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Sample records for acoustically enhanced remediation

  1. Acoustically enhanced remediation, Phase 2: Technology scaling

    Iovenitti, J.L.; Hill, D.G. [Weiss Associates, Emeryville, CA (United States); Rynne, T.M.; Spadaro, J.F.; Hutchinson, W. [Scientific Applications and Research Associates, Inc., Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Illangasakere, T. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering

    1996-12-31

    Weiss Associates is conducting the following three phase program investigating the in-situ application of acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) of contaminated unconsolidated soil and ground water under both saturated and unsaturated conditions: Phase I-- laboratory scale parametric investigation; Phase II--technology Scaling; and Phase III--large scale field tests. AER addresses the need for NAPL (either lighter or denser than water: LNAPL or DNAPL, respectively) in high and low permeability sediments, and the remediation of other types of subsurface contaminants (e.g., metals, radionuclides) in low permeability soils. This program has been placed in the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) DNAPL product. Phase I indicated that AER could be used to effectively remediate NAPL in high permeability soil, and that removal of NAPL from low permeability soil could be increased since the water flux through these soils was significantly increased. Phase II, Technology Scaling, the subject of this paper, focused on (1) evaluating the characteristics of an AER field deployment system, (2) developing DNAPL flow and transport performance data under acoustic excitation, (3) predicting the effect of acoustic remediation in three-dimensional unconsolidated hydrogeologic conditions, (4) conducting an engineering analysis of acoustical sources, and (5) identifying candidate field site(s) for large-scale field testing of the technology.

  2. Acoustically enhanced remediation of contaminated soils and ground water. Volume 1

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The Phase 1 laboratory bench-scale investigation results have shown that acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) technology can significantly accelerate the ground water remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in unconsolidated soils. The testing also determined some of the acoustic parameters which maximize fluid and contaminant extraction rates. A technology merit and trade analysis identified the conditions under which AER could be successfully deployed in the field, and an analysis of existing acoustical sources and varying methods for their deployment found that AER technology can be successfully deployed in-situ. Current estimates of deployability indicate that a NAPL plume 150 ft in diameter can be readily remediated. This program focused on unconsolidated soils because of the large number of remediation sites located in this type of hydrogeologic setting throughout the nation. It also focused on NAPLs and low permeability soil because of the inherent difficult in the remediation of NAPLs and the significant time and cost impact caused by contaminated low permeability soils. This overall program is recommended for Phase 2 which will address the technology scaling requirements for a field scale test.

  3. Laboratory {open_quotes}proof of principle{close_quotes} investigation for the acoustically enhanced remediation technology

    Iovenitti, J.L.; Spencer, J.W. Jr.; Hill, D.G. [Weiss Associates, Emergyville, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Weiss Associates is conducting a three phase program investigating the systematics of using acoustic excitation fields (AEFs) to enhance the in-situ remediation of contaminated soil and ground water under both saturated and unsaturated conditions: Phase I - Laboratory Scale Parametric Investigation; Phase II - Technology Scaling Study; and Phase III - Large Scale Field Tests. Phase I, the subject of this paper, consisted primarily of a laboratory proof of principle investigation. The field deployment and engineering viability of acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) technology was also examined. Phase II is a technology scaling study addressing the scale up between laboratory size samples on the order of inches, and the data required for field scale testing, on the order of hundreds of feet. Phase III will consist of field scale testing at an non-industrialized, non-contaminated site and at a contaminated site to validate the technology. Summarized herein are the results of the Phase I {open_quotes}proof-of-principle{close_quotes} investigation, and recommendations for Phase H. A general overview of AER technology along with the plan for the Phase I investigation was presented.

  4. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Yeo, Leslie Y. [Micro/Nanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  5. Enhanced Remediation of a Hydrocarbon Polluted Soil

    E.C. Wokoma and C.C.Wokocha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to use NPKs, saw dust and poultry manure as enhanced remediation techniques of a crude oil polluted soil, using a 42-day study period, time length. Polluted soil samples were collected at 0-10 cm depth from different polluted sites of the same area. Physicochemical parametres such as pottasium concentration and total hydrocarbon recorded a decrease at the 6th week, after application and lab testing. Total organic carbon recorded an increase on the 6th week, for treatments containing; PS+SD, PS+NPK and PS+PM. pH ranged between 5.21-10.1. The results suggest that a combination of ammendments in the right proportion w ould be effective in the remediation of crude oil polluted soil.

  6. Acoustic Cavitation: A Potential Remediation Technology for On-Site Elimination of Perfluorinated Contaminants

    Vecitis, C. D.; Cheng, J.; Park, H.; Hoffmann, M. R.

    2006-12-01

    Perfluorinated chemicals are emerging as globally ubiquitous contaminants which are recalcitrant to the conventional remediation techniques of adsorption and chemical oxidation. The release of these chemicals to the environment occurs from specific sites such as manufacturing plants, fire-fighting foams at airports and contaminated landfills. Even though these compounds are widely recognized as potentially hazardous, disposal regulations have been limited due to the ineffectiveness of current pump and treat technologies towards these species. We have shown that ultrasonically induced acoustic cavitation can effectively mineralize aqueous perfluorinated acid and sulfonate species by in situ pyrolysis and chemical oxidation at the lab and pilot scale. Efficiency has been tested on a variety of matrices such as tap water, groundwater and landfill pump-out with VOC content being the major detriment towards remediation. Advanced oxidation by the simultaneously application of ozone and ultrasound seems to partially eliminate this barrier by enhancing the rate of VOC mineralization. Application of this technology to a contaminated field site and the obstacles of scaling to such a degree are discussed.

  7. Pulse current enhanced electrodialytic soil remediation

    Sun, Tian R.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille E.

    2012-01-01

    Energy consumption is an important factor influencing the cost of electrodialytic soil remediation (EDR). It has been indicated that the pulse current (in low frequency range) could decrease the energy consumption during EDR. This work is focused on the comparison of energy saving effect at...

  8. Enhanced acoustic transmission through a slanted grating

    Norris, Andrew N

    2015-01-01

    It is known that an acoustic wave incident on an infinite array of aligned rectangular blocks of a different acoustic material exhibits total transmission if certain conditions are met [1] which relate the unique "intromission" angle of incidence with geometric and material properties of the slab. This extraordinary acoustic transmission phenomenon holds for any slab thickness, making it analogous to a Brewster effect in optics, and is independent of frequency as long as the slab microstructure is sub-wavelength in the length-wise direction. Here we show that the enhanced transmission effect is obtained in a slab with grating elements oriented obliquely to the slab normal. The dependence of the intromission angle $\\theta_i$ is given explicitly in terms of the orientation angle. Total transmission is achieved at incidence angles $\\pm \\theta_i$, with a relative phase shift between the transmitted amplitudes of the $+\\theta_i$ and $- \\theta_i$ cases. These effects are shown to follow from explicit formulas for t...

  9. Enhancing the Efficiency of Electrokinetic Remediation through Technology Integration

    Zhang, M.; Komai, T.

    2009-12-01

    Remediation or cleanup of soils and groundwater polluted by heavy metals remains a challenge in the field of geo-environmental engineering. Many sites, like ore dressing plants, electroplating plants and battery factories may be polluted by heavy metals. In addition, some natural factors like metal deposits or abundant metal mines, hot springs and volcanic eruptions may also cause heavy metal pollutions. Unlike organic pollutants, heavy metals do not decay naturally, and active approaches to remediation are generally necessary. Although electrokinetic method is considered to be the only technique that is highly-perspective for in situ remediation of heavy metals, and numerous bench-scale studies as well as a few pilot scale experiments illustrated its applicability, this technique has not yet been widely used in practice due to the low efficiencies and/or unacceptable long remediation periods. To enhance the total efficiency of electrokinetic remediation, a systematic approach by integrating different technologies is proposed. This systematic approach includes 1) on-site quick mapping for screening out localized pollution areas, characterizing chemical composition of polluted soils, and for examining the progress of in situ remediation; 2) electrical resistivity tomography(ERT) or electrical resistivity imaging(ERI) for predicting geological structure and hydrogeological boundaries conditions of a polluted site, and for optimizing parameters like voltage and current density for an effective remediation; 3) the use of solar energy to increase flexibility in and applicability of electrokinetic technique; 4) combination with large scale modeling tests for a pertinent evaluation of the feasibility related to electrokinetic remediation for a given soil type taken from a specific polluted site; 5) combination with risk-assessment method to determine feasible cleanup levels; and 6) recovery of heavy metals deposited on electrode plates for possible use as resources

  10. Rheology enhancement for remediated PX6 melter feed

    This document is referenced in WSRC-TR-94-0556. This memorandum summarizes results of experimental work performed on the original IDMS PX6 melter feed, the remediated IDMS PX6 melter feed, and melter feeds produced in a laboratory simulation to duplicate the IDMS remediation as well as the experimental results on the caustic treatment to enhance the rheology. Characterization of the products of excess caustic addition and what steps to take if excess caustic is inadvertently added to the IDMS PX6 melter feed are also discussed

  11. Enhancing a Groundwater Remedy for TCE with ISCO

    determined that the X-740 Phyto-remediation System has not performed as predicted by the Quadrant III CAS/CMS groundwater model. In a letter, Ohio EPA stated the current remedy is not achieving the goals outlined and required DOE to evaluate other remedial alternatives in conjunction with the current remedy. To enhance the remediation of groundwater at the X-740 SWMU, a new remediation approach is being implemented for the unit. The new approach involves the injection of Modified Fenton's Reagent, using temporary direct push injection points, directly into the portion of the groundwater plume that currently contains TCE concentrations of 50 parts per billion (ppb) or higher. This new approach overcomes limitations imposed by heterogeneities in the subsurface by injecting relatively small quantities of reagent into a large number of temporary injection points over the area. These injections are then repeated as necessary on a grid pattern until performance goals are achieved. Baseline and post-injection groundwater data from three complete Phase injection events are expected to be available in time for the conference. These data will be compared against the remediation end point as defined in the work plan to determine the progress of the remedy. (authors)

  12. Decontamination formulation with additive for enhanced mold remediation

    Tucker, Mark D.; Irvine, Kevin; Berger, Paul; Comstock, Robert

    2010-02-16

    Decontamination formulations with an additive for enhancing mold remediation. The formulations include a solubilizing agent (e.g., a cationic surfactant), a reactive compound (e.g., hydrogen peroxide), a carbonate or bicarbonate salt, a water-soluble bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate), a mold remediation enhancer containing Fe or Mn, and water. The concentration of Fe.sup.2+ or Mn.sup.2+ ions in the aqueous mixture is in the range of about 0.0001% to about 0.001%. The enhanced formulations can be delivered, for example, as a foam, spray, liquid, fog, mist, or aerosol for neutralization of chemical compounds, and for killing certain biological compounds or agents and mold spores, on contaminated surfaces and materials.

  13. Classroom acoustics and intervention strategies to enhance the learning environment

    Savage, Christal

    The classroom environment can be an acoustically difficult atmosphere for students to learn effectively, sometimes due in part to poor acoustical properties. Noise and reverberation have a substantial influence on room acoustics and subsequently intelligibility of speech. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA, 1995) developed minimal standards for noise and reverberation in a classroom for the purpose of providing an adequate listening environment. A lack of adherence to these standards may have undesirable consequences, which may lead to poor academic performance. The purpose of this capstone project is to develop a protocol to measure the acoustical properties of reverberation time and noise levels in elementary classrooms and present the educators with strategies to improve the learning environment. Noise level and reverberation will be measured and recorded in seven, unoccupied third grade classrooms in Lincoln Parish in North Louisiana. The recordings will occur at six specific distances in the classroom to simulate teacher and student positions. The recordings will be compared to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association standards for noise and reverberation. If discrepancies are observed, the primary investigator will serve as an auditory consultant for the school and educators to recommend remediation and intervention strategies to improve these acoustical properties. The hypothesis of the study is that the classroom acoustical properties of noise and reverberation will exceed the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association standards; therefore, the auditory consultant will provide strategies to improve those acoustical properties.

  14. Cost studies of thermally enhanced in situ soil remediation technologies

    This report describes five thermally enhanced technologies that may be used to remediate contaminated soil and water resources. The standard methods of treating these contaminated areas are Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE), Excavate ampersand Treat (E ampersand T), and Pump ampersand Treat (P ampersand T). Depending on the conditions at a given site, one or more of these conventional alternatives may be employed; however, several new thermally enhanced technologies for soil decontamination are emerging. These technologies are still in demonstration programs which generally are showing great success at achieving the expected remediation results. The cost savings reported in this work assume that the technologies will ultimately perform as anticipated by their developers in a normal environmental restoration work environment. The five technologies analyzed in this report are Low Frequency Heating (LF or Ohmic, both 3 and 6 phase AC), Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS), Radio Frequency Heating (RF), Radio Frequency Heating using Dipole Antennae (RFD), and Thermally Enhanced Vapor Extraction System (TEVES). In all of these technologies the introduction of heat to the formation raises vapor pressures accelerating contaminant evaporation rates and increases soil permeability raising diffusion rates of contaminants. The physical process enhancements resulting from temperature elevations permit a greater percentage of volatile organic compound (VOC) or semi- volatile organic compound (SVOC) contaminants to be driven out of the soils for treatment or capture in a much shorter time period. This report presents the results of cost-comparative studies between these new thermally enhanced technologies and the conventional technologies, as applied to five specific scenarios

  15. Cost studies of thermally enhanced in situ soil remediation technologies

    Bremser, J.; Booth, S.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes five thermally enhanced technologies that may be used to remediate contaminated soil and water resources. The standard methods of treating these contaminated areas are Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE), Excavate & Treat (E&T), and Pump & Treat (P&T). Depending on the conditions at a given site, one or more of these conventional alternatives may be employed; however, several new thermally enhanced technologies for soil decontamination are emerging. These technologies are still in demonstration programs which generally are showing great success at achieving the expected remediation results. The cost savings reported in this work assume that the technologies will ultimately perform as anticipated by their developers in a normal environmental restoration work environment. The five technologies analyzed in this report are Low Frequency Heating (LF or Ohmic, both 3 and 6 phase AC), Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS), Radio Frequency Heating (RF), Radio Frequency Heating using Dipole Antennae (RFD), and Thermally Enhanced Vapor Extraction System (TEVES). In all of these technologies the introduction of heat to the formation raises vapor pressures accelerating contaminant evaporation rates and increases soil permeability raising diffusion rates of contaminants. The physical process enhancements resulting from temperature elevations permit a greater percentage of volatile organic compound (VOC) or semi- volatile organic compound (SVOC) contaminants to be driven out of the soils for treatment or capture in a much shorter time period. This report presents the results of cost-comparative studies between these new thermally enhanced technologies and the conventional technologies, as applied to five specific scenarios.

  16. Acoustics as a tool to enhance physics education

    Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Gee, Kent L.

    2016-03-01

    The use of acoustics in physics pedagogy, whether in stand-alone courses, or as examples, analogies, or demonstrations in other contexts, can enhance student learning. At most, a typical physics student receives only a few weeks of instruction in acoustics, despite its potential ability to enhance class discussions of source, resonance, and traveling-wave phenomena in both introductory and advanced settings. A recent annotated bibliography, includes specific resources for incorporating acoustics-based demonstrations into physics courses. Acoustics analogies can be used to illustrate wave phenomena in advanced contexts, such as diffraction, scattering, refraction, reflection, method of images, resonance, dispersion, tunneling. This presentation will review the Resource Letter, highlighting specific demonstration ideas, as well as offer additional perspectives gained since its publication.

  17. Emission Enhancement of Sound Emitters using an Acoustic Metamaterial Cavity

    Song, Kyungjun; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Kiwon; Hur, Shin; Kim, Jedo

    2014-01-01

    The emission enhancement of sound without electronic components has wide applications in a variety of remote systems, especially when highly miniaturized (smaller than wavelength) structures can be used. The recent advent of acoustic metamaterials has made it possible to realize this. In this study, we propose, design, and demonstrate a new class of acoustic cavity using a double-walled metamaterial structure operating at an extremely low frequency. Periodic zigzag elements which exhibit Fabr...

  18. Acoustic streaming enhanced electrodeposition of nickel

    Jensen, Jens Dahl; Møller, Per

    Electrochemical deposition of Ni from a Watts-type electrolyte under the influence of high frequency ultrasound at both high (250 W) and low (5–10 W) power sonication was investigated. An improvement in the material distribution of the deposited Ni in millimeter-sized groove-features on the catho......-patterns on the surface of the deposit and near-boundary acoustic streaming....

  19. Naturally enhanced ion-acoustic spectra and their interpretation

    Sedgemore-Schulthess, K.J.F.; St. Maurice, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Incoherent scatter radars are designed to detect scatter from thermal fluctuations in the ionosphere. These fluctuations contain, among other things, features associated with ion-acoustic waves driven by random motions within the plasma. The resulting spectra are generally broad and noisy, but...... years there has been much interest in naturally occurring (as opposed to artificially stimulated) enhanced ion-acoustic spectra seen in the auroral zone and cusp/cleft region. A study of the plasma instability processes that lead to such spectra will help us to better understand auroral particle...... acceleration, wave-particle and wave-wave interactions in the ionosphere, and their association with magnetospheric processes. There is now a substantial body of literature documenting observations of enhanced ion-acoustic spectra, but there remains controversy over generation mechanisms. We present a review...

  20. Enhancement of in situ Remediation of Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soil

    Palmroth, M.

    2006-07-01

    Approximately 750 000 sites of contaminated land exist across Europe. The harmful chemicals found in Finnish soils include heavy metals, oil products, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorophenols, and pesticides. Petroleum and petroleum products enter soil from ruptured oil pipelines, land disposal of refinery products, leaking storage tanks and through accidents. PAH contamination is caused by the spills of coal tar and creosote from coal gasification and wood treatment sites in addition to oil spills. Cleanup of soil by bioremediation is cheaper than by chemical and physical processes. However, the cleaning capacity of natural attenuation and in situ bioremediation is limited. The purpose of this thesis was to find feasible options to enhance in situ remediation of hydrocarbon contaminants. The aims were to increase the bioavailability of the contaminants and microbial activity at the subsurface in order to achieve higher contaminant removal efficiency than by intrinsic biodegradation alone. Enhancement of microbial activity and decrease of soil toxicity during remediation were estimated by using several biological assays. The performance of these assays was compared in order to find suitable indicators to follow the progress of remediation. Phytoremediation and chemical oxidation are promising in situ techniques to increase the degradation of hydrocarbons in soil. Phytoremediation is plant-enhanced decontamination of soil and water. Degradation of hydrocarbons is enhanced in the root zone by increased microbial activity and through the detoxifying enzymes of plants themselves. Chemical oxidation of contaminants by Fenton's reaction can produce degradation products which are more biodegradable than the parent compounds. Fenton's reaction and its modifications apply solutions of hydrogen peroxide and iron for the oxidation of organic chemicals. The cost of oxidation can be reduced by aiming at partial instead of full

  1. Foam-Delivery of Remedial Amendments for Enhanced Vadose Zone Metals and Radionuclides Remediation

    The remediation of metals and radionuclides contamination, such as Cr(VI), Tc-99, and Sr-90 in the U.S. DOE Hanford Site vadose zone is a critical need. Water-based remedial amendments delivery to the deep vadose zone is facing significant technical challenges. Water-based delivery will easily leach out the highly mobile pollutants therefore contaminate the underlying aquifer. Preferential flow of the amendment-laden solution in the vadose zone due to the formation heterogeneity is difficult to overcome, resulting in bypassing of the less permeable zones. Foam has unique transport properties in the vadose zone that enable mitigation on the mobilization of mobile contaminants and enhance the sweeping over heterogeneous systems. Calcium polysulfide (CPS) is a remedial amendment that can be used to reduce and immobilize hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and other redox-sensitive radionuclides/metals in the vadose zone. The delivery of CPS to the vadose zone using foam and the immobilization of Cr(VI) via reduction by the foam-delivered CPS was investigated in this study. Batch tests were conducted to select the foam-generating CPS-surfactant solutions, to determine the solution foamability and the reducing potential of CPS-containing foams, and to study the influence of foam quality, surfactant concentration, and CPS concentration on foam stability. Column experiments were performed to test the foam delivery of CPS to sediments under conditions similar to field vadose zone, to study the foam transport and interaction with sediments, and to determine the extent of Cr(VI) immobilization using this novel delivery approach. CPS-containing foams with high reducing potential were prepared based on the batch tests. Sediment reduction by foam-delivered CPS was observed in the column studies. Significant mobilization of Cr(VI) from sediments occurred when CPS was delivered in aqueous solution. The Cr(VI) mobilization was minimized when CPS was delivered by foams, resulting in

  2. Gas Dynamics during Thermal Remediation: Visualization, Quantification and Enhancement

    Mumford, K. G.; Hegele, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    In situ thermal treatment (ISTT) technologies, such as electrical resistance heating (ERH) and thermal conductive heating (TCH), rely on the in situ production of a gas phase composed of steam and vaporized volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This gas phase must be captured, extracted, and processed in an aboveground treatment system to meet remediation objectives. When used to treat volatile non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), gases can be created at temperatures below the boiling points of both the groundwater and the NAPL, in a process commonly referred to as co-boiling, and vaporized VOCs can condense if gases are transported to colder regions or are not captured before thermal treatment has stopped. As such, an understanding of gas formation, connection, and flow is important for the design and operation of ISTT technologies. A recent series of laboratory experiments focused on the visualization and quantification of gas dynamics during water boiling and NAPL-water co-boiling, and the investigation of potential NAPL redistribution. Experiments were conducted in a sand-packed glass-walled chamber (40 cm tall × 20 cm wide × 1 cm thick) heated by electrical resistance. Temperatures and electric currents were measured, and digital images were captured throughout the experiments to quantify gas saturations using light transmission techniques. Additional experiments also investigated the exsolution of dissolved gas as a technique to enhance gas production at lower temperatures. Results showed the development of disconnected and connected gas flow regimes, with disconnected flow occurring at early times and during co-boiling. Results also showed the potential for NAPL redistribution due to displacement by gas formed within pools, and due to condensation in colder regions. These results highlight the need to carefully consider gases in the design of ISTT heating and gas extraction systems to ensure remediation performance.

  3. Compatibility of polymers and chemical oxidants for enhanced groundwater remediation.

    Smith, Megan M; Silva, Jeff A K; Munakata-Marr, Junko; McCray, John E

    2008-12-15

    Polymer floods provide a promising method to more effectively deliver conventional groundwater treatment agents to organic contaminants distributed within heterogeneous aquifer systems. Combinations of nontoxic polymers (xanthan and hydrolyzed polyacrylamide) and common chemical oxidants (potassium permanganate and sodium persulfate) were investigated to determine the suitability of these mixtures for polymer-enhanced in situ chemical oxidation applications. Oxidant demand and solution viscosity were utilized as initial measures of chemical compatibility. After 72 h of reaction with both test oxidants, solution viscosities in mixtures containing hydrolyzed polyacrylamide were decreased by more than 90% (final viscosities approximately 2 cP), similar to the 95% viscosity loss (final viscosities approximately 1 cP, near that of water) observed in xanthan/persulfate experiments. In contrast, xanthan solutions exposed to potassium permanganate preserved 60-95% of initial viscosity after 72 h. Permanganate depletion in xanthan-containing experiments ranged from 2% to 24% over the same test period. Although oxidant consumption in xanthan/permanganate solutions appeared to be correlated with increasing xanthan concentrations, solutions of up to 2000 mg/L xanthan did not inhibit permanganate from oxidizing a dissolved-phase test contaminant (tetrachloroethene, PCE) in xanthan solution. These advantageous characteristics (high viscosity retention, moderate oxidant demand, and lack of competitive effects on PCE oxidation rate) render xanthan/permanganate the most compatible polymer/oxidant combination of those tested for remediation by polymer-enhanced chemical oxidation. PMID:19174907

  4. Emission enhancement of sound emitters using an acoustic metamaterial cavity.

    Song, Kyungjun; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Kiwon; Hur, Shin; Kim, Jedo

    2014-01-01

    The emission enhancement of sound without electronic components has wide applications in a variety of remote systems, especially when highly miniaturized (smaller than wavelength) structures can be used. The recent advent of acoustic metamaterials has made it possible to realize this. In this study, we propose, design, and demonstrate a new class of acoustic cavity using a double-walled metamaterial structure operating at an extremely low frequency. Periodic zigzag elements which exhibit Fabry-Perot resonant behavior below the phononic band-gap are used to yield strong sound localization within the subwavelength gap, thus providing highly effective emission enhancement. We show, both theoretically and experimentally, 10 dB sound emission enhancement near 1060 Hz that corresponds to a wavelength approximately 30 times that of the periodicity. We also provide a general guideline for the independent tuning of the quality factor and effective volume of acoustic metamaterials. This approach shows the flexibility of our design in the efficient control of the enhancement rate. PMID:24584552

  5. Petroleum Hydrocarbon Pollution of Mangrove Swamps: The Promises of Remediation by Enhanced Natural Attenuation

    F. A. Orji; A. A. Ibiene; O. C. Ugbogu

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: The Remediation by Enhanced Natural Attenuation (RENA) is currently being used as a cleanup technology in polluted environments in the Niger Delta and other parts of the globe. The effectiveness of RENA as a remediation technology in the most recent time has been challenged by few authorities. The deleterious effects of pollutants on the environment have led to increased awareness and vigilance against contamination of the Niger Delta environment. Bio remediation which has ...

  6. Surface Modification on Acoustic Wave Biosensors for Enhanced Specificity

    Nathan D. Gallant

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in mass loading on the surface of acoustic biosensors result in output frequency shifts which provide precise measurements of analytes. Therefore, to detect a particular biomarker, the sensor delay path must be judiciously designed to maximize sensitivity and specificity. B-cell lymphoma 2 protein (Bcl-2 found in urine is under investigation as a biomarker for non-invasive early detection of ovarian cancer. In this study, surface chemistry and biofunctionalization approaches were evaluated for their effectiveness in presenting antibodies for Bcl-2 capture while minimizing non-specific protein adsorption. The optimal combination of sequentially adsorbing protein A/G, anti-Bcl-2 IgG and Pluronic F127 onto a hydrophobic surface provided the greatest signal-to-noise ratio and enabled the reliable detection of Bcl-2 concentrations below that previously identified for early stage ovarian cancer as characterized by a modified ELISA method. Finally, the optimal surface modification was applied to a prototype acoustic device and the frequency shift for a range of Bcl-2 concentration was quantified to demonstrate the effectiveness in surface acoustic wave (SAW-based detection applications. The surface functionalization approaches demonstrated here to specifically and sensitively detect Bcl-2 in a working ultrasonic MEMS biosensor prototype can easily be modified to detect additional biomarkers and enhance other acoustic biosensors.

  7. Sand amendment enhances bioelectrochemical remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil.

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Zhang, Yueyong; Li, Nan; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-12-01

    Bioelectrochemical system is an emerging technology for the remediation of soils contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. However, performance of such systems can be limited by the inefficient mass transport in soil. Here we report a new method of sand amendment, which significantly increases both oxygen and proton transports, resulting to increased soil porosity (from 44.5% to 51.3%), decreased Ohmic resistance (by 46%), and increased charge output (from 2.5 to 3.5Cg(-1)soil). The degradation rates of petroleum hydrocarbons increased by up to 268% in 135d. The degradation of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with high molecular weight was accelerated, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis showed that the microbial community close to the air-cathode was substantially stimulated by the induced current, especially the hydrocarbon degrading bacteria Alcanivorax. The bioelectrochemical stimulation imposed a selective pressure on the microbial community of anodes, including that far from the cathode. These results suggested that sand amendment can be an effective approach for soil conditioning that will enhances the bioelectrochemical removal of hydrocarbons in contaminated soils. PMID:26135976

  8. Subwavelength acoustic focusing by surface-wave-resonance enhanced transmission in doubly negative acoustic metamaterials

    We present analytical and numerical analyses of a yet unseen lensing paradigm that is based on a solid metamaterial slab in which the wave excitation source is attached. We propose and demonstrate sub-diffraction-limited acoustic focusing induced by surface resonant states in doubly negative metamaterials. The enhancement of evanescent waves across the metamaterial slab produced by their resonant coupling to surface waves is evidenced and quantitatively determined. The effect of metamaterial parameters on surface states, transmission, and wavenumber bandwidth is clearly identified. Based on this concept consisting of a wave source attached on the metamaterial, a high resolution of λ/28.4 is obtained with the optimum effective physical parameters, opening then an exciting way to design acoustic metamaterials for ultrasonic focused imaging

  9. Subwavelength acoustic focusing by surface-wave-resonance enhanced transmission in doubly negative acoustic metamaterials

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Badreddine Assouar, M., E-mail: Badreddine.Assouar@univ-lorraine.fr; Oudich, Mourad [CNRS, Institut Jean Lamour, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy F-54506 (France); Institut Jean Lamour, University of Lorraine, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP: 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France)

    2014-11-21

    We present analytical and numerical analyses of a yet unseen lensing paradigm that is based on a solid metamaterial slab in which the wave excitation source is attached. We propose and demonstrate sub-diffraction-limited acoustic focusing induced by surface resonant states in doubly negative metamaterials. The enhancement of evanescent waves across the metamaterial slab produced by their resonant coupling to surface waves is evidenced and quantitatively determined. The effect of metamaterial parameters on surface states, transmission, and wavenumber bandwidth is clearly identified. Based on this concept consisting of a wave source attached on the metamaterial, a high resolution of λ/28.4 is obtained with the optimum effective physical parameters, opening then an exciting way to design acoustic metamaterials for ultrasonic focused imaging.

  10. Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery through Fluid Viscosity Modifications: Experiments and numerical simulations

    Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Covert, Matthew A.

    2008-07-29

    Abstract Heterogeneity is often encountered in subsurface contamination characterization and remediation. Low-permeability zones are typically bypassed when remedial fluids are injected into subsurface heterogeneous aquifer systems. Therefore, contaminants in the bypassed areas may not be contacted by the amendments in the remedial fluid, which may significantly prolong the remediation operations. Laboratory experiments and numerical studies have been conducted to develop the Mobility-Controlled Flood (MCF) technology for subsurface remediation and to demonstrate the capability of this technology in enhancing the remedial amendments delivery to the lower permeability zones in heterogeneous systems. Xanthan gum, a bio-polymer, was used to modify the viscosity of the amendment-containing remedial solutions. Sodium mono-phosphate and surfactant were the remedial amendment used in this work. The enhanced delivery of the amendments was demonstrated in two-dimensional (2-D) flow cell experiments, packed with heterogeneous systems. The impact of polymer concentration, fluid injection rate, and permeability contract in the heterogeneous systems has been studied. The Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator was modified to include polymer-induced shear thinning effects. Shear rates of polymer solutions were computed from pore-water velocities using a relationship proposed in the literature. Viscosity data were subsequently obtained from empirical viscosity-shear rate relationships derived from laboratory data. The experimental and simulation results clearly show that the MCF technology is capable of enhancing the delivery of remedial amendments to subsurface lower permeability zones. The enhanced delivery significantly improved the NAPL removal from these zones and the sweeping efficiency on a heterogeneous system was remarkably increased when a polymer fluid was applied. MCF technology is also able to stabilize the fluid displacing front when there is a

  11. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Enhanced Melamine (ML) Foam Acoustic Test (NEMFAT)

    McNelis, Anne M.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) funded a proposal to achieve initial basic acoustic characterization of ML (melamine) foam, which could serve as a starting point for a future, more comprehensive acoustic test program for ML foam. A project plan was developed and implemented to obtain acoustic test data for both normal and enhanced ML foam. This project became known as the NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test (NEMFAT). This document contains the outcome of the NEMFAT project.

  12. Naturally enhanced ion-acoustic spectra and their interpretation

    Sedgemore-Schulthess, K.J.F.; St. Maurice, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Incoherent scatter radars are designed to detect scatter from thermal fluctuations in the ionosphere. These fluctuations contain, among other things, features associated with ion-acoustic waves driven by random motions within the plasma. The resulting spectra are generally broad and noisy, but...... nevertheless the technique can, through a detailed analysis of spectra, be used to measure a range of physical parameters in the Earth's upper atmosphere, and provides a powerful diagnostic in studies of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, thermosphere dynamics and the geospace environment in general. In recent...... acceleration, wave-particle and wave-wave interactions in the ionosphere, and their association with magnetospheric processes. There is now a substantial body of literature documenting observations of enhanced ion-acoustic spectra, but there remains controversy over generation mechanisms. We present a review...

  13. Enhanced acoustic sensing through wave compression and pressure amplification in anisotropic metamaterials.

    Chen, Yongyao; Liu, Haijun; Reilly, Michael; Bae, Hyungdae; Yu, Miao

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic sensors play an important role in many areas, such as homeland security, navigation, communication, health care and industry. However, the fundamental pressure detection limit hinders the performance of current acoustic sensing technologies. Here, through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, we show that anisotropic acoustic metamaterials can be designed to have strong wave compression effect that renders direct amplification of pressure fields in metamaterials. This enables a sensing mechanism that can help overcome the detection limit of conventional acoustic sensing systems. We further demonstrate a metamaterial-enhanced acoustic sensing system that achieves more than 20 dB signal-to-noise enhancement (over an order of magnitude enhancement in detection limit). With this system, weak acoustic pulse signals overwhelmed by the noise are successfully recovered. This work opens up new vistas for the development of metamaterial-based acoustic sensors with improved performance and functionalities that are highly desirable for many applications. PMID:25316410

  14. Enhanced electrokinetic remediation of lead-contaminated soil by complexing agents and approaching anodes.

    Zhang, Tao; Zou, Hua; Ji, Minhui; Li, Xiaolin; Li, Liqiao; Tang, Tang

    2014-02-01

    Optimizing process parameters that affect the remediation time and power consumption can improve the treatment efficiency of the electrokinetic remediation as well as determine the cost of a remediation action. Lab-scale electrokinetic remediation of Pb-contaminated soils was investigated for the effect of complexant ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and acetic acid and approaching anode on the removal efficiency of Pb. When EDTA was added to the catholyte, EDTA dissolved insoluble Pb in soils to form soluble Pb-EDTA complexes, increasing Pb mobility and accordingly removal efficiency. The removal efficiency was enhanced from 47.8 to 61.5 % when the EDTA concentration was increased from 0.1 to 0.2 M, showing that EDTA played an important role in remediation. And the migration rate of Pb was increased to 72.3 % when both EDTA and acetic acid were used in the catholyte. The "approaching anode electrokinetic remediation" process in the presence of both EDTA and acetic acid had a higher Pb-removal efficiency with an average efficiency of 83.8 %. The efficiency of electrokinetic remediation was closely related to Pb speciation. Exchangeable and carbonate-bounded Pb were likely the forms which could be removed. All results indicate that the approaching anode method in the presence of EDTA and acetic acid is an advisable choice for electrokinetic remediation of Pb-contaminated soil. PMID:24203258

  15. Electrokinetic remediation of organochlorines in soil: enhancement techniques and integration with other remediation technologies.

    Gomes, Helena I; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

    2012-06-01

    Electrokinetic remediation has been increasingly used in soils and other matrices for numerous contaminants such as inorganic, organic, radionuclides, explosives and their mixtures. Several strategies were tested to improve this technology effectiveness, namely techniques to solubilize contaminants, control soil pH and also couple electrokinetics with other remediation technologies. This review focus in the experimental work carried out in organochlorines soil electroremediation, aiming to systemize useful information to researchers in this field. It is not possible to clearly state what technique is the best, since experimental approaches and targeted contaminants are different. Further research is needed in the application of some of the reviewed techniques. Also a number of technical and environmental issues will require evaluation for full-scale application. Removal efficiencies reported in real contaminated soils are much lower than the ones obtained with spiked kaolinite, showing the influence of other factors like aging of the contamination and adsorption to soil particles, resulting in important challenges when transferring technologies into the field. PMID:22386462

  16. Stability and performance enhancements of Electrokinetic-Fenton soil remediation

    Ng, Y. S.; Sen Gupta, B; Hashim, M A

    2014-01-01

    Electrokinetic process is a potential in situ soil remediation process which transports the contaminants via electromigration and electroosmosis. For organic compounds contaminated soil, Fenton’s reagent is utilized as a flushing agent in electrokinetic process (Electrokinetic-Fenton) so that removal of organic contaminants could be achieved by in situ oxidation/destruction. However, this process is not applied widely in industries as the stability issue for Fenton’s reagent is the main drawb...

  17. Bioavailability enhanced rhizosphere remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    Marchenko, A.; Vorobyov, A.; Zharikov, G.; Ermolenko, Z.; Dyadishchev, N.; Borovick, R.; Sokolov, M. [Research Centre for Toxicology and Hygienic Regulation of Biopreparations, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Ortega-Calvo, J.J. [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia, CSIC, Sevilla (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Aliphatic, aromatic and polycyclic aromatic oil hydrocarbons are structurally complicated man-caused pollutants that are constantly brought into biosphere. Oil production in Russia, so as all over the world, is connected with pollution of biotopes, ecosystems and agro-landscapes. Presently large funds are allocated either for oil leak prevention or for discharged oil gathering. At the same time, in spite of large necessity in technologies for efficient reconstruction of soil bio-productivity, reliable regional systems of their remediation in situ have not been developed yet. One such method is rhizosphere remediation, a biotechnology, based on the functioning of plant-microbial complexes. Little is known about bioavailability in phyto-remediation systems. Specific bioavailability-promoting mechanisms, operating in soil with hydrocarbon-degrading populations, may be responsible for increased rates of pollutant transformation (increased bacterial adherence to the pollutants, production of bio-surfactants by bacteria or by plants, possible role of chemotaxis). In the course of work collection of 42 chemo-tactically active bio-surfactant producing strain-degraders of petroleum hydrocarbons including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was created. Two representative strains were selected for detailed chemotaxis studies with PAHs (naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene), bacterial lipopolysaccharide and root exudates from seven different plants. These strains are produce the bio-surfactants (rhamno-lipid). The chemotactic response was quantified with a capillary and densitometric chemotaxis assay. Surface tension of cultural liquid was measured after cultivation of strains in the presence of hexadecane or phenanthrene with the use of a ring tensiometer. Before measuring of surface tension microbial cells were collected from liquid culture by centrifugation. Total petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil were analyzed by infra-red spectroscopy method. PAHs

  18. Bioavailability enhanced rhizosphere remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    Aliphatic, aromatic and polycyclic aromatic oil hydrocarbons are structurally complicated man-caused pollutants that are constantly brought into biosphere. Oil production in Russia, so as all over the world, is connected with pollution of biotopes, ecosystems and agro-landscapes. Presently large funds are allocated either for oil leak prevention or for discharged oil gathering. At the same time, in spite of large necessity in technologies for efficient reconstruction of soil bio-productivity, reliable regional systems of their remediation in situ have not been developed yet. One such method is rhizosphere remediation, a biotechnology, based on the functioning of plant-microbial complexes. Little is known about bioavailability in phyto-remediation systems. Specific bioavailability-promoting mechanisms, operating in soil with hydrocarbon-degrading populations, may be responsible for increased rates of pollutant transformation (increased bacterial adherence to the pollutants, production of bio-surfactants by bacteria or by plants, possible role of chemotaxis). In the course of work collection of 42 chemo-tactically active bio-surfactant producing strain-degraders of petroleum hydrocarbons including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was created. Two representative strains were selected for detailed chemotaxis studies with PAHs (naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene), bacterial lipopolysaccharide and root exudates from seven different plants. These strains are produce the bio-surfactants (rhamno-lipid). The chemotactic response was quantified with a capillary and densitometric chemotaxis assay. Surface tension of cultural liquid was measured after cultivation of strains in the presence of hexadecane or phenanthrene with the use of a ring tensiometer. Before measuring of surface tension microbial cells were collected from liquid culture by centrifugation. Total petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil were analyzed by infra-red spectroscopy method. PAHs

  19. Coding and Enhancement in Wireless Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Zahedi, Adel; Østergaard, Jan; Jensen, Søren Holdt;

    2015-01-01

    We formulate a new problem which bridges between source coding and enhancement in wireless acoustic sensor networks. We consider a network of wireless microphones, each of which encoding its own measurement under a covariance matrix distortion constraint and sending it to a fusion center. To...... process the data at the center, we use a recent spatio-temporal prediction filter. We assume that a weighted sum-rate for the network is specified. The problem is to allocate optimal distortion matrices to the nodes in order to achieve a maximum output SNR at the fusion center after processing the...... microphones and a sum-rate constraint, we derive the distortion allocation in closed form and will show that if the given sum-rate is higher than a critical value, the stationary points from the KKT conditions lead to distortion allocations which maximize the output SNR of the filter...

  20. Enhanced directional sensitivity of a biomimetic MEMS acoustic localization sensor

    Gee, Danny; Liu, Haijun; Currano, Luke; Yu, Miao

    2010-04-01

    We present an improved microfabricated sound localization sensor for unobtrusive surveillance systems inspired by the tympanic membranes of the parasitoid fly, Ormia ochracea. The device consists of two silicon diaphragms mechanically coupled by a suspended beam that amplifies the difference in time response, dependent on the incident angle of the sound source. Fabrication techniques were modified to reduce residual stresses and improve device uniformity. Enhanced acoustic cues for devices with central pivoting anchors were measured with laser Doppler vibrometry. Device responses to weak excitations demonstrated good sensitivity over environmental noise. An order of magnitude in time difference amplification was measured at 90° incident angles with a directional sensitivity of .39μs/degree. These results provide a foundation for realizing an accurate bio-inspired MEMS directional microphone.

  1. Ammonium citrate as enhancement for electrodialytic soil remediation and investigation of soil solution during the process

    Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Seven electrodialytic experiments were conducted using ammonium citrate as enhancing agent to remediate copper and chromium-contaminated soil from a wood-preservation site. The purpose was to investigate the effect of current density (0.2, 1.0 and 1.5 mA cm−2), concentration of enhancing agent (0...... to remediate metal polluted soils at neutral to alkaline pH by choosing a good enhancement solution........25, 0.5 and 1.0 M) and remediation times (21, 42 and 117 d) for the removal of Cu and Cr from a calcareous soil. To gain insight on metal behavior, soil solution was periodically collected using suction cups. It was seen that current densities higher than 1.0 mA cm−2 did not increase removal and thus...

  2. Engineered Injection and Extraction for Enhanced In-situ Remediation of Sorbing Solutes in Groundwater

    Webber, B. D.; Neupauer, R. M.; Piscopo, A. N.; Mays, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater remediation is becoming increasingly more important as the world's population grows and the necessity of access to clean drinking water persists. The majority of current groundwater treatment methods involve pumping the contaminated groundwater out of the soil and treating it above ground. Sorbed contaminants are difficult to remediate using this conventional pump-and-treat method, and often produce poor treatment results because sorbed contaminants are difficult to extract from the aquifer; therefore in-situ remediation research is of particular importance. One type of in-situ groundwater remediation involves a treatment solution of varying composition being injected into the polluted aquifer to react with the contaminant and degrade it to an acceptable byproduct. Increasing the amount of spreading between the contaminant and the treatment solution promotes an increase in contact area and more desired reactions. It has been previously determined that sequential injection and extraction using four wells for in-situ remediation can enhance the spreading of an aqueous contaminant and treatment solution and increase degradation through more reactions. In this work, we focus on sorbing contaminants and investigate the effectiveness of the injection and extraction methods on varying degrees of contaminant sorption. Tests were conducted in homogeneous and heterogeneous soil media, and with instantaneous and kinetic reaction. It was determined that engineered injection and extraction methods previously developed for aqueous contaminants also enhance in-situ remediation of sorbing solutes.

  3. Electrodialytic soil remediation enhanced by low frequency pulse current

    Sun, Tian R.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Mortensen, John

    2013-01-01

    The effect of low frequency pulse current on decreasing the polarization and energy consumption during the process of electrodialytic soil remediation was investigated in the present work. The results indicated that the transportation of cations through the cation exchange membrane was the rate...... current experiment compared to the constant current experiment. At the cation exchange membrane, only the resistance caused by concentration polarization decreased. In the soil compartment, an average of +60. mV overpotential caused by the polarization of the electric double layer of the clay particles...... was obtained from the Nernstian behavior simulation of the relaxation process, which was significantly lower than the ohmic voltage drop induced by pore fluid resistance. Therefore, the ohmic polarization was the major contributor to the energy consumption in the soil compartment and diminished by...

  4. Enhancement of Focused Ultrasound Treatment by Acoustically Generated Microbubbles

    Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Takagi, Ryo; Inaba, Yuta; Yasuda, Jun

    2013-07-01

    Microbubbles, whether introduced from outside the body or ultrasonically generated in situ, are known to significantly enhance the biological effects of ultrasound, including the mechanical, thermal, and sonochemical effects. Phase-change nanodroplets, which selectively accumulate in tumor tissue and whose phase changes to microbubbles can be induced by ultrasonic stimulation, have been proposed for high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) tumor treatment with enhanced selectivity and efficiency. In this paper, a purely acoustic approach to generate microbubble clouds in the tissue to be treated is proposed. Short pulses of focused ultrasound with extremely high intensity, named trigger pulses, are used for exposure. They are immediately followed by focused ultrasound for heating with an intensity similar to or less than that of normal HIFU treatment. The localized generation of microbubble clouds by the trigger pulses is observed in a polyarylamide gel by a high-speed camera, and the effectiveness of the generated clouds in accelerating ultrasonically induced thermal coagulation is confirmed in excised chicken breast tissue. The use of second-harmonic superimposed waves as the trigger pulses is also proposed. The highly reproducible initiation of cavitation by waves with the negative peak pressure emphasized and the efficient expansion of the generated microbubble clouds by waves with the positive peak pressure emphasized are also observed by a high-speed camera in partially degassed water.

  5. Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) Munition Classification System enhancements. Final report

    Vela, O.A.; Huggard, J.C.

    1997-09-18

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a non-destructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technology has resulted in three generations of instrumentation, funded by the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), specifically designed for field identification of chemical weapon (CW) munitions. Each generation of ARS instrumentation was developed with a specific user in mind. The ARS1OO was built for use by the U.N. Inspection Teams going into Iraq immediately after the Persian Gulf War. The ARS200 was built for use in the US-Russia Bilateral Chemical Weapons Treaty (the primary users for this system are the US Onsite Inspection Agency (OSIA) and their Russian counterparts). The ARS300 was built with the requirements of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in mind. Each successive system is an improved version of the previous system based on learning the weaknesses of each and, coincidentally, on the fact that more time was available to do a requirements analysis and the necessary engineering development. The ARS300 is at a level of development that warrants transferring the technology to a commercial vendor. Since LANL will supply the computer software to the selected vendor, it is possible for LANL to continue to improve the decision algorithms, add features where necessary, and adjust the user interface before the final transfer occurs. This paper describes the current system, ARS system enhancements, and software enhancements. Appendices contain the Operations Manual (software Version 3.01), and two earlier reports on enhancements.

  6. Petroleum Hydrocarbon Pollution of Mangrove Swamps: The Promises of Remediation by Enhanced Natural Attenuation

    F. A. Orji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The Remediation by Enhanced Natural Attenuation (RENA is currently being used as a cleanup technology in polluted environments in the Niger Delta and other parts of the globe. The effectiveness of RENA as a remediation technology in the most recent time has been challenged by few authorities. The deleterious effects of pollutants on the environment have led to increased awareness and vigilance against contamination of the Niger Delta environment. Bio remediation which has been defined as biological response to environmental abuse has continued to receive research attentions across the globe. This study addresses issues against the RENA and recommended ways forward. Approach: The review paper studied published articles and Oil companies routine practices of managing petroleum hydrocarbon polluted Environments including mangrove swamps from 1970 till date. The Remediation by Enhanced Natural Attenuation (RENA is currently being used as a cleanup technology in polluted environments in the Niger Delta including mangrove ecosystems. Results: The study made inputs on the controversial issues around RENA technology and recommended certain ways forward. This revision also reported the ways of managing the concerns raised against RENA. Conclusion/Recommendations: Oil firms, remediation contractors and consultants using this RENA approach should employ strict monitoring during the process and also adhere strictly to standard practices and the mitigation measures for all the cases against RENA as documented in this review study. This is to ensure the achievement of Sustainable Development.

  7. Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery to Subsurface Using Shear Thinning Fluid and Aqueous Foam

    Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Shen, Xin; Li, Xiqing

    2011-04-23

    A major issue with in situ subsurface remediation is the ability to achieve an even spatial distribution of remedial amendments to the contamination zones in an aquifer or vadose zone. Delivery of amendment to the aquifer using shear thinning fluid and to the vadose zone using aqueous foam has the potential to enhance the amendment distribution into desired locations and improve the remediation. 2-D saturated flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the enhanced sweeping, contaminant removal, and amendment persistence achieved by shear thinning fluid delivery. Bio-polymer xanthan gum solution was used as the shear thinning fluid. Unsaturated 1-D column and 2-D flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the mitigation of contaminant mobilization, amendment uniform distribution enhancement, and lateral delivery improvement by foam delivery. Surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulfate was used as the foaming agent. It was demonstrated that the shear thinning fluid injection enhanced the fluid sweeping over a heterogeneous system and increased the delivery of remedial amendment into low-permeability zones. The persistence of the amendment distributed into the low-perm zones by the shear thinning fluid was prolonged compared to that of amendment distributed by water injection. Foam delivery of amendment was shown to mitigate the mobilization of highly mobile contaminant from sediments under vadose zone conditions. Foam delivery also achieved more uniform amendment distribution in a heterogeneous unsaturated system, and demonstrated remarkable increasing in lateral distribution of the injected liquid compared to direct liquid injection.

  8. Ion-acoustic solitary waves and spectrally uniform scattering cross section enhancements

    J. Ekeberg; Wannberg, G.; Eliasson, L; Stasiewicz, K.

    2010-01-01

    Spectra measured by incoherent scatter radars are formed predominantly by scattering of the incident signal off ion-acoustic and Langmuir waves in the ionosphere. Occasionally, the upshifted and/or downshifted lines produced by the ion-acoustic waves are enhanced well above thermal levels and referred to as naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines. In this paper, we study another kind of enhancement, which is spectrally uniform over the whole ion-line, i.e. the up- and downshifted shoulder and t...

  9. Enhanced vibration based energy harvesting using embedded acoustic black holes

    Zhao, L.; Semperlotti, F.; Conlon, S. C.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of dynamic structural tailoring via the concept of an Acoustic Black Hole (ABH) to enhance the performance of piezoelectric based energy harvesting from operational mechanical vibrations. The ABH is a variable thickness structural feature that can be embedded in the host structure allowing a smooth reduction of the phase velocity while minimizing the amplitude of reflected waves. The ABH thickness variation is typically designed according to power-law profiles. As a propagating wave enters the ABH, it is progressively slowed down while its wavelength is compressed. This effect results in structural areas with high energy density that can be exploited effectively for energy harvesting. The potential of ABH for energy harvesting is shown via a numerical study based on fully coupled finite element electromechanical models of an ABH tapered plate with surface mounted piezo-transducers. The performances of the novel design are evaluated by direct comparison with a non-tapered structure in terms of energy ratios and attenuation indices. Results show that the tailored structural design allows a drastic increase in the harvested energy both for steady state and transient excitation. Performance dependencies of key design parameters are also investigated.

  10. POTENTIAL ENHANCEMENTS TO NATURAL ATTENUATION: LINES OF INQUIRY SUPPORTING ENHANCED PASSIVE REMEDIATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS

    Vangelas, K; Tom Early, T; Michael Heitkamp, M; Brian02 Looney, B; David Major, D; Brian Riha, B; Jody Waugh, J; Gary Wein, G

    2004-06-18

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring an initiative to facilitate efficient, effective and responsible use of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) and Enhanced Passive Remediation (EPR) for chlorinated solvents. This Office of Environmental Management (EM) ''Alternative Project,'' focuses on providing scientific and policy support for MNA/EPR. A broadly representative working group of scientists supports the project along with partnerships with regulatory organizations such as the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The initial product of the technical working group was a summary report that articulated the conceptual approach and central scientific tenants of the project, and that identified a prioritized listing of technical targets for field research. This report documented the process in which: (1) scientific ground rules were developed, (2) lines of inquiry were identified and then critically evaluated, (3) promising applied research topics were highlighted in the various lines of inquiry, and (4) these were discussed and prioritized. The summary report will serve as a resource to guide management and decision-making throughout the period of the subject MNA/EPR Alternative Project. To support and more fully document the information presented in the summary report, we are publishing a series of supplemental documents that present the full texts from the technical analyses within the various lines of inquiry (see listing). The following report - documenting our evaluation of the state of the science of the characterization and monitoring process and tools-- is one of those supplemental documents.

  11. Enhancing electrokinetic remediation of cadmium- contaminated soils with stepwise moving anode method.

    Chen, Xue J; Shen, Zhe M; Yuan, Tao; Zheng, Shen S; Ju, Bing X; Wang, Wen H

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposed an innovative approach by stepwise moving anode towards cathode to enhance the cadmium (Cd) removal from soil during the process of electrokinetic (EK) remediation. Fixed anode tests and moving anode tests were carried out for 60 hours to compare their performances. The anode-cathode spacing was 21 cm. Constant voltage grade of 1.0 V cm(-1) was applied in this study. The parameters included pH, electrical conductivity, current, Cd concentration and speciation distributions, energy consumptions, etc. It was found that the pH values in the moving anode tests were relatively lower than those of the fixed tests. In the moving anode test, the removal efficiency of Cd in the soils at the fraction of S4 was enhanced by 54.9% compared with that of the fixed anode tests. After 60 hours of treatment, approximately 80% of the spiked soils (100.63 mg x kg(-1) of Cd) in the system were successfully remedied in the moving anode tests; and the mean removal efficiency was 73% for actual field-contaminated soil (54.26 mg x kg(-1) of Cd). It is effective to remedy actual contaminated soils. In addition, the cumulative energy consumptions were 59.29 kWhm(-3) and 31.52 kWhm(-3) for the fixed and moving tests, respectively. The results revealed that the Cd removal efficiency was improved by the moving anode method. Moreover, less energy was consumed in the moving test. The proposed approach does not need to introduce extra chemicals nor adjust the pH in the system to enhance the Cd removal by EK remediation. The basic idea proposed in this paper provides a novel and environmental friendly method to enhance the EK remediation of heavy metals contaminated soils. PMID:17000543

  12. Acoustic Waves: A Route to Enhance Sodium Fast Reactor Safety

    The properties of sodium – both thermohydraulic and neutronic – offer a number of advantages when used as a coolant for fourth generation fast reactors. However, the opacity of sodium is a major drawback for the instrumentation. Acoustic waves could be an efficient means to sound this medium. An ultrasonic telemetry instrument called SONAR was used in the Phénix reactor to detect core movement, to check for missing objects and for sub-assembly handling. Acoustic methods were also used in Superphenix and considered for the EFR project as one of the monitoring solutions to detect anomalies. This paper focuses on the efforts made to develop acoustic techniques to meet the system protection and monitoring requirements. It covers various fields: the development of ultrasonic transducers such as the high-temperature ultrasonic transducer (TUSHT) which have recently been re-developed and manufactured, and current research on instrumentation methods using acoustic transducers for ASTRID. This paper discusses the development of acoustic-based instrument techniques as a means to strengthen the primary and secondary sodium system monitoring approach. In the case of TUSHTs, for example, the potential uses are: core monitoring during nominal operation, the detection of core meltdown accident initiators and fuel handling guidance. (author)

  13. Enhanced tolerance and remediation of anthracene by transgenic tobacco plants expressing a fungal glutathione transferase gene

    Highlights: → Transgenic plants expressing a TvGST gene were tested for tolerance, uptake and degradation of anthracene. → Transgenic plants were more tolerant to anthracene and take up more anthracene from soil and solutions compared to control plants. → Using in vitro T1 seedlings, we showed that anthracene-a three fused benzene ring compound was phytodegraded to naphthalene derivatives, having two benzene rings. → This is the first time that a transgenic plant was shown to have the potential to phytodegrade anthracene. - Abstract: Plants can be used for remediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, which are known to be a major concern for human health. Metabolism of xenobiotic compounds in plants occurs in three phases and glutathione transferases (GST) mediate phase II of xenobiotic transformation. Plants, although have GSTs, they are not very efficient for degradation of exogenous recalcitrant xenobiotics including polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Hence, heterologous expression of efficient GSTs in plants may improve their remediation and degradation potential of xenobiotics. In the present study, we investigated the potential of transgenic tobacco plants expressing a Trichoderma virens GST for tolerance, remediation and degradation of anthracene-a recalcitrant polyaromatic hydrocarbon. Transgenic plants with fungal GST showed enhanced tolerance to anthracene compared to control plants. Remediation of 14C uniformly labeled anthracene from solutions and soil by transgenic tobacco plants was higher compared to wild-type plants. Transgenic plants (T0 and T1) degraded anthracene to naphthalene derivatives, while no such degradation was observed in wild-type plants. The present work has shown that in planta expression of a fungal GST in tobacco imparted enhanced tolerance as well as higher remediation potential of anthracene compared to wild-type plants.

  14. Electrokinetic-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of chlorinated solvents contaminated clay

    Mao, Xuhui; Wang, James; Ciblak, Ali; Cox, Evan E.; Riis, Charlotte; Terkelsen, Mads; Gent, David B.; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2012-01-01

    Successful bioremediation of contaminated soils is controlled by the ability to deliver bioremediation additives, such as bacteria and/or nutrients, to the contaminated zone. Because hydraulic advection is not practical for delivery in clays, electrokinetic (EK) injection is an alternative for efficient and uniform delivery of bioremediation additive into low-permeability soil and heterogeneous deposits. EK–enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of clays contaminated with chlorinated solven...

  15. Use of Historical Pump-and-Treat Data to Enhance Site Characterization and Remediation Performance Assessment

    Brusseau, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater withdrawal and contaminant concentration data are routinely collected for pump-and-treat operations conducted at hazardous waste sites. These data sets can be mined to produce a wealth of information to support enhanced site characterization, optimization of remedial system operations, and improved decision making regarding long-term site management and closure. Methods that may be used to analyze and interpret pump-and-treat data to produce such assessments are presented, along w...

  16. ENHANCING OSMOTIC DEHYDRATION WITH ACOUSTIC CAVITATION%声空化强化渗透脱水

    孙宝芝; 姜任秋; 淮秀兰; 李斌; 刘登瀛

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to enhance osmotic dehydration of fruits--apples using acoustic cavitation. The variation in water losses and dry matter gain rates of materials with solute concentration, cavitation intensity, the thickness of materials and treating time segment during osmotic dehydration was discussed, at the same time, the influence of different materials on mass transfer during osmotic dehydration using acoustic cavitation was investigated. The results showed that water losses rates of materials were remarkably increased during osmotic dehydration using acoustic cavitation, but dry matter gain rates increased very little. Meanwhile the physical mechanism of enhanced mass transfer during osmotic dehydration with acoustic cavitation was clarified on the basis of analyzing the experimental results.

  17. Enhanced acoustic cavitation following laser-induced bubble formation : long-term memory effect

    Yavaṣ, Oğuz; Leiderer, Paul; Park, Hee K.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poon, Chie C.; Tam, Andrew C.

    1994-01-01

    The enhancement of acoustic caviation at a liquid-solid interface following laser-induced bubble formation is studied. The experiment results indicate that metastable ultramicroscopic bubbles formed on the solid surface cause a long-term memory effect on acoustic cavitation. By performing a double-pulse experiment using two excimer lasers, the temporal decay of this memory effect is determined for two different liquids on a chromium surface. An explanation of the observed decay mode by a ...

  18. Selecting enhancing solutions for electrokinetic remediation of dredged sediments polluted with fuel.

    Rozas, F; Castellote, M

    2015-03-15

    In this paper a procedure for selecting the enhancing solutions in electrokinetic remediation experiments is proposed. For this purpose, dredged marine sediment was contaminated with fuel, and a total of 22 different experimental conditions were tested, analysing the influence of different enhancing solutions by using three commercial non-ionic surfactants, one bio-surfactant, one chelating agent, and one weak acid. Characterisation, microelectrophoretic and electrokinetic remediation trials were carried out. The results are explained on the basis of the interactions between the fuel, the enhancing electrolytes and the matrix. For one specific system, the electrophoretic zeta potential, (ζ), of the contaminated matrix in the solution was found to be related to the electroosmotic averaged ζ in the experiment and not to the efficiency in the extraction. This later was correlated to a parameter accounting for both contributions, the contaminant and the enhancing solution, calculated on the basis of differences in the electrophoretic ζ in different conditions which has allowed to propose a methodology for selection of enhancing solutions. PMID:25559497

  19. Acoustics

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  20. Effect of heterogeneity on enhanced reductive dechlorination: Analysis of remediation efficiency and groundwater acidification

    Brovelli, A.; Lacroix, E.; Robinson, C. E.; Gerhard, J.; Holliger, C.; Barry, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Enhanced reductive dehalogenation is an attractive in situ treatment technology for chlorinated contaminants. The process includes two acid-forming microbial reactions: fermentation of an organic substrate resulting in short-chain fatty acids, and dehalogenation resulting in hydrochloric acid. The accumulation of acids and the resulting drop of groundwater pH are controlled by the mass and distribution of chlorinated solvents in the source zone, type of electron donor, alternative terminal electron acceptors available and presence of soil mineral phases able to buffer the pH (such as carbonates). Groundwater acidification may reduce or halt microbial activity, and thus dehalogenation, significantly increasing the time and costs required to remediate the aquifer. In previous work a detailed geochemical and groundwater flow simulator able to model the fermentation-dechlorination reactions and associated pH change was developed. The model accounts for the main processes influencing microbial activity and groundwater pH, including the groundwater composition, the electron donor used and soil mineral phase interactions. In this study, the model was applied to investigate how spatial variability occurring at the field scale affects dechlorination rates, groundwater pH and ultimately the remediation efficiency. Numerical simulations were conducted to examine the influence of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity on the distribution of the injected, fermentable substrate and on the accumulation/dilution of the acidic products of reductive dehalogenation. The influence of the geometry of the DNAPL source zone was studied, as well as the spatial distribution of soil minerals. The results of this study showed that the heterogeneous distribution of the soil properties have a potentially large effect on the remediation efficiency. For examples, zones of high hydraulic conductivity can prevent the accumulation of acids and alleviate the problem of groundwater acidification. The

  1. Loss-induced enhanced transmission in anisotropic density-near-zero acoustic metamaterials

    Shen, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropic density-near-zero (ADNZ) acoustic metamaterials are investigated theoretically and numerically in this letter and are shown to exhibit extraordinary transmission enhancement when material loss is induced. The enhanced transmission is due to the enhanced propagating and evanescent wave modes inside the ADNZ medium thanks to the interplay of near-zero density, material loss, and high wave impedance matching in the propagation direction. The equi-frequency contour (EFC) is used to reveal whether the propagating wave mode is allowed in ADNZ metamaterials. Numerical simulations based on plate-type acoustic metamaterials with different material losses were performed to demonstrate collimation enabled by the induced loss in ADNZ media. This work provides a different way for manipulating acoustic waves.

  2. Acoustic transmission enhancement through a soft interlayer with a reactance boundary.

    Quan, Li; Qian, Feng; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-08-01

    Research has shown that acoustic transmission enhancement (ATE) can occur in stiff materials with high acoustic impedance that include a soft interlayer with low acoustic impedance inserted between them without any opening (i.e., without any links between the two stiff materials). Previously, ATE was induced either by coupling acoustic surface waves or Love waves with the Fabry-Perot resonant modes inside the apertures or by the locally resonant modes of the structure. However, in this article ATE is achieved using wave-vector redistribution induced by a reactance boundary. An optimal boundary was designed to adjust the wave vector in the propagation direction, decreasing reflection caused by impedance differences. The role of boundary conditions on ATE was also clarified. PMID:26328694

  3. Remediation of Nitrobenzene Contaminated Soil by Combining Surfactant Enhanced Soil Washing and Effluent Oxidation with Persulfate

    Yan, Jingchun; Gao, Weiguo; Qian, Linbo; Han, Lu; Chen, Yun; Chen, Mengfang

    2015-01-01

    The combination of surfactant enhanced soil washing and degradation of nitrobenzene (NB) in effluent with persulfate was investigated to remediate NB contaminated soil. Aqueous solution of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS, 24.0 mmol L-1) was used at a given mass ratio of solution to soil (20:1) to extract NB contaminated soil (47.3 mg kg-1), resulting in NB desorption removal efficient of 76.8%. The washing effluent was treated in Fe2+/persulfate and Fe2+/H2O2 systems successively. The de...

  4. Enhancing gas-phase reaction in a plasma using high intensity and high power ultrasonic acoustic waves

    2010-01-01

    acoustic energy by at least one ultrasonic high intensity and high power gas-jet acoustic wave generator (101), where said ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves are directed to propagate towards said plasma (104) so that at least a part of said predetermined amount of acoustic energy is......This invention relates to enhancing a gas-phase reaction in a plasma comprising: creating plasma (104) by at least one plasma source (106), and wherein that the method further comprises: generating ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) having a predetermined amount of...... absorbed into said plasma (104), and where a sound pressure level of said generated ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) is at least substantially 140 dB and where an acoustic power of said generated ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102); is at least...

  5. Ion-acoustic solitary waves and spectrally uniform scattering cross section enhancements

    J. Ekeberg

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Spectra measured by incoherent scatter radars are formed predominantly by scattering of the incident signal off ion-acoustic and Langmuir waves in the ionosphere. Occasionally, the upshifted and/or downshifted lines produced by the ion-acoustic waves are enhanced well above thermal levels and referred to as naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines. In this paper, we study another kind of enhancement, which is spectrally uniform over the whole ion-line, i.e. the up- and downshifted shoulder and the spectral valley in between. Based on observations made with the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR facility, we investigate the transient and spectrally uniform power enhancements, which can be explained by ion-acoustic solitary waves. We use a theory of nonlinear waves in a magnetized plasma to determine the properties of such waves and evaluate their effects on scattered signals measured by ESR. We suggest a new mechanism that can explain backscattered power enhancements by one order of magnitude above the thermal level and show that it is consistent with observations.

  6. Wayside acoustic diagnosis of defective train bearings based on signal resampling and information enhancement

    He, Qingbo; Wang, Jun; Hu, Fei; Kong, Fanrang

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of train bearing defects plays a significant role to maintain the safety of railway transport. Among various defect detection techniques, acoustic diagnosis is capable of detecting incipient defects of a train bearing as well as being suitable for wayside monitoring. However, the wayside acoustic signal will be corrupted by the Doppler effect and surrounding heavy noise. This paper proposes a solution to overcome these two difficulties in wayside acoustic diagnosis. In the solution, a dynamically resampling method is firstly presented to reduce the Doppler effect, and then an adaptive stochastic resonance (ASR) method is proposed to enhance the defective characteristic frequency automatically by the aid of noise. The resampling method is based on a frequency variation curve extracted from the time-frequency distribution (TFD) of an acoustic signal by dynamically minimizing the local cost functions. For the ASR method, the genetic algorithm is introduced to adaptively select the optimal parameter of the multiscale noise tuning (MST)-based stochastic resonance (SR) method. The proposed wayside acoustic diagnostic scheme combines signal resampling and information enhancement, and thus is expected to be effective in wayside defective bearing detection. The experimental study verifies the effectiveness of the proposed solution.

  7. Enhanced removal of petroleum hydrocarbons using a bioelectrochemical remediation system with pre-cultured anodes.

    Venkidusamy, Krishnaveni; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Marzorati, Massimo; Lockington, Robin; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical remediation (BER) systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have recently emerged as a green technology for the effective remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants (PH) coupled with simultaneous energy recovery. Recent research has shown that biofilms previously enriched for substrate degrading bacteria resulted in excellent performance in terms of substrate removal and electricity generation but the effects on hydrocarbon contaminant degradation were not examined. Here we investigate the differences between enriched biofilm anodes and freshly inoculated new anodes in diesel fed single chamber mediatorless microbial fuel cells (DMFC) using various techniques for the enhancement of PH contaminant remediation with concomitant electricity generation. An anodophilic microbial consortium previously selected for over a year through continuous culturing with a diesel concentration of about 800mgl(-1) and which now showed complete removal of this concentration of diesel within 30days was compared to that of a freshly inoculated new anode MFC (showing 83.4% removal of diesel) with a simultaneous power generation of 90.81mW/m(2) and 15.04mW/m(2) respectively. The behaviour of pre-cultured anodes at a higher concentration of PH (8000mgl(-1)) was also investigated. Scanning electron microscopy observation revealed a thick biofilm covering the pre-cultured anodic electrode but not the anode from the freshly inoculated MFC. High resolution imaging showed the presence of thin 60nm diametre pilus-like projections emanating from the cells. Anodic microbial community profiling confirmed that the selection for diesel degrading exoelectrogenic bacteria had occurred. Identification of a biodegradative gene (alkB) provided strong evidence of the catabolic pathway used for diesel degradation in the DMFCs. PMID:26360455

  8. Induced metal redistribution and bioavailability enhancement in contaminated river sediment during in situ biogeochemical remediation.

    Liu, Tongzhou; Zhang, Zhen; Mao, Yanqing; Yan, Dickson Y S

    2016-04-01

    In situ sediment remediation using Ca(NO3)2 or CaO2 for odor mitigation and acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and organic pollutant (such as TPH and PAHs) removal was reported in many studies and fieldwork. Yet, the associated effects on metal mobilization and potential distortion in bioavailability were not well documented. In this study, contaminated river sediment was treated by Ca(NO3)2 and CaO2 in bench studies. Through the investigation of AVS removal, organic matter removal, the changes in sediment oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), microbial activity, and other indigenous parameters, the effects on metal bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and fraction redistribution in sediment were evaluated. The major mechanisms for sediment treated by Ca(NO3)2 and CaO2 are biostimulation with indigenous denitrifying bacteria and chemical oxidation, respectively. After applying Ca(NO3)2 and CaO2, the decreases of metal concentrations in the treated sediment were insignificant within a 35-day incubation period. However, the [SEMtot-AVS]/f OC increased near to the effective boundary of toxicity (100 μmol g(-1) organic carbon (OC)), indicating that both bioavailability and bioaccessibility of metals (Cu, Zn, and Ni) to benthic organisms are enhanced after remediation. Metals were found redistributed from relatively stable fractions (oxidizable and residual fractions) to weakly bound fractions (exchangeable and reducible fractions), and the results are in line with the enhanced metal bioavailability. Compared with Ca(NO3)2, CaO2 led to higher enhancement in metal bioavailability and bioaccessibility, and more significant metal redistribution, probably due to its stronger chemical reactive capacity to AVS and sediment organic matter. The reactions in CaO2-treated sediment would probably shift from physicochemical to biochemical heterotrophic oxidation for sediment organic matter degradation. Therefore, further investigation on the long-term metal redistribution and associated

  9. Ligand-enhanced electrokinetic remediation of metal-contaminated marine sediments with high acid buffering capacity.

    Masi, Matteo; Iannelli, Renato; Losito, Gabriella

    2016-06-01

    The suitability of electrokinetic remediation for removing heavy metals from dredged marine sediments with high acid buffering capacity was investigated. Laboratory-scale electrokinetic remediation experiments were carried out by applying two different voltage gradients to the sediment (0.5 and 0.8 V/cm) while circulating water or two different chelating agents at the electrode compartments. Tap water, 0.1 M citric acid and 0.1 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solutions were used respectively. The investigated metals were Zn, Pb, V, Ni and Cu. In the unenhanced experiment, the acid front could not propagate due to the high acid buffering capacity of the sediments; the production of OH(-) ions at the cathode resulted in a high-pH environment causing the precipitation of CaCO3 and metal hydroxides. The use of citric acid prevented the formation of precipitates, but solubilisation and mobilisation of metal species were not sufficiently achieved. Metal removal was relevant when EDTA was used as the conditioning agent, and the electric potential was raised up to 0.8 V/cm. EDTA led to the formation of negatively charged complexes with metals which migrated towards the anode compartment by electromigration. This result shows that metal removal from sediments with high acid buffering capacity may be achieved by enhancing the electrokinetic process by EDTA addition when the acidification of the medium is not economically and/or environmentally sustainable. PMID:26490900

  10. Remediation of phthalates in river sediment by integrated enhanced bioremediation and electrokinetic process.

    Yang, Gordon C C; Huang, Sheng-Chih; Jen, Yu-Sheng; Tsai, Pei-Shin

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of enhanced bioremediation coupling with electrokinetic process for promoting the growth of intrinsic microorganisms and removing phthalate esters (PAEs) from river sediment by adding an oxygen releasing compound (ORC). Test results are given as follows: Enhanced removal of PAEs was obtained by electrokinetics, through which the electroosmotic flow would render desorption of organic pollutants from sediment particles yielding an increased bioavailability. It was also found that the ORC injected into the sediment compartment not only would alleviate the pH value variation due to acid front and base front, but would be directly utilized as the carbon source and oxygen source for microbial growth resulting in an enhanced degradation of organic pollutants. However, injection of the ORC into the anode compartment could yield a lower degree of microbial growth due to the loss of ORC during the transport by EK. Through the analysis of molecular biotechnology it was found that both addition of an ORC and application of an external electric field can be beneficial to the growth of intrinsic microbial and abundance of microflora. In addition, the sequencing result showed that PAEs could be degraded by the following four strains: Flavobacterium sp., Bacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Rhodococcus sp. The above findings confirm that coupling of enhanced bioremediation and electrokinetic process could be a viable remediation technology to treat PAEs-contaminated river sediment. PMID:26733014

  11. Use of Historical Pump-and-Treat Data to Enhance Site Characterization and Remediation Performance Assessment.

    Brusseau, Mark L

    2013-10-01

    Groundwater withdrawal and contaminant concentration data are routinely collected for pump-and-treat operations conducted at hazardous waste sites. These data sets can be mined to produce a wealth of information to support enhanced site characterization, optimization of remedial system operations, and improved decision making regarding long-term site management and closure. Methods that may be used to analyze and interpret pump-and-treat data to produce such assessments are presented, along with a brief illustration of their application to a site. The results presented herein illustrate that comprehensive analysis of pump-and-treat data is a powerful, cost-effective method for providing higher-resolution, value-added characterization of contaminated sites. PMID:24587562

  12. Hydraulic fracturing to enhance the remediation of DNAPL in low permeability soils

    Murdoch, L. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Slack, B. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Meager rates of fluid flow are a major obstacle to in situ remediation of low permeability soils. This paper describes methods designed to avoid that obstacle by creating fractures and filling them with sand to increase well discharge and change paths of fluid flow in soil. Gently dipping fractures 10 m in maximum dimension and 1 to 2 cm thick can be created in some contaminated soils at depths of a few in or greater. Hydraulic fractures can also be used to create electrically conductive layers or to deliver granules of chemically or biologically active compounds that will degrade contaminants in place. Benefits of applying hydraulic fractures to DNAPL recovery include rates of fluid recovery, enhancing upward gradients to improve hydrodynamic stabilization, forming flat-lying reactive curtains to intersect compounds moving downward, or improving the performance of electrokinetics intended to recover compounds dissolved in water. 30 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Acoustic trauma-induced auditory cortex enhancement and tinnitus

    Erin Laundrie; Wei Sun

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence suggests that noise-induced cochlear damage may lead to hyperexcitability in the central auditory system (CAS) which may give rise to tinnitus. However, the correlation between the onset of the neurophysiological changes in the CAS and the onset of tinnitus has not been well studied. To investigate this relationship, chronic electrodes were implanted into the auditory cortex (AC) and sound evoked activities were measured from awake rats before and after noise exposure. The auditory brainstem response (ABR) was used to assess the degree of noise-induced hearing loss. Tinnitus was evaluated by measuring gap-induced prepulse inhibition (gap-PPI). Rats were exposed monaurally to a high-intensity narrowband noise centered at 12 kHz at a level of 120 dB SPL for 1 h. After the noise exposure, all the rats developed either permanent (>2 weeks) or temporary (<3 days) hearing loss in the exposed ear(s). The AC amplitudes increased significantly 4 h after the noise exposure. Most of the exposed rats also showed decreased gap-PPI. The post-exposure AC enhancement showed a positive correlation with the amount of hearing loss. The onset of tinnitus-like behavior was happened after the onset of AC enhancement.

  14. An Enhanced Energy Balanced Data Transmission Protocol for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Nadeem Javaid; Mehreen Shah; Ashfaq Ahmad; Muhammad Imran; Majid Iqbal Khan; Vasilakos, Athanasios V

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents two new energy balanced routing protocols for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks (UASNs); Efficient and Balanced Energy consumption Technique (EBET) and Enhanced EBET (EEBET). The first proposed protocol avoids direct transmission over long distance to save sufficient amount of energy consumed in the routing process. The second protocol overcomes the deficiencies in both Balanced Transmission Mechanism (BTM) and EBET techniques. EBET selects relay node on the basis of opt...

  15. Acoustic field enhancement and subwavelength imaging by coupling to slab waveguide modes

    Christensen, J; García de Abajo, F. Javier

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical study on the amplification of evanescent sound waves produced by coupling to trapped modes hosted by a fluidic planar waveguide. Total internal reflection at interfaces of different refractive indexes can be frustrated by the introduction of a slow slab waveguide which is leading to a gigantic field enhancement, useful for sensitive transducers and acoustic shock lithotripsy. The mechanism behind the evanescent field coupling that is also known as tunnelling barrier p...

  16. Documenting clinical performance problems among medical students: feedback for learner remediation and curriculum enhancement

    Brian E. Mavis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We operationalized the taxonomy developed by Hauer and colleagues describing common clinical performance problems. Faculty raters pilot tested the resulting worksheet by observing recordings of problematic simulated clinical encounters involving third-year medical students. This approach provided a framework for structured feedback to guide learner improvement and curricular enhancement. Methods: Eighty-two problematic clinical encounters from M3 students who failed their clinical competency examination were independently rated by paired clinical faculty members to identify common problems related to the medical interview, physical examination, and professionalism. Results: Eleven out of 26 target performance problems were present in 25% or more encounters. Overall, 37% had unsatisfactory medical interviews, with ‘inadequate history to rule out other diagnoses’ most prevalent (60%. Seventy percent failed because of physical examination deficiencies, with missing elements (69% and inadequate data gathering (69% most common. One-third of the students did not introduce themselves to their patients. Among students failing based on standardized patient (SP ratings, 93% also failed to demonstrate competency based on the faculty ratings. Conclusions: Our review form allowed clinical faculty to validate pass/fail decisions based on standardized patient ratings. Detailed information about performance problems contributes to learner feedback and curricular enhancement to guide remediation planning and faculty development.

  17. Multi-Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with Different Acoustic Microresonator Configurations

    Huadan Zheng; Xukun Yin; Lei Dong; Hongpeng Wu; Xiaoli Liu; Weiguang Ma; Lei Zhang; Wangbao Yin; Suotang Jia

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic microresonators were added to the recently developed multi-QTF based QEPAS spectrophone to enhance the signal amplitude. Two kinds of “on-beam” configurations were experimentally investigated in detail. The developed multi-QTF based “on-beam” spectrophone had a signal enhancement of 1.6 times compared with the traditional single QTF based “on-beam” spectrophone, with the approximate noise level. A normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient (1σ) of 1.24 × 10−9 W·cm−1·Hz−1/2 wa...

  18. Multi-Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with Different Acoustic Microresonator Configurations

    Huadan Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic microresonators were added to the recently developed multi-QTF based QEPAS spectrophone to enhance the signal amplitude. Two kinds of “on-beam” configurations were experimentally investigated in detail. The developed multi-QTF based “on-beam” spectrophone had a signal enhancement of 1.6 times compared with the traditional single QTF based “on-beam” spectrophone, with the approximate noise level. A normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient (1σ of 1.24 × 10−9 W·cm−1·Hz−1/2 was obtained for water vapor detection at atmospheric pressure.

  19. Recent Enhancements to the NASA Langley Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) Facility

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2013-01-01

    The Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center is comprised of an anechoic room and a reverberant room, and may act as a transmission loss suite when test articles are mounted in a window connecting the two rooms. In the latter configuration, the reverberant room acts as the noise source side and the anechoic room as the receiver side. The noise generation system used for qualification testing in the reverberant room was previously shown to achieve a maximum overall sound pressure level of 141 dB. This is considered to be marginally adequate for generating sound pressure levels typically required for launch vehicle payload qualification testing. Recent enhancements to the noise generation system increased the maximum overall sound pressure level to 154 dB, through the use of two airstream modulators coupled to 35 Hz and 160 Hz horns. This paper documents the acoustic performance of the enhanced noise generation system for a variety of relevant test spectra. Additionally, it demonstrates the capability of the SALT facility to conduct transmission loss and absorption testing in accordance with ASTM and ISO standards, respectively. A few examples of test capabilities are shown and include transmission loss testing of simple unstiffened and built up structures and measurement of the diffuse field absorption coefficient of a fibrous acoustic blanket.

  20. Low loading of carbon nanotubes to enhance acoustical properties of poly(ether)urethane foams

    Basirjafari, Sedigheh; Malekfar, Rasoul; Esmaielzadeh Khadem, Siamak

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to fabricate a sound absorber flexible semi-open cell polymeric foam based on polyether urethane (PEU) with carboxylic functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs) as an energy decaying filler at low loadings up to 0.20 wt. %. This paper provides the relationship between the mentioned foam microstructure via field emission scanning electron microscopy and different acoustical and non-acoustical properties of PEU/COOH-MWCNT composites. Addition of just 0.05 wt. % COOH-MWCNTs enhanced the sound absorption coefficient of the mentioned nanocomposite foam over the entire frequency range. Raman spectra revealed the better dispersion of COOH-MWCNTs in the PEU matrix leading to more stress transfer between them to cause a significant dissipation of energy.

  1. Electrokinetic-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of chlorinated solvents contaminated clay.

    Mao, Xuhui; Wang, James; Ciblak, Ali; Cox, Evan E; Riis, Charlotte; Terkelsen, Mads; Gent, David B; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2012-04-30

    Successful bioremediation of contaminated soils is controlled by the ability to deliver bioremediation additives, such as bacteria and/or nutrients, to the contaminated zone. Because hydraulic advection is not practical for delivery in clays, electrokinetic (EK) injection is an alternative for efficient and uniform delivery of bioremediation additive into low-permeability soil and heterogeneous deposits. EK-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of clays contaminated with chlorinated solvents is evaluated. Dehalococcoides (Dhc) bacterial strain and lactate ions are uniformly injected in contaminated clay and complete dechlorination of chlorinated ethene is observed in laboratory experiments. The injected bacteria can survive, grow, and promote effective dechlorination under EK conditions and after EK application. The distribution of Dhc within the clay suggests that electrokinetic transport of Dhc is primarily driven by electroosmosis. In addition to biodegradation due to bioaugmentation of Dhc, an EK-driven transport of chlorinated ethenes is observed in the clay, which accelerates cleanup of chlorinated ethenes from the anode side. Compared with conventional advection-based delivery, EK injection is significantly more effective for establishing microbial reductive dechlorination capacity in low-permeability soils. PMID:22365139

  2. Potential enhancements to addressing programmatic risk in the tank waste remediation system (TWRS) program

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Risk Management methodology development task. The objective of this task was to develop risk management methodology focused on (1) the use of programmatic risk information in making TWRS architecture selection decisions and (2) the identification/evaluation/selection of TWRS risk-handling actions. Methods for incorporating programmatic risk/uncertainty estimates into trade studies are provided for engineers/analysts. Methods for identifying, evaluating, and selecting risk-handling actions are provided for managers. The guidance provided in this report is designed to help decision-makers make difficult judgments. Current approaches to architecture selection decisions and identification/evaluation/selection of risk-handling actions are summarized. Three categories of sources of programmatic risk (parametric, external, and organizational) are examined. Multiple analytical approaches are presented to enhance the current alternative generation and analysis (AGA) and risk-handling procedures. Appendix A describes some commercially available risk management software tools and Appendix B provides a brief introduction to quantification of risk attitudes. The report provides three levels of analysis for enhancing the AGA Procedure: (1) qualitative discussion coupled with estimated uncertainty ranges for scores in the alternatives-by-criteria matrix; (2) formal elicitation of probability distributions for the alternative scores; and (3) a formal, more structured, comprehensive risk analysis. A framework is also presented for using the AGA programmatic risk analysis results in making better decisions. The report also presents two levels of analysis for evaluation and selection of risk-handling actions: (1) qualitative analysis and judgmental rankings of alternative actions, and (2) Simple Multi-Attribute Rating Technique (SMART)

  3. Lab scale study of the influence of the acid strength over the performance of an acid-enhanced electrokinetic remediation

    Villén Guzmán, M.D.; Paz García, J.M.; García Delgado, R.A.; García Herruzo, Francisco; Arhoun, B.; Rodríguez Maroto, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that, when an electrokinetic remediation (EKR) is performed for the cleanup of most toxic metals, an enhancement is needed. During the unenhanced EKR the reactions at the electrodes, probably water electrolysis, result in the production of hydroxides, at the cathode, and hydroniums, at the anode, that migrate towards the opposite electrode. Most toxic metals are recovered as cations, and in their way towards the cathode will meet the hydroxides, with different problems a...

  4. Engineering Behavior and Characteristics of Water-Soluble Polymers: Implication on Soil Remediation and Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Shuang Cindy Cao; Bate Bate; Jong Wan Hu; Jongwon Jung

    2016-01-01

    Biopolymers have shown a great effect in enhanced oil recovery because of the improvement of water-flood performance by mobility control, as well as having been considered for oil contaminated-soil remediation thanks to their mobility control and water-flood performance. This study focused on the wettability analysis of biopolymers such as chitosan (85% deacetylated power), PEO (polyethylene oxide), Xanthan (xanthan gum), SA (Alginic Acid Sodium Salt), and PAA (polyacrylic acid), including th...

  5. Electrokinetic-Enhanced Remediation of Phenanthrene-Contaminated Soil Combined with Sphingomonas sp. GY2B and Biosurfactant.

    Lin, Weijia; Guo, Chuling; Zhang, Hui; Liang, Xujun; Wei, Yanfu; Lu, Guining; Dang, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Electrokinetic-microbial remediation (EMR) has emerged as a promising option for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated soils. The aim of this study was to enhance degradation of phenanthrene (Phe)-contaminated soils using EMR combined with biosurfactants. The electrokinetic (EK) remediation, combined with Phe-degrading Sphingomonas sp. GY2B, and biosurfactant obtained by fermentation of Pseudomonas sp. MZ01, degraded Phe in the soil with an efficiency of up to 65.1 % at the anode, 49.9 % at the cathode after 5 days of the treatment. The presence of biosurfactants, electricity, and a neutral electrolyte stimulated the growth of the degrading bacteria as shown by a rapid increase in microbial biomass with time. The electrical conductivity and pH changed little during the course of the treatment, which benefitted the growth of microorganisms and the remediation of Phe-contaminated soil. The EMR system with the addition of biosurfactant had the highest Phe removal, demonstrating the biosurfactant may enhance the bioavailability of Phe and the interaction with the microorganism. This study suggests that the EMR combined with biosurfactants can be used to enhance in situ bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils. PMID:26683200

  6. Electrokinetic-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of chlorinated solvents contaminated clay

    Mao, Xuhui, E-mail: x.mao@neu.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Wang, James [Geosyntec Consultants, Columbia, MA (United States); Ciblak, Ali [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Cox, Evan E. [Geosyntec Consultants, Columbia, MA (United States); Riis, Charlotte [NIRAS A/S, Alleroed (Denmark); Terkelsen, Mads [Capital Region of Denmark, Hilleroed (Denmark); Gent, David B. [Environmental Laboratory, Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), US Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Alshawabkeh, Akram N., E-mail: aalsha@neu.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous delivery of electron donors and bacteria into low permeability clays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bacteria injection, growth and consequent transformation of contaminants are viable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EK injection is more effective than advection-based injection for clay soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electroosmosis appears to be the driving mechanism for bacteria injection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both EK transport and biodegradation contribute the removal of VOCs in clay. - Abstract: Successful bioremediation of contaminated soils is controlled by the ability to deliver bioremediation additives, such as bacteria and/or nutrients, to the contaminated zone. Because hydraulic advection is not practical for delivery in clays, electrokinetic (EK) injection is an alternative for efficient and uniform delivery of bioremediation additive into low-permeability soil and heterogeneous deposits. EK-enhanced bioaugmentation for remediation of clays contaminated with chlorinated solvents is evaluated. Dehalococcoides (Dhc) bacterial strain and lactate ions are uniformly injected in contaminated clay and complete dechlorination of chlorinated ethene is observed in laboratory experiments. The injected bacteria can survive, grow, and promote effective dechlorination under EK conditions and after EK application. The distribution of Dhc within the clay suggests that electrokinetic transport of Dhc is primarily driven by electroosmosis. In addition to biodegradation due to bioaugmentation of Dhc, an EK-driven transport of chlorinated ethenes is observed in the clay, which accelerates cleanup of chlorinated ethenes from the anode side. Compared with conventional advection-based delivery, EK injection is significantly more effective for establishing microbial reductive dechlorination capacity in low-permeability soils.

  7. Green remediation: enhanced reductive dechlorination using recycled rinse water as bioremediation substrate

    Enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD) has rapidly become a remedy of choice for use on chlorinated solvent contamination when site conditions allow. With this approach, solutions of an organic substrate are injected into the affected aquifer to stimulate biological growth and the resultant production of reducing conditions in the target zone. Under the reducing conditions, hydrogen is produced and ultimately replaces chlorine atoms on the contaminant molecule causing sequential dechlorination. Under suitable conditions the process continues until the parent hydrocarbon precursor is produced, such as the complete dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) to ethene. The process is optimized by use of a substrate that maximizes hydrogen production per unit cost. When natural biota are not present to promote the desired degradation, inoculates can be added with the substrate. The in-situ method both reduces cost and accelerates cleanup. Successful applications have been extended from the most common chlorinated compounds perchloroethylene (PCE) and TCE and related products of degradation, to perchlorate, and even explosives such as RDX and trinitrotoluene on which nitrates are attacked in lieu of chloride. In recent work, the process has been further improved through use of beverage industry wastewaters that are available at little or no cost. With material cost removed from the equation, applications can maximize the substrate loading without significantly increasing total cost. The extra substrate loading both accelerates reaction rates and extends the period of time over which reducing conditions are maintained. In some cases, the presence of other organic matter in addition to simple sugars provides for longer performance times of individual injections, thereby working in a fashion similar to emulsified vegetable oil. The paper discusses results of applications at three different sites contaminated with chlorinated ethylenes. The applications have included

  8. Hydrogeochemical modeling of enhanced benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX) remediation with nitrate

    Eckert, Paul; Appelo, C. A. J.

    2002-08-01

    During a 5-month field test, active remediation of a benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX)-contaminated aquifer was initiated by injecting water with varying amounts of KNO3. The experiment was performed prior to selecting bioremediation for full-scale cleanup, particularly to evaluate the competing reaction of nitrate with hydrocarbons and reduced sulfur components. The nitrate oxidized sulfides that had precipitated earlier as a result of the natural degradation of BTEX with SO42- from groundwater. When the sulfides were exhausted, BTEX degradation was enhanced by nitrate. A hydrogeochemical model with kinetic oxidation reactions for Fe(II), FeS and BTEX by nitrate was developed to calculate the observed concentration patterns along a flow line in the aquifer. The rates for the kinetic model were based on published kinetic reaction equations for oxidation with oxygen. Nitrate was introduced in the equations in the same form as oxygen, with a premultiplier added to fit the observed concentration changes in the aquifer. The oxidation of Fe(II) with nitrate in the aquifer was 4 times slower than the abiological oxidation reaction with oxygen in water. Similar rates were found for oxidation of FeS with nitrate as for FeS2 with oxygen, but the specific surface area of FeS in the aquifer was larger. The reaction rate for degradation of BTEX compounds was about 107 times faster than for natural organic matter. BTEX release from pools in the aquifer was modeled with a linear driving force equation in which the pollutant/water interfacial area was linked to the mass of BTEX. The release rate and the denitrification rate were used to calculate the initial amounts of BTEX at the start of the KNO3 injection. This study shows that an assessment of the efficiency of nitrate addition for stimulating bioremediation has to consider possible reactions of nitrate with reduced sulfur components and ferrous iron.

  9. DEMONSTRATION OF PILOT-SCALE PERVAPORATION SYSTEMS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND REMOVAL FROM A SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION FLUID. II. HOLLOW FIBER MEMBRANE MODULES

    Pilot-scale demonstration of pervaporation-based removal of volatile organic compounds from a surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) fluid has been conducted at USEPA's Test & Evaluation Facility using hollow fiber membrane modules. The membranes consisted of microporous...

  10. Enhanced delivery of gold nanoparticles by acoustic cavitation for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    Wang, Yu-Hsin; Liao, Ai-Ho; Lin, Jia-Yu; Lee, Cheng-Ru; Wu, Cheng-Ham; Liu, Tzu-Min; Wang, Churng-Ren; Li, Pai-Chi

    2013-03-01

    Gold-nanorods incorporated with microbubbles (AuMBs) were introduced as a photoacoustic/ultrasound dual- modality contrast agent in our previous study. The application can be extended to theragnosis purpose. With the unique physical characteristics of AuMBs, we propose an enhanced delivery method for the encapsulated particles. For example, laser thermotherapy mediated by plasmonic nanoparticles can be made more effective by using microbubbles as a targeted carrier and acoustic cavitation for enhanced sonoporation. The hypothesis was experimentally tested. Firts, these AuMBs first act as molecular probes with binding to specific ligands. The improved targeting efficacy was macroscopically observed by an ultrasound system. The extended retention of targeted AuMB was observed and recorded for 30 minutes in a CT-26 tumor bearing mouse. Secondly, cavitation induced by time-varying acoustic field was also applied to disrupt the microbubbles and cause increased transient cellular permeability (a.k.a., sonoporation). Multimodal optical microscope based on a Cr:forsterite laser was used to directly observe these effects. The microscope can acquired third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon fluorescent (2PF) signals produced by the AuMBs. In vitro examination shows approximately a 60% improvement in terms of fluorescence signals from the cellular uptake of gold nanoparticles after sonoporation treatment. Therefore, we conclude that the controlled release is feasible and can further improve the therapeutic effects of the nanoparticles.

  11. High time resolution PFISR and optical observations of naturally enhanced ion acoustic lines

    R. G. Michell

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Observations of naturally enhanced ion acoustic lines (NEIALs taken with the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR using a mode with very high time resolution are presented. The auroral event took place over Poker Flat, Alaska on 8 February 2007 at 09:35 UT (~22:00 MLT, and the radar data are complemented by common-volume high-resolution auroral imaging. The NEIALs occurred during only one of the standard 15-s integration periods. The raw data of this time show very intermittent NEIALs which occur only during a few very short time intervals (≤1 s within the 15-s period. The time sampling of the raw data, ~19 ms on average, allows study of the time development of the NEIALs, though there are indications that even finer time resolution would be of interest. The analysis is based on the assumption that the NEIAL returns are the result of Bragg scattering from ion-acoustic waves that have been enhanced significantly above thermal levels. The spectra of the raw data indicate that although the up- and down-shifted shoulders can both become enhanced at the same time, (within 19 ms, they are most often enhanced individually. The overall power in the up-and down-shifted shoulders is approximately equal throughout the event, with the exception of one time, when very large up-shifted power was observed with no corresponding down-shifted power. This indicates that during the 480 μs pulse, the strongly enhanced ion-acoustic waves were only traveling downward and not upward. The exact time that the NEIALs occurred was when the radar beam was on the boundary of a fast-moving (~10 km/s, bright auroral structure, as seen in the high resolution auroral imaging of the magnetic zenith. When viewed with high time resolution, the occurrence of NEIALs is associated with rapid changes in auroral luminosity within the radar field of view due to fast-moving auroral fine structures.

  12. Overcoming Heterogeneity Effects Through Polymer-Enhanced Groundwater Remediation Techniques: Coupling Polymer Floods with Chemical Oxidants and Bio-agents

    Smith, M. M.; Silva, J. A.; Munakata-Marr, J.; McCray, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    Even small heterogeneity contrasts in contaminated systems (resulting from differences in permeability or contaminant saturation) can affect the distribution of injected remediation agents by channeling fluids through high-permeability flowpaths, thus bypassing some regions and leaving contaminants uncontacted. The addition of a viscous polymer solution to the remediation agent may enhance agent delivery as a result of increased cross-flow (or "sweep efficiency") into different layers of the system, if the polymer solution remains stable in the presence of the remediation agent. Our research combines various non-toxic, food- grade polymer solutions with the remediation techniques of chemical oxidation and bio-remediation, to increase the effectiveness of treatment at sites contaminated with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The coupling of polymer floods with oxidants may help to combat contaminant "rebound" sometimes associated with incomplete contaminant destruction in low-permeability zones. Initial compatibility testing has shown that certain robust polymer/oxidant mixtures possess stable viscosities and pose low additional oxidant demands over multi-day timescales. Transport of these solutions through natural porous media was studied in column experiments, and small two-dimensional experiments with heterogeneous layering were conducted to assess effectiveness of contaminant destruction. Limitations of these compatible polymer/oxidant combinations as well as possible experimental strategies to optimize delivery are also discussed. In addition, results of polymer/microbial screening tests reveal that polymer solutions do not inhibit the dechlorinating capabilities of a microbial consortium. Preliminary findings have also raised the possibility that certain polymers may successfully serve as electron donors in the subsurface. The implications of these results for either bioaugmentation or delivery of biostimulants are presented.

  13. In-situ treatment of hydrocarbons contamination through enhanced bio-remediation and two phase extraction system

    Aglietto, I.; Brunero Bronzin, M. [Studio Aglietto s.r.l., Torino (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    It happens frequently to find industrial site affected by contamination of subsoil and groundwater with consequent presence of free phase product floating on the water table. The remediation technologies in this case shall be properly selected and coordinated in a way that the interactions between each activities will help to decontaminate the site. The case study deals with an industrial site located near Turin, in Italy, of about 50 hectares of extension where has been found an area of about 4000 square meters with contamination of subsoil and groundwater. The compounds with higher concentrations are petroleum hydrocarbons found both in soil and in groundwater. Another big problem is represented by the presence of a layer of free product floating on the water table with a maximum measured thickness of 70 cm; this situation can be considered in fact one of the major difficulty in management of selected remediation technologies because the complete recover of the free phase is a priority for any kind of remediation system to apply subsequently. The present work is based upon the selection and implementation of a multiple treatment for definitive remediation of subsoil and groundwater. Free product recovery has been faced with a two-phase extraction technology, then for the remediation of subsoil we implemented a bio-venting system to improve biodegradation processes and finally for groundwater treatment we apply an enhanced in situ bio-remediation injecting oxygen release compounds directly into the aquifer. To reach these choices we have to pass through a complex activity of investigation of the site made up of more than 40 sampling point, 8 monitoring wells, about 140 analysis on subsoil samples and 10 on groundwater samples and one well used for an aquifer test. The preliminary design of the remediation system was therefore based on an extensive site characterization that included geological and geochemical, microbiological and hydrological data, together with

  14. In-situ treatment of hydrocarbons contamination through enhanced bio-remediation and two phase extraction system

    It happens frequently to find industrial site affected by contamination of subsoil and groundwater with consequent presence of free phase product floating on the water table. The remediation technologies in this case shall be properly selected and coordinated in a way that the interactions between each activities will help to decontaminate the site. The case study deals with an industrial site located near Turin, in Italy, of about 50 hectares of extension where has been found an area of about 4000 square meters with contamination of subsoil and groundwater. The compounds with higher concentrations are petroleum hydrocarbons found both in soil and in groundwater. Another big problem is represented by the presence of a layer of free product floating on the water table with a maximum measured thickness of 70 cm; this situation can be considered in fact one of the major difficulty in management of selected remediation technologies because the complete recover of the free phase is a priority for any kind of remediation system to apply subsequently. The present work is based upon the selection and implementation of a multiple treatment for definitive remediation of subsoil and groundwater. Free product recovery has been faced with a two-phase extraction technology, then for the remediation of subsoil we implemented a bio-venting system to improve biodegradation processes and finally for groundwater treatment we apply an enhanced in situ bio-remediation injecting oxygen release compounds directly into the aquifer. To reach these choices we have to pass through a complex activity of investigation of the site made up of more than 40 sampling point, 8 monitoring wells, about 140 analysis on subsoil samples and 10 on groundwater samples and one well used for an aquifer test. The preliminary design of the remediation system was therefore based on an extensive site characterization that included geological and geochemical, microbiological and hydrological data, together with

  15. Remediation of hydrocarbon contaminants in cold environments - Electrokinetically enhanced bioremediation and biodegradable oil sorbents

    Suni, S. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Environmental and Ecological Sciences

    2006-07-01

    Owing to the vast amounts of oil in the world, oil spills are common on land as well as at sea. In addition to oil products, other industrially used hydrocarbons, such as creosote, also contaminate soils. Most hydrocarbons are biodegradable. Hence, bioremediation is an attractive alternative for cleaning up hydrocarbon spills. In cold climate areas, however, biodegradation is often a slow process. The aim of this thesis was to develop efficient, cost-effective, and ecologically sound techniques for cold climate areas for the treatment of both oil spills on water or solid surfaces and for subsurface contamination. For subsurface hydrocarbon spills, the approach was to use electrokinetics in order to deliver nutrients and possibly microorganisms to contaminated soils, and in order to heat the soil to increase contaminant bioavailability and microbial activity. Electroosmosis proved to be an effective method to disperse bacteria and nutrients in medium- or fine-grained soils, where uncharged particles migrated with water through the soil towards the cathode. Creosote degradation proceeded faster with electroosmotically added nutrients than in controls without additions. However, inoculation with enriched creosote-degraders was not necessary because the indigenous microbes of the soil were well adapted to the creosote contaminants. For small-scale oil spills, the usual remediation method involves absorption with oil sorbents. Most sorbents in use today are synthetic and incineration is the only method for their disposal. A biodegradable sorbent, however, could be processed, for instance, in compost-like systems. Cotton grass is a common plant in peat bogs and its water-repellent fibre is a by-product of peat excavation. Cotton grass proved to be an excellent oil sorbent especially for spills on the surface of water: It absorbed up to three times as much oil as a commercial, synthetic oil sorbent. Cotton grass performed extremely well also in conditions simulating

  16. Contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless systems: acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling and performance enhancement

    There are several applications of wireless electronic components with little or no ambient energy available to harvest, yet wireless battery charging for such systems is still of great interest. Example applications range from biomedical implants to sensors located in hazardous environments. Energy transfer based on the propagation of acoustic waves at ultrasonic frequencies is a recently explored alternative that offers increased transmitter-receiver distance, reduced loss and the elimination of electromagnetic fields. As this research area receives growing attention, there is an increased need for fully coupled model development to quantify the energy transfer characteristics, with a focus on the transmitter, receiver, medium, geometric and material parameters. We present multiphysics modeling and case studies of the contactless ultrasonic energy transfer for wireless electronic components submerged in fluid. The source is a pulsating sphere, and the receiver is a piezoelectric bar operating in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity with a fundamental resonance frequency above the audible frequency range. The goal is to quantify the electrical power delivered to the load (connected to the receiver) in terms of the source strength. Both the analytical and finite element models have been developed for the resulting acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction problem. Resistive and resistive–inductive electrical loading cases are presented, and optimality conditions are discussed. Broadband power transfer is achieved by optimal resistive-reactive load tuning for performance enhancement and frequency-wise robustness. Significant enhancement of the power output is reported due to the use of a hard piezoelectric receiver (PZT-8) instead of a soft counterpart (PZT-5H) as a result of reduced material damping. The analytical multiphysics modeling approach given in this work can be used to predict and optimize the coupled system dynamics with very good accuracy and

  17. Enhancing Plasma Surface Modification using high Intensity and high Power Ultrasonic Acoustic Waves

    2010-01-01

    high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) by at least one ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic wave generator (101 ), wherein the ultrasonic acoustic waves are directed to propagate towards said surface (314) of the object (100) so that a laminar boundary layer (313) of a gas or a...

  18. Nonneoplastic enhancement of internal auditory canal contents mimicking intracanalicular acoustic neuroma on MR images

    The authors present five patients with inflammation of facial and/or vestibulocochlear nerves that showed enhancement of structures in the internal auditory canal. (IAC) on MR imaging that mimic intracanalicular acoustic neuroma. MR imaging findings of four patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss and one with acute facial paralysis were reviewed along with the operative findings. MR imaging included pre-and postcontrast T1- and T2-weighted images. Three patients who presented with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss underwent surgery for exploration and decompression of the IAC. One patient with facial paralysis showed vesicular eruption in the external auditory canal and was diagnosed as having Ramsay Hunt syndrome (herpes zosteroticus) clinically. The fifth patient is also being followed up clinically. MR imaging findings in all five cases were similar. There was focal enhancement in the lateral portion of the IAC on postcontrast T1-weighted images with minimal mass effect. The swollen and edematous nerves were noted on surgery without any evidence of neoplasm. The patients not operated on showed no progression of symptoms. The enhancement of IAC contents on MR imaging in patients with nonspecific neuritis or Ramsay Hunt syndrome may be difficult to differentiate from a small intracanalicular neuroma, which may have important therapeutic implications

  19. Geotechnical behaviour of low-permeability soils in surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation.

    López-Vizcaíno, Rubén; Navarro, Vicente; Alonso, Juan; Yustres, Ángel; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Sáez, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Electrokinetic processes provide the basis of a range of very interesting techniques for the remediation of polluted soils. These techniques consist of the application of a current field in the soil that develops different transport mechanisms capable of mobilizing several types of pollutants. However, the use of these techniques could generate nondesirable effects related to the geomechanical behavior of the soil, reducing the effectiveness of the processes. In the case of the remediation of polluted soils with plasticity index higher than 35, an excessive shrinkage can be observed in remediation test. For this reason, the continued evaporation that takes place in the sample top can lead to the development of cracks, distorting the electrokinetic transport regime, and consequently, the development of the operation. On the other hand, when analyzing silty soils, in the surroundings of injection surfactant wells, high seepages can be generated that give rise to the development of piping processes. In this article methods are described to allow a reduction, or to even eliminate, both problems. PMID:26488188

  20. Field Test of Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery Using a Shear-Thinning Fluid

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Adamson, David; Oostrom, Martinus; Zhong, Lirong; Mackley, Rob D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Horner, Jacob A.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Thomle, Jonathan N.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Johnson, Christian D.; Rysz, Michal; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Newell, Charles J.

    2015-03-01

    Heterogeneity of hydraulic properties in aquifers may lead to contaminants residing in lower-permeability zones where it is difficult to deliver remediation amendments using conventional injection processes. The focus of this effort is to examine use of a shear-thinning fluid (STF) to improve the uniformity of remedial amendment distribution within a heterogeneous aquifer. Previous studies have demonstrated the significant potential of STFs for improving remedial amendment delivery in heterogeneous aquifers, but quantitative evaluation of these improvements from field applications are lacking. A field-scale test was conducted that compares data from successive injection of a tracer in water followed by injection of a tracer in a STF to evaluate the impact of the STF on tracer distribution uniformity in the presence of permeability contrasts within the targeted injection zone. Data from tracer breakthrough at multiple depth-discrete monitoring intervals and electrical resistivity tomography showed that inclusion of STF in the injection solution slowed movement in high-permeability pathways, improved delivery of amendment to low-permeability materials, and resulted in better uniformity in injected fluid distribution within the targeted treatment zone.

  1. Engineering Behavior and Characteristics of Water-Soluble Polymers: Implication on Soil Remediation and Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Shuang Cindy Cao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers have shown a great effect in enhanced oil recovery because of the improvement of water-flood performance by mobility control, as well as having been considered for oil contaminated-soil remediation thanks to their mobility control and water-flood performance. This study focused on the wettability analysis of biopolymers such as chitosan (85% deacetylated power, PEO (polyethylene oxide, Xanthan (xanthan gum, SA (Alginic Acid Sodium Salt, and PAA (polyacrylic acid, including the measurements of contact angles, interfacial tension, and viscosity. Furthermore, a micromodel study was conducted to explore pore-scale displacement phenomena during biopolymer injection into the pores. The contact angles of biopolymer solutions are higher on silica surfaces submerged in decane than at atmospheric conditions. While interfacial tensions of the biopolymer solutions have a relatively small range of 25 to 39 mN/m, the viscosities of biopolymer solutions have a wide range, 0.002 to 0.4 Pa·s, that dramatically affect both the capillary number and viscosity number. Both contact angles and interfacial tension have effects on the capillary entry pressure that increases along with an applied effective stress by overburden pressure in sediments. Additionally, a high injection rate of biopolymer solutions into the pores illustrates a high level of displacement ratio. Thus, oil-contaminated soil remediation and enhanced oil recovery should be operated in cost-efficient ways considering the injection rates and capillary entry pressure.

  2. Treatment of murine tumors using acoustic droplet vaporization-enhanced high intensity focused ultrasound

    Zhu, Meili; Jiang, Lixing; Fabiilli, Mario L.; Zhang, Aili; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Lisa X.

    2013-09-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be applied focally and noninvasively to thermally ablate solid tumors. Long treatment times are typically required for large tumors, which can expose patients to certain risks while potentially decreasing the therapeutic efficacy of the treatment. Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a promising modality that can enhance the efficacy of tumor treatment using HIFU. In this study, the therapeutic effects of combined HIFU and ADV was evaluated in mice bearing subcutaneously-implanted 4T1 tumors. Histological examination showed that the combination of HIFU and ADV generated a mean necrotic area in the tumor that was 2.9-fold larger than with HIFU alone. A significant enhancement of necrosis was found in the periphery of the tumor, where the blood supply was abundant. Seven days after treatment, the tumors treated with combined HIFU and ADV were 30-fold smaller in volume than tumors treated with HIFU alone. The study demonstrates the potential advantage of combining HIFU and ADV in tumor treatment.

  3. An Enhanced Energy Balanced Data Transmission Protocol for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Javaid, Nadeem; Shah, Mehreen; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Imran, Muhammad; Khan, Majid Iqbal; Vasilakos, Athanasios V.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents two new energy balanced routing protocols for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks (UASNs); Efficient and Balanced Energy consumption Technique (EBET) and Enhanced EBET (EEBET). The first proposed protocol avoids direct transmission over long distance to save sufficient amount of energy consumed in the routing process. The second protocol overcomes the deficiencies in both Balanced Transmission Mechanism (BTM) and EBET techniques. EBET selects relay node on the basis of optimal distance threshold which leads to network lifetime prolongation. The initial energy of each sensor node is divided into energy levels for balanced energy consumption. Selection of high energy level node within transmission range avoids long distance direct data transmission. The EEBET incorporates depth threshold to minimize the number of hops between source node and sink while eradicating backward data transmissions. The EBET technique balances energy consumption within successive ring sectors, while, EEBET balances energy consumption of the entire network. In EEBET, optimum number of energy levels are also calculated to further enhance the network lifetime. Effectiveness of the proposed schemes is validated through simulations where these are compared with two existing routing protocols in terms of network lifetime, transmission loss, and throughput. The simulations are conducted under different network radii and varied number of nodes. PMID:27070605

  4. Enhanced electrokinetic (E/K) remediation on copper contaminated soil by CFW (carbonized foods waste).

    Han, Jung-Geun; Hong, Ki-Kwon; Kim, Young-Woong; Lee, Jong-Young

    2010-05-15

    The E/K remediation method is presented to purify low permeable contaminated soils due to Cu(2+), and carbonized foods waste (CFW) was used as a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) material. For adsorption and precipitation of the Cu(2+) in the PRB during its motion, PRB was installed in a zone of rapidly changing pH values. The adsorption efficiency of CFW used as PRB material was found to be 4-8 times more efficient than that of Zeolite. Throughout the experiment, a voltage slope of 1V/cm was implemented and acetic acid was injected on the anode to increase the remediation efficiency. The electrode exchange was executed to more completely remove precipitated heavy metals in the vicinity of the cathode. The majority of Cu(2+) was adsorbed or sedimented by CFW prior to the exchange of the electrode, and the remaining quantity of precipitated Cu(2+) on the cathode had decreased with an increase in the operating time. Experiments of seven cases with different E/K operating times were performed, and the average removal ratios were 53.4-84.6%. The removal efficiencies for the majority of cases increased proportionally with an increase in the operating time. After the experiments were completed, the adsorbed Cu(2+) on CFW was 75-150 mg. This means that the role of CFW as the material in PRB for remediating heavy metals was confirmed. The cost of energies needed to remove Cu(2+), CFW, and acetic acid are estimated at US$ 13.3-40/m(3). PMID:20080337

  5. Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Many DOE facilities are situated in areas of sand and gravel which have become polluted with dense, non-aqueous phase liquids or DNAPLs, such as chlorinated solvents, from the various industrial operations at these facilities. The presence of such DNAPLs in sand and gravel aquifers is now recognized as the principal factor in the failure of standard ground-water remediation methods, i.e., open-quotes pump-and-treatclose quotes operations, to decontaminate such systems. The principal objective of this study is to demonstrate that multi-component DNAPLs can be readily solubilized in sand and gravel aquifers by dilute surfactant solutions

  6. Humic Acids Enhanced U(VI) Attenuation in Acidic Waste Plumes: An In-situ Remediation Approach

    Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Tokunaga, T. K.

    2010-12-01

    and HA by groundwater leaching are non-detectable over a long period of time (200 days and > 100 PV without further addition of HA). As a natural reactive agent for in-situ remediation, HAs are cost-effective (enormous reservoir in nature), nontoxic, resistant to biodegradation, soluble, and easily introducible to the subsurface. This method has high potential to efficiently and sustainably enhance natural attenuation of U within acidic waste plumes.

  7. In-situ treatment of a mixed hydrocarbon plume through a permeable reactive barrier and enhanced bio-remediation

    Aglietto, I.; Bretti, L.L. [Studio aglietto s.r.l. (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    Groundwater is frequently polluted with mixtures of contaminants that are amenable to different types of remediation. One example is the combination of petroleum hydrocarbons (mostly BTEX) and chlorinated solvents (chlorinated ethenes and propanes), as it occurs in the groundwater beneath the industrial site that is the objective of the present case study. The site is located in Italy near a main river (Arno), which is supposed to be the final recipient of the contamination and where a possible exposure might take place. The aim of the treatment is the plume containment within the site boundaries in order to avoid further migration of the contaminants towards the river. The design of the remediation system was based on an extensive site characterization that included - but was not limited to - the following information: geological and geochemical, microbiological and hydrological data, together with analytical data (i.e. contaminant concentrations). Pilot tests were also implemented in order to collect the necessary parameters for the full-scale treatment design and calibration. The site was contaminated by a mixed plume of more than 30 different contaminants, ranging from BTEX, to MTBE, to PAH, to chlorinated solvents. The concentration peaks were in the order of 1-100 mg/l for each contaminant. Petroleum hydrocarbons are quickly degradable through oxidative mechanisms (especially aerobic biodegradation), whereas fully-chlorinated compounds are only degradable via reductive pathways. A mixed plume of both types of contaminants therefore requires a combined approach with the application of different treatment technologies. The remediation strategy elaborated combines a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) in a funnel and gate configuration for the down-gradient plume containment, with the enhanced bio-remediation of the contaminants for the control of the plume boundaries and for the abatement of the concentration peaks. Pilot tests were carried out in order to assess

  8. In-situ treatment of a mixed hydrocarbon plume through a permeable reactive barrier and enhanced bio-remediation

    Groundwater is frequently polluted with mixtures of contaminants that are amenable to different types of remediation. One example is the combination of petroleum hydrocarbons (mostly BTEX) and chlorinated solvents (chlorinated ethenes and propanes), as it occurs in the groundwater beneath the industrial site that is the objective of the present case study. The site is located in Italy near a main river (Arno), which is supposed to be the final recipient of the contamination and where a possible exposure might take place. The aim of the treatment is the plume containment within the site boundaries in order to avoid further migration of the contaminants towards the river. The design of the remediation system was based on an extensive site characterization that included - but was not limited to - the following information: geological and geochemical, microbiological and hydrological data, together with analytical data (i.e. contaminant concentrations). Pilot tests were also implemented in order to collect the necessary parameters for the full-scale treatment design and calibration. The site was contaminated by a mixed plume of more than 30 different contaminants, ranging from BTEX, to MTBE, to PAH, to chlorinated solvents. The concentration peaks were in the order of 1-100 mg/l for each contaminant. Petroleum hydrocarbons are quickly degradable through oxidative mechanisms (especially aerobic biodegradation), whereas fully-chlorinated compounds are only degradable via reductive pathways. A mixed plume of both types of contaminants therefore requires a combined approach with the application of different treatment technologies. The remediation strategy elaborated combines a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) in a funnel and gate configuration for the down-gradient plume containment, with the enhanced bio-remediation of the contaminants for the control of the plume boundaries and for the abatement of the concentration peaks. Pilot tests were carried out in order to assess

  9. Strain enhancement of acoustic phonon limited mobility in monolayer TiS3.

    Aierken, Yierpan; Çakır, Deniz; Peeters, Francois M

    2016-06-01

    Strain engineering is an effective way to tune the intrinsic properties of a material. Here, we show by using first-principles calculations that both uniaxial and biaxial tensile strain applied to monolayer TiS3 are able to significantly modify its intrinsic mobility. From the elastic modulus and the phonon dispersion relation we determine the tensile strain range where structure dynamical stability of the monolayer is guaranteed. Within this region, we find more than one order of enhancement of the acoustic phonon limited mobility at 300 K (100 K), i.e. from 1.71 × 10(4) (5.13 × 10(4)) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) to 5.53 × 10(5) (1.66 × 10(6)) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The degree of anisotropy in both mobility and effective mass can be tuned by using tensile strain. Furthermore, we can either increase or decrease the band gap of TiS3 monolayer by applying strain along different crystal directions. This property allows us to use TiS3 not only in electronic but also in optical applications. PMID:27171542

  10. Enhanced Sensitivity of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors Incorporating Metallic Dot Arrays

    Wen Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A new surface acoustic wave (SAW-based rate sensor pattern incorporating metallic dot arrays was developed in this paper. Two parallel SAW delay lines with a reverse direction and an operation frequency of 80 MHz on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 wafer are fabricated as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, and mixed oscillation frequency was used to characterize the external rotation. To enhance the Coriolis force effect acting on the SAW propagation, a copper (Cu dot array was deposited along the SAW propagation path of the SAW devices. The approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media was referred to analyze the response mechanisms of the SAW based rate sensor, resulting in determination of the optimal design parameters. To improve the frequency stability of the oscillator, the single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs and combed transducer were used to form the SAW device to minimize the insertion loss and accomplish the single mode selection, respectively. Excellent long-term (measured in hours frequency stability of 0.1 ppm/h was obtained. Using the rate table with high precision, the performance of the developed SAW rate sensor was evaluated experimentally; satisfactory detection sensitivity (16.7 Hz∙deg∙s−1 and good linearity were observed.

  11. Development of Enhanced Remedial Techniques for Petroleum Fuel and Related Contaminants in Soil and Groundwater

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-02-10

    Western Research Institute (WRI) in conjunction with Earth Tech and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was to identify proper sites with soils and/or groundwater contaminated by petroleum constituents and MTBE. Biodegradation rates would have been quantitatively assessed in both laboratory and field tests to achieve the optimal destruction of contaminants of concern. WRI and Earth Tech identified a site contaminated with high concentrations of methanol associated with petroleum hydrocarbons. The site was assessed and a remediation project plan was prepared; however, the site was soon acquired by a new company. An agreement between Earth Tech, WRI, and the new site owners could not be reached; therefore, a work was performed to identify a new project site. Task 33 was terminated and the available funding was redeployed to other Tasks after receiving approval from the U.S. DOE task manager.

  12. Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Jackson, R.E.; Londergan, J.T.; Pickens, J.F. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE facilities are situated in areas of sand and gravel which have become polluted with dense, non-aqueous phase liquids or DNAPLs, such as chlorinated solvents, from the various industrial operations at these facilities. The presence of such DNAPLs in sand and gravel aquifers is now recognized as the principal factor in the failure of standard ground-water remediation methods. The principal objective of this study, as stated in the Statement of Work of the contract (DE-AC21-92MC29111), is to demonstrate that multi-component DNAPLs can be readily solubilized in sand and gravel aquifers by dilute surfactant solutions. The specific objectives of the contract are: to identify dilute surfactants or blends of surfactants in the laboratory that will efficiently extract multi-component DNAPLs from sand and gravel aquifers by micellar solubilization (Phase 1); 2. to test the efficacy of the identified surfactants or blends of surfactants to solubilize in situ perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) DNAPLs by the injection and the subsequent extraction through an existing well or wells at a government-owned contaminated site (Phase 1); and 3. to demonstrate the full-scale operation of this remedial technology at a government-owned contaminated site (Phase 2). Specific objective number 1 has been completed and reported to DOE. However, the results of the test referred to in specific objective number 2, conducted at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in 1994, were inconclusive. Following this first test, it was decided by DOE and INTERA to move the test site elsewhere due to difficulties with obtaining core samples of the sand and gravel aquifer containing the DNAPL and with ascertaining the location of the DNAPL relative to the injection well. The solubilization test at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) will constitute the second test of Phase 1 of this contract.

  13. Steroid-dependent auditory plasticity for the enhancement of acoustic communication: recent insights from a vocal teleost fish

    Sisneros, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    The vocal plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus) has become an excellent model for identifying neural mechanisms of auditory perception that may be shared by all vertebrates. Recent neuroethological studies of the midshipman fish have yielded strong evidence for the steroid-dependent modulation of hearing sensitivity that leads to enhanced coupling of sender and receiver in this vocal-acoustic communication system. Previous work shows that non-reproductive females treated with either t...

  14. Enhanced-electrokinetic remediation of copper-pyrene co-contaminated soil with different oxidants and pH control.

    Cang, Long; Fan, Guang-Ping; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Wang, Quan-Ying

    2013-02-01

    Electrokinetic (EK) remediation has potential to simultaneously remove heavy metals and organic compounds from soil, but the removal percent of these pollutants is very low in general if no enhancing treatment is applied. This study developed a new enhanced-EK remediation technology to decontaminate a heavy metal-organic compound co-contaminated soil by applying different oxidants and pH control. A red soil was used as a model clayed soil, and was spiked with pyrene and Cu at about 500 mg kg(-1) for both to simulate real situation. Bench-scale EK experiments were performed using four oxidants (H(2)O(2), NaClO, KMnO(4), and Na(2)S(2)O(8)) and controlling electrolyte pH at 3.5 or 10. After the treatments with 1.0 V cm(-1) of voltage gradient for 335 h, soil pH, electrical conductivity, and the concentrations and chemical fractionations of soil pyrene and Cu were analyzed. The results showed that there was significant migration of pyrene and Cu from the soil, and the removal percent of soil pyrene and Cu varied in the range of 30-52% and 8-94%, respectively. Low pH favoured the migration of soil Cu, while KMnO(4) was the best one for the degradation of pyrene among the tested oxidants, although it unfortunately prevented the migration of soil Cu by forming Cu oxide. Application of Na(2)S(2)O(8) and to control the catholyte pH at 3.5 were found to be the best operation conditions for decontaminating the Cu-pyrene co-contaminated soil. PMID:23177009

  15. Application of iron electrode corrosion enhanced electrokinetic-Fenton oxidation to remediate diesel contaminated soils: A laboratory feasibility study

    Tsai, Tzai-Tang; Sah, Jygau; Kao, Chih-Ming

    2010-01-01

    SummaryDiesel soil contamination on gas stations or refinery plants is a worldwide environmental problem. The main objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the efficiency of electrokinetic (EK) by using different electrode materials (graphite and iron rods) and electrolytes (tap water, 0.01 M NaCl, and 0.1 M NaCl) on the remediation of diesel contaminated soils, and (2) evaluate the feasibility of total petroleum hydrocarbon-diesel (TPH-D) reducing in soils via EK-Fenton oxidation enhanced by corroded iron electrode. The EK and EK-Fenton experiments were conducted in batch and sand box experiments, respectively. Batch experiments reveal that the most appropriate electrolyte was 0.1 M NaCl when iron electrode was used in the EK system. Sand box experiments indicate that the TPH-D concentration dropped from 10,000 to 300 mg kg -1 when amorphous iron/total iron (Fe o/Fe t) ratio increased from 0.1 to 0.33, with the addition of 8% of H 2O 2 and 0.1 M NaCl after 60 days of EK-Fenton operation. Electrokinetically enhanced oxidation with the presence of both H 2O 2 and Fe 3O 4 (iron electrode corrosion) resulted in higher TPH-D removal efficiency (97%) compared to the efficiencies observed from EK (55%) or Fenton oxidation (27%) alone. This demonstrates that EK-Fenton oxidation catalyzed by iron electrode corrosion is a valuable direction to efficiently and effectively remediate diesel contaminated soils.

  16. In-situ treatment of a mixed hydrocarbon plume through enhanced bio-remediation and a PRB system

    (especially aerobic biodegradation), whereas fully-chlorinated compounds are only biodegradable via reductive pathways. Therefore, a mixed plume of both types of contaminants requires a combined approach with the application of different treatment technologies. The remediation strategy elaborated combines an enhanced bio-remediation of the hot spots with a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) in a funnel and gate configuration for the down-gradient plume containment. Pilot tests were carried out in order to assess the efficiency and feasibility of such technologies in the site of interest. The enhanced bio-remediation is going to be carried out by means of injections of hydrogen release compounds (HRC) and oxygen release compounds (ORC) for the biodegradation of chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons respectively. A pilot test was conducted to determine the degradation rates of the different contaminants. The pilot test was monitored with a periodic sampling and analysis of the groundwater and with a continuous monitoring of the physical-chemical parameters (temperature, pH, conductivity, redox potential and dissolved oxygen) in the monitoring wells placed immediately down-gradient of the injection points. The tests showed the possibility to use the enhanced bio-remediation with the double aim to reduce the hot spot concentrations, in order to lower the contaminant load on the PRB, and to control the lateral spreading of the plume in the side regions. Permeable reactive barriers are passive groundwater treatment systems that are able to decontaminate groundwater as it flows through a permeable treatment medium under natural gradients. The main advantage of this technology over ex-situ and other in-situ groundwater remediation approaches is the reduced operation- and maintenance costs. For the permeable reactive barrier, a funnel and gate configuration was selected. This system uses low permeability materials (funnel) to direct groundwater towards a permeable treatment

  17. In-situ treatment of a mixed hydrocarbon plume through enhanced bio-remediation and a PRB system

    Aglietto, I.; Bargoni, G.; Bretti, L.L. [Studio aglietto s.r.l. (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    (especially aerobic biodegradation), whereas fully-chlorinated compounds are only biodegradable via reductive pathways. Therefore, a mixed plume of both types of contaminants requires a combined approach with the application of different treatment technologies. The remediation strategy elaborated combines an enhanced bio-remediation of the hot spots with a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) in a funnel and gate configuration for the down-gradient plume containment. Pilot tests were carried out in order to assess the efficiency and feasibility of such technologies in the site of interest. The enhanced bio-remediation is going to be carried out by means of injections of hydrogen release compounds (HRC) and oxygen release compounds (ORC) for the biodegradation of chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons respectively. A pilot test was conducted to determine the degradation rates of the different contaminants. The pilot test was monitored with a periodic sampling and analysis of the groundwater and with a continuous monitoring of the physical-chemical parameters (temperature, pH, conductivity, redox potential and dissolved oxygen) in the monitoring wells placed immediately down-gradient of the injection points. The tests showed the possibility to use the enhanced bio-remediation with the double aim to reduce the hot spot concentrations, in order to lower the contaminant load on the PRB, and to control the lateral spreading of the plume in the side regions. Permeable reactive barriers are passive groundwater treatment systems that are able to decontaminate groundwater as it flows through a permeable treatment medium under natural gradients. The main advantage of this technology over ex-situ and other in-situ groundwater remediation approaches is the reduced operation- and maintenance costs. For the permeable reactive barrier, a funnel and gate configuration was selected. This system uses low permeability materials (funnel) to direct groundwater towards a permeable treatment

  18. Naturally Enhanced Ion Acoustic Lines with the Poker Flat AMISR radar.

    Stromme, A.; Semeter, J.; Zettergren, M.

    2007-12-01

    The study of Naturally Enhanced Ion Acoustic Lines (NEIALs) have become one of the key studies for EISCAT both in the polar cusp using the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR), and in the auroral zone, using the EISCAT UHF and VHF systems. Still many questions regarding the temporal and spatial extent of the NEIAL events remain unanswered. The new Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar (AMISR) in Poker Flat, Alaska is the first phased array Incoherent Scatter Radar at high latitudes, and by taking advantage of its possibility of (almost) simultaneous looking directions, we can resolve some of the space time ambiguity associated with NEIALs. During the night of the 23. March 2007, a period of NEIALs occurred. The radar ran in a 10 position mode with 9 beams in a narrow quadratic grid spaced by 3 degrees, plus a 10th position up B - slightly offset from the grid. Raw voltage data were sampled to allow for very high time resolution ACFs and spectra. Combining high time resolution data from multiple positions, we have the opportunity for the first time to look at the space-time ambiguity in the development of NEIALs. During the campaign a narrow field of view imager from university of Boston were operational at the Davis science center close by the AMISR array. The night of the 23. March, the imager was pointed field aligned, and at around 11:20 UT - at the time of the radar NEIALs - a field of dynamic rays occurred at and near the zenith. High time resolution multi position data from AMISR will be shown to follow the space and time development of the NEIAL event. This will also be correlated with high time resolution data from the imager.

  19. Study on remediation for uranium contaminated soils enhanced by chelator using brassica mustard

    Screening of perfect hyperaccumulators is the key to the application of this technology. Through the previous stage study, mustard was found to be good at absorption and accumulation of uranium among 51 species, the plant grows fast with wide adaptability and large biomass. Researches will focus on the following two aspects: 1. Simulating U- contaminated soils was prepared by two different ways to add uranium. (1). UO2 (NO3)2 . 6H2O solution was sprayed into soil when the plant was grown in the soil; (2). Above U-contaminated soils after planting and placed for a year. Study on whether the way of adding uranium can effect mustard accumulate uranium. Results found: in the first Phytoremediation, U-contaminated concentration at 100 mg/kg, U concentration in shoots reaches 1103.42 mg/kg, roots reach 1909.49 mg/kg, annual removal rate is 7.81%; in the second Phytoremediation, U-contaminated concentration at 100 mg/kg, U concentration in shoots reach 295.83 mg/kg, roots reach 268.42 mg/kg, annual removal rate is 2.52%. Led to the difference between the twice remediation is the speciation of uranium m soils has changed, respectively, Tessier-five step continuous extraction method for determination of uranium speciation in soils and found available uranium (exchangeable uranium, uranium carbonate) in the soil of the first phytoremediation was 52% higher than the second phytoremediation. 2. Study on chelators (Citric acids, Malic acids) and soil amendments (Organic fertilizer, microbe fertilizer. Humic acid organic fertilizer, Urea) whether effect mustard accumulate uranium, found organic fertilizer can reduce shoots accumulate uranium, Citric acid and microbe fertilizer increase shoots enrichment of uranium. (authors)

  20. Enhanced remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated desert soil fertilized with organic carbons

    Fertilising an oily desert soil sample with a mixture of glucose and peptone resulted in enhancing hydrocarbon disappearance in that soil. The magnitude of hydrocarbon attenuation was too high to be attributed to the nitrogen content of the added peptone alone. Fertilisation with KNO3 containing the same amount of nitrogen as in peptone, brought about an enhanced hydrocarbon attenuation affect, but lower in magnitude than fertilisation with glucose/peptone. Addition of glucose/peptone to a clean desert soil with hydro-carbon utilising microorganisms resulted in dramatic increase in their numbers. After 13 days, the microorganisms had depleted all the added organic matter and their numbers decreased. In the oily desert soil, glucose/peptone addition also increased microbial numbers, but after utilisation of the glucose/peptone, microbial numbers remained high and enhanced attenuation of hydrocarbons was found. The use of sea water instead of fresh water in these experiments blocked the hydrocarbon attenuation effect. (Author)

  1. Effect of heterogeneity on enhanced reductive dechlorination: Analysis of remediation efficiency and groundwater acidification

    Brovelli, Alessandro; Lacroix, Elsa; Robinson, Clare; Gerhard, Jason Ian; Holliger, Christof; Barry, David Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced reductive dehalogenation is an attractive in situ treatment technology for chlorinated contaminants. The process includes two acid-forming microbial reactions: fermentation of an organic substrate resulting in short-chain fatty acids, and dehalogenation resulting in hydrochloric acid. The accumulation of acids and the resulting drop of groundwater pH are controlled by the mass and distribution of chlorinated solvents in the source zone, type of electron donor, alternative terminal el...

  2. QSAR-Assisted Design of an Environmental Catalyst for Enhanced Estrogen Remediation

    Colosi, Lisa M.; Huang, Qingguo; Weber, Walter J.

    2010-01-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) was used to streamline redesign of a model environmental catalyst, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), for enhanced reactivity towards a target pollutant, steroid hormone 17β-estradiol. This QSAR, embodying relationship between reaction rate and intermolecular binding distance, was used in silico to screen for mutations improving enzyme reactivity. Eight mutations mediating significant reductions in binding distances were expressed in Saccharomy...

  3. Correlation between DNAPL distribution area and dissolved concentration in surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation effluent: a two-dimensional flow cell study

    Wu, Bin; Li, Huiying; Du, Xiaoming; Zhong, Lirong; Yang, Bin; Du, Ping; Gu, Qingbao; Li, Fasheng

    2016-02-01

    During the process of surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR), free phase dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) may be mobilized and spread. The understanding of the impact of DNAPL spreading on the SEAR remediation is not sufficient with its positive effect infrequently mentioned. To evaluate the correlation between DNAPL spreading and remediation efficiency, a two-dimensional sandbox apparatus was used to simulate the migration and dissolution process of 1,2-DCA (1,2-dichloroethane) DNAPL in SEAR. Distribution area of DNAPL in the sandbox was determined by digital image analysis and correlated with effluent DNAPL concentration. The results showed that the effluent DNAPL concentration has significant positive linear correlation with the DNAPL distribution area, indicating the mobilization of DNAPL could improve remediation efficiency by enlarging total NAPL-water interfacial area for mass transfer. Meanwhile, the vertical migration of 1,2-DCA was limited within the boundary of aquifer in all experiments, implying that by manipulating injection parameters in SEAR, optimal remediation efficiency can be reached while the risk of DNAPL vertical migration is minimized. This study provides a convenient visible and quantitative method for the optimization of parameters for SEAR project, and an approach of rapid predicting the extent of DNAPL contaminant distribution based on the dissolved DNAPL concentration in the extraction well.

  4. Enhancement of time-domain acoustic imaging based on generalized cross-correlation and spatial weighting

    Quaegebeur, Nicolas; Padois, Thomas; Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Masson, Patrice

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an alternative formulation of the time-domain beamforming is proposed using the generalized cross-correlation of measured signals. This formulation uses spatial weighting functions adapted to microphone positions and imaging points. The proposed approach is demonstrated for acoustic source localization using a microphone array, both theoretically and experimentally. An increase in accuracy of acoustic imaging results is shown for both narrow and broadband sources, while a factor of reduction up to 20 in the computation time can be achieved, allowing real-time or volumetric source localization over very large grids.

  5. Electrokinetically Enhanced Delivery for ERD Remediation of Chlorinated Ethenes in a Fractured Limestone Aquifer

    Broholm, Mette Martina; Hansen, Bente H.; With Nedergaard, Lærke;

    Leakage of the chlorinated solvents PCE and TCE into limestone aquifers from contaminated overburden and the long-lasting back diffusion from the secondary source in the limestone matrix pose a severe risk for contamination of drinking water resources. Dechlorination of PCE and TCE in limestone...... often accumulates cis-DCE due to incomplete dechlorination in the limestone aquifers, as observed downgradient of a PCE and TCE DNAPL source area at Naverland in Denmark. A microcosm study with limestone core material and groundwater from the Naverland site source area spiked with PCE showed that...... enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD) by the addition of donor and specific degraders (KB1® culture) can lead to complete dechlorination of PCE and TCE in the limestone aquifer, provided sufficient contact between specific degraders, donor and specific degraders, is obtained. Advection-based delivery of...

  6. Remediation of hexachlorobenzene contaminated soils by rhamnolipid enhanced soil washing coupled with activated carbon selective adsorption.

    Wan, Jinzhong; Chai, Lina; Lu, Xiaohua; Lin, Yusuo; Zhang, Shengtian

    2011-05-15

    The present study investigates the selective adsorption of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) from rhamnolipid solution by a powdered activated carbon (PAC). A combined soil washing-PAC adsorption technique is further evaluated on the removal of HCB from two soils, a spiked kaolin and a contaminated real soil. PAC at a dosage of 10 g L(-1) could achieve a HCB removal of 80-99% with initial HCB and rhamnolipid concentrations of 1 mg L(-1) and 3.3-25 g L(-1), respectively. The corresponding adsorptive loss of rhamnolipid was 8-19%. Successive soil washing-PAC adsorption tests (new soil sample was subjected to washing for each cycle) showed encouraging leaching and adsorption performances for HCB. When 25 g L(-1) rhamnolipid solution was applied, HCB leaching from soils was 55-71% for three cycles of washing, and HCB removal by PAC was nearly 90%. An overall 86% and 88% removal of HCB were obtained for kaolin and real soil, respectively, by using the combined process to wash one soil sample for twice. Our investigation suggests that coupling AC adsorption with biosurfactant-enhanced soil washing is a promising alternative to remove hydrophobic organic compounds from soils. PMID:21397398

  7. {In Situ} Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater via Enhanced Reductive Dehalogenation and Dual-Screened Wells

    Cunningham, J. A.; Hoelen, T. P.; Hopkins, G. D.; Reinhard, M.; Lebrón, C. A.

    2003-12-01

    Groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents, principally cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), was cleaned {in situ} by a technology that combines enhanced reductive dechlorination with dual-screened treatment wells. The prolonged historic presence of cis-DCE at the contaminated site suggested that natural attenuation rates were limited by the supply of electron donors. Therefore, propionate was added to the contaminated groundwater to serve as an electron donor and to accelerate the reductive dechlorination process. Propionate was added from the ground surface via a pair of dual-screened wells emplaced in the contaminated portion of the aquifer. The wells were screened at two depths, from 3.0--7.6 m below ground surface (bgs) and from 9.1--12.2 m bgs. These wells functioned to intercept the contaminant plume, augment the contaminated water with propionate, recirculate a portion of the contaminated water, and release treated water for continued downgradient migration. Treatment occurred wholly {in situ}. Within the recirculation zone of the well pair, cis-DCE was effectively removed during a two-month period of operation. In the lower aquifer zone, 800 μ g/L cis-DCE was converted stoichiometrically to ethene. In the upper aquifer zone, the concentration of cis-DCE was reduced from over 400 μ g/L to less than 40 μ g/L. Dechlorination was accompanied by significant sulfate reduction, but not by methanogenesis. The hydraulics of the groundwater flow are described with a relatively simple analytical mathematical model. Measured concentrations of a bromide tracer agree very well with model predictions, suggesting that the model is valid for this contaminated site. At this site, it appears sufficient to model the aquifer as consisting of two homogeneous layers separated by an impermeable aquitard; smaller-scale heterogeneity in the hydraulic conductivity can apparently be ignored.

  8. Enhanced bioremediation as a cost effective approach following thermally enhanced soil vapour extraction for sites requiring remediation of chlorinated solvents - 16296

    Thermally enhanced bioremediation can be a more cost-effective alternative to full scale in-situ thermal treatment especially for sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents, where reductive dechlorination is or might be a dominant biological step. The effect of Thermally Enhanced Soil Vapour Extraction (TESVE) on indigenous microbial communities and the potential for subsequent biological polishing of chlorinated solvents was investigated in field trials at the Western Storage Area (WSA) - RSRL (formerly United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority - UKAEA) Oxfordshire, UK. The WSA site had been contaminated with various chemicals including mineral oil, chloroform, trichloroethane (TCA), carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethene (PCE). The contamination had affected the unsaturated zone, groundwater in the chalk aquifer and was a continuing source of groundwater contamination below the WSA. During TESVE the target treatment zone was heated to above the boiling point of water increasing the degree of volatilization of contaminants of concern (CoC), which were mobilised and extracted in the vapour phase. A significant reduction of concentrations of chlorinated solvent in the unsaturated zone was achieved by the full-scale application of TESVE - In Situ Thermal Desorption (ISTD) technology. The rock mass temperature within target treatment zone remained in the range of 35 deg. - 44 deg. C, 6 months after cessation of heating. The concentration of chlorinated ethenes and other CoC were found to be significantly lower adjacent to the thermal treatment area and 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower within the thermal treatment zone. Samples were collected within and outside the thermal treatment zone using BioTrapsR (passive, in- situ microbial samplers) from which the numbers of specific bacteria were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methods of analysis. High populations of reductive de-chlorinators such as Dechalococcoides spp. and Dehalobacter spp

  9. A surface acoustic wave (SAW)-enhanced grating-coupling phase-interrogation surface plasmon resonance (SPR) microfluidic biosensor.

    Sonato, A; Agostini, M; Ruffato, G; Gazzola, E; Liuni, D; Greco, G; Travagliati, M; Cecchini, M; Romanato, F

    2016-03-23

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW)-enhanced, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) microfluidic biosensor in which SAW-induced mixing and phase-interrogation grating-coupling SPR are combined in a single lithium niobate lab-on-a-chip is demonstrated. Thiol-polyethylene glycol adsorption and avidin/biotin binding kinetics were monitored by exploiting the high sensitivity of grating-coupling SPR under azimuthal control. A time saturation binding kinetics reduction of 82% and 24% for polyethylene and avidin adsorption was obtained, respectively, due to the fluid mixing enhancement by means of the SAW-generated chaotic advection. These results represent the first implementation of a nanostructured SAW-SPR microfluidic biochip capable of significantly improving the molecule binding kinetics on a single, portable device. In addition, the biochip here proposed is suitable for a great variety of biosensing applications. PMID:26932784

  10. AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with enhanced microfluidic performance

    Wang, W. B.; Fu, Y. Q.; Chen, J. J.; Xuan, W. P.; Chen, J. K.; Wang, X. Z.; Mayrhofer, P.; Duan, P. F.; Bittner, A.; Schmid, U.; Luo, J. K.

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the characterization of scandium aluminum nitride (Al1‑x Sc x N, x  =  27%) films and discusses surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices based on them. Both AlScN and AlN films were deposited on silicon by sputtering and possessed columnar microstructures with (0 0 0 2) crystal orientation. The AlScN/Si SAW devices showed improved electromechanical coupling coefficients (K 2, ~2%) compared with pure AlN films (liquid droplets, and the acoustic streaming and pumping velocities were 2  ×  and 3  ×  those of the AlN/Si SAW devices, respectively. Mechanical characterization showed that the Young’s modulus and hardness of the AlN film decreased significantly when Sc was doped, and this was responsible for the decreased acoustic velocity and resonant frequency, and the increased temperature coefficient of frequency, of the AlScN SAW devices.

  11. Study of the behavior of an acid-enhanced electrokinetic remediation performed with a real soil spiked with lead

    Nekrasova, Marina; Sidorenko, Sergey; Galkin, K.A.; Pisar, L.U.; García Herruzo, Francisco; Rodríguez Maroto, José Miguel; Gómez-Lahoz, C.; Vereda Alonso, Carlos; Villén Guzmán, María D.

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1980s decade there has been a sharp increase in the research for the development of new techniques for the remediation of contaminates sites, because one after another country realized that the economic budget that would require the recovery of all these sites is simply unaffordable. Most countries have developed criteria to prioritize the remediation of those sites that were bearing the most severe risks for humans or the environment. Also an important effort has been done in order...

  12. Development of a New Apparatus for Investigating Acoustic Effects on Hydraulic Properties of Low-Permeability Geo-Materials

    Nakajima, H.; Sawada, A.; Sugita, H.; Takeda, M.; Komai, T.; Zhang, M.

    2006-12-01

    Remediation of polluted soils and groundwater contaminated by heavy metals and non-aqueous phase liquids has been one of the challenging issues in the field of geo-environments. In-situ removal of the contaminants from low permeable soils, such as clay strata, is particularly difficult because of the low mobility, strong adsorption, and/or other various interactions within soils. Thus current remediation techniques, such as pump- and-treat method and even eletrokinetic method, generally suffer from low recovery rates and/or economically unacceptable long remediation periods. A perspective improvement in remediation technology is to couple the electrokinetic method with an application of acoustic waves. This so-called Electro-Acoustic Soil Decontamination (EASD) method has been proposed by Battelle Columbus Labs.(Muralidhara et al. 1990). Simultaneous application of an electric field and an acoustic field may produce a synergistic effect and result in further enhancement of water transport by electro-osmosis in principle, but there is still no fundamental data for the design of EASD method in practical applications. A number of investigations have shown that an application of acoustic waves can increase hydraulic conductivity and mobility of non-aqueous phase liquids in porous media. Most of the prior and ongoing researches in this area have been focused on increasing production from declining oil and gas reservoirs. During several field tests by the oil and gas industries, increases in oil production rates by 20% or more have been reported. However, underlying physical mechanisms for acoustically enhanced fluid transport are not adequately understood. In addition, majority of the past investigations has dealt with applications of large amplitude of acoustic waves to relatively permeable soils or fractured rocks, and there is little information if acoustic wave effectively enhances flow and contaminant transport for less permeable clayey soils. To evaluate the

  13. Simulation Of Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination For Remediation Of Tce In A Fractured Clay System: A New Model Approach And Application To Field Site

    Manoli, Gabriele; Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Christiansen, Camilla Maymann; Broholm, Mette Martina; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Binning, Philip John

    2010-01-01

    An innovative model is developed for Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination (ERD) of chlorinated solvents in a fractured glacial till. The model consists of three components: hydraulics, transport and degradation. The hydraulic component calculates the flow of water through a fractured clay till with...... interspersed sand lenses and stringers. The transport model couples diffusion dominated transport in the clay matrix, with advective‐dispersive transport in the fractures and higher permeability sand lenses. The reactive model calculates sequential reductive dechlorination of TCE (trichloroethylene) to its...... model results. The spatial extent of remediation and downstream impact of the technology is evaluated. Perspectives for enhanced bioremediation technologies in fractured clay systems are discussed....

  14. Integrated enhanced bioremediation and vacuum extraction for remediation of a hydrocarbon release in response to oscillating hydrologic conditions 'Traverse Co-Bio-Vac'

    The use of enhanced in-situ biological treatment and vacuum extraction has been demonstrated to be successful in the remediation of ground water and soil contaminated with hydrocarbons. Seasonal fluctuations in the ground water causes the zone of contamination to be in the either saturated or unsaturated zone of the aquifer. In order to address these conditions, an integrated engineering design approach is being taken for the full scale remediation of an aviation of an aviation gasoline spill at the US Coast Guard Air Station at Traverse City, Township, Michigan. Enhanced aerobic biodegradation will be utilized during the periods of high water table whereby most of the contaminated interval is saturated. Carbon treated water will be utilized from the existing ground water plume. Oxygen will be injected via an oxygen generator to saturate the process stream prior to discharge to the aquifer. During low water table conditions, the same infrastructure will be utilized as a modified vacuum extraction system. The same injection wells used during the high water table would then be used during the low table condition as vapor extraction wells. The vapors will be routed to an above-ground catalytic incinerator for compound destruction. This integrated approach, entitled 'Traverse Co-Bio-Vac,' should reduce the capital costs of installing a full scale remedial system as well allowing the system to operate efficiently depending on water table conditions. The system is expected to be constructed in 1992

  15. Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP). Appendix F, remediation analysis with Decision Support Tools (DSTs) for wide-area chemical hazards.

    Hassig, Nancy L. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Pulsipher, Brent A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2011-07-01

    The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) commissioned an assessment of the Consequence Management (CM) plans in place on military bases for response to a chemical attack. The effectiveness of the CM plans for recovering from chemical incidents was modeled using a multiple Decision Support Tools (DSTs). First, a scenario was developed based on an aerial dispersion of a chemical agent over a wide-area of land. The extent of contamination was modeled with the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) tool. Subsequently, the Analyzer for Wide Area Restoration Effectiveness (AWARE) tool was used to estimate the cost and time demands for remediation based on input of contamination maps, sampling and decontamination resources, strategies, rates and costs. The sampling strategies incorporated in the calculation were designed using the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) tool. Based on a gaps assessment and the DST remediation analysis, an Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP) was developed.

  16. Enhanced characterization of calcified areas in intravascular ultrasound virtual histology images by quantification of the acoustic shadow: validation against computed tomography coronary angiography.

    Broersen, Alexander; de Graaf, Michiel A; Eggermont, Jeroen; Wolterbeek, Ron; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Dijkstra, Jouke; Bax, Jeroen J; Reiber, Johan H C; Scholte, Arthur J

    2016-04-01

    We enhance intravascular ultrasound virtual histology (VH) tissue characterization by fully automatic quantification of the acoustic shadow behind calcified plaque. VH is unable to characterize atherosclerosis located behind calcifications. In this study, the quantified acoustic shadows are considered calcified to approximate the real dense calcium (DC) plaque volume. In total, 57 patients with 108 coronary lesions were included. A novel post-processing step is applied on the VH images to quantify the acoustic shadow and enhance the VH results. The VH and enhanced VH results are compared to quantitative computed tomography angiography (QTA) plaque characterization as reference standard. The correlation of the plaque types between enhanced VH and QTA differs significantly from the correlation with unenhanced VH. For DC, the correlation improved from 0.733 to 0.818. Instead of an underestimation of DC in VH with a bias of 8.5 mm(3), there was a smaller overestimation of 1.1 mm(3) in the enhanced VH. Although tissue characterization within the acoustic shadow in VH is difficult, the novel algorithm improved the DC tissue characterization. This algorithm contributes to accurate assessment of calcium on VH and could be applied in clinical studies. PMID:26667446

  17. DNAPL Surface Chemistry: Its Impact on DNAPL Distribution in the Vadose Zone and its Manipulation to Enhance Remediation

    Suan Power; Stefan Grimberg; Miles Denham

    2003-06-16

    The remediation of DNAPLs in subsurface environments is often limited by the heterogeneous distribution of the organic fluid. The fraction of DNAPL that is in the high conductivity regions of the subsurface can often be recovered relatively easily, although DNAPL in lower conductivity regions is much more difficult to extract, either through direct pumping or remediation measures based on interface mass transfer. The distribution of DNAPL within the vadose zone is affected by a complex interplay of heterogeneities in the porous matrix and the interfacial properties defining the interactions among all fluid and solid phases. Decreasing the interfacial tension between a DNAPL and water in the vadose zone could change the spreading of the DNAPL, thereby increase the surface area for mass transfer and the effectiveness of soil vapor extraction remediation.

  18. Novel Acoustic Feedback Cancellation Approaches In Hearing Aid Applications Using Probe Noise and Probe Noise Enhancement

    Guo, Meng; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    . In many cases, this bias problem causes the cancellation system to fail. The traditional probe noise approach, where a noise signal is added to the loudspeaker signal can, in theory, prevent the bias. However, in practice, the probe noise level must often be so high that the noise is clearly audible...... and annoying; this makes the traditional probe noise approach less useful in practical applications. In this work, we explain theoretically the decreased convergence rate when using low-level probe noise in the traditional approach, before we propose and study analytically two new probe noise....... This makes the proposed approaches much more attractive in practical applications. We demonstrate this through a simulation experiment with audio signals in a hearing aid acoustic feedback cancellation system, where the convergence rate is improved by as much as a factor of 10....

  19. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  20. Membrane-enhanced surface acoustic wave analysis of grafted polymer brushes

    Brass, David A.; Shull, Kenneth R.

    2008-04-01

    An analysis is developed for the frequency response of a quartz crystal resonator (often referred to as a quartz crystal microbalance) that is modified with a grafted solvent-swollen polymer brush and placed in contact with a membrane capping layer. The shear wave generated at the resonator surface couples into the membrane layer with an efficiency that is strongly dependent on the thickness of the swollen brush layer. As a result, the resonant frequency changes by a maximum amount that is closely approximated by the Sauerbrey shift for the capping layer. The calculated shift substantially decreases for increases in the brush thickness of approximately 10nm, which gives a net frequency response that is extremely sensitive to the degree of swelling of the polymer brush. An optimum capping layer thickness is determined by balancing the Sauerbrey shift against dissipative effects that weaken the crystal resonance. This optimum membrane thickness depends only weakly on the properties of the membrane material and is in the micron range. Detailed multilayer calculations are presented for the specific case of a poly(ethylene glycol) brush swollen with water and brought into contact with an elastomeric water-permeable membrane. These calculations confirm that the method is sensitive to the properties of the brush layer in the experimentally relevant thickness regime. Connections are also made to conceptually simpler two and three layer models of the acoustic impedance of the material systems that are brought into contact with the resonator.

  1. Enhanced sensitivity of a surface acoustic wave gyroscope using a progressive wave

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based gyroscope with an 80 MHz central frequency was developed on two different piezoelectric substrates (128° YX LiNbO3 and ST-X quartz). A sensor was developed that contained two SAW oscillators. One oscillator was used as the sensing element and had metallic dots in the cavity between the input and output interdigital transducers (IDTs). The other oscillator was used as a reference element. Two oscillators were formed to extract the Coriolis effect by comparing the oscillation frequencies between these two delay lines, and metallic dots were used to induce a Coriolis force. Three different IDT structures were used to obtain a stable progressive SAW. Coupling of modes modeling was conducted prior to fabrication for determining the optimal device parameters. The device was fabricated and then measured on a rate table in accordance with the results of simulation. When the device was subjected to an angular rotation, the oscillation frequencies of the two oscillators were observed to differ. Depending on the angular velocity, the frequency difference was linearly modulated. The obtained sensitivity was approximately 62.57 Hz deg−1 s−1 at angular rates in the range 0–1000 deg s−1 in the case of the LiNbO3 substrate and single-phase unidirectional transducer and combed electrode structure. The dependence of the device performance on the piezoelectric substrate, IDT structure, and temperatures was also characterized. The developed device has good resistance to mechanical shock and stability to temperature

  2. Analysis of enhanced modal damping ratio in porous materials using an acoustic-structure interaction model

    Kook, Junghwan; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the enhancement of the damping ratio of a structure with embedded microbeam resonators in air-filled internal cavities. In this context, we discuss theoretical aspects in the framework of the effective modal damping ratio (MDR) and derive an approximate rel...

  3. Genealogy Remediated

    Marselis, Randi

    2007-01-01

    Genealogical websites are becoming an increasingly popular genre on the Web. This chapter will examine how remediation is used creatively in the construction of family history. While remediation of different kinds of old memory materials is essential in genealogy, digital technology opens new...

  4. Case study on the strategy and application of enhancement solutions to improve remediation of soils contaminated with Cu, Pb and Zn by means of electrodialysis

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.;

    2005-01-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted with electrochemical removal of heavy metals from spiked kaolinite. Meanwhile, when moving from kaolinite to real soils, new factors must be taken into account-factors influencing, e.g., the buffering capacity of the soil against acidification and the adsorption....../desorption processes of the heavy metals. The present study gives some examples where it is necessary to use an enhancement solution to aid desorption of Cu, Zn and Pb during electrodialytic treatment. Dependent on the composition of the pollution, different choices can be made. In the case of a Cu-polluted calcareous...... case of Cu, Zn and Pb at the same time, alkaline ammonium citrate may be a solution. It was shown that this enhancement solution could mobilize these three pollutants, but optimization of concentration and pH of the ammonium citrate is still needed. When choosing a remediation scheme for...

  5. Contact studies of weak adhesive interactions in water with membrane enhanced surface acoustic wave analysis

    Brass, David Alan

    The measurement of weak adhesive energies has previously been difficult to obtain. To measure these energies, I designed a technique that uses the combined sensitivities of both a quartz crystal resonator and the inflation of an elastomeric polymer membrane. The surfaces of the quartz crystal and/or the membrane are modified with water swollen polymer brushes, which are used to eliminate nonspecific adhesion. These brushes are then end-modified with adhesive functional groups. An analysis is developed for the frequency response of a quartz crystal resonator as the membrane layer is placed in contact with the surface of these swollen brushes. The shear wave generated at the resonator surface couples into the membrane layer with an efficiency that is strongly dependent on the thickness of the swollen brush layer. The calculated shift decreases substantially for increases in the brush thickness of ten to twenty nanometers, giving a net frequency response that is extremely sensitive to the degree of swelling of the brush. An optimum capping layer thickness is determined by balancing the resonant frequency shift against dissipative effects that weaken the crystal resonance. Detailed calculations are presented for the specific case of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) brushes swollen by water and capped by a poly(styrene-ethylene/butene-styrene) (SEBS) elastomeric, water-permeable membrane. These calculations show that the method is sensitive to the properties of the brush layer. This surface acoustic wave technique was coupled with an inflation method that enabled quantification of the adhesion between the membrane and the brush coated surface. This adhesive interaction is obtained from the contact angle made between the quartz and membrane surfaces and the tension on the membrane. An analysis of the membrane profile based on the numerical solution of the axisymmetric Laplace equation is developed and used to investigate both adhesive and non-adhesive situations with both an

  6. X-231A demonstration of in-situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media by soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or reactive barrier destruction

    Siegrist, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Environmental Science and Engineering Div.; Lowe, K.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Murdoch, L.D. [FRx, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Slack, W.W. [FRx, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Houk, T.C. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The overall goal of the program of activities is to demonstrate robust and cost-effective technologies for in situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media (LPM), including adaptations and enhancements of conventional technologies to achieve improved performance for DNAPLs in LPM. The technologies sought should be potential for application at simple, small sites (e.g., gasoline underground storage tanks) as well as at complex, larger sites (e.g., DOE land treatment units). The technologies involved in the X-231A demonstration at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) utilized subsurface manipulation of the LPM through soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or horizontal barrier in place destruction. To enable field evaluation of these approaches, a set of four test cells was established at the X-231A land treatment unit at the DOE PORTS plant in August 1996 and a series of demonstration field activities occurred through December 1997. The principal objectives of the PORTS X-231A demonstration were to: determine and compare the operational features of hydraulic fractures as an enabling technology for steam and hot air enhanced soil vapor extraction and mass recovery, in situ interception and reductive destruction by zero valent iron, and in situ interception and oxidative destruction by potassium permanganate; determine the interaction of the delivered agents with the LPM matrix adjacent to the fracture and within the fractured zone and assess the beneficial modifications to the transport and/or reaction properties of the LPM deposit; and determine the remediation efficiency achieved by each of the technology strategies.

  7. X-231A demonstration of in-situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media by soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or reactive barrier destruction

    The overall goal of the program of activities is to demonstrate robust and cost-effective technologies for in situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media (LPM), including adaptations and enhancements of conventional technologies to achieve improved performance for DNAPLs in LPM. The technologies sought should be potential for application at simple, small sites (e.g., gasoline underground storage tanks) as well as at complex, larger sites (e.g., DOE land treatment units). The technologies involved in the X-231A demonstration at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) utilized subsurface manipulation of the LPM through soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or horizontal barrier in place destruction. To enable field evaluation of these approaches, a set of four test cells was established at the X-231A land treatment unit at the DOE PORTS plant in August 1996 and a series of demonstration field activities occurred through December 1997. The principal objectives of the PORTS X-231A demonstration were to: determine and compare the operational features of hydraulic fractures as an enabling technology for steam and hot air enhanced soil vapor extraction and mass recovery, in situ interception and reductive destruction by zero valent iron, and in situ interception and oxidative destruction by potassium permanganate; determine the interaction of the delivered agents with the LPM matrix adjacent to the fracture and within the fractured zone and assess the beneficial modifications to the transport and/or reaction properties of the LPM deposit; and determine the remediation efficiency achieved by each of the technology strategies

  8. Evidence of Key Tinnitus-Related Brain Regions Documented by a Unique Combination of Manganese-Enhanced MRI and Acoustic Startle Reflex Testing

    Avril Genene Holt; David Bissig; Najab Mirza; Gary Rajah; Bruce Berkowitz

    2010-01-01

    Animal models continue to improve our understanding of tinnitus pathogenesis and aid in development of new treatments. However, there are no diagnostic biomarkers for tinnitus-related pathophysiology for use in awake, freely moving animals. To address this disparity, two complementary methods were combined to examine reliable tinnitus models (rats repeatedly administered salicylate or exposed to a single noise event): inhibition of acoustic startle and manganese-enhanced MRI. Salicylate-induc...

  9. Scientific Basis for Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Passive Remediation for Chlorinated Solvents - DOE Alternative Project for Technology Acceleration Implementation Plan

    The overall Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Passive Remediation (MNA/EPR) Technology Alternative Project is narrowly focused, providing the scientific and policy support to facilitate implementing appropriate passive cleanup and cost effective monitoring strategies leading to responsible completion of active remediation activities at high risk DOE waste sites. MNA/EPR describe natural processes that mitigate exposure and risk and that are self-sustaining once implemented or require minimal adjustments to maintain functionality. The overall MNA/EPR project effort will be performed as a collaboration between DOE science and operations organizations at the target sites along with regulatory agencies, stakeholders, industry, and universities, as identified in the approved Alternative Project Plan. This plan describes the project initiation activities, individual roles and responsibilities, milestones, and budget for the project. A primary product of this project will be a collaboratively developed MNA/EPR protocol that will facilitate widespread use and acceptance. This technical protocol will be developed in collaboration with regulator agencies as input for regulation updates and guidance documents, as appropriate. This plan describes the project initiation activities, individual roles and responsibilities, milestones, and budget for the project

  10. Envelope enhancement increases cortical sensitivity to interaural envelope delays with acoustic and electric hearing.

    Hartley, Douglas E H; Isaiah, Amal

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from human psychophysical and animal electrophysiological studies suggests that sensitivity to interaural time delay (ITD) in the modulating envelope of a high-frequency carrier can be enhanced using half-wave rectified stimuli. Recent evidence has shown potential benefits of equivalent electrical stimuli to deaf individuals with bilateral cochlear implants (CIs). In the current study we assessed the effects of envelope shape on ITD sensitivity in the primary auditory cortex of normal-hearing ferrets, and profoundly-deaf animals with bilateral CIs. In normal-hearing animals, cortical sensitivity to ITDs (±1 ms in 0.1-ms steps) was assessed in response to dichotically-presented i) sinusoidal amplitude-modulated (SAM) and ii) half-wave rectified (HWR) tones (100-ms duration; 70 dB SPL) presented at the best-frequency of the unit over a range of modulation frequencies. In separate experiments, adult ferrets were deafened with neomycin administration and bilaterally-implanted with intra-cochlear electrode arrays. Electrically-evoked auditory brainstem responses (EABRs) were recorded in response to bipolar electrical stimulation of the apical pair of electrodes with singe biphasic current pulses (40 µs per phase) over a range of current levels to measure hearing thresholds. Subsequently, we recorded cortical sensitivity to ITDs (±800 µs in 80-µs steps) within the envelope of SAM and HWR biphasic-pulse trains (40 µs per phase; 6000 pulses per second, 100-ms duration) over a range of modulation frequencies. In normal-hearing animals, nearly a third of cortical neurons were sensitive to envelope-ITDs in response to SAM tones. In deaf animals with bilateral CI, the proportion of ITD-sensitive cortical neurons was approximately a fifth in response to SAM pulse trains. In normal-hearing and deaf animals with bilateral CI the proportion of ITD sensitive units and neural sensitivity to ITDs increased in response to HWR, compared with SAM stimuli. Consequently

  11. Phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials

    Ming-Hui Lu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Phononic crystals have been proposed about two decades ago and some important characteristics such as acoustic band structure and negative refraction have stimulated fundamental and practical studies in acoustic materials and devices since then. To carefully engineer a phononic crystal in an acoustic “atom” scale, acoustic metamaterials with their inherent deep subwavelength nature have triggered more exciting investigations on negative bulk modulus and/or negative mass density. Acoustic surface evanescent waves have also been recognized to play key roles to reach acoustic subwavelength imaging and enhanced transmission.

  12. A demonstration of the applicability of implementing the enhanced Remedial Action Priority System (RAPS) for environmental releases

    Whelan, G.; Droppo, J.G. Jr.; Strenge, D.L.; Walter, M.B.; Buck, J.W.

    1989-12-01

    The Remedial Action Priority System (RAPS) and the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) were developed to prioritize problems associated with potential releases of hazardous chemical and radioactive materials in a scientific and objective manner based on limited site information. This report documents the model testing efforts of the RAPS/MEPAS methodology for the atmospheric, surface water, groundwater, and exposure components. Comparisons are given of model outputs with measured data at three sites: the US Department of Energy's Mound facility in Ohio and Hanford facility in Washington, and a chromium-cadmium plating site in New York. The results show that the simulated magnitudes, spacial and temporal trends, and distributions of contaminants corresponded well with the measured data. 25 refs., 86 figs., 26 tabs.

  13. Integrating Real-Time Room Acoustics Simulation into a CAD Modeling Software to Enhance the Architectural Design Process

    Sönke Pelzer; Lukas Aspöck; Dirk Schröder; Michael Vorländer

    2014-01-01

    For architects, real-time 3D visual rendering of CAD-models is a valuable tool. The architect usually perceives the visual appearance of the building interior in a natural and realistic way during the design process. Unfortunately this only emphasizes the role of the visual appearance of a building, while the acoustics often remain disregarded. Controlling the room acoustics is not integrated into most architects’ workflows—due to a lack of tools. The present contribution describes a newly de...

  14. Integrating Real-Time Room Acoustics Simulation into a CAD Modeling Software to Enhance the Architectural Design Process

    Sönke Pelzer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available For architects, real-time 3D visual rendering of CAD-models is a valuable tool. The architect usually perceives the visual appearance of the building interior in a natural and realistic way during the design process. Unfortunately this only emphasizes the role of the visual appearance of a building, while the acoustics often remain disregarded. Controlling the room acoustics is not integrated into most architects’ workflows—due to a lack of tools. The present contribution describes a newly developed plug-in for adding an adequate 3D-acoustics feedback to the architect. To present intuitively the acoustical effect of the current design project, the plug-in uses real-time audio rendering and 3D-reproduction. The room acoustics of the design can be varied by modifying structural shapes as well as by changing the material selection. In addition to the audio feedback, also a visualization of important room acoustics qualities is provided by displaying color-coded maps inside the CAD software.

  15. Identification of Turbomachinery Noise Sources Using Acoustical Holography Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Evaluation and enhancement of the acoustical performance of turbomachinery requires knowledge of the acoustic sources. However, the noise generation mechanisms...

  16. Evaluation of the Eological Management and Enhancement Alernative for Remediation of the K1007-P1 Pond

    Peterson, M.J.

    2005-10-31

    An evaluation of the human and ecological risks associated with the P1 Pond and surrounding environs was conducted as part of the ETTP Site-Wide Remedial Investigation. The RI provides the basis for the focus on PCBs as the most important unacceptable risk to human and ecological health in the pond. Other P1 contaminants, media, or pathways of risk to receptors are identified in the RI, but are not addressed as a major risk reduction goal for the ETTP Site-Wide Feasibility Study. Therefore, the goal of the Ecological Management alternative is to reduce unacceptable risks associated with PCBs in fish. Many of the actions proposed for this alternative, however, are likely to reduce risks associated with other contaminants and their pathways. The high PCB concentrations in fish from the P1 Pond are most certainly due in part to the current ecological condition of the pond that maximizes PCB biomagnification. This basic assumption and the factors contributing to it were evaluated by conducting an intensive field study of the P1 Pond in the summer of 2004 (for a thorough presentation of current P1 Pond biological conditions, see Peterson et al. 2005). Major hypotheses regarding the P1 Pond's current fish community, PCB fate and transport processes, pond vegetation, and limnological conditions that contribute to the high PCB levels in fish were validated by the study (Appendix A), The results of the 2004 ecological assessment, in concert with long-term datasets obtained as part of the ETTP Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) and recent abiotic sampling for the RI, provide the basis for the assessment of current conditions.

  17. Ensemble of surrogates-based optimization for identifying an optimal surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation strategy at heterogeneous DNAPL-contaminated sites

    Jiang, Xue; Lu, Wenxi; Hou, Zeyu; Zhao, Haiqing; Na, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify an optimal surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) strategy for aquifers contaminated by dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) based on an ensemble of surrogates-based optimization technique. A saturated heterogeneous medium contaminated by nitrobenzene was selected as case study. A new kind of surrogate-based SEAR optimization employing an ensemble surrogate (ES) model together with a genetic algorithm (GA) is presented. Four methods, namely radial basis function artificial neural network (RBFANN), kriging (KRG), support vector regression (SVR), and kernel extreme learning machines (KELM), were used to create four individual surrogate models, which were then compared. The comparison enabled us to select the two most accurate models (KELM and KRG) to establish an ES model of the SEAR simulation model, and the developed ES model as well as these four stand-alone surrogate models was compared. The results showed that the average relative error of the average nitrobenzene removal rates between the ES model and the simulation model for 20 test samples was 0.8%, which is a high approximation accuracy, and which indicates that the ES model provides more accurate predictions than the stand-alone surrogate models. Then, a nonlinear optimization model was formulated for the minimum cost, and the developed ES model was embedded into this optimization model as a constrained condition. Besides, GA was used to solve the optimization model to provide the optimal SEAR strategy. The developed ensemble surrogate-optimization approach was effective in seeking a cost-effective SEAR strategy for heterogeneous DNAPL-contaminated sites. This research is expected to enrich and develop the theoretical and technical implications for the analysis of remediation strategy optimization of DNAPL-contaminated aquifers.

  18. Phyto-enhanced remediation of soil co-contaminated with lead and diesel fuel using biowaste and Dracaena reflexa: A laboratory study.

    Dadrasnia, Arezoo; Pariatamby, Agamuthu

    2016-03-01

    In phytoremediation of co-contaminated soil, the simultaneous and efficient remediation of multiple pollutants is a major challenge rather than the removal of pollutants. A laboratory-scale experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of 5% addition of each of three different organic waste amendments (tea leaves, soy cake, and potato skin) to enhance the phytoaccumulation of lead (60 mg kg(-1)) and diesel fuel (25,000 mg kg(-1)) in co-contaminated soil by Dracaena reflexa Lam for a period of 180 day. The highest rate of oil degradation was recorded in co-contaminated soil planted with D. reflexa and amended with soy cake (75%), followed by potato skin (52.8%) and tea leaves (50.6%). Although plants did not accumulate hydrocarbon from the contaminated soil, significant bioaccumulation of lead in the roots and stems of D. reflexa was observed. At the end of 180 days, 16.7 and 9.8 mg kg(-1) of lead in the stems and roots of D. reflexa were recorded, respectively, for the treatment with tea leaves. These findings demonstrate the potential of organic waste amendments in enhancing phytoremediation of oil and bioaccumulation of lead. PMID:26675494

  19. Reimagining Remediation

    Handel, Stephen J.; Williams, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the College Board's Community College Advisory Panel--a group of college presidents that advises the organization's membership on community college issues--asked these authors to write a paper describing effective remedial education programs. They never wrote the paper. The problem was not the lack of dedicated faculty and staff working…

  20. REMEDIATING #IRANELECTION

    Andersen, Rune Saugmann

    2012-01-01

    When mass protests and violent crackdown followed the 2009 Iranian presidential election, Western mass media found themselves in a precarious situation: eager to report on the unfolding events, but without access to them; save through snapshots and text bites posted to content- sharing sites by u....... KEYWORDS content-sharing sites; epistemic authority; images; Iran; journalism; remediation; social media...

  1. The potential for solubilizing agents to enhance the remediation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions

    Laha, S.; Liu, Z.; Edwards, D.; Luthy, R.G.

    1991-02-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility for use of surfactant solubilizing agents to enhance the solubility and the rate of microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. Hydrophobic organic contaminants are strongly sorbed to soil or sediment material, and as a consequence the rate of microbial degradation may depend greatly on the desorption of the sorbed-phase contaminant and the accessibility of the contaminant to soil microorganisms. Chemical solubilizing agents may enhance the rate of hydrophobic organic solute degradation by increasing the rate of solute desorption from soil and the extent of solute partitioning to the aqueous phase. The presentation will review on-going research on: surfactant solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in clean water, and in soil-water suspensions; and experiments to assess if the addition of surfactant to soil-water suspension results in faster rate of mineralization of PAH compounds in soil.

  2. The potential for solubilizing agents to enhance the remediation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. [Quarterly report

    Laha, S.; Liu, Z.; Edwards, D.; Luthy, R.G.

    1991-02-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility for use of surfactant solubilizing agents to enhance the solubility and the rate of microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. Hydrophobic organic contaminants are strongly sorbed to soil or sediment material, and as a consequence the rate of microbial degradation may depend greatly on the desorption of the sorbed-phase contaminant and the accessibility of the contaminant to soil microorganisms. Chemical solubilizing agents may enhance the rate of hydrophobic organic solute degradation by increasing the rate of solute desorption from soil and the extent of solute partitioning to the aqueous phase. The presentation will review on-going research on: surfactant solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in clean water, and in soil-water suspensions; and experiments to assess if the addition of surfactant to soil-water suspension results in faster rate of mineralization of PAH compounds in soil.

  3. The potential for solubilizing agents to enhance the remediation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions

    This paper discusses the feasibility for use of surfactant solubilizing agents to enhance the solubility and the rate of microbial degradation of hydrophobic organic solutes in soil-water suspensions. Hydrophobic organic contaminants are strongly sorbed to soil or sediment material, and as a consequence the rate of microbial degradation may depend greatly on the desorption of the sorbed-phase contaminant and the accessibility of the contaminant to soil microorganisms. Chemical solubilizing agents may enhance the rate of hydrophobic organic solute degradation by increasing the rate of solute desorption from soil and the extent of solute partitioning to the aqueous phase. The presentation will review on-going research on: (1) surfactant solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in clean water, and in soil-water suspensions; and (2) experiments to assess if the addition of surfactant to soil-water suspension results in faster rate of mineralization of PAH compounds in soil. The presentation explains the methodology employed to select various surfactants for use in the experiments. Experimental results presented show the equilibrium partitioning of phenanthrene, aanthracene and pyrene in soil-water suspensions. A preliminary model is shown which describes some of the features of the solubilization process. Currently work is in progress to evaluate the rate of evolution of 14CO2 from soil-water suspensions using 14C-labeled phenanthrene and surfactants. The tests are being performed with acclimaated PAH-degrading organisms. The experimental protocols for this work will be reviewed

  4. Communication Acoustics

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  5. A context based approach using Green Chemistry/Bio-remediation principles to enhance interest and learning of organic chemistry in a high school AP chemistry classroom

    Miller, Tricia

    The ability of our planet to sustain life and heal itself is not as predictable as it used to be. Our need for educated future scientists who know what our planet needs, and can passionately apply that knowledge to find solutions should be at the heart of science education today. This study of learning organic chemistry through the lens of the environmental problem "What should be done with our food scraps?" explores student interest, and mastery of certain concepts in organic chemistry. This Green Chemistry/ Bio-remediation context-based teaching approach utilizes the Nature MillRTM, which is an indoor food waste composting machine, to learn about organic chemistry, and how this relates to landfill reduction possibilities, and resource production. During this unit students collected food waste from their cafeteria, and used the Nature MillRTM to convert food waste into compost. The use of these hands on activities, and group discussions in a context-based environment enhanced their interest in organic chemistry, and paper chromatography. According to a one-tailed paired T-test, the result show that this context-based approach is a significant way to increase both student interest and mastery of the content.

  6. Historical and Retrospective Survey of Monitored Natural Attenuation: A Line of Inquiry Supporting Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Passive Remediation of Chlorinated Solvents

    The Department of Energy is sponsoring an initiative to facilitate efficient, effective and responsible use of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) and Enhanced Passive Remediation(EPR) for chlorinated solvents. This Office of Environmental Management Alternative Project, focuses on providing scientific and policy support for MNA/EPR. A broadly representative working group of scientists supports the project along with partnerships with regulatory organizations such as the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council and the Environmental Protection Agency. The initial product of the technical working group was a summary report that articulated the conceptual approach and central scientific tenants of the project, and that identified a prioritized listing of technical targets for field research. This report documented the process in which: (1) scientific ground rules were developed, (2) lines of inquiry were identified and then critically evaluated, (3) promising applied research topics were highlighted in the various lines of inquiry, and (4) these were discussed and prioritized. The summary report will serve as a resource to guide management and decision making throughout the period of the subject MNA/EPR Alternative Project. To support and more fully document the information presented in the summary report, we are publishing a series of supplemental documents that present the full texts from the technical analyses within the various lines of inquiry. The following report - documenting our Historical and Retrospective Survey of Monitored Natural Attenuation - is one of those supplemental documents

  7. Efficiency of drug delivery enhanced by acoustic pressure during blood–brain barrier disruption induced by focused ultrasound

    Yang, Feng-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Feng-Yi Yang, Pei-Yi LeeDepartment of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, TaiwanPurpose: We evaluated the delivery efficiency of intravenously injected large molecular agents, before and after disruption of the blood–brain barrier (BBB-D), induced by focused ultrasound (FUS) using various acoustic parameters.Materials and methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intravenously with Evans blue (EB) before or after BBB-D induction...

  8. Application of biosurfactants and periodic voltage gradient for enhanced electrokinetic remediation of metals and PAHs in dredged marine sediments.

    Ammami, M T; Portet-Koltalo, F; Benamar, A; Duclairoir-Poc, C; Wang, H; Le Derf, F

    2015-04-01

    Dredged harbor sediment co-contaminated by heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was subjected to enhanced electrokinetic treatments, using a mixture of a chelating agent (citric acid CA) and a surfactant as additives in the processing fluids. We tested various operating conditions (at 1 V cm(-1)): different CA concentrations, applying a periodic voltage gradient, pre-conditioning the sediment with the additives, and replacing the synthetic surfactant Tween 20 (TW20) by biosurfactants. Increasing the CA concentration was favorable for both metal and PAH removal. Applying a periodic voltage gradient associated to a low concentration of CA and TW20 provided the best results for Zn, Cd and Pb removal and also for removal of the 16 priority PAHs. Promising results were obtained with solutions containing rhamnolipids (0.028%) and a viscosin-like biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pfa7B (0.025%), associated to a periodic voltage gradient. Although the rhamnolipid and the viscosin-like compounds involved a higher electrical current than TW20, metals were less removed from the sediment. The electroosmotic flow was lower when we used biosurfactants, hence a less effective effect on PAH removal. PMID:25644703

  9. Enhanced solubilisation of six PAHs by three synthetic cyclodextrins for remediation applications: molecular modelling of the inclusion complexes.

    Esmeralda Morillo

    Full Text Available Solubilisation of six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs (acenaphthene, anthracene, fluoranthene, fluorene, phenanthrene and pyrene by three synthetic cyclodextrins (CDs (2-hydroxypropyl-β-CD, hydroxypropyl-γ-CD and randomly methylated-β-CD was investigated in order to select the CD which presents the greatest increase in solubility and better complexation parameters for its use in contaminated scenarios. The presence of the three cyclodextrins greatly enhanced the apparent water solubility of all the PAHs through the formation of inclusion complexes of 1:1 stoichiometry. Anthracene, fluoranthene, fluorene and phenanthrene clearly presented a higher solubility when β-CD derivatives were used, and especially the complexes with the randomly methylated-β-CD were favoured. On the contrary, pyrene presented its best solubility results when using 2-hydroxypropyl-γ-CD, but for acenaphthene the use of any of the three CDs gave the same results. Complementary to experimental phase-solubility studies, a more in-depth estimation of the inclusion process for the different complexes was carried out using molecular modelling in order to find a correlation between the degree of solubilisation and the fit of PAH molecules within the cavity of the different CDs and to know the predominant driving forces of the complexation.

  10. Acoustic Neuroma

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  11. Acoustic Neuroma

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

  12. Anolyte Enhanced Electrokinetic Remediation of Fluorine-contaminated Soils%氟污染土壤的阳极强化电动力学修复研究

    朱书法; 闫春丽; 董铁有; 汤红妍

    2009-01-01

    在不同电解电压及阳极电解液浓度下,对土壤氟在电动力学作用下的迁移特征及其影响因素进行了研究,分析了利用阳极强化电动力学技术修复氟污染土壤的可行性.结果表明,1.0 V/cm电解电压下,当阳极电解液为去离子水时,氟在阴、阳极电解液中的累积量分别为8.2 mg和47.7 mg,土壤氟的去除率仅为8.8%.而阳极强化电动力学作用能够有效促进土壤中氟化物的迁移,1.0、1.5、2.0 V/cm电解电压下,阳极电解液为0.02 mol/L的氢氧化钠溶液时,土壤氟的去除率分别为25.9%、31.2%、47.3%;当阳极电解液浓度升高为0.1 mol/L时,土壤氟的去除率分别为55.4%、61.1%、73.O%.电迁移是其主要的作用机制,电渗析也对氟在土壤中的移动产生影响.电解电压及电解液浓度是影响氟去除效率的主要因素.可以采用适当的阳极强化电动力学技术对氟污染土壤进行修复.%An experimental study was carried out in order to determine the characteristics of migration and its influencing factor of soil fluorine in the electrokinetic process under different applied voltage and concentration of anolyte. The feasibility of anolyte enhanced on electrokinetic remediation of fluorine-contaminated soil was analyzed. The results show that when deionized water is used as anolyte with the 1.0 V/cm voltage gradient, the cumulative mass of fluorine in catholyte and anolyte are 8.2 mg and 47.7 nig respectively and the removal rate of fluorine is only 8.8% . Anolyle enhanced electrokinetic process can promote effectively the migration of fluoride in soil. When 0.02 mol/L NaOH solution is employed as the anolyte, the removal rates are 25.9%, 31.2% and 47.3% with 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 V/cm voltage gradient respectively. As the concentration of anolyte increased to 0.1 mol/L, the removal rates are 55.4% , 61.1% and 73.0%. The electromigration is the main transport mechanism and the electroosmotic flow has an effect on the

  13. Acoustic Test Characterization of Melamine Foam for Usage in NASA's Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The external acoustic liftoff levels predicted for NASA's future heavy lift launch vehicles are expected to be significantly higher than the environment created by today's commercial launch vehicles. This creates a need to develop an improved acoustic attenuation system for future NASA payload fairings. NASA Glenn Research Center initiated an acoustic test series to characterize the acoustic performance of melamine foam, with and without various acoustic enhancements. This testing was denoted as NEMFAT, which stands for NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test, and is the subject of this paper. Both absorption and transmission loss testing of numerous foam configurations were performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory in July 2013. The NEMFAT test data provides an initial acoustic characterization and database of melamine foam for NASA. Because of its acoustic performance and lighter mass relative to fiberglass blankets, melamine foam is being strongly considered for use in the acoustic attenuation systems of NASA's future launch vehicles.

  14. REPORT ON THE GEOELECTRICAL DETECTION OF SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION OF PCE: PROPERTY CHANGES IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS DUE TO SURFACTANT TREATMENT OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE: IMPLICATIONS TO GEOPHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS

    Select physicochemical properties of nine surfactants which are conventionally used in the remediation of perchloroethylene (PCE, a.k.a. tetrachloroethene) were evaluated with varying concentrations of PCE and indicator dyes in aqueous solutions using a response surface quadrati...

  15. Acoustic noise reduction of a 6/4 SRM drive based on third harmonic real power cancellation and mutual coupling flux enhancement

    In this paper, an effective technology is presented for noise reduction and torque increase in a three-phase 6/4 switched reluctance motor (SRM) drive without position sensors. Using a three-phase full bridge inverter and Y-typed connection of winding configuration, three-phase sinusoidal currents in each commutation region can be controlled to form long and short-flux paths. Long main flux can be added by short mutual coupling flux to enhance the stator flux; the resulting current-oriented control scheme can obtain a higher electromagnetic torque and cancel the third harmonic real power. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed scheme, it was applied to a 350 W three-phase 6/4 SRM drive system operating below 1500 rpm. Experimental results yield maximal acoustic noise at 74 dB and maximal torque at 21 kg cm. Moreover, the 6th harmonic real power is found to be the dominant source of acoustic noises in the SRM system.

  16. Acoustic engineering and technology '90

    Acoustic monitoring, testing and diagnosis in machines, production processes and products enhance the uptimes and profitability of machinery and plants. 18 papers discuss the current state of the art of acoustic monitoring systems including integrated factory planning as well as industrial health, and noise protection. (DG)

  17. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  18. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    Chen Huanyang [School of Physical Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215006 (China); Chan, C T, E-mail: kenyon@ust.h, E-mail: phchan@ust.h [Department of Physics and the William Mong Institute of NanoScience and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong)

    2010-03-24

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  19. Advanced Remediation Technologies

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the cleanup of nation's nuclear weapons program legacy wastes, along with waste associated with nuclear energy programs and research. The EM cleanup efforts continue to progress, however the cleanup continues to be technologically complex, heavily regulated, long-term; and the effort also has a high life cycle cost estimate (LCCE) effort. Over the past few years, the EM program has undergone several changes to accelerate its cleanup efforts with varying degrees of success. This article will provide some insight into the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) projects that may enhance cleanup efforts and reduce life cycle costs. (authors)

  20. Evidence of key tinnitus-related brain regions documented by a unique combination of manganese-enhanced MRI and acoustic startle reflex testing.

    Avril Genene Holt

    Full Text Available Animal models continue to improve our understanding of tinnitus pathogenesis and aid in development of new treatments. However, there are no diagnostic biomarkers for tinnitus-related pathophysiology for use in awake, freely moving animals. To address this disparity, two complementary methods were combined to examine reliable tinnitus models (rats repeatedly administered salicylate or exposed to a single noise event: inhibition of acoustic startle and manganese-enhanced MRI. Salicylate-induced tinnitus resulted in wide spread supernormal manganese uptake compared to noise-induced tinnitus. Neither model demonstrated significant differences in the auditory cortex. Only in the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus (DCIC did both models exhibit supernormal uptake. Therefore, abnormal membrane depolarization in the DCIC appears to be important in tinnitus-mediated activity. Our results provide the foundation for future studies correlating the severity and longevity of tinnitus with hearing loss and neuronal activity in specific brain regions and tools for evaluating treatment efficacy across paradigms.

  1. Acoustical Imaging

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  2. A signal processing approach for enhanced Acoustic Emission data analysis in high activity systems: Application to organic matrix composites

    Kharrat, M.; Ramasso, E.; Placet, V.; Boubakar, M. L.

    2016-03-01

    Structural elements made of Organic Matrix Composites (OMC) under complex loading may suffer from high Acoustic Emission (AE) activity caused by the emergence of different emission sources at high rates with high noise level, which finally engender continuous emissions. The detection of hits in this situation becomes a challenge particularly during fatigue tests. This work suggests an approach based on the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) denoising applied on signal segments. A particular attention is paid to the adjustment of the denoising parameters based on pencil lead breaks and their influence on the quality of the denoised AE signals. The validation of the proposed approach is performed on a ring-shaped Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) under in-service-like conditions involving continuous emissions with superimposed damage-related transients. It is demonstrated that errors in hit detection are greatly reduced leading to a better identification of the natural damage scenario based on AE signals.

  3. Acoustic telemetry and network analysis reveal the space use of multiple reef predators and enhance marine protected area design.

    Lea, James S E; Humphries, Nicolas E; von Brandis, Rainer G; Clarke, Christopher R; Sims, David W

    2016-07-13

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are commonly employed to protect ecosystems from threats like overfishing. Ideally, MPA design should incorporate movement data from multiple target species to ensure sufficient habitat is protected. We used long-term acoustic telemetry and network analysis to determine the fine-scale space use of five shark and one turtle species at a remote atoll in the Seychelles, Indian Ocean, and evaluate the efficacy of a proposed MPA. Results revealed strong, species-specific habitat use in both sharks and turtles, with corresponding variation in MPA use. Defining the MPA's boundary from the edge of the reef flat at low tide instead of the beach at high tide (the current best in Seychelles) significantly increased the MPA's coverage of predator movements by an average of 34%. Informed by these results, the larger MPA was adopted by the Seychelles government, demonstrating how telemetry data can improve shark spatial conservation by affecting policy directly. PMID:27412274

  4. Radiation acoustics

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  5. Strong acoustic wave action

    Gokhberg, M. B.

    1983-07-01

    Experiments devoted to acoustic action on the atmosphere-magnetosphere-ionosphere system using ground based strong explosions are reviewed. The propagation of acoustic waves was observed by ground observations over 2000 km in horizontal direction and to an altitude of 200 km. Magnetic variations up to 100 nT were detected by ARIEL-3 satellite near the epicenter of the explosion connected with the formation of strong field aligned currents in the magnetosphere. The enhancement of VLF emission at 800 km altitude is observed.

  6. Memory-Effect on Acoustic Cavitation

    Yavaṣ, Oğuz; Leiderer, Paul; Park, Hee K.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poon, Chie C.; Tam, Andrew C.

    1994-01-01

    The formation of bubbles at a liquid-solid interface due to acoustic cavitation depends particularly on the preconditions of the interface. Here, it wiIl be shown that following laser-induced bubble formation at the interface the acoustic cavitation efficiency is strongly enhanced. Optical reflectance measurements reveal that this observed enhancement of acoustic cavitation due to preceding laser-induced bubble formation, which could be termed as memory effect, decays in a few hundred microse...

  7. Stabilisation of nanoscale zero-valent iron with biochar for enhanced transport and in-situ remediation of hexavalent chromium in soil.

    Su, Huijie; Fang, Zhanqiang; Tsang, Pokeung Eric; Fang, Jianzhang; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a biochar-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI@BC) material was used for in situ remediation of hexavalent chromium-contaminated soil. Sedimentation tests and column experiments were used to compare the stability and mobility of nZVI@BC and bare-nZVI. The immobilisation efficiency of chromium, toxic effect of chromium and the content of iron were assessed through leaching tests and pot experiments. Sedimentation tests and transport experiments indicated that nZVI@BC with nZVI to BC mass ratio of 1:1 exhibited better stability and mobility than that of bare-nZVI. The immobilisation efficiency of Cr(VI) and Crtotal was 100% and 92.9%, respectively, when the soil was treated with 8 g/kg of nZVI@BC for 15 days. Moreover, such remediation effectively reduced the leachability of Fe caused by bare-nZVI. In addition, pot experiments showed that such remediation reduced the phytotoxicity of Cr and the leachable Fe and was favourable for plant growth. PMID:27064615

  8. Acoustical Imaging

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  9. Acoustic telemetry

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To determine movements of green turtles in the nearshore foraging areas, we deployed acoustic tags and determined their movements through active and passive...

  10. Acoustics Research

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  11. Battlefield acoustics

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  12. Topical Day on Site Remediation

    Vandenhove, H. [ed.

    1996-09-18

    Ongoing activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre relating to site remediation and restoration are summarized. Special attention has been paid to the different phases of remediation including characterization, impact assessment, evaluation of remediation actions, and execution of remediation actions.

  13. Topical Day on Site Remediation

    Ongoing activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre relating to site remediation and restoration are summarized. Special attention has been paid to the different phases of remediation including characterization, impact assessment, evaluation of remediation actions, and execution of remediation actions

  14. Evaluation of Transient Elastography, Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI, and Enhanced Liver Function (ELF Score for Detection of Fibrosis in Morbidly Obese Patients.

    Thomas Karlas

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis induced by non-alcoholic fatty liver disease causes peri-interventional complications in morbidly obese patients. We determined the performance of transient elastography (TE, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI imaging, and enhanced liver fibrosis (ELF score for fibrosis detection in bariatric patients.41 patients (median BMI 47 kg/m2 underwent 14-day low-energy diets to improve conditions prior to bariatric surgery (day 0. TE (M and XL probe, ARFI, and ELF score were performed on days -15 and -1 and compared with intraoperative liver biopsies (NAS staging.Valid TE and ARFI results at day -15 and -1 were obtained in 49%/88% and 51%/90% of cases, respectively. High skin-to-liver-capsule distances correlated with invalid TE measurements. Fibrosis of liver biopsies was staged as F1 and F3 in n = 40 and n = 1 individuals. However, variations (median/range at d-15/-1 of TE (4.6/2.6-75 and 6.7/2.9-21.3 kPa and ARFI (2.1/0.7-3.7 and 2.0/0.7-3.8 m/s were high and associated with overestimation of fibrosis. The ELF score correctly classified 87.5% of patients.In bariatric patients, performance of TE and ARFI was poor and did not improve after weight loss. The ELF score correctly classified the majority of cases and should be further evaluated.

  15. Duct Remediation Program: Remediation operations and implementation

    Beckman, T.d.; Davis, M.M.; Karas, T.M.

    1992-11-01

    Plutonium holdup material has accumulated in the process ventilation duct systems at Rocky Flats. Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) measurements identified ducts containing this material. The Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board and the Department of Energy established the criteria for remediation of these ducts. A remediation team was assembled and a program plan created. This program plan included activities such as fissile material accumulation identification, criticality safety assessments, radiation dose determinations, facility safety evaluations, prevention of future accumulation, and removal of holdup material. Several operational considerations had to be evaluated in determining completion of remediation.

  16. Duct Remediation Program: Remediation operations and implementation

    Plutonium holdup material has accumulated in the process ventilation duct systems at Rocky Flats. Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) measurements identified ducts containing this material. The Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board and the Department of Energy established the criteria for remediation of these ducts. A remediation team was assembled and a program plan created. This program plan included activities such as fissile material accumulation identification, criticality safety assessments, radiation dose determinations, facility safety evaluations, prevention of future accumulation, and removal of holdup material. Several operational considerations had to be evaluated in determining completion of remediation

  17. A quartz enhanced photo-acoustic gas sensor based on a custom tuning fork and a terahertz quantum cascade laser.

    Patimisco, Pietro; Borri, Simone; Sampaolo, Angelo; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, David A; Vitiello, Miriam S; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    An innovative quartz enhanced photoacoustic (QEPAS) gas sensing system operating in the THz spectral range and employing a custom quartz tuning fork (QTF) is described. The QTF dimensions are 3.3 cm × 0.4 cm × 0.8 cm, with the two prongs spaced by ∼800 μm. To test our sensor we used a quantum cascade laser as the light source and selected a methanol rotational absorption line at 131.054 cm(-1) (∼3.93 THz), with line-strength S = 4.28 × 10(-21) cm mol(-1). The sensor was operated at 10 Torr pressure on the first flexion QTF resonance frequency of 4245 Hz. The corresponding Q-factor was 74 760. Stepwise concentration measurements were performed to verify the linearity of the QEPAS signal as a function of the methanol concentration. The achieved sensitivity of the system is 7 parts per million in 4 seconds, corresponding to a QEPAS normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 2 × 10(-10) W cm(-1) Hz(-1/2), comparable with the best result of mid-IR QEPAS systems. PMID:24167816

  18. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  19. Acoustic emission

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  20. Natural Remediation at Savannah River Site

    Natural remediation is a general term that includes any technology or strategy that takes advantage of natural processes to remediate a contaminated media to a condition that is protective of human health and the environment. Natural remediation techniques are often passive and minimally disruptive to the environment. They are generally implemented in conjunction with traditional remedial solutions for source control (i.e., capping, stabilization, removal, soil vapor extraction, etc.). Natural remediation techniques being employed at Savannah River Site (SRS) include enhanced bio-remediation, monitored natural attenuation, and phytoremediation. Enhanced bio-remediation involves making nutrients available and conditions favorable for microbial growth. With proper precautions and feeding, the naturally existing microbes flourish and consume the contaminants. Case studies of enhanced bio-remediation include surface soils contaminated with PCBs and pesticides, and Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) contamination in both the vadose zone and groundwater. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has been selected as the preferred alternative for groundwater clean up at several SRS waste units. Successful implementation of MNA has been based on demonstration that sources have been controlled, groundwater modeling that indicates that plumes will not expand or reach surface water discharge points at levels that exceed regulatory limits, and continued monitoring. Phytoremediation is being successfully utilized at several SRS waste units. Phytoremediation involves using plants and vegetation to uptake, break down, or manage contaminants in groundwater or soils. Case studies at SRS include managing groundwater plumes of tritium and VOCs with pine trees that are native to the area. Significant decreases in tritium discharge to a site stream have been realized in one phytoremediation project. Studies of other vegetation types, methods of application, and other target contaminants are

  1. Natural Remediation at Savannah River Site

    Lewis, C. M.; Van Pelt, R.

    2002-02-25

    Natural remediation is a general term that includes any technology or strategy that takes advantage of natural processes to remediate a contaminated media to a condition that is protective of human health and the environment. Natural remediation techniques are often passive and minimally disruptive to the environment. They are generally implemented in conjunction with traditional remedial solutions for source control (i.e., capping, stabilization, removal, soil vapor extraction, etc.). Natural remediation techniques being employed at Savannah River Site (SRS) include enhanced bio-remediation, monitored natural attenuation, and phytoremediation. Enhanced bio-remediation involves making nutrients available and conditions favorable for microbial growth. With proper precautions and feeding, the naturally existing microbes flourish and consume the contaminants. Case studies of enhanced bio-remediation include surface soils contaminated with PCBs and pesticides, and Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) contamination in both the vadose zone and groundwater. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has been selected as the preferred alternative for groundwater clean up at several SRS waste units. Successful implementation of MNA has been based on demonstration that sources have been controlled, groundwater modeling that indicates that plumes will not expand or reach surface water discharge points at levels that exceed regulatory limits, and continued monitoring. Phytoremediation is being successfully utilized at several SRS waste units. Phytoremediation involves using plants and vegetation to uptake, break down, or manage contaminants in groundwater or soils. Case studies at SRS include managing groundwater plumes of tritium and VOCs with pine trees that are native to the area. Significant decreases in tritium discharge to a site stream have been realized in one phytoremediation project. Studies of other vegetation types, methods of application, and other target contaminants are

  2. Ethyl lactate-EDTA composite system enhances the remediation of the cadmium-contaminated soil by Autochthonous Willow (Salix x aureo-pendula CL 'J1011') in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River

    In order to explore a practical approach to the remediation of the cadmium (Cd)-contaminated soil in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River, we evaluated the effects of a local willow (Salix x aureo-pendula CL 'J1011') of absorbing, accumulating, and translocating Cd; and assessed the potential of chelator ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in combination with ethyl lactate for enhancing the efficiency of the willow in removing Cd in two water-culture growth chamber trials and a field one. The willow showed a high tolerance to Cd in growth chamber trial 1 where the Cd concentration in the medium reached up to 25 mg L-1 medium, and the bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) of the shoots for Cd rose from 3.8 to 7.4 as the Cd concentration in the medium was elevated from 5 to 25 mg L-1 medium. In growth chamber trial 2, the average Cd removal rates in two treatments with EDTA and ethyl lactate (molar ratios of EDTA to ethyl lactate = 68/39 and 53.5/53.5, respectively) reached 0.71 mg d-1pot-1 for the duration of Day 5-8 and 0.59 mg d-1pot-1 for that of Day 8-11, which were 5- and 4-fold of their counterparts in the control, respectively. In the field trial, for the remediational duration of 45 days, three treatments-willow alone, willow combined with EDTA, and willow combined with EDTA and ethyl lactate-led to decreases in the Cd concentration in soil by 5%, 20%, and 29%, respectively; increases in that in the leaves by 14.6%, 56.7%, and 146.5%, respectively; and increases in that in the stems by 15.6%, 41.2%, and 87.4%, respectively, compared to their counterparts on Day 0. These results indicate that EDTA combined with ethyl lactate significantly enhanced the efficiency of willow in removing Cd from the soil. Therefore, a phytoextration system consisting of the autochthonous willow, EDTA, and ethyl lactate has high potential for the remediation of the Cd-polluted soil in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River.

  3. Ethyl lactate-EDTA composite system enhances the remediation of the cadmium-contaminated soil by Autochthonous Willow (Salix x aureo-pendula CL 'J1011') in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River

    Li Jiahua [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Sun Yuanyuan [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Department of Hydrosciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Yin Ying; Ji Rong [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu Jichun [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Department of Hydrosciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wang Xiaorong [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Guo Hongyan, E-mail: hyguo@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-09-15

    In order to explore a practical approach to the remediation of the cadmium (Cd)-contaminated soil in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River, we evaluated the effects of a local willow (Salix x aureo-pendula CL 'J1011') of absorbing, accumulating, and translocating Cd; and assessed the potential of chelator ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in combination with ethyl lactate for enhancing the efficiency of the willow in removing Cd in two water-culture growth chamber trials and a field one. The willow showed a high tolerance to Cd in growth chamber trial 1 where the Cd concentration in the medium reached up to 25 mg L{sup -1} medium, and the bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) of the shoots for Cd rose from 3.8 to 7.4 as the Cd concentration in the medium was elevated from 5 to 25 mg L{sup -1} medium. In growth chamber trial 2, the average Cd removal rates in two treatments with EDTA and ethyl lactate (molar ratios of EDTA to ethyl lactate = 68/39 and 53.5/53.5, respectively) reached 0.71 mg d{sup -1}pot{sup -1} for the duration of Day 5-8 and 0.59 mg d{sup -1}pot{sup -1} for that of Day 8-11, which were 5- and 4-fold of their counterparts in the control, respectively. In the field trial, for the remediational duration of 45 days, three treatments-willow alone, willow combined with EDTA, and willow combined with EDTA and ethyl lactate-led to decreases in the Cd concentration in soil by 5%, 20%, and 29%, respectively; increases in that in the leaves by 14.6%, 56.7%, and 146.5%, respectively; and increases in that in the stems by 15.6%, 41.2%, and 87.4%, respectively, compared to their counterparts on Day 0. These results indicate that EDTA combined with ethyl lactate significantly enhanced the efficiency of willow in removing Cd from the soil. Therefore, a phytoextration system consisting of the autochthonous willow, EDTA, and ethyl lactate has high potential for the remediation of the Cd-polluted soil in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River.

  4. Integrated approach to planning the remediation of sites undergoing decommissioning

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Decommissioning and remediation activities are subject to some common driving forces that influence the ability of decommissioning and remediation programs to achieve end-states that correspond to planned or anticipated (future) end-uses (i.e., facility or site re-use). In addition, decommissioning and remediation programs have common resources needs that, when identified and fully utilized in an integrated framework, can result in optimizing the use of available resources to achieve risk-based results faster and at lower costs. To achieve this, it is necessary that the goals of individual decommissioning and remediation activities are aligned and not conflict with each other while costs are minimized and net health, safety, security and environmental benefits are maximized. Managing the decommissioning and remediation activities in an integrated program can result in enhanced environmental conditions, and/or reduced requirements for additional remediation work, both of which impact the effort to achieve the ultimate site remediation objectives. The most important step in this process is the establishment of the site remediation objectives, which principally involves selecting the best re-use option for the site. Different technological approaches and different sequences of decommissioning and remediation tasks can be taken to transform the site to achieve its intended end-state. This paper presents a framework in which decommissioning and remediation activities developed altogether (i.e., in an integrated manner) will enhance the outcomes of both tasks. (authors)

  5. Introducing passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring: Motor bike piston-bore fault identification

    Jena, D. P.; Panigrahi, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    Requirement of designing a sophisticated digital band-pass filter in acoustic based condition monitoring has been eliminated by introducing a passive acoustic filter in the present work. So far, no one has attempted to explore the possibility of implementing passive acoustic filters in acoustic based condition monitoring as a pre-conditioner. In order to enhance the acoustic based condition monitoring, a passive acoustic band-pass filter has been designed and deployed. Towards achieving an efficient band-pass acoustic filter, a generalized design methodology has been proposed to design and optimize the desired acoustic filter using multiple filter components in series. An appropriate objective function has been identified for genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization technique with multiple design constraints. In addition, the sturdiness of the proposed method has been demonstrated in designing a band-pass filter by using an n-branch Quincke tube, a high pass filter and multiple Helmholtz resonators. The performance of the designed acoustic band-pass filter has been shown by investigating the piston-bore defect of a motor-bike using engine noise signature. On the introducing a passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring reveals the enhancement in machine learning based fault identification practice significantly. This is also a first attempt of its own kind.

  6. The social effects of poor classroom acoustics on students and The District of Columbia Public Schools demonstration of support through mandating the ANSI Classroom Acoustics standard

    Ellis, Donna

    2002-11-01

    The effects that poor acoustics have on students extend beyond the classroom. This paper is to discuss the immediate and long-term results that inadequate acoustical design in the educational setting has on academic and social development and how the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) are contributing to the classroom acoustic movement. DCPS is taking a pro-active stance in educational acoustics by mandating the ANSI Draft S12.60-200X classroom acoustic standard in the transformation of ten schools a year for the next ten to fifteen years. Synthesizing the ANSI S12 standard with the DCPS Design Guidelines describes explanation of how to design for appropriate acoustics in all core-learning spaces. Examples of the existing conditions of the facilities and acoustical remediation for new and historical preservation projects will be demonstrated. In addition, experience will be shared on the International Building Code Council hearings for classroom acoustics.

  7. Acoustic lenses

    Acoustic lenses focus ultrasound to produce pencil-like beams with reduced near fields. When fitted to conventional (flat-faced) transducers, such lenses greatly improve the ability to detect and size defects. This paper describes a program developed to design acoustic lenses for use in immersion or contact inspection, using normal or angle beam mode with flat or curved targets. Lens surfaces are circular in geometry to facilitate machining. For normal beam inspection of flat plate, spherical or cylindrical lenses are used. For angle beam or curved surface inspections, a compound lens is required to correct for the extra induced aberration. Such a lens is aspherical with one radius of curvature in the plane of incidence, and a different radius of curvature in the plane perpendicular to the incident plane. The resultant beam profile (i.e., location of the acoustic focus, beam diameter, 6 dB working range) depends on the degree of focusing and the transducer used. The operating frequency and bandwidth can be affected by the instrumentation used. Theoretical and measured beam profiles are in good agreement. Various applications, from zone focusing used for defect sizing in thick plate, to line focusing for pipe weld inspection, are discussed

  8. Gamma butyrolactone (GBL) and gamma valerolactone (GVL): similarities and differences in their effects on the acoustic startle reflex and the conditioned enhancement of startle in the rat.

    Marinetti, Laureen J; Leavell, Bonita J; Jones, Calleen M; Hepler, Bradford R; Isenschmid, Daniel S; Commissaris, Randall L

    2012-06-01

    Gamma butyrolactone (GBL) is metabolized to gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in the body. GHB is a DEA Schedule 1 compound; GBL is a DEA List 1 chemical. Gamma valerolactone (GVL) is the 4-methyl analog of GBL; GVL is metabolized to 4-methyl-GHB; GVL is NOT metabolized to GBL or GHB. The effects of GBL (18.75-150 mg/kg), GVL (200-1600 mg/kg) or vehicle on the acoustic startle reflex (ASR), and the classically-conditioned enhancement of startle, the Startle Anticipated Potentiation of Startle (SAPS) response were studied in male rats. Both compounds produced a dose-dependent reduction of ASR, with GBL 5-7 times more potent than GVL. In contrast, GBL treatment significantly reduced SAPS at doses that exerted only moderate effects on ASR, whereas GVL exerted little or no effect on the SAPS, except at doses that produced pronounced reductions in Noise Alone ASR. In a second experiment, rats were tested for Noise Alone ASR behavior following treatment with a single mid-range dose of GBL (75 mg/kg), GVL (400mg/kg) or vehicle; immediately following startle testing the animals were sacrificed and their brains and blood were collected for determination of GHB, 4-methyl-GHB, GBL and GVL. GHB was found in measurable concentrations in all of the blood specimens and 6 (of 8) of the brain specimens from the GBL-treated subjects. 4-Methyl-GHB was found in measurable concentrations in all of the blood and brain specimens of the GVL-treated subjects; the change in startle amplitude was inversely correlated to the brain concentrations of these compounds. These findings confirm the differences in the metabolic fate of GBL and GVL as pro-drugs for the formation of GHB and 4-methyl-GHB, respectively. Moreover, the dissimilarity in effect profile for GBL and GVL on ASR versus SAPS behaviors suggests that different receptor(s) may be involved in mediating these behavioral effects. PMID:22349589

  9. Electrodialytic soil remediation

    Karlsmose, Bodil; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Lene;

    1999-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of how heavy metals can be found in the soil and the theory of electrodialytic remediation. Basically electrodialytic remediation works by passing electric current through the soil, and the heavy metals in ionic form will carry some of the current. Ion-exchange membranes...... prevents the protons and the hydroxides ions from the electrode processes to enter the soil. The heavy metals are collected in a concentration compartment, which is separated from the soil by ion-exchange membranes. Examples from remediation experiments are shown, and it is demonstrated that it is possible...... to remediate soil polluted with heavy metals be this method. When adding desorbing agents or complexing agents, chosing the right current density, electrolyte and membranes, the proces can be optimised for a given remediation situation. Also electroosmosis is influencing the system, and if extra...

  10. Electrodialytic soil remediation

    Karlsmose, Bodil; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Lene; Hansen, Henrik K.; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Kristensen, Iben Vernegren; Ribeiro, Alexandra J. B.; Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Villumsen, Arne

    The paper gives an overview of how heavy metals can be found in the soil and the theory of electrodialytic remediation. Basically electrodialytic remediation works by passing electric current through the soil, and the heavy metals in ionic form will carry some of the current. Ion-exchange membranes...... prevents the protons and the hydroxides ions from the electrode processes to enter the soil. The heavy metals are collected in a concentration compartment, which is separated from the soil by ion-exchange membranes. Examples from remediation experiments are shown, and it is demonstrated that it is possible...... to remediate soil polluted with heavy metals be this method. When adding desorbing agents or complexing agents, chosing the right current density, electrolyte and membranes, the proces can be optimised for a given remediation situation. Also electroosmosis is influencing the system, and if extra...

  11. Enhanced electrokinetic remediation of quinoline-contaminated soils%喹啉污染土壤的电动强化修复研究

    任大军; 周思思; 刘剑; 张元元

    2012-01-01

    Kaolin was selected as a test soil and quinoline was investigated as a typical pollutant. The characteristic of migration and its effect of quinoline in Kaolin under different voltage gradient and experimental time were studied, revealing the mechanism of using electrokinetic technology to remediate the quinoline-contaminated in soils. The results show that the electrokinetic transport processes can effectively stimulate the desorption and movement of the quinoline in the test soils. Migration rate and distance of quinoline will increase along with the voltage gradient growth under some conditions. Electromigration and electroosmosis are the main mechanisms both driving the quinoline migrate toward the cathode.%以高岭土为实验土壤,喹啉为代表污染物,研究了不同电压梯度和运行时间下土壤中喹啉的迁移特征和效果,揭示了利用电动力学技术迁移土壤中喹啉的作用机理.结果表明:电动力学过程能有效地促进土壤中喹啉的解吸附和迁移,迁移速率和距离在一定条件下随电压强度升高而增大;电渗析和电迁移是其主要作用机理,均推动喹啉向阴极移动.

  12. Sound reduction by metamaterial-based acoustic enclosure

    Shanshan Yao; Pei Li; Xiaoming Zhou; Gengkai Hu

    2014-01-01

    In many practical systems, acoustic radiation control on noise sources contained within a finite volume by an acoustic enclosure is of great importance, but difficult to be accomplished at low frequencies due to the enhanced acoustic-structure interaction. In this work, we propose to use acoustic metamaterials as the enclosure to efficiently reduce sound radiation at their negative-mass frequencies. Based on a circularly-shaped metamaterial model, sound radiation properties by either central ...

  13. Physiochemical technologies for HCB remediation and disposal: A review

    Tong, Man [State Key Lab of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Environmental Science Research Institute, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yuan, Songhu, E-mail: yuansonghu622@hotmail.com [State Key Lab of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2012-08-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCB contamination is still a serious environmental problem. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physiochemical technologies for HCB remediation and disposal are reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perspectives for most remediation technologies are proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot and large scale remediation and disposal are presented. - Abstract: Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is one of the 12 persistent organic pollutants (POPs) listed in 'Stockholm Convention'. It is hydrophobic, toxic and persistent in the environment. Due to extensive use in the past, HCB contamination is still a serious environmental problem. Strong adsorption on solid particles makes the remediation difficult. This paper presents an overview of the physiochemical technologies for HCB remediation and disposal. The adsorption/desorption behavior of HCB is firstly described because it comprises the fundamental for most remediation technologies. Physiochemical technologies concerned mostly for HCB remediation and disposal, i.e., chemical enhanced washing, electrokinetic remediation, reductive dechlorination and thermal decomposition, are reviewed in terms of fundamentals, state of the art and perspectives. The other physiochemical technologies including chemical oxidation, radiation induced catalytic dechlorination, ultrasonic assisted treatment and mechanochemical dechlorination are also reviewed. The pilot and large scale tests on HCB remediation or disposal are summarized in the end. This review aims to provide useful information to researchers and practitioners regarding HCB remediation and disposal.

  14. Aquatic environmental remediation approaches

    The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant's nuclear accident contaminated a significant portion of Fukushima Prefecture, and environmental remediation activities have been performed. To reduce the human exposure to the radiation induced by the nuclear contamination, one can reduce the radiation level in the environment, and/or eliminate radionuclide pathways to humans. This paper presents some case studies that are relevant to the Fukushima case. These examples include the Chernobyl nuclear accident's environmental and remediation assessments, U.S. Hanford environmental remediation activities, and the pesticide remediation assessment for the James River Estuary, Virginia, U.S.A. 1-D TODAM, 2-D FETRA and 3-D FLESCOT codes have been applied to the surface waters. TODAM code is currently being applied to the Ukedo and Takase rivers in Fukushima to predict cesium-137 migration in these rivers. A lesson learned from these experiences is that to achieve the effective clean-up, remediation decision makers must include knowledgeable scientists and competent engineers, so that environmental remediation activities are based on a scientifically-valid approach for a given contaminated location. Local participation to the remediation decision making is critically important. (author)

  15. REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOILS BY SOLVENT FLUSHING

    Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. This technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, ...

  16. Electrodialytic remediation of copper mine tailings

    Hansen, Henrik K.; Rojo, A.; Ottpsen, Lisbeth M.

    2005-01-01

    electrodialytic remediation experiments on copper mine tailings. The results show that electric current could remove copper from watery tailing if the potential gradient was higher than 2V/cm during 21 days. With addition of sulphuric acid, the process was enhanced because the pH decreased to around 4, and the...

  17. Alkaline electrolyte circulation enhanced electrokinetic remediation of fluorine-contaminated Soils%碱液循环强化电动力学修复氟污染土壤

    朱书法; 杜锦屏; 索美玉; 闫春丽

    2009-01-01

    1 V·cm~(-1)电解电压下,利用去离子水及NaOH溶液做电解液,研究了电解液不同循环方式下土壤氟在电动力学作用下的迁移特征,分析了利用碱液循环强化电动力学技术修复氟污染土壤的可行性.结果表明,以去离子水为电解液单独循环时,土壤氟的去除率为20.3%,而以NaOH溶液为电解液时去除率最高可达57.3%,碱性电解液可提高土壤氟的去除率,且随着碱性的增强土壤氟的去除率逐渐升高.电解液的不同循环方式也对土壤氟的去除产生显著影响,两极溶液串联循环时土壤氟的去除率明显升高.可以采用碱液循环强化电动力学技术修复氟污染土壤.%Deionized water and NaOH solution being used as electrolyte with 1 V·cm~(-1) voltage gradient, an experimental study was carried out in order to determine the characteristics of migration of soil fluorine in the electrokinetic process under different circula-tion manner of electrolyte. The feasibility of electrokinetic remediation of fluorine-contaminated soil enhanced by alkaline electrolyte circulation was analyzed. The results show that when deionized water is used as the electrolyte and circulates separately, the removal rate of fluorine is only 20.3%. When NaOH solution is employed as the electrolyte, the removal rote is up to 57.3%. Alkaline elec-trolyte can effectively promote the removal rate of fluorine in soil and the removal rate increases with the alkalinity of the electrolyte. Different circulation manner of electrolyte has a significant effect on the removal of fluorine in soil. The removal rate of fluorine in soil is markedly increased when catholyte and anolyte circulate in series. Alkaline electrolyte circulation enhanced electroldnetic method can be applied to remediate fluorine-contaminated soils.

  18. Environmental Remediation Data Management Tools

    Computer software tools for data management can improve site characterization, planning and execution of remediation projects. This paper discusses the use of two such products that have primarily been used within the nuclear power industry to enhance the capabilities of radiation protection department operations. Advances in digital imaging, web application development and programming technologies have made development of these tools possible. The Interactive Visual Tour System (IVTS) allows the user to easily create and maintain a comprehensive catalog containing digital pictures of the remediation site. Pictures can be cataloged in groups (termed ''tours'') that can be organized either chronologically or spatially. Spatial organization enables the user to ''walk around'' the site and view desired areas or components instantly. Each photo is linked to a map (floor plan, topographical map, elevation drawing, etc.) with graphics displaying the location on the map and any available tour/component links. Chronological organization enables the user to view the physical results of the remediation efforts over time. Local and remote management teams can view these pictures at any time and from any location. The Visual Survey Data System (VSDS) allows users to record survey and sample data directly on photos and/or maps of areas and/or components. As survey information is collected for each area, survey data trends can be reviewed for any repetitively measured location or component. All data is stored in a Quality Assurance (Q/A) records database with reference to its physical sampling point on the site as well as other information to support the final closeout report for the site. The ease of use of these web-based products has allowed nuclear power plant clients to plan outage work from their desktop and realize significant savings with respect to dose and cost. These same tools are invaluable for remediation and decommissioning planning of any scale and for recording

  19. Remedial action planning for Trench 1

    The accelerated action to remove the depleted uranium chips and associated soils and wastes from Trench 1 at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) will begin in June 1998. To ensure that the remedial action is conducted safely, a rigorous and disciplined planning process was followed that incorporates the principles of Integrated Safety Management and Enhanced Work Planning. Critical to the success of the planning was early involvement of project staff (salaried and hourly) and associated technical support groups and disciplines. Feedback was and will continue to be solicited, and lessons learned incorporated to ensure the safe remediation of this site

  20. Duct Remediation Program

    The Duct Remediation Program was established in March of 1990 to identify and remediate sections of plutonium contaminated ductwork in existing Plutonium Fabrication and Recovery Facilities at Rocky Flats near Golden, Colorado. The program was implemented as a result of non-destructive assay measurements which identified areas of significant holdup accumulations. These facilities housed plutonium operations for over 30 years and included processes such as foundries, machining, and plutonium transfer/storage. The Secretary of Energy defined the criteria for remediation success as ''...as low as practicable, but in no case greater than 400 grams of plutonium in any single upward flow path in a glovebox exhaust system...'' This criteria was additionally restricted to include a non-destructive measurement uncertainty of 100 percent. The remediation project also had to comply with the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 90-6. The ''As Low As Practicable'' criteria became the programmatic goal and the basis of the research and operation that occurred over a two year period. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders provided design and safety criteria bounding the engineering methods used in program development. A Mockup and Test Facility was established for the conception and refinement of holdup material characterization, tool manipulation, remediation equipment, duct access, and operational procedures. With these items in place the remediation operation was implemented and carried through to completion

  1. Diagnostic Values of Plain and Contrast-enhanced MRI to Mini and Small Size Acoustic Neuroma%MRI平扫加增强检查对微型、小型听神经瘤的诊断价值

    孙兴旺; 袁涛

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate diagnostic values of enhanced MR imaging to mini and small size acoustic neuroma. Materials and methods 13 cases with mini-size acoustic neuroma (d < 10mm) and 19 cases with small size acoustic neuroma (10enhanced MRI were performed. The images were retrospectively analyzed, and boundaries, signals and adjacengt structures were compared. Results 32 cases with mini and small size acoustic neuroma showed obvious enhancement in Gd-DTPA scanning, and the location, signal, adjacent structures of masses showed more clearly. Masses showed equal or low signal on T1WI, high signal on T2WI. There were no enlargement of offected canal. 11 cases located in internal auditory canal, and the size of tumors were about 0.3-1.2mm, average 0. 54mm. 3cases located in auditory nerve, T1WI and T2WI showed thickened auditory nerves, but no abnormal signals, and the tumors showed flaky enhancement. Tumors of 18 cases were mostly located in internal auditory canal, small parts of them out into cerebellopontine angle, and the size were 0.8-2.0mm, average 1.24mm. Conclusion Conventional and contrast-enhanced MRI is the most effective examination to prevent missed diagnosis of mini and small size acoustic neuroma, and the diagnosis is accurate and reliable.%目的 评价增强MRI对微型、小型听神经瘤的诊断价值.材料和方法 本文收集了经手术和病理证实的微型听神经瘤13例(d≤10mm),小型听神经瘤19例(10<d≤20mm),男15例,女17例,年龄33-61岁,平均41.8岁,采用Signa HDX 3.0T MRI超导型MR系统平扫及增强扫描,对其影像学表现进行回顾性分析,对肿瘤病灶边缘、信号、邻近结构关系进行比较.结果 32例微、小型听神经瘤Gd-DTPA扫描呈明显强化,病灶的位置、边缘及邻近

  2. Extraordinary acoustic transmission through annuluses in air and its applications in acoustic beam splitter and concentrator.

    Ge, Yong; Sun, Hong-Xiang; Liu, Shu-Sen; Yuan, Shou-Qi; Xia, Jian-Ping; Guan, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Shu-Yi

    2016-08-01

    We report an extraordinary acoustic transmission through two layer annuluses made of metal cylinders in air both numerically and experimentally. The effect arises from the enhancement and reconstruction of the incident source induced by different Mie-resonance modes of the annuluses. The proposed system takes advantages of the consistency in the waveform between the input and output waves, the high amplitude amplification of output waves, and the easy adjustment of structure. More interestingly, we investigate the applications of the extraordinary acoustic transmission in the acoustic beam splitter and acoustic concentrator. Our finding should have an impact on ultrasonic applications. PMID:27587144

  3. Acoustic hemostasis

    Crum, L.; Andrew, M.; Bailey, M.; Beach, K.; Brayman, A.; Curra, F.; Kaczkowski, P.; Kargl, S.; Martin, R.; Vaezy, S.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past several years, the Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound (CIMU) at the Applied Physics Laboratory in the University of Washington has undertaken a broad research program in the general area of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Our principal emphasis has been on the use of HIFU to induce hemostasis; in particular, CIMU has sought to develop a small, lightweight, portable device that would use ultrasound for both imaging and therapy. Such a technology is needed because nearly 50% of combat casualty mortality results from exsanguinations, or uncontrolled bleeding. A similar percentage occurs for civilian death due to trauma. In this general review, a presentation of the general problem will be given, as well as our recent approaches to the development of an image-guided, transcutaneous, acoustic hemostasis device. [Work supported in part by the USAMRMC, ONR and the NIH.

  4. Acoustic telemetry.

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  5. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available Educational Video Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video ... for pre- and post-treatment acoustic neuroma patients. Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic ...

  6. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...

  7. CT findings of acoustic neuroma

    Sim, Do Choul; Lee, Jae Mun; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Computed Tomography (CT) is very accurate in evaluating the location, size, shape and extension of acoustic neuroma. We analysed CT findings of 23 acoustic neuromas seen at Department of Radiology, Kangnam St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University Medical College during the period of from January 1981 to June 1987. 1. Five (22%) were men and 18 (78%) were women with the high incidence occurring in the 4th and 5th decades. 2. Twenty two cases were diagnosed satisfactorily by CT examinations which included axial, coronal and reconstruction images. One with the smallest dimension of 8 mm in diameter could not be detected by the conventional CT scan. But is could be seen after metrizamide cisternography. mean size of the tumor masses was estimated 3.6 cm in diameter. 3. The shape of the tumor was oval in 50%, round in 27% and lobulated in 23%. The masses were presented as hypodense in 50%, isodense in 32% and hyperdense in 18%. All tumors were extended from the internal acoustic and toward the cerebellopontine angle. The internal acoustic canal was widened in 77%. Hydrocephalus was associated in 45%. Widening of cerebellopontine angle cistern was noted in 50%. 4. After contrast infusion the tumors were enhanced markedly in 45%, moderately in 32% and mildly in 23%. The enhanced pattern was homogeneous in 41%, mixed in 41% and rim in 18%. The margin of the tumors was sharply defined in 82%. The tumors were attached to the petrous bone with acute angle in 73%. Cystic change within the tumor was found in 27%. The peritumoral edema was noted in 45%. In conclusion, CT is of most effective modalities to evaluate size, shape, extent and internal architecture of acoustic neuroma as well as relationship with adjacent anatomic structures including the internal acoustic canal.

  8. Acoustic dispersive prism

    Hussein Esfahlani; Sami Karkar; Herve Lissek; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic ...

  9. Restructuring reward processing with Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement: novel therapeutic mechanisms to remediate hedonic dysregulation in addiction, stress, and pain.

    Garland, Eric L

    2016-06-01

    Though valuation processes are fundamental to survival of the human species, hedonic dysregulation is at the root of an array of maladies, including addiction, stress, and chronic pain, as evidenced by the allostatic shift in the relative salience of natural reward to drug reward observed among persons with severe substance use disorders. To address this crucial problem, novel interventions are needed to restore hedonic regulatory processes gone awry in persons exhibiting addictive behaviors. This article describes a theoretical rationale and empirical evidence for the effects of one such new intervention, Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE), on top-down and bottom-up mechanisms implicated in cognitive control and hedonic regulation. MORE is innovative and distinct from extant mindfulness-based interventions in that it unites traditional mindfulness meditation with reappraisal and savoring strategies designed to reverse the downward shift in salience of natural reward relative to drug reward, representing a crucial tipping point to disrupt the progression of addiction-a mechanistic target that no other behavioral intervention has been designed to address. Though additional studies are needed, clinical and biobehavioral data from several completed and ongoing trials suggest that MORE may exert salutary effects on addictive behaviors and the neurobiological processes that underpin them. PMID:27037786

  10. Enhanced proliferation of fibroblasts and endothelial cells treated with an extract of the leaves of Chromolaena odorata (Eupolin), an herbal remedy for treating wounds.

    Phan, T T; Hughes, M A; Cherry, G W

    1998-03-01

    Burns are a major problem in many developing countries. Eupolin ointment is a topical agent used in the treatment of soft-tissue wounds and burns in Vietnam and is made from an aqueous extract of the leaves of Chromolaena odorata (formerly Eupatorium odoratum). Clinical studies using this extract have shown antimicrobial and anticoagulation effects as well as the promotion of tissue remodeling in the wound healing process. However, the mechanism by which this agent affects cells involved in the wound healing process is unknown. In our research, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, two cell types that play a crucial role in wound healing, were used to investigate some of the effects of Eupolin extract in vitro. Cell growth was estimated by a colorimetric assay at different time intervals. Enhanced growth of fibroblasts and endothelial cells was found at concentrations of 10 microg/ml and 100 microg/ml of Eupolin extract. This was particularly evident in medium supplemented with only 0.5% fetal calf serum where the cells were quiescent. Toxicity of the extract to fibroblasts was observed at 250 microg/ml in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/0.5% fetal calf serum, but there was no significant damage at this dose to the endothelial cells. The results of the study demonstrated that Eupolin extract increased fibroblast and endothelial cell growth, and this could explain in part the beneficial clinical effects that have been observed. PMID:9500394

  11. Site Remediation in Practice

    This paper describes the remediation of a former uranium mining area in Hungary. The work was carried out using stringent quality controls and special attention was paid to the radiological survey during the cleanup works on the roads, on pipe lines and yards, on the mill site and places used earlier for heap leaching. Groundwater quality control and the related groundwater quality restoration were the most important aspects of the post remediation phase which was aimed at the long term protection of the nearby drinking water aquifer. The expenditure for the remediation was approximately $100 million. The estimated cost for long term monitoring and water treatment is about US $4 million/year. (author)

  12. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  13. Acoustic Neurinomas

    Mohammad Faraji Rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuromas (AN are schwann cell-derived tumors that commonly arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve also known as vestibular schwannoma(VS causes unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and unsteadiness. In many cases, the tumor size may remain unchanged for many years following diagnosis, which is typically made by MRI. In the majority of cases the tumor is small, leaving the clinician and patient with the options of either serial scanning or active treatment by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR or microneurosurgery. Despite the vast number of published treatment reports, comparative studies are few. The predominant clinical endpoints of AN treatment include tumor control, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Less focus has been put on symptom relief and health-related quality of life (QOL. It is uncertain if treating a small tumor leaves the patient with a better chance of obtaining relief from future hearing loss, vertigo or tinnitus than by observing it without treatment.   In this paper we review the literature for the natural course, the treatment alternatives and the results of AN. Finally, we present our experience with a management strategy applied for more than 30 years.

  14. Acoustic Spatiality

    Brandon LaBelle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of listening can be appreciated as intensely relational, bringing us into contact with surrounding events, bodies and things. Given that sound propagates and expands outwardly, as a set of oscillations from a particular source, listening carries with it a sensual intensity, whereby auditory phenomena deliver intrusive and disruptive as well as soothing and assuring experiences. The physicality characteristic of sound suggests a deeply impressionistic, locational "knowledge structure" – that is, the ways in which listening affords processes of exchange, of being in the world, and from which we extend ourselves. Sound, as physical energy reflecting and absorbing into the materiality around us, and even one's self, provides a rich platform for understanding place and emplacement. Sound is always already a trace of location.Such features of auditory experience give suggestion for what I may call an acoustical paradigm – how sound sets in motion not only the material world but also the flows of the imagination, lending to forces of signification and social structure, and figuring us in relation to each other. The relationality of sound brings us into a steady web of interferences, each of which announces the promise or problematic of being somewhere.

  15. Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT) enhances the therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel and Abraxane® for treatment of human prostate adenocarcinoma in mice.

    van Wamel, Annemieke; Sontum, Per Christian; Healey, Andrew; Kvåle, Svein; Bush, Nigel; Bamber, Jeffrey; de Lange Davies, Catharina

    2016-08-28

    Acoustic cluster therapy (ACT) is a novel approach for ultrasound mediated, targeted drug delivery. In the current study, we have investigated ACT in combination with paclitaxel and Abraxane® for treatment of a subcutaneous human prostate adenocarcinoma (PC3) in mice. In combination with paclitaxel (12mg/kg given i.p.), ACT induced a strong increase in therapeutic efficacy; 120days after study start, 42% of the animals were in stable, complete remission vs. 0% for the paclitaxel only group and the median survival was increased by 86%. In combination with Abraxane® (12mg paclitaxel/kg given i.v.), ACT induced a strong increase in the therapeutic efficacy; 60days after study start 100% of the animals were in stable, remission vs. 0% for the Abraxane® only group, 120days after study start 67% of the animals were in stable, complete remission vs. 0% for the Abraxane® only group. For the ACT+Abraxane group 100% of the animals were alive after 120days vs. 0% for the Abraxane® only group. Proof of concept for Acoustic Cluster Therapy has been demonstrated; ACT markedly increases the therapeutic efficacy of both paclitaxel and Abraxane® for treatment of human prostate adenocarcinoma in mice. PMID:27297780

  16. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  17. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton;

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design for the...... acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design was...... simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  18. Electrodialytic Soil Remediation

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Lene; Hansen, Henrik K.;

    1997-01-01

    It is not possible for all heavy metal polluted soils to remediate it by an applied electric field alone. A desorbing agent must in different cases be added to the soil in order to make the process possible or to make it cost effective......It is not possible for all heavy metal polluted soils to remediate it by an applied electric field alone. A desorbing agent must in different cases be added to the soil in order to make the process possible or to make it cost effective...

  19. Solutions Remediate Contaminated Groundwater

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, NASA workers used chlorinated solvents to clean rocket engine components at launch sites. These solvents, known as dense non-aqueous phase liquids, had contaminated launch facilities to the point of near-irreparability. Dr. Jacqueline Quinn and Dr. Kathleen Brooks Loftin of Kennedy Space Center partnered with researchers from the University of Central Florida's chemistry and engineering programs to develop technology capable of remediating the area without great cost or further environmental damage. They called the new invention Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron (EZVI). The groundwater remediation compound is cleaning up polluted areas all around the world and is, to date, NASA's most licensed technology.

  20. Active in-situ petroleum hydrocarbon remediation in discontinuous permafrost : practical experience and lessons learned

    Brown, M. [WorleyParsons Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The active in-situ petroleum hydrocarbon remediation in discontinuous permafrost was presented as practical experience and lessons learned. The presentation provided background information on permafrost, the site characterization phase, and conceptual site model. Remedial options analysis, permeability enhancement, and full scale remediation system were discussed. Remediation options that were presented included: impacted soil; excavation and landfill; excavation and biocell; soil vapour extraction (SVE); and dual phase extraction (DPE). The remediation strategy of SVE and DPE was outlined, with particular reference to full scale DPE remediation; enhancing limited permeability; remediation trench installation; radius of influence; trench potential radius of influence; and fluid and vapour gathering system. The presentation also discussed challenges and lessons learned regarding seasonal operation; permafrost encroachment into trenches; flammable vapours; downhole pump freezing over time; and variable performance and balancing flows. tabs., figs.

  1. Acoustic Fresnel lenses with extraordinary transmission

    Molerón, Miguel; Serra-Garcia, Marc; Daraio, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically and experimentally highly efficient acoustic lenses based on the principle of extraordinary acoustic transmission. We study circular, flat lenses composed of perforated air channels. The geometry is similar to binary Fresnel lenses, and the lenses exploit several resonance mechanisms to enhance the transmission, such as Fabry–Perot resonances in the channels and cavity resonances on the lens surface. The proposed lenses are able to transmit up to 83% of the incident...

  2. Remediation and Reuse of Soils

    Zihms, Stephanie; Switzer, Christine; Tarantino, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    Links between contaminant remediation and impacts on soil properties have not been explored in a systematic way. Most remediation studies focus on the effectiveness of the remediation process. Contamination and remediation can have significant effects on soil properties and function. Considering that in most remediation cases the soil will be re-used in some way, it is important to understand the effects of the remediation process on soil properties and the post-remediation soil behaviour. This understanding can help to determine the best re-use of the soil and therefore improve post-remediation site development. Laboratory experiments on coal tar contaminated soil treated with smouldering remediation show that thermal treatments affect a variety of soil properties ranging from mineralogical composition, particle size distribution, and pH. Dynamic responses like permeability and shear strength are impacted as well and these responses are linked to the changes in soil properties. Soil permeability, capillary rise, and contact angle change dramatically after this remediation process, indicating some degree of hydrophobicity and significant implications for water movement through the post-remediation soil. The observed changes in permeability are linked to physical changes to the soil grain surface combined with small amounts (residue. Decoupling these effects is essential to understanding the extent of impact remediation processes have on long-term soil function. While chemical residue within the pores can be removed through "polishing" remediation steps, physical changes are likely to be permanent. Physical changes and chemical residue also have important implications with respect to the response of the soil under shear. These observed changes indicate that the remediated soil and its behaviour should be considered by remediation research. Monitoring of soil properties and behaviour during aggressive remediation can improve prediction of changes to infiltration

  3. 2014 Ohio Remediation Report

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In fulfillment of Ohio Revised Code 3333.041 (A) (1) the Chancellor has published a listing by school district of the number of the 2013 high school graduates who attended a state institution of higher education in academic year 2013-2014 and the percentage of each district's graduates required by the institution to enroll in a remedial course in…

  4. Catalysts for Environmental Remediation

    Abrams, B. L.; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2013-01-01

    The properties of catalysts used in environmental remediation are described here through specific examples in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis. In the area of heterogeneous catalysis, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx was used as an example reaction with vanadia and tungsta on...

  5. Remediation for contaminated soils

    Kivekaes, L. [Lohja Envirotec, Helsinki (Finland)

    2000-07-01

    A versatile remediation centre for contaminated soils has operated at Virkkala close to Helsinki since 1998. It is the first regional soil remediation centre in Finland and serves a large area in south- western Finland. Contaminated soils are collected from tens of small and large sites each year and transported to Virkkala for a very high class and environmentally safe treatment under controlled conditions. The centre consists of a 2 ha large hall for storage and treatment of the soils, a 1 ha outside bio-remediation field and a service and truck washing hall. Three treatment technologies are available at the centre: Stabilization/solidification, washing and bio-remediation. With these methods all the most common types of contamination can be treated: Heavy metals, oils, PAHs, creosotes and chlorophenols. Special care has been taken with prevention of environmental emissions, because the centre is located close to a housing area and on a lake-front. All the storage and treatment areas are covered with a double or triple bottom liner system and all environmental emissions are being monitored constantly. EU's Life Environment -fund has supported the project. (orig.)

  6. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS trademark) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB's as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology

  7. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask ... Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask ...

  8. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Join/Renew ... ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Search ANAUSA. ...

  9. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Join/Renew Ways to Give ANA Discussion Forum ... ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Search ANAUSA.org Connect with us! Educational Video ...

  10. Cystic acoustic neuromas

    Chitkara, Naveen; Chanda, Rakesh; Yadav, S. P. S.; N.K. Sharma

    2002-01-01

    Predominantly cystic acoustic neuromas are rare and they usually present with clinical and radiological features different from their more common solid counterparts. Two cases of cystic acoustic neuromas are reported here.