge of branch pipe and generated fluctuating pressure wave. After this experience, US-NRC issued that the licensee for new type of reactor should perform a vibration assessment program for an adverse flow effect in the main steam line in accordance with regulatory guideline 1.20 revision 3. In Korea, KHNP CRI implements comprehensive vibration program for steam generator of APR1400 and evaluates acoustic-induced vibration in main steam line using a commercial CFD code, ANSYS CFX 13.0. This paper deals with benchmark analysis to obtain applicability and reliability of commercial code for prediction of acoustic resonance phenomenon in case of single branch pipe test. Based on the benchmark analysis, analysis of main steam line in APR1400 plant is performed. In case of APR1400, five main steam safety valves are installed in the main steam line. Finally, this paper shows a prediction result of acoustic induced vibration characteristic in main steam system of APR1400

  2. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  3. Flow-induced vibration and acoustic behaviour of CANFLEX-LVRF bundles in a Bruce B NGS fuel channel

    Frequency/temperature sweep tests were performed in a high-temperature/high-pressure test channel to determine the acoustic and flow-induced vibration characteristics of the CANFLEX-LVRF bundle. The vibratory response of CANFLEX-LVRF bundles was compared with that of 37-element fuel bundles under Bruce B NGS fuel channel normal operating conditions. The tests were performed with a 12-bundle string of CANFLEX-LVRF bundles as well as a mixed string for the transition core. The tests showed that the LVRF bundles performed as required without failure or gross geometry changes. The mixed fuel strings behaved in a manner similar to that of a string of CANFLEX-LVRF bundles. (author)

  4. Influence of vocal fold stiffness and acoustic loading on flow-induced vibration of a single-layer vocal fold model

    Zhang, Zhaoyan; Neubauer, Juergen; Berry, David A.

    2009-04-01

    The flow-induced vibrations of a single-layer vocal fold model were investigated as a function of vocal fold stiffness, and subglottal and supraglottal acoustic loading. Previously, it was reported that the single-layer vocal fold model failed to vibrate when short, clinically relevant tracheal tubes were used. Moreover, it was reported that the model had a propensity to be acoustically driven, and aerodynamically driven vibration was observed only when a vertical restraint was applied superiorly to the vocal folds. However, in this study involving a wider range of source/tract conditions, the previous conclusions were shown to apply only for the special case of a stiff vocal fold model, for which self-oscillation occurred only when the vocal fold vibration synchronized to either a subglottal or supraglottal resonance. For a more general case, when vocal fold stiffness was decreased, the model did exhibit self-oscillation at short tracheal tubes, and no vertical restraint was needed to induce aerodynamically driven phonation. Nevertheless, the vocal fold vibration transitioned from aerodynamically driven to acoustically driven vibration when one of the subglottal resonance frequencies approximated one of the natural frequencies of the vocal folds. In this region, strong superior-inferior vibrations were observed, the phonation threshold pressure was significantly reduced, and the phonation onset frequency was heavily influenced by the dominant acoustic resonance. For acoustically driven phonation, a compliant subglottal system always lowered phonation threshold. However, an inertive vocal tract could either increase or decrease phonation threshold pressure, depending on the phonation frequency.

  5. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  6. Impact of flow induced vibration acoustic loads on the design of the Laguna Verde Unit 2 steam dryer

    Industry experience with Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) has shown that increasing the steam flow through the main steam lines (MSLs) to implement an extended power up rate (EPU) may lead to amplified acoustic loads on the steam dryer, which may negatively affect the structural integrity of the component. The source of these acoustic loads has been found to be acoustic resonance of the side branches on the MSLs, specifically, coupling of the vortex shedding frequency and natural acoustic frequency of safety relief valves (SRVs). The resonance that results from this coupling can contribute significant acoustic energy into the MSL system, which may propagate upstream into the reactor pressure vessel steam dome and drive structural vibration of steam dryer components. This can lead to high-cycle fatigue issues. Lock-in between the vortex shedding frequency and SRV natural frequency, as well as the ability for acoustic energy to propagate into the MSL system, are a function of many things, including the plant operating conditions, geometry of the MSL/SRV junction, and placement of SRVs with respect to each other on the MSLs. Comision Federal de Electricidad and Westinghouse designed, fabricated, and installed acoustic side branches (ASBs) on the MSLs which effectively act in the system as an energy absorber, where the acoustic standing wave generated in the side-branch is absorbed and dissipated inside the ASB. These ASBs have been very successful in reducing the amount of acoustic energy which propagates into the steam dome. In addition, modifications to the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant Unit 2 steam dryer have been completed to reduce the stress levels in critical locations in the dryer. The objective of this paper is to describe the acoustic side branch concept and the design iterative processes that were undertaken at Laguna Verde Unit 2 to achieve a steam dryer design that meets the guidelines of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Boiler and Pressure

  7. Impact of flow induced vibration acoustic loads on the design of the Laguna Verde Unit 2 steam dryer

    Forsyth, D. R.; Wellstein, L. F.; Theuret, R. C.; Han, Y.; Rajakumar, C. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States); Amador C, C.; Sosa F, W., E-mail: forsytdr@westinghouse.com [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Km 42.5 Carretera Cardel-Nautla, 91680 Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Industry experience with Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) has shown that increasing the steam flow through the main steam lines (MSLs) to implement an extended power up rate (EPU) may lead to amplified acoustic loads on the steam dryer, which may negatively affect the structural integrity of the component. The source of these acoustic loads has been found to be acoustic resonance of the side branches on the MSLs, specifically, coupling of the vortex shedding frequency and natural acoustic frequency of safety relief valves (SRVs). The resonance that results from this coupling can contribute significant acoustic energy into the MSL system, which may propagate upstream into the reactor pressure vessel steam dome and drive structural vibration of steam dryer components. This can lead to high-cycle fatigue issues. Lock-in between the vortex shedding frequency and SRV natural frequency, as well as the ability for acoustic energy to propagate into the MSL system, are a function of many things, including the plant operating conditions, geometry of the MSL/SRV junction, and placement of SRVs with respect to each other on the MSLs. Comision Federal de Electricidad and Westinghouse designed, fabricated, and installed acoustic side branches (ASBs) on the MSLs which effectively act in the system as an energy absorber, where the acoustic standing wave generated in the side-branch is absorbed and dissipated inside the ASB. These ASBs have been very successful in reducing the amount of acoustic energy which propagates into the steam dome. In addition, modifications to the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant Unit 2 steam dryer have been completed to reduce the stress levels in critical locations in the dryer. The objective of this paper is to describe the acoustic side branch concept and the design iterative processes that were undertaken at Laguna Verde Unit 2 to achieve a steam dryer design that meets the guidelines of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Boiler and Pressure

  8. Analysis of Vibration and Acoustic Radiation of Submarine Hull Induced by Longitudinal Vibration of Propulsion Shafting%推进轴系纵向振动引起的艇体声振特性分析

    张赣波; 赵耀

    2012-01-01

    The pulsatile thrust of propeller induced by asymmetrical wake field can cause longitudinal vibration of the propulsion shafting. The vibration will transmit through the shafting, thrust bearing and foundation to the submarine hull, and induce the low frequency underwater acoustic radiation of the hull. Considering the coupled effect of shafting, foundation and the hull, the structural model of the propulsion shafting was established. The propulsion shafting -submarine hull coupled vibration was analyzed, and the acoustic radiation field of the hull was calculated by FEM/BEM based on the mode superposition method. The results show that the longitudinal vibration mode is one of main modes which participates the acoustic radiation. By instilling a dynamic vibration absorber between the thrust bearing and its foundation, the transmission of longitudinal vibration to the hull can be decreased. The acoustic radiation of hull induced by longitudinal vibration of propulsion shafting can be controlled.%螺旋桨在艇体艉部不均匀伴流场中旋转产生的脉动推力激励起推进轴系纵向振动,振动经推力轴承基座传递至艇体,引起艇体水下低频辐射噪声.通过建立推进轴系、推力轴承基座和艇体耦合结构模型,分析推进轴系—艇体的耦合振动模态,结果显示,艇体弹性支撑边界条件对推进轴系的纵向振动特性有一定影响.采用基于模态叠加法的有限元结合边界元方法分析推进轴系纵向振动激励下的艇体水下辐射声场,分析表明,艇体第1阶纵向振动模态是参与艇体水下声辐射的主模态.进一步在推力轴承及其基座间安装动力吸振器以减小推进轴系纵向振动向艇体的传递,使艇体水下辐射噪声得到一定程度上的控制.

  9. Adaptive structural vibration control of acoustic deflector

    Ostasevicius, Vytautas; Palevicius, Arvydas; Ragulskis, Minvydas; Dagys, Donatas; Janusas, Giedrius

    2004-06-01

    Vehicle interior acoustics became an important design criterion. Both legal restrictions and the growing demand for comfort, force car manufacturers to optimize the vibro-acoustic behavior of their products. The main source of noise is, of course, the engine, but sometimes some ill-designed cover or other shell structure inside the car resonates and makes unpredicted noise. To avoid this, we must learn the genesis mechanism of such vibrations, having as subject complex 3D shells. The swift development of computer technologies opens the possibility to numerically predict and optimize the vibrations and noises.

  10. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Vibration Sensors

    Jerzy Filipiak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  11. Acoustic vibration induced high electromagnetic responses of Fe3O4 nano-hollow spheres in the THz regime

    Herein, we investigate the origin of enhanced absorption and complex conductivity of magnetite (Fe3O4) nano-hollow spheres (NHSs) in contrast to its nanoparticles (NPs) configuration in the frequency range 0.4–2.0 THz. The maximum absorption for NHSs and NPs of the same average diameter (∼100 nm) are found to be 246.27 and 48.35 cm−1 at 1.8 THz, respectively. A detailed study suggests that the multiple resonance peaks in the absorption spectra are due to low frequency acoustic vibrational phonon modes of Fe3O4 nanostructures. Moreover, we demonstrate that the magnitude of total absorption can be tailored by varying the shell thickness of NHSs. It is found to increase with increasing shell thickness, and attain a maximum value of 498.5 cm−1 for the NHSs of average diameter 350 nm at 1.8 THz. The invariance of frequency dependent magnetic permeability points out that the absorption is basically due to dielectric loss instead of magnetic loss. The enhanced THz conductivity of Fe3O4 NHSs, as compared to NPs is described in light of thermally activated polaronic hopping which is found to increase with increasing THz absorption. Finally, the size dependent THz conductivity of NHSs confirms its sole dependence on the magnitude of THz absorptivity. (paper)

  12. Numerical simulation of flow induced airfoil vibrations

    Sváček, P.; Feistauer, M.; Horáček, Jaromír

    Vol. II. Paříž : Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, 2004 - (Langre, E.; Axisa, F.), s. 57-62 ISBN 2-7302-1141-1. [International Conference on Flow Induced Vibration - FIV 2004 /8./. Paříž (FR), 06.07.2004-09.07.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/02/0391 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : unsteady Navier-Stokes equations * nonlinear aeroelasticity * postcritical vibrations Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  13. Acoustics and vibration comfort; Akustik und Schwingungskomfort

    Penne, Filip; Mueller, Torsten [BMW Group, Muenchen (Germany). Akustik und Schwingungskomfort fuer die mittlere und grosse Modellreihe

    2008-11-15

    With the new BMW 7 Series, BMW is continuing its success story in the luxury class. Within the BMW product portfolio, the 7 Series is the pinnacle in terms of vehicle dynamics, fuel consumption and comfort. This unique combination of efficient dynamics on one hand and an extremely convincing level of comfort on the other hand comprises the character of this automobile. Vehicle acoustics and vibration comfort make a significant contribution towards the overall impression of ''sheer driving pleasure''. (orig.)

  14. Organ pipe resonance induced vibration in piping system

    Acoustic-induced vibration is a fluid-structure interaction phenomenon. The feedback mechanism between the acoustic pressure pulsation and the structure movements determines the excited acoustic modes which, in turn, amplify the structure response when confidence frequency and mode shape matching occurs. The acoustic modes are not determined from the acoustic boundary conditions alone, structure feedback is as responsible for determining the acoustic modes and shaping the resulting forcing functions. Acoustic-induced piping vibration, when excited, does not attenuate much with distance. Pressure pulsation can be transmitted throughout the piping system and its branch connections. It is this property that makes vibration monitoring difficult, because vibration can surface at locations far away from the acoustic source when resonance occurs. For a large piping system with interconnected branches, the monitoring task can be formidable, particularly when there is no indication what the real source is. In organ pipe resonance induced vibration, the initiating acoustic source may be inconspicuous or unavoidable during operation. In these situations, the forcing function approach can offer an optimal tool for vibration assessment. The forcing function approach was used in the evaluation of a standby steam piping vibration problem. Monitoring locations and instrument specifications were determined from the acoustic eigenfunction profiles. Measured data confirmed the presence of coherent vibrations in the large bore piping. The developed forcing function permits design evaluation of the piping system, which leads to remedial actions and enables fatigue life determination, thus providing confidence to system operation. The forcing function approach is shown to be useful in finding potential vibration area and verifying the integrity of weak structure links. Application is to steam lines at BWR plants

  15. Materials for Damping Ambient Acoustic and Vibration Signals Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-term exposure to even relatively low levels of acoustic and vibration signals has been shown to be potentially harmful to humans. A new class of piezoelectric...

  16. Research on modal analysis of structural acoustic radiation using structural vibration modes and acoustic radiation modes

    LI Sheng; ZHAO Deyou

    2004-01-01

    Modal analysis of structural acoustic radiation from a vibrating structure is discussed using structural vibration modes and acoustic radiation modes based on the quadratic form of acoustic power. The finite element method is employed for discretisizing the structure.The boundary element method and Rayleigh integral are used for modeling the acoustic fluid.It is shown that the power radiated by a single vibration mode is to increase the radiated power and the effect of modal interaction can lead to an increase or a decrease or no change in the radiated power, moreover, control of vibration modes is a good way to reduce both vibration and radiated sound as long as the influence of interaction of vibration modes on sound radiation is insignificant. Stiffeners may change mode shapes of a plate and thus change radiation efficiency of the plate's modes. The CHIEF method is adopted to obtain an acoustic radiation mode formulation without the nonuniqueness difficulty at critical frequencies for three-dimensional structures by using Moore-Penrose inverse. A pulsating cube is involved to verify the formulation. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical and analytical solutions. The shapes and radiation efficiencies of acoustic radiation modes of the cube are discussed. The structural acoustic control using structural vibration modes and acoustic radiation modes are compared and studied.

  17. Natural vibration of a spherical shell with an acoustical medium

    Zolotarev, Igor

    GarmischPartenkirchen: XX, 2000, s. 5-10. [Proceedings of international congress on Sound and vibrations /7./.. Garmisch-Partenkirchen (NE), 04.07.2000-07.07.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GV106/98/K019 Keywords : spherical shell * acoustical medium Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  18. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-09-01

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  19. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2014-09-08

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  20. Acoustical comfort of vehicles: A combination of sound and vibration

    Genuit, Klaus; Schutte-Fortkamp, Brigitte; Fiebig, Andre

    2005-09-01

    As vehicles become more and more quiet, the customer's sensitivity to acoustical comfort increases. The acoustical comfort is not independent of the vibrations the driver can feel in the seat and at the steering. The passenger of a vehicle must be regarded as part of a vibro-acoustic system. Correspondingly, the subjective judgement which passengers make about their impression of levels of acoustic comfort encompasses both sound and vibration. Achievement in this field depends on obtaining knowledge about the interaction between sound and vibration and how these factors impact subjective evaluation. To save time and money prediction tools for the estimation of sound and vibration contributions into the vehicle cabin are very important in order to simulate the final comfort with respect to sound and vibration. Based on the binaural transfer path analysis in combination with the binaural transfer path synthesis a sound and vibration reproduction in a so-called SoundCar can be realized with a very good simulation of a real situation of a car. First research tests completed for the European research project OBELICS (Objective Evaluation of Interior Car Sound) have shown that the use of SoundCar may result in more reliable sound characteristic and quality evaluation.

  1. Vibration and Acoustic Radiation from Submerged Spherical Double-Shell

    陈军明; 黄玉盈; 陈应波

    2003-01-01

    Based on the motion differential equations of vibration and acoustic coupling system for a thin elastic spherical double-shell with several elastic plates attached to the shells, in which Dirac-δ functions are employed to introduce the forces and moments applied by the attachments, and by means of expanding field quantities as the Legendre series, a semi-analytic solution is derived for the solution to the vibration and acoustic radiation from a submerged spherical double-shell. This solution has a satisfying computational effectiveness and precision for arbitrary frequency range excitation. It is concluded that the internal plates attached to shells can change significantly the mechanical and acoustical characteristics of shells, and make the coupling system have a very rich resonance frequency spectrum. Moreover, the present method can be used to study the acoustic radiation mechanism of the type of structure.

  2. Active elastic metamaterials with applications in vibration and acoustics

    Pope, Simon A.; Laalej, Hatim; Daley, Stephen; Reynolds, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Elastic metamaterials provide a new approach to solving existing problems in vibration and acoustics. They have also been associated with novel concepts such as acoustic invisibility and subwavelength imaging. To be applied to many of the proposed applications a metamaterial would need to have the desired mass density and elastic moduli over a prescribed frequency band. Importantly active metamaterials provide a degree of adaptability. This paper will focus on extending a previous theoretical...

  3. Chaotic vortex induced vibrations

    Zhao, J.; Sheridan, J. [Fluids Laboratory for Aeronautical and Industrial Research (FLAIR), Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Leontini, J. S. [Department of Mechanical and Product Design Engineering, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Lo Jacono, D. [Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT), CNRS, UPS and Université de Toulouse, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2014-12-15

    This study investigates the nature of the dynamic response of an elastically mounted cylinder immersed in a free stream. A novel method is utilized, where the motion of the body during a free vibration experiment is accurately recorded, and then a second experiment is conducted where the cylinder is externally forced to follow this recorded trajectory. Generally, the flow response during both experiments is identical. However, particular regimes exist where the flow response is significantly different. This is taken as evidence of chaos in these regimes.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Airfoil Vibrations Induced by Turbulent Flow

    Feistauer, M.; Horáček, Jaromír; Sváček, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2015), s. 146-188. ISSN 1815-2406 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/0207 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : fluid-structure interaction * flow induced vibrations * turbulence models * finite element method Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.943, year: 2014

  5. Assessing the severity of fatigue crack using acoustics modulated by hysteretic vibration for a cantilever beam

    He, Qingbo; Lin, Yin

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates fatigue crack severity assessment using acoustics modulated by hysteretic vibration for a cantilever beam. In this study, a nonlinear oscillator system is constructed to induce the hysteretic frequency response of the cantilever beam in dynamics, and the hysteretic vibration is then used to modulate the acoustic waves to generate the vibro-acoustic modulation (VAM) effect. Through modulation of hysteretic vibration, the hysteretic response of the VAM can be achieved. The experimental results further validated that the VAM hysteresis phenomenon can be enhanced with the increase of crack severity owing to the change of beam's effective stiffness. Simulations in the proposed physical model explained the reason of enhancement of hysteresis phenomenon. Combined with nonlinear bistable structural model, a fatigue crack severity assessment approach was proposed by evaluating the hysteretic region (e.g., bandwidth or jumping frequency) in the vibration frequency response of the VAM effect. The reported study is valuable in building a monotonic relationship to assess the severity of fatigue crack by a nonlinear acoustics approach.

  6. Man-Induced Vibrations

    Jönsson, Jeppe; Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    1994-01-01

    Human motion can cause various types of periodic or transient dynamic loads. The periodic loads are mainly due to jumping, running, dancing, walking and body rocking. Transient loads primarily result from single impulse loads, such as jumping and falling from elevated positions. The response...... to these loads are of primary interest for the structural engineer, whereas the exact load as a function of time generally is of minor importance. This is true when the loading time (contact duration) tp is smal1 compared to the largest natura1 periods Tn = 2π/ωn of the structure. The present study is mainly...... work has been done on the measurement of the exact load functions and related reponse analysis. A recent work using a spectral description has been performed by Per-Erik Erikson and includes a good literature survey. Bachmann and Ammann give a good overview of vibrations caused by human activity. Other...

  7. Measurement of vibration, flow and acoustic characteristics

    Horáček, Jaromír; Bula, Vítězslav; Veselý, Jan

    Plzeň : University of West Bohemia, 2012 - (Adámek, V.; Zajíček, M.; Jonášová, A.). s. 1-2 ISBN 978-80-261-0157-4. [Computational mechanics 2012 /28./. 12.11.2012-14.11.2012, Špičák] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/12/1306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : biomechanics of voice * impact stress * voice production modelling Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  8. Acoustically-Induced Electrical Signals

    Brown, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have observed electrical signals excited by and moving along with an acoustic pulse propagating in a sandstone sample. Using resonance we are now studying the characteristics of this acousto-electric signal and determining its origin and the controlling physical parameters. Four rock samples with a range of porosities, permeabilities, and mineralogies were chosen: Berea, Boise, and Colton sandstones and Austin Chalk. Pore water salinity was varied from deionized water to sea water. Ag-AgCl electrodes were attached to the sample and were interfaced to a 4-wire electrical resistivity system. Under computer control, the acoustic signals were excited and the electrical response was recorded. We see strong acoustically-induced electrical signals in all samples, with the magnitude of the effect for each rock getting stronger as we move from the 1st to the 3rd harmonics in resonance. Given a particular fluid salinity, each rock has its own distinct sensitivity in the induced electrical effect. For example at the 2nd harmonic, Berea Sandstone produces the largest electrical signal per acoustic power input even though Austin Chalk and Boise Sandstone tend to resonate with much larger amplitudes at the same harmonic. Two effects are potentially responsible for this acoustically-induced electrical response: one the co-seismic seismo-electric effect and the other a strain-induced resistivity change known as the acousto-electric effect. We have designed experimental tests to separate these mechanisms. The tests show that the seismo-electric effect is dominant in our studies. We note that these experiments are in a fluid viscosity dominated seismo-electric regime, leading to a simple interpretation of the signals where the electric potential developed is proportional to the local acceleration of the rock. Toward a test of this theory we have measured the local time-varying acoustic strain in our samples using a laser vibrometer.

  9. Laser method of acoustical emission control from vibrating surfaces

    Motyka, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    For limitation of the noise in environment, the necessity occurs of determining and location of sources of sounds emitted from surfaces of many machines and devices, assuring in effect the possibility of suitable constructional changes implementation, targeted at decreasing of their nuisance. In the paper, the results of tests and calculations are presented for plane surface sources emitting acoustic waves. The tests were realized with the use of scanning laser vibrometer which enabled remote registration and the spectral analysis of the surfaces vibrations. The known hybrid digital method developed for determination of sound wave emission from such surfaces divided into small finite elements was slightly modified by distinguishing the phase correlations between such vibrating elements. The final method being developed may find use in wide range of applications for different forms of vibrations of plane surfaces.

  10. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  11. Coupling of Acoustic Vibrations to Plasmon Resonances in Metal Nanoparticles

    Ahmed, Aftab; Pelton, Matthew; Guest, Jeffrey

    Measurements of acoustic vibrations in nanoparticles provide a unique opportunity to study mechanical phenomena at nanometer length scales and picosecond time scales. Phonon vibrations of plasmonic nanoparticles are of particular interest, due to their large extinction efficiencies, and high sensitivity to surrounding medium. There are two mechanisms that transduce the mechanical oscillations into plasmon resonance shift: (1) changes in polarizability; and (2) changes in electron density. These mechanisms have been used to explain qualitatively the origin of the transient-absorption signals, however, a quantitative connection has not yet been made except for simple geometries. Here, we present a method to quantitatively determine the coupling between vibrational modes and plasmon modes in noble-metal nanoparticles including spheres, shells, rods and cubes. We separately determine the parts of the optical response that are due to shape changes and to changes in electron density, and we relate the optical signals to the symmetries of the vibrational and plasmon modes. These results clarify reported experimental results, and should help guide the optimization of future experiments.

  12. CRBRP flow induced vibration program

    The program to assure the structural adequacy of Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBRP) components during its planned 30 years of operation is described. The program includes (1) an assessment of reactor components relative to their susceptibility to FIV, (2) designing to minimize component excitation due to Fluid induced vibrations (FIV), (3) scale model tests to measure structural response during simulated operating conditions and (4) preoperational tests. An overview of the CRBRP test program is described. Additionally, details of scale model testing of reactor internals and the steam generator is described in more detail. (author)

  13. Acoustic Pressure Waves in Vibrating 3-D Laminated Beam-Plate Enclosures

    Charles A. Osheku

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of structural vibration on the propagation of acoustic pressure waves through a cantilevered 3-D laminated beam-plate enclosure is investigated analytically. For this problem, a set of well-posed partial differential equations governing the vibroacoustic wave interaction phenomenon are formulated and matched for the various vibrating boundary surfaces. By employing integral transforms, a closed form analytical expression is computed suitable for vibroacoustic modeling, design analysis, and general aerospace defensive applications. The closed-form expression takes the form of a kernel of polynomials for acoustic pressure waves showing the influence of linear interface pressure variation across the axes of vibrating boundary surfaces. Simulated results demonstrate how the mode shapes and the associated natural frequencies can be easily computed. It is shown in this paper that acoustic pressure waves propagation are dynamically stable through laminated enclosures with progressive decrement in interfacial pressure distribution under the influence of high excitation frequencies irrespective of whether the induced flow is subsonic, sonic , supersonic, or hypersonic. Hence, in practice, dynamic stability of hypersonic aircrafts or jet airplanes can be further enhanced by replacing their noise transmission systems with laminated enclosures.

  14. Characteristics of Vibration Induced by Cavitation

    WANG Guo-yu; TAO Lei; LIU Shu-yan; QIAN Jian-jun

    2005-01-01

    Cavitation-induced vibration characteristics and the relations between the vibration and cavitation are studied. Cavitation vibrations are measured around a model hollow-jet valve by an accelerometer under cavitating and non-cavitating conditions. The measurement data is analyzed by FFT method. The corresponding cavitating flow patterns are photographed by a high-speed camera with an xenon flash lamp. The frequency band of the vibration induced by cavitation is determined. To compare the vibration intensities under different cavitation conditions, a definition of vibration acceleration level is introduced based on power spectral density of the vibration. By the analysis of vibration, the definitions of characteristic cavitation number are suggested. According to these cavitation numbers, the cavitation process is divided into three stages, that is, incipient cavitation, subcavitation and supercavitation.

  15. Acoustic and Vibration Control for an Underwater Structure under Mechanical Excitation

    Shi-Jian Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic and vibration control for an underwater structure under mechanical excitation has been investigated by using negative feedback control algorithm. The underwater structure is modeled with cylindrical shells, conical shells, and circular bulkheads, of which the motion equations are built with the variational approach, respectively. Acoustic property is analyzed by the Helmholtz integration formulation with boundary element method. Based on negative feedback control algorithm, a control loop with a coupling use of piezoelectric sensor and actuator is built, and accordingly some numerical examples are carried out on active control of structural vibration and acoustic response. Effects of geometrical and material parameters on acoustic and vibration properties are investigated and discussed.

  16. Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization

    Smith, M. K.; James, A.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal management is critical to a number of technologies used in a microgravity environment and in Earth-based systems. Examples include electronic cooling, power generation systems, metal forming and extrusion, and HVAC (heating, venting, and air conditioning) systems. One technique that can deliver the large heat fluxes required for many of these technologies is two-phase heat transfer. This type of heat transfer is seen in the boiling or evaporation of a liquid and in the condensation of a vapor. Such processes provide very large heat fluxes with small temperature differences. Our research program is directed toward the development of a new, two-phase heat transfer cell for use in a microgravity environment. In this paper, we consider the main technology used in this cell, a novel technique for the atomization of a liquid called vibration-induced droplet atomization. In this process, a small liquid droplet is placed on a thin metal diaphragm that is made to vibrate by an attached piezoelectric transducer. The vibration induces capillary waves on the free surface of the droplet that grow in amplitude and then begin to eject small secondary droplets from the wave crests. In some situations, this ejection process develops so rapidly that the entire droplet seems to burst into a small cloud of atomized droplets that move away from the diaphragm at speeds of up to 50 cm/s. By incorporating this process into a heat transfer cell, the active atomization and transport of the small liquid droplets could provide a large heat flux capability for the device. Experimental results are presented that document the behavior of the diaphragm and the droplet during the course of a typical bursting event. In addition, a simple mathematical model is presented that qualitatively reproduces all of the essential features we have seen in a burst event. From these two investigations, we have shown that delayed droplet bursting results when the system passes through a resonance

  17. Effects of boundary conditions on vibrating mode of acoustic logging dipole transducer

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic transducer is an important part of acoustic well logging tool. In this paper,ANSYS software package is used to design acoustic dipole transducer and simulate vibrating mode of the dipole transducer in different mechanical boundary conditions. The results show that boundary conditions influence the number of vibrating mode in the same frequency band and the frequency value of the same vibrating mode. Several acoustic dipole transducers are designed according to the results of numerical simulation and laboratory measurements. The basic frequency of vibrating mode of experi-ment has good agreement with that of simulation. The numerical simulation plays a good guidance role in designing,producing and correctly installing the acoustic dipole transducer.

  18. Flow induced vibrations of piping system (Vibration sources - Mechanical response of the pipes)

    In order to design the supports of piping system, an estimation of the vibration induced by the fluid conveyed through the pipes are generally needed. For that purpose it is necessary. To evaluate the power spectra of all the main sources generated by the flow. These sources are located at the singular points of the circuit (enlargements, bends, valves, etc. ...). To calculate the modal parameters of fluid containing pipes. This paper presents: a methodical study of the most current singularities. Inter-correlation spectra of local pressure fluctuation downstream from the singularity and correlation spectra of associated acoustical sources have been measured. A theory of noise generation by unsteady flow in internal acoustics has been developed. All these results are very useful for evaluating the source characteristics in most practical pipes. A comparison between the calculation and the results of an experimental test has shown a good agreement

  19. Enhanced vibration based energy harvesting using embedded acoustic black holes

    Zhao, L.; Semperlotti, F.; Conlon, S. C.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of dynamic structural tailoring via the concept of an Acoustic Black Hole (ABH) to enhance the performance of piezoelectric based energy harvesting from operational mechanical vibrations. The ABH is a variable thickness structural feature that can be embedded in the host structure allowing a smooth reduction of the phase velocity while minimizing the amplitude of reflected waves. The ABH thickness variation is typically designed according to power-law profiles. As a propagating wave enters the ABH, it is progressively slowed down while its wavelength is compressed. This effect results in structural areas with high energy density that can be exploited effectively for energy harvesting. The potential of ABH for energy harvesting is shown via a numerical study based on fully coupled finite element electromechanical models of an ABH tapered plate with surface mounted piezo-transducers. The performances of the novel design are evaluated by direct comparison with a non-tapered structure in terms of energy ratios and attenuation indices. Results show that the tailored structural design allows a drastic increase in the harvested energy both for steady state and transient excitation. Performance dependencies of key design parameters are also investigated.

  20. Prediction of induced vibrations in stall

    Thirstrup Petersen, J.; Thomsen, K.; Aagaard Madsen, H. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The main results from recent research in stall induced vibrations are presented. The focus is on the edgewise blade vibrations, which during the last decade have turned out to be a potential threat against the stable operation of stall regulated wind turbines and a fact, which must be dealt with by the designer. The basic physical explanation for the phenomenon and examples of design precaution, which can be taken, are presented. (au)

  1. Damping Evaluation for Free Vibration of Spherical Structures in Elastodynamic-Acoustic Interaction

    Joumaa, Hady k

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the free vibration of elastic spherical structures in the presence of an externally unbounded acoustic medium. In this vibration, damping associated with the radiation of energy from the confined solid medium to the surrounding acoustic medium is observed. Evaluating the coupled system response (solid displacement and acoustic pressure) and characterizing the acoustic radiation damping in conjunction with the media properties are the main objectives of this research. In this work, acoustic damping is demonstrated for two problems: the thin spherical shell and the solid sphere. The mathematical approach followed in solving these coupled problems is based on the Laplace transform method. The linear under-damped harmonic oscillator is the reference model for damping estimation. The damping evaluation is performed in frequency as well as in time domains; both investigations lead to identical damping factor expressions.

  2. Flow induced vibration in pump impellers

    The complex nature of flow-induced vibration (FIV) has led prominent researchers in the field to conclude that it is extremely important to understand the flow-induced vibration mechanism in order to design out of the problem (DOP), rather than to attempt to design the problem area on the basis of analysis with a high degree of certitude (i.e., predicting system response). Designing out of the problem may not be affected by addressing one parameter but rather several: structural contour, material selection, flow properties, structural stiffness, damping, and fluid-structure coupling In this paper the mechanism of flow induced vibration fatigue failure of large circulating water pumps is discussed. This paper provides an overview of the inter-relationship of finite element and theoretical analysis, component and material testing, operational data, fabrication, and repair practices

  3. The statistical distributed source boundary point method to calculate the acoustic radiation from the random vibrating body

    WANGXiufeng; CHENXinzhao; LIUZhao

    2003-01-01

    The statistical distributed source boundary point method (SDSBPM) put forward is applied to calculate the acoustic radiation from the random vibrating body. A detailed description of this method is presented. A test for the SDSBPM is carried out through the random vibrating sphere and the random vibrating cuboid. An experiment on the exterior acoustic radiation of a random vibrating simulation axial box of the lathe tool is performed in a semi-anechoic chamber.

  4. Structural Design Optimization On Thermally Induced Vibration

    The numerical method of design optimization for structural thermally induced vibration is originally studied in this paper and implemented in application software JIFEX. The direct and adjoint methods of sensitivity analysis for thermal induced vibration coupled with both linear and nonlinear transient heat conduction is firstly proposed. Based on the finite element method, the structural linear dynamics is treated simultaneously with coupled linear and nonlinear transient heat structural linear dynamics is treated simultaneously with coupled linear and nonlinear transient heat conduction. In the thermal analysis model, the nonlinear heat conduction considered is result from the radiation and temperature-dependent materials. The sensitivity analysis of transient linear and nonlinear heat conduction is performed with the precise time integration method. And then, the sensitivity analysis of structural transient dynamics is performed by the Newmark method. Both the direct method and the adjoint method are employed to derive the sensitivity equations of thermal vibration, and there are two adjoint vectors of structure and heat conduction respectively. The coupling effect of heat conduction on thermal vibration in the sensitivity analysis is particularly investigated. With coupling sensitivity analysis, the optimization model is constructed and solved by the sequential linear programming or sequential quadratic programming algorithm. The methods proposed have been implemented in the application software JIFEX of structural design optimization, and numerical examples are given to illustrate the methods and usage of structural design optimization on thermally induced vibration

  5. Acoustic Levitation Transportation of Small Objects Using a Ring-type Vibrator

    Thomas, Gilles P. L.; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Adamowski, Julio C.; Silva, Eḿílio C. N.

    A new device for noncontact transportation of small solid objects is presented here. Ultrasonic flexural vibrations are generated along the ring shaped vibrator using two Langevin transducers and by using a reflector parallel to the vibrator, small particles are trapped at the nodal points of the resulting acoustic standing wave. The particles are then moved by generating a traveling wave along the vibrator, which can be done by modulating the vibration amplitude of the transducers. The working principle of the traveling wave along the vibrator has been modeled by the superposition of two orthogonal standing waves, and the position of the particles can be predicted by using finite element analysis of the vibrator and the resulting acoustic field. A prototype consisting of a 3 mm thick, 220 mm long, 50 mm wide and 52 mm radius aluminum ring-type vibrator and a reflector of the same length and width was built and small polystyrene spheres have been successfully transported along the straight parts of the vibrator.

  6. Stochastic analysis of self-induced vibrations

    Rüdinger, Finn; Krenk, Steen

    Vortex-induced vibrations of a structurl element are modelled as a non-linear stochastic single-degree-of-freedom system. The deterministic part of the governing equation represents laminar flow conditions with a stationary non-zero solution corresponding to lock-in. Across-wind turbulence is...

  7. Stochastic analysis of self-induced vibrations

    Rüdinger, Finn; Krenk, Steen

    2002-01-01

    Vortex-induced vibrations of a structurl element are modelled as a non-linear stochastic single-degree-of-freedom system. The deterministic part of the governing equation represents laminar flow conditions with a stationary non-zero solution corresponding to lock-in. Across-wind turbulence is...

  8. Analyses of Acoustic Streaming Generated by Four Ultrasonic Vibrators in a Vessel

    Nakagawa, Masafumi

    2004-05-01

    When ultrasonic waves are applied, the heat transfer at a heated surface in water increases markedly. The origin of this increase in heat transfer is thought to be due to the agitation effect from the microjets of cavitation and from acoustic streaming. The method in which four vibrators are used has the ability of further enhancing heat transfer. This paper presents the method using four vibrators to eject an acoustic stream jet at a selected position in the vessel. Analyses of this method are performed to establish it theoretically and to compare with an experiment previously conducted. The analyses shown in this research indicate that the aspects of acoustic streaming generated by the four vibrators in the vessel can be correctly predicted and provide a foundation for the development of using this method for the enhancement of heat transfer.

  9. Convergence of intense aerial acoustic waves radiated by a rectangular transverse vibrating plate

    Nakai, Tomoki; Asami, Takuya; Miura, Hikaru

    2016-07-01

    A stripe-mode rectangular transverse vibrating plate can be used as a sound source that emits intense ultrasonic waves in air by placing a jut driving point outside the vibrating plate. The aim of this research was to use this vibrating plate to focus sound waves in the direction perpendicular to the nodal lines of the vibrating plate, which differs from the conventional direction. In this study, we investigated new methods for focusing the emitted sound waves by arranging reflective plates around the vibrating plate, using a design equation for each node between nodes in the vibrating plate, and placing additional reflective plates at an outer position beyond the convergence point, and found that a powerful acoustic field can be formed at an arbitrary position.

  10. Effect of the free surface and the rigid plane on structural vibration and acoustic radiation

    ZOU Yuanjie; ZHAO Deyou; LI Sheng

    2004-01-01

    The coupled fluid-structure interaction equation is established for bodies in the haft-space fluid domain, especially sitting on the infinite plane, based on the BEM (Boundary Element Method) theory. Then, the natural frequencies, vibration responses and the acoustic radiation for a box are calculated, and the effect of the free surface and the rigid plane is discussed. Finally, several relative factors including the plate thickness, the structure damping and the distance between the body and the infinite plane are studied. The results show that the effect of the free surface and the rigid plane on the structural natural frequencies, vibration responses and the acoustic radiation cannot be ignored.

  11. Ice induced vibrations of offshore structures

    E.A. Salganik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article was to analyze the process of the dynamic interaction between ice and offshore structures and find conditions of vibration beginnings. The problems of creating a full-scale finite element model of ice and offshore structure interaction and comparison of the received results of vibration conditions with the field data were solved. Modeling was realized with the finite element analysis software ANSYS. The problems of modeling cracks formation, checking the multilateral model using basic ice strength tests and finding ice loads level on different types of structures were solved in order to create a destructible ice model. The object of the investigation is the role of elastic and inertial offshore structure parameters and geometrical and dynamical ice field parameters in the process of ice-induced structure vibrations. Molikpaq drilling and oil production platform in Canada and Norströmsgrund lighthouse in Sweden were chosen as objects for modeling. The research contains verification of the results, their comparison to field data, load magnitudes from ISO 19906 «Petroleum and natural gas industries – Arctic offshore structures» algorithm and results of discrete element modeling. The results are acceptable in comparison with the results of other ice-induced vibration research.

  12. Flow-induced vibration analysis of nuclear components

    Excessive flow-induced vibration may lead to fretting-wear or fatigue problems in nuclear components. Some recent vibration problems and their solution are reviewed. The analytical and experimental techniques used to solve or preferably avoid flow-induced vibration problems are emphasized in this paper. Vibration excitation mechanisms in parallel and cross-flow and in both liquid and two-phase steam-water flow will be discussed. These vibration excitation mechanisms and the structural dynamics of nuclear components are formulated in analytical models. This is illustrated by the application of a computer model to analyse steam generator designs. Current studies related to flow-induced vibration are reviewed. Among these are: 1) the in-reactor vibration behaviour of nuclear fuel elements, 2) the prediction of vibration-fretting damage for heat exchanger tube materials and 3) the damping of wind-induced vibration of heavy water plant structures. (author)

  13. Fatigue failure by flow-induced vibration

    The mechanism of fatigue failure by flow-induced vibration was studied by using a newly developed small wind tunnel. The necessary conditions of flow-induced vibration for a carbon steel specimen attached to a larger styrofoam cylinder were first investigated. Possible methods to detect indications of fatigue crack initiation and propagation were sought. A fatigue life prediction method was also developed. The change in natural frequency and amplitude of the test cylinder and strain history at the prospective crack initiation sites were measured. The 0.45 C steel specimen contained an artificial small hole which is expected to become the crack initiation site. A small portable service strain histogram recorder (Mini Rainflow Corder, MRC) developed in another project was used to monitor the variation of strains due to crack growth from the small hole. Fatigue damage accumulation based on Miner's rule was calculated and compared with the experimental results. (author)

  14. Experimental investigations on flow induced vibration of an externally excited flexible plate

    Purohit, Ashish; Darpe, Ashish K.; Singh, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    Flow-induced vibration of a harmonically actuated flexible plate in the wake of an upstream bluff body is experimentally investigated. The experiments are performed in an open-ended wind tunnel. A flexible plate trailing a bluff body is under fluid induced excitation due to the flowing fluid. The additional external excitation to the trailing plate is applied using an electro-magnetic exciter. The frequency and amplitude of the external harmonic excitation are selected as variable parameters in the experiments and their effect on the plate vibration and is investigated. To know the nature of acoustic pressure wave generated from the vibrating system, near-field acoustic pressure is also measured. A laser vibrometer, a pressure microphone and a high-speed camera are employed to measure the plate vibration, pressure signal, and instantaneous images of the plate motion respectively. The results obtained indicate that the dynamics of the plate is influenced by both the flow-induced excitation and external harmonic excitation. When frequency of the two excitations is close enough, a large vibration level and a high tonal sound pressure are observed. At higher amplitude of external excitation, the frequency component corresponding to the flow-induced excitation is found to reduce significantly in the frequency spectrum of the vibration signal. It is observed that, for certain range of excitation frequency, the plate vibration first reduces, reaches a minimum value and then increases with increase in the level of external excitation. A fair qualitative agreement of the experimental results with numerical simulation result of the past study has been noted. In addition to the experiments, the role of phase difference between the flow-induced excitation generated from the front obstacle and externally applied harmonic excitation is investigated through numerical simulations. The result obtained reveals that the final steady state vibration of the coupled system is

  15. Vibration Damping Via Acoustic Treatment Attached To Vehicle Body Panels

    Gambino, Carlo

    Currently, in the automotive industry, the control of noise and vibration is the subject of much research, oriented towards the creation of innovative solutions to improve the comfort of the vehicle and to reduce its cost and weight. This thesis fits into this particular framework, as it aims to investigate the possibility of integrating the functions of sound absorptioninsulation and vibration damping in a unique component. At present the bituminous viscoelastic treatments, which are bonded to the car body panels, take charge of the vibration damping, while the sound absorption and insulation is obtained by means of the poroacoustic treatments. The solution proposed here consists of employing porous materials to perform both these functions, thus allowing the partial or complete removal of the viscoelastic damping treatments from the car body. This should decrease the weight of the vehicle, reducing fuel consumption and emissions, and it might also benefit production costs.

  16. Vibration amplitude and induced temperature limitation of high power air-borne ultrasonic transducers.

    Saffar, Saber; Abdullah, Amir

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic impedances of matching layers, their internal loss and vibration amplitude are the most important and influential parameters in the performance of high power airborne ultrasonic transducers. In this paper, the optimum acoustic impedances of the transducer matching layers were determined by using a genetic algorithm, the powerful tool for optimizating domain. The analytical results showed that the vibration amplitude increases significantly for low acoustic impedance matching layers. This enhancement is maximum and approximately 200 times higher for the last matching layer where it has the same interface with the air than the vibration amplitude of the source, lead zirconate titanate-pizo electric while transferring the 1 kW is desirable. This large amplitude increases both mechanical failure and temperature of the matching layers due to the internal loss of the matching layers. It has analytically shown that the temperature in last matching layer with having the maximum vibration amplitude is high enough to melt or burn the matching layers. To verify suggested approach, the effect of the amplitude of vibration on the induced temperature has been investigated experimentally. The experimental results displayed good agreement with the theoretical predictions. PMID:23664304

  17. The Harmonic Response Analysis with Acoustic-vibration Coupling of the Combustion Chamber under Different Combustion Conditions

    Zheng Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, numerical calculations of harmonic response with acoustic-vibration coupling of the combustion chamber under different combustion conditions has been performed by combining CFD and FEM methods. Temperature and sound pressure fields created by the flame in the combustion chamber are calculated first. And then the results of the CFD are exported to the FEM analysis for the interaction between acoustic waves and wall vibrations. The possible acoustic-vibration coupled eigenfrequencies at given combustion conditions are predicted by the harmonic response analysis.

  18. VIBRATION AND ACOUSTIC RADIATION FROM SUBMERGED STIFFENED SPHERICAL SHELL WITH DECK-TYPE INTERNAL PLATE

    ChenJnnming; HuangYuying

    2003-01-01

    Based on the motion differential equations of vibration and acoustic coupling system for thin elastic spherical shell with an elastic plate attached to its internal surface, in which Dirac-δ functions are employed to introduce the moments and forces applied by the attachment on the surface of shell, by means of expanding field quantities as Legendre series, a semi-analytic solution is derived for the vibration and acoustic radiation from a submerged stiffened spherical shell with a deck-type internal plate, which has a satisfactory computational effectiveness and precision for an arbitrary frequency range. It is easy to analyze the effect of the internal plate on the acoustic radiation field by using the formulas obtained by the method proposed. It is concluded that the internal plate can significantly change the mechanical and acoustic characteristics of shell, and give the coupling system a very rich resonance frequency spectrum. Moreover, the method can be used to study the acoustic radiation mechanism in similar structures as the one studied here.

  19. Pedestrian-induced lateral vibrations of footbridges

    Ingólfsson, Einar Thór

    experimental campaign involved 71 test subjects who covered approximately 55 km of walking distributed on almost 5000 individual tests. An in-depth analysis of the movement of the pedestrians that participated in the experimental campaign reveal that synchronisation is not a pre-condition for the ix...... statistically reliable analytical tool for modelling of pedestrian-induced lateral vibrations. It is shown that the modal response of a footbridge subject to a pedestrian crowd is sensitive to the selection of the pacing rate distribution within the group, the magnitude of ambient loads and the total duration...

  20. Separation of the vibration-induced signal of oil debris for vibration monitoring

    Oil debris sensors are designed for monitoring machine component conditions by detecting oil debris in the circulating oil lines. However, these sensors are not only sensitive to metallic particles, but are susceptible to machinery vibration as well. The vibration-induced signal has thus far been treated as interference and is accordingly removed to better reveal the particle signature. As the vibration signal also contains important information on machine health, which can be used to detect not only the machine component faults but also machine structural malfunctions, we propose a joint integral and wavelet transform approach to separate the vibration and particle signals to make the oil debris sensor multi-functional. The recovered vibration signal is then used to detect faults that cannot be revealed by examining oil debris content. Our experimental results have shown that the separated vibration signal is, in general, consistent with the vibration velocity and hence can be used as an auxiliary vibration monitoring tool

  1. Flow induced vibration of an airfoil with three degrees of freedom

    Růžička, M.; Feistauer, M.; Horáček, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr

    Praha : Institute of Thermomechanics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v. v. i., 2008 - (Zolotarev, I.; Horáček, J.), s. 507-512 ISBN 80-87012-12-7. [International Conference on Flow Induced Vibration /9./ FIV2008. Praha (CZ), 30.06.2008-03.07.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200760613 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : aeroelasticity * flutter * finite element method Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  2. COMPLEX HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT BY FLUID INDUCED VIBRATION

    2003-01-01

    A new method of heat transfer enhancement by fluid induced vibration was put forward, and its theoretical analysis and experimental study were performed. Though people always try to prophylaxis fluid induced vibration for regarding it as an accident, the utilization space of fluid induced vibration is still very large. The in-surface and out-surface vibrations which come from the fluid induce elastic tube bundles, can effectively increase the convective heat transfer coefficient, and also decrease the fouling resistance, then increase the heat transfer coefficient remarkably.

  3. Vibrational and acoustical characteristics of the piano soundboard

    Ege, Kerem

    2012-01-01

    The vibrations of the soundboard of an upright piano in playing condition are investigated. It is first shown that the linear part of the response is at least 50 dB above its nonlinear component at normal levels of vibration. Given this essentially linear response, a modal identification is performed in the mid-frequency domain [300-2500] Hz by means of a novel high resolution modal analysis technique (Ege, Boutillon and David, JSV, 2009). The modal density of the spruce board varies between 0.05 and 0.01 modes/Hz and the mean loss factor is found to be approximately 2%. Below 1.1 kHz, the modal density is very close to that of a homogeneous isotropic plate with clamped boundary conditions. Higher in frequency, the soundboard behaves as a set of waveguides defined by the ribs. A numerical determination of the modal shapes by a finite-element method confirms that the waves are localised between the ribs. The dispersion law in the plate above 1.1 kHz is derived from a simple waveguide model. We present how the ...

  4. Gearbox Tooth Cut Fault Diagnostics Using Acoustic Emission and Vibration Sensors — A Comparative Study

    Yongzhi Qu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, acoustic emission (AE sensors and AE-based techniques have been developed and tested for gearbox fault diagnosis. In general, AE-based techniques require much higher sampling rates than vibration analysis-based techniques for gearbox fault diagnosis. Therefore, it is questionable whether an AE-based technique would give a better or at least the same performance as the vibration analysis-based techniques using the same sampling rate. To answer the question, this paper presents a comparative study for gearbox tooth damage level diagnostics using AE and vibration measurements, the first known attempt to compare the gearbox fault diagnostic performance of AE- and vibration analysis-based approaches using the same sampling rate. Partial tooth cut faults are seeded in a gearbox test rig and experimentally tested in a laboratory. Results have shown that the AE-based approach has the potential to differentiate gear tooth damage levels in comparison with the vibration-based approach. While vibration signals are easily affected by mechanical resonance, the AE signals show more stable performance.

  5. Water Induced Vibration in the NSRRC

    Wang, Duan J; Tsai, Zong-Da; Wang, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    Water flow related vibrations were found on the spectrum of electron beam position monitor in the NSRRC. They were associated with the vibrations of quadrupole magnets. One major vibration source was from a pump in the cooling water system. Most amount of vibration coupled through water pipe and water flow and propagated to the magnets. A small water flow station was set up to study the effect about coupling, propagating and excitation. Some damping schemes tested in the ring to improve the vibration are also included..

  6. Vibration Control Induced by Ice of a Jacket Platform

    郑宏宇; 姜大宁; 唐友刚; 周满红

    2003-01-01

    Based on the self-excited vibration theory of ice, the vibration control technology of jacket platform is studied in this paper. The magnetorheological suspensions (MR) unit is chosen as the damper, the control objective function for vibration excited by ice is determined by instantaneous optimal control (IOC) method, and genetic algorithm (GA) is used to select the optimal control force. For the jacket platform of 40 m in height and a 3-floor deck, the vibration responses induced by ice have been calculated before and after control considering the different thickness and speed of ice. It is shown that the control method presented in this paper can reduce the vibration response by 30%, and it is feasible to adopt MR absorber and GA in the control of vibration induced by ice.

  7. Identification of vibration excitations from acoustic measurements using near field acoustic holography and the force analysis technique

    Pézerat, C.; Leclère, Q.; Totaro, N.; Pachebat, M.

    2009-10-01

    This study presents a method of using acoustic holography and the force analysis technique to identify vibration sources from radiated noise measurements. The structure studied is a plate excited by a shaker on which three measurements were performed: the first is a reference measurement of plate velocity obtained by scanning laser vibrometry, the second is based on sound pressure measurements in the near field of the structure, and the third is the measurement of normal acoustic velocities by using a p-U probe recently developed by Microflown Technologies. This was followed by the application of classical NAH, known as pressure-to-velocity holography and velocity-to-velocity holography to predict the plate velocity field from acoustic measurements at distances of 1 and 5 cm. Afterwards, the force analysis technique, also known as the RIFF technique, is applied with these five data sets. The principle is to inject the displacement field of the structure into its equation of motion and extract the resulting force distribution. This technique requires regularization done by a low-pass filter in the wavenumber domain. Apart from pressure-to-velocity holography at 5 cm, the reconstructed force distribution allows localizing the excitation point in the measurement area. FAT regularization is also shown to improve results as its cutoff wavenumber is optimized with the natural wavenumber of the plate. Lastly, quantitative force values are extracted from force distributions at all frequencies of the band 0-4 kHz studied and compared with the force spectrum measured directly by a piezoelectric sensor.

  8. On the interaction of a vibrating plate with an acoustic medium

    Mixson, J. S.; Koval, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of a vibrating plate with an adjacent acoustic medium is important in problems involving the radiation of sound from panels, in problems involving the transmission of sound through walls of buildings, aircraft, or launch vehicles; and in problems involving the estimation of damping and the stress amplitude of vibration for panel-fatigue predictions. There appear to have been no systematic studies of the effects on the plate of fluid coupling for an arbitrary fluid-mass/plate-mass loading ratio. An attempt is made to determine this effect for a wide range of fluid-plate mass ratios without resorting to the usual simplifications of light or heavy fluid loading. Emphasis is with the plate motion rather than the radiation of sound.

  9. SPEED DEPENDENCE OF ACOUSTIC VIBRATION PROPAGATION FROM THE FERRITIC GRAIN SIZE IN LOW-CARBON STEEL

    I. A. Vakulenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. It is determining the nature of the ferrite grain size influence of low-carbon alloy steel on the speed propagation of acoustic vibrations. Methodology. The material for the research served a steel sheet of thickness 1.4 mm. Steel type H18T1 had a content of chemical elements within grade composition: 0, 12 % C, 17, 5 % Cr, 1 % Mn, 1, 1 % Ni, 0, 85 % Si, 0, 9 % Ti. The specified steel belongs to the semiferritic class of the accepted classification. The structural state of the metal for the study was obtained by cold plastic deformation by rolling at a reduction in the size range of 20-30 % and subsequent recrystallization annealing at 740 – 750 ° C. Different degrees of cold plastic deformation was obtained by pre-selection of the initial strip thickness so that after a desired amount of rolling reduction receives the same final thickness. The microstructure was observed under a light microscope, the ferrite grain size was determined using a quantitative metallographic technique. The using of X-ray structural analysis techniques allowed determining the level of second-order distortion of the crystal latitude of the ferrite. The speed propagation of acoustic vibrations was measured using a special device such as an ISP-12 with a working frequency of pulses 1.024 kHz. As the characteristic of strength used the hardness was evaluated by the Brinell’s method. Findings. With increasing of ferrite grain size the hardness of the steel is reduced. In the case of constant structural state of metal, reducing the size of the ferrite grains is accompanied by a natural increasing of the phase distortion. The dependence of the speed propagation of acoustic vibrations up and down the rolling direction of the ferrite grain size remained unchanged and reports directly proportional correlation. Originality. On the basis of studies to determine the direct impact of the proportional nature of the ferrite grain size on the rate of propagation of sound

  10. Flow-induced vibrations of a rotating cylinder

    Bourguet, Rémi; Lo Jacono, David

    2014-01-01

    International audience The flow-induced vibrations of a circular cylinder, free to oscillate in the cross-flow direction and subjected to a forced rotation about its axis, are analysed by means of two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations. The impact of the symmetry breaking caused by the forced rotation on the vortex-induced vibration (VIV) mechanisms is investigated for a Reynolds number equal to 100, based on the cylinder diameter and inflow velocity. The cylinder is found to osc...

  11. Acoustically induced transparency using Fano resonant periodic arrays

    Amin, M.; Elayouch, A.; Farhat, M.; Addouche, M.; Khelif, A.; Baǧcı, H.

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional acoustic device, which supports Fano resonance and induced transparency in its response to an incident sound wave, is designed and fabricated. These effects are generated from the destructive interference of closely coupled one broad- and one narrow-band acoustic modes. The proposed design ensures excitation and interference of two spectrally close modes by locating a small pipe inside a wider and longer one. Indeed, numerical simulations and experiments demonstrate that this simple-to-fabricate structure can be used to generate Fano resonance as well as acoustically induced transparency with promising applications in sensing, cloaking, and imaging.

  12. Acoustically induced transparency using Fano resonant periodic arrays

    Amin, M.

    2015-10-22

    A three-dimensional acoustic device, which supports Fano resonance and induced transparency in its response to an incident sound wave, is designed and fabricated. These effects are generated from the destructive interference of closely coupled one broad- and one narrow-band acoustic modes. The proposed design ensures excitation and interference of two spectrally close modes by locating a small pipe inside a wider and longer one. Indeed, numerical simulations and experiments demonstrate that this simple-to-fabricate structure can be used to generate Fano resonance as well as acoustically induced transparency with promising applications in sensing, cloaking, and imaging.

  13. Flow-induced vibration -- 1994. PVP-Volume 273

    Flow-induced vibration is a subject of practical interest to many engineering disciplines, including the power generation, process, and petrochemical industries. In the nuclear industry, flow-induced vibration reaches a higher level of concern because of safety issues and the huge cost associated with down time and site repair. Not surprisingly, during the last 25 years a tremendous amount of effort has been spent in the study of flow-induced vibration phenomena related to nuclear plant components, notably nuclear steam generator tube banks and nuclear fuel bundles. Yet, in spite of this concentrated effort, the industry is still not free from flow-induced vibration-related problems. This explains why in this volume almost half of the papers address the issue of cross-flow induced vibration in tube bundles, with applications to the nuclear steam generator and nuclear fuel bundles in mind. Unlike 10 or 15 years ago, when flow-induced vibration studies almost always involved experimentation and empirical studies, the advent of high-speed computers has enabled numerical calculation and simulation of this complex phenomenon to take place. Separate abstracts were prepared for 27 papers in this volume

  14. A new acoustic portal into the odontocete ear and vibrational analysis of the tympanoperiotic complex.

    Ted W Cranford

    Full Text Available Global concern over the possible deleterious effects of noise on marine organisms was catalyzed when toothed whales stranded and died in the presence of high intensity sound. The lack of knowledge about mechanisms of hearing in toothed whales prompted our group to study the anatomy and build a finite element model to simulate sound reception in odontocetes. The primary auditory pathway in toothed whales is an evolutionary novelty, compensating for the impedance mismatch experienced by whale ancestors as they moved from hearing in air to hearing in water. The mechanism by which high-frequency vibrations pass from the low density fats of the lower jaw into the dense bones of the auditory apparatus is a key to understanding odontocete hearing. Here we identify a new acoustic portal into the ear complex, the tympanoperiotic complex (TPC and a plausible mechanism by which sound is transduced into the bony components. We reveal the intact anatomic geometry using CT scanning, and test functional preconceptions using finite element modeling and vibrational analysis. We show that the mandibular fat bodies bifurcate posteriorly, attaching to the TPC in two distinct locations. The smaller branch is an inconspicuous, previously undescribed channel, a cone-shaped fat body that fits into a thin-walled bony funnel just anterior to the sigmoid process of the TPC. The TPC also contains regions of thin translucent bone that define zones of differential flexibility, enabling the TPC to bend in response to sound pressure, thus providing a mechanism for vibrations to pass through the ossicular chain. The techniques used to discover the new acoustic portal in toothed whales, provide a means to decipher auditory filtering, beam formation, impedance matching, and transduction. These tools can also be used to address concerns about the potential deleterious effects of high-intensity sound in a broad spectrum of marine organisms, from whales to fish.

  15. Vibration induced flow in hoppers: DEM 2D polygon model

    2008-01-01

    A two-dimensional discrete element model (DEM) simulation of cohesive polygonal particles has been developed to assess the benefit of point source vibration to induce flow in wedge-shaped hoppers. The particle-particle interaction model used is based on a multi-contact principle.The first part of the study investigated particle discharge under gravity without vibration to determine the critical orifice size (Be) to just sustain flow as a function of particle shape. It is shown that polygonal-shaped particles need a larger orifice than circular particles. It is also shown that Be decreases as the number of particle vertices increases. Addition of circular particles promotes flow of polygons in a linear manner.The second part of the study showed that vibration could enhance flow, effectively reducing Be. The model demonstrated the importance of vibrator location (height), consistent with previous continuum model results, and vibration amplitude in enhancing flow.

  16. Experimental and numerical prediction of railway induced vibration

    Hans VERBRAKEN; Geert LOMBAERT; Geert DEGRANDE

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,both measurements and numerical simulations of railway induced vibration are discussed.A measurement campaign has been carried out along the high-speed railway track in Lincent,Belgium.The experimental determination of transfer functions and vibration velocity during train passages are discussed.A numerical model is introduced to predict the transfer functions and the vibration velocity during train passages.The comparison of experimental and numerical results demonstrates the importance of accurate numerical models and input data.The results are obtained in the framework of the development of a hybrid prediction method,where numerical and experimental data can be combined to improve the prediction accuracy for railway induced vibration.

  17. Attenuation of cryocooler induced vibration in spaceborne infrared payloads

    Veprik, A.; Twitto, A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancement of operational responsive space programs calls for a development of compact, reliable, low power and vibration free cryogenic cooling for sophisticated infrared payloads. The refrigeration in a typical closed cycle split Stirling linear cryocooler is achieved by a cyclic compression and expansion of a gaseous working agent due to a synchronized reciprocation of electro-dynamically and pneumatically actuated compressor and expander pistons. Attenuation of the cryocooler induced vibration usually relies on the concept of actively assisted momentum cancellation. In a typical dual-piston compressor this objective is achieved by actively synchronizing the motion of oppositely moving piston assemblies; a typical single-piston expander may be counterbalanced by a motorized counter-balancer. The above approach produces complexity, weight, size, high incurred costs and affects reliability. The authors analyze the case of passive attenuation the vibration export induced by the split Stirling linear cryocooler comprised of inline mounted single-piston compressor and expander. Placement of all the moving components onto a common axis results in a single axis consolidation of vibration export and enables use of single tuned dynamic absorber and low frequency vibration mount. From theoretical analysis and full-scale testing, the performance of such vibration protection arrangement is similar to known systems of active vibration cancellation.

  18. Reduction of Train-induced Vibrations by using Barriers

    Giovanni Leonardi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the ground-borne vibration caused by high speed trains has received considerable attention in recent years, due to the effects of vibration on buildings, in terms of physical damage and on population, in terms of discomfort. The problem has become more significant with the increase of speed and weight of trains, which results in heavier loads on the tracks. Therefore, there is the necessity to find a method, which allows investigating the propagation of vibration waves in the soil. This study aims to study the train-induced ground vibration and the mitigation effects of barriers using a Finite Element Method (FEM model. Two different types of barriers were evaluated considering their stiffness and a benchmark model without mitigation measures was also analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of the considered barriers. The results of the proposed elaborations have been finalized to the assessment of the incidence of the barrier on the vibration state induced from the passage of a high speed trains and the following conclusions can be made: concrete seems to provide a significative reduction of the vibration. The proposed method can be successfully applied to a preliminary analysis of the influence of different types of barriers on the dynamic properties of vibration waves in the soil.

  19. Vibration-Induced Conductance Fluctuation (VICOF) Testing of Soils

    Kish, L B; Kishne, A S; Kish, Laszlo B.; Morgan, Cristine L.S.; Kishne, Andrea Sz.

    2005-01-01

    In this Letter, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a simple method to provide additional information by conductance measurements of soils. While the AC electrical conductance of the soil is measured, it is exposed to a periodic vibration. The vibration-induced density fluctuation implies a corresponding conductivity fluctuation that can be seen as combination frequency components, the sum and the difference of the mean AC frequency and the vibration frequency, in the current response. The method is demonstrated by measurements on two different soil types.

  20. Modelling flow-induced vibrations of gates in hydraulic structures

    Erdbrink, C.D.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic behaviour of gates in hydraulic structures caused by passing flow poses a potential threat to flood protection. Complex interactions between the turbulent flow and the suspended gate body may induce undesired vibrations. This thesis contributes to a better understanding and prevention of gate vibrations by employing a variety of computational approaches. Simulations with the finite-element method are used to analyse the fluid-structure interaction of a new underflow gate type whic...

  1. General theory of detection of signal induced in vibrating magnetometer

    Assuming the point dipole approximation only and making use of the vectorial notation, signal (EMF) induced in a single-turn pick-up coil of the vibrating magnetometer are calculated for the case of any orientation of the coil, of vibration axis and of the magnetic moment of the sample. On the basis of formula obtained, three types of measurement geometries have been distinquished and for these the qualitative analysis is made. (author)

  2. Circus, software for computation of flow induced vibrations in piping system. General purpose

    This paper is a presentation of the code CIRCUS version 2. CIRCUS deals with the hydraulic, acoustic and vibratory behaviour of piping systems under acoustic loads. CIRCUS first computes permanent mean-flow, and associated acoustic loads. It then determines the acoustic and vibration response along the piping system. The CIRCUS software is used at EDF to check the design of piping system and to investigate solutions in case of damage or troubleshooting. (author)

  3. Flow-induced vibration study in the LOFT steam generator

    Carmichael, C.F.

    1977-10-18

    The consequences of flow induced vibration in the LOFT steam generator were studied. Tube-baffle contact and fretting wear are expected to occur while tube-tube contact is not predicted. The LOFT steam generator is, in all probability adequate from a fluid induced viewpoint for the scheduled service of the LOFT facility at power. 37 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Vibration optimization of ZnO thin film bulk acoustic resonator with ring electrodes

    Zhao, Zinan; Qian, Zhenghua; Wang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    A rectangular ZnO thin film bulk acoustic resonator with ring electrodes is presented in this paper to demonstrate the existence of a nearly uniform displacement distribution at the central part of this typical resonator. The variational formulation based on two-dimensional scalar differential equations provides a theoretical foundation for the Ritz method adopted in our analysis. The resonant frequencies and vibration distributions for the thickness-extensional modes of this ring electrode resonator are obtained. The structural parameters are optimized to achieve a more uniform displacement distribution and therefore a uniform mass sensitivity, which guarantee the high accuracy and repeatable measurement for sensor detection in an air or a liquid environment. These results provide a fundamental reference for the design and optimization of the high quality sensor.

  5. Nanoparticle monolayer-based flexible strain gauge with ultrafast dynamic response for acoustic vibration detection

    Lizhi Yi[1; Weihong Jiao[1; Ke Wu[1; Lihua Qian[1; Xunxing Yu[2; Qi Xia[2; Kuanmin Mao[2; Songliu Yuan[1; Shuai Wang[3; Yingtao Jiang[4

    2015-01-01

    The relatively poor dynamic response of current flexible strain gauges has prevented their wide adoption in portable electronics. In this work, we present a greatly improved flexible strain gauge, where one strip of Au nanoparticle (NP) monolayer assembled on a polyethylene terephthalate film is utilized as the active unit. The proposed flexible gauge is capable of responding to applied stimuli without detectable hysteresis via electron tunneling between adjacent nanoparticles within the Au NP monolayer. Based on experimental quantification of the time and frequency domain dependence of the electrical resistance of the proposed strain gauge, acoustic vibrations in the frequency range of 1 to 20,000 Hz could be reliably detected. In addition to being used to measure musical tone, audible speech, and creature vocalization, as demonstrated in this study, the ultrafast dynamic response of this flexible strain gauge can be used in a wide range of applications, including miniaturized vibratory sensors, safe entrance guard management systems, and ultrasensitive pressure sensors.

  6. Similarity analysis and prediction for data of structural acoustic and vibration

    Support vector machine (SVM) is a learning machine based on statistical learning theory, which can get a model having good generalization. It can solve 'learning more' when dealing with small size. It can also avoid 'dimensional disaster' when solving nonlinear problems. This paper works on the parameters optimization for support vector regression machine (SVRM) and its applications. Solution path algorithm can save much CPU time when it is employed to optimize the regularization parameter of SVRM. Simulated annealing algorithm has good ability of finding global optimal solution. An improved solution path algorithm and simulated annealing algorithm are combined to optimize parameters of SVRM in the regression analysis of the acoustic and vibration data for complex practical problems. The numerical results show the model has good predictive capability. (authors)

  7. Applications of Lorentz force in medical acoustics: Lorentz force hydrophone, Lorentz Force Electrical Impedance Tomography, Imaging of shear waves induced by Lorentz force

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol

    2014-01-01

    The ability of the Lorentz force to link a mechanical displacement to an electrical current presents a strong interest for medical acoustics, and three applications were studied in this thesis. In the first part of this work, a hydrophone was developed for mapping the particle velocity of an acoustic field. This hydrophone was constructed using a thin copper wire and an external magnetic field. A model was elaborated to determine the relationship between the acoustic pressure and the measured electrical current, which is induced by Lorentz force when the wire vibrates in the acoustic field of an ultrasound transducer. The built prototype was characterized and its spatial resolution, frequency response, sensitivity, robustness and directivity response were investigated. An imaging method called Lorentz Force Electrical Impedance Tomography was also studied. In this method, a biological tissue is vibrated by ultrasound in a magnetic field, which induces an electrical current by Lorentz force. The electrical imp...

  8. Numerical Research about Influence of Blade Outlet Angle on Flow-Induced Noise and Vibration for Centrifugal Pump

    Ailing Yang; Dapeng Lang; Guoping Li; Eryun Chen; Ren Dai

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid numerical method was used to calculate the flow-induced noise and vibration of the centrifugal pump in the paper. The unsteady flows inside the centrifugal pumps with different blade outlet angles were simulated firstly. The unsteady pressure on the inner surface of the volute and the unsteady force applied on the impeller were analyzed. Then the vibration of the volute and sound field were calculated based on an acoustic-vibro-coupling method. The results show that the pump head has...

  9. Hydrodynamics induced vibration to trash-racks

    In conventional power plants trash-racks are provided at the intakes to protect the turbines. In pumped storage plants, the draft tube or tailrace must also have trash-racks to protect the units while pumping. Because the loads believed to cause many failures of trash-racks are dynamic in nature, it is important to understand the dynamic characteristics of trash-racks structures in general and a single rack in particular. The classical added-mass solution structure-fluid dynamic interaction is known as an approximate solution procedure. An accurate added-mass approach mixed with implementation in finite element framework is proposed. In this proposal, experimental conclusions, supported by theory, led to presentation of more accurate results in vibration of trash-racks. This numerical solution as a powerful method to solve such a complex problem can be employed to carry out dynamic characteristics of these structures while vibrating in water

  10. Implementing wavelet packet transform for valve failure detection using vibration and acoustic emission signals

    The efficiency of reciprocating compressors relies heavily on the health condition of its moving components, most importantly its valves. Previous studies showed good correlation between the dynamic response and the physical condition of the valves. These can be achieved by employing vibration technique which is capable of monitoring the response of the valve, and acoustic emission technique which is capable of detecting the valves' material deformation. However, the relationship/comparison between the two techniques is rarely investigated. In this paper, the two techniques were examined using time-frequency analysis. Wavelet packet transform (WPT) was chosen as the multi-resolution analysis technique over continuous wavelet transform (CWT), and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). This is because WPT could overcome the high computational time and high redundancy problem in CWT and could provide detailed analysis of the high frequency components compared to DWT. The features of both signals can be extracted by evaluating the normalised WPT coefficients for different time window under different valve conditions. By comparing the normalised coefficients over a certain time frame and frequency range, the feature vectors revealing the condition of valves can be constructed. One way analysis of variance was employed on these feature vectors to test the significance of data under different valve conditions. It is believed that AE signals can give a better representation of the valve condition as it can detect both the fluid motion and material deformation of valves as compared to the vibration signals.

  11. Implementing wavelet packet transform for valve failure detection using vibration and acoustic emission signals

    Sim, H. Y.; Ramli, R.; Abdullah, M. A. K.

    2012-05-01

    The efficiency of reciprocating compressors relies heavily on the health condition of its moving components, most importantly its valves. Previous studies showed good correlation between the dynamic response and the physical condition of the valves. These can be achieved by employing vibration technique which is capable of monitoring the response of the valve, and acoustic emission technique which is capable of detecting the valves' material deformation. However, the relationship/comparison between the two techniques is rarely investigated. In this paper, the two techniques were examined using time-frequency analysis. Wavelet packet transform (WPT) was chosen as the multi-resolution analysis technique over continuous wavelet transform (CWT), and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). This is because WPT could overcome the high computational time and high redundancy problem in CWT and could provide detailed analysis of the high frequency components compared to DWT. The features of both signals can be extracted by evaluating the normalised WPT coefficients for different time window under different valve conditions. By comparing the normalised coefficients over a certain time frame and frequency range, the feature vectors revealing the condition of valves can be constructed. One way analysis of variance was employed on these feature vectors to test the significance of data under different valve conditions. It is believed that AE signals can give a better representation of the valve condition as it can detect both the fluid motion and material deformation of valves as compared to the vibration signals.

  12. Scale modeling flow-induced vibrations of reactor components

    Similitude relationships currently employed in the design of flow-induced vibration scale-model tests of nuclear reactor components are reviewed. Emphasis is given to understanding the origins of the similitude parameters as a basis for discussion of the inevitable distortions which occur in design verification testing of entire reactor systems and in feature testing of individual component designs for the existence of detrimental flow-induced vibration mechanisms. Distortions of similitude parameters made in current test practice are enumerated and selected example tests are described. Also, limitations in the use of specific distortions in model designs are evaluated based on the current understanding of flow-induced vibration mechanisms and structural response

  13. Poiseuille flow-induced vibrations of two cylinders in tandem

    Lin, Jianzhong; Jiang, Renjie; Chen, Zhongli; Ku, Xiaoke

    2013-07-01

    Laminar flows past two tandem cylinders which are free to move transversely in a parallel-wall channel were studied numerically by the lattice Boltzmann method. With fixed Reynolds number Re=100, blockage ratio β=1/4 and structural damping ξ=0, the effect of streamwise separation between two cylinders at a range of S/D=[1.1, 10] on the motions of cylinders and fluids was studied for both mass ratios of m(*)=1 and m(*)=0.1. A variety of distinct vibration regimes involving periodic, quasi-periodic and non-periodic vibrations with corresponding flow patterns were observed. A detailed analysis of the vibration amplitudes, vibration frequencies and relative equilibrium positions for both mass ratios demonstrated that as S/D increases, the interaction of the two cylinders first enhances and then reduces. In the strong coupling regime, both cylinders oscillate periodically around the centerline of the channel with large vibration amplitudes and high vibration frequencies. By comparing with the case of an isolated cylinder, a further study indicated that the gap flow plays an important role in such a dynamic system, and the vortex cores formation behind the front cylinder causes the interaction of the cylinders decouple rapidly. Based on the present observations, such a dynamic model system can be considered as a novel type of vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) and is expected to find applications in fluid mixing and heat transfer.

  14. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for component-loaded curved orthogrid panels typical of launch vehicle skin structures. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was applied to correlate the measured input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application quantifies the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software developed for the RPTF method allows easy replacement of the diffuse acoustic field with other pressure fields such as a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) model suitable for vehicle ascent. Structural responses

  15. Strategy for predicting railway-induced vibrations in buildings

    Persson, Peter; Persson, Kent; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard;

    2016-01-01

    Urban densification is a way of accommodating population growth. Land adjacent to railways is used for constructing residences and other buildings, and new tramway systems are planned. Under these circumstances, nearby buildings will be exposed to vibrations and noise that may become a nuisance for...... the residents. It is necessary, even at an early stage of planning, to assess the extent of the vibrations and state requirements for the building in order to avoid costly changes at later stages. Ground vibration induced by railway traffic is studied in the paper. The aim is to develop a strategy for...... typical buildings can be predicted. Design of building foundations and structural design can then be addressed. Field vibration measurements along railway tracks as well as at built-up areas have been carried out. Conclusions from the measurements and numerical simulation s are discussed to establish a...

  16. Flow-induced vibrations an engineering guide

    Naudascher, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Despite their variety, the vibration phenomena from many different engineering fields can be classified into a relatively few basic excitation mechanisms. The classification enables engineers to identify all possible sources of excitation in a given system and to assess potential dangers. This graduate-level text presents a synthesis of research results and practical experience from disparate fields in the form of engineering guidelines. It is particularly geared toward assessing the possible sources of excitation in a flow system, in identifying the actual danger spots, and in finding appropr

  17. Failure Progress of 3D Reinforced GFRP Laminate during Static Bending, Evaluated by Means of Acoustic Emission and Vibrations Analysis

    Mateusz Koziol

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The work aimed to assess the failure progress in a glass fiber-reinforced polymer laminate with a 3D-woven and (as a comparison plain-woven reinforcement, during static bending, using acoustic emission signals. The innovative method of the separation of the signal coming from the fiber fracture and the one coming from the matrix fracture with the use of the acoustic event’s energy as a criterion was applied. The failure progress during static bending was alternatively analyzed by evaluation of the vibration signal. It gave a possibility to validate the results of the acoustic emission. Acoustic emission, as well as vibration signal analysis proved to be good and effective tools for the registration of failure effects in composite laminates. Vibration analysis is more complicated methodologically, yet it is more precise. The failure progress of the 3D laminate is “safer” and more beneficial than that of the plain-woven laminate. It exhibits less rapid load capacity drops and a higher fiber effort contribution at the moment of the main laminate failure.

  18. Low Head, Vortex Induced Vibrations River Energy Converter

    Bernitsas, Michael B.; Dritz, Tad

    2006-06-30

    Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy (VIVACE) is a novel, demonstrated approach to extracting energy from water currents. This invention is based on a phenomenon called Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV), which was first observed by Leonardo da Vinci in 1504AD. He called it ‘Aeolian Tones.’ For decades, engineers have attempted to prevent this type of vibration from damaging structures, such as offshore platforms, nuclear fuel rods, cables, buildings, and bridges. The underlying concept of the VIVACE Converter is the following: Strengthen rather than spoil vortex shedding; enhance rather than suppress VIV; harness rather than mitigate VIV energy. By maximizing and utilizing this unique phenomenon, VIVACE takes this “problem” and successfully transforms it into a valuable resource for mankind.

  19. Evaluation of blast-induced vibration effects on structures 1

    Lee, Jong Rim; Jeon, Gyu Shick; Lee, Dae Soo; Joo, Kwang Ho; Lee, Woong Keon [Korea Electrotechnology Research Inst., Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Chang Ha; Chung, So Keul; Lee, Kyung Won; Shin, Hee Soon; Chun, Sun Woo; Park, Yeon Jun; Synn, Joong Ho; Choi, Byung Hee [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-31

    Due to the difficulties of obtaining construction site for new plants, following ones are inevitably being built in the site adjacent to existing power plants. Therefore considerable thought has been recently given to the dynamic loading generated by blasting works near the plants to maintain the safety of structures and facilities in power plants. Our own standard for safety level of blast vibration is not prepared yet, and foreign standards have been generally employed without theoretical and experimental verification. Safety-related structures of power plants and facilities have to be protected against the effects of possible hazards due to blast vibration. Earthquakes have been considered a major dynamic design loading as a requirement of plant design, but the effects of blast-induced vibration are not. In order to ensure the safety, rational safe criterion should be established and blast design should be satisfy it, which requires the development of a model for prediction of vibration level through more systematic measurement and analysis. The main objectives of the study are : to provide background data for establishing the rational safe vibration limits, to develop models for prediction of blast vibration level, to establish safe blast design criterion, and to accumulate techniques for field measurements, data acquisition and analysis (author). 80 refs., 347 figs.

  20. Flow-induced vibration of circular cylindrical structures

    Chen, S.S.

    1985-06-01

    This report summarizes the flow-induced vibration of circular cylinders in quiescent fluid, axial flow, and crossflow, and applications of the analytical methods and experimental data in design evaluation of various system components consisting of circular cylinders. 219 figs., 30 tabs. (JDB)

  1. Flow-induced vibration of circular cylindrical structures

    This report summarizes the flow-induced vibration of circular cylinders in quiescent fluid, axial flow, and crossflow, and applications of the analytical methods and experimental data in design evaluation of various system components consisting of circular cylinders. 219 figs., 30 tabs

  2. Analysis of flow induced vibration in heat exchangers

    A description will be given of three different types of heat exchangers developed by the Dutch Nuclear Industry Group ''Neratoom'' in cooperation with TNO for the sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor SNR-300 at Kalkar. Moreover, the research related with flow induced vibrations carried out by TNO (Organization for Applied Scientific Research) will be presented. The flow induced forces on the tubes of the straight-tube steam generators were measured at the inlet and outlet section where partial crossflow occurs. With the measured flow induced forces the response of a tube was calculated as a function of the tube-to-supportbush clearances taking into account the non-linear damping effects from the sodium. The theoretical results showed that for this particular design no tube impact damage is to be expected which was confirmed later by a full scale experiment. Special attention will be devoted to the steam generator with helical-coil tube-bundles, where the sodium flows in a counter cross-flow over the tube-bundle. Extensive measurements of the power spectra of the flow induced forces were carried out since no information could be found in the literature. The vibration analysis will be presented and vibration modes of the entire bundle will be compared with experimentally obtained results. Finally a description of the vibration tests to be carried out on the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) will be presented. (author)

  3. Laser-induced vibrational dynamics of ozone in solid argon

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Amstrup, B.; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    We consider the vibrational dynamics, induced by an intense infrared laser pulse, in an ozone molecule with isotopic substitution, that is, (OOO)-O-16-O-16-O-18 and compare the dynamics in the gas phase and in solid ar on. not perturbed by argon on a time-scale of a few picoseconds and selective...

  4. Analysis of flow-induced vibrations in the PEC design

    This paper summarizes the studies performed for the Italian PEC fast reactor test facility with regard to flow-induced vibration problems. Reference is made to the reactor-block, the primary and secondary coolant loops and the emergency loops. Studies in progress and future developments foreseen are also mentioned. (author)

  5. Flow induced vibrations in a PWR piping system

    During a recurring bench test of an operating system, high amplitude vibrations have been observed on a safety piping system of a nuclear power plant. Due to the source of the pumps, these vibrations lead to wear damage and it is therefore necessary to estimate the life time of the piping system. This paper describes the methodology used to study the dynamic behaviour and to analyze the damage of a piping system submitted to internal flow. Starting from an experimental modal analysis of the piping system when not i service, we analyse the main parameters of the mechanical behaviour. Following this analysis, we obtain a mechanical model fitting the first experimental modes. On this basis, we build a vibro-acoustical model. This model takes into account the influence of the acoustical pipe length, both above and below the mechanical part, the modelling of acoustical components, the speed of sound. We did not experimentally characterize the pumps. Therefore, we use a numerical model in order to simulate the behaviour of the pumps. This model is based on the theory of the transfer matrix and takes into account the geometric and the hydraulic characteristics of the pump.The modelling of both sources (suction and discharge) connected to the pump is formed by contributions from a source corresponding to the turbulent noise at low frequency, a source at blade passage frequency. This model has been experimentally validated in a laboratory. The final results of the modelling of the complete piping system are in a complete accord with experimental measurements. (author). 3 refs., 7 figs

  6. Specialists meeting on LMFBR flow induced vibrations. Summary report

    A Specialists' Meeting on LMFBR Flow-Induced Vibrations was held at ANL in the United States which was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on the recommendations of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR). It was attended by participants from France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, the United Kingdom, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United States and the IAEA. The purpose of the meeting was to provide, for the first time, a common forum for the exchange of information on flow-induced vibration programs of the member countries. As this was a first meeting, information was sought in the broad areas of: 1. Design Criteria and Problem Areas in LMFBR Design; 2. Current Design Procedures; and 3. Ongoing Research. A session was devoted to each of the above topics wherein papers were presented and discussed followed by open discussions on the session topic. The objective of the open discussions was to identify, from a review of specific reactor designs, (a) flow induced vibration problem areas (expected and observed) and their potential for occurrence; (b) failure modes and associated design criteria; (c) specific components that are susceptible to flow induced vibration; and (d) probable excitation mechanisms. It was aimed to assess the current state-of-the-art in designing to avoid flow induced vibration with consideration of licensing requirements; to evaluate existing methods of analysis, testing, and surveillance, along with their limitations and to identify areas requiring research and review ongoing research programmes relative to these research needs

  7. Influence of surface acoustic waves induced acoustic streaming on the kinetics of electrochemical reactions

    Tietze, Sabrina; Schlemmer, Josefine; Lindner, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    The kinetics of electrochemical reactions is controlled by diffusion processes of charge carriers across a boundary layer between the electrode and the electrolyte, which result in a shielding of the electric field inside the electrolyte and a concentration gradient across this boundary layer. In accumulators the diffusion rate determines the rather long time needed for charging, which is a major drawback for electric mobility. This diffusion boundary can be removed by acoustic streaming in the electrolyte induced by surface acoustic waves propagating of the electrode, which results in an increase of the charging current and thus in a reduction of the time needed for charging. For a quantitative study of the influence of acoustic streaming on the charge transport an electropolishing cell with vertically oriented copper electrodes and diluted H3PO4-Propanol electrolytes were used. Lamb waves with various excitation frequencies were exited on the anode with different piezoelectric transducers, which induced acoustic streaming in the overlaying electrolytic liquid. An increase of the polishing current of up to approximately 100 % has been obtained with such a set-up.

  8. Flow induced vibrations in liquid metal fast breeder reactors

    Flow induced vibrations are well known phenomena in industry. Engineers have to estimate their destructive effects on structures. In the nuclear industry, flow induced vibrations are assessed early in the design process, and the results are incorporated in the design procedures. In many cases, model testing is used to supplement the design process to ensure that detrimental behaviour due to flow induced vibrations will not occur in the component in question. While these procedures attempt to minimize the probability of adverse performance of the various components, there is a problem in the extrapolation of analytical design techniques and/or model testing to actual plant operation. Therefore, sodium tests or vibrational measurements of components in the reactor system are used to provide additional assurance. This report is a general survey of experimental and calculational methods in this area of structural mechanics. The report is addressed to specialists and institutions in industrialized and developing countries who are responsible for the design and operation of liquid metal fast breeder reactors. 92 refs, 90 figs, 8 tabs

  9. Geodesic Acoustic Modes Induced by Energetic Particles

    Zhou, Tianchun; Berk, Herbert

    2009-11-01

    A global geodesic acoustic mode driven by energetic particles (EGAM) has been observed in JET[1, 2] and DIII D[3, 4]. The mode is to be treated fully kinetically. The descriptions of the background electrons and ions are based on standard high and low bounce frequency expansion respectively with respect to the mode frequency. However, the energetic ions must be treated without any expansion of ratio between their bounce frequency and the mode frequency since they are comparable. Under electrostatic perturbation, we construct a quadratic form for the wave amplitude, from which an integro-differential equation is derived. In the limit where the drift orbit width is small comparison with the mode width, a differential equation for perturbed electrostatic field is obtained. Solution is obtained both analytically and numerically. We find that beam counterinjection enhances the instability of the mode. Landau damping due to thermal species is investigated.

  10. Piezoelectric energy harvesting from traffic-induced bridge vibrations

    This paper focuses on energy harvesting from traffic-induced vibrations in bridges. Using a pre-stressed concrete highway bridge as a case study, in situ vibration measurements are presented and analysed. From these results, a prototype of a cantilever piezoelectric harvester is designed, tested and modelled. Even though the considered bridge vibrations are characterized by small amplitude and a low frequency (i.e. below 15 Hz), it is shown that mean power of the order of 0.03 mW can be produced, with a controlled voltage between 1.8 and 3.6 V. A simple model is proposed for theoretical prediction of the delivered power in terms of traffic intensity. This model shows good agreement with the experimental results and leads to a simple but effective design rule for piezoelectric harvesters to be used on bridges. (paper)

  11. Flow induced vibration characteristics of two circular cylinders in a side by side arrangement and the vibration mechanism

    This experimental study investigated the characteristics of flow induced vibration of two elastically supported circular cylinders in a side by side arrangement. In particular, the characteristics of the flow induced vibration of the two cylinders are investigated by changing the flow speed at each spacing ratio L/D (L is the space between two cylinders and D is the diameter of the cylinder). To clarify the mechanism generating the flow induced vibration of the cylinders, the flow patterns around the two vibrating cylinders are also investigated using a flow visualization test that reproduces the flow induced vibration of the cylinders with a forced vibration apparatus. As a result, it is clarified that the flow induced vibration characteristics of the two cylinders arranged side by side switch among four patterns as the flow between the two cylinders is switched. Among the three arrangements considered (tandem, staggered, and side by side), the arrangement that generates flow induced vibration of the two cylinders most easily is the side by side arrangement

  12. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray.

  13. An Intelligent Sensor Array Distributed System for Vibration Analysis and Acoustic Noise Characterization of a Linear Switched Reluctance Actuator

    Maria Calado

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a distributed system for analysis and monitoring (DSAM of vibrations and acoustic noise, which consists of an array of intelligent modules, sensor modules, communication bus and a host PC acting as data center. The main advantages of the DSAM are its modularity, scalability, and flexibility for use of different type of sensors/transducers, with analog or digital outputs, and for signals of different nature. Its final cost is also significantly lower than other available commercial solutions. The system is reconfigurable, can operate either with synchronous or asynchronous modes, with programmable sampling frequencies, 8-bit or 12-bit resolution and a memory buffer of 15 kbyte. It allows real-time data-acquisition for signals of different nature, in applications that require a large number of sensors, thus it is suited for monitoring of vibrations in Linear Switched Reluctance Actuators (LSRAs. The acquired data allows the full characterization of the LSRA in terms of its response to vibrations of structural origins, and the vibrations and acoustic noise emitted under normal operation. The DSAM can also be used for electrical machine condition monitoring, machine fault diagnosis, structural characterization and monitoring, among other applications.

  14. Detection of vibrational-overtone excitation in water via laser-induced grating spectroscopy

    In this paper we describe a method, based on the laser-induced grating technique, for studying the spectroscopy of vibrational overtone-excited gas-phase water. Two phase-coherent visible laser beams whose frequencies are in the range of the third overtone of the OH stretch in water are crossed in the gas-phase sample. As the wavelength of these excitation beams is scanned through individual rovibrational OH overtone transitions, vibrational energy is deposited into the water in a spatially sinusoidal pattern. A fixed-frequency 266 nm probe laser beam is diffracted from the resultant transmission diffraction grating in water. We show that under collision-free conditions, probe laser diffraction is observed from the initially excited grating, which is a necessary condition for using this technique to study the absorption spectroscopy of the vibrationally excited molecules. Under multiple collision conditions, a probe laser wavelength-independent refractive index grating is formed within the bulk sample. In addition, we observe temporal oscillations in the grating diffraction efficiency arising from excitation of standing acoustic waves

  15. Experimental Study on the Measurement of Water Bottom Vibration Induced by Underwater Drilling Blasting

    Gu Wenbin; Chen Jianghai; Wang Zhenxiong; Wang Zhihua; Liu Jianqing; Lu Ming

    2015-01-01

    Due to the lack of proper instrumentations and the difficulties in underwater measurements, the studies about water bottom vibration induced by underwater drilling blasting are seldom reported. In order to investigate the propagation and attenuation laws of blasting induced water bottom vibration, a water bottom vibration monitor was developed with consideration of the difficulties in underwater measurements. By means of this equipment, the actual water bottom vibration induced by underwater ...

  16. Flow-induced vibration of component cooling water heat exchangers

    This paper presents an evaluation of flow-induced vibration problems of component cooling water heat exchangers in one of Taipower's nuclear power stations. Specifically, it describes flow-induced vibration phenomena, tests to identify the excitation mechanisms, measurement of response characteristics, analyses to predict tube response and wear, various design alterations, and modifications of the original design. Several unique features associated with the heat exchangers are demonstrated, including energy-trapping modes, existence of tube-support-plate (TSP)-inactive modes, and fluidelastic instability of TSP-active and -inactive modes. On the basis of this evaluation, the difficulties and future research needs for the evaluation of heat exchangers are identified. 11 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Evaluation of human-induced vibration of continuous footbridges

    El-Robaa Ahmed; Gaawan Sameh; Malek Charles

    2015-01-01

    With the development of construction materials and the introduction of high strength steel and concrete, the human-induced vibration became a dominant criterion for the design of pedestrian bridges. Currently, longer spans and lightweight bridges have been comprised in most of design trends. This leads to lower the natural frequencies of the system which have a great effect on the dynamic performance of bridges subjected to human activities. Although the design of steel footbridges could reac...

  18. Light-induced vibration in the hearing organ

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl; Fridberger, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing organs is attributed to an active process, where force produced by sensory cells boost sound-induced vibrations, making soft sounds audible. This process is thought to be local, with each section of the hearing organ capable of amplifying sound-evoked movement, and nearly instantaneous, since amplification can work for sounds at frequencies up to 100 kHz in some species. To test these fundamental precepts, we developed a method for focally stim...

  19. CFD Simulation of Vortex Induced Vibration of a Cylindrical Structure

    Asyikin, Muhammad Tedy

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents the investigation of the flow characteristic and vortex induced vibration (VIV) of a cylindrical structure due to the incompressible laminar and turbulent flow at Reynolds number 40, 100, 200 and 1000. The simulations were performed by solving the steady and transient (unsteady) 2D Navier-Stokes equation. For Reynolds number 40, the simulations were set as a steady and laminar flow and the SIMPLE and QUICK were used as the pressure-velocity coupling scheme and momentum sp...

  20. Acoustic-induced motion of the bushcricket (Mecopoda elongata, Tettigoniidae) tympanum.

    Nowotny, Manuela; Hummel, Jennifer; Weber, Melanie; Möckel, Doreen; Kössl, Manfred

    2010-12-01

    Bushcrickets have a tonotopically organised hearing organ, the so-called crista acustica, in the tibia of the forelegs. This organ responds to a frequency range of about 5-80 kHz and lies behind the anterior tympanum on top of a trachea branch. We analyzed the sound-induced vibration pattern of the anterior tympanum, using a Laser-Doppler-Vibrometer Scanning microscope system, in order to identify frequency-dependent amplitude and phase of displacement. The vibration pattern evoked by a frequency sweep (4-79 kHz) showed an amplitude maximum which would correspond to the resonance frequency of an open tube system. At higher frequencies of about 30 kHz a difference in the amplitude and phase response between the distal and the proximal part of the tympanum was detected. The inner plate of the tympanum starts to wobble at this frequency. This higher mode in the motion pattern is not explained by purely acoustic characteristics of the tracheal space below the tympanum but may depend on the mechanical impedance of the tympanum plate. In accordance with a previous hypothesis, the tympanum moves over the whole tested frequency range in the dorso-ventral direction like a hinged flap with the largest displacement in its ventral part and no higher modes of vibration. PMID:20827480

  1. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-12-01

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus.

  2. Passive acoustic radiation control for a vibrating panel with piezoelectric shunt damping circuit using particle swarm optimization algorithm

    This paper presents a new acoustic radiation optimization method for a vibrating panel-like structure with a passive piezoelectric shunt damping system in order to minimize well-radiating modes generated from the panel. The optimization method is based on an idea of using the p-version finite element method(p-version FEM), the boundary element method(BEM), and the particle swarm optimization algorithm(PSOA). Optimum embossment design for the vibrating panel using the PSOA is first investigated in order to minimize noise radiation over a frequency range of interest. The optimum embossment design works as a kind of stiffener so that well-radiating natural modes are shifted up with some degrees. The optimized panel, however, may still require additional damping for attenuating the peak acoustic amplitudes. A passive shunt damping system is thus employed to additionally damp the well-radiating modes from the optimized panel. To numerically evaluate the acoustic multiple-mode damping capability by a shunt damping system, the integrated p-version FEM/BEM for the panel with the shunt damping system is modeled and developed by MATLAB. Using the PSOA, the optimization technique for the optimal multiple-mode shunt damper is investigated in order to achieve the optimum damping performance for the well-radiating modes simultaneously. Also, the acoustic damping performance of the shunt damping circuit in the acoustic environment is demonstrated numerically and experimentally with respect to the realistically sized panel. The simulated result shows a good agreement with that of the experimental result

  3. Heterogeneous Nucleation Induced by Capillary Wave During Acoustic Levitation

    吕勇军; 解文军; 魏炳波

    2003-01-01

    The rapid solidification of acoustically levitated drops of Pb-61.9 wt. %Sn eutectic alloy is accomplished. A surface morphology of spreading ripples is observed on a sample undercooled by 15 K. The ripples originate from the centre of sample surface, which is also the heterogeneous nucleation site for eutectic growth. The Faraday instability excited by forced surface vibration has brought about these ripples. They are retained in the solidified sample if the sound pressure level exceeds the threshold pressure required for the appearance of capillary waves.Theoretical calculations indicate that both the pressure and displacement maxima exist in the central part of a levitated drop. The pressure near the sample centre can promote heterogeneous nucleation, which is in agreement qualitatively with the experimental results.

  4. Evaluation of human-induced vibration of continuous footbridges

    El-Robaa Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of construction materials and the introduction of high strength steel and concrete, the human-induced vibration became a dominant criterion for the design of pedestrian bridges. Currently, longer spans and lightweight bridges have been comprised in most of design trends. This leads to lower the natural frequencies of the system which have a great effect on the dynamic performance of bridges subjected to human activities. Although the design of steel footbridges could reach the optimum level of design in terms of strength criterion, it might not reach the acceptance level for vibration condition. This will enforce the designer to choose section profiles with higher inertia to enhance stiffness of the whole system. This paper presents an overall assessment for floor vibration problem due to pedestrian induced vertical forces on continuous composite footbridges. The footfall method presented by concrete centre “CCIP-016” is adopted in this study to evaluate the response factor and acceleration of pedestrian bridges using a FEA software package “Robot Structural Analysis”.

  5. Road vehicle-induced vibration control of microelectronics facilities

    Guo Anxin; Xu Youlin; Li Hui

    2005-01-01

    A hybrid control platform is investigated in this paper to mitigate microvibrations to a group of vibrationsensitive equipment installed in a microelectronics facility subject to nearby road vehicle-induced horizontal and vertical ground motions. The hybrid control platform, on which microelectronics equipment is installed, is mounted on a building floor through a series of passive mounts and controlled by hydraulic actuators in both horizontal and vertical directions. The control platform is an elastic body with significant bending modes of vibration, and a sub-optimal control algorithm is used to manipulate the hydraulic actuators with actuator dynamics included. The finite element model and the equations of motion of the coupled platform-building system are then established in the absolute coordinate to facilitate the feedback control and performance evaluation of the platform. The horizontal and vertical ground vibrations at the base of the building induced by nearby moving road vehicles are assumed to be stationary random processes. A typical three-story microelectronics building is selected as a case study. The case study shows that the vertical vibration of the microelectronics building is higher than the horizontal. The use of a hybrid control platform can effectively reduce both horizontal and vertical microvibrations of the microelectronics equipment to the level which satisfies the stringent microscale velocity requirement specified in the Bolt Beranek & Newman (BBN) criteria.

  6. Numerical simulation of flow-induced vibrations in tube bundles

    Full text of publication follows: In many industrial components mechanical structures like rod cluster control assembly, fuel assembly and heat exchanger tube bundles are submitted to complex flows causing possible vibrations and damage. Fluid forces are usually split into two parts: structure motion independent forces and fluid-elastic forces coupled with tube motion and responsible for possible dynamic instability development leading to possible short term failures through high amplitude vibrations. Most classical fluid force identification methods rely on structure response experimental measurements associated with convenient data processes. Owing to recent improvements in Computational Fluid Dynamics (C.F.D.), numerical fluid force identification is now practicable in the presence of industrial configurations. The present paper is devoted to numerical simulation of flow-induced vibrations of tube bundles submitted to single-phase cross flows by using C.F.D. codes. Direct Numerical Simulation (D.N.S.), Arbitrary Lagrange Euler formulation (A.L.E.) and code coupling process are involved to predict fluid forces responsible for tube bundle vibrations in the presence of fluid structure and fluid-elastic coupling effects. In the presence of strong multi-physics coupling, simulation of flow-induced vibrations requires a fluid structure code coupling process. The methodology consists in solving in the same time thermohydraulics and mechanics problems by using an A.L.E. formulation for the fluid computation. The purpose is to take into account coupling between flow and structure motions in order to be able to capture coupling effects. From a numerical point of view, there are three steps in the computation: the fluid problem is solved on the computational domain; fluid forces acting on the moving tube are estimated; finally they are introduced in the structure solver providing the tube displacement that is used to actualize the fluid computational domain. Specific

  7. Response characteristics and suppression of flow-induced vibrations of rectangular prisms with rotary oscillation. 1st report, response characteristics and generation mechanism of flow-induced vibrations

    The response characteristics and suppression of flow-induced vibration of rectangular prisms with various width-to-height ratios were experimentally investigated. The present study focused on rotary oscillation, which is one of flow-induced vibrations generated in a rectangular prism. In this paper, the response characteristics on elastically supported prism were first examined in detail by free-vibration test. Next, flow-induced vibrations obtained by the free-vibration test were reproduced by forced-vibration test, and then the generation mechanism of flow-induced vibrations was examined on the basis of the visualized flow patterns, fluctuating pressure distributions of the surface of prism and characteristics of flow-induced vibrations by the flow control. The main findings were that (1) there are three types of flow-induced vibrations, i.e., vortex excitation, low-speed torsion flutter and high-speed torsion flutter, (2) flow-induced vibrations can be classified into six patterns depending on the width-to-height ratio, (3) flow-induced vibrations occur due to change in fluctuating pressure on the surface of the prism based on the difference of the behavior of the shear layer separating from the leading edge, the impinging leading-edge vortex, and the wake vortices, and (4) generation of low-speed torsion flutter and vortex excitation is completely suppressed by adopting large values of the reduced mass-damping factor, however, high-speed torsion flutter occurs regardless of the reduced mass-damping factor. (author)

  8. An experimental study of vibration based energy harvesting in dynamically tailored structures with embedded acoustic black holes

    Zhao, Liuxian; Conlon, Stephen C.; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present an experimental investigation on the energy harvesting performance of dynamically tailored structures based on the concept of embedded acoustic black holes (ABHs). Embedded ABHs allow tailoring the wave propagation characteristics of the host structure creating structural areas with extreme levels of energy density. Experiments are conducted on a tapered plate-like aluminum structure with multiple embedded ABH features. The dynamic response of the structure is tested via laser vibrometry in order to confirm the vibration localization and the passive wavelength sweep characteristic of ABH embedded tapers. Vibrational energy is extracted from the host structure and converted into electrical energy by using ceramic piezoelectric discs bonded on the ABHs and shunted on an external electric circuit. The energy harvesting performance is investigated both under steady state and transient excitation. The experimental results confirm that the dynamic tailoring produces a drastic increase in the harvested energy independently from the nature of the excitation input.

  9. Structural vibration and fluid-borne noise induced by turbulent flow through a 90° piping elbow with/without a guide vane

    The structural vibration and fluid-borne noise induced by turbulent flow through a 90° piping elbow is studied and the effect of guide vanes in different positions installed at the elbow on the flow-induced vibration and flow-induced noise is investigated. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model is adopted to solve for time varying pressure and velocity fields. The structural vibration is investigated based on a fluid–structure interaction (FSI) code using harmonic response analysis. The computation of hydrodynamic noise is based on a hybrid LES/Lighthill's acoustic analogy method and sound sources are solved as volume sources in commercial software ACTRAN. The numerical results indicate that the guide vane at the right location is effective in reducing vibration and flow-induced noise in the 90° piping elbow with water. The ideal position of the guide vane is determined and some useful engineering conclusions are drawn. - Highlights: • Vibration and noise induced by turbulent flow through an elbow is analyzed. • The guide vane can decrease fluctuations of the turbulent flows. • The guide vane is effective in reducing vibration and noise of the elbow. • The ideal position of the guide vane installed at the elbow is determined

  10. Dose-response patterns for vibration-induced white finger

    Griffin, M; Bovenzi, M.; Nelson, C

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To investigate alternative relations between cumulative exposures to hand-transmitted vibration (taking account of vibration magnitude, lifetime exposure duration, and frequency of vibration) and the development of white finger (Raynaud's phenomenon).

  11. Two-phase flow induced vibrations in CANDU steam generators

    The U-Bend region of nuclear steam generators tube bundles have suffered from two-phase cross flow induced vibrations. Tubes in this region have experienced high amplitude vibrations leading to catastrophic failures. Turbulent buffeting and fluid-elastic instability has been identified as the main causes. Previous investigations have focused on flow regime and two-phase flow damping ratio. However, tube bundles in steam generators have vapour generated on the surface of the tubes, which might affect the flow regime, void fraction distribution, turbulent intensity levels and tube-flow interaction, all of which have the potential to change the tube vibration response. A cantilevered tube bundle made of electric cartridges heaters was built and tested in a Freon-11 flow loop at McMaster University. Tubes were arranged in a parallel triangular configuration. The bundle was exposed to two-phase cross flows consisting of different combinations of void from two sources, void generated upstream of the bundle and void generated at the surface of the tubes. Tube tip vibration response was measured optically and void fraction was measured by gamma densitometry technique. It was found that tube vibration amplitude in the transverse direction was reduced by a factor of eight for void fraction generated at the tube surfaces only, when compared to the upstream only void generation case. The main explanation for this effect is a reduction in the correlation length of the turbulent buffeting forcing function. Theoretical calculations of the tube vibration response due to turbulent buffeting under the same experimental conditions predicted a similar reduction in tube amplitude. The void fraction for the fluid-elastic instability threshold in the presence of tube bundle void fraction generation was higher than that for the upstream void fraction generation case. The first explanation of this difference is the level of turbulent buffeting forces the tube bundle was exposed to

  12. Laser induced vibration of a thin soap film.

    Emile, Olivier; Emile, Janine

    2014-01-01

    We report on the vibration of a thin soap film based on the optical radiation pressure force. The modulated low power laser induces a counter gravity flow in a vertical free standing draining film. The thickness of the soap film is then higher in the upper region than in the lower region of the film. Moreover, the lifetime of the film is dramatically increased by a factor of 2. Since the laser beam only acts mechanically on the film interfaces, such a film can be implemented in an optofluidic...

  13. Vibrationally-induced electronic population inversion with strong femtosecond pulses

    Sampedro, Pablo; Sola, Ignacio R

    2016-01-01

    We discover a new mechanism of electronic population inversion using strong femtosecond pulses, where the transfer is mediated by vibrational motion on a light-induced potential. The process can be achieved with a single pulse tuning its frequency to the red of the Franck-Condon window. We show the determinant role that the sign of the slope of the transition dipole moment can play on the dynamics, and extend the method to multiphoton processes with odd number of pulses. As an example, we show how the scheme can be applied to population inversion in Na2.

  14. Laser-induced vibrational dynamics of ozone in solid argon

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Amstrup, B.; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We consider the vibrational dynamics, induced by an intense infrared laser pulse, in an ozone molecule with isotopic substitution, that is, (OOO)-O-16-O-16-O-18 and compare the dynamics in the gas phase and in solid ar on. not perturbed by argon on a time-scale of a few picoseconds and selective...... bond-breaking in the molecule should be possible following the same laser control scheme as suggested in the gas phase. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V....

  15. Predicting vibration-induced displacement for a resonant friction slider

    Fidlin, A.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2001-01-01

    A mathematical model is set up to quantify vibration-induced motions of a slider, sandwiched between friction layers with different coefficients of friction, and equipped with an imbedded resonator that oscillates at high frequency and small amplitude. This model is highly nonlinear, involving non......-smooth functions with strong harmonic excitation terms. The method of averaging is extended to hold for systems of this class, and used to derive approximate expressions for predicting average velocities of the slider. These expressions are shown to produce results that agree very well with numerical integration...... of the full equations of motion. The expressions are used to estimate and explain the influence of system parameters....

  16. Flow-induced vibration signal analysis of the FIV test loop

    Vibration spectrums of the test loop according to flow conditions were analyzed in order to identify the sources of vibration at peak frequencies. While a flow condition of the sweep test was changed by varying pump rotational speed from 450 rpm to 1500 rpm by the step 150 rpm, mid span acceleration of the test section in width-direction and dynamic pressure perturbation in the test section were measured. Other sources of vibration due to the flow structure interactions, such as acoustic resonance, blade pulsing frequency and bellows wrinkles, were investigated. Pressure perturbation in the section and acoustic resonance due to branch pipe give major effects to the vibration of the test section in high frequency range of 1.5 kHz to 2.8 kHz

  17. Regional distribution of acoustic-based lung vibration as a function of mechanical ventilation mode

    Dellinger, R Phillip; Jean, Smith; Cinel, Ismail; Tay, Christina; Rajanala, Susmita; Glickman, Yael A; Parrillo, Joseph E

    2007-01-01

    Introduction There are several ventilator modes that are used for maintenance mechanical ventilation but no conclusive evidence that one mode of ventilation is better than another. Vibration response imaging is a novel bedside imaging technique that displays vibration energy of lung sounds generated during the respiratory cycle as a real-time structural and functional image of the respiration process. In this study, we objectively evaluated the differences in regional lung vibration during di...

  18. Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensor for Detection and Localization of Acoustic Vibrations

    Sifta Radim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A sensing system utilizing a standard optical fiber as a distributed sensor for the detection and localization of mechanical vibrations is presented. Vibrations can be caused by various external factors, like moving people, cars, trains, and other objects producing mechanical vibrations that are sensed by a fiber. In our laboratory we have designed a sensing system based on the Φ-OTDR (phase sensitive Optical Time Domain Reflectometry using an extremely narrow laser and EDFAs.

  19. Flow Induced Vibration Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    Argonne National Laboratory has had a Flow Induced Vibration Program since 1967; the Program currently resides in the Laboratory's Components Technology Division. Throughout its existence, the overall objective of the program has been to develop and apply new and/or improved methods of analysis and testing for the design evaluation of nuclear reactor plant components and heat exchange equipment from the standpoint of flow induced vibration. Historically, the majority of the program activities have been funded by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), and Department of Energy (DOE). Current DOE funding is from the Breeder Mechanical Component Development Division, Office of Breeder Technology Projects; Energy Conversion and Utilization Technology (ECUT) Program, Office of Energy Systems Research; and Division of Engineering, Mathematical and Geosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Testing of Clinch River Breeder Reactor upper plenum components has been funded by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) Project Office. Work has also been performed under contract with Foster Wheeler, General Electric, Duke Power Company, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Westinghouse

  20. Flow Induced Vibration Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    1984-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has had a Flow Induced Vibration Program since 1967; the Program currently resides in the Laboratory's Components Technology Division. Throughout its existence, the overall objective of the program has been to develop and apply new and/or improved methods of analysis and testing for the design evaluation of nuclear reactor plant components and heat exchange equipment from the standpoint of flow induced vibration. Historically, the majority of the program activities have been funded by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), and Department of Energy (DOE). Current DOE funding is from the Breeder Mechanical Component Development Division, Office of Breeder Technology Projects; Energy Conversion and Utilization Technology (ECUT) Program, Office of Energy Systems Research; and Division of Engineering, Mathematical and Geosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Testing of Clinch River Breeder Reactor upper plenum components has been funded by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) Project Office. Work has also been performed under contract with Foster Wheeler, General Electric, Duke Power Company, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Westinghouse.

  1. Experimental and analytical studies on pedestrian induced footbridge vibrations

    Gudmundsson, Gudmundur Valur; Ingólfsson, Einar Thór; Einarsson, Baldvin;

    2007-01-01

    models describing human-induced vibrations on structures in current literature and standards are explained, both for a single person walking or running and crowd loading. The measured vertical acceleration induced by single pedestrians was compared against the predictions and it was found that all the...... pacing rates large differences were observed between the measured acceleration response and the one predicted by the code. Instead, a slightly improved simplified load model using frequency dependent load factors gives better results....... modes corresponding to the measured values. The models were subsequently used to calculate the predicted acceleration according to the preliminary version of the Eurocode (ENV 1992-2: Concrete bridges) using time-history analysis with a moving load as representative for a single pedestrian. The load...

  2. Flow-induced vibration of steam generator tube bundles

    The vibrations induced in tube arrays by a transversal flow are of great practical interest because of their destructive effects especially on heat exchangers. Instabilities can appear beyond a critical flow velocity and induce very high vibratory levels which may involve fractures. These instabilities involve a fluidelastic coupling between the vibratory movement of the tubes and the flow round them. Studies are being carried out in France concerning steam generators. A lot of bundle mock-ups with various pitches have been tested and large range parameter domains have been investigated. In a second part, the C.E.A., FRAMATOME, E.D.F. and WESTINGHOUSE research program, which is being carried out, is presented

  3. Flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    Jaiswal, Surabhi; Bandyopadhyay, Pintu; Sen, Abhijit

    2015-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of particle flow induced large amplitude shock waves in a dusty plasma. These dust acoustic shocks (DAS) are observed for strongly supersonic flows and have been studied in a U-shaped Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device for charged kaolin dust in a background of Argon plasma. The strong flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change of the dust density near the potential hill is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks. The dynamics of the shocks are captured by fast video pictures of the structures that are illuminated by a laser sheet beam. The physical characteristics of the shock are delineated from a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of plasma parameters and flow speeds. Details of these observations and a physical explanation based on model calculations will be presented.

  4. BVI induced vibration and noise alleviation by active and passive approaches

    Liu, Li

    This dissertation describes the development of a comprehensive aeroelastic/aeroacoustic simulation capability for the modeling of vibration and noise in rotorcraft induced by blade-vortex interaction (BVI). Subsequently this capability is applied to study vibration and noise reduction, using active and passive control approaches. The active approach employed is the actively controlled partial span trailing edge flaps (ACF), implemented in single and dual, servo and plain flap configurations. The passive approach is based on varying the sweep and anhedral on the tip of the rotor. Two different modern helicopters are chosen as the baseline for the implementation of ACF approach, one resembling a four-bladed MBB BO-105 hingeless rotor and the other similar to a five-bladed MD-900 bearingless rotor. The structural model is based on a finite element approach capable of simulating composite helicopter blades with swept tips, and representing multiple load paths at the blade root which is a characteristic of bearingless rotors. An unsteady compressible aerodynamic model based on a rational function approximation (RFA) approach is combined with a free wake analysis which has been enhanced by improving the wake analysis resolution and modeling a dual vortex structure. These enhancements are important for capturing BVI effects. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades has been developed, which is required by the acoustic analysis. A modified version of helicopter noise code WOPWOP with provisions for blade flexibility has been combined with the aeroelastic analysis to predict the BVI noise. Several variants of the higher harmonic control (HHC) algorithm have been applied for the active noise control, as well as the simultaneous vibration and noise control. Active control of BVI noise is accomplished using feedback from an onboard microphone. The simulation has been extensively validated against experimental data and

  5. Flow-induced noise and vibration analysis of a piping elbow with/without a guide vane

    Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Yong'ou; Ouyang, Huajiang; Guo, Tao

    2014-12-01

    The effect of a guide vane installed at the elbow on flow-induced noise and vibration is investigated in the range of Reynolds numbers from 1.70×105 to 6.81×105, and the position of guide vane is determined by publications. The turbulent flow in the piping elbow is simulated with large eddy simulation (LES). Following this, a hybrid method of combining LES and Lighthill's acoustic analogy theory is used to simulate the hydrodynamic noise and sound sources are solved as volume sources in code Actran. In addition, the flow-induced vibration of the piping elbow is investigated based on a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) code. The LES results indicate that the range of vortex zone in the elbow without the guide vane is larger than the case with the guide vane, and the guide vane is effective in reducing flow-induced noise and vibration in the 90° piping elbow at different Reynolds numbers.

  6. Relationship between sound radiation from sound-induced and force-excited vibration: Analysis using an infinite elastic plate model.

    Yairi, Motoki; Sakagami, Kimihiro; Nishibara, Kosuke; Okuzono, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Although sound radiation from sound-induced vibration and from force-excited vibration of solid structures are similar phenomena in terms of radiating from vibrating structures, the general relationship between them has not been explicitly studied to date. In particular, airborne sound transmission through walls and sound radiation from structurally vibrating surfaces in buildings are treated as different issues in architectural acoustics. In this paper, a fundamental relationship is elucidated through the use of a simple model. The transmission coefficient for random-incidence sound and the radiated sound power under point force excitation of an infinite elastic plate are both analyzed. Exact and approximate solutions are derived for the two problems, and the relationship between them is theoretically discussed. A conversion function that relates the transmission coefficient and radiated sound power is obtained in a simple closed form through the approximate solutions. The exact solutions are also related by the same conversion function. It is composed of the specific impedance and the wavenumber, and is independent of any elastic plate parameters. The sound radiation due to random-incidence sound and point force excitation are similar phenomena, and the only difference is the gradient of those characteristics with respect to the frequency. PMID:27475169

  7. Design of CAP1400 reactor internals flow-induced vibration simulation test model

    While the first CAP1400 reactor internals is defined as a 'prototype', it is necessary to carry out the reactor internals flow-induced vibration simulation test for verifying the structure integrity of reactor internals and providing data for vibration assessment of CAP1400 reactor internals. The reactor internals flow-induced vibration simulation test is usually a reduced scale model test. This paper describes in detail the main factors of model scale, similarity criterion and the simplification of test model. The simplification of model will not only reduce the fabrication cost, but also obtain more accurate test data from the flow-induced vibration simulation test. (authors)

  8. A theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels

    Muller, Peter Barkholt

    2015-01-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal build-up and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance wit...

  9. Added mass and critical mass in vortex induced vibration

    Konstantinidis, Efstathios

    2015-11-01

    The critical mass phenomenon is the observation that a circular cylinder suspended freely in a fluid stream without a mechanical restoring force exhibits significant vortex induced vibration if its mass is below some value whereas insignificant vibration occurs if the mass is above this value. While the phenomenon is known, its origin remains largely unknown. Furthermore, there are several outstanding questions regarding this phenomenon which cannot be explained on the basis of the existing theoretical framework. In this work, a new formulation of the added mass in the context of potential flow is presented. This leads to a new expression for the potential force, which is more complex than the classical one, that is subsequently employed in simplified form in order to analytically model the flow-structure interaction by decomposing the fluid force into potential and vortex components via the equation of cylinder motion. It is found that the model predicts a significant increase in the amplitude response of a freely suspended cylinder in sharp contrast to predictions using the classical formulation of the added mass. Finally, the model equations are employed to exemplify the phenomenology of the critical mass in real flows.

  10. Theory and Techniques for Vibration-Induced Conductivity Fluctuation testing of Soils

    Chang, Hung-Chih; Kishne, Andrea; Morgan, Cristine; Kwan, Chiman; 10.1142/S021947750800443X

    2009-01-01

    First we present and theoretically analyze the phenomenological physical picture behind Vibration-Induced Conductivity Fluctuations. We identify the relevant tensors characterizing the electromechanical response against the vibrations for both longitudinal and transversal responses. We analyze the conductivity response with acceleration type vibrations and a new scheme, measurements with more advantageous compression type vibrations that are first introduced here. Compression vibrations provide sideband spectral lines shifted by the frequency of the vibration instead of its second harmonics; moreover the application of this method is less problematic with loose electrodes. Concerning geometry and electrodes, the large measurement errors in earlier experiment indicated electrode effects which justify using four-electrode type measurements. We propose and analyze new arrangements for the longitudinal and transversal measurements with both compression vibration and acceleration vibration for laboratory and field...

  11. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  12. Acoustically induced optical second harmonic generation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    Ebothe, J; Cabarrocas, P R I; Godet, C; Equer, B

    2003-01-01

    Acoustically induced second harmonic generation (AISHG) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si : H) films of different morphology has been observed. We have found that with increasing acoustical power, the optical SHG of Gd : YAB laser light (lambda = 2.03 mu m) increases and reaches its maximum value at an acoustical power density of about 2.10 W cm sup - sup 2. With decreasing temperature, the AISHG signal strongly increases below 48 K and correlates well with the temperature behaviour of differential scanning calorimetry indicating near-surface temperature phase transition. The AISHG maxima were observed at acoustical frequencies of 10-11, 14-16, 20-22 and 23-26 kHz. The independently performed measurements of the acoustically induced IR spectra have shown that the origin of the observed phenomenon is the acoustically induced electron-phonon anharmonicity in samples of different morphology.

  13. Flow induced vibration analysis for preventing PWR fuel rods from excessive fretting wear

    In order to prevent PWR fuel rods excessive fretting wear, the author analysed flow induced vibration. The methods developed and used by FRAMATOME to analyze and to justify the fuel rod behaviour with respect to flow induced vibrations and wear at grid support locations were presented

  14. Dynamic Characteristics of Flow Induced Vibration in a Rotor-Seal System

    Nan Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow induced vibration is an important factor affecting the performance of the rotor-seal system. From the point of view of flow induced vibration, the nonlinear models of the rotor-seal system are presented for the analysis of the fluid force, which is induced by the interaction between the unstable fluid flow in the seal and the vibrating rotor. The nonlinear characteristics of flow induced vibration in the rotor-seal system are analyzed, and the nonlinear phenomena in the unbalanced rotor-seal system are investigated using the nonlinear models. Various nonlinear phenomena of flow induced vibration in the rotor-seal system, such as synchronization phenomenon and amplitude mutation, are reproduced.

  15. Visco-acoustic modelling of a vibrating plate interacting with water confined in a domain of micrometric size

    Lebental, B.; Bourquin, F.

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that concrete durability strongly depends on the capillary porosity of the material. Hence, structural health monitoring of concrete structure could take advantage of concrete microporosity monitoring. To this end, a new method for the in situ non-destructive testing of capillary porosity in cementitious materials has been proposed. A sensing device that seems well suited to this application is a capacitive ultrasonic transducer with a characteristic size of 1 μm. It is to be embedded in the material. Its vibrating membrane is made of aligned carbon nanotubes forming a thin layer with a typical thickness of 1 nm. It generates acoustic waves of micrometric wavelength into water-filled micropores, aiming at measuring their properties. The present paper focuses on the numerical simulation of the embedded sensor. In order to properly account for viscous effects in fluids at the micrometric scale, we have developed a specific computational method for the visco-acoustic modelling of a microplate vibrating between 10 MHz and 2 GHz in a water-filled domain of micrometric size. Our approach is based on the condensation of the fluid part of the fluid-structure problem on the structure by a finite element method, and on a spectral approximation of the structural equations. The numerical results indicate that the fluid domain is resonant despite the viscous terms, which causes a frequency downshift of the resonances and a decrease of the quality factor. In the coupled system, the plate does not perturb the fluid resonances, whereas the plate resonances are strongly upshifted by the water load. The resonance frequencies of the system are shown to display a clear dependence on the pore width, which makes the device a good candidate as a porosity sensor.

  16. Force Limiting Vibration Tests Evaluated from both Ground Acoustic Tests and FEM Simulations of a Flight Like Vehicle System Assembly

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted a series of ground acoustic tests with the dual goals of informing analytical judgment, and validating analytical methods when estimating vibroacoustic responses of launch vehicle subsystems. The process of repeatedly correlating finite element-simulated responses with test-measured responses has assisted in the development of best practices for modeling and post-processing. In recent work, force transducers were integrated to measure interface forces at the base of avionics box equipment. Other force data was indirectly measured using strain gauges. The combination of these direct and indirect force measurements has been used to support and illustrate the advantages of implementing the Force Limiting approach for equipment qualification tests. The comparison of force response from integrated system level tests to measurements at the same locations during component level vibration tests provides an excellent illustration. A second comparison of the measured response cases from the system level acoustic tests to finite element simulations has also produced some principles for assessing the suitability of Finite Element Models (FEMs) for making vibroacoustics estimates. The results indicate that when FEM models are employed to guide force limiting choices, they should include sufficient detail to represent the apparent mass of the system in the frequency range of interest.

  17. Determination of hydrocarbon levels in water via laser-induced acoustics wave

    Bidin, Noriah; Hossenian, Raheleh; Duralim, Maisarah; Krishnan, Ganesan; Marsin, Faridah Mohd; Nughro, Waskito; Zainal, Jasman

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination in water is a major environmental concern in terms of foreseen collapse of the natural ecosystem. Hydrocarbon level in water was determined by generating acoustic wave via an innovative laser-induced breakdown in conjunction with high-speed photographic coupling with piezoelectric transducer to trace acoustic wave propagation. A Q-switched Nd:YAG (40 mJ) was focused in cuvette-filled hydrocarbon solution at various concentrations (0-2000 ppm) to induce optical breakdown, shock wave generation and later acoustic wave propagation. A nitro-dye (ND) laser (10 mJ) was used as a flash to illuminate and frozen the acoustic wave propagation. Lasers were synchronised using a digital delay generator. The image of acoustic waves was grabbed and recorded via charged couple device (CCD) video camera at the speed of 30 frames/second with the aid of Matrox software version 9. The optical delay (0.8-10.0 μs) between the acoustic wave formation and its frozen time is recorded through photodetectors. A piezo-electric transducer (PZT) was used to trace the acoustic wave (sound signal), which cascades to a digital oscilloscope. The acoustic speed is calculated from the ratio of acoustic wave radius (1-8 mm) and optical time delay. Acoustic wave speed is found to linearly increase with hydrocarbon concentrations. The acoustic signal generation at higher hydrocarbon levels in water is attributed to supplementary mass transfer and impact on the probe. Integrated high-speed photography with transducer detection system authenticated that the signals indeed emerged from the laser-induced acoustic wave instead of photothermal processes. It is established that the acoustic wave speed in water is used as a fingerprint to detect the hydrocarbon levels.

  18. Recent monitoring of the Øresund Bridge: Observations of rain-wind induced cable vibrations

    Acampora, Antonio; Georgakis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    In 1999, 2m amplitude cable vibrations were observed on the Øresund Bridge. The vibrations were attributed to a change in cable shape due to sleet accretion. Subsequent monitoring of the bridge, though, revealed other vibration events due to rain-wind induced mechanisms and parametric excitation...... diameters have been observed, although the most frequent observations are of smaller amplitude and are almost always in combination with rain. In this paper, several observations are made, regarding the rain-wind induced vibrations (RWIVs) of the cables, based on a relatively brief full-scale monitoring...... dampers were installed on the longest and second longest cable pairs. Although the bridge has not suffered from any significant vibration events since the installation of the new damping systems, smaller amplitude vibrations are recorded from time to time. Peak to peak amplitudes of up to three cable...

  19. Vibrational predissociation and vibrationally induced isomerization of 3-aminophenol-ammonia.

    Heid, Cornelia G; Merrill, Wyatt G; Case, Amanda S; Crim, F Fleming

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the vibrational predissociation dynamics of the hydrogen-bonded 3-aminophenol-ammonia cluster (3-AP-NH3) in the OH and NH stretching regions. Vibrational excitation provides enough energy to dissociate the cluster into its constituent 3-AP and NH3 monomers, and we detect the 3-AP fragments via (1 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). The distribution of vibrational states of the 3-AP fragment suggests the presence of two distinct dissociation pathways. The first dissociation channel produces a broad, unstructured feature in the REMPI-action spectrum after excitation of any of the OH or NH stretching vibrations, pointing to a nearly statistical dissociation pathway with extensive coupling among the vibrations in the cluster during the vibrational predissociation. The second dissociation channel produces distinct, resolved features on top of the broad feature but only following excitation of the OH or symmetric NH3 stretch in the cluster. This striking mode-specificity is consistent with strong coupling of these two modes to the dissociation coordinate (the O-H⋯N bond). The presence of clearly resolved transitions to the electronic origin and to the 10a(2) + 10b(2) state of the cis-3-AP isomer shows that vibrational excitation is driving the isomerization of the trans-3-AP-NH3 isomer to the cis-3-AP-NH3 isomer in the course of the dissociation. PMID:25573564

  20. Acoustics

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  1. The destabilization paradox applied to friction-induced vibrations in an aircraft braking system

    Chevillot, Fabrice; Sinou, Jean-Jacques; Mazet, Guy-Bernard; Hardouin, Nicolas; Jezequel, Louis

    2008-01-01

    International audience Mechanisms of friction are known as an important source of vibrations in a large variety of engineering systems, where the emergence of oscillations is noisy and can cause severe damage to the system. The reduction or elimination of these vibrations is then an industrial issue that requires the attention of engineers and researchers together. Friction-induced vibrations have been the matter of several investigations, considering experimental, analytical, and numerica...

  2. Self-induced vibration due to upward plane jet colliding with liquid surface. Vibration mechanism of jet flutter

    When there are free liquid surface and jet or circulating flow in a vessel, sometimes the self-induced vibration of the liquid surface occurs according to the condition. The typical self-induced vibration of jet-liquid surface system is the phenomena that the upward plane jet colliding with the liquid surface causes when it is at the position partitioning the middle of a rectangular tank. There are two kinds, self-induced fluctuation and jet flutter in these phenomena. The object of this study is the latter, and it has been known that the frequency of this phenomenon coincides with that of the liquid surface vibration in a continuous tank which is partitioned at jet position and connected only near jet inflow port, and it occurs when jet velocity exceeds the limit value determined by the distance between the jet inflow port and liquid surface. The features of this phenomenon are explained. The measurement of the variable quantities, the constitution of the vibration system controlling frequency, the analysis of jet locus, the additional pressure on liquid surface by moving swell, exciting energy and the effect that various factors exert to excitation range are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Experimental investigation of the thermo-acoustic instabilities coupled with walls vibration

    Pozarlik, Artur; Kok, Jim

    2010-01-01

    In order to fulfil requirements regarding emission of harmful gases to atmosphere, the gas turbine technologies had to develop into clean techniques for energy generation. Lean premixed combustion of natural gas is one of them. Since during this process exceed of air is used, the total combustion temperature is relatively low. In consequence fewer pollutants are produced. The major drawback of this process is high sensitivity on the thermo-acoustic instabilities. Inside the combustion chamber...

  4. Aero-Acoustic and Vibration Characteristics of Self-Oscillating Artificial Vocal Folds

    Horáček, Jaromír; Bula, Vítězslav; Radolf, Vojtěch; Vampola, T.; Dušková, M.

    Praha: Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics ASCR, v. v. i, 2015 - (Náprstek, J.; Fischer, C.). s. 96-97 ISBN 978-80-86246-42-0. ISSN 1805-8248. [Engineering mechanics 2015 /21./. 11.05.2015-14.05.2015, Svratka] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/12/1306 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : fluid-structure interaction * flutter * biomechanics of voice * modeling of phonation Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  5. Measurement of vibration, flow and acoustic characteristics of a human larynx replica

    Horáček, Jaromír; Bula, Vítězslav; Radolf, Vojtěch; Vampola, T.; Dušková, Miroslava

    Brno : Brno University of Technology, 2014 - (Fuis, V.), s. 224-227 ISBN 978-80-214-4871-1. ISSN 1805-8248. [Engineering Mechanics 2014 /20./. Svratka (CZ), 12.05.2014-15.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/12/1306 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : fluid-structure interaction * flutter * biomechanics of voice modeling * phonation Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V)

  6. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF ENHANCED HEAT TRANSFER BY FLOW-INDUCED VIBRATION OF ELASTIC TUBE BUNDLES

    2000-01-01

    A new concept of heat transfer enhancement by flow-induced vibration was put forward, and a novel heat transfer element called elastic tube bundles was designed. The experimental investigation was performed on its characteristics of flow-induced virbration in out-tube or in-tube flow. Under the conditions of fixed heat flux and steam-water heat transfer, the regularity of heat transfer enhancement by flow-induced vibration was examined.

  7. Field experiment of subgrade vibration induced by passing train in a seasonally frozen region of Daqing

    Ling Xianzhang; Zhang Feng; Zhu Zhanyuan; Ding Lin; Hu Qinli

    2009-01-01

    The vibration characteristics and attenuation of the subgrade caused by passing trains in a seasonally frozen region of Daqing, China are investigated. Three field experiments were conducted during different times through the year, in normal, freezing and thawing periods, respectively, and the influence of the season, train speed and train type, is described in this paper. The results show that: (l) the vertical component is the greatest among the three components of the measured vibration near the rail track, and as the distance to the railway track increases, the dominant vibration depends on the season. (2) Compared with the vibration in the normal period, the vertical and longitudinal vibrations increase while the lateral vibration decreases in the freezing period. However, in the thawing period, the vertical and longitudinal vibrations decrease, and the lateral vibration increases. (3) As train speeds increase, the subgrade vibration increases. (4) The vibration induced by a freight train is greater than by a passenger train. These observations provide a better understanding of the vibration and dynamic stability of the subgrade and may be useful in developing criteria for railway and building construction in cold regions.

  8. MIMO adaptive control of thruster-firing-induced vibration of satellites using multifunctional platforms

    Ma, Kougen; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the concept, control strategy, and simulations of suppressing the thruster-firing-induced vibration of satellites. First, a satellite vibration reduction concept of utilizing the UHM multifunctional platform is discussed, and the structural configurations of the platform as well as the combination of the platform and a satellite are described. A satellite-like frame with the platform is analyzed, and the predominant modes of the frame are determined. A MIMO adaptive control scheme is then developed to suppress the frame vibration, and a convergence factor vector concept is introduced to ease the multi-channel convergence rate control. This controller is adjusted based on the vibration information of the frame and drives the platform to isolate the vibration transmission from the firing thruster to the satellite structure. The entire system has ten actuators: four piezoelectric stack actuators and six piezoelectric patch actuators. Eleven vibration components of the frame and platform are controlled. Nine components are in the frame for the satellite vibration suppression, and two are in the top-device plate of the platform for the thruster vibration suppression. Finally, simulations are performed to suppress the vibration of the frame for three platform positions to simulate the misalignment correction of the satellite thrust vector. The results demonstrate that the entire frame vibration at its dominant frequency decreases to 7-10% of its uncontrolled value in the three platform positions, and the thruster vibration decreases to 7.5% of its uncontrolled value.

  9. Finite-difference lattice Boltzmann simulation on acoustics-induced particle deposition

    Fu, Sau-Chung; Yuen, Wai-Tung; Wu, Chili; Chao, Christopher Yu-Hang

    2015-10-01

    Particle manipulation by acoustics has been investigated for many years. By a proper design, particle deposition can be induced by the same principle. The use of acoustics can potentially be developed into an energy-efficient technique for particle removal or filtration system as the pressure drop due to acoustic effects is low and the flow velocity is not necessary to be high. Two nonlinear acoustic effects, acoustic streaming and acoustic radiation pressure, are important. Acoustic streaming introduces vortices and stagnation points on the surface of an air duct and removes the particles by deposition. Acoustic radiation pressure causes particles to form agglomerates and enhances inertial impaction and/or gravitational sedimentation. The objective of this paper is to develop a numerical model to investigate the particle deposition induced by acoustic effects. A three-step approach is adopted and lattice Boltzamnn technique is employed as the numerical method. This is because the lattice Boltzmann equation is hyperbolic and can be solved locally, explicitly, and efficiently on parallel computers. In the first step, the acoustic field and its mean square fluctuation values are calculated. Due to the advantage of the lattice Boltzmann technique, a simple, stable and fast lattice Boltzmann method is proposed and verified. The result of the first step is input into the second step to solve for acoustic streaming. Another finite difference lattice Boltzmann method, which has been validated by a number of flows and benchmark cases in the literature, is used. The third step consists in tracking the particle's motion by a Lagrangian approach where the acoustic radiation pressure is considered. The influence of the acoustics effects on particle deposition is explained. The numerical result matches with an experiment. The model is a useful tool for optimizing the design and helps to further develop the technique.

  10. Analysis of Shear-horizontal Vibrations of Crystal Plates for Acoustic Wave Resonators and Sensors

    Liu, Bo

    2010-01-01

    In this work, theoretical analysis of shear-horizontal vibrations of crystal plates under lateral electric field excitation (LFE) without and with a fluid layer is presented. A crystal plate with separated electrodes under thickness electric field excitation (TFE) in contact with a fluid layer is also analyzed.We have started with analyzing the coupled face-shear (FS) and thickness-twist (TT) motions of piezoelectric plates with lateral electric fields, using the Mindlin's first-order theory ...

  11. Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibrations in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers

  12. Self-induced vibrations of a DU96-W-180 airfoil in stall

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    2014-01-01

    degrees of freedom. The computations aimed at investigating the mechanisms of both vortex-induced and stall-induced vibrations related to a wind turbine blade at standstill conditions. In this work, a DU96-W-180 airfoil was used in the angle-of-attack region potentially corresponding to stallinduced...... likely to occur at modern wind turbine blades at standstill. In contrast, the predicted cut-in wind speed necessary for the onset of stall-induced vibrations appeared high enough for such vibrations to be unlikely. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  13. Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibrations in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    Uvan Catton; Vijay K. Dhir; Deepanjan Mitra; Omar Alquaddoomi; Pierangelo Adinolfi

    2004-04-06

    Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers.

  14. Housing development near a railway tunnel: Mitigating vibration and induced noise by tweaking foundation design

    Galanti, F.M.B.; Koopman, A.

    2009-01-01

    Vibration insulation of buildings is often achieved by introducing springs in the foundation. It can be a very effective measure, especially against vibration induced noise, but also a very costly one. There is a need for less costly measures which, although less effective, may achieve the required

  15. Analysis of fluid induced vibration of cryogenic pipes in consideration of the cooling effect

    The purpose of system analysis using fluid induced vibration is to identify the problems of the system in advance by analyzing the vibration behavior of the system excited by fluid flow. Fluid-induced vibration analysis methods, developed so far, generally use the numerical analysis method to analyze the fluid flowing inside the pipe and the infinitesimal elements at normal temperature on the basis of the governing equation obtained by applying Newton's Second Law and the momentum equation. However, as the fluid temperature changes greatly at low temperature, fluid-induced vibration analysis methods for normal temperature cannot be applied. This study investigated methods of analyzing fluid-induced vibration in consideration of the cooling effect. In consideration of the changes in the properties of the fluid and system relative to temperature, vibration behavior was analyzed numerically by means of the equation of motion. As a result, the natural frequency of the system tends to change because of the changes of the properties of materials even when the flux is constant inside the pipe, and the vibration behavior of the system was compared to that in case of normal temperature to analyze how much influence the cooling effect has on the vibration behavior of the system

  16. Flow-Induced Vibrations in a Steam Blow-0ut Line of a Power Plant

    We consider in this work the large amplitude flow-induced vibrations in a steam blow-out line of a power plant. A low-order, parametrically excited, coupled nonlinear dynamical system is formulated 1iom the describing boundary value problem. Analysis of system response enables identification of governing mechanisms of: instability and complex aperiodic vibrations

  17. Pedestrian induced vertical vibrations: Response to running using the Response Spectrum Method

    Matteoni, Giulia; Georgakis, Christos

    Footbridges are increasingly prone to vibrations and designers are generally unable to predict pedestrian-induced vertical vibrations. Many aspects of human loading are infact not properly taken into account for in the load models employed by the international codes of practice, such as the rando...

  18. Selective magnetic resonance imaging of magnetic nanoparticles by Acoustically Induced Rotary Saturation (AIRS)

    Zhu, Bo; Witzel, Thomas; Jiang, Shan; Huang, Susie Y.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We introduce a new method to selectively detect iron oxide contrast agents using an acoustic wave to perturb the spin-locked water signal in the vicinity of the magnetic particles. The acoustic drive can be externally modulated to turn the effect on and off, allowing sensitive and quantitative statistical comparison and removal of confounding image background variations. Methods We demonstrate the effect in spin-locking experiments using piezoelectric actuators to generate vibrational displacements of iron oxide samples. We observe a resonant behavior of the signal changes with respect to the acoustic frequency where iron oxide is present. We characterize the effect as a function of actuator displacement and contrast agent concentration. Results The resonant effect allows us to generate block-design “modulation response maps” indicating the contrast agent’s location, as well as positive contrast images with suppressed background signal. We show the AIRS effect stays approximately constant across acoustic frequency, and behaves monotonically over actuator displacement and contrast agent concentration. Conclusion AIRS is a promising method capable of using acoustic vibrations to modulate the contrast from iron oxide nanoparticles and thus perform selective detection of the contrast agents, potentially enabling more accurate visualization of contrast agents in clinical and research settings. PMID:25537578

  19. Proceedings of the 8. international conference on Flow-induced vibration

    of all, it proved to be efficient in solving many industrial problems, ranging from civil engineering and marine structures, aerospace terrestrial and marine transportation, to power generation and chemical processing. In the other hand, in the course of investigating the physical mechanisms responsible for FIV and the response of the structures, new mathematical and computational methods, as well as experimental and data processing techniques, have been developed which are of general interest to understand the dynamics of complex systems. Following the trend set at the last three Conferences, the 164 papers from more than 20 countries and presented in the 40 technical sessions at the FIV2004 Conference, address a large range of application areas. Major headings of the topics covered include axial flow and thin walled structures, fluid structure interaction, wind induced vibration, computational methods, flow-acoustic coupling, ship and offshore applications, bluff bodies, bio-mechanics, vortex induced vibrations, tube arrays, piping systems, gates and turbines. Among these papers, 30 have been selected for the INIS database and 35 for the ETDE database

  20. Analysis of Vortex Induced Vibrations of Marine Risers

    Karl E. Kaasen

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Vortex induced vibrations (VIV can be a severe problem to marine risers with regard to fatigue damage and drag loading. In order to design marine risers, therefore, it is necessary to have good theoretical and numerical models for prediction of VIV. Full-scale data are needed for verification of the models. To this end, three drilling risers were instrumented with accelerometers and rotation-rate devices for measurement of VIV. Also, sea current was measured at number of depths for reference. A large quantity of data was collected during the time the instrument system was in operation. In order to choose data records for further investigation and comparison with theoretical models the raw data had to be conditioned and converted to a suitable form. The paper describes how the riser lateral displacements were derived from the measurements. A major task has been to rid the acceleration measurements of the influence of gravity due to the riser's rotations out of the vertical and include the measurements of angular motion in a consistent way. This has been done using modal decomposition and a least-squares method combined with frequency-domain calculation to estimate the modal weights. MATLAB was used for the calculations and the presentation of results. An example of results is given.

  1. Suppressing molecular vibrations in organic semiconductors by inducing strain

    Kubo, Takayoshi; Häusermann, Roger; Tsurumi, Junto; Soeda, Junshi; Okada, Yugo; Yamashita, Yu; Akamatsu, Norihisa; Shishido, Atsushi; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Yanagisawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Organic molecular semiconductors are solution processable, enabling the growth of large-area single-crystal semiconductors. Improving the performance of organic semiconductor devices by increasing the charge mobility is an ongoing quest, which calls for novel molecular and material design, and improved processing conditions. Here we show a method to increase the charge mobility in organic single-crystal field-effect transistors, by taking advantage of the inherent softness of organic semiconductors. We compress the crystal lattice uniaxially by bending the flexible devices, leading to an improved charge transport. The mobility increases from 9.7 to 16.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 by 70% under 3% strain. In-depth analysis indicates that compressing the crystal structure directly restricts the vibration of the molecules, thus suppresses dynamic disorder, a unique mechanism in organic semiconductors. Since strain can be easily induced during the fabrication process, we expect our method to be exploited to build high-performance organic devices.

  2. Harbor Seal Vibrissa Morphology Reduces Vortex-Induced Vibrations

    Beem, Heather; Dahl, Jason; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Studies show that harbor seals are adept at tracking small movements in the water, such as those left in the wake of fish, by using their highly sensitive whiskers to detect fluid structures, even without auditory or visual cues. The present work investigates the intriguing claim that the unique morphology of the harbor seal whisker suppresses Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV). This implies that the geometry is specialized to reduce the background noise caused by the whisker's own wake in the detection of the upstream target. Forces on a rigid whisker model (scale: 50x) being towed steadily down a water tank while experiencing imposed oscillations are measured. A range of frequencies and amplitudes are tested, the hydrodynamic lift coefficient in phase with velocity (CL,v) is calculated for each, and values are combined in a contour plot. The region of positive CL,v peaks at an amplitude ratio of 0.1, indicating that the whisker's undulatory, asymmetric structure considerably reduces (but does not entirely suppress) regions where the structure experiences VIV in comparison with a standard cylinder, whose peak reaches an amplitude ratio of 0.8.

  3. Regimes of flow induced vibration for tandem, tethered cylinders

    Nave, Gary; Stremler, Mark

    2015-11-01

    In the wake of a bluff body, there are a number of dynamic response regimes that exist for a trailing bluff body depending on spacing, structural restoring forces, and the mass-damping parameter m* ζ . For tandem cylinders with low values of m* ζ , two such regimes of motion are Gap Flow Switching and Wake Induced Vibration. In this study, we consider the dynamics of a single degree-of-freedom rigid cylinder in the wake of another in these regimes for a variety of center-to-center cylinder spacings (3-5 diameters) and Reynolds numbers (4,000-11,000). The system consists of a trailing cylinder constrained to a circular arc around a fixed leading cylinder, which, for small angle displacements, bears a close resemblance to the transversely oscillating cylinders found more commonly in existing literature. From experiments on this system, we compare and contrast the dynamic response within these two regimes. Our results show sustained oscillations in the absence of a structural restoring force in all cases, providing experimental support for the wake stiffness assumption, which is based on the mean lift toward the center line of flow.

  4. Light-induced basilar membrane vibrations in the sensitive cochlea

    Grosh, Karl; Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Fridberger, Anders; Li, Yizeng; Nankali, Amir

    2015-12-01

    The exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing organ is attributed to an outer hair cell-mediated active process, where forces produced by sensory cells boost sound-induced vibrations, making soft sounds audible. This process is thought to be local, with each section of the hearing organ capable of amplifying sound-evoked movement, and nearly instantaneous, since amplification can work for sounds at frequencies up to 100 kHz in some species. To test these precepts, we developed a method for focally stimulating the living hearing organ with light. Light pulses caused intense and highly damped mechanical responses followed by traveling waves that developed with considerable delay. The delayed response was identical to movements evoked by click-like sounds. A physiologically based mathematical model shows that such waves engage the active process, enhancing hearing sensitivity. The experiments and the theoretical analysis show that the active process is neither local nor instantaneous, but requires mechanical waves traveling from the cochlear base toward its apex.

  5. Evaluation and study on PMD performance of OPGW optical cables in wind induced vibration and galloping test environment

    Li, Jie; Zhao, Ziyuan

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes the concepts of wind induced vibration and galloping of power transmission lines, indicates the necessity of evaluation in wind induced vibration and galloping test environment, proposes the evaluation method of wind induced vibration and galloping, summarizes and analyzes the measured PMD performance data of OPGW optical fiber obtained from wind induced vibration and galloping tests on OPGW, and reaches a conclusion that the PMD performance parameters of OPGW cable stocks meet the industry standard in wind induced vibration and galloping environment, and will play an important role in project construction guidance and operation maintenance.

  6. Wind-induced Vibrations in the European Court Towers

    Hansen, Jannick B.; Brincker, Rune; Andersen, Ken G.; Andersen, Steffen; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2012-01-01

    Issues regarding occupancy comfort in vibration-sensitive structures are the motivation of this study concerning windinduced vibrations in the European Court Towers in Luxembourg. In one of the two identical towers tuned liquid dampers (TLD) have been installed. Recent studies investigate the cha...

  7. Experimental investigation of vibration, flow and acoustic characteristics of a model of human larynx

    Horáček, Jaromír; Bula, Vítězslav; Radolf, Vojtěch; Vampola, T.; Dušková, M.

    Plzeň : University of West Bohemia, 2013 - (Adámek, V.; Zajíček, M.; Jonášová, A.). s. 43-44 ISBN 978-80-261-0282-3. [Computational Mechanics 2013 /29./. 04.11.2013-06.11.2013, Špičák] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/12/1306 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : biomechanics of voice * self-oscillations * vocal folds model Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  8. Smartphones as experimental tools to measure acoustical and mechanical properties of vibrating rods

    González, Manuel Á.; González, Miguel Á.

    2016-07-01

    Modern smartphones have calculation and sensor capabilities that make them suitable for use as versatile and reliable measurement devices in simple teaching experiments. In this work a smartphone is used, together with low cost materials, in an experiment to measure the frequencies emitted by vibrating rods of different materials, shapes and lengths. The results obtained with the smartphone have been compared with theoretical calculations and the agreement is good. Alternatively, physics students can perform the experiment described here and use their results to determine the dependencies of the obtained frequencies on the rod characteristics. In this way they will also practice research methods that they will probably use in their professional life.

  9. Laser-induced acoustic imaging of underground objects

    Li, Wen; DiMarzio, Charles A.; McKnight, Stephen W.; Sauermann, Gerhard O.; Miller, Eric L.

    1999-02-01

    This paper introduces a new demining technique based on the photo-acoustic interaction, together with results from photo- acoustic experiments. We have buried different types of targets (metal, rubber and plastic) in different media (sand, soil and water) and imaged them by measuring reflection of acoustic waves generated by irradiation with a CO2 laser. Research has been focused on the signal acquisition and signal processing. A deconvolution method using Wiener filters is utilized in data processing. Using a uniform spatial distribution of laser pulses at the ground's surface, we obtained 3D images of buried objects. The images give us a clear representation of the shapes of the underground objects. The quality of the images depends on the mismatch of acoustic impedance of the buried objects, the bandwidth and center frequency of the acoustic sensors and the selection of filter functions.

  10. FLOW-INDUCED VIBRATION IN PIPES: CHALLENGESS AND SOLUTIONS - A REVIEW

    M. SIBA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Flow-induced vibration has recently been the topic of experimental, numerical, and theoretical studies. It was intended to implement better applications for controlling the flow using orifice technique. Having the flow under control, the orifice becomes an instrument for measuring the flow. The flow of all fluid such as water, oil, gas and vapours through an orifice was tested and mathematical models were developed adequately. The basic theme for these enormous studies was the need for the very accurate flow measurements through orifices. All experimental, theoretical, numerical, and analytical studies have agreed that there is more than one avenue to develop, modify, and enhance such measurements. However, one factor that affects the flow measurements is the vibration which was not treated as required until the mid-20th century due to enormous discoveries that damages could be rooted to vibration. Researchers have studied vibration and then proposed mathematical models in conjunction with the pressure and velocity measurements of the flowing fluids and then the effect of the vibration, induced or not induced, has been under continuous investigation. This paper is an attempt to review the previous studies regarding understanding the nature of the vibration and the possible effects of vibration on the flow and on the piping structure in order to limit the damage caused by the vibration. This study shows that the need for more experimental studies and more comprehensive analytical approaches are, in particular, very essential to develop better results.

  11. Study on thermally induced vibration of flexible boom in various thermal environments of vacuum chamber

    Kong, Changduk; Oh, Kyung-Won; Park, Hyun-Bum; Sugiyama, Y.

    2005-02-01

    In order to simulate the thermally-induced vibration phenomenon of the flexible thin boom structure of the spacecraft such as the thin solar panel and the flexible cantilever with the attached tip mass in space, the thermally-induced vibration including thermal flutter of the flexible thin boom with the concentrated tip mass was experimentally investigated at various thermal environments using a heat lamp and both vacuum and air condition using the vacuum chamber. In this experimental study, divergence speed, natural frequency and thermal strains of the thermally-induced vibration were comparatively evaluated at various thermal environment conditions. Finally the thermally-induced vibration of the flexible boom structure of the earth orbit satellite in solar radiation environment from the earth eclipse region including umbra and penumbra was simulated using the vacuum chamber and power control of the heating lamp.

  12. Optimal Design and Acoustic Assessment of Low-Vibration Rotor Blades

    G. Bernardini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimal procedure for the design of rotor blade that generates low vibratory hub loads in nonaxial flow conditions is presented and applied to a helicopter rotor in forward flight, a condition where vibrations and noise become severe. Blade shape and structural properties are the design parameters to be identified within a binary genetic optimization algorithm under aeroelastic stability constraint. The process exploits an aeroelastic solver that is based on a nonlinear, beam-like model, suited for the analysis of arbitrary curved-elastic-axis blades, with the introduction of a surrogate wake inflow model for the analysis of sectional aerodynamic loads. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to identify low vibratory hub loads rotor blades as well as to assess the robustness of solution at off-design operating conditions. Further, the aeroacoustic assessment of the rotor configurations determined is carried out in order to examine the impact of low-vibration blade design on the emitted noise field.

  13. Raman scattering from ZnO incorporating Fe nanoparticles: Vibrational modes and low-frequency acoustic modes

    Romcevic, N., E-mail: romcevi@ipb.ac.r [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Kostic, R.; Hadzic, B.; Romcevic, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Kuryliszyn-Kudelska, I.; Dobrowolski, W.D. [Institute of Physics PAS, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02/668 Warsaw (Poland); Narkiewicz, U.; Sibera, D. [Szcecin University of Tehnology, Institute of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Puleskiego 10, 70-322 Szczecin, Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: Nanocrystaline samples of ZnO(Fe) were synthesized by wet chemical method. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction to determine composition of the samples (ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and the mean crystalline size (8-52 nm). Small amount (5 wt.%) of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the beginning of the synthesis results in forming of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. Large amount (90 wt.%) of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the beginning of the synthesis results in forming Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Both samples contain ZnO phase which is not registered by XRD, but is clearly seen in the Raman spectra. Main characteristics of experimental Raman spectrum in 200-1600 cm{sup -1} spectral region are: sharp peak at 436 cm{sup -1} and broad two-phonon structure at {approx}1150 cm{sup -1}, typical for ZnO; broad structure below 700 cm{sup -1} that has different position and shape in case of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} or Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. In low-frequency Raman spectra of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles registered peaks agree well with the calculated frequencies of acoustic phonons. As a result we identified (0,2), (0,0), (2,2) and (1,0) modes. - Abstract: Nanocrystaline samples of ZnO(Fe) were synthesized by wet chemical method. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction to determine composition of the samples (ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and the mean crystalline size (8-52 nm). In this paper we report the experimental spectra of Raman scattering. Main characteristics of experimental Raman spectrum in 200-1600 cm{sup -1} spectral region are: sharp peak at 436 cm{sup -1} and broad two-phonon structure at {approx}1150 cm{sup -1}, typical for ZnO; broad structure below 700 cm{sup -1} that has different position and shape in case of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} or Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Low-frequency Raman modes were measured and assigned according to confined acoustic vibrations of spherical nanoparticles

  14. A stator flux oriented current vector control of a sensorless 6/4 SRM for reduction of acoustic noise and vibration

    In this paper, a stator flux oriented current vector control of a sensorless three-phase 6/4 switched reluctance motor without position sensors is presented. Space current vector control technology based on torque angle estimation was used to reduce the acoustic noise and vibration of the motor drive system. The power converter for the 6/4 switched reluctance motor is three-phase full bridge inverter. The experimental results show that the maximum level of acoustic noises and vibration are 73 dB and 8 dB; m/s/s, respectively, and the steady speed error of the drive system is less than 0.1% operated at the rated load when the drive system was operated below 1500 rpm. In addition, the transient speed performance is also satisfactory

  15. Fast reactor flow induced vibration with particular reference to PFR and conceptual CDFR design

    This paper describes development work and basic design criteria as applied to vibration induced by fluid flow for the United Kingdom LMFBR programme. Possible harmful effects that could result from excessive vibration levels are highlighted with the associated excitation mechanisms. Instances of flow-induced vibration encountered in development models and in PFR are described. Basic design requirements and the overall philosophy are considered with respect to PFR and notional CDFRs. Ongoing research objectives are outlined giving some insight into the broad strategy involved. Finally, details are given concerning projects presently in progress along with more long term proposals. (author)

  16. Study on Vibrations induced by Parametric Excitations on Strings

    Guarena, Armando Enrique León

    2007-01-01

    The present thesis work studies the parametrically excited vibrations on bridge stay cables when the natural frequency of the bridge tower is half of the resonance frequency of the cable. This condition is found at the longest stay cables of the Øresund Bridge. Experimental and numerical analysis is carried out based on a simplified scaled model (1:200) of this bridge, replacing the cables by strings made of steel. When parametrically excited vibrations are studied, certain relations between ...

  17. Railway ground vibrations induced by wheel and rail singular defects

    Kouroussis, Georges; Connolly, David P.; Alexandrou, Georgios; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos

    2015-10-01

    Railway local irregularities are a growing source of ground-borne vibration and can cause negative environmental impacts, particularly in urban areas. Therefore, this paper analyses the effect of railway track singular defects (discontinuities) on ground vibration generation and propagation. A vehicle/track/soil numerical railway model is presented, capable of accurately predicting vibration levels. The prediction model is composed of a multibody vehicle model, a flexible track model and a finite/infinite element soil model. Firstly, analysis is undertaken to assess the ability of wheel/rail contact models to accurately simulate the force generation at the wheel/rail contact, in the presence of a singular defect. It is found that, although linear contact models are sufficient for modelling ground vibration on smooth tracks, when singular defects are present higher accuracy wheel/rail models are required. Furthermore, it is found that the variation in wheel/rail force during the singular defect contact depends on the track flexibility, and thus requires a fully coupled vehicle/track/foundation model. Next, a parametric study of ground vibrations generated by singular rail and wheel defects is undertaken. Six shapes of discontinuity are modelled, representing various defect types such as transition zones, switches, crossings, rail joints and wheel flats. The vehicle is modelled as an AM96 train set and it is found that ground vibration levels are highly sensitive to defect height, length and shape.

  18. Acoustic Resonance Frequency Elimination Device for Safety Relief Valves

    Industry experience has shown that Safety Relief Valves (SRVs) and Steam Dryers installed in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) experience vibration induced degradation and failures caused by acoustic resonance vibration of the main steam lines, resulting in decreased reliability and potential safety issues. The resonance is caused by vortex shedding from the standpipe inlet and acoustic standing waves in the standpipe, occurring when the two frequencies match. (Author)

  19. The postural disorientation induced by neck muscle vibration subsides on lightly touching a stationary surface or aiming at it.

    Bove, M; Bonzano, L; Trompetto, C; Abbruzzese, G; Schieppati, M

    2006-12-28

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the standing body spatial disorientation, induced by neck muscle vibration, and the related post-effects can be suppressed by light finger touch (LFT) of a stationary surface. Continuous (60 s) vibration of dorsal neck or sternocleidomastoid muscle was administered with eyes closed. The center of foot pressure (CFP) displacement, measured by a stabilometric platform, indicated the degree of vibration-induced body tilt. We also investigated whether sensory information from LFT itself was necessary or anticipation of a more secure posture was enough for reducing vibration effects. To this aim, we administered a vibration pulse (5 s) to dorsal neck or sternocleidomastoid muscle and during reaching to the stationary surface. CFP was recorded during both vibration and post-vibration condition and during the aiming task. Neck vibration induced significant CFP displacement in the direction opposite to vibration site. Post-vibration, CFP slowly returned to control values with ample oscillations. LFT during vibration reduced body tilt. LFT was more effective when fingertip contact was in the plane of the greatest tilt. LFT applied during either vibration or post-vibration period reduced post-vibration effects. Reaching toward the stationary surface was enough for reducing vibration-induced body tilt to values close to those observed during actual LFT. The novel conclusions of this study are: 1) LFT is able to relieve the effects of vibration-induced abnormal proprioceptive input from the neck, a segment central to postural control and orientation; 2) LFT during vibration also attenuates vibration post-effects, further suggesting that its action is not merely mechanical; 3) the intention to stabilize the body generates a new postural 'set' sufficient for diminishing body tilt. PMID:17071008

  20. Investigation of vibration of the heating cylindrical rod induced by boiling and condensation phenomena

    Flow induced vibrations (FIVs) are important and interesting phenomena from the view point of reactor safety. In nuclear power plants, fuel pins in reactor cores, heat exchange tubes in steam generators and some other complex structures can cause FIVs. Especially, in Boiling Water Reactor, subcooled or saturated boiling flows induce vibrations. These vibrations result in fretting wear of the structures and may cause a radioactive leakage. This paper deals with an experimental investigation of the cylindrical rod's vibrations induced from boiling an condensation phenomena on the circumferential surface of itself. The measurements were conducted changing the bulk water temperature from the saturation temperature at an atmospheric pressure to the degree of subcooling up to around 30 K. (author)

  1. Flow-induced vibration for light water reactors. Program final report

    The Flow-Induced Vibrations for Light Water Reactors Program was a five-year effort to develop basic knowledge and understanding needed to improve the flow-induced vibration design of light water reactors. Major tasks included analytical and test investigations of the flow-induced vibration of cylinders in isolation and arrays in smooth and turbulent single-vibration testing of reactor components including reactor inlet plenum components, jet pumps, low-pressure coolant injection coupling, and fuel rods. Cases of self-excited limit cycle response were encountered which required design modifications. The fuel rod tests were made in axially flowing water and steam/water mixtures under adiabatic and boiling conditions

  2. Flow Induced Acoustic Resonance in In-line Tube Banks

    Hiromitsu Hamakawa; Tohru Fukano; Eiichi Nishida; Yoshikazu Satou

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper the attention is focused on the relation between vortex shedding phenomena and acoustic resonance which occurred in the two-dimensional model of boiler. There were tube banks with in-line arrangement for small tube pitch ratio. We measured the sound pressure level, the phase delay of acoustic pressures, the spectrum of velocity fluctuation and the gap velocity. As a result, we found two peak frequencies of sound pressure level with different Strouhal numbers St, mainly about 0.26 and 0.52. The noise of St=0.26 was the resonance of transverse mode and St=0.52 was longitudinal mode. The vortex shedding of St=0.15 was generated inside the tube banks without acoustic resonance. As gap velocity increased, we observed that the peak level of spectrum was weak and broad-banded. The onset velocity of the acoustic resonance of longitudinal mode was lower than that of transverse mode.

  3. The Effects of Acute Stress-Induced Sleep Disturbance on Acoustic Trauma-Induced Tinnitus in Rats

    Stiles, Lucy; Darlington, Cynthia L.; Smith, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is a debilitating condition and often accompanied by anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. It has been suggested that sleep disturbance, such as insomnia, may be a risk factor/predictor for tinnitus-related distress and the two conditions may share common neurobiological mechanisms. This study investigated whether acute stress-induced sleep disturbance could increase the susceptibility to acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus in rats. The animals were exposed to unilateral acoustic trauma 24 h before sleep disturbance being induced using the cage exchange method. Tinnitus perception was assessed behaviourally using a conditioned lick suppression paradigm 3 weeks after the acoustic trauma. Changes in the orexin system in the hypothalamus, which plays an important role in maintaining long-lasting arousal, were also examined using immunohistochemistry. Cage exchange resulted in a significant reduction in the number of sleep episodes and acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus with acoustic features similar to a 32 kHz tone at 100 dB. However, sleep disturbance did not exacerbate the perception of tinnitus in rats. Neither tinnitus alone nor tinnitus plus sleep disturbance altered the number of orexin-expressing neurons. The results suggest that acute sleep disturbance does not cause long-term changes in the number of orexin neurons and does not change the perception of tinnitus induced by acoustic trauma in rats. PMID:25162023

  4. Coriolis induced vibration and rotation mixing in formaldehyde

    The effect of Coriolis interaction on the intramolecular dynamics of formaldehyde is investigated theoretically. Classical dynamics calculations are presented that include all seven degrees of freedom, i.e., the six vibrational modes and the rotational mode associated with K, the projection of total angular momentum on a body-fixed axis. These calculations show that vibrational modes 4 (out of plane bend) and 6 (HCO bend) can be significantly coupled due to Coriolis interaction. The qualitative features of such coupling is further understood via study of a reduced dimension model that includes just modes 4, 6, and the rotational degree of freedom. Two interesting classical consequences of Coriolis interaction are noted. First, for large K (e.g., for chemical bondKchemical bond/similar to/J) we find vibrational mixing can occur without significant deterioration of K. We find that this mixing is not due to the usual ''Chirikov'' or pendulum picture of nonlinear resonance. Second, we find that both vibrational and rotational mixing can occur when the rotational frequency is in resonance with the difference in vibrational frequencies. In this situation, the resonances lead to a partial K mixing. Chaos about the resonances can lead to a more extensive K mixing. Quantum calculations are also performed for the reduced dimension model and the nature of the quantum eigenstates is discussed in relation to the corresponding classical dynamics

  5. Control of wind-induced vibration of long-span bridges and tall buildings

    GU Ming

    2007-01-01

    With the rapid increase in scales of structures,research on controlling wind-induced vibration of large-scale structures,such as long-span bridges and super-tall buildings,has been an issue of great concern.For wind-induced vibration of large-scale structures,vibration frequencies and damping modes vary with wind speed.Passive,semiactive,and active control strategies are developed to improve the windresistance performance of the structures in this paper.The multiple tuned mass damper (MTMD) system is applied to control vertical bending buffeting response.A new semiactive lever-type tuned mass damper (TMD) with an adjustable frequency is proposed to control vertical bending buffeting and torsional buffeting and flutter in the whole velocity range of bridge decks.A control strategy named sinusoidal reference strategy is developed for adaptive control of wind-induced vibration of super-tall buildings.Multiple degrees of freedom general building aeroelastic model with a square cross-section is tested in a wind tunnel.The results demonstrate that the proposed strategies can reduce vibration effectively,and can adapt to wind-induced vibration control of large-scale structures in the uncertain dynamic circumstance.

  6. Application of inertia-induced excitation theory for nonlinear acoustic modes in colloidal plasma equilibrium flow

    P K Karmakar

    2007-04-01

    Application of inertia-induced acoustic excitation theory offers a new resonant excitation source channel of acoustic turbulence in the transonic domain of plasma flow. In bi-ion plasmas like colloidal plasma, two well-defined transonic points exist corresponding to the parent ion and the dust grain-associated acoustic modes. As usual, the modified ion acoustic mode (also known as dust ion-acoustic (DIA) wave) dynamics associated with parent ion inertia is excitable for both nanoscale- and micronscale-sized dust grains. It is found that the so-called (ion) acoustic mode (also known as dust-acoustic (DA) wave) associated with nanoscale dust grain inertia is indeed resonantly excitable through the active role of weak but finite parent ion inertia. It is interestingly conjectured that the same excitation physics, as in the case of normal plasma sound mode, operates through the active inertial role of plasma thermal species. Details of the nonlinear acoustic mode analyses of current interest in transonic domains of such impure plasmas in hydrodynamic flow are presented.

  7. Numerical simulation of flow induced airfoil vibrations with large amplitudes

    Sváček, Petr; Feistauer, M.; Horáček, Jaromír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 23, - (2007), s. 391-411. ISSN 0889-9746 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200760613 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : aeroelasticity * flutter * nonlinear oscillations Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.821, year: 2007

  8. Numerical simulation of flow induced airfoil vibrations with large amplitudes

    Sváček, P.; Feistauer, M.; Horáček, Jaromír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 2005, č. 1 (2005), s. 1-30 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/02/0391 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : aeroelasticity * flutter * finite element method Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  9. Vibration-Induced Conductivity Fluctuation Measurement for Soil Bulk Density Analysis

    Kishne, Andrea Sz; Chang, Hung-Chih; Kish, Laszlo B

    2007-01-01

    Soil bulk density affects water storage, water and nutrient movement, and plant root activity in the soil profile. Its measurement is difficult in field conditions. Vibration-induced conductivity fluctuation was investigated to quantify soil bulk density with possible field applications in the future. The AC electrical conductivity of soil was measured using a pair of blade-like electrodes while exposing the soil to periodic vibration. The blades were positioned longitudinally and transversally to the direction of the induced vibration to enable the calculation of a normalized index. The normalized index was expected to provide data independent from the vibration strength and to reduce the effect of soil salinity and water content. The experiment was conducted on natural and salinized fine sand at two moisture conditions and four bulk densities. The blade-shaped electrodes improved electrode-soil contact compared to cylindrical electrodes, and thereby, reduced measurement noise. Simulations on a simplified re...

  10. Computational insights into intriguing vibration-induced pulsing diradical character in perfluoropentacene and the perfluorination effect.

    Zhang, Fengying; Feng, Yiwei; Song, Xinyu; Bu, Yuxiang

    2016-06-28

    As an n-type organic semiconductor compound, perfluoropentacene has more widespread applications in organic electronics because of its higher electron mobility compared with its parent pentacene. Herein, we explore intriguing dynamic electronic properties of perfluoropentacene caused by structural vibrations using density functional theory calculations. Perfluoropentacene could exhibit diradical character because of the persistent vibrations, although it belongs to a closed-shell singlet molecule in its equilibrium configuration. Not all the vibration-induced structural changes can induce diradical character, but only those leading to a small singlet-triplet energy gap, especially the small HOMO-LUMO gap, as well as the short cross-linking C-C bonds and distorted carbon ring structures in polyacetylene chains make great contributions. Due to molecular vibrations, the diradical character of dynamic perfluoropentacene exhibits pulsing behavior. Compared with pentacene, its perfluorination can not only considerably stabilize two frontier molecular orbitals, but also reduce the HOMO-LUMO gap, thus leading to an increase of the number of vibrational modes which can make the diradical character appear. In particular, perfluorination makes 19 diradical vibrational modes appear in the low frequency region. These observations indicate that some low energy pulses can trigger perfluoropentacene molecular vibrations according to some low energy modes and thus the appearance of pulsing diradical character or molecular magnetism. Clearly, the observed novel characters of a molecule possessing hidden pulsing diradical character and tunable magnetism in this work would contribute to opening up promising areas for designing peculiar magnetic materials. PMID:27250923

  11. Experimental Investigation on Flow-Induced Vibration of Fuel Rods in Supercritical Water Loop

    Licun Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR is one of the most promising Generation IV reactors. In order to make the fuel qualification test for SCWR, a research plan is proposed to test a small scale fuel assembly in a supercritical water loop. To ensure the structure safety of fuel assembly in the loop, a flow-induced vibration experiment was carried out to investigate the vibration behavior of fuel rods, especially the vibration caused by leakage flow. From the experiment result, it can be found that: the vibration of rods is mainly caused by turbulence when flow rate is low. However, the effects of leakage flow become obvious as flow rate increases, which could changes the distribution of vibrational energy in spectrum, increasing the vibrational energy in high-frequency band. That is detrimental to the structure safety of fuel rods. Therefore, it is more reasonable to improve the design by using the spacers with blind hole, which can eliminate the leakage flow, to assemble the fuel rods in supercritical water loop. On the other hand, the experimental result could provide a benchmark for the theoretical studies to validate the applicability of boundary condition set for the leakage-flow-induced vibration.

  12. Incorporating a disturbance observer with direct velocity feedback for control of human-induced vibrations

    Nyawako, Donald; Reynolds, Paul; Hudson, Emma

    2016-04-01

    Feedback control strategies are desirable for disturbance rejection of human-induced vibrations in civil engineering structures as human walking forces cannot easily be measured. In relation to human-induced vibration control studies, most past researches have focused on floors and footbridges and the widely used linear controller implemented in the trials has been the direct velocity feedback (DVF) scheme. With appropriate compensation to enhance its robustness, it has been shown to be effective at damping out the problematic modes of vibration of the structures in which the active vibration control systems have been implemented. The work presented here introduces a disturbance observer (DOB) that is used with an outer-loop DVF controller. Results of analytical studies presented in this work based on the dynamic properties of a walkway bridge structure demonstrate the potential of this approach for enhancing the vibration mitigation performance offered by a purely DVF controller. For example, estimates of controlled frequency response functions indicate improved attenuation of vibration around the dominant frequency of the walkway bridge structure as well as at higher resonant frequencies. Controlled responses from three synthesized walking excitation forces on a walkway bridge structure model show that the inclusion of the disturbance observer with an outer loop DVF has potential to improve on the vibration mitigation performance by about 3.5% at resonance and 6-10% off-resonance. These are realised with hard constraints being imposed on the low frequency actuator displacements.

  13. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, we present a numerical study of the temporal buildup and decay of unsteady acoustic fields and acoustic streaming flows actuated by vibrating walls in the transverse cross-sectional plane of a long straight microchannel under adiabatic conditions and assuming temperature-independent material parameters. The unsteady streaming flow is obtained by averaging the time-dependent velocity field over one oscillation period, and as time increases, it is shown to converge towards the well-known steady time-averaged solution calculated in the frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation does not reduce streaming significantly due to its slow decay. Our analysis also shows that for an acoustic resonance with a quality factor Q , the amplitude of the oscillating second-order velocity component is Q times larger than the usual second-order steady time-averaged velocity component. Consequently, the well-known criterion v1≪cs for the validity of the perturbation expansion is replaced by the more restrictive criterion v1≪cs/Q . Our numerical model is available as supplemental material in the form of comsol model files and matlab scripts.

  14. Laser-induced acoustic wave generation/propagation/interaction in water in various internal channels

    Ko, Seung Hwan; Lee, Daeho; Pan, Heng; Ryu, Sang-Gil; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Kladias, Nick; Panides, Elias; Domoto, Gerald A.

    2010-01-01

    Short pulsed laser-induced single acoustic wave generation, propagation, interaction within a water-filled internal channel are experimentally and numerically studied. A large-area, short-duration, single-plane acoustic wave was generated by the thermoelastic interaction of a homogenized nanosecond pulsed laser beam with a liquid–solid interface and propagated at the speed of sound in water. Laser flash Schlieren photography was used to visualize the transient interaction of the plane acousti...

  15. Enhanced acoustic cavitation following laser-induced bubble formation : long-term memory effect

    Yavaṣ, Oğuz; Leiderer, Paul; Park, Hee K.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poon, Chie C.; Tam, Andrew C.

    1994-01-01

    The enhancement of acoustic caviation at a liquid-solid interface following laser-induced bubble formation is studied. The experiment results indicate that metastable ultramicroscopic bubbles formed on the solid surface cause a long-term memory effect on acoustic cavitation. By performing a double-pulse experiment using two excimer lasers, the temporal decay of this memory effect is determined for two different liquids on a chromium surface. An explanation of the observed decay mode by a ...

  16. Vibration-induced jitter control in satellite optical communication

    Xue, Zheng-yan; Qi, Bo; Ren, Ge

    2013-08-01

    Laser satellite communication has become especially attractive in recent years. However, because the laser beam is very narrow and there is a long distance between satellites, the laser communication channel is very sensitive to vibrations of the optical platform. These vibrations cause optical jitter, leading to the reduction of received signals and bit-error rate degradation. Consequently, optical jitter control with PAT (pointing acquisition and tracking) subsystems is a critical problem in laser satellite communication. To compensate for the platform vibration effectively in realtime, in this paper, an adaptive feedback control technique based on Youla-parameterization is presented, which can adapt to the current disturbance acting on the laser beam by adjusting its parameters in realtime to maintain optimal performance. The main idea is to use the well-known Youla parameterization formula to construct a feedback control scheme with the guaranteed closed loop stability, and the feedback controller is a function of plant coprime factors and a free parameter Q. For adaptive disturbance estimation, the free parameter Q is set to an adaptive finite impulse response (FIR) filter, the coefficients of which are updated by a recursive least-squares (RLS) algorithm in realtime. It is shown in experiment that the adaptive feedback control technique based on Youla-parameterization can reject the optical jitter caused by satellite platform vibration effectively and improve the performance of the system.

  17. Train induced vibrations in geosynthetic reinforced railway embankments

    Zania, Varvara; Hededal, Ole; Krogsbøll, Anette

    2011-01-01

    High–speed trains may generate ground vibrations which cause undesirable environmental and economical impacts such as nuisance of the passengers, deflections along the rail, and possibly impairment of the stability of the embankments. The increase of the velocity of a moving load on homogeneous...

  18. The Torsional Vibration of Turbo Axis Induced by Unsteady Aerodynamic Force on Rotor blade

    ChenZuoyi; WuXiaofeng

    1998-01-01

    An algorithm for computing the 3-D oscillating flow field of the balde passage under the torsional vibration of the rotor is applied to analyze the stability in turbomachines.The induced flow field responding to blade vibration is computed by Oscillating Fluid Mechanics Method and parametric Polynomial Method.After getting the solution of the unsteady flow field,the work done by the unsteay aerodynamic force acting on the blade can be obtained.The negative or positive work is the criterion of the aeroelastic stability.Numerical results indicate that there are instabilities of the torsional vibration in some frequency bands.

  19. A simple model to predict train-induced vibration: theoretical formulation and experimental validation

    No suitable handy tool is available to predict train-induced vibration on environmental impact assessment. A simple prediction model is proposed which has been calibrated for high speed trains. The model input data are train characteristics, train speed and track properties; model output data are soil time-averaged velocity and velocity level. Model results have been compared with numerous vibration data retrieved from measurement campaigns led along the most important high-speed European rail tracks. Model performances have been tested by comparing measured and predicted vibration values

  20. Vortex-induced vibration of a square-section cylinder with incidence angle variation

    Zhao, Jisheng; Nemes, Andras; Lo Jacono, David; Sheridan, John

    2010-01-01

    Vortex-induced vibration (VIV) occurs when vortex shedding from a body results in fluctuating forces that, in turn, cause the body to vibrate. This can result in undesired large-amplitude vibrations leading to structural damage or catastrophic failure. While much has been done on the VIV of a circular cylinder less has been done on other canonical bluff bodies, such as rectangular cylinders. The present experimental work studied the VIV of a square cross-section cylinder in a water channel, w...

  1. Interference-induced angle-independent acoustical transparency

    It is revealed that the Fano-like interference leads to the extraordinary acoustic transmission through a slab metamaterial of thickness much smaller than the wavelength, with each unit cell consisting of a Helmholtz resonator and a narrow subwavelength slit. More importantly, both the theoretical analysis and experimental measurement show that the angle-independent acoustical transparency can be realized by grafting a Helmholtz resonator and a quarter-wave resonator to the wall of a narrow subwavelength slit in each unit cell of a slit array. The observed phenomenon results from the interferences between the waves propagating in the slit, those re-radiated by the Helmholtz resonator, and those re-radiated by the quarter-wave resonator. The proposed design may find its applications in designing angle-independent acoustical filters and controlling the phase of the transmitted waves

  2. Interference-induced angle-independent acoustical transparency

    Qi, Lehua; Yu, Gaokun, E-mail: gkyu@ouc.edu.cn; Wang, Ning [Department of Marine Technology, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Wang, Xinlong [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics and Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wang, Guibo [Shipbuilding Information Center of China, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-12-21

    It is revealed that the Fano-like interference leads to the extraordinary acoustic transmission through a slab metamaterial of thickness much smaller than the wavelength, with each unit cell consisting of a Helmholtz resonator and a narrow subwavelength slit. More importantly, both the theoretical analysis and experimental measurement show that the angle-independent acoustical transparency can be realized by grafting a Helmholtz resonator and a quarter-wave resonator to the wall of a narrow subwavelength slit in each unit cell of a slit array. The observed phenomenon results from the interferences between the waves propagating in the slit, those re-radiated by the Helmholtz resonator, and those re-radiated by the quarter-wave resonator. The proposed design may find its applications in designing angle-independent acoustical filters and controlling the phase of the transmitted waves.

  3. Robust saturated control of human-induced floor vibrations via a proof-mass actuator

    Diaz, I.M.; Reynolds, P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the design of a robust active vibration control system that makes use of a proof-mass actuator for the mitigation of human-induced vibrations in floor structures. Ideally, velocity feedback control (VFC) is unconditionally stable and robust to spillover effects, interlacing of poles and zeros of collocated control is then accomplished. However, the use of a proof-mass actuator influences the system dynamics and the alternating pole-zero pattern of the system forme...

  4. Action spectroscopy for single-molecule motion induced by vibrational excitation with a scanning tunneling microscope

    Ueba, H.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2007-01-01

    We propose an action spectroscopy for single-molecule motion induced by vibrational excitation with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Calculations of the inelastic tunneling current for excitation of the C-O stretch mode of the CO molecule on metal surfaces are combined with a theory which describes how the energy in the vibrational mode is transferred to a reaction coordinate mode to overcome the activation barrier. The calculated rate for CO hopping on Pd (110) as a function of the bia...

  5. Vibrational wave packet induced oscillations in two-dimensional electronic spectra. I. Experiments

    Nemeth, Alexandra; Milota, Franz; Mancal, Tomas; Lukes, Vladimir; Hauer, Juergen; Kauffmann, Harald F.; Sperling, Jaroslaw

    2010-01-01

    This is the first in a series of two papers investigating the effect of electron-phonon coupling in two-dimensional Fourier transformed electronic spectroscopy. We present a series of one- and two-dimensional nonlinear spectroscopic techniques for studying a dye molecule in solution. Ultrafast laser pulse excitation of an electronic transition coupled to vibrational modes induces a propagating vibrational wave packet that manifests itself in oscillating signal intensities and line-shapes. For...

  6. Flow-induced vibrations of two tandem cylinders in a channel

    Jiang Ren-Jie

    2012-01-01

    We numerically studied flow-induced vibrations of two tandem cylinders in transverse direction between two parallel walls. The effect of the horizontal separation between two cylinders, ranging from 1.1 to 10, on the motions of the cylinders and the flow structures were investigated and a variety of periodic and non-periodic vibration regimes were observed. The results show that when two cylinders are placed in close proximity to each other, compared with the case of an isolated cylinde...

  7. Texture-induced vibrations in the forearm during tactile exploration

    Delhaye, Benoit; Hayward, Vincent; Lefèvre, Philippe; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    Humans can detect and discriminate between fine variations of surface roughness using active touch. It is hitherto believed that roughness perception is mediated mostly by cutaneous and subcutaneous afferents located in the fingertips. However, recent findings have shown that following abolishment of cutaneous afferences resulting from trauma or pharmacological intervention, the ability of subjects to discriminate between textures roughness was not significantly altered. These findings suggest that the somatosensory system is able to collect textural information from other sources than fingertip afference. It follows that signals resulting of the interaction of a finger with a rough surface must be transmitted to stimulate receptor populations in regions far away from the contact. This transmission was characterized by measuring in the wrist vibrations originating at the fingertip and thus propagating through the finger, the hand and the wrist during active exploration of textured surfaces. The spectral analysis of the vibrations taking place in the forearm tissues revealed regularities that were correlated with the scanned surface and the speed of exploration. In the case of periodic textures, the vibration signal contained a fundamental frequency component corresponding to the finger velocity divided by the spatial period of the stimulus. This regularity was found for a wide range of textural length scales and scanning velocities. For non-periodic textures, the spectrum of the vibration did not contain obvious features that would enable discrimination between the different stimuli. However, for both periodic and non-periodic stimuli, the intensity of the vibrations could be related to the microgeometry of the scanned surfaces. PMID:22783177

  8. Stochastic Response of Energy Balanced Model for Vortex-Induced Vibration

    Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Krenk, S.

    A double oscillator model for vortex-induced oscillations of structural elements based on exact power exchange between fluid and structure, recently proposed by authors, is extended to include the effect of the turbulent component of the wind. In non-turbulent flow vortex-induced vibrations of li...

  9. Thermally induced vibration of composite solar array with honeycomb panels in low earth orbit

    Solar arrays are critical appendages that provide primary power sources for spacecrafts. This paper presents a numerical method to characterize the thermal response of a composite solar array subjected to space heat flux. Thermally induced vibration is investigated based on this method. The thermally induced vibrations of a solar array using two commonly used materials are also compared. Thermally induced vibrations in different thermal environments, incident angles of solar radiation, and material properties of honeycomb panel are discussed to reveal the causes of thermally induced vibration. Simulation results reveal the dynamic response of the solar array in low earth orbit under transient temperature, which could provide guidance for designers to optimize the structure utilized in minimizing the influence of the space thermal environment. - Highlights: • A method to characterize the thermal response of a rigid solar array is presented. • Composite material and orbital thermal environments are considered in the model. • Thermally induced vibration is investigated based on this model. • The effects of different parameters are discussed. • Incident angle and parameters of honeycomb composite have significant influence

  10. Numerical Approximation of Flow Induced Vibration of Vocal Folds

    Sváček, P.; Horáček, Jaromír

    Berlin : Springer, 2011 - (Clavero, C.; Gracia, J.; Lisbona, F.), s. 227-234 ISBN 978-3-642-19664-5. ISSN 1439-7358. [BAIL 2010. Zaragoza (ES), 05.07.2010-09.07.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : FEM * fluid-structure interaction * biomechanics of voice Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  11. Numerical modelling of flow induced airfoil vibrations problem

    Sváček, Petr; Feistauer, M.; Horáček, Jaromír

    Queen´s University Belfast: CEIAT, Queen´s University Belfast, Nothern Ireland, 2005, s. 1-10. [International Conference on Innovation and Integration in Aerospace Sciences /1./. Queen´s University Belfast (GB), 04.04.2004-05.04.2004] R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FT-TA/026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : unsteady viscous flows * aeroelasticity * flutter Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  12. Sympathetic Tone Induced by High Acoustic Tempo Requires Fast Respiration.

    Watanabe, Ken; Ooishi, Yuuki; Kashino, Makio

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have revealed the influences of music, and particularly its tempo, on the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and respiration patterns. Since there is the interaction between the ANS and the respiratory system, namely sympatho-respiratory coupling, it is possible that the effect of musical tempo on the ANS is modulated by the respiratory system. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the relationship between musical tempo and respiratory rate on the ANS. Fifty-two healthy people aged 18-35 years participated in this study. Their respiratory rates were controlled by using a silent electronic metronome and they listened to simple drum sounds with a constant tempo. We varied the respiratory rate-acoustic tempo combination. The respiratory rate was controlled at 15 or 20 cycles per minute (CPM) and the acoustic tempo was 60 or 80 beats per minute (BPM) or the environment was silent. Electrocardiograms and an elastic chest band were used to measure the heart rate and respiratory rate, respectively. The mean heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) were regarded as indices of ANS activity. We observed a significant increase in the mean heart rate and the low (0.04-0.15 Hz) to high (0.15-0.40 Hz) frequency ratio of HRV, only when the respiratory rate was controlled at 20 CPM and the acoustic tempo was 80 BPM. We suggest that the effect of acoustic tempo on the sympathetic tone is modulated by the respiratory system. PMID:26284521

  13. Sympathetic Tone Induced by High Acoustic Tempo Requires Fast Respiration.

    Ken Watanabe

    Full Text Available Many studies have revealed the influences of music, and particularly its tempo, on the autonomic nervous system (ANS and respiration patterns. Since there is the interaction between the ANS and the respiratory system, namely sympatho-respiratory coupling, it is possible that the effect of musical tempo on the ANS is modulated by the respiratory system. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the relationship between musical tempo and respiratory rate on the ANS. Fifty-two healthy people aged 18-35 years participated in this study. Their respiratory rates were controlled by using a silent electronic metronome and they listened to simple drum sounds with a constant tempo. We varied the respiratory rate-acoustic tempo combination. The respiratory rate was controlled at 15 or 20 cycles per minute (CPM and the acoustic tempo was 60 or 80 beats per minute (BPM or the environment was silent. Electrocardiograms and an elastic chest band were used to measure the heart rate and respiratory rate, respectively. The mean heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV were regarded as indices of ANS activity. We observed a significant increase in the mean heart rate and the low (0.04-0.15 Hz to high (0.15-0.40 Hz frequency ratio of HRV, only when the respiratory rate was controlled at 20 CPM and the acoustic tempo was 80 BPM. We suggest that the effect of acoustic tempo on the sympathetic tone is modulated by the respiratory system.

  14. Capabilities, Design, Construction and Commissioning of New Vibration, Acoustic, and Electromagnetic Capabilities Added to the World's Largest Thermal Vacuum Chamber at NASA's Space Power Facility

    Motil, Susan M.; Ludwiczak, Damian R.; Carek, Gerald A.; Sorge, Richard N.; Free, James M.; Cikanek, Harry A., III

    2011-01-01

    NASA s human space exploration plans developed under the Exploration System Architecture Studies in 2005 included a Crew Exploration Vehicle launched on an Ares I launch vehicle. The mass of the Crew Exploration Vehicle and trajectory of the Ares I coupled with the need to be able to abort across a large percentage of the trajectory generated unprecedented testing requirements. A future lunar lander added to projected test requirements. In 2006, the basic test plan for Orion was developed. It included several types of environment tests typical of spacecraft development programs. These included thermal-vacuum, electromagnetic interference, mechanical vibration, and acoustic tests. Because of the size of the vehicle and unprecedented acoustics, NASA conducted an extensive assessment of options for testing, and as result, chose to augment the Space Power Facility at NASA Plum Brook Station, of the John H. Glenn Research Center to provide the needed test capabilities. The augmentation included designing and building the World s highest mass capable vibration table, the highest power large acoustic chamber, and adaptation of the existing World s largest thermal vacuum chamber as a reverberant electromagnetic interference test chamber. These augmentations were accomplished from 2007 through early 2011. Acceptance testing began in Spring 2011 and will be completed in the Fall of 2011. This paper provides an overview of the capabilities, design, construction and acceptance of this extraordinary facility.

  15. STUDY ON VIBRATION SENSITIVITY DIFFERENT BODY AREAS IN PATIENTS WITH VIBRATION-INDUCER DISEASES EXPOSED TO A LOCAL VIBRATION AND IN PATIENTS WITH AN OCCUPATIONAL NEUROSENSORIC DULLNESS OF HEARING

    Kartapoltseva, N.

    2008-01-01

    The pathological disorders in the state of the peripheral nerves based on the data of the vibration sensitivity studies were observed to be in both the patients with the vibration-induced diseases as a result of the local vibration exposure and in the patients with an occupational neurosensoric dullness of hearing. This may assume a total effect mechanism of the physical factors on the human organism. In the former case the alterations observedshowed a more pronounced character.

  16. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Yeo, Leslie Y. [Micro/Nanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  17. Fluid induced structural vibrations in steam generators and heat exchangers

    Fluid-elastic instability (FEI) in tube bundle heat exchangers was studied experimentally. The motion of an array of 15 stainless steel vibrating tubes (Φ 25.4mm) in water cross-flow, suspended using stainless steel piano wire has been recorded with a CCD camera. The individual motion and relative motion of the tubes are reported and can be used for computational model validation. The relative displacement of the tubes allows identification of the most potentially damaging patterns of tube bundle vibration. A critical reduced velocity may be determined by specification of an allowable limit on tube motion amplitude. Measurements were made for various tube array configurations, tube natural frequencies and flow conditions. (author)

  18. Tyre induced vibrations of the car-trailer system

    Beregi, S.; Takács, D.; Stépán, G.

    2016-02-01

    The lateral and yaw dynamics of the car-trailer combination are analysed by means of a single track model. The equations of motion are derived rigorously by means of the Appell-Gibbs equations for constant longitudinal velocity of the vehicle. The tyres are described with the help of the so-called delayed tyre model, which is based on a brush model with pure rolling contact. The lateral forces and aligning torques of the tyre/road interaction are calculated via the instantaneous lateral deformations in the contact patches. The linear stability analysis of the rectilinear motion is performed via the analytically determined characteristic function of the system. Stability charts are constructed with respect to the vehicle longitudinal velocity and the payload position on the trailer. Self-excited lateral vibrations are detected with different vibration modes at low and at high longitudinal speeds of the vehicle. The effects of the tyre parameters are also investigated.

  19. Mitigation of Ice-Induced Vibrations for Offshore Platforms Using Tuned Mass Damper

    ZHANG Li; YUE Qian-jin; ZHANG Wen-shou

    2008-01-01

    The problems of ice-induced vibration have been noticed and concerned since the 1960s, but it has not been well resolved. One reason is that the dynamic interaction between ice and structure is so complicated that practical ice force model has not been developed. The recent full-scale tests conducted on jacket platforms in the Bohai Sea presented that ice could cause intense vibrations which endanger the facilities on the deck and make discomfort for the crew. In this paper, the strategy of mitigation of ice-induced offshore structure vibration is discussed. Based on field observations and understanding of the interaction between ice and structure, the absorption mitigation method to suppress ice-induced vibration is presented. The numerical simulations were conducted for a simplified model of platform attached with a Tuned Mass Damper (TMD) under ice force function and ice force time history. The simulation results show that TMD can favorably reduce ice-induced vibrations, therefore, it can be considered to be an alternative approach to utilize. Finally, the application possibilities of utilizing TMDs on other miniature offshore structures in ice-covered areas of marginal oil fields are discussed.

  20. Vortex-Induced Vibration Suppression of a Circular Cylinder with Vortex Generators

    Shi-bo Tao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The vortex-induced vibration is one of the most important factors to make the engineering failure in wind engineering. This paper focuses on the suppression method of vortex-induced vibration that occurs on a circular cylinder fitted with vortex generators, based on the wind tunnel experiment. The effect of the vortex generators is presented with comparisons including the bare cylinder. The experimental results reveal that the vortex generators can efficiently suppress vortex-induced vibration of the circular cylinder. Vortex generator control can make the boundary layer profile fuller and hence more resistant to separation. The selections of skew angles and the angular position have a significant influence on the vortex generator control effect. By correlation analysis, it can be concluded that the vortex generators can inhibit the communication between the two shear layers and produce streamwise vortices to generate a disturbance in the spanwise direction.

  1. Vibration Mitigation without Dissipative Devices: First Large-Scale Testing of a State Switched Inducer

    Daniel Tirelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new passive device for mitigating cable vibrations is proposed and its efficiency is assessed on 45-meter long taut cables through a series of free and forced vibration tests. It consists of a unilateral spring attached perpendicularly to the cable near the anchorage. Because of its ability to change the cable dynamic behaviour through intermittent activation, the device has been called state switched inducer (SSI. The cable behaviour is shown to be deeply modified by the SSI: the forced vibration response is anharmonicc and substantially reduced in amplitude whereas the free vibration decay is largely sped up through a beating phenomenon. The vibration mitigation effect is mainly due to the activation and coupling of various vibration modes, as evidenced in the response spectra of the equipped cable. This first large-scale experimental campaign shows that the SSI outperforms classical passive devices, thus paving the way to a new kind of low-cost vibration mitigation systems which do not rely on dissipation.

  2. MULTI-MODE OF VORTEX-INDUCED VIBRATION OF A FLEXIBLE CIRCULAR CYLINDER

    XIE Fang-fang; DENG Jian; ZHENG Yao

    2011-01-01

    The vortex-induced vibration of a flexible circular cylinder is investigated at a constant Reynolds number of 1 000.The finite-volume method on moving meshes is applied for the fluid flow,and the Euler-Bemoulli beam theory is used to model the dynamic response of a flexible cylinder.The relationship between the reduced velocity and the amplitude response agrees well with the experimental results.Moreover,five different vibrating modes appear in the simulation.From the comparisons of their vortex structures,the strength of the wake flow is related to the exciting vibrating mode and different vortex patterns arise for different vibrating modes.Only 2P pattern appears in the first vibrating mode while 2S-2P patterns occur in the other vibrating modes if monitoring at different sections along the length of the cylinder.The vibration of the flexible cylinder can also greatly alter the three-dimensionality in the wake,which needs further studies in our future work,especially in the transition region for the Reynolds number from 170 to 300.

  3. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  4. Scale-model characterization of flow-induced vibrational response of FFTF reactor internals

    Fast Test Reactor core internal and peripheral components were assessed for flow-induced vibrational characteristics under scaled and simulated prototype flow conditions in the Hydraulic Core Mockup as an integral part of the Fast Test Reactor Vibration Program. The Hydraulic Core Mockup was an 0.285 geometric scale model of the Fast Test Reactor internals designed to simulate prototype vibrational and hydraulic characteristics. Using water to simulate sodium coolant, vibrational characteristics were measured and determined for selected model components over the scaled flow range of 36 to 110%. Additionally, in-situ shaker tests were conducted on selected Hydraulic Core Mockup outlet plenum components to establish modal characteristics. Most components exhibited resonant response at all test flow rates; however, the measured dynamic response was neither abnormal nor anomalously flow-rate dependent, and the predicted prototype components' response were deemed acceptable

  5. Tactile perception of skin and skin cream by friction induced vibrations.

    Ding, Shuyang; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-11-01

    Skin cream smooths, softens, and moistens skin by altering surface roughness and tribological properties of skin. Sliding generates vibrations that activate mechanoreceptors located in skin. The brain interprets tactile information to identify skin feel. Understanding the tactile sensing mechanisms of skin with and without cream treatment is important to numerous applications including cosmetics, textiles, and robotics sensors. In this study, frequency spectra of friction force and friction induced vibration signals were carried out to investigate tactile perception by an artificial finger sliding on skin. The influence of normal load, velocity, and cream treatment time were studied. Coherence between friction force and vibration signals were found. The amplitude of vibration decreased after cream treatment, leading to smoother perception. Increasing normal load or velocity between contacting surfaces generated a smoother perception with cream treatment, but rougher perception without treatment. As cream treatment time increases, skin becomes smoother. The related mechanisms are discussed. PMID:27474814

  6. First international symposium on Flow Induced Noise and Vibration Issues and Aspects

    Rosa, Sergio; Franco, Francesco; Guyader, Jean-Louis; Hambric, Stephen; Flinovia - Flow Induced Noise and Vibration Issues and Aspects

    2015-01-01

    Flow induced vibration and noise (FIVN) remains a critical research topic. Even after over 50 years of intensive research, accurate and cost-effective FIVN simulation and measurement techniques remain elusive. This book gathers the latest research from some of the most prominent experts in the field. It describes methods for characterizing wall pressure fluctuations, including subsonic and supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows over smooth and rough surfaces using computational methods like Large Eddy Simulation;
for inferring wall pressure fluctuations using inverse techniques based on panel vibrations or holographic pressure sensor arrays;
for calculating the resulting structural vibrations and radiated sound using traditional finite element methods, as well as advanced methods like Energy Finite Elements;
for using scaling approaches to universally collapse flow-excited vibration and noise spectra; and for computing time histories of structural response, including alternating stresses. This book p...

  7. Calculation of the ex-core neutron noise induced by fuel vibrations in PWRs

    Calculation of the neutron noise induced by fuel assembly vibrations in two pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores has been performed to investigate the effect of cycle burnup on the properties of the ex-core detector noise. Pendular vibrations of individual fuel assemblies were assumed to occur at different locations in the core. The auto power spectra density (APSD) of the ex-core detector noise was evaluated with the assumption of stochastic vibrations along a random two-dimensional trajectory. The results show that no general monotonic variation of APSD was found. The increase of APSD occurs predominantly for peripheral assemblies. Assuming simultaneous vibrations of a number of fuel assemblies uniformly distributed over the core with the more realistic perturbation model, the effect of the peripheral assemblies will dominate and the increase of the amplitude of the ex-core neutron noise with burnup can be confirmed. (author)

  8. Low dose ionizing radiation induced acoustic neuroma: A putative link?

    Sachin A Borkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although exposure to high dose ionizing radiation (following therapeutic radiotherapy has been incriminated in the pathogenesis of many brain tumors, exposure to chronic low dose ionizing radiation has not yet been shown to be associated with tumorigenesis. The authors report a case of a 50-year-old atomic reactor scientist who received a cumulative dose of 78.9 mSv over a 10-year period and was detected to have an acoustic neuroma another 15 years later. Although there is no proof that exposure to ionizing radiation was the cause for the development of the acoustic neuroma, this case highlights the need for extended follow-up periods following exposure to low dose ionizing radiation.

  9. Excitation of Light-Induced Acoustic Waves in Doped Lithium Niobate Crystals

    2006-01-01

    The phenomena of acoustic emission in doped lithium niobate crystals were observed in the process of light-induced quasi-breakdown. It is found that the ultrasonic waves introduce into the crystal have been modulated by the low frequency acoustic waves. Its frequency increases with the rise of the intensity of incident light and its jump period of breakdown is the same as that of the photovoltaic current Ic, the change of light-induced refractive index Δn and the diffracted light intensity L. This effect was explained with the interaction of the three waves and resonant state theory. The experimental results and the theoretical analysis are in conformity.

  10. Experimental study and numerical simulation on vortex-induced vibration of flexible riser

    LOU Min; QUO Haiyan; DONG Wenyi

    2007-01-01

    In order to study the effect of internal flow on vortex-induced vibration of flexible riser, the experiment on the vortex - induced vibration of flexible riser transporting fluid in the current was conducted in the physical oceanography laboratory of Ocean University of China. Considering the internal flowing fluid and external marine environment, the dynamic response of the flexible riser was measured. The corresponding numerical simulation was performed using the wake oscillatory model considering the extensibility of the riser system. Both the experiment and the numerical simulation indicated that with the increase of internal flow speed, the response amplitude increases, while the response frequency decreases.

  11. Flow-induced vibration analysis of heat exchanger and steam generator designs

    Tube and shell heat exchange components such as steam generators, heat exchangers and condensers are essential parts of CANDU nuclear power stations. Excessive flow-induced vibration may cause tube failures by fatigue or more likely by fretting-wear. Such failures may lead to station shutdowns that are very undesirable in terms of lost production. Hence good performance and reliability dictate a thorough flow-induced vibration analysis at the design stage. This paper presents our approach and techniques in this respect. (author)

  12. Fluidic harvesters in free stream turbulence undergoing flow-induced vibrations or flutter

    Gomez, Joan; Azadeh Ranjbar, Vahid; Goushcha, Oleg; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Elvin, Niell

    2015-11-01

    In the present experimental work we investigated the performance of fluidic harvesters consisting of cylindrical body mounted of the tip of a flexible beam in the presence of nearly homogeneous and isotropic turbulence. Circular, semi-circular and square shapes have been tested. It was found that turbulence interferes with resonance conditions between the flow and the structure in the case of vortex induced vibrations and has absolutely no effect in flutter dominated case. As a result, turbulence increases the power output of non-linear harvesters subjected to vortex induces vibration and it has no effect in harvester under flutter conditions. Supported by NSF Grant: CBET #1033117.

  13. Study on flow induced vibration evaluation for a large scale JSFR piping. (1) Current status of flow induced vibration evaluation for hot-leg piping

    This paper describes the current status of flow-induced vibration evaluation for the primary cooling piping in Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor (JSFR), with particular emphasis on research and development activities for the hot-leg piping characterized by a short-elbow piping. Important factors were discussed in evaluating the flow-induced vibration for the hot-leg piping, to which the coolant flows from the reactor upper sodium plenum. To investigate a complex flow near the inlet of the hot-leg piping, a reactor scale numerical analysis was carried out for the reactor upper plenum flow, which was simulated in a 1/10-scale reactor upper plenum experiment. Based on this analysis, experimental conditions on swirl inflow and deflected inflow that were identified as important factors were determined for flow-induced vibration experiments simulating only the hot-leg piping. In this study, the effect of the swirl inflow on flow pattern and pressure fluctuation onto the pipe wall was investigated in a 1/3-scale hot-leg pipe experiment. (author)

  14. Wave-induced Ship Hull Vibrations in Stochastic Seaways

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Dogliani, M.

    1996-01-01

    stationary stochastic seaways. The statistical properties of a response are here described by the first four statistical moments through a Hermite series approximation to the probability density function. The peak value distributions of the low and high frequency responses are treated independently, due to...... head sea in lighter sea states where the zero-crossing periods are small. It is also found that the non-linear contributions to the springing response are at least as important as the linear contribution. However, for the long-term extreme peak responses the springing vibrations become less important...

  15. Subscale Acoustic Testing: Comparison of ALAT and ASMAT

    Houston, Janice D.; Counter, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option. This paper compares the acoustic measurements of two different subscale tests: the 2% Ares Liftoff Acoustic Test conducted at Stennis Space Center and the 5% Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  16. Intelligent control for braking-induced longitudinal vibration responses of floating-type railway bridges

    This paper presents an intelligent control method and its engineering application in the control of braking-induced longitudinal vibration of floating-type railway bridges. Equations of motion for the controlled floating-type railway bridges have been established based on the analysis of the longitudinal vibration responses of floating-type railway bridges to train braking and axle-loads of moving trains. For engineering applications of the developed theory, a full-scale 500 kN smart magnetorheologic (MR) damper has been designed, fabricated and used to carry out experiments on the intelligent control of braking-induced longitudinal vibration. The procedure for using the developed intelligent method in conjunction with the full-scale 500 kN MR dampers has been proposed and used to control the longitudinal vibration responses of the deck of floating-type railway bridges induced by train braking and axle-loads of moving trains. This procedure has been applied to the longitudinal vibration control of the Tian Xingzhou highway and railway cable-stayed bridge over the Yangtze River in China. The simulated results have shown that the intelligent control system using the smart MR dampers can effectively control the longitudinal response of the floating-type railway bridge under excitations of braking and axle-loads of moving trains

  17. Acoustic Measurements of Small Solid Rocket Motor

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Rocket acoustic noise can induce loads and vibration on the vehicle as well as the surrounding structures. Models have been developed to predict these acoustic loads based on scaling existing solid rocket motor data. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center acoustics team has measured several small solid rocket motors (thrust below 150,000 lbf) to anchor prediction models. This data will provide NASA the capability to predict the acoustic environments and consequent vibro-acoustic response of larger rockets (thrust above 1,000,000 lbf) such as those planned for the NASA Constellation program. This paper presents the methods used to measure acoustic data during the static firing of small solid rocket motors and the trends found in the data.

  18. Dissociative ionization of liquid water induced by vibrational overtone excitation

    Photochemistry of vibrationally activated ground electronic state liquid water to produce H+ and OH- ions has been initiated by pulsed, single-photon excitation of overtone and combination transitions. Transient conductivity measurements were used to determine quantum yields as a function of photon energy, isotopic composition, and temperature. The equilibrium relaxation rate following perturbation by the vibrationally activated reaction was also measured as a function of temperature reaction and isotopic composition. In H2O, the quantum yield at 283 +- 1 K varies from 2 x 10-9 to 4 x 10-5 for wave numbers between 7605 and 18140 cm-1. In D2O, the dependence of quantum yield on wavelength has the same qualitative shape as for H2O, but is shifted to lower quantum yields. The position of a minimum in the quantum yield versus hydrogen mole fraction curve is consistent with a lower quantum yield for excitation of HOD in D2O than for excitation of D2O. The ionic recombination distance of 5.8 +- 0.5 A is constant within experimental error with temperature in H2O and with isotopic composition at 25 +- 10C

  19. Loss-induced enhanced transmission in anisotropic density-near-zero acoustic metamaterials

    Shen, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropic density-near-zero (ADNZ) acoustic metamaterials are investigated theoretically and numerically in this letter and are shown to exhibit extraordinary transmission enhancement when material loss is induced. The enhanced transmission is due to the enhanced propagating and evanescent wave modes inside the ADNZ medium thanks to the interplay of near-zero density, material loss, and high wave impedance matching in the propagation direction. The equi-frequency contour (EFC) is used to reveal whether the propagating wave mode is allowed in ADNZ metamaterials. Numerical simulations based on plate-type acoustic metamaterials with different material losses were performed to demonstrate collimation enabled by the induced loss in ADNZ media. This work provides a different way for manipulating acoustic waves.

  20. Light-induced acoustic effect in LiNbO3:Fe:Ce crystals

    Huang Wei; Wu Zhong-Kang; Wang Chang-Qing

    2005-01-01

    The phenomena of acoustic emission in LiNbO3:Fe:Ce crystals have been observed in the process of light-induced quasi-breakdown. It is found that the ultra-high frequency acoustic signal introduced into the crystal is modulated by the low frequency acoustic waves. Its frequency increases with the increase of the intensity of incident light and its jump period of breakdown is the same as that of the photovoltaic current Ic, the change of light-induced refractive index △n and the diffracted light intensity L. This phenomenon has been analysed in this paper, which is caused by the inverse piezoelectric strain effect of the jump of space charge field during the quasi-breakdown.

  1. Application of coupled analysis methods for prediction of blast-induced dominant vibration frequency

    Li, Haibo; Li, Xiaofeng; Li, Jianchun; Xia, Xiang; Wang, Xiaowei

    2016-03-01

    Blast-induced dominant vibration frequency (DVF) involves a complex, nonlinear and small sample system considering rock properties, blasting parameters and topography. In this study, a combination of grey relational analysis and dimensional analysis procedures for prediction of dominant vibration frequency are presented. Six factors are selected from extensive effect factor sequences based on grey relational analysis, and then a novel blast-induced dominant vibration frequency prediction is obtained by dimensional analysis. In addition, the prediction is simplified by sensitivity analysis with 195 experimental blast records. Validation is carried out for the proposed formula based on the site test database of the firstperiod blasting excavation in the Guangdong Lufeng Nuclear Power Plant (GLNPP). The results show the proposed approach has a higher fitting degree and smaller mean error when compared with traditional predictions.

  2. Reducing friction-induced vibration using intelligent active force control (AFC) with piezoelectric actuators

    S M Hashemi-Dehkordi; A R Abu-Bakar; M Mailah

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to reduce the effect of mode coupling that causes friction induced vibration (FIV) is proposed by applying an intelligent active force control (AFC)-based strategy employing piezoelectric actuators with hysteresis effect to a simplified two degree-of-freedom mathematical model of a friction-induced vibration system. At first, the model is simulated and analysed using a closed loop pure Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller. Later, it is integrated with the intelligent AFC with fuzzy logic (FL) estimator and simulated under similar operating condition. After running several tests with different sets of operating and loading conditions, the results both in time and frequency domains show that the PID controller with the intelligent AFC is much more effective in reducing the vibration, compared to the pure PID controller alone.

  3. Self-induced vibration of plane submerged water jets; Nijigen suifunryu no jirei shindo

    Sudo, K.; Hibara, H. [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Shimada, N. [Maritime Safety School, Kyoto (Japan); Harada, M. [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Ishibashi, Y. [Chiba Polytechnic College, Chiba (Japan)

    1999-10-25

    This paper is concerned with an experimental investigation on a self-induced vibration of plane submerged water jets, which occurs, as pointed out in the previous authors' report{sup (10)}, under the condition of a reduced Froude number, Fr{sup *}{identical_to}0.7{approx}1.0 when water jets issue into quiescent water with a free surface. Flow fields are visualized by using injected dye and tracer particles, and interesting data are drawn from the obtained photographs. As the results, it is clarified that the self-induced vibration of water jets is caused by attachment of a jet to a water surface owing to the Coanda effect and branching of a jet at an attachment point, and that the frequency of vibration is independent of water level. (author)

  4. Proton beam characterization by proton-induced acoustic emission: simulation studies

    Due to their Bragg peak, proton beams are capable of delivering a targeted dose of radiation to a narrow volume, but range uncertainties currently limit their accuracy. One promising beam characterization technique, protoacoustic range verification, measures the acoustic emission generated by the proton beam. We simulated the pressure waves generated by proton radiation passing through water. We observed that the proton-induced acoustic signal consists of two peaks, labeled α and γ, with two originating sources. The α acoustic peak is generated by the pre-Bragg peak heated region whereas the source of the γ acoustic peak is the proton Bragg peak. The arrival time of the α and γ peaks at a transducer reveals the distance from the beam propagation axis and Bragg peak center, respectively. The maximum pressure is not observed directly above the Bragg peak due to interference of the acoustic signals. Range verification based on the arrival times is shown to be more effective than determining the Bragg peak position based on pressure amplitudes. The temporal width of the α and γ peaks are linearly proportional to the beam diameter and Bragg peak width, respectively. The temporal separation between compression and rarefaction peaks is proportional to the spill time width. The pressure wave expected from a spread out Bragg peak dose is characterized. The simulations also show that acoustic monitoring can verify the proton beam dose distribution and range by characterizing the Bragg peak position to within ∼1 mm. (paper)

  5. Experimental study on flow-induced acoustic resonance in square closed side branch

    Flow-induced acoustic resonance is a phenomenon caused by the interaction of flow and acoustic fields in special structure. Acoustic resonance characteristic experiments were carried out on square closed side branch. The influences of the velocity in main pipe and the length of the side branch on acoustic resonance were studied. The range of occurrence and characteristics of pressure pulsation were analyzed. Three lengths of side branches (L/d=5.6 and 7) were experimentally studied and the Reynolds number in the experiment was 2.74 X 104-2.429 X 105 while the Mach number was 0.025-0.218. The results show that the resonance frequency shows a lock-in phenomenon with the increase of velocity. As the length of the side branch increasing, the amplitude of the acoustic pressure and the resonance frequency decrease. In the considered structure, the acoustic resonance occurs when Strouhal number is 0.3-0.6 and 0.7-1.0. (authors)

  6. Thermally induced secondary atomization of droplet in an acoustic field

    Basu, Saptarshi; Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-01-01

    We study the thermal effects that lead to instability and break up in acoustically levitated vaporizing fuel droplets. For selective liquids, atomization occurs at the droplet equator under external heating. Short wavelength [Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)] instability for diesel and bio-diesel droplets triggers this secondary atomization. Vapor pressure, latent heat, and specific heat govern the vaporization rate and temperature history, which affect the surface tension gradient and gas phase density, ultimately dictating the onset of KH instability. We develop a criterion based on Weber number to define a condition for the inception of secondary atomization.

  7. Metro train-induced vibrations on historic buildings in Chengdu, China

    Meng MA; Valéri MARKINE; Wei-ning LIU; Yang YUAN; Feng ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,the vibration influence on a monument caused by Chengdu Subway Line 2 is analyzed.Due to its elaborate and unique design,both structural and architectural damages should be avoided.First,the allowable root mean square (RMS) velocity at the foundation of the monument is derived and a site measurement is performed to obtain the background vibrations induced by road traffic.In addition,a train-track coupled model and 3D tunnel-soil-structure coupled finite element models are built to predict the dynamic response of the monument.Prediction models are checked by site measurement in Beijing Subway Line 5.Different kinds of fasteners and train speeds are compared and discussed as well.Results show that:(1) At a train speed of 72 km/h,all the traffic vibrations exceed the low limit no matter what kind of fastener is used,which is mainly due to the contribution of road traffic.Slowing down train speeds can cause effective vibration attenuation; (2) Vibrations drop dramatically with the train speed from 65 to 58 krn/h.When the train speed is lower than 58 km/h,vibrations are lower than allowable value even if the contribution of road traffic is considered.

  8. Light-induced vibration characteristics of free-standing carbon nanotube films fabricated by vacuum filtration

    Li, Junying; Zhu, Yong, E-mail: yongzhu@cqu.edu.cn; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Jie [The Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044 (China); Wang, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, 610054 (China)

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, we fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT) films with different thickness by vacuum filtration method, and the films were separated from Mixed Cellulose Ester membranes with burn-off process. The thickness of CNT films with different concentrations of CNTs 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, and 200 mg are 10.36 μm, 20.90 μm, 30.19 μm, and 39.98 μm respectively. The CNT bundles are homogeneously distributed and entangled with each other, and still maintain 2D continuous network structures after burn-off process. The optical absorptivity of the films is between 84% and 99% at wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 2500 nm. Vibration characteristics were measured with the Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer vibration measurement system. CNT films vibrate only under the xenon light irradiating perpendicularly to the surface. Vibration recorded by Fabry-Perot interferometer is considered to be caused by the time-dependent thermal moment, which is due to the temperature differences of two sides of CNT films. The vibration frequency spectrums between 0.1 ∼ 0.5 Hz were obtained by the Fast Fourier Transform spectra from time domain to frequency domain, and showed a linear relationship with films thickness, which is in accordance with theoretical model of thermal induced vibration.

  9. Light-induced vibration characteristics of free-standing carbon nanotube films fabricated by vacuum filtration

    In this paper, we fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT) films with different thickness by vacuum filtration method, and the films were separated from Mixed Cellulose Ester membranes with burn-off process. The thickness of CNT films with different concentrations of CNTs 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, and 200 mg are 10.36 μm, 20.90 μm, 30.19 μm, and 39.98 μm respectively. The CNT bundles are homogeneously distributed and entangled with each other, and still maintain 2D continuous network structures after burn-off process. The optical absorptivity of the films is between 84% and 99% at wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 2500 nm. Vibration characteristics were measured with the Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer vibration measurement system. CNT films vibrate only under the xenon light irradiating perpendicularly to the surface. Vibration recorded by Fabry-Perot interferometer is considered to be caused by the time-dependent thermal moment, which is due to the temperature differences of two sides of CNT films. The vibration frequency spectrums between 0.1 ∼ 0.5 Hz were obtained by the Fast Fourier Transform spectra from time domain to frequency domain, and showed a linear relationship with films thickness, which is in accordance with theoretical model of thermal induced vibration.

  10. Poiseuille flow-induced vibrations of two tandem circular cylinders with different mass ratios

    Jiang, Ren-Jie; Lin, Jian-Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Flow-induced vibrations of two tandem circular cylinders with different mass ratios confined between two parallel walls are numerically studied via a lattice Boltzmann method. With fixed Reynolds number Re = 100 and blockage ratio β = 1/4, the effects of mass ratio m* = [0.0625, 16] and streamwise separation between two cylinders S/D = [1.125, 10] on the cylinder motions and vortex wake modes are investigated. A variety of distinct cylinder motion regimes involving the symmetric periodic vibration, biased quasi-periodic vibration, beating vibration, and steady regimes, with the corresponding wake structures, e.g., two rows of alternately rotating vortices, a single row of same-sign vortices, and steady wake, are observed. For each current case, the cylinder motion type is exclusive and in the binary oscillation regime, both cylinders always vibrate at a common primary frequency. The lighter cylinder usually oscillates at a larger amplitude than the heavier one, while the heavier cylinder undergoes larger lift force than the lighter one. The lift force and cylinder displacement always behave as an out-of-phase state. In the gap-interference region, large-amplitude oscillations could be produced extensively and in the wake-interference region, the cylinder motions and fluid flows are mainly dependent on the upstream cylinder. When the separation is large enough, both cylinders behave as two isolated ones. The mechanisms for the excitations of cylinder vibrations have also been analysed.

  11. Vibration-induced field fluctuations in a superconducting magnet

    Britton, J W; Bohnet, J G; Uys, H; Biercuk, M J; Bollinger, J J

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting magnets enable precise control of nuclear and electron spins, and are used in experiments that explore biological and condensed matter systems, and fundamental atomic particles. In high-precision applications, a common view is that that slow (<1 Hz) drift of the homogeneous magnetic field limits control and measurement precision. We report on previously undocumented higher-frequency field noise (10 Hz to 200 Hz) that limits the coherence time of 9Be+ electron-spin qubits in the 4.46 T field of a superconducting magnet. We measure a spin-echo T2 coherence time of ~6 ms for the 9Be+ electron-spin resonance at 124 GHz, limited by part-per-billion fractional fluctuations in the magnet's homogeneous field. Vibration isolation of the magnet improved T2 to ~50 ms.

  12. Vibration-induced displacement using high-frequency resonators and friction layers

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    A mathematical model is set up to quantify vibration-induced motions of a slider with an imbedded resonator. A simple approximate expression is presented for predicting average velocities of the slider, agreeing fairly well with numerical integration of the full equations of motion. The simple...

  13. Vibration-induced displacement using high-frequency resonators and friction layers

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    1998-01-01

    A mathematical model is set up to quantify vibration-induced motions of a slider with an imbedded resonator. A simple approximate expression is presented for predicting average velocities of the slider, agreeing fairly well with numerical integration of the full equations of motion. The simple ex...

  14. Whole-body vibration training induces hypertrophy of the human patellar tendon.

    Rieder, F; Wiesinger, H-P; Kösters, A; Müller, E; Seynnes, O R

    2016-08-01

    Animal studies suggest that regular exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) induces an anabolic response in bone and tendon. However, the effects of this type of intervention on human tendon properties and its influence on the muscle-tendon unit function have never been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of WBV training on the patellar tendon mechanical, material and morphological properties, the quadriceps muscle architecture and the knee extension torque-angle relationship. Fifty-five subjects were randomized into either a vibration, an active control, or an inactive control group. The active control subjects performed isometric squats on a vibration platform without vibration. Muscle and tendon properties were measured using ultrasonography and dynamometry. Vibration training induced an increase in proximal (6.3%) and mean (3.8%) tendon cross-sectional area, without any appreciable change in tendon stiffness and modulus or in muscle architectural parameters. Isometric torque at a knee angle of 90° increased in active controls (6.7%) only and the torque-angle relation remained globally unchanged in all groups. The present protocol did not appreciably alter knee extension torque production or the musculo-tendinous parameters underpinning this function. Nonetheless, this study shows for the first time that WBV elicits tendon hypertrophy in humans. PMID:26173589

  15. Effect of vehicle weight on natural frequencies of bridges measured from traffic-induced vibration

    2003-01-01

    Recently, ambient vibration test (AVT) is widely used to estimate dynamic characteristics of large civil structures. Dynamic characteristics can be affected by various environmental factors such as humidity, intensity of wind, and temperature. Besides these environmental conditions, the mass of vehicles may change the measured values when traffic-induced vibration is used as a source of AVT for bridges. The effect of vehicle mass on dynamic characteristics is investigated through traffic-induced vibration tests on three bridges; (1) three-span suspension bridge (128m+404m+128m), (2) five-span continuous steel box girder bridge (59m+3@95m+59m), (3) simply supported plate girder bridge (46m). Acceleration histories of each measurement location under normal traffic are recorded for 30 minutes at field. These recorded histories are divided into individual vibrations and are combined into two groups according to the level of vibration; one by heavy vehicles such as trucks and buses and the other by light vehicles such as passenger cars. Separate processing of the two groups of signals shows that, for the middle and long-span bridges, the difference can be hardly detected, but, for the short span bridges whose mass is relatively small, the measured natural frequencies can change up to 5.4%.

  16. Shellside flow-induced tube vibration in typical heat exchanger configurations: Overview of a research program

    Halle, H.; Chenoweth, J. M.; Wambsganss, M. W.

    A comprehensive research program is being conducted to develop the necessary criteria to assist designers and operators of shell-and-tube heat exchangers to avoid detrimental flow-induced tube vibration. This paper presents an overview of the insights gained from shellside water-flow testing on a horizontal, industrial-sized test exchanger that can be configured in many ways using interchangeable tube bundles and replaceable nozzles. Nearly 50 different configurations have been tested representing various combinations of triangular, square, rotated-triangular, and rotated-square tubefield layouts; odd and even numbers of crosspasses; and both single- and double-segmental baffles with different cut sizes and orientations. The results are generally consistent with analytical relationships that predict tube vibration response by the combined reinforcing effect of the vibration mode shape and flow velocity distribution. An understanding of the vibration and instability performance is facilitated by recognizing that the excitation is induced by three separate, though sometimes interacting, flow conditions. These are the crossflows that generate classic fluidelastic instabilities in the interior of the tube bundle, the entrance and exit bundle flow from and into the shell nozzles, and the localized high velocity bypass and leakage stream flows. The implications to design and/or possible field remedies to avoid vibration problems are discussed.

  17. Regarding "A new method for predicting nonlinear structural vibrations induced by ground impact loading" [Journal of Sound and Vibration, 331/9 (2012) 2129-2140

    Cartmell, Matthew P.

    2016-09-01

    The Editor wishes to make the reader aware that the paper "A new method for predicting nonlinear structural vibrations induced by ground impact loading" by Jun Liu, Yu Zhang, Bin Yun, Journal of Sound and Vibration, 331 (2012) 2129-2140, did not contain a direct citation of the fundamental and original work in this field by Dr. Mark Svinkin. The Editor regrets that this omission was not noted at the time that the above paper was accepted and published.

  18. Music-induced emotions can be predicted from a combination of brain activity and acoustic features.

    Daly, Ian; Williams, Duncan; Hallowell, James; Hwang, Faustina; Kirke, Alexis; Malik, Asad; Weaver, James; Miranda, Eduardo; Nasuto, Slawomir J

    2015-12-01

    It is widely acknowledged that music can communicate and induce a wide range of emotions in the listener. However, music is a highly-complex audio signal composed of a wide range of complex time- and frequency-varying components. Additionally, music-induced emotions are known to differ greatly between listeners. Therefore, it is not immediately clear what emotions will be induced in a given individual by a piece of music. We attempt to predict the music-induced emotional response in a listener by measuring the activity in the listeners electroencephalogram (EEG). We combine these measures with acoustic descriptors of the music, an approach that allows us to consider music as a complex set of time-varying acoustic features, independently of any specific music theory. Regression models are found which allow us to predict the music-induced emotions of our participants with a correlation between the actual and predicted responses of up to r=0.234,pmusic induced emotions can be predicted by their neural activity and the properties of the music. Given the large amount of noise, non-stationarity, and non-linearity in both EEG and music, this is an encouraging result. Additionally, the combination of measures of brain activity and acoustic features describing the music played to our participants allows us to predict music-induced emotions with significantly higher accuracies than either feature type alone (p<0.01). PMID:26544602

  19. Flow-induced vibration test of an advanced water reactor model. Part 2: Turbulence-induced structural response

    A 1/9-scale model flow-induced vibration test of a proposed advanced water reactor (AWR) was performed. The main objectives of the test program were: (1) to derive an empirical equation for the turbulence-induced forcing function that can be applied to the full-sized prototype; (2) to study the effect of viscosity on the turbulence forcing function generation and dissipation and to verify the superposition assumption widely used in dynamic analysis of weakly coupled fluid-shell systems; (3) to measure the shell response due to turbulence-induced excitation so that the data can be used to verify methods and computer programs used in the flow-induced vibration design analysis of the prototype. This paper describes Objective (3) of the test program

  20. Vibrational emission analysis of the CN molecules in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of organic compounds

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of organic materials is based on the analysis of atomic and ionic emission lines and on a few molecular bands, the most important being the CN violet system and the C2 Swan system. This paper is focused in molecular emission of LIBS plasmas based on the CN (B2Σ–X2Σ) band, one of the strongest emissions appearing in all carbon materials when analyzed in air atmosphere. An analysis of this band with sufficient spectral resolution provides a great deal of information on the molecule, which has revealed that valuable information can be obtained from the plume chemistry and dynamics affecting the excitation mechanisms of the molecules. The vibrational emission of this molecular band has been investigated to establish the dependence of this emission on the molecular structure of the materials. The paper shows that excitation/emission phenomena of molecular species observed in the plume depend strongly on the time interval selected and on the irradiance deposited on the sample surface. Precise time resolved LIBS measurements are needed for the observation of distinctive CN emission. For the organic compounds studied, larger differences in the behavior of the vibrational emission occur at early stages after plasma ignition. Since molecular emission is generally more complex than that involving atomic emission, local plasma conditions as well as plume chemistry may induce changes in vibrational emission of molecules. As a consequence, alterations in the distribution of the emissions occur in terms of relative intensities, being sensitive to the molecular structure of every single material. - Highlights: • Vibrational emission of CN species in laser-induced plasmas has been investigated. • Distribution of vibrational emission of CN has been found to be time dependent. • Laser irradiance affects the vibrational distribution of the CN molecules. • Plume chemistry controls the excitation mechanisms of CN molecules in the

  1. Experimental investigation of railway train-induced vibrations of surrounding ground and a nearby multi-story building

    Xia He; Chen Jianguo; Wei Pengbo; Xia Chaoyi; G. De Roeck; G. Degrande

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a field experiment was carried out to study train-induced environmental vibrations. During the field experiment, velocity responses were measured at different locations of a six-story masonry structure near the Beijing- Guangzhou Railway and along a small road adjacent to the building. The results show that the velocity response levels of the environmental ground and the building floors increase with train speed, and attenuate with the distance to the railway track. Heavier freight trains induce greater vibrations than lighter passenger trains. In the multi-story building, the lateral velocity levels increase monotonically with floor elevation, while the vertical ones increase with floor elevation in a fluctuating manner. The indoor floor vibrations are much lower than the outdoor ground vibrations. The lateral vibration of the building along the direction of weak structural stiffness is greater than along the direction with stronger stiffness. A larger room produces greater floor vibrations than the staircase at the same elevation, and the vibration at the center of a room is greater than at its comer. The vibrations of the building were compared with the Federal Transportation Railroad Administration (FTA) criteria for acceptable ground-borne vibrations expressed in terms ofrms velocity levels in decibels. The results show that the train-induced building vibrations are serious, and some exceed the allowance given in relevant criterion.

  2. Experimental investigation of railway train-induced vibrations of surrounding ground and a nearby multi-story building

    Xia, He; Chen, Jianguo; Wei, Pengbo; Xia, Chaoyi; de Roeck, G.; Degrande, G.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, a field experiment was carried out to study train-induced environmental vibrations. During the field experiment, velocity responses were measured at different locations of a six-story masonry structure near the Beijing-Guangzhou Railway and along a small road adjacent to the building. The results show that the velocity response levels of the environmental ground and the building floors increase with train speed, and attenuate with the distance to the railway track. Heavier freight trains induce greater vibrations than lighter passenger trains. In the multi-story building, the lateral velocity levels increase monotonically with floor elevation, while the vertical ones increase with floor elevation in a fluctuating manner. The indoor floor vibrations are much lower than the outdoor ground vibrations. The lateral vibration of the building along the direction of weak structural stiffness is greater than along the direction with stronger stiffness. A larger room produces greater floor vibrations than the staircase at the same elevation, and the vibration at the center of a room is greater than at its corner. The vibrations of the building were compared with the Federal Transportation Railroad Administration (FTA) criteria for acceptable ground-borne vibrations expressed in terms of rms velocity levels in decibels. The results show that the train-induced building vibrations are serious, and some exceed the allowance given in relevant criterion.

  3. The Effects of Acute Stress-Induced Sleep Disturbance on Acoustic Trauma-Induced Tinnitus in Rats

    2014-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is a debilitating condition and often accompanied by anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. It has been suggested that sleep disturbance, such as insomnia, may be a risk factor/predictor for tinnitus-related distress and the two conditions may share common neurobiological mechanisms. This study investigated whether acute stress-induced sleep disturbance could increase the susceptibility to acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus in rats. The animals were exposed to unilateral a...

  4. Frequencies in the Vibration Induced by the Rotor Stator Interaction in a Centrifugal Pump Turbine

    Rodriguez, Cristian; Egusquiza, Eduard; Santos, Ilmar

    2007-01-01

    among their amplitudes. It is valuable for the design and condition monitoring to count on these characteristics. A CFD model is an appropriate tool to determine the force and its characteristics. However it is time consuming and needs highly qualified human resources while usually these results are...... result of the analysis and after it is carried out in one of the units, the vibration levels are reduced The vibration induced by the RSI is predicted considering the sequence of interaction and different amplitudes in the interactions between the same moving blade and different stationary blades, giving...

  5. Mathematical model for cross-flow-induced vibrations of tube rows

    A mathematical model is presented for cross-flow-induced vibrations of tube banks including the effects of vortex shedding, fluidelastic coupling, drag force, fluid inertia coupling, and others. The model can predict the details of complex tube-fluid interactions: (1) natural frequencies and mode shapes of coupled vibrations; (2) critical flow velocities; (3) responses to vortex shedding, drag force, and other types of excitations; and (4) the dominant excitation mechanism at a given flow velocity. The analytical results are in good agreement with the published experimental results

  6. Sliding mode control of wind-induced vibrations using fuzzy sliding surface and gain adaptation

    Thenozhi, Suresh; Yu, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Although fuzzy/adaptive sliding mode control can reduce the chattering problem in structural vibration control applications, they require the equivalent control and the upper bounds of the system uncertainties. In this paper, we used fuzzy logic to approximate the standard sliding surface and designed a dead-zone adaptive law for tuning the switching gain of the sliding mode control. The stability of the proposed controller is established using Lyapunov stability theory. A six-storey building prototype equipped with an active mass damper has been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller towards the wind-induced vibrations.

  7. Leakage flow-induced vibrations for variations of a tube-in-tube slip joint

    Variations in the design of a specific slip joint separating two cantilevered, telescoping tubes conveying water were studied to determine their effect upon the leakage flow-induced vibration self-excitation mechanism known to exist for the original slip joint geometry. The important parameters controlling the self-excitation mechanism were identified, which, along with previous results, allowed the determination of a comprehensive set of design rules to avoid unstable vibrations. This was possible even though a new self-excitation mechanism was found when the engagement of the two tubes was small. 9 refs

  8. Wind tunnel study on wind-induced vibration of middle pylon of Taizhou Bridge

    Ma Rujin; Zhang Zhen; Chen Airong

    2012-01-01

    Full aero-elastic model tests are carried out to investigate wind-induced vibration of middle steel pylon of Taizhou Bridge. Model of the pylon under different construction periods is tested in both uniform and turbulent flow field. And the yaw angle of wind changes from transverse to longitudinal. Through full aero-elastic model testing, windinduced vibration is checked, which includes vortex resonance, buffeting and galloping. Vortex resonance is observed and further studies are carried out by changing damping ratio. Based on wind tunnel testing results, wind-resistance of middle pylon is evaluated and some suggestions are given for middle pylon' s construction.

  9. Assessing the underwater acoustics of the world's largest vibration hammer (OCTA-KONG and its potential effects on the Indo-Pacific humpbacked dolphin (Sousa chinensis.

    Zhitao Wang

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic noise in aquatic environments is a worldwide concern due to its potential adverse effects on the environment and aquatic life. The Hongkong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge is currently under construction in the Pearl River Estuary, a hot spot for the Indo-Pacific humpbacked dolphin (Sousa chinensis in China. The OCTA-KONG, the world's largest vibration hammer, is being used during this construction project to drive or extract steel shell piles 22 m in diameter. This activity poses a substantial threat to marine mammals, and an environmental assessment is critically needed. The underwater acoustic properties of the OCTA-KONG were analyzed, and the potential impacts of the underwater acoustic energy on Sousa, including auditory masking and physiological impacts, were assessed. The fundamental frequency of the OCTA-KONG vibration ranged from 15 Hz to 16 Hz, and the noise increments were below 20 kHz, with a dominant frequency and energy below 10 kHz. The resulting sounds are most likely detectable by Sousa over distances of up to 3.5 km from the source. Although Sousa clicks do not appear to be adversely affected, Sousa whistles are susceptible to auditory masking, which may negatively impact this species' social life. Therefore, a safety zone with a radius of 500 m is proposed. Although the zero-to-peak source level (SL of the OCTA-KONG was lower than the physiological damage level, the maximum root-mean-square SL exceeded the cetacean safety exposure level on several occasions. Moreover, the majority of the unweighted cumulative source sound exposure levels (SSELs and the cetacean auditory weighted cumulative SSELs exceeded the acoustic threshold levels for the onset of temporary threshold shift, a type of potentially recoverable auditory damage resulting from prolonged sound exposure. These findings may aid in the identification and design of appropriate mitigation methods, such as the use of air bubble curtains, "soft start" and "power down

  10. A study on leakage-flow-induced vibrations: Pt. 1

    The viscous fluid-dynamic forces and the moments acting on the walls of a one-dimensional, narrow, tapered passage when one wall is vibrating in coupled translational and rotational modes are analyzed, and fluid-dynamic mass, damping and stiffness matrices are determined. By this means the mechanism of instability generated from the flow through a narrow passage is examined. In the case of a single-degree-of-freedom translational or rotational system, only diagonal components of the fluid-dynamic matrices are estimated, and it is found that both negative fluid-dynamic damping caused by the phase delay due to the fluid inertia and negative fluid-dynamic stiffness can occur. In the case of a single-degree-of-freedom translational system, if the passage is divergent, both negative fluid-dynamic damping and fluid-dynamic stiffness can occur. In the case of a single-degree-of-freedom rotational system, the area increment ratio of the passage, at which negative fluid-dynamic damping and fluid-dynamic stiffness can occur, changes remarkably with the location of the pivot. In the case of a two-degree-of-freedom translational and rotational system, it is difficult to conclude directly from the fluid-dynamic matrices whether the fluid-dynamic forces stabilize the system or not. (author)

  11. A study on leakage-flow-induced vibrations: Pt. 2

    The stability of a rigid, thin plate able to execute coupled translational and rotational vibrations in a one-dimensional, narrow, tapered passage is studied, and the critical flow rates, natural frequencies and modes on the stability boundaries determined both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical values correspond very well to those obtained from experiments. The types of flutter are also analysed theoretically. Both divergent- and flutter-type instabilities can occur; the flutter-type is classified as single-degree-of-freedom flutter, which can also occur in single-degree-of-freedom systems, and two-degree-of-freedom flutter, which can occur only in two-degree-of-freedom systems. The single-degree-of-freedom flutter hardly ever occurs when the passage is convergent or when the pivot of rotation is near the inlet of the passage, but the two-degree-of-freedom flutter tends to occur whether the passage is convergent or not and the pivot close to the inlet or not. (author)

  12. Periodicity-induced effects and method in vibro-acoustics

    Sorokin, Sergey V.

    2014-01-01

    attention being paid to eigenfrequencies of a single periodicity cell with various boundary conditions. Another issue addressed in the lecture is an influence of the corrugation shape and amplitude on the broadness and location of the stop- and pass-bands in an infinite periodic structure. The concluding......The lecture is concerned with the modelling of wave propagation in and vibration of periodic elastic structures. Although analysis of wave-guide properties of infinite periodic structures is a well establish research subject, some issues have not yet been fully addressed in the literature. The aim...... of the lecture is to illustrate these issues in simple examples and to discuss possible applications and generalisations. First, the eigenfrequency spectra of finite periodic structures are compared with the location of stop-bands for their infinite counterparts. This is done with the special...

  13. Periodicity-induced effects and methods in vibro-acoustics

    Sorokin, Sergey V.

    2015-01-01

    eigenfrequencies and eigenmodes of a single periodicity cell with appropriate boundary conditions. The influence of the amount of periodicity cells in a finite compound structure on its eigenfrequency spectrum is analyzed. Several features are found and discussed in the context of the existing knowledge on the......The paper is concerned with the modelling of wave propagation in and vibration of periodic elastic structures. Although analysis of waveguide properties of infinite periodic structures is a well establish research subject, some issues have not yet been fully addressed in the literature. The aim of...... the paper is to illustrate these issues in simple examples and to discuss possible applications and generalisations. First, the eigenfrequency spectra of finite periodic structures are compared with the location of stop-bands for their infinite counterparts. Special attention is paid to...

  14. Dynamics of the Turbulent Wake of Rigid and Flexible Cylinders Subject to Vortex-Induced Vibrations

    Evangelinos, Constantinos; Karniadakis, George Em.

    1998-11-01

    We present DNS simulation results for flow past a flexible cylinder subject to vortex-induced vibrations at a Reynolds number of 1000. The structure is modeled using the wave equation (simplified cable) or the beam equation. The structural parameters are chosen to obtain lock-in excitation for the fundamental mode of vibration. The transition to a traveling wave solution from the standing wave initial conditions is studied, along with the phase relationship in time between structural displacement and hydrodynamic force variations. The differences and similarities between a cable and a beam are investigated further by looking at the energy variations of the excited structural modes in time. Time history point statistics for the near wake are examined, and spectra and correlation lengths are compared with each other, with those for a stationary cylinder, and with those of a rigid vibrating cylinder.

  15. Vulnerability Assessment for a Complex Structure Using Vibration Response Induced by Impact Load

    This work presents a vulnerability assessment procedure for a complex structure using vibration characteristics. The structural behavior of a three-dimensional framed structure subjected to impact forces was predicted using the spectral element method. The Timoshenko beam function was applied to simulate the impact wave propagations induced by a high-velocity projectile at relatively high frequencies. The interactions at the joints were analyzed for both flexural and longitudinal wave propagations. Simulations of the impact energy transfer through the entire structure were performed using the transient displacement and acceleration responses obtained from the frequency analysis. The kill probabilities of the crucial components for an operating system were calculated as a function of the predicted acceleration amplitudes according to the acceptable vibration levels. Following the proposed vulnerability assessment procedure, the vulnerable positions of a three-dimensional combat vehicle with high possibilities of damage generation of components by impact loading were identified from the estimated vibration responses

  16. Flow-induced acoustic resonance at the mouth of one or two side branches

    Highlights: ► We investigated the effect of the geometrical and flow parameters on the flow-induced acoustic resonance. ► In the case of a single branch, the dimensionless acoustic pressure amplitude at resonance increases as the cross-sectional ratio of the main and branch pipes is decreased. ► In the case of coaxial branches, the pressure amplitude shows a counter tendency to that in the case of a single branch. ► In the case of tandem branches, peak pressure and frequency change cyclically as the distance between tandem branches changes. - Abstract: In the case of flow-induced acoustic resonance with multiple side branches, the pulsation amplitude may be significantly enhanced compared to the case of a single branch. However, few studies have been presented on the effects of the distance between tandem branches or side branches on fluctuating pressure amplitude. In this study, we carried out several air flow experiments at ordinary temperatures and pressures to investigate the effect of the geometrical and flow parameters on the general acoustic resonance. In the case of a single branch, the dimensionless acoustic pressure amplitude at resonance increases as the cross-sectional ratio of the main and branch pipes is decreased. This is attributed to the acoustic radiation loss from the branch pipe to the main pipe increasing at higher values of the cross-sectional ratio. In the case of coaxial branches, the pressure amplitude shows a counter tendency to that in the case of a single branch. This is because the two branches strongly couple and form a standing wave with negligible radiation losses. In the case of tandem branches, peak pressure and frequency change cyclically as the distance between tandem branches changes.

  17. Numerical investigation on flow-induced vibration of a triangular cylinder at a low Reynolds number

    Wang, Huakun; Zhao, Dongliang; Yang, Wenyu; Yu, Guoliang, E-mail: yugl@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Ocean Engineering, School of Naval Architecture, Ocean and Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China (China)

    2015-02-01

    Flow-induced vibration (FIV) of a triangular cylinder is numerically investigated at a Reynolds number of Re = 100. The four-step fractional finite element method is employed to solve the two-dimensional (2D) incompressible Navier–Stokes equations. The cylinder is endowed with a two-degree-of-freedom motion with the reduced mass ratio of M{sub r} = 2. Three typical flow incidence angles, α = 0°, 30° and 60°, are examined to identify the effect of incidence angle on the vibration characteristics of the cylinder. For each α, computations are conducted in a wide range of reduced velocities 2 U{sub r} ≤ 18. The numerical results show that at α = 0° and 30°, the responses of the cylinder are dominated by vortex-induced vibration which resembles that of a circular cylinder. At α = 0°, the peak amplitude of transverse vibration is the smallest among the three investigated α, and most of the cylinder motions exhibit a regular figure-eight trajectory. Some single-loop trajectories are observed at α = 30°, where the vibration frequency in the in-line direction is always identical to that in the transverse direction. At α = 60°, the triangular cylinder undergoes a typical transverse galloping with large amplitude and low frequency, and the vibration trajectories appear to be regular or irregular figure-eight patterns, which are strongly affected by the reduced velocity. (paper)

  18. Numerical investigation on flow-induced vibration of a triangular cylinder at a low Reynolds number

    Flow-induced vibration (FIV) of a triangular cylinder is numerically investigated at a Reynolds number of Re = 100. The four-step fractional finite element method is employed to solve the two-dimensional (2D) incompressible Navier–Stokes equations. The cylinder is endowed with a two-degree-of-freedom motion with the reduced mass ratio of Mr = 2. Three typical flow incidence angles, α = 0°, 30° and 60°, are examined to identify the effect of incidence angle on the vibration characteristics of the cylinder. For each α, computations are conducted in a wide range of reduced velocities 2 Ur ≤ 18. The numerical results show that at α = 0° and 30°, the responses of the cylinder are dominated by vortex-induced vibration which resembles that of a circular cylinder. At α = 0°, the peak amplitude of transverse vibration is the smallest among the three investigated α, and most of the cylinder motions exhibit a regular figure-eight trajectory. Some single-loop trajectories are observed at α = 30°, where the vibration frequency in the in-line direction is always identical to that in the transverse direction. At α = 60°, the triangular cylinder undergoes a typical transverse galloping with large amplitude and low frequency, and the vibration trajectories appear to be regular or irregular figure-eight patterns, which are strongly affected by the reduced velocity. (paper)

  19. Numerical study on the valve acoustic resonance behaviors

    Background: In recent years some reactors have experienced significant steam dryer cracking. Studies indicate that the fatigue is due to flow-induced acoustic vibration. Purpose: In this study, sound source behaviors of a single valve on the main steam line are investigated. Methods: Mode and CFD analysis were carried to investigate the acoustic mode and resonance behaviors. Results: The following results can be concluded from this study: various categories of acoustic modes exist in the structure; geometries directly influence acoustic mode; peak excitation occurs around St of some specifically range. Conclusions: The results match theory and experimental studies well, and provide reference for the related researches. (authors)

  20. Current-induced runaway vibrations in dehydrogenated graphene nanoribbons

    Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Lu, Jing Tao; Hedegard, Per;

    2016-01-01

    We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach to study current-induced atomic dynamics in a partially dehydrogenated armchair graphene nanoribbon. All parameters are obtained from density functional theory. The dehydrogenated carbon dimers behave as effective impurities, whose motion decouples from...

  1. Wave-induced Ship Hull Vibrations in Stochastic Seaways

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Dogliani, M.

    1996-01-01

    A theoretical Study is undertaken on the determination of wave-induced loads in flexible ship hulls. The calculations are performed within the framework of a non-linear, quadratic strip theory formulated in the frequency domain. Included are non-linear effects due to changes in added mass, hydrod...

  2. Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibration in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers

    Catton, Ivan; Dhir, Vijay K.; Alquaddoomi, O.S.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Adinolfi, Pierangelo

    2004-03-26

    OAK-B135 Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers. In the nuclear industry, steam generators are often affected by this problem. However, flow-induced vibration is not limited to nuclear power plants, but to any type of heat exchanger used in many industrial applications such as chemical processing, refrigeration and air conditioning. Specifically, shell and tube type heat exchangers experience flow-induced vibration due to the high velocity flow over the tube banks. Flow-induced vibration in these heat exchangers leads to equipment breakdown and hence expensive repair and process shutdown. The goal of this research is to provide accurate measurements that can help modelers to validate their models using the measured experimental parameters and thereby develop better design criteria for avoiding fluid-elastic instability in heat exchangers. The research is divided between two primary experimental efforts, the first conducted using water alone (single phase) and the second using a mixture of air or steam and water as the working fluid (two phase). The outline of this report is as follows: After the introduction to fluid-elastic instability, the experimental apparatus constructed to conduct the experiments is described in Chapter 2 along with the measurement procedures. Chapter 3 presents results obtained on the tube array and the flow loop, as well as techniques used in data processing. The project performance is described and evaluated in Chapter 4 followed by

  3. Flow-induced vibration testing of replacement thermowell designs

    Haslinger, K. H.

    2003-09-01

    Inconel 600 Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) in Nuclear Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) has necessitated the repair/replacement of various small bore nozzles. These repairs/replacements must be designed to avoid unwanted vibrations. So, to this end, new RTD-Thermowell-Nozzle replacement designs were developed and subjected to flow testing over a velocity range from 9.14 to 33.53m/s (30-110ft/s), and temperatures ranging from 121°C to 316°C (250-600°F). The replacement nozzles are welded on the pipe OD, rather than on the pipe ID. A split, tapered ferrule is used to support the nozzle tip inside the pipe bore. This maintains high thermowell tip-resonance frequencies with the objective of avoiding self-excitation from vortex shedding that is believed to have caused failures in an earlier design during initial, precritical plant startup testing. The flow testing was complicated by the small size of the thermowell tips (5.08mm or 0.2in ID), which necessitated use of a complement of low temperature and high temperature instrumentation. Since the high temperature device had an internal resonance (750Hz) within the frequency range of interest (0-2500Hz), adequate sensor correlations had to be derived from low temperature tests. The current nozzle/thermowell design was tested concurrently with two slight variations of the replacement design. The acceleration signals were acquired during incremental and continuous flow sweeps, nominally at 5kHz sampling rates and for time domain processing as high as 25kHz. Whereas vortex-shedding frequencies were predicted to prevail between 400 and 1500Hz, no such response was observed at these frequencies. Rather, the thermowell tips responded due to turbulent buffeting with a peak response that was related directly to flow velocity. Lift direction response was always larger than drag direction response. The thermowell tips also responded at their natural tip frequencies in a narrow band random fashion. At the higher

  4. Vibration induced phase noise in Mach-Zehnder atom interferometers

    Miffre, Alain; Jacquey, Marion; Büchner, Matthias; Trénec, Gérard; Vigué, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    The high inertial sensitivity of atom interferometers has been used to build accelerometers and gyrometers but this sensitivity makes these interferometers very sensitive to the laboratory seismic noise. This seismic noise induces a phase noise which is large enough to reduce the fringe visibility in many cases. We develop here a model calculation of this phase noise in the case of Mach-Zehnder atom interferometers and we apply this model to our thermal lithium interferometer. We are thus abl...

  5. Simulation of cross-flow-induced vibration of tube bundle by surface vorticity method

    Fenghao WANG; Gedong JIANG; Jong Zhang Lin

    2008-01-01

    A fluid-structure interaction model based on Surface Vorticity Method (SVM) was used to study flow-induced vibrations of tube bundles in medium space ratio. The flow-induced vibrations of four tubes in a rotated square and a staggered tube bundle in three-row and five-column arrangements were simulated in the high sub-critical Reynolds number (Re) range. The results on fluid forces, tube responses and vorticity maps were pre-sented. The vorticity maps of the four rotated-square tubes changed dramatically when the rigid tubes were replaced by the flexible tubes. From the vorticity maps and vibration responses of the staggered tube bundle of different structural parameters, it was found that with the decrease of tube natural frequency, the maximal vibration response moved from the third row to the first. The results also showed that when more flexible tubes are used, the flow pattern changed drastically and the fluid-structure interaction imposed a dominant impact on the flow.

  6. Analytical investigation of the properties of the neutron noise induced by vibrating absorber and fuel rods

    Analytical solution methods for the neutron noise in a one-dimensional multi-region system in two-group theory, which have so far been based on the adjoint function technique, are extended here to using the forward Green's function technique. The forward Green's functions were calculated analytically for a noise source in a core surrounded by reflector regions at both sides. It is shown that with symbolic computation methods, the forward Green's function can be used for the calculation of the space- and frequency-dependent noise in the first order approximation for arbitrary noise sources which have an analytical representation. The properties of the induced neutron noise were investigated for vibrations of both absorbers and fuel assemblies, with two representations of the noise sources: a point-like source which corresponds to the vibrations of a fuel rod, and a finite width source which corresponds to vibrations of a fuel assembly. The contributions of the components induced by the fluctuations of the various types of macroscopic cross sections in the total noise are also discussed and the information content of the noise in the fast group is explored for the identification of fuel assembly vibrations. (orig.)

  7. Study on flow-induced vibration of the fuel rod in HTTR

    This study was performed in order to investigate flow-induced vibration characteristics of a fuel rod in HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor) from both an experiment and a numerical simulation. Two kinds of fuel rods were used in this experiment: one was a graphite rod which simulated a specification of the HTTR's fuel rod and the other was an aluminum rod whose weight was a half of the graphite one. The experiment was carried out up to Re = 31000 using air at room temperature and pressure. Air flowed downstream in an annular passage which consisted of the fuel rod and the graphite channel. Numerical simulations by fluid and frequency equations were also carried out. Numerical and experimental results were then compared. The following conclusions were drived: (1) The fuel rod amplitudes increase with the flow rate and with a decrease of the fuel rod weight. (2) The fuel rod amplitudes are obtained by δ/De = 2.22 x 10-10Re1.43, 9000 ≤ Re ≤ 31000, where δ is a vibration amplitude, De is a hydraulic diameter and Reis Reynolds number. (3) The fuel rod frequencies shift from lower natural frequency to higher as the flow rate increases. (4) The flow-induced vibration behavior of the fuel rod can simulate well by simultaneous equations which used the turbulence model for fluid and the mass model for vibration of the fuel rod. (author)

  8. Use of single crystal and soft piezoceramics for alleviation of flow separation induced vibration in a smart helicopter rotor

    Thakkar, Dipali; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2006-04-01

    Dynamic stall and flow separation induced vibration alleviation is investigated using single crystal and soft piezoceramic-induced shear actuation. PZT-5H performs well to reduce vibration at cruise speed (about 50%) but fails to achieve a substantial vibration reduction (about 20%) at high speed forward flight because dynamic stall and flow separation require a larger stroke for vibration reduction. {\\mathrm {PZN\\mbox {-}8%PT}}\\langle 111\\rangle -induced shear actuation is found to generate a larger stroke and eventually a higher vibration reduction (about 60-70%) at both cruise and high speed flight. It is observed that the controller performs satisfactorily up to a noise level of 20% in the sensed data. Optimum placement of actuators along the span, as well as the eventualities of actuator failure and degradation are also addressed.

  9. Detection of explosive events by monitoring acoustically-induced geomagnetic perturbations

    Lewis, J P; Rock, D R; Shaeffer, D L; Warshaw, S I

    1999-10-07

    The Black Thunder Coal Mine (BTCM) near Gillette, Wyoming was used as a test bed to determine the feasibility of detecting explosion-induced geomagnetic disturbances with ground-based induction magnetometers. Two magnetic observatories were fielded at distances of 50 km and 64 km geomagnetically north from the northernmost edge of BTCM. Each observatory consisted of three separate but mutually orthogonal magnetometers, Global Positioning System (GPS) timing, battery and solar power, a data acquisition and storage system, and a three-axis seismometer. Explosions with yields of 1 to 3 kT of TNT equivalent occur approximately every three weeks at BTCM. We hypothesize that explosion-induced acoustic waves propagate upward and interact collisionally with the ionosphere to produce ionospheric electron density (and concomitant current density) perturbations which act as sources for geomagnetic disturbances. These disturbances propagate through an ionospheric Alfven waveguide that we postulate to be leaky (due to the imperfectly conducting lower ionospheric boundary). Consequently, wave energy may be observed on the ground. We observed transient pulses, known as Q-bursts, with pulse widths about 0.5 s and with spectral energy dominated by the Schumann resonances. These resonances appear to be excited in the earth-ionosphere cavity by Alfven solitons that may have been generated by the explosion-induced acoustic waves reaching the ionospheric E and F regions and that subsequently propagate down through the ionosphere to the atmosphere. In addition, we observe late time (> 800 s) ultra low frequency (ULF) geomagnetic perturbations that appear to originate in the upper F region ({approximately}300 km) and appear to be caused by the explosion-induced acoustic wave interacting with that part of the ionosphere. We suggest that explosion-induced Q-bursts may be discriminated from naturally occurring Q-bursts by association of the former with the late time explosion-induced ULF

  10. Soft Computing Approach to Evaluate and Predict Blast-Induced Ground Vibration

    Khandelwal, Manoj

    2010-05-01

    Drilling and blasting is still one of the major economical operations to excavate a rock mass. The consumption of explosive has been increased many folds in recent years. These explosives are mainly used for the exploitation of minerals in mining industry or the removal of undesirable rockmass for community development. The amount of chemical energy converted into mechanical energy to fragment and displace the rockmass is minimal. Only 20 to 30% of this explosive energy is utilized for the actual fragmentation and displacement of rockmass and rest of the energy is wasted in undesirable ill effects, like, ground vibration, air over pressure, fly rock, back break, noise, etc. Ground vibration induced due to blasting is very crucial and critical as compared to other ill effects due to involvement of public residing in the close vicinity of mining sites, regulating and ground vibration standards setting agencies together with mine owners and environmentalists and ecologists. Also, with the emphasis shifting towards eco-friendly, sustainable and geo-environmental activities, the field of ground vibration have now become an important and imperative parameter for safe and smooth running of any mining and civil project. The ground vibration is a wave motion, spreading outward from the blast like ripples spreading outwards due to impact of a stone dropped into a pond of water. As the vibration passes through the surface structures, it induces vibrations in those structures also. Sometimes, due to high ground vibration level, dwellings may get damaged and there is always confrontation between mine management and the people residing in the surroundings of the mine area. There is number of vibration predictors available suggested by different researchers. All the predictors estimate the PPV based on mainly two parameters (maximum charge used per delay and distance between blast face to monitoring point). However, few predictors considered attenuation/damping factor too. For

  11. Wire-bond failures induced by resonant vibrations in the CDF silicon detector

    Unrecoverable internal failures of modules in the CDF Run2 Silicon detector have been observed since its installation in early 2001. A fraction of these failures has been categorized as infant mortality. Other failures occurring later were strongly correlated with fixed trigger conditions. These failures are explained by wire-bonds breaking due to fatigue stress induced by resonant vibration. These resonant vibrations are a direct consequence of the oscillating Lorentz forces induced by the 1.4 T magnetic field on wire-bonds carrying non-DC current. Changes have been implemented in data-taking procedures in order to minimize the occurrences of such failures and to prolong the lifetime of the detector itself. A more general analysis of the topic has been pursued. Changes in the packaging and assembly processes for future applications have been investigated

  12. Inelastic analysis and design of reinforced concrete structures submitted to induced vibrations of extreme events

    It is shown, that even with low plastification ratios a high reduction of strengthening measures is possible. This is verified by calculating elasto-plastic floor response design spectra for different plastification ratios on the basis of typical time histories due to induced vibrations of extreme events like aircraft or missile impact, explosion forces or pipe ruptures. The following will be recommended for the design of reinforced concrete structures and ductile equipment against the induced vibrations of short-time impact:-to make a simplified analysis with the peak accelerations of the floor time histories, without considering floor response spectra, - to calculate the elasto-plastic response only in those cases, where the additional strenghtening measures resulting from the above mentioned method are uneconomic. (Author)

  13. Hybrid predictions of railway induced ground vibration using a combination of experimental measurements and numerical modelling

    Kuo, K. A.; Verbraken, H.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2016-07-01

    Along with the rapid expansion of urban rail networks comes the need for accurate predictions of railway induced vibration levels at grade and in buildings. Current computational methods for making predictions of railway induced ground vibration rely on simplifying modelling assumptions and require detailed parameter inputs, which lead to high levels of uncertainty. It is possible to mitigate against these issues using a combination of field measurements and state-of-the-art numerical methods, known as a hybrid model. In this paper, two hybrid models are developed, based on the use of separate source and propagation terms that are quantified using in situ measurements or modelling results. These models are implemented using term definitions proposed by the Federal Railroad Administration and assessed using the specific illustration of a surface railway. It is shown that the limitations of numerical and empirical methods can be addressed in a hybrid procedure without compromising prediction accuracy.

  14. The Tibetan singing bowl : an acoustics and fluid dynamics investigation

    Terwagne, Denis

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the acoustics and fluid dynamics of Tibetan singing bowls. Their acoustic behavior is rationalized in terms of the related dynamics of standing bells and wine glasses. Striking or rubbing a fluid-filled bowl excites wall vibrations, and concomitant waves at the fluid surface. Acoustic excitation of the bowl's natural vibrational modes allows for a controlled study in which the evolution of the surface waves with increasing forcing amplitude is detailed. Particular attention is given to rationalizing the observed criteria for the onset of edge-induced Faraday waves and droplet generation via surface fracture. Our study indicates that drops may be levitated on the fluid surface, induced to bounce on or skip across the vibrating fluid surface.

  15. Non-linear system identification in flow-induced vibration

    Spanos, P.D.; Zeldin, B.A. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Lu, R. [Hudson Engineering Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The paper introduces a method of identification of non-linear systems encountered in marine engineering applications. The non-linearity is accounted for by a combination of linear subsystems and known zero-memory non-linear transformations; an equivalent linear multi-input-single-output (MISO) system is developed for the identification problem. The unknown transfer functions of the MISO system are identified by assembling a system of linear equations in the frequency domain. This system is solved by performing the Cholesky decomposition of a related matrix. It is shown that the proposed identification method can be interpreted as a {open_quotes}Gram-Schmidt{close_quotes} type of orthogonal decomposition of the input-output quantities of the equivalent MISO system. A numerical example involving the identification of unknown parameters of flow (ocean wave) induced forces on offshore structures elucidates the applicability of the proposed method.

  16. Natural and laser-induced cavitation in corn stems: On the mechanisms of acoustic emissions

    Gabriel Mario Bilmes

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Water in plant xylem is often superheated, and therefore in a meta-stable state. Under certain conditions, it may suddenly turn from the liquid to the vapor state. This cavitation process produces acoustic emissions. We report the measurement of ultrasonic acoustic emissions (UAE produced by natural and induced cavitation in corn stems. We induced cavitation and UAE in vivo, in well controlled and reproducible experiments, by irradiating the bare stem of the plants with a continuous-wave laser beam. By tracing the source of UAE, we were able to detect absorption and frequency filtering of the UAE propagating through the stem. This technique allows the unique possibility of studying localized embolism of plant conduits, and thus to test hypotheses on the hydraulic architecture of plants. Based on our results, we postulate that the source of UAE is a transient "cavity oscillation"' triggered by the disruptive effect of cavitation inception.

  17. Natural and laser-induced cavitation in corn stems: On the mechanisms of acoustic emissions

    Fernández, E; Bilmes, G M; 10.4279/PIP.040003

    2012-01-01

    Water in plant xylem is often superheated, and therefore in a meta-stable state. Under certain conditions, it may suddenly turn from the liquid to the vapor state. This cavitation process produces acoustic emissions. We report the measurement of ultrasonic acoustic emissions (UAE) produced by natural and induced cavitation in corn stems. We induced cavitation and UAE in vivo, in well controlled and reproducible experiments, by irradiating the bare stem of the plants with a continuous-wave laser beam. By tracing the source of UAE, we were able to detect absorption and frequency filtering of the UAE propagating through the stem. This technique allows the unique possibility of studying localized embolism of plant conduits, and thus to test hypotheses on the hydraulic architecture of plants. Based on our results, we postulate that the source of UAE is a transient "cavity oscillation" triggered by the disruptive effect of cavitation inception.

  18. Acoustical “transparency” induced by local resonance in Bragg bandgaps

    We show that sound waves can resonantly transmit through Bragg bandgaps in an acoustical duct periodically attached with an array of Helmholtz resonators, forming within the normally forbidden band a transparency window with group velocity smaller than the normal speed of sound. The transparency occurs for the locally resonant frequency so much close to the Bragg one that both the local-resonance-induced bandgap and the Bragg one heavily overlap with each other. The phenomenon seems an acoustical analog of the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency by quantum interference. Different from the Fano-like interference explanation, we also provide a mechanism for the transparency window phenomenon which makes it possible to extend the phenomenon in general

  19. Acoustical “transparency” induced by local resonance in Bragg bandgaps

    Yu, Gaokun; Wang, Xinlong, E-mail: xlwang@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics and Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-01-28

    We show that sound waves can resonantly transmit through Bragg bandgaps in an acoustical duct periodically attached with an array of Helmholtz resonators, forming within the normally forbidden band a transparency window with group velocity smaller than the normal speed of sound. The transparency occurs for the locally resonant frequency so much close to the Bragg one that both the local-resonance-induced bandgap and the Bragg one heavily overlap with each other. The phenomenon seems an acoustical analog of the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency by quantum interference. Different from the Fano-like interference explanation, we also provide a mechanism for the transparency window phenomenon which makes it possible to extend the phenomenon in general.

  20. The experimental validation of a numerical model for the prediction of railway induced vibrations

    Lombaert, Geert; Degrande, Geert; Kogut, J.; François, Stijn

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental validation of a numerical model for the prediction of train induced vibrations. The model fully accounts for the dynamic interaction between the train, the track and the soil. The track geometry is assumed to be invariant with respect to the longitudinal direction, which allows for an efficient solution of the dynamic track-soil interaction problem in the frequency-wavenumber domain. The model is validated by means of several experiments that have been per...

  1. CFD simulation of flow-induced vibration of an elastically supported airfoil

    Šidlof Petr

    2016-01-01

    Flow-induced vibration of lifting or control surfaces in aircraft may lead to catastrophic consequences. Under certain circumstances, the interaction between the airflow and the elastic structure may lead to instability with energy transferred from the airflow to the structure and with exponentially increasing amplitudes of the structure. In the current work, a CFD simulation of an elastically supported NACA0015 airfoil with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge) coupled with 2D incompress...

  2. On vortex shedding and prediction of vortex-induced vibrations of circular cylinders

    Halse, Karl Henning

    1997-12-31

    In offshore installations, many crucial components can be classified as slender marine structures: risers, mooring lines, umbilicals and cables, pipelines. This thesis studies the vortex shedding phenomenon and the problem of predicting vortex-induced vibrations of such structures. As the development of hydrocarbons move to deeper waters, the importance of accurately predicting the vortex-induced response has increased and so the need for proper response prediction methods is large. This work presents an extensive review of existing research publications about vortex shedding from circular cylinders and the vortex-induced vibrations of cylinders and the different numerical approaches to modelling the fluid flow. The response predictions from different methods are found to disagree, both in response shapes and in vibration amplitudes. This work presents a prediction method that uses a fully three-dimensional structural finite element model integrated with a laminar two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solution modelling the fluid flow. This solution is used to study the flow both around a fixed cylinder and in a flexibly mounted one-degree-of-freedom system. It is found that the vortex-shedding process (in the low Reynolds number regime) is well described by the computer program, and that the vortex-induced vibration of the flexibly mounted section do reflect the typical dynamic characteristics of lock-in oscillations. However, the exact behaviour of the experimental results found in the literature was not reproduced. The response of the three-dimensional structural model is larger than the expected difference between a mode shape and a flexibly mounted section. This is due to the use of independent hydrodynamic sections along the cylinder. The predicted response is not unrealistic, and the method is considered a powerful tool. 221 refs., 138 figs., 36 tabs.

  3. Experimental study of hydrodynamically induced vibrational processes in VVER-440 fuel assemblies

    Investigations are described of hydrodynamically induced vibrations in a single fuel assembly of a VVER-440 reactor, performed on a full-scale model installed in a closed loop filled with distilled water; the model fuel elements contained simulators of fuel pellets. Data on hydrodynamic loads were obtained by measuring pressure oscillations along the height of the fuel assembly case. Results of the measurements are presented in graphs and are discussed in some detail. (A.K.)

  4. Development of acoustics and vibrational comfort on the New A6; Entwicklung von Akustik und Schwingungskomfort am neuen Audi A6

    Becker, K.; Bukovics, J.; Kosamke, D.; Ohlendorf, J.; Schrey, A.C.; Verweyen, K. [Audi AG, Ingolstadt (Germany)

    2004-03-01

    Positioning the new A6 as a sporty vehicle, which is, at the same time, a comfortable touring limousine, places special demands on the acoustic design and vibrational comfort. Because the characteristics of a vehicle are the result of the interactions of its subassemblies, in the concept phase, the characteristics of the complete vehicle were broken down to the individual modules. Examples of this are the radiation of sound from the engine, airborne noise from the inlet and exhaust systems, and the insulation of the body against airborne noise. (orig.) [German] Die sportliche Positionierung des neuen A6, der zugleich eine komfortable Reiselimousine bleiben sollte, stellte spezielle Anforderungen an die Auslegung von Akustik und Schwingungskomfort. Da ein Fahrzeug seine Eigenschaften durch das Zusammenspiel seiner Baugruppen erhaelt, wurden die Charakteristiken des Gesamtfahrzeugs in der Konzeptphase auf die einzelnen Module heruntergebrochen. Beispiele sind hier die Schallabstrahlung des Motors, der Muendungsschall von Ansaug- und Abgasanlage und die Luftschalldaemmung der Karosserie. (orig.)

  5. Acoustic superradiance from an optical-superradiance-induced vortex in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür; Ghazanfari, Nader

    2014-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A 89, 043619 (2014) Acoustic superradiance from an optical-superradiance-induced vortex in a Bose-Einstein condensate Nader Ghazanfari* Department of Physics, Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University, Bomonti 34380, Istanbul, Turkey O¨ zgu¨r Esat Mu¨stecaplıog˘lu Department of Physics, Koc¸ University, 34450 Sariyer, Istanbul, Turkey (Received 13 January 2014; revised manuscript received 10 March 2014; published 24 April 2014) We consider the scattering of an a...

  6. Thermally-induced bending-torsion coupling vibration of large scale space structures

    Xue, Ming-De; Duan, Jin; Xiang, Zhi-Hai

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, a finite element scheme is developed to solve the problem of thermally-induced bending-torsion coupling vibration of large scale space structures, which are usually composed of thin-walled beams with open and closed cross-section. A two-noded finite element is proposed to analyze the transient temperature field over the longitudinal and circumferential direction of a beam. Since this temperature element can share the same mesh with the two-noded beam element of Euler-Bernoulli type, a unified finite element scheme is easily formulated to solve the thermal-structural coupling problem. This scheme is characterized with very strong nonlinear formulation, due to the consideration of the thermal radiation and the coupling effect between structural deformations and the incident normal heat flux. Moreover, because the warping is taken into account, not only the thermal axial force and thermal bending moments but also the thermal bi-moment are presented in the formulation. Consequently, the thermally-induced bending-torsion coupling vibration can be simulated. The performance of the proposed computational scheme is illustrated by the analysis of the well-known failure of Hubble space telescope solar arrays. The results reveal that the thermally-induced bending-torsion coupling vibration is obviously presented in that case and could be regarded as a cause of failure.

  7. Mitigation of Railway Traffic Induced Vibrations: The Influence of Barriers in Elastic Half-Space

    Michele Buonsanti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of vibrations induced by trains and their propagation through the soil is studied. Particular attention is focused on the vibration induced by trains in motion and on the effects of such vibrations on the foundations of buildings in proximity of the tracks. The interaction between propagating waves induced by trains in motion and buildings foundations is a problem which does not admit a straightforward analytical solution; thus a solution is given by the use of a model based on the finite elements method. Firstly, we analyze the theoretical aspects of the problem by considering constant or harmonic loads moving along a straight railway track; then, we define a transfer function soil-railway and the response function of the entire system. The study aims to address the wave propagation in an elastic semi-space and the presence in the ground of a discontinuity element, such as a barrier of a given depth is considered. The efficiency variation of barriers is analyzed in function of the different materials used, and different numerical simulations are analyzed in order to study how the wave propagation and the track-soil interaction are influenced by the membrane, seen as damping barrier.

  8. Acoustic trauma-induced auditory cortex enhancement and tinnitus

    Erin Laundrie; Wei Sun

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence suggests that noise-induced cochlear damage may lead to hyperexcitability in the central auditory system (CAS) which may give rise to tinnitus. However, the correlation between the onset of the neurophysiological changes in the CAS and the onset of tinnitus has not been well studied. To investigate this relationship, chronic electrodes were implanted into the auditory cortex (AC) and sound evoked activities were measured from awake rats before and after noise exposure. The auditory brainstem response (ABR) was used to assess the degree of noise-induced hearing loss. Tinnitus was evaluated by measuring gap-induced prepulse inhibition (gap-PPI). Rats were exposed monaurally to a high-intensity narrowband noise centered at 12 kHz at a level of 120 dB SPL for 1 h. After the noise exposure, all the rats developed either permanent (>2 weeks) or temporary (<3 days) hearing loss in the exposed ear(s). The AC amplitudes increased significantly 4 h after the noise exposure. Most of the exposed rats also showed decreased gap-PPI. The post-exposure AC enhancement showed a positive correlation with the amount of hearing loss. The onset of tinnitus-like behavior was happened after the onset of AC enhancement.

  9. Long-term daily vibration exposure alters current perception threshold (CPT) sensitivity and myelinated axons in a rat-tail model of vibration-induced injury.

    Krajnak, Kristine; Raju, Sandya G; Miller, G Roger; Johnson, Claud; Waugh, Stacey; Kashon, Michael L; Riley, Danny A

    2016-01-01

    Repeated exposure to hand-transmitted vibration through the use of powered hand tools may result in pain and progressive reductions in tactile sensitivity. The goal of the present study was to use an established animal model of vibration-induced injury to characterize changes in sensory nerve function and cellular mechanisms associated with these alterations. Sensory nerve function was assessed weekly using the current perception threshold test and tail-flick analgesia test in male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 28 d of tail vibration. After 28 d of exposure, Aβ fiber sensitivity was reduced. This reduction in sensitivity was partly attributed to structural disruption of myelin. In addition, the decrease in sensitivity was also associated with a reduction in myelin basic protein and 2',3'- cyclic nucleotide phosphodiasterase (CNPase) staining in tail nerves, and an increase in circulating calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) concentrations. Changes in Aβ fiber sensitivity and CGRP concentrations may serve as early markers of vibration-induced injury in peripheral nerves. It is conceivable that these markers may be utilized to monitor sensorineural alterations in workers exposed to vibration to potentially prevent additional injury. PMID:26852665

  10. Quantitative shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) with acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) induced by phase array transducer

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Shear Wave Optical Coherence Elastography (SW-OCE) uses the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative measurement of localized shear modulus, making it a valuable technique for the elasticity characterization of tissues such as skin and ocular tissue. One of the main challenges in shear wave elastography is to induce a reliable source of shear wave; most of nowadays techniques use external vibrators which have several drawbacks such as limited wave propagation range and/or difficulties in non-invasive scans requiring precisions, accuracy. Thus, we propose linear phase array ultrasound transducer as a remote wave source, combined with the high-speed, 47,000-frame-per-second Shear-wave visualization provided by phase-sensitive OCT. In this study, we observed for the first time shear waves induced by a 128 element linear array ultrasound imaging transducer, while the ultrasound and OCT images (within the OCE detection range) were triggered simultaneously. Acoustic radiation force impulses are induced by emitting 10 MHz tone-bursts of sub-millisecond durations (between 50 μm - 100 μm). Ultrasound beam steering is achieved by programming appropriate phase delay, covering a lateral range of 10 mm and full OCT axial (depth) range in the imaging sample. Tissue-mimicking phantoms with agarose concentration of 0.5% and 1% was used in the SW-OCE measurements as the only imaging samples. The results show extensive improvements over the range of SW-OCE elasticity map; such improvements can also be seen over shear wave velocities in softer and stiffer phantoms, as well as determining the boundary of multiple inclusions with different stiffness. This approach opens up the feasibility to combine medical ultrasound imaging and SW-OCE for high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  11. Videokymographic and acoustic analysis of vibration of silicone lips for use in tracheo-esophageal shunt valves

    Šidlof, Petr; Veselý, Jan; Švec, J. G.; Šram, F.; Horáček, Jaromír

    Groningen: University Medical Center Groningen, 2005. s. 37-37. [International Congress on Surgical and Prosthetic Rehabilitation after Larygectomy /10./. 17.04.2005-20.04.2005, Gröningen] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : voice prosthese * laryngectomy * phoniatrics Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  12. Air-pressure, vocal fold vibration and acoustic characteristics of phonation during vocal exercising. - Part 1: Measurement in vivo

    Radolf, Vojtěch; Laukkanen, A. M.; Horáček, Jaromír; Liu, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2014), s. 53-59. ISSN 1802-1484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP101/12/P579 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : biomechanics of voice * subglottal * oral and transglottal pressure * electroglottography * phonation into tubes Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  13. Vortex-induced vibrations of pipes conveying fluid in the subcritical and supercritical regimes

    Dai, H. L.; Wang, L.; Qian, Q.; Ni, Q.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the vortex-induced vibrations of a hinged-hinged pipe conveying fluid are examined, by considering the internal fluid velocities ranging from the subcritical to the supercritical regions. The nonlinear coupled equations of motion are discretized by employing a four-mode Galerkin method. Based on numerical simulations, diagrams of the displacement amplitude versus the external fluid reduced velocity are constructed for pipes transporting subcritical and supercritical fluid flows. It is shown that when the internal fluid velocity is in the subcritical region, the pipe is always vibrating periodically around the pre-buckling configuration and that with increasing external fluid reduced velocity the peak amplitude of the pipe increases first and then decreases, with jumping phenomenon between the upper and lower response branches. When the internal fluid velocity is in the supercritical region, however, the pipe displays various dynamical behaviors around the post-buckling configuration such as inverse period-doubling bifurcations, periodic and chaotic motions. Moreover, the bifurcation diagrams for vibration amplitude of the pipe with varying internal fluid velocities are constructed for each of the lowest four modes of the pipe in the lock-in conditions. The results show that there is a significant difference between the vibrations of the pipe around the pre-buckling configuration and those around the post-buckling configuration.

  14. Seal whisker-inspired circular cylinders reduce vortex-induced vibrations

    Beem, Heather; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Recent work shows that the undulatory, asymmetric geometry of harbor seal whiskers passively reduces vortex-induced vibration (VIV) amplitudes to less than 0.1 times the whisker diameter. This reduction holds in frontal flows, but due to the elliptical cross-section of the whisker, flows that approach from large angles of attack generate significant vibrational response. The present study investigates the possibility of extending the vibration reduction to unidirectional bodies, such that flows from all angles cause reduced VIV. A method for developing a new geometry that incorporates the ``whisker'' features into bodies with uniform, circular cross-section is presented. This geometry and multiple variations on it are fabricated into rigid models. Forces are measured on the models while they undergo imposed oscillations and are towed down a water tank. Contour plots of CL , v show peak VIV amplitudes to decrease as much as 28% from that of a standard cylinder. This result holds promise for applications where vibration reduction is desired, regardless of the angle of oncoming flow.

  15. Diagnosis and control of machine induced noise and vibration in steel construction

    Most high-rise buildings constructed of steel or steel reinforced concrete have to install various vital equipment. Among these equipment machinery noise is especially annoying for accommodation close to them. In attempting to control the machine-induced structure-borne noise and vibration, the methodology by employing mobility functions to identify the dominant frequency band of vibrational power flow transmission and to assess the isolation effectiveness of isolators is established. The proposed method of diagnosis procedure is applied to the structure-borne vibration power flow transmission for a steel construction parking tower. After proper check and replacement of the isolators of the power unit platform of the mechanical parking tower, the improvement results in a substantial structure-borne noise reduction of 16 dB(NC). The unique parts of the paper include the establishment of the relation of mobility functions with respect to four-pole parameters for a coupled machine/mount/foundation system. Also expressions to represent the vibrational input power, the output power and the transmitted power in relation to mobility functions are clarified

  16. Relation between vibrotactile perception thresholds and reductions in finger blood flow induced by vibration of the hand at frequencies in the range 8–250 Hz

    Ye, Ying; Griffin, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: this study investigated how the vasoconstriction induced by vibration depends on the frequency of vibration when the vibration magnitude is defined by individual thresholds for perceiving vibration [i.e. sensation levels (SL)]. Methods: fourteen healthy subjects attended the laboratory on seven occasions: for six vibration frequencies (8, 16, 31.5, 63, 125, or 250 Hz) and a static control condition. Finger blood flow (FBF) was measured in the middle fingers of both hands at 30-se...

  17. Predications and Observations of Global Beta-induced Alfven-acoustic Modes in JET and NSTX

    N.N. Gorelenkov, et. al.

    2008-10-21

    In this paper we report on observations and interpretations of a new class of global MHD eigenmode solutions arising in gaps in the low frequency Alfven-acoustic continuum below the geodesic acoustic mode frequency. These modes have been just reported (Gorelenkov et al 2007 Phys. Lett. 370 70-7) where preliminary comparisons indicate qualitative agreement between theory and experiment. Here we show a more quantitative comparison emphasizing recent NSTX experiments on the observations of the global eigenmodes, referred to as beta-induced Alfven-acoustic eigenmodes (BAAEs), which exist near the extrema of the Alfven-acoustic continuum. In accordance to the linear dispersion relations, the frequency of these modes may shift as the safety factor, q, profile relaxes. We show that BAAEs can be responsible for observations in JET plasmas at relatively low beta <2% as well as in NSTX plasmas at relatively high beta >20%. In NSTX plasma observed magnetic activity has the same properties as predicted by theory for the mode structure and the frequency. Found numerically in NOVA simulations BAAEs are used to explain the observed properties of relatively low frequency experimental signals seen in NSTX and JET tokamaks.

  18. Predictions and observations of global beta-induced Alfven-acoustic modes in JET and NSTX

    Gorelenkov, N N [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Berk, H L [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Crocker, N A [Institute of Plasma and Fusion Research, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1354 (United States); Fredrickson, E D [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Kaye, S [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Kubota, S [Institute of Plasma and Fusion Research, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1354 (United States); Park, H [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Peebles, W [Institute of Plasma and Fusion Research, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1354 (United States); Sabbagh, S A [Department of Applied Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Sharapov, S E [Euroatom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Stutmat, D [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Tritz, K [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Levinton, F M [Nova Photonics, One Oak Place, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Yuh, H [Nova Photonics, One Oak Place, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    In this paper we report on observations and interpretations of a new class of global MHD eigenmode solutions arising in gaps in the low frequency Alfven-acoustic continuum below the geodesic acoustic mode frequency. These modes have been just reported (Gorelenkov et al 2007 Phys. Lett. 370 70-7) where preliminary comparisons indicate qualitative agreement between theory and experiment. Here we show a more quantitative comparison emphasizing recent NSTX experiments on the observations of the global eigenmodes, referred to as beta-induced Alfven-acoustic eigenmodes (BAAEs), which exist near the extrema of the Alfven-acoustic continuum. In accordance to the linear dispersion relations, the frequency of these modes may shift as the safety factor, q, profile relaxes. We show that BAAEs can be responsible for observations in JET plasmas at relatively low beta <2% as well as in NSTX plasmas at relatively high beta >20%. In NSTX plasma observed magnetic activity has the same properties as predicted by theory for the mode structure and the frequency. Found numerically in NOVA simulations BAAEs are used to explain the observed properties of relatively low frequency experimental signals seen in NSTX and JET tokamaks.

  19. Envelope Solitons in Acoustically Dispersive Vitreous Silica

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic radiation-induced static strains, displacements, and stresses are manifested as rectified or dc waveforms linked to the energy density of an acoustic wave or vibrational mode via the mode nonlinearity parameter of the material. An analytical model is developed for acoustically dispersive media that predicts the evolution of the energy density of an initial waveform into a series of energy solitons that generates a corresponding series of radiation-induced static strains (envelope solitons). The evolutionary characteristics of the envelope solitons are confirmed experimentally in Suprasil W1 vitreous silica. The value (-11.9 plus or minus 1.43) for the nonlinearity parameter, determined from displacement measurements of the envelope solitons via a capacitive transducer, is in good agreement with the value (-11.6 plus or minus 1.16) obtained independently from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. The agreement provides strong, quantitative evidence for the validity of the model.

  20. Advanced non-linear flow-induced vibration and fretting-wear analysis capabilities

    Fretting wear is a potentially significant degradation mechanism in nuclear steam generators and other shell and tube heat transfer equipment as well. This paper presents an overview of the recently developed code FIVDYNA which is used for the non-linear flow-induced vibration and fretting wear analysis for operating steam generators (OTSG and RSG) and shell-and-tube heat exchangers. FIVDYNA is a non-linear time-history Flow-Induced Vibration (FIV) analysis computer program that has been developed by Babcock and Wilcox Canada to advance the understanding of tube vibration and tube to tube-support interaction. In addition to the dynamic fluid induced forces the program takes into account other tube static forces due to axial and lateral tube preload and thermal interaction loads. The program is capable of predicting the location where the fretting wear is most likely to occur and its magnitude taking into account the support geometry including gaps. FIVDYNA uses the general purpose finite element computer code ABAQUS as its solver. Using ABAQUS gives the user the flexibility to add additional forces to the tube ranging from tube preloads and the support offsets to thermal loads. The forces currently being modeled in FIVDYNA are the random turbulence, steady drag force, fluid-elastic forces, support offset and pre-strain force (axial loads). This program models the vibration of tubes and calculates the structural dynamic characteristics, and interaction forces between the tube and the tube supports. These interaction forces are then used to calculate the work rate at the support and eventually the predicted depth of wear scar on the tube. A very good agreement is found with experiments and also other computer codes. (author)

  1. A Patch Density Recommendation based on Convergence Studies for Vehicle Panel Vibration Response resulting from Excitation by a Diffuse Acoustic Field

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Jones, Douglas; Towner, Robert; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Producing fluid structural interaction estimates of panel vibration from an applied pressure field excitation are quite dependent on the spatial correlation of the pressure field. There is a danger of either over estimating a low frequency response or under predicting broad band panel response in the more modally dense bands if the pressure field spatial correlation is not accounted for adequately. It is a useful practice to simulate the spatial correlation of the applied pressure field over a 2d surface using a matrix of small patch area regions on a finite element model (FEM). Use of a fitted function for the spatial correlation between patch centers can result in an error if the choice of patch density is not fine enough to represent the more continuous spatial correlation function throughout the intended frequency range of interest. Several patch density assumptions to approximate the fitted spatial correlation function are first evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative illustrations. The actual response of a typical vehicle panel system FEM is then examined in a convergence study where the patch density assumptions are varied over the same model. The convergence study results illustrate the impacts possible from a poor choice of patch density on the analytical response estimate. The fitted correlation function used in this study represents a diffuse acoustic field (DAF) excitation of the panel to produce vibration response.

  2. Highly asymmetric interaction forces induced by acoustic waves in coupled plate structures

    Fan, Xiying; Zhang, Shenwei; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-01-01

    Mutual forces can be induced between coupled structures when illuminated by external acoustic waves. In this Letter, we propose a concept of asymmetric interaction between two coupled plate-like structures, which is generated by oppositely incident plane waves. Besides the striking contrast in magnitude, the mutual force induced by one of the incidences can be tuned extremely strong due to the resonant excitation of the flexural plate modes. The highly asymmetric interaction with enhanced strength in single side should be potentially useful, such as in designing ultrasound instruments and sensors.

  3. Coherent Magnetization Precession in Ferromagnetic (Ga,Mn) As Induced by Picosecond Acoustic Pulses

    Scherbakov, A. V.; Salasyuk, A. S.; Akimov, A. V.; Liu, X.; Bombeck, M.; Brüggemann, C.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Sapega, V. F.; J. K. Furdyna; Bayer, M.

    2010-01-01

    We show that the magnetization of a thin ferromagnetic (Ga,Mn)As layer can be modulated by picosecond acoustic pulses. In this approach a picosecond strain pulse injected into the structure induces a tilt of the magnetization vector M, followed by the precession of M around its equilibrium orientation. This effect can be understood in terms of changes in magneto-crystalline anisotropy induced by the pulse. A model where only one anisotropy constant is affected by the strain pulse provides a g...

  4. Analysis of blade vibration response induced by rotating stall in axial compressor

    2012-01-01

    An experimental and numerical study was conducted to investigate the forced response of blade vibration induced by rotating stall in a low speed axial compressor.Measurements have been made of the transient stalling process in a low speed axial compressor stage.The CFD study was performed using solution of 3-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations,coupled with structure finite element models for the blades to identify modal shapes and structural deformations simultaneously.Interactions between fluid and structure were managed in a coupled manner,based on the interface information exchange until convergence in each time step.Based on the rotating stall measurement data obtained from a low speed axial compressor,the blade aeroelastic response induced by the rotating stall flow field was analyzed to study the vibration characteristics and the correlation between the phenomena.With this approach,good agreement between the numerical results and the experimental data was observed.The flow phenomena were well captured,and the results indicate that the rotating field stall plays a significant role in the blade vibration and stress affected by the flow excitation.

  5. Experimental Study on Vortex-Induced Vibrations of Submarine Pipeline near Seabed Boundary in Ocean Currents

    2006-01-01

    Unlike most previous studies on vortex-induced vibrations of a cylinder far from a boundary, this paper focuses on the influences of close proximity of a submarine pipeline to a rigid seabed boundary upon the dynamic responses of the pipeline in ocean currents. The effects of gap-to-diameter ratio and those of the stability parameter on the amplitude and frequency responses of a pipeline are investigated experimentally with a novel hydro-elastic facility. A comparison is made between the present experimental results of the amplitude and frequency responses for the pipes with seabed boundary effects and those for wall-free cylinders given by Govardhan and Williamson (2000) and Anand (1985). The comparison shows that the close proximity of a pipeline to seabed has much influence on the vortex-induced vibrations of the pipeline. Both the width of the lock-in ranges in terms of Vr and the dimensionless amplitude ratio Amax/D become larger with the decrease of the gap-to-diameter ratio e/D. Moreover, the vibration of the pipeline becomes easier to occur and its amplitude response becomes more intensive with the decrease of the stability parameter, while the pipeline frequency responses are affected slightly by the stability parameter.

  6. Analytical Model of Underground Train Induced Vibrations on Nearby Building Structures in Cameroon: Assessment and Prediction

    Lezin Seba MINSILI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research paper was to assess and predict the effect of vibrations induced by an underground railway on nearby-existing buildings prior to the construction of projected new railway lines of the National Railway Master Plan of Cameroon and after upgrading of the railway conceded to CAMRAIL linking the two most densely populated cities of Cameroon: Douala and Yaoundé. With the source-transmitter-receiver mathematical model as the train-soil-structure interaction model, taking into account sub-model parameters such as type of the train-railway system, typical geotechnical conditions of the ground and the sensitivity of the nearby buildings, the analysis is carried out over the entire system using the dynamic finite element method in the time domain. This subdivision of the model is a powerful tool that allows to consider different alternatives of sub-models with different characteristics, and thus to determine any critical excessive vibration impact. Based on semi-empirical analytical results obtained from presented models, the present work assesses and predicts characteristics of traffic-induced vibrations as a function of time duration, intensity and vehicle speed, as well as their influence on buildings at different levels.

  7. Effect of Induced Vibration on the Blood Flow Properties in a Mechanical Aortic Valve

    Kadhim Saleem Khalefa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of induced vibration on velocity distribution for the blood flow in the bileaflet mechanical heart valves conveying blood was investigated in this study. The bileaflet valve was simulated as an orifice. The induced vibration is due to the pulsed blood flow in the artery. Results presented in this study were performed using CFD FLUENT software. This analysis is based on the non-linear numerical solution by using a finite-element method, for the system of governing partial differential equations (continuity, momentum of Navier - Stokes equation of blood flow through the orifice. It has been found that as the flow through the orifice increased, the vibration at the orifice inlet increased. For steady state conditions, at Reynolds number 50 the recorded frequency was 20Hz. When the Reynolds number increased to 100 due to the increase in the blood flow the recorded frequency increased to 30Hz. The increase in frequency may result in damaging the blood red cells and platelets which subsequently results in increasing the blood clogging downstream of the orifice.

  8. Application of Piezoelectric Materials in a Novel Linear Ultrasonic Motor based on Shear-induced Vibration Mode

    CHEN Chao; SHI Yunlai; CHEN Haipeng; ZHAO Chunsheng

    2014-01-01

    A novel linear ultrasonic motor based on d15 effect of piezoelectric materials was presented. The design idea aimed at the direct utilization of the shear-induced vibration modes of piezoelectric material. Firstly, the inherent electromechanical coupling mechanism of piezoelectric material was investigated, and shear vibration modes of a piezoelectric shear block was specially designed. A driving point’s elliptical trajectory induced by shear vibration modes was discussed. Then a dynamic model for the piezoelectric shear stator was established with finite element (FE) method to conduct the parametric optimal design. Finally, a prototype based on d15 converse piezoelectric effect is manufactured, and the modal experiment of piezoelectric stator was conducted with laser doppler vibrometer. The experimental results show that the calculated shear-induced vibration modes can be excited completely, and the new linear ultrasonic motor reaches a speed 118 mm/s at no-load, and maximal thrust 12.8 N.

  9. Experimental investigation of vibration, pressure and acoustic characteristics of normal and soft phonations on a physical model

    Horáček, Jaromír; Radolf, Vojtěch; Bula, Vítězslav; Veselý, Jan; Laukkanen, A. M.

    Prague : Medical Healthcom, 2013 - (Domagalský, T.). s. 133-134 ISBN 978-80-260-4832-9. [PEVOC - Pan Europian Voice Conference /10./. 21.08.2013-24.08.2013, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/12/1306 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : biomechanics of voice * aeroelastic flow and pressure characteristics * vocal folds replica Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  10. Experiments on Interaction Between Current-Induced Vibration and Scour of Submarine Pipelines on Sandy Bottom

    SHEN Zhonghan; LIU Yubiao; LI Qingping; HUANG Qinghua; ZHU Farong

    2000-01-01

    In order to understand the dynamic behavior of submarine pipelines exposed to current and the mechanism of the interaction between current-induced vibration and scour of pipelines on a sandy bottom, an experimental investigation is conducted with a small scale model. A test model which can be testedin the flume is set up by taking into account the typical working conditions of the pipelines and by applying the similarity theory. The interactions between the shape of the scour hole and the behavior of the pipeline as well as the flow patterns of the current are detailed, and the interaction mechanism outlined.The effect of vibration of the pipeline on the development of dynamic scour at different stages is found out. The proposed experimental method and test results provide an effective means for design of marine pipelines against scouring.

  11. Modeling and control of flow-induced vibrations of a flexible hydrofoil in viscous flow

    Caverly, Ryan James; Li, Chenyang; Chae, Eun Jung; Forbes, James Richard; Young, Yin Lu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a reduced-order model (ROM) of the flow-induced vibrations of a flexible cantilevered hydrofoil is developed and used to design an active feedback controller. The ROM is developed using data from high-fidelity viscous fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations and includes nonlinear terms to accurately capture the effect of lock-in. An active linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller is designed based on a linearization of the ROM and is implemented in simulation with the ROM and the high-fidelity viscous FSI model. A controller saturation method is also presented that ensures that the control force applied to the system remains within a prescribed range. Simulation results demonstrate that the LQG controller successfully suppresses vibrations in both the ROM and viscous FSI simulations using a reasonable amount of control force.

  12. Experiments on flow induced vibrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle

    Most structure and equipment used in nuclear power plant and process plant, such as reactor internals, fuel rod bundles, steam generator tubes and heat exchanger tubes are sub-merged in the fluid. These structures are subjected to flow-induced vibration. An experimental study has been carried out for Reynolds number (7.15 x 103 3) and reduced velocities (1 r < 19) on a research heat exchanger tube bundle to simulate the real conditions. Effect of thermal loading has also been considered. Experimental natural frequencies have been compared to existing literature. Effect of flow rate and pressure on tube drag, lift and axial forces has been analyzed. It has been shown that temperature increase results favorably with respect to stability against vibration as indicated by decrease in volumetric fretting wear loss at loose supports which is due to increase in damping with temperature (thermal damping). (authors)

  13. Vibrational wave packet induced oscillations in two-dimensional electronic spectra. I. Experiments

    Nemeth, Alexandra; Mancal, Tomas; Lukes, Vladimir; Hauer, Juergen; Kauffmann, Harald F; Sperling, Jaroslaw

    2010-01-01

    This is the first in a series of two papers investigating the effect of electron-phonon coupling in two-dimensional Fourier transformed electronic spectroscopy. We present a series of one- and two-dimensional nonlinear spectroscopic techniques for studying a dye molecule in solution. Ultrafast laser pulse excitation of an electronic transition coupled to vibrational modes induces a propagating vibrational wave packet that manifests itself in oscillating signal intensities and line-shapes. For the two-dimensional electronic spectra we can attribute the observed modulations to periodic enhancement and decrement of the relative amplitudes of rephasing and non-rephasing contributions to the total response. Different metrics of the two-dimensional signals are shown to relate to the frequency-frequency correlation function which provides the connection between experimentally accessible observations and the underlying microscopic molecular dynamics. A detailed theory of the time-dependent two-dimensional spectral li...

  14. Analysis of wind-induced vibrations in high-rise buildings

    Persson, Peter; Austrell, Per-Erik; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning;

    2016-01-01

    Buildings are getting taller due to increased urbanisation and densification of cities. More advanced construction methods and the desire to construct impressive buildings is also supporting the trend. Due to their inherent slenderness resulting in low eigenfrequencies, these buildings are...... susceptible to wind-induced vibrations which can be highly disturbing for occupants. Already barely perceivable acceleration levels within the low-frequency range relevant to whole-body vibrations can cause nausea and discomfort, while high acceleration levels can cause alarm and fea r amongst the occupants....... The paper summarises acceptable acceleration levels in high -rise buildings (here referred to as buildings over 200 m in height) stated in different building codes and previous work on the subject. Accelerations of a high-rise building subjected to wind-loads are evaluated using a full numerical model...

  15. Vibro-acoustics

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume book gives a thorough and comprehensive presentation of vibration and acoustic theories. Different from traditional textbooks which typically deal with some aspects of either acoustic or vibration problems, it is unique of this book to combine those two correlated subjects together. Moreover, it provides fundamental analysis and mathematical descriptions for several crucial phenomena of Vibro-Acoustics which are quite useful in noise reduction, including how structures are excited, energy flows from an excitation point to a sound radiating surface, and finally how a structure radiates noise to a surrounding fluid. Many measurement results included in the text make the reading interesting and informative. Problems/questions are listed at the end of each chapter and the solutions are provided. This will help the readers to understand the topics of Vibro-Acoustics more deeply. The book should be of interest to anyone interested in sound and vibration, vehicle acoustics, ship acoustics and inter...

  16. Rapid phase change induced by double picosecond laser pulses and the dynamics of acoustic phonons

    For a given phase change material and composition, the double laser pulses better than a single pulse for the crystallization process. We investigated the crystallization process in Si15Sb85 thin films induced by double picosecond pulses with constant fluence and variable intervals. The crystallization degree is a function of the intervals of double pump laser pulses. The crystallization time decreased with the increasing of the intervals of the pump pulses. We believe that acoustic phonons play a key role in the crystallization process. - Highlights: • The double pulse crystallization is easier than the single pulse crystallization. • The crystallization is a function of the intervals of double pump laser pulses. • The crystallization time decreases with the increase of the pump pulse intervals. • Acoustic phonons play a key role in the crystallization process

  17. Fast reconstruction of a bounded ultrasonic beam using acoustically induced piezo-luminescence

    Kersemans, Mathias, E-mail: Mathias.Kersemans@UGent.be; Lammens, Nicolas; Degrieck, Joris; Van Paepegem, Wim [Mechanics of Materials and Structures MMS, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); Smet, Philippe F. [LumiLab, Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S1, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2015-12-07

    We report on the conversion of ultrasound into light by the process of piezo-luminescence in epoxy with embedded BaSi{sub 2}O{sub 2}N{sub 2}:Eu as active component. We exploit this acoustically induced piezo-luminescence to visualize several cross-sectional slices of the radiation field of an ultrasonic piston transducer (f = 3.3 MHz) in both the near-field and the far-field. Simply combining multiple slices then leads to a fast representation of the 3D spatial radiation field. We have confronted the luminescent results with both scanning hydrophone experiments and digital acoustic holography results, and obtained a good correlation between the different approaches.

  18. Temperature and Pressure Dependence of Signal Amplitudes for Electrostriction Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    The relative signal strength of electrostriction-only (no thermal grating) laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) in gas-phase air is reported as a function of temperature T and pressure P. Measurements were made in the free stream of a variable Mach number supersonic wind tunnel, where T and P are varied simultaneously as Mach number is varied. Using optical heterodyning, the measured signal amplitude (related to the optical reflectivity of the acoustic grating) was averaged for each of 11 flow conditions and compared to the expected theoretical dependence of a pure-electrostriction LITA process, where the signal is proportional to the square root of [P*P /( T*T*T)].

  19. Numerical and experimental investigation of natural flow-induced vibrations of flexible hydrofoils

    Chae, Eun Jung; Akcabay, Deniz Tolga; Lelong, Alexandra; Astolfi, Jacques Andre; Young, Yin Lu

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this work is to present combined numerical and experimental studies of natural flow-induced vibrations of flexible hydrofoils. The focus is on identifying the dependence of the foil's vibration frequencies and damping characteristics on the inflow velocity, angle of attack, and solid-to-fluid added mass ratio. Experimental results are shown for a cantilevered polyacetate (POM) hydrofoil tested in the cavitation tunnel at the French Naval Academy Research Institute (IRENav). The foil is observed to primarily behave as a chordwise rigid body and undergoes spanwise bending and twisting deformations, and the flow is observed to be effectively two-dimensional (2D) because of the strong lift retention at the free tip caused by a small gap with a thickness less than the wall boundary layer. Hence, the viscous fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model is formulated by coupling a 2D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) model with a two degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) model representing the spanwise tip bending and twisting deformations. Good agreements were observed between viscous FSI predictions and experimental measurements of natural flow-induced vibrations in fully turbulent and attached flow conditions. The foil vibrations were found to be dominated by the natural frequencies in absence of large scale vortex shedding due to flow separation. The natural frequencies and fluid damping coefficients were found to vary with velocity, angle of attack, and solid-to-fluid added mass ratio. In addition, the numerical results showed that the in-water to in-air natural frequency ratios decreased rapidly, and the fluid damping coefficients increased rapidly, as the solid-to-fluid added mass ratio decreases. Uncoupled mode (UM) linear potential theory was found to significantly over-predict the fluid damping for cases of lightweight flexible hydrofoils, and this over-prediction increased with higher velocity and lower solid-to-fluid added mass ratio.

  20. Study on flow induced vibration evaluation for a large scale JSFR piping. (2) Vibration analysis in 1/3 scale hot-leg piping experiments under swirl inflow conditions

    The present study was intended to grasp flow-induced vibration characteristics in the hot-leg piping of Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor by newly taken experimental data as well as to verify a vibration analysis tool with its data. Considering reactor upper sodium plenum flow in the reactor condition, flow-induced-vibration tests were carried out to investigate the effect of swirl flow at the inlet of the hot-leg piping in this study. The parameters were a swirl flow velocity ratio, which was defined as the swirl flow velocity on the inner surface of the pipe divided by the mean velocity. The parameter range of the swirl flow velocity ratio was set 5%∼15% for the conservative evaluation. In these tests, the random force distributions along the pipe and their correlation lengths were measured with pressure sensors to evaluate the flow-induced vibrations. It was found that the influence of the pressure fluctuation due to the swirl flow was negligibly small. The power spectrum densities of pressure fluctuations and correlation lengths were classified into some sections in order to reasonably evaluate flow-induced-random vibration response for reactor power plant piping. The vibration analysis method was proposed based on the measured power spectrum densities and correlation lengths of turbulent-flow induced forces. The analysis results of vibration response showed good agreement with the flow-induced-vibration test results, thereby it can be said that the vibration analysis method is valid. (author)

  1. Mobile platform for acoustic mine detection applications

    Libbey, Brad; Fenneman, Douglas; Burns, Brian

    2005-06-01

    Researchers in academia have successfully demonstrated acoustic landmine detection techniques. These typically employ acoustic or seismic sources to induce vibration in the mine/soil system, and use vibration sensors such as laser vibrometers or geophones to measure the resultant surface motion. These techniques exploit the unique mechanical properties of landmines to discriminate the vibration response of a buried mine from an off-target measurement. The Army requires the ability to rapidly and reliably scan an area for landmines and is developing a mobile platform at NVESD to meet this requirement. The platform represents an initial step toward the implementation of acoustic mine detection technology on a representative field vehicle. The effort relies heavily on the acoustic mine detection cart system developed by researchers at the University of Mississippi and Planning Systems, Inc. The NVESD platform consists of a John Deere E-gator configured with a robotic control system to accurately position the vehicle. In its present design, the E-gator has been outfitted with an array of laser vibrometers and a bank of loudspeakers. Care has been taken to ensure that the vehicle"s mounting hardware and data acquisition algorithms are sufficiently robust to accommodate the implementation of other sensor modalities. A thorough discussion of the mobile platform from its inception to its present configuration will be provided. Specific topics to be addressed include the vehicle"s control and data acquisition systems. Preliminary results from acoustic mine detection experiments will also be presented.

  2. A Study on the Uncertainty of Flow-Induced Vibration in a Cross Flow over Staggered Tubes

    Cross-flow in many support columns of very high temperature reactor (VHTR) lower plenum would have FIV issues under high speed flow jetting from the core. For a group of multiple circular cylinders subjected to a cross-flow, three types of potential vibration mechanisms may exist: (1) Vortex-induced vibration (VIV), (2) Fluid-elastic vibration (FEV) and (3) Turbulence-induced vibration (TIV). Kevalahan studied the free vibration of circular cylinders in a tightly packed periodic square inline array of cylinders. Pandey et al. studied the flue gas flow distribution in the Low Temperature Super Heater (LTSH) tube bundles situated in second pass of a utility boiler and the phenomenon of flow induced vibration. Nakamura et al. studied flow instability of cylinder arrays resembling U-bend tubes in steam generators. The FIV evaluation is usually performed with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis to obtain unknown frequency of oscillation of the multiple objects under turbulent flow and thus the uncertainty residing in the turbulence model used should be quantified. In this paper, potential FIV uncertainty arising from the turbulence phenomena are evaluated for a typical cross flow through staggered tube bundles resembling the VHTR lower plenum support columns. Flow induced vibration (FIV) is one of the important mechanical and fatigue issues in nuclear systems. Especially, cross-flow in many support structures of VHTR lower plenum would have FIV issues under highly turbulent jet flows from the core. The results show that the effect of turbulence parameters on FIV is not negligible and the uncertainty is 5 to 10%. Present method can be applied to future FIV evaluations of nuclear systems. More extensive studies on flow induced vibration in a plant scale by using more rigorous computational methods are under way

  3. Studies of collision-induced emission in the fundamental vibration-rotation band of H2

    Caledonia, G. E.; Krech, R. H.; Wilkerson, T.; Taylor, R. L.; Birnbaum, G.

    Measurements are presented of the collision induced emission (CIE) from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of H2 taken over the temperature range of 900-3000 K. The spectral shape and strength of this IR band centered about 2.4 microns has been measured behind reflected shocks in mixtures of H2/Ar. The observed radiation at elevated temperatures is found to be dominantly in the Q branch. The results, compared with theory, show that radiation at elevated temperatures is primarily the result of an induced dipole moment in H2 induced by the overlap between the H2 and Ar electron clouds during collision. The strength of this interaction has been evaluated by an analysis of the measured temperature dependence of the absolute bandstrengths.

  4. An advanced tube wear and fatigue workstation to predict flow induced vibrations of steam generator tubes

    Flow induced tube vibration damage is a major concern for designers and operators of nuclear power plant steam generators (SG). The operating flow-induced vibrational behaviour has to be estimated accurately to allow a precise evaluation of the new safety margins in order to optimize the maintenance policy. For this purpose, an industrial 'Tube Wear and Fatigue Workstation', called 'GEVIBUS Workstation' and based on an advanced methodology for predictive analysis of flow-induced vibration of tube bundles subject to cross-flow has been developed at Electricite de France. The GEVIBUS Workstation is an interactive processor linking modules as: thermalhydraulic computation, parametric finite element builder, interface between finite element model, thermalhydraulic code and vibratory response computations, refining modelling of fluid-elastic and random forces, linear and non-linear dynamic response and the coupled fluid-structure system, evaluation of tube damage due to fatigue and wear, graphical outputs. Two practical applications are also presented in the paper; the first simulation refers to an experimental set-up consisting of a straight tube bundle subject to water cross-flow, while the second one deals with an industrial configuration which has been observed in some operating steam generators i.e., top tube support plate degradation. In the first case the GEVIBUS predictions in terms of tube displacement time histories and phase planes have been found in very good agreement with experiment. In the second application the GEVIBUS computation showed that a tube with localized degradation is much more stable than a tube located in an extended degradation zone. Important conclusions are also drawn concerning maintenance. (author)

  5. Fluid Induced Vibration Analysis of a Cooling Water Pipeline for the HANARO CNS

    CNS is the initial of Cold Neutron Source and the CNS facility system consists of hydrogen, a vacuum, a gas blanketing, a helium refrigeration and a cooling water supply system. Out of these subsystems, the helium refrigeration system has the function of removal of heat from a thermal neutron under reactor operation. Therefore, HRS (helium refrigeration system) must be under normal operation for the production of cold neutron. HRS is mainly made up of a helium compressor and a coldbox. This equipment is in need of cooling water to get rid of heat generation under stable operation and a cooling water system is essential to maintain the normal operation of a helium compressor and a coldbox. The main problem for the cooling water system is the vibration issue in the middle of operation due to a water flow in a pipeline. In order to suppress the vibration problem for a pipeline, the characteristics of a pipeline and fluid flow must be analyzed in detail. In this paper, fluid induced vibration of a cooling water pipe is analyzed numerically and the stability of the cooling water pipeline is investigated by using pipe dynamic theory

  6. Mechanism of vibration-induced repulsion force on a particle in a viscous fluid cell

    Saadatmand, Mehrrad; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    Space platforms such as the Space Shuttle and International Space Station have been considered an ideal environment for production of protein and semiconductor crystals of superior quality due to the negligible gravity-induced convection. Although it was believed that under microgravity environment diffusive mass transport would dominate the growth of the crystals, some related experiments have not shown satisfactory results possibly due to the movement of the growing crystals in fluid cells caused by small vibrations present in the space platforms called g-jitter. In ground-based experiments, there have been clear observations of attraction and repulsion of a solid particle with respect to a nearby wall of the fluid cell due to small vibrations. The present work is a numerical investigation on the physical mechanisms responsible for the repulsion force, which has been predicted to increase with the cell vibration frequency and amplitude, as well as the fluid viscosity. Moreover, the simulations have revealed that the repulsion force occurs mostly due to the increased pressure in the narrow gap between the particle and the nearest wall.

  7. INVESTIGATION OF VORTEX SHEDDING INDUCED HYDRODYNAMIC VIBRATION IN VORTEX STREET FLOWMETER

    2001-01-01

    Vortex street flowmeter has been used in steady flo w measurement for about three decades. The benefits of this type of flowmeter i nclude high accuracy,good linearty,wide measuring range,and excellent reliabilit y. However,in unsteady flow measurement,the pressure disturbance as well as the noise from the system or surrounding can reduce the signal-to-noise ra tio of the flowmeter seriously. Aimed to use vortex street flowmeters in unstea dy flow measurement,the characteristics of the vortex shedding induced hydrodyna mic vibration around the prism bluff body in a vortex street flowmeter are inves tigated numerically and by expriments. The results show that the hydrodynamic vibrations with 180° phase shift occur at the axisymmetric points of the channe l around the bluff body. The most intense vibration occurs at the points on the lateral faces close to the base of the prism. The results provide therefore a useful reference for developing an anti-interference vortex flowmeter using the differential sensing technique.

  8. Flow-induced vibrations of two tandem circular cylinders in a parallel-wall channel

    Jiang, Ren-Jie; Lin, Jian-Zhong; Ku, Xiao-Ke

    2014-10-01

    Flow-induced vibrations of one and two tandem circular cylinders in the flow around cylinders in a parallel-wall channel are numerically studied by the lattice Boltzmann method. Within a range of Reynolds number Re = [1, 160], the effects of streamwise separation between two cylinders S/D = [1.25, 3], mass ratio M = [0.05, 5], and blockage ratio β = [1/2, 1/8] on the motions of cylinders and fluids are investigated, respectively. For the case of an isolated cylinder, as the mass ratio is 1, no large-amplitude oscillation is observed, and as the mass ratio is 0.1, the cylinder motion translates from the steady regime to the biased periodic vibration with a large oscillation amplitude gradually as Reynolds number is increased from 1 to 160. For the case of two cylinders in tandem, two steady regimes and a variety of distinct oscillation regimes with the corresponding flow structures are observed. The critical mass ratio of the two tandem cylinders in the strong coupling regime is about an order of magnitude larger than that of an isolated cylinder. For blockage ratio is more than 1/5, the vibration type of the cylinders is exclusive, while for blockage ratio is less than 1/6, the cylinder oscillation state is bistable. The mechanisms of the observed phenomena are also discussed.

  9. Vibration-induced extra torque during electrically-evoked contractions of the human calf muscles

    Kohn André F

    2010-06-01

    stimulation could be beneficial for many therapeutic interventions and vibration-based exercise programs. The command for the vibration-induced extra torques presumably activates spinal motoneurons following the size principle, which is a desirable feature for stimulation paradigms.

  10. Acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB)

    O' Donnell, Matthew (Ann Arbor, MI); Ye, Jing Yong (Ann Arbor, MI); Norris, Theodore B. (Dexter, MI); Baker, Jr., James R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Balogh, Lajos P. (Ann Arbor, MI); Milas, Susanne M. (Ann Arbor, MI); Emelianov, Stanislav Y. (Ann Arbor, MI); Hollman, Kyle W. (Fenton, MI)

    2008-05-06

    An acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB) provides information which characterize material which is broken down, microbubbles in the material, and/or the microenvironment of the microbubbles. In one embodiment of the invention, femtosecond laser pulses are focused just inside the surface of a volume of aqueous solution which may include dendrimer nanocomposite (DNC) particles. A tightly focused, high frequency, single-element ultrasonic transducer is positioned such that its focus coincides axially and laterally with this laser focus. When optical breakdown occurs, a microbubble forms and a shock or pressure wave is emitted (i.e., acoustic emission). In addition to this acoustic signal, the microbubble may be actively probed with pulse-echo measurements from the same transducer. After the microbubble forms, received pulse-echo signals have an extra pulse, describing the microbubble location and providing a measure of axial microbubble size. Wavefield plots of successive recordings illustrate the generation, growth, and collapse of microbubbles due to optical breakdown. These same plots can also be used to quantify LIOB thresholds.

  11. Analysis of stochastic resonance phenomenon in wind induced vibration of a girder

    Pospíšil, Stanislav; Náprstek, Jiří

    Vol. 617. Pfaffikon: Trans Tech Publications, 2014 - (Kotrasova, K.; Melcer, J.), s. 285-290 ISBN 978-3-03835-197-9. ISSN 1660-9336. [International scientific conference on dynamic of civil engineering and transport structures and wind engineering /6./. Donovaly (SK), 25.05.2014-29.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC13-34405J Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : aero elastic divergence * nonlinear aero -elasticity * stochastic resonance * turbulence * wind induced vibration * wind tunnel experiments Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering http://scientific.stp.net/AMM.617.285

  12. Investigation of stochastic resonance effects in problems of wind induced vibration

    Pospíšil, Stanislav; Náprstek, Jiří

    Porto: European Association for Structural Dynamics (EASD), 2014 - (Cunha, A.; Caetano, E.; Ribeiro, P.; Müller, G.), s. 1957-1963 ISBN 978-972-752-165-4. ISSN 2311-9020. [International Conference on Structural Dynamics. EURODYN 2014 /9./. Porto (PT), 30.06.2014-02.07.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC13-34405J Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : nonlinear aero -elasticity * stochastic resonance * turbulence * aero elastic divergence * wind induced vibration * wind tunnel experiment Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering http://paginas.fe.up.pt/~eurodyn2014/CD/papers/272_MS11_ABS_1084.pdf

  13. Analysis of stochastic resonance phenomenon in wind induced vibration of a girder

    Pospíšil, Stanislav; Náprstek, Jiří

    Žilina: EDIS publishing house University of Zilina, 2014 - (Melcer, J.), s. 254-260 ISBN 978-80-554-0844-6. [Dynamics of Civil Engineering and Transport Structures and Wind Engineering DYN-WIND'2014 /6./. Donovaly (SK), 26.05.2014-29.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC13-34405J Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : stochastic resonance * wind induced vibrations * Fokker-Planck equation Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering http://www.itam.cas.cz/?pid=5

  14. Comparative assessment of different treatment modalities in miners with vibration- and noise-induced disease

    Velskaya, M.L.; Nekhorosheva, M.A.; Konovalova, S.I.; Kukhtina, G.V.; Gonchar, I.G.; Terentyeva, D.P.; Grishchenko, L.A.; Soboleva, N.P.; Kharitonov, S.A.; Priklonskiy, I.V.

    1985-02-01

    A group of 71 miners with vibration sickness and noise-induced pathology were managed either by standard methods, or in combination with acupuncture and/or hyperbaric oxygenation for a comparative assessment of the effectiveness of the different therapeutic approaches. Analysis of subjective factors as well as standard physiological parameters (EKG, rheoencephalography, peripheral rheography, EEG, neuropsychological tests) demonstrate that both acupuncture and hyperbaric oxygenation are effective modalities in the majority of the subjects. Nevertheless, the lack of improvement in certain criteria, or even what could be regarded as adverse sequelae, suggest that the use of hyperbaric oxygenation in the management of such disorders be approached with considerable care.

  15. Flow-induced vibration for light-water reactors. Progress report, April 1978-December 1979

    Flow-Induced vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a four-year program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program commenced December 1, 1976, but was suspended on September 30, 1978, due to a shift in Department of Energy (DOE) priorities away from LWR productivity/availability. It was reinitiated as of August 1, 1979. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the period from April 1978 to December 1979

  16. Design evaluation of flow-induced vibrations for a large shell and tube type nuclear heat exchanger

    Increased flow requirements for a large sized shell and tube type nuclear heat exchanger during advanced stage of manufacturing required re-evaluation of the Design to withstand flow-induced vibrations and suggest suitable Design alternatives within the constraints imposed at this advanced stage of manufacturing. Detailed flow-induced vibration analysis was done and two design alternatives offered. The first one consisted in attaching a wire-netted grid mounted alongside the baffle supports and the second considered removal of tubes from the vibration prone double span window region, which was counter-checked for heat-transfer adequacy requirement. Of the two alternatives, the second one was accepted due to its easy application at the advanced manufacturing stage. While the application of the wire-netted grid was not considered in the specific case, this might find application wherever the vibration prone double span tubes cannot be removed due to heat transfer requirements of Design

  17. Railway vibrations induced into the soil: experiments, modelling and isolation. - Vibrations induites dans les sols par le trafic ferroviaire : exp\\'erimentations, mod\\'elisations et isolation

    Semblat, Jean-François; Jacqueline, Delphine; Leblond, Jean-Jacques; Grasso, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Railway traffic induces cyclic and dynamic loadings in the track structure but also in the close environment (Degrande et al. 2006, Fran\\c{c}ois et al. 2007, Kausel 2008, Lefeuve-Mesgouez et al 2002, Paolucci et Spinelli 2006). The analysis of such excitations and their effects (e.g. vibrations, waves, etc) is fundamental to estimate their level and mitigate their potential consequences (settlements, nuisances, etc). After a brief summary of the current regulations, in situ experiments show the variability of the parameters characterizing the main phenomena (wave propagation into the soil, induced vibrations, etc). The main dynamic laboratory experiments are then discussed. They allow the estimation of the dynamic features of the materials (e.g. resonant column test), but also a simplified analysis of the main phenomena under controlled conditions (e.g. experiments in a geotechnical pit, centrifuge tests). The vibratory sources and the impedance ratios between the various soil layers (or some inclusions) bein...

  18. The influence of source-receiver interaction on the numerical prediction of railway induced vibrations

    Coulier, P.; Lombaert, G.; Degrande, G.

    2014-06-01

    The numerical prediction of vibrations in buildings due to railway traffic is a complicated problem where wave propagation in the soil couples the source (railway tunnel or track) and the receiver (building). This through-soil coupling is often neglected in state-of-the-art numerical models in order to reduce the computational cost. In this paper, the effect of this simplifying assumption on the accuracy of numerical predictions is investigated. A coupled finite element-boundary element methodology is employed to analyze the interaction between a building and a railway tunnel at depth or a ballasted track at the surface of a homogeneous halfspace, respectively. Three different soil types are considered. It is demonstrated that the dynamic axle loads can be calculated with reasonable accuracy using an uncoupled strategy in which through-soil coupling is disregarded. If the transfer functions from source to receiver are considered, however, large local variations in terms of vibration insertion gain are induced by source-receiver interaction, reaching up to 10 dB and higher, although the overall wave field is only moderately affected. A global quantification of the significance of through-soil coupling is made, based on the mean vibrational energy entering a building. This approach allows assessing the common assumption in seismic engineering that source-receiver interaction can be neglected if the distance between source and receiver is sufficiently large compared to the wavelength of waves in the soil. It is observed that the interaction between a source at depth and a receiver mainly affects the power flow distribution if the distance between source and receiver is smaller than the dilatational wavelength in the soil. Interaction effects for a railway track at grade are observed if the source-receiver distance is smaller than six Rayleigh wavelengths. A similar trend is revealed if the passage of a freight train is considered. The overall influence of dynamic

  19. Flow-induced vibration test of an advanced water reactor model. Part 1: Turbulence-induced forcing function

    A 1/9 scale model of a proposed advanced water reactor was tested for flow-induced vibration. The main objectives of this test were to (1) derive an empirical equation for the turbulence forcing function which can be applied to the full-sized prototype; (2) study the effect of viscosity on the turbulence; (3) verify the superposition assumption widely used in dynamic analysis of weakly coupled fluid-shell systems; and (4) measure the shell responses to verify methods and computer programs used in the flow-induced vibration analysis of the prototype. This paper describes objectives (1), (2), and (3). Objective (4) will be discussed in a companion paper. The turbulence-induced fluctuating pressure was measured at 49 locations over the surface of a thick-walled, non-responsive scale model of the reactor vessel/core support cylinders. An empirical equation relating the fluctuating pressure, the frequency, and the distance from the inlet nozzle center line was derived to fit the test data. This equation involves only non-dimensional, fluid mechanical parameters that are postulated to represent the full-sized, geometrically similar prototype. While this postulate cannot be verified until similar measurements are taken on the full-sized unit, a similar approach using a 1/6 scale model of a commercial pressurized water reactor was verified in the mid-seventies by field measurements on the full-sized reactor

  20. 行星减速器箱体振动及声辐射特性分析%Research on Vibration and Acoustic Radiation of Planetary Gearbox Housing

    杨程; 梁谦; 史冬岩

    2015-01-01

    In this paper ,an analysis model of planetary gearbox housing is constructed based on the finite element method/boundary element method (FEM /BEM ) to investigate its vibration and acoustic radiation characteristics .Firstly ,a finite element model is established using ABAQUS .The main factors affecting its dynamic characteristics are observed through modal analysis ,and the impact of main structural parame‐ters on transmission characteristics is investigated .Secondly ,an acoustic radiation analysis model is estab‐lished using VA‐One on the basis of vibration characteristics analysis ,and through numerical analysis the acoustic pressure nephogram ,noise spectrum ,noise radiation and modal contribution of the housing sur‐face are obtained .The effects of main structure parameters on noise radiation characteristics are observed . It is shown that the rigidity of the front and back plates is weaker than the circumferential rigidity of the housing ;however ,reinforcing the local thickness of the front and back plates cannot improve the dynamic characteristics due to the effect of shafting in the gearbox housing .Finally ,acoustic protection of the hous‐ing is carried out .It is found that changing the loss factor can effectively reduce the noise of the housing structure .The authors believe that this investigation can provide technical support to the scheme design of the planetary gearbox housing .%通过 FEM /BEM 方法,建立了行星减速器箱体振动及声辐射分析模型,对其振动以及声辐射特性进行分析研究。首先,在 ABAQUS 里建立有限元分析模型,通过模态分析,找出影响其动态特性的主要因素,分析了主要结构参数对传递特性的影响。其次,在振动特性分析的基础上,通过 VA‐one 建立其声辐射边界元模型,计算箱体表面及声场的声压分布云图、噪声谱及箱体辐射噪声板面贡献度和模态贡献度,并分析主要结构参数对辐射

  1. Sub-Microsecond Temperature Measurement in Liquid Water Using Laser Induced Thermal Acoustics

    Alderfer, David W.; Herring, G. C.; Danehy, Paul M.; Mizukaki, Toshiharu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Using laser-induced thermal acoustics, we demonstrate non-intrusive and remote sound speed and temperature measurements over the range 10 - 45 C in liquid water. Averaged accuracy of sound speed and temperature measurements (10 s) are 0.64 m/s and 0.45 C respectively. Single-shot precisions based on one standard deviation of 100 or greater samples range from 1 m/s to 16.5 m/s and 0.3 C to 9.5 C for sound speed and temperature measurements respectively. The time resolution of each single-shot measurement was 300 nsec.

  2. Controlling flow-induced vibrations of flood barrier gates with data-driven and finite-element modelling

    Erdbrink, C.D.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Sloot, P. M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Operation of flood barrier gates is sometimes hampered by flow-induced vibrations. Although the physics is understood for specific gate types, it remains challenging to judge dynamic gate behaviour for unanticipated conditions. This paper presents a hybrid modelling system for predicting vibrations by combining machine learning with physics-based modelling so that critical situations can be avoided. In the outlined data-driven approach gate response data is acquired by sensors and stored in a...

  3. Nonlinear transient vibrations and coexistences of multi-instabilities induced by friction in an aircraft braking system

    Chevillot, Fabrice; Sinou, Jean-Jacques; Hardouin, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    International audience Friction-induced vibration is still a cause for concern in a wide variety of mechanical systems, because it can lead to structural damage if high vibration levels are reached. Another effect is the noise produced that can be very unpleasant for end-users, thereby making it a major problem in the field of terrestrial transport. In this work the case of an aircraft braking system is examined. An analytical model with polynomial nonlinearity in the contact between rotor...

  4. Influence of wind angle of attack and isotropic turbulence on wind-induced vibrations of ice-accreted bridge cables

    Pospíšil, S.; Trush, A. (Arsenii); Kuznetsov, S. (Sergeii); Kozmar, H.; Náprstek, J. (Jiří)

    2016-01-01

    Bridge-supporting cables and mast guys with high flexibility and low damping often experience vibrations with large amplitudes that may have consequently destructive effects on supported structures. Surface roughness and ice accretion are important issues, as they can considerably alter aerodynamic characteristics of bridge cables. This study describes wind-tunnel experiments on vortex-induced vibration of cylindrical section models with the deliberately adjusted natural frequency f = 5 Hz. T...

  5. Simulation of Human-induced Vibrations Based on the Characterized In-field Pedestrian Behavior.

    Van Nimmen, Katrien; Lombaert, Geert; De Roeck, Guido; Van den Broeck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    For slender and lightweight structures, vibration serviceability is a matter of growing concern, often constituting the critical design requirement. With designs governed by the dynamic performance under human-induced loads, a strong demand exists for the verification and refinement of currently available load models. The present contribution uses a 3D inertial motion tracking technique for the characterization of the in-field pedestrian behavior. The technique is first tested in laboratory experiments with simultaneous registration of the corresponding ground reaction forces. The experiments include walking persons as well as rhythmical human activities such as jumping and bobbing. It is shown that the registered motion allows for the identification of the time variant pacing rate of the activity. Together with the weight of the person and the application of generalized force models available in literature, the identified time-variant pacing rate allows to characterize the human-induced loads. In addition, time synchronization among the wireless motion trackers allows identifying the synchronization rate among the participants. Subsequently, the technique is used on a real footbridge where both the motion of the persons and the induced structural vibrations are registered. It is shown how the characterized in-field pedestrian behavior can be applied to simulate the induced structural response. It is demonstrated that the in situ identified pacing rate and synchronization rate constitute an essential input for the simulation and verification of the human-induced loads. The main potential applications of the proposed methodology are the estimation of human-structure interaction phenomena and the development of suitable models for the correlation among pedestrians in real traffic conditions. PMID:27167309

  6. Improving hand sensibility in vibration induced neuropathy: A case-series

    Lundborg Göran

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives We report a long-term series of nine workers suffering from vibration-induced neuropathy, after many years of exposure to hand-held vibrating tools at high or low frequency. They were treated with temporary selective cutaneous anaesthesia (EMLA® cream of the forearm repeatedly for a period up to one year (in two cases four years. The aim was to improve their capacity to perceive touch and thereby improve hand function and diminish disability. The treatment principle is based on current concepts of brain plasticity, where a deafferentation of a skin area results in improved sensory function in adjacent skin areas. Methods All participants had sensory hand problems in terms of numbness (median touch thresholds > 70 mg and impaired hand function influencing ADL (mean DASH score 22. After an initial identical self-administered treatment period of 8 weeks (12-15 treatments with increasing intervals they did one treatment every 2-3 month. Results After one year sensibility (touch thresholds and tactile discrimination as well as hand function (mean DASH score 13 were improved in a majority of the cases. Seven of the participants choose to continue the treatment after the first year and two of them have continued at a regular basis for up to four years. A surprising, secondary finding was diminishing nocturnal numbness of the hand and arm in eight of the nine subjects from "frequently" to "hardly ever or never". Conclusions Our observations open new perspectives for treatment of impaired sensibility and hand function in a group of patients with vibration induced hand problems where we have no treatment to offer today.

  7. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  8. Effect of Internal Flow on Vortex-Induced Vibration of Submarine Free Spanning Pipelines

    LOU Min; DING Jian; GUO Hai-yan; DONG Xiao-lin

    2005-01-01

    At present, most researches on the vortex-induced vibration of submarine free spanning pipelines ignore the effect of internal flowing fluid; furthermore, there are no research reports considering the coupling effect of internal and external fluid with the free span. In this paper, combining Iwan's wake oscillator model with the differential equation derived for the dynamic response of submarine free spanning pipelines with inclusion of internal flow, the pipe-fluid coupling equations are developed to investigate the effect of internal flow on the vortex-induced vibration of the free spans. The finite element approximation is implemented to derive the matrix equations of equilibrium. The Newmark method combined with simple iteration is used to solve the system of equations. The results indicate that the internal fluid flow may cause the shift of resonance band to the lower frequency and a slight decrease in the peak value; the effect will be more pronounced with the increase of the span length and can be weakened in the presence of the axial tension.

  9. A theoretical investigation of flow induced vibration instabilities of steam generator tubes in cross-flow

    Since the early 1970s, extensive studies of flow induced vibration in cross flow, especially, fluid-elastic instability, have been reported. Determination of fluid-elastic stability thresholds in tube arrays is very important for design basis. Once large amplitude whirling motions are initiated, the system often does not retrace the response curve as flow velocity is reduced. This is so called hysteresis and is one of the considerations that we must take into account. The objective of this paper is to analyze the hysteresis and determine the critical flow velocity for the flow induced vibrations (FIV). A simple semi-empirical linear model has been developed to determine critical flow velocity. The results of present linear model were compared with those of other theories. These results were better than those of Gorman's theory in low mass damping parameter region. In addition, nonlinear model has been developed to analyze the hysteresis behavior. As results of the present the nonlinear model for two flexible tubes, the regions of hysteresis behavior were shown. These results were also compared with experimental data which was obtained by Lever and Rzentkowski. The region of hysteresis is an important factor for more conservative design

  10. Fatigue failure by flow-induced vibration. Effect on initial defect size on cumulative fatigue damage

    The method of fatigue life prediction is presented for structures which suffer from flow-induced vibration. A small wind tunnel was made and used to reproduce fatigue failure by flow-induced vibration. A medium carbon steel specimen attached to a larger styrofoam cylinder was fixed to the experimental equipment. A small artificial hole was introduced onto the specimen surface. Fatigue crack initiated from the artificial hole. A small portable strain histogram recorder (Mini Rainflow Corder, MRC) developed in another project of the authors' team was used to acquire the service strain histogram at a critical point of the specimen and to measure the variation of natural frequency. Fatigue damage D defined by the Modified Miner Rule was calculated by using the strain histogram at the initial stage of the operation of the wind turbine. The values of D were all smaller than 1.0 and ranged approximately from 0.2 to 0.8. The reason for small values of D is explained from the behaviour of small crack growth. (author)

  11. 2-D Urans Simulations of Vortex Induced Vibrations of Circular Cylinder at Trsl3 Flow Regime

    Omer Kemal Kinaci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on vortex-induced vibrations (VIV mainly involves experimental science but building laboratory setups to investigate the flow are expensive and time consuming. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD methods may offer a faster and a cheaper way to understand this phenomenon depending on the solution approach to the problem. The context of this paper is to present the author’s computational approach to solve for vortex-induced vibrations which cover extensive explanations on the mathematical background, the grid structure and the turbulence models implemented. Current computational research on VIV for smooth cylinders is currently restricted to flows that have Reynolds numbers below 10,000. This paper describes the method to approach the problem with URANS and achieves to return satisfactory results for higher Reynolds numbers.The computational approach is first validated with a benchmark experimental study for rather low Reynolds number which falls into TrSL2 flow regime. Then, some numerical results up to Re=130,000, which falls into TrSL3 flow regime,are given at the end of the paper to reveal the validity of the approach for even higher Reynolds numbers.

  12. Passive control of vortex induced vibration in internal flow using body shape

    Sánchez–Sanz, M.; Velazquez, A.

    2011-10-01

    We present a concept for passive control of vortex induced vibration (VIV) that uses the body shape of a prismatic body as the control parameter in 2D internal flow. We consider that the Reynolds number based on the prism cross section height is 200 and that the blockage ratio of the channel is 2.5. The working fluid is water and the solid-to-fluid density ratio is 1, so that the prism presents neutral buoyancy and the body shape parameter γ acts as the only control parameter. Two very different fluid dynamics regimes are observed depending on γ with an abrupt transition between them for γ = γ c , where γ c represents a critical value obtained numerically. For γ γ c the oscillation is a mixture of galloping and vortex induced vibration that causes the prism motion to shift from a stable periodic motion to a highly irregular pattern. The physical explanation for the change of regime is given based on the cylinder equation of motion.

  13. Development of evaluation method on flow-induced vibration and corrosion of components in two-phase flow by coupled analysis. 1. Evaluation of effects of flow-induced vibration on structural material integrity

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. An innovative method for flow induced vibration of structures in two phase flow by combined analyses of three dimensional flow dynamics and structures is to be introduced. (author)

  14. Experimental investigation of flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    Jaiswal, S; Sen, A

    2016-01-01

    We report on experimental observations of flow induced large amplitude dust-acoustic shock waves (DASW) in a complex plasma. The experiments have been carried out in a $\\Pi$ shaped DC glow discharge experimental device using kaolin particles as the dust component in a background of Argon plasma. A strong supersonic flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change of gas flow rate is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks whose dynamics are captured by fast video pictures of the evolving structures. The physical characteristics of these shocks are delineated through a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of flow speeds and potential hill heights. The observed evolution of the shock waves and their propagation characteristics are found to compare well with model numerical results based on a m...

  15. Experimental investigation of flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-08-01

    We report on experimental observations of flow induced large amplitude dust-acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma. The experiments have been carried out in a Π shaped direct current glow discharge experimental device using kaolin particles as the dust component in a background of Argon plasma. A strong supersonic flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change in the gas flow rate is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks whose dynamics are captured by fast video pictures of the evolving structures. The physical characteristics of these shocks are delineated through a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of flow speeds and potential hill heights. The observed evolution of the shock waves and their propagation characteristics are found to compare well with model numerical results based on a modified Korteweg-de-Vries-Burgers type equation.

  16. Stress-Induced Fracturing of Reservoir Rocks: Acoustic Monitoring and μCT Image Analysis

    Pradhan, Srutarshi; Stroisz, Anna M.; Fjær, Erling; Stenebråten, Jørn F.; Lund, Hans K.; Sønstebø, Eyvind F.

    2015-11-01

    Stress-induced fracturing in reservoir rocks is an important issue for the petroleum industry. While productivity can be enhanced by a controlled fracturing operation, it can trigger borehole instability problems by reactivating existing fractures/faults in a reservoir. However, safe fracturing can improve the quality of operations during CO2 storage, geothermal installation and gas production at and from the reservoir rocks. Therefore, understanding the fracturing behavior of different types of reservoir rocks is a basic need for planning field operations toward these activities. In our study, stress-induced fracturing of rock samples has been monitored by acoustic emission (AE) and post-experiment computer tomography (CT) scans. We have used hollow cylinder cores of sandstones and chalks, which are representatives of reservoir rocks. The fracture-triggering stress has been measured for different rocks and compared with theoretical estimates. The population of AE events shows the location of main fracture arms which is in a good agreement with post-test CT image analysis, and the fracture patterns inside the samples are visualized through 3D image reconstructions. The amplitudes and energies of acoustic events clearly indicate initiation and propagation of the main fractures. Time evolution of the radial strain measured in the fracturing tests will later be compared to model predictions of fracture size.

  17. The Impact of Traffic-Induced Bridge Vibration on Rapid Repairing High-Performance Concrete for Bridge Deck Pavement Repairs

    Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on forced vibration tests for high-performance concrete (HPC, the influence of bridge vibration induced by traveling vehicle on compressive strength and durability of HPC has been studied. It is concluded that 1 d and 2 d compressive strength of HPC decreased significantly, and the maximum reduction rate is 9.1%, while 28 d compressive strength of HPC had a slight lower with a 3% maximal drop under the action of two simple harmonic vibrations with 2 Hz, 3 mm amplitude, and 4 Hz, 3 mm amplitude. Moreover, the vibration had a slight effect on the compressive strength of HPC when the simple harmonic vibration had 4 Hz and 1 mm amplitude; it is indicated that the amplitude exerts a more prominent influence on the earlier compressive strength with the comparison of the frequency. In addition, the impact of simple harmonic vibration on durability of HPC can be ignored; this shows the self-healing function of concrete resulting from later hydration reaction. Thus, the research achievements mentioned above can contribute to learning the laws by which bridge vibration affects the properties of concrete and provide technical support for the design and construction of the bridge deck pavement maintenance.

  18. A numerical study of microparticle acoustophoresis driven by acoustic radiation forces and streaming-induced drag forces

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Barnkob, Rune; Jensen, Mads Jakob Herring;

    2012-01-01

    rigid walls. Second, the products of the resulting first-order fields are used as source terms in the time-averaged second-order equations, from which the net acoustic forces acting on the particles are determined. The resulting acoustophoretic particle velocities are quantified for experimentally......We present a numerical study of the transient acoustophoretic motion of microparticles suspended in a liquid-filled microchannel and driven by the acoustic forces arising from an imposed standing ultrasound wave: the acoustic radiation force from the scattering of sound waves on the particles and...... the Stokes drag force from the induced acoustic streaming flow. These forces are calculated numerically in two steps. First, the thermoacoustic equations are solved to first order in the imposed ultrasound field taking into account the micrometer-thin but crucial thermoviscous boundary layer near the...

  19. Investigation of the ex-core noise induced by fuel assembly vibrations in the Ringhals-3 PWR

    Highlights: • The effect of cycle burnup on the ex-core noise induced by fuel assembly vibrations in a PWR was investigated. • No general monotonic variation of APSD during cycle burnup was found. • The increase of APSD occurs primarily for the vibrations of peripheral assemblies. • The ex-core noise is dominated by peripheral assemblies. • For the vibration of several assemblies distributed throughout the core in Model 2, a monotonic increase of APSD was found. - Abstract: The effect of cycle burnup on the ex-core detector noise at the frequency of the pendular core barrel vibrations in the Ringhals-3 PWR core was investigated using a neutron noise simulator. The purpose of the investigations was to confirm or disprove a hypothesis raised by Sweeney et al. (1985) that fuel assembly vibrations could affect the ex-core detector noise and cause the corresponding peak in the auto power spectral density (APSD) to increase during the cycle due to the effects of fuel burnup, the change of boron concentration, flux redistribution etc. Numerical calculations were performed by modelling the vibrations of fuel assemblies at different locations in the core and calculating the induced neutron noise at three burnup steps. The APSD of the ex-core detector noise was evaluated with the assumption of vibrations either along a straight-line or along a random two-dimensional trajectory, with two different representations of the cross section perturbations caused by the vibrations. The results show the obvious effect of in-core fuel vibrations on the ex-core detector noise, but the monotonic increase of the APSD does not occur for all fuel elements, vibration types and cross section perturbation models. Such an increase of the of APSD occurs predominantly for peripheral assemblies with one of the perturbation models. However, assuming simultaneous vibrations of a number of fuel assemblies uniformly distributed over the core with random vibrations and the more realistic

  20. The liquid phase separation of Bi-Ga hypermonotectic alloy under acoustic levitation condition

    HONG ZhenYu; L(U) YongJun; XIE WenJun; WEI BingBo

    2007-01-01

    Containerless treatment of Bi-58.5at%Ga hypermonotectic alloy is successfully performed with acoustic levitation technique. Under acoustic levitation condition, the second phase (Ga) distributes almost homogeneously in solidification sample, opposite to macrosegregation in solidification sample under conventional condition. Stokes motion of the second liquid droplet (Ga) is significantly restrained under acoustic levitation condition. The analyses indicate that the melt vibration in the gravity direction forced by acoustic field can induce steady flow around the second liquid droplet, which influences droplet shape during its moving upward and consequently restrains Stokes motion velocity of the second liquid droplet.

  1. Unsteady elbow pipe flow to develop a flow-induced vibration evaluation methodology for JSFR

    For an advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor (named Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor: JSFR) a two-loop cooling system is designed by adopting a large-diameter piping system with high coolant velocity. The high-velocity piping system brings a flow-induced-vibration issue. To address this issue, experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to grasp flow-induced vibration characteristics in the piping. A flow-induced vibration evaluation methodology that was preliminarily verified with the experimental data tentatively indicated positive feasibility of the JSFR piping.This paper describes the current status of flow-induced vibration evaluation methodology development for primary cooling pipes in JSFR, in particular emphasizing on recent R and D activities that investigate unsteady elbow pipe flow. Experimental efforts have been made using 1/3-scale and 1/10-scale single-elbow test sections for the hot-leg pipe.First of all, experiments with water for the hot-leg piping were carried out using the 1/3-scale test section under rectified-flow conditions. The 1/10-scale experiment indicated no effect of pipe scale by comparison to the 1/3-scale experiment. The next experiment using the 1/3-scale test section was performed to investigate the effect of swirl flow at the inlet. Although the flow separation region was distorted at the downstream from the elbow, the experiment clarified that the effect of swirl flow on pressure fluctuation onto the pipe wall was not significant as shown. An additional experiment was intended to study the effect of elbow curvature. The experiments with water clarified that turbulence is weakened in an elbow with larger curvature than that of the JSFR. For cold-leg pipe experiments, a test section with triple elbows is necessary to simulate the JSFR pipe. Since the interference of multiple elbows should be investigated to understand turbulent flow in the cold-leg pipe geometry, 1/15-scale experiments with double elbows were carried out

  2. The ecological and evolutionary consequences of noise-induced acoustic habitat loss

    Tennessen, Jennifer Beissinger

    negative physiological consequences, and that populations have adapted over short timescales to minimize the detrimental impacts of this novel pressure. Finally, I present results from a field acoustic playback experiment that show that noise from the invasive Cuban treefrog (Osteopilus septentrionalis ) differentially affects the vocal behavior of native anurans, with those with more similar calls being disproportionally more affected. Green treefrogs (Hyla cinerea) shortened their calls, called louder, and maintained call spacing (e.g. continued actively calling) during noise stimuli whereas pine woods treefrogs (H. femoralis) did not modify vocal behavior in response to any noise stimuli. Collectively, the results of these investigations (1) provide insight into the extent of noise-induced acoustic habitat loss in space and time, (2) reveal fitness-relevant individual- and population-level consequences of this form of habitat loss, and (3) show resiliency within ecological systems through the individual- and population-level responses to this novel pressure over short time-scales. These findings advance the field by illustrating how the spatiotemporal extent of anthropogenic noise impacts important ecological processes, and by demonstrating the resiliency of some species in responding rapidly to novel pressures.

  3. Vibration mitigation for wind-induced jitter for the Giant Magellan Telescope

    Glaese, Roger M.; Sheehan, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is a planned large terrestrial telescope with a segmented primary mirror with a 24.5 meter overall diameter. Like most terrestrial telescopes, the GMT resides within an enclosure designed to protect the telescope from the elements and to reduce the effects of wind on the optical performance of the telescope. Wind impingement on the telescope causes static deformation and vibration in the telescope structure that affects the alignment and image jitter performance of the telescope. Actively controlled primary mirror segments and a secondary mirror can correct for the static and low frequency portions of the wind effects, but typically the actuators do not have the bandwidth to address higher frequency components of the wind environment. Preliminary analyses on the GMT indicate that the image jitter associated with wind effects meets budgeted allowances but without much margin. Preliminary models show that the bulk of the residual jitter arises from excitation of a small number of modes in the 9 to 12 Hz range. Therefore, as a risk mitigation effort to increase the margin on the wind induced jitter, passive and active vibration mitigation approaches have been examined for the GMT, which will be the focus of this paper. Using a finite element model of the GMT along with wind loading load cases, several passive and active vibration mitigation approaches were analyzed. These approaches include passive approaches such as tuned mass dampers targeting the worst offending modes, and constrained layer damping targeting all of the modes within the troublesome frequency range. Active approaches evaluated include two active damping approaches, one using several reaction mass actuators and the other using active strut type actuators. The results of the study show that although all approaches are successful in reducing the jitter, the active damping approach using reaction mass actuators offers the lightest weight, least implementation impact

  4. Robust saturated control of human-induced floor vibrations via a proof-mass actuator

    This paper is concerned with the design of a robust active vibration control system that makes use of a proof-mass actuator for the mitigation of human-induced vibrations in floor structures. Ideally, velocity feedback control (VFC) is unconditionally stable and robust to spillover effects, interlacing of poles and zeros of collocated control is then accomplished. However, the use of a proof-mass actuator influences the system dynamics and the alternating pole-zero pattern of the system formed by the actuator and structure is no longer fulfilled. However, a controlled migration of the two zeros of the root locus plot at the origin, resulting from the acceleration output, can be achieved by adding a feed-through term (FTT) to the structure acceleration output. That is, the FTT enables us to control the position of a pair of complex conjugate zeros (an anti-resonance in the frequency domain). This paper proposes the introduction of an FTT designed in such a way that the anti-resonance at the origin is located between the actuator resonance and the structure fundamental resonance. Hence, an integral controller leads to infinite gain margin and significant phase margin. Simulation and experimental results on a concrete slab strip have validated the proposed control strategy. Significant improvements in the stability properties compared with VFC are reported

  5. Flow induced vibration and stability analysis of multi wall carbon nanotubes

    The free vibration and flow induced flutter instability of cantilever multi wall carbon nanotubes conveying fluid are investigated and the nanotubes are modeled as thin-walled beams. The non-classical effects of the transverse shear, rotary inertia, warping inhibition, and van der Waals forces between two walls are incorporated into the structural model. The governing equations and associated boundary conditions are derived using Hamilton's principle. A numerical analysis is carried out by using the extended Galerkin method, which enables us to obtain more accurate solutions compared to the conventional Galerkin method. Cantilevered carbon nanotubes are damped with decaying amplitude for a flow velocity below a certain critical value. However, beyond this critical flow velocity, flutter instability may occur. The variations in the critical flow velocity with respect to both the radius ratio and length of the carbon nanotubes are investigated and pertinent conclusions are outlined. The differences in the vibration and instability characteristics between the Timoshenko beam theory and Euler beam theory are revealed. A comparative analysis of the natural frequencies and flutter characteristics of MWCNTs and SWCNTs is also performed

  6. Electronic, structural and vibrational induced effects upon ionization of 2-quinolinone

    Bellili, A.; Pan, Y.; Al Mogren, M. M.; Lau, K. C.; Hochlaf, M.

    2016-07-01

    Using first principle methodologies, we characterize the lowest electronic states of 2-quinolinone+ cation. The ground state of this ion is of X˜2A″ nature. We deduce the adiabatic ionization energy of 2-quinolinone to be equal 8.249 eV using the explicitly correlated coupled cluster level and where zero point vibrational energy, core-valence and scalar relativistic effects are taken into account. We examine also the ionization induced structural changes and vibrational shifts and analyze the electron density differences between the neutral and ionic species. These data show that the formation of 2-quinolinone+X˜2A″ from 2-quinolinone affects strongly the HNCO group, whereas the carbon skeletal is perturbed when the upper electronic cationic states are populated. The comparison to 2-pyridone allows the elucidation of the effect of benzene ring fused with this heterocyclic ring. Since quinolones and pyridones are both model systems of DNA bases, these findings might help in understanding the charge redistribution in these biological entities upon ionization.

  7. Electronic, structural and vibrational induced effects upon ionization of 2-quinolinone.

    Bellili, A; Pan, Y; Al Mogren, M M; Lau, K C; Hochlaf, M

    2016-07-01

    Using first principle methodologies, we characterize the lowest electronic states of 2-quinolinone(+) cation. The ground state of this ion is of X˜(2)A(″) nature. We deduce the adiabatic ionization energy of 2-quinolinone to be equal 8.249eV using the explicitly correlated coupled cluster level and where zero point vibrational energy, core-valence and scalar relativistic effects are taken into account. We examine also the ionization induced structural changes and vibrational shifts and analyze the electron density differences between the neutral and ionic species. These data show that the formation of 2-quinolinone(+)X˜(2)A(″) from 2-quinolinone affects strongly the HNCO group, whereas the carbon skeletal is perturbed when the upper electronic cationic states are populated. The comparison to 2-pyridone allows the elucidation of the effect of benzene ring fused with this heterocyclic ring. Since quinolones and pyridones are both model systems of DNA bases, these findings might help in understanding the charge redistribution in these biological entities upon ionization. PMID:27060413

  8. Flow induced vibration and stability analysis of multi wall carbon nanotubes

    Yun, Kyung Jae [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jong Woon [Korean Intellectual Property Office, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Kyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Oh Seop [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    The free vibration and flow induced flutter instability of cantilever multi wall carbon nanotubes conveying fluid are investigated and the nanotubes are modeled as thin-walled beams. The non-classical effects of the transverse shear, rotary inertia, warping inhibition, and van der Waals forces between two walls are incorporated into the structural model. The governing equations and associated boundary conditions are derived using Hamilton's principle. A numerical analysis is carried out by using the extended Galerkin method, which enables us to obtain more accurate solutions compared to the conventional Galerkin method. Cantilevered carbon nanotubes are damped with decaying amplitude for a flow velocity below a certain critical value. However, beyond this critical flow velocity, flutter instability may occur. The variations in the critical flow velocity with respect to both the radius ratio and length of the carbon nanotubes are investigated and pertinent conclusions are outlined. The differences in the vibration and instability characteristics between the Timoshenko beam theory and Euler beam theory are revealed. A comparative analysis of the natural frequencies and flutter characteristics of MWCNTs and SWCNTs is also performed.

  9. Exact analytical solution of shear-induced flexural vibration of functionally graded piezoelectric beam

    Sharma, Pankaj; Parashar, Sandeep Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The priority of this paper is to obtain the exact analytical solution for free flexural vibration of FGPM beam actuated using the d15 effect. In piezoelectric actuators, the potential use of d15 effect has been of particular interest for engineering applications since shear piezoelectric coefficient d15 is much higher than the other piezoelectric coupling constants d31 and d33. The applications of shear actuators are to induce and control the flexural vibrations of beams and plates. In this study, a modified Timoshenko beam theory is used where electric potential is assumed to vary sinusoidaly along the thickness direction. The material properties are assumed to be graded across the thickness in accordance with power law distribution. Hamilton`s principle is employed to obtain the equations of motion along with the associated boundary conditions for FGPM beams. Exact analytical solution is derived thus obtained equations of motion. Results for clamped-clamped and clamped-free boundary conditions are presented. The presented result and method shell serve as benchmark for comparing the results obtained from the other approximate methods.

  10. Vortex-Induced Vibration (VIV) Reduction Properties of Seal Whisker-Like Geometries

    Hans, Hendrik; Miao, Jianmin; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Biological studies have shown that harbor seal whiskers are capable of reducing Vortex-Induced Vibrations (VIV). As the whiskers have convoluted geometry, it is necessary to evaluate the parameters that define their VIV reduction properties. Whisker-Like Geometries (WLGs) consisting of all but one feature on the true whisker geometry are designed. Comparison of VIV on these WLGs with VIV on circular and elliptical cylinders at Re = 500 is performed. Three-dimensional simulations of flow past these geometries, which are allowed to freely vibrate in crossflow, are performed with the Implicit Large Eddy Simulation as the turbulence model. The results indicate that the existence of axial undulations is the most dominant feature that affects the VIV reduction. The smallest VIV is observed on WLGs with dual-axial undulations and the largest VIV is observed on the circular cylinder. Variations in the features of the WLGs result in noticeable changes in their VIV. The circular cylinder is observed to response as a steady system while the WLGs with dual-axial undulations are observed to respond as a chaotic system. The response of WLGs with single-axial undulations is found to depend on their detailed features. I would like to acknowledge the support and funding from National Research Foundation (NRF) through CENSAM of Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology and Nanyang Technological University.

  11. Harvesting traffic-induced vibrations for structural health monitoring of bridges

    This paper discusses the development and testing of a renewable energy source for powering wireless sensors used to monitor the structural health of bridges. Traditional power cables or battery replacement are excessively expensive or infeasible in this type of application. An inertial power generator has been developed that can harvest traffic-induced bridge vibrations. Vibrations on bridges have very low acceleration (0.1–0.5 m s−2), low frequency (2–30 Hz), and they are non-periodic. A novel parametric frequency-increased generator (PFIG) is developed to address these challenges. The fabricated device can generate a peak power of 57 µW and an average power of 2.3 µW from an input acceleration of 0.54 m s−2 at only 2 Hz. The generator is capable of operating over an unprecedentedly large acceleration (0.54–9.8 m s−2) and frequency range (up to 30 Hz) without any modifications or tuning. Its performance was tested along the length of a suspension bridge and it generated 0.5–0.75 µW of average power without manipulation during installation or tuning at each bridge location. A preliminary power conversion system has also been developed

  12. Evaluation of deformation-induced transformation and reversion processes of stainless steel by acoustic microscope

    Kasuga, Yukio; Endo, Tomio; Miyasaka, Chiaki; Kasano, Hideaki

    1999-02-01

    Deformation-induced martensite and reversed austenite of a metastable austenitic stainless steel sheet were evaluated by a scanning acoustic microscope with frequencies 600MHz and 800 MHz. The sheet was elongated up to 40 percent at and below the room temperature to produce martensite, followed by annealing for reversion. First martensite content was measured by a Feritscope. Next using a complex V(z) curve, leaky Rayleigh wave velocity was measured. The deformed and annealed grain structure s were observed with the frequency 800MHz and compared with those by the optical microscope. Rayleigh wave velocity is dependent on the elongation and ambient temperature in elongation and the annealing temperature, which agrees well with the one by the Feritscope. Deformed grains are more clearly observed by the scanning acoustic microscope with 800MHz. The measured value of the velocity is compared with the theoretical one which can be calculated by Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and the density. The measured Rayleigh wave velocity is well agreement with the theoretical one.

  13. IAEA specialist meeting on flow induced vibrations in fast breeder reactors, Paris, France, 22-24 October 1986

    The Specialists' Meeting on ''Flow Induced Vibrations in FBRs for LMFBR Applications'' was held in Paris under the auspices of the French CEA on 21-24 October 1982. The meeting was sponsored by the IAEA on the recommendation of the 14th Meeting of the IWGFR and was attended by 31 participants from France, the Federal Republic of Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United States of America and one international organization (IAEA). The meeting was presided over by Pr. R.J. Gibert of France. After the first session on review of national positions in the subject field (7 papers), the meeting was divided into five technical sections as follows: fluid-structures interaction, calculation methods (3 papers); tubes bundles vibration and weir (4 papers); instability (6 papers); induced vibrations in the pumps (2 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  14. Flow-induced vibration for light water reactors. Final progress report, July 1981-September 1981

    Flow-Induced Vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, and general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and through the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program is managed by the General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department and has three major contributors: General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department (NPSED), General Electric Corporate Research and Development (CR and D) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The program commenced December 1, 1976. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the final period from July 1981 to September 1981. This is the last quarterly progress report to be issued for this program

  15. Orientation of bluff body for designing efficient energy harvesters from vortex-induced vibrations

    Dai, H. L. [Department of Mechanics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Abdelkefi, A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 (United States); Yang, Y., E-mail: cywyang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, L. [Department of Mechanics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-02-01

    The characteristics and performances of four distinct vortex-induced vibrations (VIVs) piezoelectric energy harvesters are experimentally investigated and compared. The difference between these VIV energy harvesters is the installation of the cylindrical bluff body at the tip of cantilever beam with different orientations (bottom, top, horizontal, and vertical). Experiments show that the synchronization regions of the bottom, top, and horizontal configurations are almost the same at low wind speeds (around 1.5 m/s). The vertical configuration has the highest wind speed for synchronization (around 3.5 m/s) with the largest harvested power, which is explained by its highest natural frequency and the smallest coupled damping. The results lead to the conclusion that to design efficient VIV energy harvesters, the bluff body should be aligned with the beam for low wind speeds (<2 m/s) and perpendicular to the beam at high wind speeds (>2 m/s)

  16. Buffer gas-induced resonance vibrational polarizability in the SF6-rare gas mixtures

    Bulanin, Michael O.; Burtsev, Andrey P.; Kerl, Klaus; Kisliakov, Ivan M.

    2001-04-01

    Mixed second refractivity virial coefficients BRab(ω) have been evaluated from the analysis of the pressure broadened ν3≈930 cm-1 34SF6 IR absorption band profile in mixtures with Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe buffer gases at relative densities up to 150 Amagat. The values of the BRab(ω) in the resonance region are found to be orders of magnitude greater compared to those observed for the neat gases in the spectral regions far from resonance. The experimental results are compared with the predictions of the dynamic DID model for the buffer gas-induced vibrational pair polarizability. The DID model reproduces surprisingly well the frequency variation of BRab in the range of the band wings for the heavier buffer gases, but significantly deviates from experiment for the SF6-Ne mixture.

  17. Piezoelectric energy harvesting from vortex-induced vibrations of circular cylinder

    Mehmood, A.; Abdelkefi, A.; Hajj, M. R.; Nayfeh, A. H.; Akhtar, I.; Nuhait, A. O.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of harvesting energy from a circular cylinder undergoing vortex-induced vibrations is investigated. The energy is harvested by attaching a piezoelectric transducer to the transverse degree of freedom. Numerical simulations are performed for Reynolds numbers (Re) in the range 96≤Re≤118, which covers the pre-synchronization, synchronization, and post-synchronization regimes. Load resistances (R) in the range 500 Ω≤R≤5 MΩ are considered. The results show that the load resistance has a significant effect on the oscillation amplitude, lift coefficient, voltage output, and harvested power. The results also show that the synchronization region widens when the load resistance increases. It is also found that there is an optimum value of the load resistance for which the harvested power is maximum. This optimum value does not correspond to the case of largest oscillations, which points to the need for a coupled analysis as performed here.

  18. CFD simulation of flow-induced vibration of an elastically supported airfoil

    Šidlof, Petr

    2016-03-01

    Flow-induced vibration of lifting or control surfaces in aircraft may lead to catastrophic consequences. Under certain circumstances, the interaction between the airflow and the elastic structure may lead to instability with energy transferred from the airflow to the structure and with exponentially increasing amplitudes of the structure. In the current work, a CFD simulation of an elastically supported NACA0015 airfoil with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge) coupled with 2D incompressible airflow is presented. The geometry of the airfoil, mass, moment of inertia, location of the centroid, linear and torsional stiffness was matched to properties of a physical airfoil model used for wind-tunnel measurements. The simulations were run within the OpenFOAM computational package. The results of the CFD simulations were compared with the experimental data.

  19. Vortex-induced vibration of a harbor-vibrissa-shaped cylinder: Experimental measurements.

    Liu, Yingzheng; Wang, Shaofei

    2015-11-01

    Influence of the unique surface variation of the harbor seal vibrissa on its vortex-induced vibration was extensively investigated in a low-speed wind tunnel. Toward this end, a scaled-up model of the harbor-vibrissa-shaped cylinder was employed for measurement, while a circular cylinder sharing the same hydraulic diameter, mass ratio and nature frequency was used as baseline case. Two configurations with and without the approaching Karman-vortex street were respectively tested for both cylinders at various free stream flow speeds. Here, the Karman-vortex street was generated by placing a circular cylinder far up stream. A laser displacement sensor having a high time-spatial resolution was used to capture the cross-stream displacement of the cylinders. The fluctuating pressure distribution on the surface and the wake flow pattern were captured by microphone array and the planar Particle Image Velocimetry, respectively. National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant nos. 51176108, and 11372189).

  20. CFD simulation of flow-induced vibration of an elastically supported airfoil

    Šidlof Petr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow-induced vibration of lifting or control surfaces in aircraft may lead to catastrophic consequences. Under certain circumstances, the interaction between the airflow and the elastic structure may lead to instability with energy transferred from the airflow to the structure and with exponentially increasing amplitudes of the structure. In the current work, a CFD simulation of an elastically supported NACA0015 airfoil with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge coupled with 2D incompressible airflow is presented. The geometry of the airfoil, mass, moment of inertia, location of the centroid, linear and torsional stiffness was matched to properties of a physical airfoil model used for wind-tunnel measurements. The simulations were run within the OpenFOAM computational package. The results of the CFD simulations were compared with the experimental data.

  1. Orientation of bluff body for designing efficient energy harvesters from vortex-induced vibrations

    The characteristics and performances of four distinct vortex-induced vibrations (VIVs) piezoelectric energy harvesters are experimentally investigated and compared. The difference between these VIV energy harvesters is the installation of the cylindrical bluff body at the tip of cantilever beam with different orientations (bottom, top, horizontal, and vertical). Experiments show that the synchronization regions of the bottom, top, and horizontal configurations are almost the same at low wind speeds (around 1.5 m/s). The vertical configuration has the highest wind speed for synchronization (around 3.5 m/s) with the largest harvested power, which is explained by its highest natural frequency and the smallest coupled damping. The results lead to the conclusion that to design efficient VIV energy harvesters, the bluff body should be aligned with the beam for low wind speeds (<2 m/s) and perpendicular to the beam at high wind speeds (>2 m/s)

  2. The acoustics of snoring.

    Pevernagie, Dirk; Aarts, Ronald M; De Meyer, Micheline

    2010-04-01

    Snoring is a prevalent disorder affecting 20-40% of the general population. The mechanism of snoring is vibration of anatomical structures in the pharyngeal airway. Flutter of the soft palate accounts for the harsh aspect of the snoring sound. Natural or drug-induced sleep is required for its appearance. Snoring is subject to many influences such as body position, sleep stage, route of breathing and the presence or absence of sleep-disordered breathing. Its presentation may be variable within or between nights. While snoring is generally perceived as a social nuisance, rating of its noisiness is subjective and, therefore, inconsistent. Objective assessment of snoring is important to evaluate the effect of treatment interventions. Moreover, snoring carries information relating to the site and degree of obstruction of the upper airway. If evidence for monolevel snoring at the site of the soft palate is provided, the patient may benefit from palatal surgery. These considerations have inspired researchers to scrutinize the acoustic characteristics of snoring events. Similarly to speech, snoring is produced in the vocal tract. Because of this analogy, existing techniques for speech analysis have been applied to evaluate snoring sounds. It appears that the pitch of the snoring sound is in the low-frequency range (noise-like', and has scattered energy content in the higher spectral sub-bands (>500 Hz). To evaluate acoustic properties of snoring, sleep nasendoscopy is often performed. Recent evidence suggests that the acoustic quality of snoring is markedly different in drug-induced sleep as compared with natural sleep. Most often, palatal surgery alters sound characteristics of snoring, but is no cure for this disorder. It is uncertain whether the perceived improvement after palatal surgery, as judged by the bed partner, is due to an altered sound spectrum. Whether some acoustic aspects of snoring, such as changes in pitch, have predictive value for the presence of

  3. A distributed parameter electromechanical and statistical model for energy harvesting from turbulence-induced vibration

    Extensive research has been done on the topics of both turbulence-induced vibration and vibration based energy harvesting; however, little effort has been put into bringing these two topics together. Preliminary experimental studies have shown that piezoelectric structures excited by turbulent flow can produce significant amounts of useful power. This research could serve to benefit applications such as powering remote, self-sustained sensors in small rivers or air ventilation systems where turbulent fluid flow is a primary source of ambient energy. A novel solution for harvesting energy in these unpredictable fluid flow environments was explored by the authors in previous work, and a harvester prototype was developed. This prototype, called piezoelectric grass, has been the focus of many experimental studies. In this paper the authors present a theoretical analysis of the piezoelectric grass harvester modeled as a single unimorph cantilever beam exposed to turbulent cross-flow. This distributed parameter model was developed using a combination of both analytical and statistical techniques. The analytical portion uses a Rayleigh–Ritz approximation method to describe the beam dynamics, and utilizes piezoelectric constitutive relationships to define the electromechanical coupling effects. The statistical portion of the model defines the turbulence-induced forcing function distributed across the beam surface. The model presented in this paper was validated using results from several experimental case studies. Preliminary results show that the model agrees quite well with experimental data. A parameter optimization study was performed with the proposed model. This study demonstrated how a new harvester could be designed to achieve maximum power output in a given turbulent fluid flow environment. (paper)

  4. Random Vibrations

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  5. Acoustic radiation- and streaming-induced microparticle velocities determined by microparticle image velocimetry in an ultrasound symmetry plane

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Laurell, Thomas; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    We present microparticle image velocimetry measurements of suspended microparticles of diameters from 0.6 to 10μm undergoing acoustophoresis in an ultrasound symmetry plane in a microchannel. The motion of the smallest particles is dominated by the Stokes drag from the induced acoustic streaming ...

  6. Acoustic-radiation-force-induced shear wave propagation in cardiac tissue

    Bouchard, Richard R.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2009-02-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) was employed to track acoustic radiation force (ARF)-induced shear waves in the myocardium of a beating heart. Shear waves were generated in and tracked through the myocardium of the left ventricular free wall (LVFW) in an in vivo heart that was exposed through a thoracotomy; matched studies were also preformed on an ex vivo myocardial specimen. Average shear wave velocities ranged from 2.22 to 2.53 m/s for the ex vivo specimen and 1.5 to 2.9 m/s (1.5-2.09 m/s during diastole; 2.9 m/s during systole) for in vivo specimens. Despite the known rotation of myocardial fiber orientation with tissue depth, there was no statistically significant shear wave velocity depth dependence observed in any of the experimental trials.

  7. Oximetry: a new non-invasive method to detect metabolic effects induced by a local application of mechanical vibration

    Mechanical vibrations application is increasingly common in clinical practice due to the effectiveness induced by these stimuli on the human body. Local vibration (LV) application allows to apply and act only where needed, focusing the treatment on the selected body segment. An experimental device for LV application was used to generate the vibrations. The aim of this study was to detect and analyze the metabolic effects induced by LV on the brachial bicep muscle by means of an oximeter. This device monitors tissue and muscle oxygenation using NIRS (Near Infrared Spectroscopy) and is able to determine the concentration of haemoglobin and oxygen saturation in the tissue. In a preliminary stage we also investigated the effects induced by LV application, by measuring blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation and temperature. These data confirmed that the effects induced by LV application are actually localized. The results of the measurements obtained using the oximeter during the vibration application, have shown a variation of the concentrations. In particular an increase of oxygenate haemoglobin was shown, probably caused by an increased muscle activity and/or a rise in local temperature detected during the application.

  8. Oximetry: a new non-invasive method to detect metabolic effects induced by a local application of mechanical vibration

    Felici, A.; Trombetta, C.; Abundo, P.; Foti, C.; Rosato, N.

    2012-10-01

    Mechanical vibrations application is increasingly common in clinical practice due to the effectiveness induced by these stimuli on the human body. Local vibration (LV) application allows to apply and act only where needed, focusing the treatment on the selected body segment. An experimental device for LV application was used to generate the vibrations. The aim of this study was to detect and analyze the metabolic effects induced by LV on the brachial bicep muscle by means of an oximeter. This device monitors tissue and muscle oxygenation using NIRS (Near Infrared Spectroscopy) and is able to determine the concentration of haemoglobin and oxygen saturation in the tissue. In a preliminary stage we also investigated the effects induced by LV application, by measuring blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation and temperature. These data confirmed that the effects induced by LV application are actually localized. The results of the measurements obtained using the oximeter during the vibration application, have shown a variation of the concentrations. In particular an increase of oxygenate haemoglobin was shown, probably caused by an increased muscle activity and/or a rise in local temperature detected during the application.

  9. Study on flow-induced vibration of a flexible weir due to fluid discharge: Effect of weir stiffness

    A fluid-elastic vibration of a thermal shield induced by the coolant discharge was experienced in the reactor vessel of SPX-1, a French fast breeder reactor. Since a similar structure is considered in the design of the Japanese Demonstration Fast Breeder Reactor, an experimental study was performed on the flow-induced vibration of a flexible weir due to fluid discharge from the upper plenum to the lower plenum. The purposes of this experiment are: (1) to clarify the vibration phenomena and (2) to confirm the effectiveness of several countermeasures for preventing the instability of the weir. In the experiment a 1/5-scale weir-coolant model for the thermal shield of the Japanese demonstration fast breeder reactor was employed as a test apparatus. Three cylindrical weirs were tested to study the effect of the stiffness of weirs. Those were 3mm and 6mm-thick polyvinyl chloride models and 2.5mm-thick aluminum model. Unstable vibration conditions were obtained by altering the fall height and the flow rate. The predominant frequencies and the amplitudes of the weir displacement and the sloshing were measured under the instability conditions. The phase differences between the weir displacement and the sloshing were also obtained. Moreover, several kinds of vibrational mitigation methods were investigated. Concerning the threshold of instability, the stiffness and the natural frequency of the weirs and the frequency ratio between the weir and sloshing were discussed. From this study, the effects of the weir stiffness on the unstable vibration of the flexible weir due to fluid discharge were clarified and the effectiveness of some of the vibrational mitigation methods were confirmed

  10. 粒子间耦合振动对液体中刚性球形粒子声辐射力的影响%Influence of coupling vibration on acoustic radiation force of rigid spherical particles in liquid

    孙秀娜; 张小凤; 常国栋; 汪艳

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic particle manipulation has wide applications in biomedical and material science fields.The control of acoustic radiation is the key technique for acoustic manipulation.In this paper,the property of the acoustic radiation force for a rigid spherical particle incidented by modulated Gaussian acoustic beam was studied through finite difference time domain method and the stress tensor equations.The effects of coupling vibration between two particles on acoustic radiation force of rigid spherical particle were analyzed in detail.Simulation results show that the axial and transverse acoustic radiation force were all increased,due to the influence of the coupling vibration on a-coustic field when two particles were present.But the relationship between the acoustic radiation force and frequency did not change apparently.The size of the particle,around the rigid spherical particle has influence on acoustic radiation force.The larger the surrounding particle,the greater the effect on acoustic radiation force.The acoustic radiation force will become ups and downs when the distance between two particles increases.The study will provide theory foundation for acoustic manipulation in actual environment.%声学粒子操控技术在生物医学、材料科学等领域具有重要的应用,而声辐射力的控制是实现声学粒子操控的关键。利用时域有限差分法结合粒子表面的应力张量方程,对刚性球形粒子在调制高斯脉冲作用下的声辐射力特性进行了研究,详细分析了声场中存在其他粒子时,粒子间耦合振动对刚性球所受声辐射力的影响。仿真结果表明:由于受到周围粒子对声场的影响,刚性球形粒子的轴向和横向声辐射力都有所增加,但辐射力随频率的变化规律基本不发生改变。不同尺寸的周围粒子对刚性球形粒子声辐射力的影响不同,尺寸越大的粒子对声辐射力的影响越大。随着粒子间距离不断增大,

  11. 测量船水下噪声预报及减振降噪技术研究%Research on underwater acoustic forecast and reduction of noise and vibration for a survey ship

    王国治; 唐曾艳; 胡玉超

    2012-01-01

    以某测量船为背景,通过有限元建模以及模拟实船动力系统的激励,在流固耦合条件下对整船进行谐响应分析.结合声学边界元软件以及统计能量分析思想,对低、中、高频段的水下辐射噪声特性进行研究及预报.在此基础上,研究控制船舶结构振动和降低水下噪声的途径.%A survey ship was taken as the research object. The harmonic vibration responses caused by the main exciting source were analyzed through the modeling and simulation with the fluid-structure interaction by means of the finite element analysis software. Underwater acoustic forecast in low frequency band was carried out with the help of the acoustic BEM( boundary elemant method) software. The research and prediction of underwater acoustic radiation characteristics in mid and high frequency band were conducted through the statistical energy analysis (SEA). On this basis, the methods to reduce vibration and underwater noise of the ship structure were researched. In accordance with engineering requirements, the secondary development of commercial software has been made for the harmonic response analysis.

  12. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    Blaeser, Susan B; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Susan B. Blaeser.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:27036268

  13. A Novel Wireless and Temperature-Compensated SAW Vibration Sensor

    Wen Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW based temperature-compensated vibration sensor utilizing a flexible Y-cut quartz cantilever beam with a relatively substantial proof mass and two one-port resonators is developed. One resonator acts as the sensing device adjacent to the clamped end for maximum strain sensitivity, and the other one is used as the reference located on clamped end for temperature compensation for vibration sensor through the differential approach. Vibration directed to the proof mass flex the cantilever, inducing relative changes in the acoustic propagation characteristics of the SAW travelling along the sensing device, and generated output signal varies in frequency as a function of vibration.  A theoretical mode using the Rayleigh method was established to determine the optimal dimensions of the cantilever beam. Coupling of Modes (COM model was used to extract the optimal design parameters of the SAW devices prior to fabrication. The performance of the developed SAW sensor attached to an antenna towards applied vibration was evaluated wirelessly by using the precise vibration table, programmable incubator chamber, and reader unit.  High vibration sensitivity of ~10.4 kHz/g, good temperature stability, and excellent linearity were observed in the wireless measurements.

  14. Vibration syndrome and vibration in pedestal grinding.

    Starck, J; Färkkilä, M; Aatola, S; Pyykkö, I; Korhonen, O.

    1983-01-01

    At one Finnish foundry all the workers had typical symptoms of vibration induced white finger (VWF) after they began using a new type of pedestal grinding machine. The objectives of this study were to establish the severity of the symptoms and the difference in vibration exposure between the new and the old machines. Vibration detection thresholds and grip forces were measured, as well as the vibration in the casting and in the wrist simultaneously. The mean latency for VWF among the grinders...

  15. A direct pedestrian-structure interaction model to characterize the human induced vibrations on slender footbridges

    Jiménez-Alonso, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the scientific community had knowledge of the human induced vibration problems in structures since the end of the 19th century, it was not until the occurrence of the vibration phenomenon happened in the Millennium Bridge (London, 2000 that the importance of the problem revealed and a higher level of attention devoted. Despite the large advances achieved in the determination of the human-structure interaction force, one of the main deficiencies of the existing models is the exclusion of the effect of changes in the footbridge dynamic properties due to the presence of pedestrians. In this paper, the formulation of a human-structure interaction model, addresses these limitations, is carried out and its reliability is verified from previously published experimental results.Aunque la comunidad científica tenía conocimiento de los problemas vibratorios inducidos por peatones en estructuras desde finales del siglo xix, no fue hasta la ocurrencia de los eventos vibratorios acontecidos en la pasarela del Milenio (Londres, 2000, cuando la importancia del problema se puso de manifiesto y se le comenzó a dedicar un mayor nivel de atención. A pesar de los grandes avances alcanzados en la caracterización de la fuerza de interacción peatón-estructura una de las principales deficiencias de los modelos existentes es la exclusión del cambio en las propiedades dinámicas de la pasarela por la presencia de peatones. En este artículo, se presenta la formulación de un modelo de interacción peatón-estructura que intenta dar respuesta a dichas limitaciones, y su validación a partir de resultados experimentales previamente publicados por otros autores.

  16. Application of acoustic diagnosis for rotating machines

    This report describes the effectiveness of the application of acoustic diagnosis using vibration data for inspecting rotating machines. We usually apply the vibration diagnosis for the inspection of rotating machines on CBM (Condition Based Maintenance). However, with the vibration diagnosis, sometimes we cannot discover the cause of abnormal sounds from rotating machines. Therefore, we tried another diagnosis. We converted the vibration data to the acoustic data and then inspected the abnormal sounds. We used the frequency filters in the acoustic analyzer for the diagnosis. This acoustic diagnosis method is helpful in transmitting the inspection techniques of rotating machines to the next generation. (author)

  17. Modeling and simulation of vortex induced vibration on the subsea riser/pipeline (GRP pipe)

    Raja Adli, Raja Nor Fauziah bt; Ibrahim, Idris

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the research work conducted to investigate the dynamics characteristics of the offshore riser pipeline due to vortex flow and to develop a model that could predict its vortex induced responses. Glass-fiber reinforced plastic (GRP) pipe is used for this study which has smaller density from the steel. A two-dimensional finite element computational method is implemented to describe the dynamic behavior of the riser. The governing equation of motion was based on Hamilton's principle, consists of the strain energy due to bending and axial deformation, kinetic energy due to both riser and internal fluid movement and also external force from currents and waves. A direct integration method namely Newmark integration scheme is proposed to solve the equation of motion. A MATLAB program code was developed to obtain the simulation results. The natural frequency and damping ratio are presented for each mode. Dynamic response of riser is shown in time-domain and the numerical results are discussed. Several parameter effects are used to investigate dynamic responses and the results show an agreement with the theory. Vortex shedding phenomenon also has been discussed in this paper. As a conclusion, the simulation results have successfully shown the vortex induced vibration responses for GRP pipeline.

  18. Modelling and numerical simulation of vortex induced vibrations of single cylinder or cylinder arrays

    This research thesis fits into the frame of researches achieved in the nuclear field in order to optimize the predictive abilities of sizing models of nuclear plant components. It more precisely addresses the modelling of the action exerted by the flowing fluid and the induced feedback by the structure dynamics. The objective is herein to investigate the interaction between the turbulence at the wall vicinity and the effects of non-conservative and potentially destabilizing unsteady coupling. The peculiar case of a single cylinder in infinite environment, and submitted to a transverse flow, is studied statically and then dynamically. The influence of flow regimes on dynamic response is characterized, and the quantification of fluid-structure interaction energy is assessed. The author then addresses the case of an array of cylinders, and highlights the contribution of three-dimensional macro-simulations for the analysis of flow-induced structure vibrations in subcritical regime within a High Performance Calculation (HPC) framework, and the interest of a CFD/CSM (computational fluid dynamics/computational structure mechanics) coupling in the case of turbulent flows in an industrial environment

  19. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists do not decrease, but may increase, acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus in rats

    Yiwen eZheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus has been suggested to arise from neuronal hyperactivity in auditory areas of the brain and anti-epileptic drugs are sometimes used to provide relief from tinnitus. Recently, the anti-epileptic properties of the cannabinoid drugs have gained increasing interest; however, the use of cannabinoids as a form of treatment for tinnitus is controversial. In the present study, we tested whether a combination of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC and cannabidiol (CBD, delivered in a 1:1 ratio, could affect tinnitus perception in a rat model of acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus. Following sham treatment or acoustic trauma, the animals were divided into the following groups: 1 sham (i.e. no acoustic trauma with vehicle treatment; 2 sham with drug treatment (i.e. delta-9-THC + CBD; 3 acoustic trauma-exposed exhibiting tinnitus, with drug treatment; and 4 acoustic trauma-exposed exhibiting no tinnitus, with drug treatment. The animals received either the vehicle or the cannabinoid drugs every day, 30 min before the tinnitus behavioural testing. Acoustic trauma caused a significant increase in the auditory brainstem response (ABR thresholds in the exposed animals, indicating hearing loss; however, there was a partial recovery over 6 months. Acoustic trauma did not always result in tinnitus; however among those that did exhibit tinnitus, some of them had tinnitus at multiple frequencies while others had it only at a single frequency. The cannabinoids significantly increased the number of tinnitus animals in the exposed-tinnitus group, but not in the sham group. The results suggest that cannabinoids may promote the development of tinnitus, especially when there is pre-existing hearing damage.

  20. Comparative Study of Bridge Structure Vortex-induced Vibration Examples and Vibration Reduction Measures%桥梁结构涡激振动实例及减振措施比较研究

    桑建设

    2013-01-01

    针对设计中不被重视的涡激共振问题,讨论了桥梁结构涡激振动及其响应分析的复杂性,介绍了几座国外大跨度桥梁结构的涡激振动问题,并比较分析了这些桥梁结构所采用的不同减振措施方案,推荐设计阶段首先选择气动控制措施来抑制桥梁涡激振动,而已建成的桥梁发生涡振病害则更适宜选用机械减振措施。%In view of the ignored problem of vortex-induced resonance in design, this article analyzes vortex-induced vibration of bridge structure and the complexity of response analysis. The vortex-induced vibration problem of some foreign large span bridge structures is introduced and different vibration reducing measures of these bridges are analyzed and compared. It is recommended that pneumatic control measures be firstly used to control the vortex-induced vibration of bridges in design phase, while for vortex-induced vibration of built-up bridges, mechanical vibration reduction measures are more appropriate.

  1. Comparative Study of Bridge Structure Vortex-induced Vibration Examples and Vibration Reduction Measures%桥梁结构涡激振动实例及减振措施比较研究

    桑建设

    2013-01-01

    In view of the ignored problem of vortex-induced resonance in design, this article analyzes vortex-induced vibration of bridge structure and the complexity of response analysis. The vortex-induced vibration problem of some foreign large span bridge structures is introduced and different vibration reducing measures of these bridges are analyzed and compared. It is recommended that pneumatic control measures be firstly used to control the vortex-induced vibration of bridges in design phase, while for vortex-induced vibration of built-up bridges, mechanical vibration reduction measures are more appropriate.%针对设计中不被重视的涡激共振问题,讨论了桥梁结构涡激振动及其响应分析的复杂性,介绍了几座国外大跨度桥梁结构的涡激振动问题,并比较分析了这些桥梁结构所采用的不同减振措施方案,推荐设计阶段首先选择气动控制措施来抑制桥梁涡激振动,而已建成的桥梁发生涡振病害则更适宜选用机械减振措施。

  2. Effect of Blast-Induced Vibration from New Railway Tunnel on Existing Adjacent Railway Tunnel in Xinjiang, China

    Liang, Qingguo; Li, Jie; Li, Dewu; Ou, Erfeng

    2013-01-01

    The vibrations of existing service tunnels induced by blast-excavation of adjacent tunnels have attracted much attention from both academics and engineers during recent decades in China. The blasting vibration velocity (BVV) is the most widely used controlling index for in situ monitoring and safety assessment of existing lining structures. Although numerous in situ tests and simulations had been carried out to investigate blast-induced vibrations of existing tunnels due to excavation of new tunnels (mostly by bench excavation method), research on the overall dynamical response of existing service tunnels in terms of not only BVV but also stress/strain seemed limited for new tunnels excavated by the full-section blasting method. In this paper, the impacts of blast-induced vibrations from a new tunnel on an existing railway tunnel in Xinjiang, China were comprehensively investigated by using laboratory tests, in situ monitoring and numerical simulations. The measured data from laboratory tests and in situ monitoring were used to determine the parameters needed for numerical simulations, and were compared with the calculated results. Based on the results from in situ monitoring and numerical simulations, which were consistent with each other, the original blasting design and corresponding parameters were adjusted to reduce the maximum BVV, which proved to be effective and safe. The effect of both the static stress before blasting vibrations and the dynamic stress induced by blasting on the total stresses in the existing tunnel lining is also discussed. The methods and related results presented could be applied in projects with similar ground and distance between old and new tunnels if the new tunnel is to be excavated by the full-section blasting method.

  3. Perception of acoustically complex phonological features in vowels is reflected in the induced brain-magnetic activity

    Obleser Jonas

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A central issue in speech recognition is which basic units of speech are extracted by the auditory system and used for lexical access. One suggestion is that complex acoustic-phonetic information is mapped onto abstract phonological representations of speech and that a finite set of phonological features is used to guide speech perception. Previous studies analyzing the N1m component of the auditory evoked field have shown that this holds for the acoustically simple feature place of articulation. Brain magnetic correlates indexing the extraction of acoustically more complex features, such as lip rounding (ROUND in vowels, have not been unraveled yet. The present study uses magnetoencephalography (MEG to describe the spatial-temporal neural dynamics underlying the extraction of phonological features. We examined the induced electromagnetic brain response to German vowels and found the event-related desynchronization in the upper beta-band to be prolonged for those vowels that exhibit the lip rounding feature (ROUND. It was the presence of that feature rather than circumscribed single acoustic parameters, such as their formant frequencies, which explained the differences between the experimental conditions. We conclude that the prolonged event-related desynchronization in the upper beta-band correlates with the computational effort for the extraction of acoustically complex phonological features from the speech signal. The results provide an additional biomagnetic parameter to study mechanisms of speech perception.

  4. Modelling and passive correction investigation of vibration induced machining errors on CNC machine tools

    Widiyarto, Muhammad Helmi Nur

    2006-01-01

    Machine tool vibration is a complex subject requiring a multi-disciplinary approach involving the identification and analysis of the vibration sources and characteristics, as well as its direct and indirect effects. Machine tool vibration is influenced and can be characterised by the machine's structural dynamics, the drive system performance and the cutting force generation. Its effect materialises in the form of poor surface finish of the workpiece, accelerated cuttingtool we...

  5. CFD simulation on flow induced vibrations in high pressure control and emergency stop turbine valve

    During the refuelling outage at Unit 2 of Forsmark NPP in 2009, the high pressure turbine valves were replaced. Three month after recommissioning, an oil pipe connected to one of the actuators was broken. Measurements showed high-frequency vibration levels. The pipe break was suspected to be an effect of highly increased vibrations caused by the new valve. In order to establish the origin of the vibrations, investigations by means of CFD-simulations were made. The simulations showed that the increased vibrations most likely stems from the open cavity that the valves centre consists of. (author)

  6. CFD simulation on flow induced vibrations in high pressure control and emergency stop turbine valve

    Lindqvist, H. [Forsmark Kraftverk AB, Osthammar (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    During the refuelling outage at Unit 2 of Forsmark NPP in 2009, the high pressure turbine valves were replaced. Three month after recommissioning, an oil pipe connected to one of the actuators was broken. Measurements showed high-frequency vibration levels. The pipe break was suspected to be an effect of highly increased vibrations caused by the new valve. In order to establish the origin of the vibrations, investigations by means of CFD-simulations were made. The simulations showed that the increased vibrations most likely stems from the open cavity that the valves centre consists of. (author)

  7. Remote sensing for flow induced vibrations in the PARR-1 core assembly

    Reactor core vibrations of the Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) have been investigated using remote technique and mechanical accelerometers. The signals taken from the reactor core grid plate and at the support structure have been compared to find out the damping. For remote sensing technique, a 1 mW He-Ne laser has been used to detect the vibration signal reflected from the mirror fixed at the dummy fuel assembly on a grid plate. In comparison with the vibrations at the core and at the support structure, it was observed that the vibrations were damped by a factor of 38%

  8. Remote sensing for flow induced vibrations in the PARR-1 core assembly

    Hussain, Akhtar; Ayazuddin, S.K.; Ikram, Masroor E-mail: masroori@yahoo.com; Mudassar, Asloob A.; Qureshi, Arif A.; Iqbal, Masood

    2001-04-01

    Reactor core vibrations of the Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) have been investigated using remote technique and mechanical accelerometers. The signals taken from the reactor core grid plate and at the support structure have been compared to find out the damping. For remote sensing technique, a 1 mW He-Ne laser has been used to detect the vibration signal reflected from the mirror fixed at the dummy fuel assembly on a grid plate. In comparison with the vibrations at the core and at the support structure, it was observed that the vibrations were damped by a factor of 38%.

  9. Analysis of the Nonlinear Structural-Acoustic Resonant Frequencies of a Rectangular Tube with a Flexible End Using Harmonic Balance and Homotopy Perturbation Methods

    Y. Y. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural acoustic problem considered in this study is the nonlinear resonant frequencies of a rectangular tube with one open end, one flexible end, and four rigid side walls A multiacoustic single structural modal formulation is derived from two coupled partial differential equations which represent the large amplitude structural vibration of the flexible end and acoustic pressure induced within the tube. The results obtained from the harmonic balance and homotopy perturbation approaches verified each other. The effects of vibration amplitude, aspect ratio, the numbers of acoustic modes and harmonic terms, and so forth, on the first two resonant natural frequencies, are examined.

  10. Vortex-induced vibration of two parallel risers: Experimental test and numerical simulation

    Huang, Weiping; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Haiming

    2016-04-01

    The vortex-induced vibration of two identical rigidly mounted risers in a parallel arrangement was studied using Ansys- CFX and model tests. The vortex shedding and force were recorded to determine the effect of spacing on the two-degree-of-freedom oscillation of the risers. CFX was used to study the single riser and two parallel risers in 2-8 D spacing considering the coupling effect. Because of the limited width of water channel, only three different riser spacings, 2 D, 3 D, and 4 D, were tested to validate the characteristics of the two parallel risers by comparing to the numerical simulation. The results indicate that the lift force changes significantly with the increase in spacing, and in the case of 3 D spacing, the lift force of the two parallel risers reaches the maximum. The vortex shedding of the risers in 3 D spacing shows that a variable velocity field with the same frequency as the vortex shedding is generated in the overlapped area, thus equalizing the period of drag force to that of lift force. It can be concluded that the interaction between the two parallel risers is significant when the risers are brought to a small distance between them because the trajectory of riser changes from oval to curve 8 as the spacing is increased. The phase difference of lift force between the two risers is also different as the spacing changes.

  11. Simplified Prediction Model for Vortex-Induced Vibrations of Top Tensioned Risers

    2008-01-01

    According to the characteristics of deepwater top tensioned risers, a simplified model is presented to predict the multi-modal response of vortex-induced vibration (VIV) in non-uniform flow based on energy equilibrium theory and the experimental data from VIV self-excited and forced oscillations of rigid cylinders. The response amplitude of each mode is determined by a balance between the energy fed into the riser over the lock-in regions and the energy dissipated by the fluid damping over the remainders. Compared with the previous prediction models, this method can take fully account of the intrinsic nature of VIV for low mass ratio structures on lock-in regions, added mass and nonlinear fluid damping effect, etc. Moreover, it is the first time to propose the accurate calculating procedure for VIV amplitude correction factor by solving energy equilibrium equation and a closed form solution is presented for the case of a riser of uniform mass and cross-section oscillating in a uniform flow. The predicted values show a reasonable agreement with VIV experiments of riser models in stepped and sheared currents.

  12. Simulation analyses of vibration tests on pile-group effects using blast-induced ground motions

    Extensive vibration tests have been performed on pile-supported structures at a large-scale mining site to promote better understanding of the dynamic behavior of pile-supported structures, especially pile-group effects. Two test structures were constructed in an excavated pit. One structure was supported on 25 tubular steel piles and the other on 4. The test pit was backfilled with sand of an appropriate grain size distribution to ensure good compaction. Ground motions induced by large-scale blasting operations were used as excitation forces for the tests. The 3D Finite Element Method (3D FEM)and a Genetic Algorithm (GA) were employed to identify the shear wave velocities and damping factors of the compacted sand, especially of the surface layer. A beam-interaction spring model was employed to simulate the test results of the piles and the pile-supported structures. The superstructure and pile foundation were modeled by a one-stick model comprising lumped masses and beam elements. The pile foundations were modeled just as they were, with lumped masses and beam elements to simulate the test results showing that, for the 25-pile structure, piles at different locations showed different responses. It was confirmed that the analysis methods employed were very useful for evaluating the nonlinear behavior of the soil-pile-structure system, even under severe ground motions. (authors)

  13. Flow-induced vibration for light water reactors. Progress report, January-June 1980

    Flow-Induced Vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a four-year program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program is managed by the General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department and has three major contributors: General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department (NPSED), General Electric Corporate Research and Development (CR and D) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The program commenced December 1, 1976, but was suspended on September 30, 1978, due to a shift in Department of Energy (DOE) priorities away from LWR productivity/availability. It was reinitiated as of August 1, 1979. A second program suspension occurred from March 29, 1980 through May 16, 1980, due to funding limits. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the period from Janury 1980 to June 1980

  14. Experimental investigation on vortex-induced vibration of steel catenary riser

    Fan, Yu-ting; Mao, Hai-ying; Guo, Hai-yan; Liu, Qing-hai; Li, Xiao-min

    2015-10-01

    Steel catenary riser (SCR) is the transmission device between the seabed and the floating production facilities. As developments move into deeper water, the fatigue life of the riser can become critical to the whole production system, especially due to the vortex-induced vibration (VIV), which is the key factor to operational longevity. As a result, experimental investigation about VIV of the riser was performed in a large plane pool which is 60 m long, 36 m wide and 6.5 m deep. Experiments were developed to study the influence of current speed and seabed on VIV of SCR. The results show that amplitudes of strain and response frequencies increase with the current speed both in cross-flow (CF) and in-line (IL). When the current speed is high, multi-mode response is observed in the VIV motion. The amplitudes of strain in IL direction are not much smaller than those in CF direction. The seabed has influence on the response frequencies of riser and the positions of damage for riser.

  15. Predicting wind-induced vibrations of high-rise buildings using unsteady CFD and modal analysis

    Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the wind-induced vibration of the CAARC standard tall building model, via unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and a structural modal analysis. In this numerical procedure, the natural unsteady wind in the atmospheric boundary layer is modeled with an artificial inflow turbulence generation method. Then, the turbulent flow is simulated by the second mode of a Zonal Detached-Eddy Simulation, and a conservative quadrature-projection scheme is adopted to transfer unsteady loads from fluid to structural nodes. The aerodynamic damping that represents the fluid-structure interaction mechanism is determined by empirical functions extracted from wind tunnel experiments. Eventually, the flow solutions and the structural responses in terms of mean and root mean square quantities are compared with experimental measurements, over a wide range of reduced velocities. The significance of turbulent inflow conditions and aeroelastic effects is highlighted. The current methodology provides predictions of good accuracy and can be considered as a preliminary design tool to evaluate the unsteady wind effects on tall buildings.

  16. Flow-induced vibration specifications for steam generators and liquid heat exchangers

    It is desirable to avoid vibration problems by following appropriate guidelines and specifications at the design stage. Accordingly, design specifications were developed to prevent tube failures due to vibration in nuclear steam generators and liquid heat exchangers. These specifications are outlined in this report. (author). 14 refs., 2 figs

  17. Analysis of flow-induced vibration of heat exchanger and steam generator tube bundles using the AECL computer code PIPEAU-2

    PIPEAU-2 is a computer code developed at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories for the flow-induced vibration analysis of heat exchanger and steam generator tube bundles. It can perform this analysis for straight and 'U' tubes. All the theoretical work underlying the code is analytical rather than numerical in nature. Highly accurate evaluation of the free vibration frequencies and mode shapes is therefore obtained. Using the latest experimentally determined parameters available, the free vibration analysis is followed by a forced vibration analysis. Tube response due to fluid turbulence and vortex shedding is determined, as well as critical fluid velocity associated with fluid-elastic instability

  18. Study on optical attenuation performance of special stock power optical cable based on a wind induced vibration environment in laboratory

    Li, Jie; Zhao, Ziyuan

    2010-08-01

    For the purpose of 10G communication system upgrade for Guangdong Power Grid, laboratory simulation tests on dynamic and temperature cycle are performed for the reserved cables (stock optical cables) of existing 2.5G special optical cable lines that have operated for ten years, in order to verify the possibility of optical cable to be upgraded to a 10G transmission level and evaluate the degradation level of optical cables. This paper points out the necessity of laboratory test on attenuation performance in a wind-induced vibration environment, describes the test methods thereof, summarizes and analyzes a variety of optical attenuation performance data, and finds that the attenuation performance of current OPGW, ADSS, ADL optical fiber lines in wind-induced vibration environment meets the industry standards.

  19. Local amplification of deep mining induced vibrations - Part.2: Simulation of the ground motion in a coal basin

    Semblat, Jean-François; Driad-Lebeau, L; Bonnet, Guy; 10.1016/j.soildyn.2010.04.006

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the impact of deep coal mining induced vibrations on surface constructions using numerical tools. An experimental study of the geological site amplification and of its influence on mining induced vibrations has already been published in a previous paper (Part 1: Experimental evidence for site effects in a coal basin). Measurements have shown the existence of an amplification area in the southern part of the basin where drilling data have shown the presence of particularly fractured and soft stratigraphic units. The present study, using the Boundary Element Method (BEM) in the frequency domain, first investigates canonical geological structures in order to get general results for various sites. The amplification level at the surface is given as a function of the shape of the basin and of the velocity contrast with the bedrock. Next, the particular coal basin previously studied experimentally (Driad-Lebeau et al., 2009) is modeled numerically by BEM. The amplification phenomena characteri...

  20. Micro-vibrating spatial filters-induced beam positioning stability in large laser system

    Fang Liu; Jianqiang Zhu; Jia Xu; Quanyuan Shan; Kun Xiao; Xuejie Zhang

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic beam propagation model of micro-vibrating spatial filters in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities is built based on the additional beam in SG-Ⅱ facility.The transfer matrix is then deduced,and the sensitivities of the beam positioning to the pellet in the target area to the vibrations of every spatial filter are analyzed,which indicates that the vibrations of spatial filters in the pre-amplify zone has less effects on beam positioning stability at the target.In addition,the vibrations of spatial filters in the main amplify zone dominates the beam positioning stability of the target,especially the vibration of the spatial filter SF7.

  1. Negative refraction induced acoustic concentrator and the effects of scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage

    Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2012-07-01

    We present a three-dimensional acoustic concentrator capable of significantly enhancing the sound intensity in the compressive region with scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage effects. The concentrator shell is built by isotropic gradient negative-index materials, which together with an exterior host medium slab constructs a pair of complementary media. The enhancement factor, which can approach infinity by tuning the geometric parameters, is always much higher than that of a traditional concentrator made by positive-index materials with the same size. The acoustic scattering theory is applied to derive the pressure field distribution of the concentrator, which is consistent with the numerical full-wave simulations. The inherent acoustic impedance match at the interfaces of the shell as well as the inverse processes of “negative refraction—progressive curvature—negative refraction” for arbitrary sound rays can exactly cancel the scattering of the concentrator. In addition, the concentrator shell can also function as an acoustic spherical magnifying superlens, which produces a perfect image with the same shape, with bigger geometric and acoustic parameters located at a shifted position. Then some acoustic mirages are observed whereby the waves radiated from (scattered by) an object located in the center region may seem to be radiated from (scattered by) its image. Based on the mirage effect, we further propose an intriguing acoustic transformer which can transform the sound scattering pattern of one object into another object at will with arbitrary geometric, acoustic, and location parameters.

  2. Theoretical study of time-dependent, ultrasound-induced acoustic streaming in microchannels

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    frequency domain. Scaling analysis reveals that the acoustic resonance builds up much faster than the acoustic streaming, implying that the radiation force may dominate over the drag force from streaming even for small particles. However, our numerical time-dependent analysis indicates that pulsed actuation...

  3. Vibro-acoustical instabilities induced by combustion dynamics in gas turbine combustors

    Pozarlik, Artur

    2010-01-01

    The lean premixed combustion suffers from a high sensitivity to thermo-acoustic instabilities which may occur in a combustion chamber of a gas turbine. The high level of acoustic excitation is hazardous to the combustion chamber walls (liner). The situation is even worse when mutual interaction betw

  4. Laser-induced acoustic landmine detection with experimental results on buried landmines

    Heuvel, J.C. van den; Putten, F.J.M. van; Koersel, A.C. van; Schleijpen, H.M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic landmine detection (ALD) is a technique for the detection of buried landmines including non-metal mines. Since it gives complementary results with GPR or metal detection, sensor fusion of these techniques with acoustic detection would give promising results. Two methods are used for the aco

  5. Electron-Induced Vibrational Spectroscopy. A New and Unique Tool To Unravel the Molecular Structure of Polymer Surfaces

    Pireaux, J. J.; Gregoire, Ch.; Caudano, R.; Rei Vilar, M.; Brinkhuis, R; Schouten, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Among the surface-sensitive spectroscopies used to characterize clean and surface-modified polymers, one technique has rather recently emerged as a very promising complementary tool. High-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy, or electron-induced vibrational spectroscopy, has potentially all the attributes of the well-known optical (infrared and Raman) spectroscopies; it clearly adds to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy the possibility to go beyond surface elemental and chemical analysi...

  6. Enhanced excitation of Giant Pairing Vibrations in heavy-ion reactions induced by weakly-bound projectiles

    Fortunato, L; Sofia, H M; Vitturi, A

    2002-01-01

    The use of radioactive ion beams is shown to offer the possibility to study collective pairing states at high excitation energy, which are not usually accessible with stable projectiles because of large energy mismatch. In the case of two-neutron stripping reactions induced by 6He, we predict a population of the Giant Pairing Vibration in 208Pb or 116Sn with cross sections of the order of a millibarn, dominating over the mismatched transition to the ground state.

  7. Efficiency of drug delivery enhanced by acoustic pressure during blood–brain barrier disruption induced by focused ultrasound

    Yang, Feng-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Feng-Yi Yang, Pei-Yi LeeDepartment of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, TaiwanPurpose: We evaluated the delivery efficiency of intravenously injected large molecular agents, before and after disruption of the blood–brain barrier (BBB-D), induced by focused ultrasound (FUS) using various acoustic parameters.Materials and methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intravenously with Evans blue (EB) before or after BBB-D induction...

  8. Surface acoustic wave-induced precise particle manipulation in a trapezoidal glass microfluidic channel

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) excitation of an acoustic field in a trapezoidal glass microfluidic channel for particle manipulation in continuous flow has been demonstrated. A unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a Y-cut Z-propagation lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate was used to excite a surface acoustic wave at approximately 35 MHz. An SU8 layer was used for adhesive bonding of the superstrate glass layer and the substrate piezoelectric layer. This work extends the use of SAWs for acoustic manipulation to also include glass channels in addition to prior work with mainly poly-di-methyl-siloxane channels. Efficient alignment of 1.9 µm polystyrene particles to narrow nodal regions was successfully demonstrated. In addition, particle alignment with only one IDT active was realized. A finite element method simulation was used to visualize the acoustic field generated in the channel and the possibility of 2D alignment into small nodal regions was demonstrated

  9. Acoustic module of the Acquabona (Italy debris flow monitoring system

    A. Galgaro

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of debris flows aimed to the assessment of their physical parameters is very important both for theoretical and practical purposes. Peak discharge and total volume of debris flows are crucial for designing effective countermeasures in many populated mountain areas where losses of lives and property damage could be avoided. This study quantifies the relationship between flow depth, acoustic amplitude of debris flow induced ground vibrations and front velocity in the experimental catchment of Acquabona, Eastern Dolomites, Italy. The analysis of data brought about the results described in the following. Debris flow depth and amplitude of the flow-induced ground vibrations show a good positive correlation. Estimation of both mean front velocity and peak discharge can be simply obtained monitoring the ground vibrations, through geophones installed close to the flow channel; the total volume of debris flow can be so directly estimated from the integral of the ground vibrations using a regression line. The application of acoustic technique to debris flow monitoring seems to be of the outmost relevance in risk reduction policies and in the correct management of the territory. Moreover this estimation is possible in other catchments producing debris flows of similar characteristics by means of their acoustic characterisation through quick and simple field tests (Standard Penetration Tests and seismic refraction surveys.

  10. Acoustic module of the Acquabona (Italy) debris flow monitoring system

    Galgaro, A.; Tecca, P. R.; Genevois, R.; Deganutti, A. M.

    2005-02-01

    Monitoring of debris flows aimed to the assessment of their physical parameters is very important both for theoretical and practical purposes. Peak discharge and total volume of debris flows are crucial for designing effective countermeasures in many populated mountain areas where losses of lives and property damage could be avoided. This study quantifies the relationship between flow depth, acoustic amplitude of debris flow induced ground vibrations and front velocity in the experimental catchment of Acquabona, Eastern Dolomites, Italy. The analysis of data brought about the results described in the following. Debris flow depth and amplitude of the flow-induced ground vibrations show a good positive correlation. Estimation of both mean front velocity and peak discharge can be simply obtained monitoring the ground vibrations, through geophones installed close to the flow channel; the total volume of debris flow can be so directly estimated from the integral of the ground vibrations using a regression line. The application of acoustic technique to debris flow monitoring seems to be of the outmost relevance in risk reduction policies and in the correct management of the territory. Moreover this estimation is possible in other catchments producing debris flows of similar characteristics by means of their acoustic characterisation through quick and simple field tests (Standard Penetration Tests and seismic refraction surveys).

  11. Operational modal analysis of flow-induced vibration of nuclear fuel rods in a turbulent axial flow

    Highlights: • We describe an analysis technique to evaluate nuclear fuel pins. • We test a single fuel pin mockup subjected to turbulent axial flow. • Our analysis is based on operational modal analysis (OMA). • The accuracy and precision of our method is higher compared to traditional methods. • We demonstrate the possible onset of a fluid-elastic instability. - Abstract: Flow-induced vibration of nuclear reactor fuel pins can result in mechanical noise and lead to failure of the reactor's fuel assembly. This problem can be exacerbated in the new generation of liquid heavy metal fast reactors that use a much denser and more viscous coolant in the reactor core. An investigation of the flow-induced vibration in these particular conditions is therefore essential. In this paper, we describe an analysis technique to evaluate flow-induced vibration of nuclear reactor fuel pins subjected to a turbulent axial flow of heavy metal. We deal with a single fuel pin mockup designed for the lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled MYRRHA reactor which is subjected to similar flow conditions as in the reactor core. Our analysis is based on operational modal analysis (OMA) techniques. We show that the accuracy and precision of our OMA technique is higher compared to traditional methods and that it allows evaluating the evolution of modal parameters in operational conditions. We also demonstrate the possible onset of a fluid-elastic instability by tracking the modal parameters with increasing flow velocity

  12. Operational modal analysis of flow-induced vibration of nuclear fuel rods in a turbulent axial flow

    De Pauw, B., E-mail: bdepauw@vub.ac.be [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels Photonics Team (B-Phot), Brussels (Belgium); Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Department of Mechanical Engineering (AVRG), Brussels (Belgium); Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, Mol (Belgium); Weijtjens, W.; Vanlanduit, S. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Department of Mechanical Engineering (AVRG), Brussels (Belgium); Van Tichelen, K. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, Mol (Belgium); Berghmans, F. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels Photonics Team (B-Phot), Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • We describe an analysis technique to evaluate nuclear fuel pins. • We test a single fuel pin mockup subjected to turbulent axial flow. • Our analysis is based on operational modal analysis (OMA). • The accuracy and precision of our method is higher compared to traditional methods. • We demonstrate the possible onset of a fluid-elastic instability. - Abstract: Flow-induced vibration of nuclear reactor fuel pins can result in mechanical noise and lead to failure of the reactor's fuel assembly. This problem can be exacerbated in the new generation of liquid heavy metal fast reactors that use a much denser and more viscous coolant in the reactor core. An investigation of the flow-induced vibration in these particular conditions is therefore essential. In this paper, we describe an analysis technique to evaluate flow-induced vibration of nuclear reactor fuel pins subjected to a turbulent axial flow of heavy metal. We deal with a single fuel pin mockup designed for the lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled MYRRHA reactor which is subjected to similar flow conditions as in the reactor core. Our analysis is based on operational modal analysis (OMA) techniques. We show that the accuracy and precision of our OMA technique is higher compared to traditional methods and that it allows evaluating the evolution of modal parameters in operational conditions. We also demonstrate the possible onset of a fluid-elastic instability by tracking the modal parameters with increasing flow velocity.

  13. A self-resonant micro flow velocity sensor based on a resonant frequency shift by flow-induced vibration

    We report the development of a self-resonant flow sensor based on a resonant frequency shift due to flow-induced vibrations. The vibration of a microcantilever beam, induced by a turbulent flow, is modulated with its own natural frequency, and the resonant frequency is shifted by a surface stress on the beam due to fluid drag force. The vibration induced by air flow is measured by using a piezoelectric PZT material on a silicon cantilever beam. The theoretical resonant frequencies of two cantilever beams (lengths: 610 µm and 2000 µm) are 12416 Hz and 1155 Hz, respectively. For the air flow velocities of 2.8 m s−1 and 9.7 m s−1, the shifted resonant frequencies of the cantilever beam whose length is 610 µm are 12 810 Hz and 15 602 Hz, respectively. Sensitivities of the two self-resonant flow sensors with the 610 and 2000 µm long beams are approximately 384 ± 15 Hz/(m/s) and 20.4 ± 0.6 Hz/(m/s), respectively.

  14. Full-wave acoustic and thermal modeling of transcranial ultrasound propagation and investigation of skull-induced aberration correction techniques: a feasibility study

    Kyriakou, Adamos; Neufeld, Esra; Werner, Beat; Székely, Gábor; Kuster, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Background Transcranial focused ultrasound (tcFUS) is an attractive noninvasive modality for neurosurgical interventions. The presence of the skull, however, compromises the efficiency of tcFUS therapy, as its heterogeneous nature and acoustic characteristics induce significant distortion of the acoustic energy deposition, focal shifts, and thermal gain decrease. Phased-array transducers allow for partial compensation of skull-induced aberrations by application of precalculated phase and ampl...

  15. Full-wave acoustic and thermal modeling of transcranial ultrasound propagation and investigation of skull-induced aberration correction techniques: a feasibility study

    Kyriakou, Adamos; Neufeld, Esra; Werner, Beat; Székely, Gábor; Kuster, Niels

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transcranial focused ultrasound (tcFUS) is an attractive noninvasive modality for neurosurgical interventions. The presence of the skull, however, compromises the efficiency of tcFUS therapy, as its heterogeneous nature and acoustic characteristics induce significant distortion of the acoustic energy deposition, focal shifts, and thermal gain decrease. Phased-array transducers allow for partial compensation of skull-induced aberrations by application of precalculated phase and amp...

  16. Characteristics of ultrasonic acoustic emissions from walnut branches during freeze-thaw-induced embolism formation.

    Kasuga, Jun; Charrier, Guillaume; Uemura, Matsuo; Améglio, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic emission (UAE) methods have been applied for the detection of freeze-thaw-induced embolism formation in water conduits of tree species. Until now, however, the exact source(s) of UAE has not been identified especially in angiosperm species, in which xylem tissues are composed of diverse types of cells. In this study, UAE was recorded from excised branches of walnut (Juglans regia cv. Franquette) during freeze-thaw cycles, and attempts were made to characterize UAEs generated by cavitation events leading to embolism formation according to their properties. During freeze-thaw cycles, a large number of UAEs were generated from the sample segments. However, the cumulative numbers of total UAE during freeze-thawing were not correlated with the percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity after thawing, suggesting that the sources of UAE were not only cavitation leading to embolism formation in vessels. Among the UAEs, cumulative numbers of UAEs with absolute energy >10.0 fJ strongly correlated with the increase in percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity. The high absolute energy of the UAEs might reflect the formation of large bubbles in the large lumen of vessels. Therefore, UAEs generated by cavitation events in vessels during freeze-thawing might be distinguished from other signals according to their magnitudes of absolute energy. On the other hand, the freezing of xylem parenchyma cells was followed by a certain number of UAEs. These results indicate the possibility that UAE methods can be applied to the detection of both freeze-thaw-induced embolism and supercooling breakdown in parenchyma cells in xylem. PMID:25662846

  17. Development of the magnetic force-induced dual vibration energy harvester using a unimorph cantilever

    Umaba, M.; Nakamachi, E.; Morita, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a high frequency piezoelectric energy harvester converted from the human low vibrated motion energy was newly developed. This hybrid energy harvester consists of the unimorph piezoelectric cantilever, the pendulum and a pair of permanent magnets. One magnet was attached at the edge of cantilever, and the counterpart magnet at the edge of pendulum. The mechanical energy provided through the human walking motion, which is a typical ubiquitous existence of vibration, is converted to the electric energy via the piezoelectric unimorph cantilever vibration. At first, we studied the energy convert mechanism and analyze the performance of novel energy harvester, where the resonance free vibration of unimorph piezoelectric cantilever generated a high electric power. Next, we equipped the counterpart permanent magnet at the edge of pendulum, which vibrates with a very low frequency caused by the human walking. Then the counterpart magnet was set at the edge of unimorph piezoelectric cantilever, which vibrated with a high frequency. This low-to-high frequency convert "dual vibration system" can be characterized as an enhanced energy harvester. We examined and obtained average values of voltage and power in this system, as 8.31 mV and 0.33 μW. Those results show the possibility to apply for the energy harvester in the portable and implantable Bio-MEMS devices.

  18. Predictions and observations of low-shear beta-induced shear Alfven-acoustic eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas

    Gorelenkov, N.N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University (United States)], E-mail: ngorelen@pppl.gov; Berk, H.L. [IFS, Austin, Texas (United States); Fredrickson, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University (United States); Sharapov, S.E. [Euroatom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United States)

    2007-10-08

    New global MHD eigenmode solutions arising in gaps in the low frequency Alfven-acoustic continuum below the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) frequency have been found numerically and have been used to explain relatively low frequency experimental signals seen in NSTX and JET tokamaks. These global eigenmodes, referred to here as Beta-induced Alfven-Acoustic Eigenmodes (BAAE), exist in the low magnetic safety factor region near the extrema of the Alfven-acoustic continuum. In accordance to the linear dispersion relations, the frequency of these modes shifts as the safety factor, q, decreases. We show that BAAEs can be responsible for observations in JET plasmas at relatively low beta <2% as well as in NSTX plasmas at relatively high-beta >20%. In contrast to the mostly electrostatic character of GAMs the new global modes also contain an electromagnetic (magnetic field line bending) component due to the Alfven coupling, leading to wave phase velocities along the field line that are large compared to the sonic speed. Qualitative agreement between theoretical predictions and observations are found.

  19. Predictions and Observations of Low-shear Beta-induced Alfvén-acoustic Eigenmodes in Toroidal Plasmas

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Berk, H. L.; Fredrickson, E.; Sharapov, S. E.

    2007-07-02

    New global MHD eigenmode solutions arising in gaps in the low frequency Alfvén -acoustic continuum below the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) frequency have been found numerically and have been used to explain relatively low frequency experimental signals seen in NSTX and JET tokamaks. These global eigenmodes, referred to here as Beta-induced Alfvén-Acoustic Eigenmodes (BAAE), exist in the low magnetic safety factor region near the extrema of the Alfvén-acoustic continuum. In accordance to the linear dispersion relations, the frequency of these modes shifts as the safety factor, q, decreases. We show that BAAEs can be responsible for observations in JET plasmas at relatively low beta < 2% as well as in NSTX plasmas at relatively high beta > 20%. In contrast to the mostly electrostatic character of GAMs the new global modes also contain an electromagnetic (magnetic field line bending) component due to the Alfvén coupling, leading to wave phase velocities along the field line that are large compared to the sonic speed. Qualitative agreement between theoretical predictions and observations are found.

  20. A Numerical Study of the Screening Effectiveness of Open Trenches for High-Speed Train-Induced Vibration

    Chih-hung Chiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used the 2D boundary element method in time domain to examine the screening effectiveness of open trenches on reducing vibration generated by a high-speed train. The parameters included configurations of the trench, train speed, the distance between the source and the trench, and the Poisson’s ratio of the soil. A reducing displacement level (in dB scale was defined and used to evaluate the screening effectiveness of a wave barrier. The maximal reducing displacement level reached 25 dB when an open trench was used as a wave barrier. The depth of an open trench is a main influential parameter of screening effectiveness. The cutoff frequency of the displacement spectrum increases with decreasing trench depth. The maximal screening effectiveness occurs when the depth is 0.3-0.4 Rayleigh wavelength. Using an open trench as a wave barrier can reduce 10–25 dB of vibration amplitude at frequencies between 30 and 70 Hz. A considerable increase in screening effectiveness of the open trench was observed from 30 to 70 Hz, which matches the main frequencies of vibration induced by Taiwan High Speed Rail. The influence of trench width on screening effectiveness is nonsignificant except for frequencies from 30 to 40 Hz. Poisson’s ratio has various effects on the reduction of vibration at frequencies higher than 30 Hz.

  1. Flow-Induced Vibration Measurement of an Inner Cladding Tube in a Simulated Dual-Cooled Fuel Rod

    To create an internal coolant flow passage in a dual cooled fuel rod, an inner cladding tube cannot have intermediate supports enough to relieve its vibration. Thus it can be suffered from a flow-induced vibration (FIV) more severely than an outer cladding tube which will be supported by series of spacer grids. It may cause a fatigue failure at welding joints on the cladding's end plug or fluid elastic instability of long, slender inner cladding due to decrease of a critical flow velocity. This is one of the challenging technical issues when a dual cooled fuel assembly is to be realized into a conventional reactor core To study an actual vibration phenomenon of a dual cooled fuel rod, FIV tests using a small-scale test bundle are being carried out. Measurement results of inner cladding tube of two typically simulated rods are presented. Causes of the differences in the vibration amplitude and response spectrum of the inner cladding tube in terms of intermediate support condition and pellet stacking are discussed

  2. 声学超材料在低频减振降噪中的应用评述%Application of Acoustic Metamaterials in Low-frequency Vibration and Noise Reduction

    吴九汇; 马富银; 张思文; 沈礼

    2016-01-01

    The low-frequency mechanical wave has stronger penetration capability in dissemination process, so it is hard to be attenuated. Especially in infrasound range, the mechanical wave could resonance with body organs easily, and causing harm to health. In order to effectivly control the low-frequency mechanical wave, the solution for noise pollution problems in modern industrial production and daily life is given, by combining with the phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials that have been developed in last decade. New methods for low-frequency vibration and noise reduction based on phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials are systematically summarized and discussed.Typical sources of low-frequency vibration and noise, the existence difficulties to control it, and the harms to human body are summarized. The related works that passively control the low-frequency vibration and noise based on acoustic band gap characteristics of photonic crystal are summarized. Particularly, the specific methods and effects to achieve low-frequency vibration and noise attenuation by rod, plate and membrane structures with subwavelength size characteristics are reviewed. In the framework of the acoustic metamaterials, the applications of membrane-type structures in low-frequency vibration and noise attenuation, its advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Through a combination of practical engineering and the latest research developments, the problems still exist in this field and future trends are summarized. The result has some guiding value to promot the application of phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials in engineering practice.%低频机械波在传播过程中穿透力强,难以衰减,特别是次声频段的机械波易与机体器官发生共振,对身体造成危害。为了实现对低频机械波的有效控制,解决现代工业生产和生活中普遍存在的噪声污染问题,结合最近十几年发展起来的声子晶体和声学超材料,

  3. Effect of Ultrasonic Vibration on Unmixed Zone Formation

    Cui, Yan [ORNL; Xu, Cailu [ORNL; Han, Qingyou [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasonic vibration was introduced into the molten super-austenitic-stainless weld metal during the shielded metal arc welding process. It was observed that the unmixed zone in the weld metal was completely eliminated by high-intensity ultrasonic vibrations. This is mainly due to a complete mixing of the molten filler metal and base metal, at the freezing front, caused by the acoustically induced cavitation and streaming. The elimination of the unmixed zone can significantly enhance the corrosion resistance of the weldment because the unmixed zone is the preferential location for the corrosion attack.

  4. Visualization of unsteady flow around a vibrating profile

    Vlček, Václav; Horáček, Jaromír; Luxa, Martin; Veselý, Jan

    Praha: Institute of Thermomechanics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v. v. i., 2008 - (Zolotarev, I.; Horáček, J.), s. 531-536 ISBN 80-87012-12-7. [International Conference on Flow Induced Vibration /9./ FIV2008. Praha (CZ), 30.06.2008-03.07.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200760613 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : aeroelasticity * flutter * schlieren and interferomety methods Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  5. Measurements of seismic vibrations induced by Quarry blasts at the Mostecká basin

    Kaláb, Zdeněk

    -, č. 271 (2006), s. 49-58. ISSN 0372-9508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : seismic vibration * slope stability * quarry blast Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  6. Application of flow-induced vibration predictive techniques to operating steam generators

    Analytical techniques for flow-induced vibration (FIV), such as those incorporated in available design tools, are routinely applied to process equipment at the initial design stage. Unfortunately, this does not always apply to the situation when problems, related to FIV, develop in crucial operating equipment, since design uses conservative methods, whereas in-service applications require more realistic assessments. Usually these problems appear in the form of severe through wall fret flaws or fatigue cracks that compromise the integrity of the tubes and possibly the complete unit. It is here where a somewhat different approach must be taken in the evaluation of tube response to FIV. Tube damage from fretting wear or fatigue crack growth must be estimated from actual in situ operating conditions. In this paper, an overview of the predictive methods used in the development and/or qualification of remedial measures for problems that occur in operating process equipment along with applications are described. The steps in the evaluation procedure, from the prediction of flow regimes, the development of the nonlinear computer models and associated fluid forcing functions through to the estimates of tube damage in operating heat exchangers and steam generators are presented. A probabilistic (i.e. Monte Carlo simulation) FIV approach that readily accommodates uncertainties associated with damage predictions is summarized. The efficacy of this approach comes from the fact that probabilistic methods facilitate the incorporation of field data, and that a large number of tubes and possible variations in geometry, process and support conditions, usually present in such equipment, can be addressed effectively. (author)

  7. Flow-induced vibration for light water reactors. Progress report, December 1976--May 1977

    The report describes the program objectives, overall work plans, and progress achieved. A description is also given of the related state-of-the-art flow-induced vibration (FIV) technology which represents the starting point of the program. The program has been developed to increase plant availability through substantially reducing downtime caused by FIV failure of components. It is a four-year balanced effort of fundamental studies, analyses, tests of idealized conditions, and realistic tests of reactor components, all leading to the preparation of design guides and criteria for LWR's. The specific goals of the program are to: (1) produce improved FIV design criteria; (2) provide improved analytical methods for predicting behavior of components; (3) provide general scaling laws which will improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests (required for those situations where it is impossible to predict the FIV response analytically or through full-scale testing); and (4) identify high FIV risk areas. To achieve these goals, the program has been divided into four major tasks: (1) fundamental studies; (2) model and full-size tests; (3) design methods, guides and criteria; and (4) program administration. Task 1 will provide a better understanding of FIV phenomena through a combination of fundamental tests and analyses of geometries common in LWR's and mechanisms which can cause FIV. The studies will systematically vary parameters using relatively small-scale idealized geometries and controlled flow fields. Task 2 will verify and extend the results of Task 1 through the testing of realistic LWR component geometries. Task 3 will develop analytical methods, as well as utilize the results of Tasks 1 and 2 to produce design guides, predictive models, and scaling laws. Task 4 will administrate the program, as well as insure that pressure water reactor (PWR) needs are given proper consideration

  8. Vortex-induced vibration effect on fatigue life estimate of turbine blades

    Lau, Y. L.; Leung, R. C. K.; So, R. M. C.

    2007-11-01

    An analysis of a turbine blade fatigue life that includes the physics of fluid-structure interaction on the high cycle fatigue (HCF) life estimate of turbine blades is carried out. The rotor wake excitation is modeled by rows of Karman vortices superimposed on an inviscid uniform flow. The vortex-induced vibration problem is modeled by a linear cascade composed of five turbine blades and the coupled Euler and structural dynamics equations are numerically solved using a time-marching boundary element technique. The analysis can be applied to any blade geometries; it is not limited to the blade geometry considered here. Two major design parameters have been identified; the ratio of blade spacing to blade chord length s/ c of the stator, and the normalized frequency parameter c/ d which is related to the wake passing frequency of the rotor. For a rigid cascade, it is found that aerodynamic resonance prevails at the resonant c/ d values corresponding to an isolated blade while s/ c is responsible for the level of the aerodynamic response. If the central blades were elastic, the parameter s/ c plays a different role in the fluid-structure interaction problem. With a c/ d that could lead to structural resonance for an isolated blade, changing s/ c would stabilize the aerodynamic and structural response of the elastic blade in a cascade. On the contrary, an improper choice of s/ c might turn the elastic blade response into structural resonance even though the oncoming c/ d is non-resonant. The results of the nonlinear effects of c/ d and s/ c could be used together with the Campbell diagram to obtain an improved HCF design of rotor-stator pair.

  9. Assessment of flow induced vibration limits in preliminary I2S-LWR fuel designs

    The Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR) is a novel PWR concept being developed by a multi-institutional team, led by Georgia Tech, under the auspices of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy University Programs Integrated Research Projects (DOE NEUP IRP). The I2S-LWR aims at delivering an electric power of ∼1 GW while, simultaneously, achieving an overall level of safety that is enhanced with respect to GW-class Generation III+ LWRs, including considerations for “accident tolerant fuels”. The adoption of inherent safety features and unconventional materials for the main core components are key design features intended to permit the I2S-LWR to achieve the design objectives. This work summarizes a preliminary approach to identify Flow Induced Vibration (FIV) limits for new fuel designs proposed for the I2S-LWR. While not a substitute for a detailed, system-level Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis, the approach presented here provides a methodology assembled from “best practices” documented in the literature to establish design thresholds and enable designs that resist FIV damage. This is an essential task to evaluate early in the design process, simply because the best designs considering other perspectives may inherently fail due to FIV related causes. Because different fuels behave differently, we identify the essential design considerations and focus on the main fuel candidates for the I2S-LWR, i.e. UO2 and U3Si2, augmenting the fuel material selection process and the fuel rod design in general. (author)

  10. Influence of Induced Unbalance on Subsynchronous Vibrations of an Automotive Turbocharger

    Sterling, John Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Rotordynamic instability is present in most or all automotive turbochargers. High subsynchronous amplitudes can cause a variety of problems in areas such as mechanical failures, emissions regulations and rotor design. Self-excited vibrations from sources of damping can lock in at lateral natural frequencies causing dangerously high vibration levels. The resulting high-amplitude conical and bending modes can be reduced in order to achieve a more robust system. This rese...

  11. An investigation of vibration-induced protein desorption mechanism using a micromachined membrane and PZT plate.

    Yeh, Po Ying; Le, Yevgeniya; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Chiao, Mu

    2008-10-01

    A micromachined vibrating membrane is used to remove adsorbed proteins on a surface. A lead zirconate titanate (PZT) composite (3 x 1 x 0.5 mm) is attached to a silicon membrane (2,000 x 500 x 3 microm) and vibrates in a flexural plate wave (FPW) mode with wavelength of 4,000/3 microm at a resonant frequency of 308 kHz. The surface charge on the membrane and fluid shear stress contribute in minimizing the protein adsorption on the SiO(2) surface. In vitro characterization shows that 57 +/- 10% of the adsorbed bovine serum albumin (BSA), 47 +/- 13% of the immunoglobulin G (IgG), and 55.3~59.2 +/- 8% of the proteins from blood plasma are effectively removed from the vibrating surface. A simulation study of the vibration-frequency spectrum and vibrating amplitude distribution matches well with the experimental data. Potentially, a microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-based vibrating membrane could be the tool to minimize biofouling of in vivo MEMS devices. PMID:18427993

  12. Simultaneous investigation of blast induced ground vibration and airblast effects on safety level of structures and human in surface blasting

    Faramarzi Farhad⇑; Ebrahimi Farsangi Mohammad Ali; Mansouri Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The significance of studying, monitoring and predicting blast induced vibration and noise level in mining and civil activities is justified in the capability of imposing damages, sense of uncertainty due to negative psychological impacts on involved personnel and also judicial complaints of local inhabitants in the nearby area. This paper presents achieved results during an investigation carried out at Sungun Copper Mine, Iran. Besides, the research also studied the significance of blast induced ground vibration and air-blast on safety aspects of nearby structures, potential risks, frequency analysis, and human response. According to the United States Bureau of Mines (USBM) standard, the attenuation equations were devel-oped using field records. A general frequency analysis and risk evaluation revealed that:94%of generated frequencies are less than 14 Hz which is within the natural frequency of structures that increases risk of damage. At the end, studies of human response showed destructive effects of the phenomena by ranging between 2.54 and 25.40 mm/s for ground vibrations and by the average value of 110 dB for noise levels which could increase sense of uncertainty among involved employees.

  13. A comprehensive flow-induced vibration model to predict crack growth and leakage potential in steam generator tubes

    El Bouzidi, Salim [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Hassan, Marwan, E-mail: mahassan@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Riznic, Jovica [Operational Engineering Assessment Division, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5S9 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Comprehensive flow induced vibrations time domain model was developed. • Simulations of fluidelastic instability and turbulence were conducted. • Nonlinear effect due to the clearances at the supports was studied. • Prediction of stresses due to fluid excitation was obtained. • Deterministic and stochastic analyses for crack and leakage rate were conducted. - Abstract: Flow-induced vibrations (FIVs) are a major threat to the operation of nuclear steam generators. Turbulence and fluidelastic instability are the two main excitation mechanisms leading to tube vibrations. The consequences to the operation of steam generators are premature wear of the tubes, as well as development of cracks that may leak hazardous fluids. This paper investigates the effect of tube support clearance on the integrity of tube bundles within steam generators. Special emphasis will be placed on crack propagation and leakage rates. A crack growth model is used to simulate the growth of surface flaws and through-wall cracks of various initial sizes due to a wide range of support clearances. Leakage rates are predicted using a two-phase flow leakage model. Nonlinear finite element analysis is used to simulate a full U-bend subjected to fluidelastic and turbulence forces. Monte Carlo simulations are then used to conduct a probabilistic assessment of steam generator life due to crack development.

  14. Laboratory measurements of vortex- and wake-induced vibrations of a tandem arrangement of two flexible risers

    Liu, Huai-zeng; Wang, Fei; Jiang, Guo-sheng; Guo, Hai-yan; Li, Xiao-min

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic response of two flexible model risers in tandem arrangement immersed in a stepped current was analyzed. The risers, with an external diameter of 20 mm and a total length of 6200 mm, had an aspect ratio of 310. They were hinged to the support structure at the center-to-center distances away 3-12 times the external diameter. The top 1200 mm was exposed to a uniform current at a speed which was up to 0.9 m/s (the Reynolds number was 18000) and the rest in still water. The dynamic responses, which were obtained through the Fiber Bragg Grating strain gauges mounted on the surface, were analyzed by studying the cross-flow amplitudes and modal weights. The cross-flow vibration were observed up to the third mode, and the modal transformation from the second mode to the third mode was clearly observed. The experiment confirmed that the typical vortex-induced vibration (VIV) had occurred on the up-stream riser. But for the down-stream riser, the main excitation mechanism was wake-induced vibration (WIV). The modal transformation of WIV was more complex than that of VIV, which might be helpful for other researchers to study the interference effect.

  15. A comprehensive flow-induced vibration model to predict crack growth and leakage potential in steam generator tubes

    Highlights: • Comprehensive flow induced vibrations time domain model was developed. • Simulations of fluidelastic instability and turbulence were conducted. • Nonlinear effect due to the clearances at the supports was studied. • Prediction of stresses due to fluid excitation was obtained. • Deterministic and stochastic analyses for crack and leakage rate were conducted. - Abstract: Flow-induced vibrations (FIVs) are a major threat to the operation of nuclear steam generators. Turbulence and fluidelastic instability are the two main excitation mechanisms leading to tube vibrations. The consequences to the operation of steam generators are premature wear of the tubes, as well as development of cracks that may leak hazardous fluids. This paper investigates the effect of tube support clearance on the integrity of tube bundles within steam generators. Special emphasis will be placed on crack propagation and leakage rates. A crack growth model is used to simulate the growth of surface flaws and through-wall cracks of various initial sizes due to a wide range of support clearances. Leakage rates are predicted using a two-phase flow leakage model. Nonlinear finite element analysis is used to simulate a full U-bend subjected to fluidelastic and turbulence forces. Monte Carlo simulations are then used to conduct a probabilistic assessment of steam generator life due to crack development

  16. Laboratory Measurements of Vortex-and Wake-Induced Vibrations of A Tandem Arrangement of Two Flexible Risers

    刘怀增; 王飞; 蒋国盛; 郭海燕; 李效民

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic response of two flexible model risers in tandem arrangement immersed in a stepped current was analyzed. The risers, with an external diameter of 20 mm and a total length of 6200 mm, had an aspect ratio of 310. They were hinged to the support structure at the center-to-center distances away 3-12 times the external diameter. The top 1200 mm was exposed to a uniform current at a speed which was up to 0.9 m/s (the Reynolds number was 18000) and the rest in still water. The dynamic responses, which were obtained through the Fiber Bragg Grating strain gauges mounted on the surface, were analyzed by studying the cross-flow amplitudes and modal weights. The cross-flow vibration were observed up to the third mode, and the modal transformation from the second mode to the third mode was clearly observed. The experiment confirmed that the typical vortex-induced vibration (VIV) had occurred on the up-stream riser. But for the down-stream riser, the main excitation mechanism was wake-induced vibration (WIV). The modal transformation of WIV was more complex than that of VIV, which might be helpful for other researchers to study the interference effect.

  17. Eutectic growth under acoustic levitation conditions.

    Xie, W J; Cao, C D; Lü, Y J; Wei, B

    2002-12-01

    Samples of Pb-Sn eutectic alloy with a high density of 8.5 x 10(3) kg/m(3) are levitated with a single-axis acoustic levitator, and containerlessly melted and then solidified in argon atmosphere. High undercoolings up to 38 K are obtained, which results in a microstructural transition of "lamellas-broken lamellas-dendrites." This transition is further investigated in the light of the coupled zone for eutectic growth and the effects of ultrasound. The breaking of regular eutectic lamellas and suppression of gravity-induced macrosegregation of (Pb) and (Sn) dendrites are explained by the complicated internal flow inside the levitated drop, which is jointly induced by the shape oscillation, bulk vibration and rotation of the levitated drop. The ultrasonic field is also found to drive forced surface vibration, which subsequently excites capillary ripples and catalyzes nucleation on the sample surface. PMID:12513291

  18. Flow-Induced Pulsation and Vibration in Hydroelectric Machinery Engineer’s Guidebook for Planning, Design and Troubleshooting

    Dörfler, Peter; Coutu, André

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1970’s, an increasing amount of specialized research has focused on the problems created by instability of internal flow in hydroelectric power plants. However, progress in this field is hampered by the inter­disciplinary nature of the subject, between fluid mechanics, structural mechanics and hydraulic transients. Flow-induced Pulsation and Vibration in Hydroelectric Machinery provides a compact guidebook explaining the many different underlying physical mechanisms and their possible effects.   Typical phenomena are described to assist in the proper diagnosis of problems and various key strategies for solution are compared and considered with support from practical experience and real-life examples. The link between state-of the-art CFD computation and notorious practical problems is discussed  and quantitative data is provided on  normal levels of vibration and pulsation so realistic limits can be set for future projects. Current projects are also addressed as the possibilities and limitatio...

  19. Photodissociation path in H2 + induced by nonuniform optical near fields: Two-step excitation via vibrationally excited states

    Yamaguchi, Maiku; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, effects of the spatial nonuniformity of an optical near field (ONF) on the molecular photodissociation process are presented. The dissociation dynamics of H2 + was theoretically investigated by solving a non-Born-Oppenheimer Schrödinger equation. It was found that in addition to two dissociation mechanisms, which are one-photon and three-photon processes induced by uniform laser light excitation, the nonuniform ONF opens another dissociation path: two-step excitation mediated by vibrationally excited states. The nonuniformity of the ONF causes a transition between vibrational states that is forbidden according to conventional selection rules, leading to the dissociation path. The dependences of photodissociation on the intensity and nonuniformity of the ONF were calculated and the results validated the two-step dissociation mechanism.

  20. Experimental Study on Coupled Cross-Flow and in-Line Vortex-Induced Vibration of Flexible Risers

    GUO Hai-yan; LOU Min

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we study the coupled cross-flow and in-line vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a fixedly mounted flexible pipe, which is free to move in cross-flow (Y-) and in-line (X-) direction in a fluid flow where the mass and natural frequencies are precisely the same in both X- and Y-direction. The fluid speed varies from low to high with the corresponding vortex shedding frequency varying from below the first natural frequency to above the second natural frequency of the flexible pipe. Particular emphasis was placed on the investigation of the relationship between in-line and cross-flow vibration. The experimental results analyzed by using these measurements exhibits several valuable features.