WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustic-radiation-force-driven shear wave

  1. Shear Alfven waves in tokamaks

    Shear Alfven waves in an axisymmetric tokamak are examined within the framework of the linearized ideal MHD equations. Properties of the shear Alfven continuous spectrum are studied both analytically and numerically. Implications of these results in regards to low frequency rf heating of toroidally confined plasmas are discussed. The structure of the spatial singularities associated with these waves is determined. A reduced set of ideal MHD equations is derived to describe these waves in a very low beta plasma

  2. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves.

    Salhi, A; Lehner, T; Godeferd, F; Cambon, C

    2012-02-01

    We present a spectral linear analysis in terms of advected Fourier modes to describe the behavior of a fluid submitted to four constraints: shear (with rate S), rotation (with angular velocity Ω), stratification, and magnetic field within the linear spectral theory or the shearing box model in astrophysics. As a consequence of the fact that the base flow must be a solution of the Euler-Boussinesq equations, only radial and/or vertical density gradients can be taken into account. Ertel's theorem no longer is valid to show the conservation of potential vorticity, in the presence of the Lorentz force, but a similar theorem can be applied to a potential magnetic induction: The scalar product of the density gradient by the magnetic field is a Lagrangian invariant for an inviscid and nondiffusive fluid. The linear system with a minimal number of solenoidal components, two for both velocity and magnetic disturbance fields, is eventually expressed as a four-component inhomogeneous linear differential system in which the buoyancy scalar is a combination of solenoidal components (variables) and the (constant) potential magnetic induction. We study the stability of such a system for both an infinite streamwise wavelength (k(1) = 0, axisymmetric disturbances) and a finite one (k(1) ≠ 0, nonaxisymmetric disturbances). In the former case (k(1) = 0), we recover and extend previous results characterizing the magnetorotational instability (MRI) for combined effects of radial and vertical magnetic fields and combined effects of radial and vertical density gradients. We derive an expression for the MRI growth rate in terms of the stratification strength, which indicates that purely radial stratification can inhibit the MRI instability, while purely vertical stratification cannot completely suppress the MRI instability. In the case of nonaxisymmetric disturbances (k(1) ≠ 0), we only consider the effect of vertical stratification, and we use Levinson's theorem to demonstrate the

  3. Seismic shear waves as Foucault pendulum

    Snieder, Roel; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Ruigrok, Elmer; Shiomi, Katsuhiko

    2016-03-01

    Earth's rotation causes splitting of normal modes. Wave fronts and rays are, however, not affected by Earth's rotation, as we show theoretically and with observations made with USArray. We derive that the Coriolis force causes a small transverse component for P waves and a small longitudinal component for S waves. More importantly, Earth's rotation leads to a slow rotation of the transverse polarization of S waves; during the propagation of S waves the particle motion behaves just like a Foucault pendulum. The polarization plane of shear waves counteracts Earth's rotation and rotates clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere. The rotation rate is independent of the wave frequency and is purely geometric, like the Berry phase. Using the polarization of ScS and ScS2 waves, we show that the Foucault-like rotation of the S wave polarization can be observed. This can affect the determination of source mechanisms and the interpretation of observed SKS splitting.

  4. A new method for shear wave speed estimation in shear wave elastography.

    Engel, Aaron J; Bashford, Gregory R

    2015-12-01

    Visualization of mechanical properties of tissue can aid in noninvasive pathology diagnosis. Shear wave elastography (SWE) measures the elastic properties of soft tissues by estimation of local shear wave propagation speed. In this paper, a new robust method for estimation of shear wave speed is introduced which has the potential for simplifying continuous filtering and real-time elasticity processing. Shear waves were generated by external mechanical excitation and imaged at a high frame rate. Three homogeneous phantoms of varying elastic moduli and one inclusion phantom were imaged. Waves propagating in separate directions were filtered and shear wave speed was estimated by inversion of the 1-D first-order wave equation. Final 2-D shear wave speed maps were constructed by weighted averaging of estimates from opposite traveling directions. Shear wave speed results for phantoms with gelatin concentrations of 5%, 7%, and 9% were 1.52 ± 0.10 m/s, 1.86 ± 0.10 m/s, and 2.37 ± 0.15 m/s, respectively, which were consistent with estimates computed from three other conventional methods, as well as compression tests done with a commercial texture analyzer. The method was shown to be able to reconstruct a 2-D speed map of an inclusion phantom with good image quality and variance comparable to conventional methods. Suggestions for further work are given. PMID:26670851

  5. Shear wave speed and dispersion measurements using crawling wave chirps.

    Hah, Zaegyoo; Partin, Alexander; Parker, Kevin J

    2014-10-01

    This article demonstrates the measurement of shear wave speed and shear speed dispersion of biomaterials using a chirp signal that launches waves over a range of frequencies. A biomaterial is vibrated by two vibration sources that generate shear waves inside the medium, which is scanned by an ultrasound imaging system. Doppler processing of the acquired signal produces an image of the square of vibration amplitude that shows repetitive constructive and destructive interference patterns called "crawling waves." With a chirp vibration signal, successive Doppler frames are generated from different source frequencies. Collected frames generate a distinctive pattern which is used to calculate the shear speed and shear speed dispersion. A special reciprocal chirp is designed such that the equi-phase lines of a motion slice image are straight lines. Detailed analysis is provided to generate a closed-form solution for calculating the shear wave speed and the dispersion. Also several phantoms and an ex vivo human liver sample are scanned and the estimation results are presented. PMID:24658144

  6. Propagation of waves in shear flows

    Fabrikant, A L

    1998-01-01

    The state of the art in a theory of oscillatory and wave phenomena in hydrodynamical flows is presented in this book. A unified approach is used for waves of different physical origins. A characteristic feature of this approach is that hydrodynamical phenomena are considered in terms of physics; that is, the complement of the conventionally employed formal mathematical approach. Some physical concepts such as wave energy and momentum in a moving fluid are analysed, taking into account induced mean flow. The physical mechanisms responsible for hydrodynamic instability of shear flows are conside

  7. Surface Shear, Persistent Wave Groups and Rogue Waves

    Chafin, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of waves with surface flows by considering the full set of conserved quantities, subtle but important surface elevations induced by wave packets and by directly considering the necessary forces to prevent packet spreading in the deep water limit. Narrow surface shear flows are shown to exert strong localizing and stabilizing forces on wavepackets to maintain their strength and amplify their intensity even in the linear regime. Necessary criticisms of some earlier notions of stress and angular momentum of waves are included and we argue that nonlinearity enters the system in a way that makes the formation of rogue waves nonperturbative. Quantitative bounds on the surface shear flow necessary to stabilize packets of any wave amplitude are given.

  8. Horizontal Shear Wave Imaging of Large Optics

    Quarry, M J

    2007-09-05

    When complete the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be the world's largest and most energetic laser and will be capable of achieving for the first time fusion ignition in the laboratory. Detecting optics features within the laser beamlines and sizing them at diameters of 0.1 mm to 10 mm allows timely decisions concerning refurbishment and will help with the routine operation of the system. Horizontally polarized shear waves at 10 MHz were shown to accurately detect, locate, and size features created by laser operations from 0.5 mm to 8 mm by placing sensors at the edge of the optic. The shear wave technique utilizes highly directed beams. The outer edge of an optic can be covered with shear wave transducers on four sides. Each transducer sends a pulse into the optic and any damage reflects the pulse back to the transmitter. The transducers are multiplexed, and the collected time waveforms are enveloped and replicated across the width of the element. Multiplying the data sets from four directions produces a map of reflected amplitude to the fourth power, which images the surface of the optic. Surface area can be measured directly from the image, and maximum depth was shown to be correlated to maximum amplitude of the reflected waveform.

  9. The stability of Rossby waves in a stratified shear fluid

    Tan, Benkui

    1990-11-01

    An investigation is undertaken of the stability of linear Rossby waves in a stratified shear fluid by means of a qualitative theory employing ordinary differential equations. It is noted that, while the basic current has no detectable shear, the Rossby waves are always stable. If the basic current possesses only horizontal shear, the unstable criterion for waves takes one form, but it takes entirely another in the case where the basic current possesses only vertical shear.

  10. Surface gravity waves in deep fluid at vertical shear flows

    Gogoberidze, G.; Samushia, L.; Chagelishvili, G. D.; Lominadze, J. G.; Horton, W

    2005-01-01

    Special features of surface gravity waves in deep fluid flow with constant vertical shear of velocity is studied. It is found that the mean flow velocity shear leads to non-trivial modification of surface gravity wave modes dispersive characteristics. Moreover, the shear induces generation of surface gravity waves by internal vortex mode perturbations. The performed analytical and numerical study provides, that surface gravity waves are effectively generated by the internal perturbations at h...

  11. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere. PMID:24606251

  12. Wave-front recovery from two orthogonal sheared interferograms

    Servin, M.; Malacara, Daniel; Marroquin, J. L.

    1996-08-01

    We present a new technique for using the information of two orthogonal lateral-shear interferograms to estimate an aspheric wave front. The wave-front estimation from sheared inteferometric data may be considered an ill-posed problem in the sense of Hadamard. We apply Thikonov regularization theory to estimate the wave front that has produced the lateral sheared interferograms as the minimizer of a positive definite-quadratic cost functional. The introduction of the regularization term permits one to find a well-defined and stable solution to the inverse shearing problem over the wave-front aperture as well as to reduce wave-front noise as desired.

  13. From supersonic shear wave imaging to full-field optical coherence shear wave elastography

    Nahas, Amir; Tanter, Mickaël; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Fink, Mathias; Claude Boccara, A.

    2013-12-01

    Elasticity maps of tissue have proved to be particularly useful in providing complementary contrast to ultrasonic imaging, e.g., for cancer diagnosis at the millimeter scale. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers an endogenous contrast based on singly backscattered optical waves. Adding complementary contrast to OCT images by recording elasticity maps could also be valuable in improving OCT-based diagnosis at the microscopic scale. Static elastography has been successfully coupled with full-field OCT (FF-OCT) in order to realize both micrometer-scale sectioning and elasticity maps. Nevertheless, static elastography presents a number of drawbacks, mainly when stiffness quantification is required. Here, we describe the combination of two methods: transient elastography, based on speed measurements of shear waves induced by ultrasonic radiation forces, and FF-OCT, an en face OCT approach using an incoherent light source. The use of an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner and an ultrafast camera working at 10,000 to 30,000 images/s made it possible to follow shear wave propagation with both modalities. As expected, FF-OCT is found to be much more sensitive than ultrafast ultrasound to tiny shear vibrations (a few nanometers and micrometers, respectively). Stiffness assessed in gel phantoms and an ex vivo rat brain by FF-OCT is found to be in good agreement with ultrasound shear wave elastography.

  14. Coupling of sound and internal waves in shear flows

    Gravity waves in the parallel shear flow of a continuously stratified compressible fluid are considered. It is demonstrated that the shear induces a coupling between the sound waves and the internal gravity waves. The conditions for the effectiveness of the coupling are defined and a corresponding linear mechanism of wave transformation and energy transfer between the modes is described. It is also shown that, under suitable conditions, beat waves can be generated. (author). 28 refs, 5 figs

  15. Shear Wave Splitting Beneath the Galapagos Archipelago

    Fontaine, F. R.; Burkett, P. G.; Hooft, E. E.; Toomey, D. R.; Solomon, S. C.; Silver, P. G.

    2004-12-01

    We report measurements of teleseismic shear wave splitting in the Galápagos Archipelago. The inferred lateral variations in azimuthal anisotropy allow us to examine the dynamics of an evolving hotspot-ridge system. The data are from SKS and SKKS phases, as well as S waves from deep sources, recorded by a relatively dense network of 10 portable broadband seismometers deployed from 1999 to 2003 for the IGUANA (Imaging Galápagos Upwelling and Neotectonics of the Archipelago) experiment and from the GSN broadband station in Santa Cruz (PAYG). We find a delay time between fast and slow shear waves of 0.4 to 0.9 s and fast polarization directions of N85-90° E beneath five stations at the leading and southern edge of the archipelago. Despite clear seismic signals, we did not find any anisotropy at the six stations located in the interior of the archipelago. For those stations that show shear wave splitting, there is an increase in the delay time toward the expected location of the Galápagos hotspot at the western edge of the archipelago. With the exception of Española, fast polarization directions (N85-90° E) are close to the current direction of absolute plate motion of the overlying Nazca plate (N91° E). The lack of azimuthal anisotropy in the interior of the archipelago is interpreted as an absence of strongly oriented mantle fabric beneath these stations. The apparent isotropy in this dynamic region, where we expect considerable mantle strain, is surprising. It is not likely that the olivine a-axis is oriented vertically beneath the interior of the archipelago as the Galápagos plume is thought to lie at the western edge. It is also unlikely that there are two layers of perpendicularly-oriented anisotropy which are solely confined to the center of the archipelago. However, there appears to be some correlation between the region of apparent isotropy and a zone of anomalously low upper mantle velocities imaged beneath Santiago and Marchena from surface waves by

  16. Study on Rayleigh Wave Inversion for Estimating Shear-wave Velocity Profile

    T.A. Sanny; Yoes Avianto

    2003-01-01

    Rayleigh wave or ground roll is a noise in seismic body waves. However, how to use this noise for soil characterization is very interesting since Rayleigh wave phase velocity is a function of compression-wave velocity, shear-wave velocity, density and layer thickness. In layered-medium Rayleigh wave velocity also depends on wavelength or frequency, and this phenomenon is called dispersion. Inversion procedure to get shear-wave velocity profile needs a priori information about the solution of ...

  17. Triad resonance between gravity and vorticity waves in vertical shear

    Drivas, Theodore D.; Wunsch, Scott

    2016-07-01

    Weakly nonlinear theory is used to explore the effect of vertical shear on surface gravity waves in three dimensions. An idealized piecewise-linear shear profile motivated by wind-driven profiles and ambient currents in the ocean is used. It is shown that shear may mediate weakly nonlinear resonant triad interactions between gravity and vorticity waves. The triad results in energy exchange between gravity waves of comparable wavelengths propagating in different directions. For realistic ocean shears, shear-mediated energy exchange may occur on timescales of minutes for shorter wavelengths, but slows as the wavelength increases. Hence this triad mechanism may contribute to the larger angular spreading (relative to wind direction) for shorter wind-waves observed in the oceans.

  18. BOTTOM SHEAR STRESS UNDER WAVE-CURRENT INTERACTION

    LIANG Bing-chen; LI Hua-jun; LEE Dong-yong

    2008-01-01

    The present work adopts the COHERENS-SWAN model developed by the first author through coupling three-dimensional hydrodynamic model (COHERENS) and third-generation wave model (SWAN). Inside the COHERENS-SWAN, the SWAN is regarded as a subroutine and the time- and space-varying current velocity and surface elevation are obtained from the COHERENS. Wave-enhanced bottom shear stress, wave induced surface mixing length and wave dependent surface drag coefficient have been introduced into the COHERENS. Secondly, as wave-enhanced bottom shear stress ("bottom shear stress" described as BSS sometimes in this article) is concerned, a modified bottom shear stress Grant and Madsen model which introduces random wave field is given and introduced to COHERENS-SWAN. COHERENS-SWAN is also adopted to simulate three-dimensional flow in the Yellow River Delta with wave-current co-existing. Four numerical experiments were given to study the effects of wave-current interaction on enhancing bottom shear stress. The simulated current velocities, wave height and wave period match well with field measurement data. The simulated significant wave height and wave period for the case with considering the effects of current can give better agreement with measurement data than the case without involving the effects of current. The introduction of random wave generates lower the bottom shear stress than the case without introducing it. There are obvious differences between bottom shear stress of two way interaction and one way interaction. Velocity field obtained by the COHERENS-SWAN is reasonable according to previous studies and measurements.

  19. Shear waves in a fluid saturated elastic plate

    A Pradhan; S K Samal; N C Mahanti

    2002-12-01

    In the present context, we consider the propagation of shear waves in the transverse isotropic fluid saturated porous plate. The frequency spectrum for SH-modes in the plate has been studied. It is observed that the frequency of the propagation is damped due to the two-phase character of the porous medium. The dimensionless phase velocities of the shear waves have also been calculated and presented graphically. It is interesting to note that the frequency and phase velocity of shear waves in porous media differ significantly in comparison to that in isotropic elastic media.

  20. Excitation of fundamental shear horizontal wave by using face-shear (d36) piezoelectric ceramics

    Miao, Hongchen; Dong, Shuxiang; Li, Faxin

    2016-05-01

    The fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) wave in plate-like structures is extremely useful for non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) as it is non-dispersive. However, currently, the SH0 wave is usually excited by electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) whose energy conversion efficiency is fairly low. The face-shear ( d 36 ) mode piezoelectrics is more promising for SH0 wave excitation, but this mode cannot appear in conventional piezoelectric ceramics. Recently, by modifying the symmetry of poled PbZr1-xTixO3 (PZT) ceramics via ferroelastic domain engineering, we realized the face-shear d 36 mode in both soft and hard PZT ceramics. In this work, we further improved the face-shear properties of PZT-4 and PZT-5H ceramics via lateral compression under elevated temperature. It was found that when bonded on a 1 mm-thick aluminum plate, the d 36 type PZT-4 exhibited better face-shear performance than PZT-5H. We then successfully excite SH0 wave in the aluminum plate using a face-shear PZT-4 square patch and receive the wave using a face-shear 0.72[Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]-0.28[PbTiO3] (PMN-PT) patch. The frequency response and directionality of the excited SH0 wave were also investigated. The SH0 wave can be dominated over the Lamb waves (S0 and A0 waves) from 160 kHz to 280 kHz. The wave amplitude reaches its maxima along the two main directions (0° and 90°). The amplitude can keep over 80% of the maxima when the deviate angle is less than 30°, while it vanishes quickly at the 45° direction. The excited SH0 wave using piezoelectric ceramics could be very promising in the fields of NDT and SHM.

  1. On acoustic wave generation in uniform shear flow

    Gogoberidze, G.

    2016-07-01

    The linear dynamics of acoustic waves and vortices in uniform shear flow is studied. For flows with very low shear rates, the dynamics of perturbations is adiabatic and can be described by the WKB approximation. However, for flows with moderate and high shear rates the WKB approximation is not appropriate, and alternative analysis shows that two important phenomena occur: acoustic wave over-reflection and wave generation by vortices. The later phenomenon is a known linear mechanisms for sound generation in shear flows, a mechanism that is related to the continuous spectrum that arises in linear shear flow dynamics. A detailed analytical study of these phenomena is performed and the main quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the radiated acoustic field are obtained and analyzed.

  2. Effect of shear on failure waves in soda lime glass

    By means of in-material stress gauges, failure waves in shock-compressed soda lime glass have been shown to be distinguished by a marked reduction in shear stress. To explore further the relation between failure waves and shearing resistance, a series of pressure-shear impact experiments have been performed involving the impact of a glass plate by a steel flyer plate and vice versa. The latter configuration is designed to allow direct measurements of the shearing resistance of the failed material. In both configurations, the normal and transverse motion of the free surface of the target is monitored using laser interferometry. The transverse velocity-time profiles show a pronounced loss in shearing resistance of the glass at impact velocities above the threshold for failure waves to occur

  3. Convertion Shear Wave Velocity to Standard Penetration Resistance

    Madun, A.; Tajuddin, S. A. A.; Abdullah, M. E.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Sani, S.; Siang, A. J. L. M.; Yusof, M. F.

    2016-07-01

    Multichannel Analysis Surface Wave (MASW) measurement is one of the geophysics exploration techniques to determine the soil profile based on shear wave velocity. Meanwhile, borehole intrusive technique identifies the changes of soil layer based on soil penetration resistance, i.e. standard penetration test-number of blows (SPT-N). Researchers across the world introduced many empirical conversions of standard penetration test blow number of borehole data to shear wave velocity or vice versa. This is because geophysics test is a non-destructive and relatively fast assessment, and thus should be promoted to compliment the site investigation work. These empirical conversions of shear wave velocity to SPT-N blow can be utilised, and thus suitable geotechnical parameters for design purposes can be achieved. This study has demonstrated the conversion between MASW and SPT-N value. The study was conducted at the university campus and Sejagung Sri Medan. The MASW seismic profiles at the University campus test site and Sejagung were at a depth of 21 m and 13 m, respectively. The shear wave velocities were also calculated empirically using SPT-N value, and thus both calculated and measured shear wave velocities were compared. It is essential to note that the MASW test and empirical conversion always underestimate the actual shear wave velocity of hard layer or rock due to the effect of soil properties on the upper layer.

  4. Shear-wave splitting of Sichuan Regional Seismic Network

    ZHANG Yong-jiu; GAO Yuan; SHI Yu-tao; CHENG Wan-zheng

    2008-01-01

    Using seismic data recorded by the Chengdu Digital Seismic Network from May 1, 2000 to December 31, 2006, we obtain the dominant polarization directions of fast shear-waves at eight digital seismic stations adopting the SAM technique. The results show that the dominant directions of polarizations of fast shear-waves at most of sta- tions are mainly in nearly NE,-SW or NW-SE direction in Sichuan. The dominant polarization directions of the fast shear-waves at stations located at the active faults or intersection of several active faults are consistent with the strikes of active faults which control the earthquakes used in the analysis, and are basically consistent with the directions of regional compression axis. However, several stations show that the fast shear-waves are not consis- tent with the strikes of active faults and the directions of regional compression axis, due to the influence of local complicated crustal structure.

  5. ORTHOGONALITY RELATIONSHIP FOR SHEAR WAVE MODES IN PIEZOELECTRIC WAVEGUIDE

    Ghazaryan K.B.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the full set of Maxwell equations and dynamic equations of the elasticity theory an orthogonality relationship is derived for interconnected electro-magneto-elastic shear wave modes in piezoelectric waveguide.

  6. Length and activation dependent variations in muscle shear wave speed

    Muscle stiffness is known to vary as a result of a variety of disease states, yet current clinical methods for quantifying muscle stiffness have limitations including cost and availability. We investigated the capability of shear wave elastography (SWE) to measure variations in gastrocnemius shear wave speed induced via active contraction and passive stretch. Ten healthy young adults were tested. Shear wave speeds were measured using a SWE transducer positioned over the medial gastrocnemius at ankle angles ranging from maximum dorsiflexion to maximum plantarflexion. Shear wave speeds were also measured during voluntary plantarflexor contractions at a fixed ankle angle. Average shear wave speed increased significantly from 2.6 to 5.6 m s–1 with passive dorsiflexion and the knee in an extended posture, but did not vary with dorsiflexion when the gastrocnemius was shortened in a flexed knee posture. During active contractions, shear wave speed monotonically varied with the net ankle moment generated, reaching 8.3 m s–1 in the maximally contracted condition. There was a linear correlation between shear wave speed and net ankle moment in both the active and passive conditions; however, the slope of this linear relationship was significantly steeper for the data collected during passive loading conditions. The results show that SWE is a promising approach for quantitatively assessing changes in mechanical muscle loading. However, the differential effect of active and passive loading on shear wave speed makes it important to carefully consider the relevant loading conditions in which to use SWE to characterize in vivo muscle properties. (paper)

  7. Shear-Wave Elastography of Segmental Infarction of the Testis

    Kantarci, Fatih; Cebi Olgun, Deniz; Mihmanli, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Segmental testicular infarction (STI) is a rare cause of acute scrotum. The spectrum of findings on gray-scale and color Doppler ultrasonography differ depending on the time between the onset of testicular pain and the ultrasonography examination. We are not aware of the usefulness of shear-wave elastography for the diagnosis of STI. We report the shear-wave elastography features in a case of STI and discuss the role of this diagnostic modality in the differential diagnosis.

  8. Shear wave propagation in anisotropic soft tissues and gels

    Namani, Ravi; Bayly, Philip V.

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of shear waves in soft tissue can be visualized by magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) [1] to characterize tissue mechanical properties. Dynamic deformation of brain tissue arising from shear wave propagation may underlie the pathology of blast-induced traumatic brain injury. White matter in the brain, like other biological materials, exhibits a transversely isotropic structure, due to the arrangement of parallel fibers. Appropriate mathematical models and well-characterized...

  9. Maximum likelihood estimation of shear wave speed in transient elastography.

    Audière, Stéphane; Angelini, Elsa D; Sandrin, Laurent; Charbit, Maurice

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasonic transient elastography (TE), enables to assess, under active mechanical constraints, the elasticity of the liver, which correlates with hepatic fibrosis stages. This technique is routinely used in clinical practice to assess noninvasively liver stiffness. The Fibroscan system used in this work generates a shear wave via an impulse stress applied on the surface of the skin and records a temporal series of radio-frequency (RF) lines using a single-element ultrasound probe. A shear wave propagation map (SWPM) is generated as a 2-D map of the displacements along depth and time, derived from the correlations of the sequential 1-D RF lines, assuming that the direction of propagation (DOP) of the shear wave coincides with the ultrasound beam axis (UBA). Under the assumption of pure elastic tissue, elasticity is proportional to the shear wave speed. This paper introduces a novel approach to the processing of the SWPM, deriving the maximum likelihood estimate of the shear wave speed when comparing the observed displacements and the estimates provided by the Green's functions. A simple parametric model is used to interface Green's theoretical values of noisy measures provided by the SWPM, taking into account depth-varying attenuation and time-delay. The proposed method was evaluated on numerical simulations using a finite element method simulator and on physical phantoms. Evaluation on this test database reported very high agreements of shear wave speed measures when DOP and UBA coincide. PMID:24835213

  10. On Shear Wave Speed Estimation for Agar-Gelatine Phantom

    Hassan M. Ahmed

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Conventional imaging of diagnostic ultrasound is widely used. Although it makes the differences in the soft tissues echogenicities’ apparent and clear, it fails in describing and estimating the soft tissue mechanical properties. It cannot portray their mechanical properties, such as the elasticity and stiffness. Estimating the mechanical properties increases chances of the identification of lesions or any pathological changes. Physicians are now characterizing the tissue’s mechanical properties as diagnostic metrics. Estimating the tissue’s mechanical properties is achieved by applying a force on the tissue and calculating the resulted shear wave speed. Due to the difficulty of calculating the shear wave speed precisely inside the tissue, it is estimated by analyzing ultrasound images of the tissue at a very high frame rate. In this paper, the shear wave speed is estimated using finite element analysis. A model is constructed to simulate the tissue’s mechanical properties. For a generalized soft tissue model, Agar-gelatine model is used because it has properties similar to that of the soft tissue. A point force is applied at the center of the proposed model. As a result of this force, a deformation is caused. Peak displacements are tracked along the lateral dimension of the model for estimating the shear wave speed of the propagating wave using the Time-To-Peak displacement (TTP method. Experimental results have shown that the estimated speed of the shear wave is 5.2 m/sec. The speed value is calculated according to shear wave speed equation equals about 5.7 m/sec; this means that our speed estimation system’s accuracy is about 91 %, which is reasonable shear wave speed estimation accuracy with a less computational power compared to other tracking methods.

  11. Regional and teleseismic shear-wave radiation feature of underground nuclear explosions and its implications for shear-wave excitation mechanisms

    Hong, T.-K.

    2009-04-01

    Understanding the shear-wave excitation mechanism is a key issue for effective seismic monitoring of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs). We often observe strong shear waves from UNEs, which causes difficulty in prompt discrimination of nuclear explosions from natural earthquakes. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the shear-wave excitation from the UNEs. Consensus on dominant mechanism of shear-wave excitation has not been made. To constrain the shear-wave excitation mechanism, we examine the consistency in shear-wave radiation pattern using a source-array slowness-wavenumber (F-K) analysis, which allows us to check the time-invariant feature in the shear waves. We examine regional and teleseismic waveforms for the UNEs of the Balapan test site and Nevada test site along with the Indian and North Korean UNEs. We observe consistent radiation pattern in both regional and teleseismic shear waves. The observed radiation pattern suggests that the shear waves were not excited azimuthally-isotropic. Shear waves observed in teleseismic distances are far weak compared to those in regional distances, which implies that shear waves are excited stronger at high takeoff angles. Also, spectra of shear waves display significantly low overshoot feature that is different from those of P phases. The time-invariant anisotropic radiation pattern, strong excitation in high takeoff angle and low overshoot feature allow us to constrain the shear-wave excitation mechanism.

  12. Monitoring of thermal therapy based on shear modulus changes: I. shear wave thermometry.

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-02-01

    The clinical applicability of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive therapy is today hampered by the lack of robust and real-time monitoring of tissue damage during treatment. The goal of this study is to show that the estimation of local tissue elasticity from shear wave imaging (SWI) can lead to the 2-D mapping of temperature changes during HIFU treatments. This new concept of shear wave thermometry is experimentally implemented here using conventional ultrasonic imaging probes. HIFU treatment and monitoring were, respectively, performed using a confocal setup consisting of a 2.5-MHz single-element transducer focused at 30 mm on ex vivo samples and an 8-MHz ultrasound diagnostic probe. Thermocouple measurements and ultrasound-based thermometry were used as a gold standard technique and were combined with SWI on the same device. The SWI sequences consisted of 2 successive shear waves induced at different lateral positions. Each wave was created using 100-μs pushing beams at 3 depths. The shear wave propagation was acquired at 17,000 frames/s, from which the elasticity map was recovered. HIFU sonications were interleaved with fast imaging acquisitions, allowing a duty cycle of more than 90%. Elasticity and temperature mapping was achieved every 3 s, leading to realtime monitoring of the treatment. Tissue stiffness was found to decrease in the focal zone for temperatures up to 43°C. Ultrasound-based temperature estimation was highly correlated to stiffness variation maps (r² = 0.91 to 0.97). A reversible calibration phase of the changes of elasticity with temperature can be made locally using sighting shots. This calibration process allows for the derivation of temperature maps from shear wave imaging. Compared with conventional ultrasound-based approaches, shear wave thermometry is found to be much more robust to motion artifacts. PMID:21342822

  13. Shear horizontal wave excitation and reception with shear horizontal piezoelectric wafer active sensor (SH-PWAS)

    This article discusses shear horizontal (SH) guided-waves that can be excited with shear type piezoelectric wafer active sensor (SH-PWAS). The paper starts with a review of state of the art SH waves modelling and their importance in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). The basic piezoelectric sensing and actuation equations for the case of shear horizontal piezoelectric wafer active sensor (SH-PWAS) with electro-mechanical coupling coefficient d35 are reviewed. Multiphysics finite element modelling (MP-FEM) was performed on a free SH-PWAS to show its resonance modeshapes. The actuation mechanism of the SH-PWAS is predicted by MP-FEM, and modeshapes of excited structure are presented. The structural resonances are compared with experimental measurements and showed good agreement. Analytical prediction of SH waves was performed. SH wave propagation experimental study was conducted between different combinations of SH-PWAS and regular in-plane PWAS transducers. Experimental results were compared with analytical predictions for aluminium plates and showed good agreement. 2D wave propagation effects were studied by MP-FEM. An analytical model was developed for SH wave power and energy. The normal mode expansion (NME) method was used to account for superpositioning multimodal SH waves. Modal participation factors were presented to show the contribution of every mode. Power and energy transfer between SH-PWAS and the structure was analyzed. Finally, we present simulations of our developed wave power and energy analytical models. (paper)

  14. Wave propagation in carbon nanotubes under shear deformation

    This paper reports the results of an investigation on the effect of shear deformations on wave propagation in carbon nanotubes embedded in an elastic matrix. A multi-walled carbon nanotube is considered as a multiple shell coupled together through van der Waals forces between two adjacent tubes. The surrounding matrix is considered as a spring element defined by the Winkler model. Using the variational calculus of Hamilton's principle, dynamic governing equations considering the shear deformation and rotary inertia terms are derived. Numerical examples describe the effects of shear deformation, rotary inertia and elastic matrix on the velocity, the critical frequency, the cut-off frequency and the amplitude ratio of wave propagation in multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in an elastic matrix, respectively. The results obtained show that wave propagation in carbon nanotubes appears in a critical frequency or a cut-off frequency for different wave modes; the effect of shear deformation decreases the value of critical frequency; the critical frequency increases as the matrix stiffness increases; the inertia rotary has an obvious influence on the wave velocity for some wave modes in the higher frequency region

  15. Probing the shear-band formation in granular media with sound waves

    KHIDAS, Yacine; Jia, X.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the mechanical responses of dense granular materials, using a direct shear box combined with simultaneous acoustic measurements. Measured shear wave speeds evidence the structural change of the material under shear, from the jammed state to the flowing state. There is a clear acoustic signature when the shear band is formed. Subjected to cyclic shear, both shear stress and wave speed show the strong hysteretic dependence on the shear strain, likely associated with the geometry ...

  16. A Hammer-Impact, Aluminum, Shear-Wave Seismic Source

    Haines, Seth S.

    2007-01-01

    Near-surface seismic surveys often employ hammer impacts to create seismic energy. Shear-wave surveys using horizontally polarized waves require horizontal hammer impacts against a rigid object (the source) that is coupled to the ground surface. I have designed, built, and tested a source made out of aluminum and equipped with spikes to improve coupling. The source is effective in a variety of settings, and it is relatively simple and inexpensive to build.

  17. Near surface shear wave velocity in Bucharest, Romania

    M. von Steht; B. Jaskolla; Ritter, J.R.R.

    2010-01-01

    Bucharest, the capital of Romania with nearly 2 1/2 million inhabitants, is endangered by the strong earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone. To obtain information on the near surface shear-wave velocity Vs structure and to improve the available microzonations we conducted seismic refraction measurements in two parks of the city. There the shallow Vs structure is determined along five profiles, and the compressional-wave velocity (Vp) s...

  18. Advantages of Shear Wave Seismic in Morrow Sandstone Detection

    Paritosh Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Upper Morrow sandstones in the western Anadarko Basin have been prolific oil producers for more than five decades. Detection of Morrow sandstones is a major problem in the exploration of new fields and the characterization of existing fields because they are often very thin and laterally discontinuous. Until recently compressional wave data have been the primary resource for mapping the lateral extent of Morrow sandstones. The success with compressional wave datasets is limited because the acoustic impedance contrast between the reservoir sandstones and the encasing shales is small. Here, we have performed full waveform modeling study to understand the Morrow sandstone signatures on compressional wave (P-wave, converted-wave (PS-wave and pure shear wave (S-wave gathers. The contrast in rigidity between the Morrow sandstone and surrounding shale causes a strong seismic expression on the S-wave data. Morrow sandstone shows a distinct high amplitude event in pure S-wave modeled gathers as compared to the weaker P- and PS-wave events. Modeling also helps in understanding the adverse effect of interbed multiples (due to shallow high velocity anhydrite layers and side lobe interference effects at the Morrow level. Modeling tied with the field data demonstrates that S-waves are more robust than P-waves in detecting the Morrow sandstone reservoirs.

  19. Shear Alfven wave excitation by direct antenna coupling and fast wave resonant mode conversion

    Antenna coupling to the shear Alfven wave by both direct excitation and fast wave resonant mode conversion is modelled analytically for a plasma with a one dimensional linear density gradient. We demonstrate the existence of a shear Alfven mode excited directly by the antenna. For localised antennas, this mode propagates as a guided beam along the steady magnetic field lines intersecting the antenna. Shear Alfven wave excitation by resonant mode conversion of a fast wave near the Alfven resonance layer is also demonstrated and we prove that energy is conserved in this process. We compare the efficiency of these two mechanisms of shear Alfven wave excitation and present a simple analytical formula giving the ratio of the coupled powers. Finally, we discuss the interpretation of some experimental results. 45 refs., 7 figs

  20. Shear-wave traveltimes in inhomogeneous weakly anisotropic media

    Iversen, E.; Farra, V.; Pšenčík, Ivan

    Tulsa : SEG, 2009, s. 3486-3490. [Annual Meeting of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists /79./. Houston (US), 25.10.2009-30.10.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/0332 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : seismic anisotropy * shear-wave coupling * traveltimes Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  1. Measurement and modelling of bed shear induced by solitary waves

    JayaKumar, S.

    ±20% accuracy, which is probably adequate for most practical engineering purposes. 168 Solitary wave induced shear stresses Chapter 10: Conclusions 10.3. Friction factors The wave friction factors derived from the classical drag law vary... Engineering, 56(5-6): 506-516. Baldock, T.E. and Holmes, P., 1998. Seepage effects on sediment transport by waves and currents. 26th International Conference Coastal Engineering, Orlando, p.^pp. 3601- 3614. Barends, F.B.J. and Spierenburg, S.E.J., 1991...

  2. Cosmic Shear from Scalar-Induced Gravitational Waves

    Sarkar, Devdeep; Cooray, Asantha; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Baumann, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing by foreground density perturbations generates a gradient mode in the shear of background images. In contrast, cosmological tensor perturbations induce a non-zero curl mode associated with image rotations. In this note, we study the lensing signatures of both primordial gravitational waves from inflation and second-order gravitational waves generated from the observed spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. We derive the curl mode for galaxy lensing surveys at redshifts of 1 to 3 and for lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a redshift of 1100. We find that the curl mode angular power spectrum associated with secondary tensor modes for galaxy lensing surveys dominates over the corresponding signal generated by primary gravitational waves from inflation. However, both tensor contributions to the shear curl mode spectrum are below the projected noise levels of upcoming galaxy and CMB lensing surveys and therefore are unlikely to be detectable.

  3. Turbulence closure: turbulence, waves and the wave-turbulence transition – Part 1: Vanishing mean shear

    H. Z. Baumert

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends a turbulence closure-like model for stably stratified flows into a new dynamic domain in which turbulence is generated by internal gravity waves rather than mean shear. The model turbulent kinetic energy (TKE, K balance, its first equation, incorporates a term for the energy transfer from internal waves to turbulence. This energy source is in addition to the traditional shear production. The second variable of the new two-equation model is the turbulent enstrophy (Ω. Compared to the traditional shear-only case, the Ω-equation is modified to account for the effect of the waves on the turbulence time and space scales. This modification is based on the assumption of a non-zero constant flux Richardson number in the limit of vanishing mean shear when turbulence is produced exclusively by internal waves. This paper is part 1 of a continuing theoretical development. It accounts for mean shear- and internal wave-driven mixing only in the two limits of mean shear and no waves and waves but no mean shear, respectively.

    The new model reproduces the wave-turbulence transition analyzed by D'Asaro and Lien (2000b. At small energy density E of the internal wave field, the turbulent dissipation rate (ε scales like ε~E2. This is what is observed in the deep sea. With increasing E, after the wave-turbulence transition has been passed, the scaling changes to ε~E1. This is observed, for example, in the highly energetic tidal flow near a sill in Knight Inlet. The new model further exhibits a turbulent length scale proportional to the Ozmidov scale, as observed in the ocean, and predicts the ratio between the turbulent Thorpe and Ozmidov length scales well within the range observed in the ocean.

  4. SHEAR WAVE ELASTOGRAPHY OF THE ARTERIAL WALL – WHERE WE ARE TODAY

    Widman, Erik; Maksuti, Elira; Larsson, Matilda; Bjällmark, Anna; Nordenfur, Tim; Caidahl, Kenneth; D’hooge, Jan

    2013-01-01

    1.  Introduction Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) is a recently developed noninvasive method for elastography assessment using ultrasound. The technique consists of sending an acoustic radiation force (pushing sequence) into the tissue that in turn generates an orthogonal low frequency propagating shear wave. The shear wave propagation is measured real time by high speed B-mode imaging. From the B-mode images, the shear wave is tracked via normalized cross-correlation and the speed is calculate...

  5. Instability of subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity shear waves

    Salhi, A.; Nasraoui, S.

    2013-12-01

    We study analytically the instability of the subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity waves excited by a (vertical) time-periodic shear for an inviscid and nondiffusive unbounded conducting fluid. Due to the fact that the magnetic potential induction is a Lagrangian invariant for magnetohydrodynamic Euler-Boussinesq equations, we show that plane-wave disturbances are governed by a four-dimensional Floquet system in which appears, among others, the parameter ɛ representing the ratio of the periodic shear amplitude to the vertical Brunt-Väisälä frequency N3. For sufficiently small ɛ and when the magnetic field is horizontal, we perform an asymptotic analysis of the Floquet system following the method of Lebovitz and Zweibel [Astrophys. J. 609, 301 (2004), 10.1086/420972]. We determine the width and the maximal growth rate of the instability bands associated with subharmonic resonances. We show that the instability of subharmonic resonance occurring in gravity shear waves has a maximal growth rate of the form Δm=(3√3 /16)ɛ. This instability persists in the presence of magnetic fields, but its growth rate decreases as the magnetic strength increases. We also find a second instability involving a mixing of hydrodynamic and magnetic modes that occurs for all magnetic field strengths. We also elucidate the similarity between the effect of a vertical magnetic field and the effect of a vertical Coriolis force on the gravity shear waves considering axisymmetric disturbances. For both cases, plane waves are governed by a Hill equation, and, when ɛ is sufficiently small, the subharmonic instability band is determined by a Mathieu equation. We find that, when the Coriolis parameter (or the magnetic strength) exceeds N3/2, the instability of the subharmonic resonance vanishes.

  6. Energetics of internal solitary waves in a background sheared current

    K. G. Lamb

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The energetics of internal waves in the presence of a background sheared current is explored via numerical simulations for four different situations based on oceanographic conditions: the nonlinear interaction of two internal solitary waves; an internal solitary wave shoaling through a turning point; internal solitary wave reflection from a sloping boundary and a deep-water internal seiche trapped in a deep basin. In the simulations with variable water depth using the Boussinesq approximation the combination of a background sheared current, bathymetry and a rigid lid results in a change in the total energy of the system due to the work done by a pressure change that is established across the domain. A final simulation of the deep-water internal seiche in which the Boussinesq approximation is not invoked and a diffuse air-water interface is added to the system results in the energy remaining constant because the generation of surface waves prevents the establishment of a net pressure increase across the domain. The difference in the perturbation energy in the Boussinesq and non-Boussinesq simulations is accounted for by the surface waves.

  7. Prediction of the Shear Wave Velocity from Compressional Wave Velocity for Gachsaran Formation

    Parvizi Saeed

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Shear and compressional wave velocities, coupled with other petrophysical data, are very important for hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. In situ shear wave velocity (Vs is measured by some sonic logging tools. Shear velocity coupled with compressional velocity is vitally important in determining geomechanical parameters, identifying the lithology, mud weight design, hydraulic fracturing, geophysical studies such as VSP, etc. In this paper, a correlation between compressional and shear wave velocity is obtained for Gachsaran formation in Maroon oil field. Real data were used to examine the accuracy of the prediction equation. Moreover, the genetic algorithm was used to obtain the optimal value for constants of the suggested equation. Furthermore, artificial neural network was used to inspect the reliability of this method. These investigations verify the notion that the suggested equation could be considered as an efficient, fast, and cost-effective method for predicting Vs from Vp.

  8. Teleseismic shear-wave splitting and deformations in Central Europe

    P. Bormann; P. T. Burghardt; L. I. Makeyeva; L. P. Vinnik;  

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: We analyse the results of measurements of shear-wave splitting due to azimuthally anisotropy in the upper mantle of Central Europe, based on the SKS technique. The observations at seismograph stations in the eastern part of Germany are combined with the published estimates of the parameters of azimuthally anisotropy at neighbouring locations. These data are interpreted in terms of lattice preferred orientation of olivine which is caused by deformations in the upper mantle. Direction...

  9. SHEAR WAVES IN PERIODIC WAVEGUIDE WITH ALTERNATING BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Piliposyan D.G.; Ghazaryan R.A.; Ghazaryan K.B.

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of shear waves in elastic waveguide of periodic structure consisting of three different materials with alternating along the guide walls boundary conditions is investigated. Using the transfer matrix approach the problem is reduced to the solution of a block transfer matrix eigenvalue problem. Bloth the dispersion and the band gap structure analysis have been carried out numerically. It is shown that for alternating boundary conditions along the waveguide walls, by modulating ...

  10. Shear-wave splitting measurements – Problems and solutions

    Vecsey, Luděk; Plomerová, Jaroslava; Babuška, Vladislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 462, č. 1-4 (2008), s. 178-196. ISSN 0040-1951 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB300120605; GA AV ČR IAA3012405; GA AV ČR IAA300120709 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : seismic anisotropy * shear-wave splitting * comparison of cross-correlation * eigenvalue * transverse minimization methods Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.677, year: 2008

  11. Triple point shear-layers in gaseous detonation waves

    Massa, L.; Austin, J. M.; Jackson, T. L.

    2006-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown intriguing regions of intense luminescence or ‘hotspots’ in the vicinity of triple-point shear layers in propagating gaseous detonation waves. Localized explosions have also been observed to develop in these fronts. These features were observed in higher effective activation energy mixtures, but not in lower effective activation energy mixtures. The increased lead shock oscillation through a cell cycle in higher activation energy mixtures may result in a signific...

  12. Driven transverse shear waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    Bandyopadhyay, P. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)], E-mail: banerjee_pintu2002@yahoo.com; Prasad, G.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P.K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2008-08-11

    The linear dispersion properties of transverse shear waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma are experimentally studied in a DC discharge device by exciting them in a controlled manner with a variable frequency external source. The dusty plasma is maintained in the strongly coupled fluid regime with (1<{gamma}<<{gamma}{sub c}) where {gamma} is the Coulomb coupling parameter and {gamma}{sub c} is the crystallization limit. A dispersion relation for the transverse waves is experimentally obtained over a frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 2 Hz and found to show good agreement with viscoelastic theoretical results.

  13. Shear layer behavior resulting from shock wave diffraction

    Skews, Beric; Law, Craig; Muritala, Adam; Bode, Sebastian [University of the Witwatersrand, School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Aeronautical Engineering, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2012-02-15

    All previous studies on shock wave diffraction in shock tubes have spatial and temporal limitations due to the size of the test sections. These limitations result from either the reflection of the expansion wave, generated at the corner, from the top wall and/or of the reflection of the incident diffracted shock from the bottom wall of the test section passing back through the region of interest. This has limited the study of the evolution of the shear layer and its associated vortex, which forms a relatively small region of the flow behind the shock with an extent of only a few centimeters, and yet is a region of significant interest. A special shock tube is used in the current tests which allow evolution of the flow to be examined at a scale about an order of magnitude larger than in previously published results, with shear layer lengths of up to 250 mm being achieved without interference from adjacent walls. Tests are presented for incident shock wave Mach numbers of nominally 1.3-1.5. Studies have been undertaken with wall angles of 10, 20, 30 and 90 . Significant changes are noted as the spatial and temporal scale of the experiment increases. For a given wall angle, the flow behind the incident shock is not self-similar as is usually assumed. Both shear layer instability and the development of turbulent patches become evident, neither of which have been noted in previous tests. (orig.)

  14. Chaotic transport by Rossby waves in shear flow

    Transport and mixing properties of Rossby waves in shear flow are studied using tools from Hamiltonian chaos theory. The destruction of barriers to transport is studied analytically, by using the resonance overlap criterion and the concept of separatrix reconnection, and numerically by using Poincare sections. Attention is restricted to the case of symmetric velocity profiles with a single maximum; the Bickley jet with velocity profile sech2 is considered in detail. Motivated by linear stability analysis and experimental results, a simple Hamiltonian model is proposed to study transport by waves in these shear flows. Chaotic transport, both for the general case and for the sech2 profile, is investigated. The resonance overlap criterion and the concept of separatrix reconnection are used to obtain an estimate for the destruction of barriers to transport and the notion of banded chaos is introduced to characterize the transport that typically occurs in symmetric shear flows. Comparison between the analytical estimates for barrier destruction and the numerical results is given. The role of potential vorticity conservation in chaotic transport is discussed. An area preserving map, termed standard nontwist map, is obtained from the Hamiltonian model. It is shown that the map reproduces the transport properties and the separatrix reconnection observed in the Hamiltonian model. The conclusions reached are used to explain experimental results on transport and mixing by Rossby waves in rotating fluids

  15. Shear wave velocity structure in West Java, Indonesia as inferred from surface wave dispersion

    Anggono, Titi; Syuhada

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the crust and upper mantle of West Java, Indonesia by measuring the group velocity dispersion of surface waves. We analyzed waveform from four teleseismic earthquake recorded at three 3-component broadband seismometers. We analyzed fundamental mode of Rayleigh and Love waves from vertical, radial, and transverse components using multiple filter technique. We inverted the measured group velocity to obtain shear wave velocity profile down to 200 km depth. We observed low shear wave velocity zone at depth of about 20 km. Shear velocity reduction is estimated to be 18% compared to the upper and lower velocity layer. The low velocity zone might be associated with the subducting slab of Indo-Australian Plate as similar characteristics of low velocity zones also observed at other subducting regions.

  16. Magnetic resonance elastography of slow and fast shear waves illuminates differences in shear and tensile moduli in anisotropic tissue.

    Schmidt, J L; Tweten, D J; Benegal, A N; Walker, C H; Portnoi, T E; Okamoto, R J; Garbow, J R; Bayly, P V

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical anisotropy is an important property of fibrous tissues; for example, the anisotropic mechanical properties of brain white matter may play a key role in the mechanics of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The simplest anisotropic material model for small deformations of soft tissue is a nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material characterized by three parameters: minimum shear modulus (µ), shear anisotropy (ϕ=µ1µ-1) and tensile anisotropy (ζ=E1E2-1). These parameters can be determined using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) to visualize shear waves, if the angle between the shear-wave propagation direction and fiber direction is known. Most MRE studies assume isotropic material models with a single shear (µ) or tensile (E) modulus. In this study, two types of shear waves, "fast" and "slow", were analyzed for a given propagation direction to estimate anisotropic parameters µ, ϕ, and ζ in two fibrous soft materials: turkey breast ex vivo and aligned fibrin gels. As expected, the speed of slow shear waves depended on the angle between fiber direction and propagation direction. Fast shear waves were observed when the deformations due to wave motion induced stretch in the fiber direction. Finally, MRE estimates of anisotropic mechanical properties in turkey breast were compared to estimates from direct mechanical tests. PMID:26920505

  17. Unbounded wall flow with free surface waves and horizontal shear

    Lapham, Gary; McHugh, John

    2015-11-01

    Free surface waves in the presence of a non-uniform shear flow are treated. The shear flow of interest varies with both the transverse and vertical coordinates, U (y , z) . Initial results treat a mean flow varying only with the transverse, U (y) . The domain is bounded on one side by a flat rigid vertical wall and is unbounded on the other side. The mean flows considered here are nonzero near the vertical wall and approach zero far from the wall, e.g. U =e-γy . The flowfield is treated as inviscid but rotational. Linear solutions are obtained using a nonuniform coordinate transformation that converts the free surface boundary condition into a modified Bessel equation. Velocity components are expanded in modified Bessel functions of the first kind of purely imaginary order. The dispersion relation for steady waves are found with wavespeeds outside the range of U, matching previous results for a flow bounded on both sides. Corresponding eigenvectors show a sequence of wave profiles of increasing complexity near the wall. The wave amplitude approaches zero far from the wall.

  18. Shear Wave Splitting Inversion in a Complex Crust

    Lucas, A.

    2015-12-01

    Shear wave splitting (SWS) inversion presents a method whereby the upper crust can be interrogated for fracture density. It is caused when a shear wave traverses an area of anisotropy, splits in two, with each wave experiencing a different velocity resulting in an observable separation in arrival times. A SWS observation consists of the first arrival polarization direction and the time delay. Given the large amount of data common in SWS studies, manual inspection for polarization and time delay is considered prohibitively time intensive. All automated techniques used can produce high amounts of observations falsely interpreted as SWS. Thus introducing error into the interpretation. The technique often used for removing these false observations is to manually inspect all SWS observations defined as high quality by the automated routine, and remove false identifications. We investigate the nature of events falsely identified compared to those correctly identified. Once this identification is complete we conduct a inversion for crack density from SWS time delay. The current body of work on linear SWS inversion utilizes an equation that defines the time delay between arriving shear waves with respect to fracture density. This equation makes the assumption that no fluid flow occurs as a result of the passing shear wave, a situation called squirt flow. We show that the assumption is not applicable in all geological situations. When it is not true, its use in an inversion produces a result which is negatively affected by the assumptions. This is shown to be the case at the test case of 6894 SWS observations gathered in a small area at Puna geothermal field, Hawaii. To rectify this situation, a series of new time delay formulae, applicable to linear inversion, are derived from velocity equations presented in literature. The new formula use a 'fluid influence parameter' which indicates the degree to which squirt flow is influencing the SWS. It is found that accounting for

  19. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis

    Helfenstein-Didier, C.; Andrade, R. J.; Brum, J.; Hug, F.; Tanter, M.; Nordez, A.; Gennisson, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear.

  20. Turbulence closure: turbulence, waves and the wave-turbulence transition – Part 1: Vanishing mean shear

    H. Z. Baumert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A new two-equation, closure-like turbulence model for stably stratified flows is introduced which uses the turbulent kinetic energy (K and the turbulent enstrophy (Ω as primary variables. It accounts for mean shear – and internal wave-driven mixing in the two limits of mean shear and no waves and waves but no mean shear, respectively. The traditional TKE balance is augmented by an explicit energy transfer from internal waves to turbulence. A modification of the Ω-equation accounts for the effect of the waves on the turbulence time and space scales. The latter is based on the assumption of a non-zero constant flux Richardson number in the limit of vanishing mean-flow shear when turbulence is produced exclusively by internal waves. The new model reproduces the wave-turbulence transition analyzed by D'Asaro and Lien (2000. At small energy density E of the internal wave field, the turbulent dissipation rate (ε scales like ε~E2. This is what is observed in the deep sea. With increasing E, after the wave-turbulence transition has been passed, the scaling changes to ε~E1. This is observed, for example, in the swift tidal flow near a sill in Knight Inlet. The new model further exhibits a turbulent length scale proportional to the Ozmidov scale, as observed in the ocean, and predicts the ratio between the turbulent Thorpe and Ozmidov length scales well within the range observed in the ocean.

  1. The velocity of shear waves in unsaturated soil

    Whalley, W. R.; Jenkins, M; Attenborough, K.

    2012-01-01

    The velocities of shear waves Vs in two soils, a loamy sand and a sandy clay loam, were measured at various matric potentials and confining pressures. We used a combination of Haines apparatus, pressure plate apparatus and a Bishop and Wesley tri-axial cell to obtain a range of saturation and consolidation states. We proposed a single effective stress variable based on a modification to Bishop’s equation which could be used in a published empirical model (Santamarina et al., 2001) to relate s...

  2. SHEAR WAVES IN PERIODIC WAVEGUIDE WITH ALTERNATING BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Piliposyan D.G.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of shear waves in elastic waveguide of periodic structure consisting of three different materials with alternating along the guide walls boundary conditions is investigated. Using the transfer matrix approach the problem is reduced to the solution of a block transfer matrix eigenvalue problem. Bloth the dispersion and the band gap structure analysis have been carried out numerically. It is shown that for alternating boundary conditions along the waveguide walls, by modulating the ratio of the length of the unit cell to the width of the waveguide, the minimum widths of the stop bands can be moved to the middle of the Brillouin zone

  3. Measurement and modeling of bed shear stress under solitary waves

    Jayakumar, S.; Guard, P.A.; Baldock, T.E.

    ) of the water particles, and kinematic viscosity (ν ): ν Au R e = (2) In order to estimate R e , the semi-excursion length of the water particles needs to be estimated properly for the solitary waves. This semi-excursion of the water particle... ⎥ ⎦ ⎤ ⎢ ⎣ ⎡ =νν (8) where, z 0 is roughness height, z is depth, ν is kinematic viscosity. It was also shown that to leading order bed shear stress, τ , can be expressed as convolution integral of the depth integrated averaged horizontal velocity, u , Eq...

  4. Propagation of shear wave in nonlinear and dissipative medium

    The civil engineering projects, like nuclear installations, submitted to vibrations or seismic motions, require the study of the soil behaviour underlying the site under intensive dynamic loading. In order to understand in depth the soil damping phenomenon, a propagation of a shear seismic wave in a dissipative medium has been numerically simulated. The computer code, based on a nonlinear hysteretic model using Newmark-Wilson and Newton-Raphson algorithms and variable spatial steps, passes through the difficulties related to acceleration discontinuities. The simulation should allow the identification of the soil parameters by comparison with in situ measures. (author)

  5. Seismic Waves in Finely Layered VTI Media: Poroelasticity, Thomsen Parameters, and Fluid Effects on Shear Waves

    Berryman, J G

    2004-02-24

    Layered earth models are well justified by experience, and provide a simple means of studying fairly general behavior of the elastic and poroelastic characteristics of seismic waves in the earth. Thomsen's anisotropy parameters for weak elastic and poroelastic anisotropy are now commonly used in exploration, and can be conveniently expressed in terms of the layer averages of Backus. Since our main interest is usually in the fluids underground, it would be helpful to have a set of general equations relating the Thomsen parameters as directly as possible to the fluid properties. This end can be achieved in a rather straightforward fashion for these layered earth models, and the present paper develops and then discusses these relations. Furthermore, it is found that, although there are five effective shear moduli for any layered VTI medium, one and only one effective shear modulus for the layered system contains all the dependence of pore fluids on the elastic or poroelastic constants that can be observed in vertically polarized shear waves in VTI media. The effects of the pore fluids on this effective shear modulus can be substantial - an increase of shear wave speed on the order of 10% is shown to be possible when circumstances are favorable -when the medium behaves in an undrained fashion, and the shear modulus fluctuations are large (resulting in strong anisotropy). These effects are expected to be seen at higher frequencies such as sonic and ultrasonic waves for well-logging or laboratory experiments, or at seismic wave frequencies for low permeability regions of reservoirs, prior to hydrofracing. Results presented are strictly for velocity analysis.

  6. Solitary waves of permanent form in a deep fluid with weak shear

    Derzho, Oleg G.; Velarde, Manuel G.

    1995-06-01

    The Benjamin-Davis-Acrivos-Ono equation is generalized to account for finite, large amplitude solitary waves in a sheared deep fluid. It is shown how fine structure of stratification and weak noncritical shear in such geophysical flows do affect length (shape), wave (phase) velocity, and even stability of finite amplitude solitary waves.

  7. A NEW MEASURE FOR DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE BED SHEAR STRESS OF WAVE BOUNDARY LAYER IN WAVE FLUME

    2007-01-01

    In this article, a shear plate was mounted on the bottom in a wave flume and direct measurements of the smooth and rough bed shear stress under regular and irregular waves were conducted with the horizontal force exerted on the shear plates by the bottom shear stress in the wave boundary layer. Under immobile bed condition, grains of sand were glued uniformly and tightly onto the shear plate, being prevented from motion with the fluid flow and generation of sand ripples. The distribution of the bottom mean shear stress varying with time was measured by examining the interaction between the shear plate and shear transducers. The relation between the force measured by the shear transducers and its voltage is a linear one. Simultaneous measurements of the bottom velocity were carried out by an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV), while the whole process was completely controlled by computers, bottom shear stress and velocity were synchronously measured. Based on the experimental results, it can be concluded that (1) the friction coefficient groews considerably with the increase of the Reynolds number, (2) the shear stress is a function varying with time and linearly proportional to the velocity. Compared with theoretical results and previous experimental data, it is shown that the experimental method is feasible and effective, A further study on the bed shear stress under regular or irregular waves can be carried out. And applicability to the laboratory studies on the initiation of sediments and the measurement of the shear stress after sediment imigration.

  8. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis

    Helfenstein-Didier, C.; Andrade, R. J.; Brum, J.; Hug, F.; Tanter, M.; Nordez, A.; Gennisson, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  SSI was always lower than C55 and the difference increased with the ankle dorsiflexion. However, shear modulus values provided by both methods were highly correlated (R  =  0.84), indicating that the conventional shear wave elastography technique (SSI technique) can be used to compare tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear.

  9. Study on Correlation and Quantitative Error Estimation Method Among the Splitting Shear Wave Identification Methods

    Liu Xiqiang; Zhou Huilan; Li Hong; Gai Dianguang

    2000-01-01

    Based on the propagation characteristics of shear wave in the anisotropic layers, thecorrelation among several splitting shear-wave identification methods hasbeen studied. Thispaper puts forward the method estimating splitting shear-wave phases and its reliability byusing of the assumption that variance of noise and useful signal data obey normaldistribution. To check the validity of new method, the identification results and errorestimation corresponding to 95% confidence level by analyzing simulation signals have beengiven.

  10. Study on Rayleigh Wave Inversion for Estimating Shear-wave Velocity Profile

    T.A. Sanny

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Rayleigh wave or ground roll is a noise in seismic body waves. However, how to use this noise for soil characterization is very interesting since Rayleigh wave phase velocity is a function of compression-wave velocity, shear-wave velocity, density and layer thickness. In layered-medium Rayleigh wave velocity also depends on wavelength or frequency, and this phenomenon is called dispersion. Inversion procedure to get shear-wave velocity profile needs a priori information about the solution of the problem to limit the unknown parameters. The Lagrange multiplier method was used to solve the constrained optimization problems or well known as a smoothing parameter in inversion problems. The advantage of our inversion procedure is that it can guarantee the convergence of solution even though the field data is incomplete, insufficient, and inconsistent. The addition of smoothing parameter can reduce the time to converge. Beside numerical stability, the statistical stability is also involved in inversion procedure. In field experiment we extracted ground roll data from seismic refraction record. The dispersion curves had been constructed by applying f-k analysis and f-k dip filtering. The dispersion curves show the dependence of Rayleigh wave phase velocities in layered media to frequency. The synthetic models also demonstrate the stability and the speed of inversion procedure.

  11. A Comparative Study of Strain- and Shear-Wave-Elastography in an Elasticity Phantom

    Carlsen, Jonathan F; Pedersen, Malene R; Ewertsen, Caroline; Săftoiu, Adrian; Lönn, Lars; Rafaelsen, Søren R; Nielsen, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of strain and shear-wave elastography for determining targets of varying stiffness in a phantom. The effect of target diameter on elastographic assessments and the effect of depth on shear-wave velocity were also investiga......OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of strain and shear-wave elastography for determining targets of varying stiffness in a phantom. The effect of target diameter on elastographic assessments and the effect of depth on shear-wave velocity were also...

  12. Near surface shear wave velocity in Bucharest, Romania

    M. von Steht

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bucharest, the capital of Romania with nearly 2 1/2 million inhabitants, is endangered by the strong earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone. To obtain information on the near surface shear-wave velocity Vs structure and to improve the available microzonations we conducted seismic refraction measurements in two parks of the city. There the shallow Vs structure is determined along five profiles, and the compressional-wave velocity (Vp structure is obtained along one profile. Although the amount of data collected is limited, they offer a reasonable idea about the seismic velocity distribution in these two locations. This knowledge is useful for a city like Bucharest where seismic velocity information so far is sparse and poorly documented. Using sledge-hammer blows on a steel plate and a 24-channel recording unit, we observe clear shear-wave arrivals in a very noisy environment up to a distance of 300 m from the source. The Vp model along profile 1 can be correlated with the known near surface sedimentary layers. Vp increases from 320 m/s near the surface to 1280 m/s above 55–65 m depth. The Vs models along all five profiles are characterized by low Vs (<350 m/s in the upper 60 m depth and a maximum Vs of about 1000 m/s below this depth. In the upper 30 m the average Vs30 varies from 210 m/s to 290 m/s. The Vp-Vs relations lead to a high Poisson's ratio of 0.45–0.49 in the upper ~60 m depth, which is an indication for water-saturated clayey sediments. Such ground conditions may severely influence the ground motion during strong Vrancea earthquakes.

  13. Near surface shear wave velocity in Bucharest, Romania

    von Steht, M.; Jaskolla, B.; Ritter, J. R. R.

    2008-12-01

    Bucharest, the capital of Romania with nearly 2 1/2 million inhabitants, is endangered by the strong earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone. To obtain information on the near surface shear-wave velocity Vs structure and to improve the available microzonations we conducted seismic refraction measurements in two parks of the city. There the shallow Vs structure is determined along five profiles, and the compressional-wave velocity (Vp) structure is obtained along one profile. Although the amount of data collected is limited, they offer a reasonable idea about the seismic velocity distribution in these two locations. This knowledge is useful for a city like Bucharest where seismic velocity information so far is sparse and poorly documented. Using sledge-hammer blows on a steel plate and a 24-channel recording unit, we observe clear shear-wave arrivals in a very noisy environment up to a distance of 300 m from the source. The Vp model along profile 1 can be correlated with the known near surface sedimentary layers. Vp increases from 320 m/s near the surface to 1280 m/s above 55 65 m depth. The Vs models along all five profiles are characterized by low Vs (<350 m/s) in the upper 60 m depth and a maximum Vs of about 1000 m/s below this depth. In the upper 30 m the average Vs30 varies from 210 m/s to 290 m/s. The Vp-Vs relations lead to a high Poisson's ratio of 0.45 0.49 in the upper ~60 m depth, which is an indication for water-saturated clayey sediments. Such ground conditions may severely influence the ground motion during strong Vrancea earthquakes.

  14. Wave blocking phenomenon of surface waves on a shear flow with a constant vorticity

    Maïssa, Philippe; Rousseaux, Germain; Stepanyants, Yury

    2016-03-01

    Propagation of gravity-capillary surface waves on a background shear flow with a constant vorticity is studied and compared with the case when the background flow is uniform in depth. Under the assumption that the background flow gradually varies in the horizontal direction, the primary attention is paid to the wave blocking phenomenon; the effect of vorticity on this phenomenon is studied in detail. The conditions for wave blocking are obtained and categorized for different values of the governing dimensionless parameters: Froude number, dimensionless vorticity, and surface tension.

  15. Generation of remote adaptive torsional shear waves with an octagonal phased array to enhance displacements and reduce variability of shear wave speeds: comparison with quasi-plane shear wavefronts

    A method based on adaptive torsional shear waves (ATSW) is proposed to overcome the strong attenuation of shear waves generated by a radiation force in dynamic elastography. During the inward propagation of ATSW, the magnitude of displacements is enhanced due to the convergence of shear waves and constructive interferences. The proposed method consists in generating ATSW fields from the combination of quasi-plane shear wavefronts by considering a linear superposition of displacement maps. Adaptive torsional shear waves were experimentally generated in homogeneous and heterogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms, and compared to quasi-plane shear wave propagations. Results demonstrated that displacement magnitudes by ATSW could be up to 3 times higher than those obtained with quasi-plane shear waves, that the variability of shear wave speeds was reduced, and that the signal-to-noise ratio of displacements was improved. It was also observed that ATSW could cause mechanical inclusions to resonate in heterogeneous phantoms, which further increased the displacement contrast between the inclusion and the surrounding medium. This method opens a way for the development of new noninvasive tissue characterization strategies based on ATSW in the framework of our previously reported shear wave induced resonance elastography (SWIRE) method proposed for breast cancer diagnosis. (paper)

  16. Drift-wave spectra in plasmas with magnetic shear

    The nonlinear radial eigenmode equation governing the evolution of drift waves in a weakly turbulent state is obtained under the assumption that ion nonlinear scattering (nonlinear ion Landau damping) is the dominant saturation mechanism. The poloidal spectrum is to be derived from the eigenvalue equation. The local character of the interaction in frequencies allows the transformation of the otherwise integral wave kinetic equation (i.e., the eigenvalue equation) into a system of two first-order differential equations coupling the spectra I(k/sub theta/) and I(k/sup dagger//sub theta/) if ω(k/sup dagger//sub theta/) = ω(k/sub theta/). The density fluctuation spectrum is obtained analytically in the limit of the small temperature ratio T/sub i//T/sub e/. Some features are: (i) the spectral index at high mode numbers agrees well with experimental values; (ii) the long-wavelength spectrum peaks at k/sub theta/a/sub s/approx. =0.62 (a/sub s/ equivalentsound Larmor radius), (iii) the cross-field diffusion is mostly induced by the high-mode-number fluctuations, whereas the major contribution to the density fluctuations is in the long wavelengths; (iv) the frequency spectrum of the beat waves peaks at ω = 0 (they then have a convective cell character); and (v) the turbulence level is a factor L/sub n//L/sub s/ (ratio of density and shear lengths) smaller than with former theories

  17. Feasibility of optical coherence elastography measurements of shear wave propagation in homogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms.

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Sun, Cuiru; Luk, Timothy W H; Yang, Victor X D; Kolios, Michael C

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a 20 MHz piezoelectric transducer (circular element 8.5 mm diameter) transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with the OCT swept source wavelength sweep. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) was applied to two gelatin phantoms (differing in gelatin concentration by weight, 8% vs. 14%). Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms of different stiffness. We present preliminary results of OCT derived shear wave propagation velocity and modulus, and compare these results to rheometer measurements. The results demonstrate the feasibility of shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) for high-resolution microscopic homogeneous tissue mechanical property characterization. PMID:22567590

  18. Gravitational, shear and matter waves in Kantowski-Sachs cosmologies

    Keresztes, Zoltán; Bradley, Michael; Dunsby, Peter K S; Gergely, László Á

    2015-01-01

    A general treatment of vorticity-free, perfect fluid perturbations of Kantowski-Sachs models with a positive cosmological constant are considered within the framework of the 1+1+2 covariant decomposition of spacetime. The dynamics is encompassed in six evolution equations for six harmonic coefficients, describing certain gravito-magnetic, kinematic and matter perturbations, and a set of algebraic expressions for the rest of the variables. The six equations further decouple into a set of four equations sourced by the perfect fluid, representing forced oscillations and two uncoupled damped oscillator equations. In the geometric optics approximation, the even and odd tensorial perturbations of the Weyl tensor evolve as gravitational waves on the anisotropic Kantowski-Sachs background, while the modes describing the shear and the matter density gradient are dephased by $\\pi /2$ and share the same speed of sound.

  19. Laboratory measurements of compressional and shear wave speeds through methane hydrate

    Durham, W B; Waite, WF; Pinkston, J C; Stern, L A; Kirby, S H; Helgerud, M B; Nur, A

    1999-10-25

    Simultaneous measurements of compressional and shear wave speeds through polycrystalline methane hydrate have been made. Methane hydrate, grown directly in a wave speed measurement chamber, was uniaxially compacted to a final porosity below 2%. At 277 K, the compacted material's compressional wave speed was 3650 {+-} 50 m/s. The shear wave speed, measured simultaneously, was 1890 {+-} 30 m/s. From these wave speed measurements, we derive Vp/Vs, Poisson's Ratio, bulk, shear and Young's moduli.

  20. Ship waves on uniform shear current at finite depth: wave resistance and critical velocity

    Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We present a comprehensive theory for linear gravity-driven ship waves in the presence of a shear current with uniform vorticity, including the effects of finite water depth. The wave resistance in the presence of shear current is calculated for the first time, containing in general a non-zero lateral component. While formally apparently a straightforward extension of existing deep water theory, the introduction of finite water depth is physically non-trivial, since the surface waves are now affected by a subtle interplay of the effects of the current and the sea bed. This becomes particularly pronounced when considering the phenomenon of critical velocity, the velocity at which transversely propagating waves become unable to keep up with the moving source. The phenomenon is well known for shallow water, and was recently shown to exist also in deep water in the presence of a shear current [Ellingsen, J.~Fluid Mech.\\ {\\bf 742} R2 (2014)]. We derive the exact criterion for criticality as a function of an intrin...

  1. [INVITED] Laser generation and detection of ultrafast shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids

    Pezeril, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the up-to-date findings related to ultrafast shear acoustic waves. Recent progress obtained for the laser generation and detection of picosecond shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids is reviewed. Examples in which the transverse isotropic symmetry of the sample structure is broken in order to permit shear acoustic wave generation through sudden laser heating are described in detail. Alternative photo-induced mechanisms for ultrafast shear acoustic generation in metals, semiconductors, insulators, magnetostrictive, piezoelectric and electrostrictive materials are reviewed as well. With reference to key experiments, an all-optical technique employed to probe longitudinal and shear structural dynamics in the GHz frequency range in ultra-thin liquid films is described. This technique, based on specific ultrafast shear acoustic transducers, has opened new perspectives that will be discussed for ultrafast shear acoustic probing of viscoelastic liquids at the nanometer scale.

  2. Analysis shear wave velocity structure obtained from surface wave methods in Bornova, Izmir

    Pamuk, Eren; Özdaǧ, Özkan Cevdet; Akgün, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    Properties of the soil from the bedrock is necessary to describe accurately and reliably for the reduction of earthquake damage. Because seismic waves change their amplitude and frequency content owing to acoustic impedance difference between soil and bedrock. Firstly, shear wave velocity and depth information of layers on bedrock is needed to detect this changing. Shear wave velocity can be obtained using inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods (MASW- the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves, ReMi-Refraction Microtremor, SPAC-Spatial Autocorrelation). While research depth is limeted in active source study, a passive source methods are utilized for deep depth which is not reached using active source methods. ReMi method is used to determine layer thickness and velocity up to 100 m using seismic refraction measurement systems.The research carried out up to desired depth depending on radius using SPAC which is utilized easily in conditions that district using of seismic studies in the city. Vs profiles which are required to calculate deformations in under static and dynamic loads can be obtained with high resolution using combining rayleigh wave dispersion curve obtained from active and passive source methods. In the this study, Surface waves data were collected using the measurements of MASW, ReMi and SPAC at the İzmir Bornova region. Dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods were combined in wide frequency band and Vs-depth profiles were obtained using inversion. Reliability of the resulting soil profiles were provided by comparison with theoretical transfer function obtained from soil paremeters and observed soil transfer function from Nakamura technique and by examination of fitting between these functions. Vs values are changed between 200-830 m/s and engineering bedrock (Vs>760 m/s) depth is approximately 150 m.

  3. Passive elastography: shear-wave tomography from physiological-noise correlation in soft tissues.

    Gallot, Thomas; Catheline, Stefan; Roux, Philippe; Brum, Javier; Benech, Nicolas; Negreira, Carlos

    2011-06-01

    Inspired by seismic-noise correlation and time reversal, a shear-wave tomography of soft tissues using an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner is presented here. Free from the need for controlled shear-wave sources, this passive elastography is based on Green's function retrieval and takes advantage of the permanent physiological noise of the human body. PMID:21693392

  4. A cumulative shear mechanism for tissue damage initiation in shock-wave lithotripsy

    Freund, Jonathan B.; Colonius, Tim; Evan, Andrew P.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence suggests that inertial cavitation plays an important role in the renal injury incurred during shock-wave lithotripsy. However, it is unclear how tissue damage is initiated, and significant injury typically occurs only after a sufficient dose of shock waves. While it has been suggested that shock-induced shearing might initiate injury, estimates indicate that individual shocks do not produce sufficient shear to do so. In this paper, we hypothesize that the cumulative shear of the many...

  5. Anomalous shear wave delays and surface wave velocities at Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

    To investigate the effects of a geothermal area on the propagation of intermediate-period (1--30 s) teleseismic body waves and surface waves, a specially designed portable seismograph system was operated in Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming. Travel time residuals, relative to a station outside the caldera, of up to 2 s for compressional phases are in agreement with short-period residuals for P phases measured by other investigators. Travel time delays for shear arrivals in the intermediate-period band range from 2 to 9 s and decrease with increasing dT/dΔ. Measured Rayleigh wave phase velocities are extremely low, ranging from 3.2 km/s at 27-s period to 2.0 km/s at 7-s period; the estimated uncertainty associated with these values is 15%. We propose a model for compressional and shear velocities and Poisson's ratio beneath the Yellowstone caldera which fits the teleseismic body and surface wave data: it consists of a highly anomalous crust with an average shear velocity of 3.0 km/s overlying an upper mantle with average velocity of 4.1 km/s. The high average value of Poisson's ratio in the crust (0.34) suggests the presence of fluids there; Poisson's ratio in the mantle between 40 and approximately 200 km is more nearly normal (0.29) than in the crust. A discrepancy between normal values of Poisson's ratio in the crust calculated from short-period data and high values calculated from teleseismic data can be resolved by postulating a viscoelastic crustal model with frequency-dependent shear velocity and attenuation

  6. Imaging mechanical shear waves induced by piezoelectric ceramics in magnetic resonance elastography

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive technique to measure elasticity of tissues in vivo. In this paper, a mechanical shear wave MR imaging system experiment is set for MRE. A novel actuator is proposed to generate mechanical shear waves propagating inside a gel phantom. The actuator is made of piezoelectric ceramics, and fixed on a plexiglass bracket. Both of the gel phantom and the actuator are put into a head coil inside the MR scanner's bore. The actuator works synchronously with an MR imaging sequence running on the MR scanner. The sequence is modified from a FLASH sequence into a motion-sensitizing phase- contrast sequence for shear wave MR imaging. Shear wave images are presented, and these effects on the shear wave MR imaging system, including the stiffness of phantoms, the frequency of the actuator, the parameters of the motion-sensitizing gradient, and the oscillation of the patient bed, are discussed.

  7. Acoustic-radiation-force-induced shear wave propagation in cardiac tissue

    Bouchard, Richard R.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2009-02-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) was employed to track acoustic radiation force (ARF)-induced shear waves in the myocardium of a beating heart. Shear waves were generated in and tracked through the myocardium of the left ventricular free wall (LVFW) in an in vivo heart that was exposed through a thoracotomy; matched studies were also preformed on an ex vivo myocardial specimen. Average shear wave velocities ranged from 2.22 to 2.53 m/s for the ex vivo specimen and 1.5 to 2.9 m/s (1.5-2.09 m/s during diastole; 2.9 m/s during systole) for in vivo specimens. Despite the known rotation of myocardial fiber orientation with tissue depth, there was no statistically significant shear wave velocity depth dependence observed in any of the experimental trials.

  8. Flow shear suppression of turbulence using externally driven ion Bernstein and Alfven waves

    The utilization of externally-launched radio-frequency waves as a means of active confinement control through the generation of sheared poloidal flows is explored. For low-frequency waves, kinetic Alfven waves are proposed, and are shown to drive sheared E x B flows as a result of the radial variation in the electromagnetic Reynolds stress. In the high frequency regime, ion Bernstein waves are considered, and shown to generate sheared poloidal rotation through the ponderomotive force. In either case, it is shown that modest amounts of absorbed power (∼ few 100 kW) are required to suppress turbulence in a region of several cm radial width. 9 refs

  9. A wave interaction approach to studying non-modal homogeneous and stratified shear instabilities

    Guha, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Resonant interaction between two (or more) progressive interfacial waves produce exponentially growing instabilities in idealized, homogeneous and density stratified, inviscid shear layers (Holmboe 1962). Resonance occurs when the two waves attain a "phase-locked" configuration. In this paper we have generalized the mechanistic picture of shear instabilities described in Holmboe (1962). Unlike Holmboe, we do not initially assume the wave type (e.g. vorticity wave or gravity wave), nor do we impose the normal-mode waveform (which only accounts for exponential growth). Starting from the first principles, we demonstrate that two oppositely propagating interfacial waves, having arbitrary initial amplitudes (which are small enough to satisfy linearity) and phases, eventually phase-lock, provided they satisfy a certain condition. We show it to be the necessary and sufficient condition for exponentially growing instabilities in idealized shear layers. We investigate three types of shear instabilities - Kelvin Helmho...

  10. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  11. Feasibility of optical coherence elastography measurements of shear wave propagation in homogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Sun, Cuiru; Luk, Timothy W. H.; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a 20 MHz piezoelectric transducer (circular element 8.5 mm diameter) transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with the OCT swept source wavelength sweep. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) was applied to two gelatin phantoms (differing in gelatin concentration by w...

  12. Propagation of Shear Waves Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force in Nondissipative Inhomogeneous Media

    LU Ming-Zhu; LIU Xue-Jin; SHI Yu; KANG Yan-Ni; GUAN Yu-Bo; WAN Ming-Xi

    2012-01-01

    We concentrate on the nondissipative mechanism induced shear wave in inhomogenous tissue.The shear wave equation of radiation force in inhomogeneous media is solved numerically with a finite-difference time-domain method.A rarely studied nondissipative mechanism of shear displacement due to a smooth medium inhomogeneity is evaluated.It is noted that unlike the dissipative effect,the nondissipative action on a localized inhomogeneity with its hardness parameter changing smoothly along the beam axis,compresses or stretches the focus area.The shear waves in nondissipative inhomogeneous media remain the property of sharp turn with 100% peak positive displacement and 64% peak negative displacement.This action is useful in discerning the water-like lesion.%We concentrate on the nondissipative mechanism induced shear wave in inhomogenous tissue. The shear wave equation of radiation force in inhomogeneous media is solved numerically with a finite-difference time-domain method. A rarely studied nondissipative mechanism of shear displacement due to a smooth medium inhomogeneity is evaluated. It is noted that unlike the dissipative effect, the nondissipative action on a localized inhomogeneity with its hardness parameter changing smoothly along the beam axis, compresses or stretches the focus area. The shear waves in nondissipative inhomogeneous media remain the property of sharp turn with 100% peak positive displacement and 64% peak negative displacement. This action is useful in discerning the water-like lesion.

  13. Systematic Analysis Method of Shear-Wave Splitting:SAM Software System

    Gao Yuan; Liu Xiqiang; Liang Wei; Hao Ping

    2004-01-01

    In order to make a more effective use of the data from regional digital seismograph networks and to promote the study on shear wave splitting and its application to earthquake stressforecasting, SAM software system, i.e., the software on systematic analysis method of shear wave splitting has been developed. This paper introduces the design aims, system structure,function and characteristics about the SAM software system and shows some graphical interfaces of data input and result output. Lastly, it discusses preliminarily the study of shear wave splitting and its application to earthquake forecasting.

  14. Contactless Remote Induction of Shear Waves in Soft Tissues Using a Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Device

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Tang, An; Catheline, Stefan; Cloutier, Guy

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the first observation of shear wave induced remotely within soft tissues. It was performed through the combination of a transcranial magnetic stimulation device and a permanent magnet. A physical model based on Maxwell and Navier equations was developed. Experiments were performed on a cryogel phantom and a chicken breast sample. Using an ultrafast ultrasound scanner, shear waves of respective amplitude of 5 and 0.5 micrometers were observed. Experimental and numerical results were in good agreement. This study constitutes the framework of an alternative shear wave elastography method.

  15. Generating Shear Waves in the Human Brain for Ultrasound Elastography: A new Approach

    Nicolas, Emmanuel; Callé, Samuel; Remenieras, Jean-Pierre

    One of the challenges of brain elastography is the generation of the shear waves inside the brain. The generation system has to bypass the body's natural protection while keeping a good level of comfort for the patient. We propose a shear wave inducing system for brain ultrasound elastography. In this paper we will validate this system in vitro on a tissue mimicking phantom by doing shear wave velocity measurements. The system proves to work well on phantoms and to be comfortable for the patient. Further work will include measurements in vivo.

  16. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Z. Hashemiyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort.

  17. Nonlinear shear wave in a non Newtonian visco-elastic medium

    Banerjee, D.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Calcutta 700 064 (India); Chaudhuri, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, 85741 Garching (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    An analysis of nonlinear transverse shear wave has been carried out on non-Newtonian viscoelastic liquid using generalized hydrodynamic model. The nonlinear viscoelastic behavior is introduced through velocity shear dependence of viscosity coefficient by well known Carreau-Bird model. The dynamical feature of this shear wave leads to the celebrated Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem. Numerical solution has been obtained which shows that initial periodic solutions reoccur after passing through several patterns of periodic waves. A possible explanation for this periodic solution is given by constructing modified Korteweg de Vries equation. This model has application from laboratory to astrophysical plasmas as well as in biological systems.

  18. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Packo, P.; Staszewski, W. J.; Uhl, T.

    2016-01-01

    Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort. PMID:26884808

  19. New pure shear elastic surface waves in magneto-electro-elastic half-space

    Melkumyan, Arman

    2006-01-01

    Pure shear surface waves guided by the free surface of a magneto-electro-elastic material are investigated. Three surface waves are obtained for various magneto-electrical conditions on the free surface of the magneto-electro-elastic half-space. The velocities of propagation and the existence conditions for each of these waves are obtained in explicit exact form.

  20. Estimation of Shear Wave Velocity in Seafloor Sediment by Seismo-Acoustic Interface Waves:. a Case Study for Geotechnical Application

    Dong, Hefeng; Hovem, Jens M.; Frivik, Svein Arne

    2006-10-01

    Estimates of shear wave velocity profiles in seafloor sediments can be obtained from inversion of measured dispersion relations of seismo-acoustic interface waves propagating along the seabed. The interface wave velocity is directly related to shear wave velocity with value of between 87-96% of the shear wave velocity, dependent on the Poission ratio of the sediments. In this paper we present two different techniques to determine the dispersion relation: a single-sensor method used to determine group velocity and a multi-sensor method used to determine the phase velocity of the interface wave. An inversion technique is used to determine shear wave velocity versus depth and it is based on singular value decomposition and regularization theory. The technique is applied to data acquired at Steinbåen outside Horten in the Oslofjorden (Norway) and compared with the result from independent core measurements taken at the same location. The results show good agreement between the two ways of determining shear wave velocity.

  1. Estimation of material parameters from slow and fast shear waves in an incompressible, transversely isotropic material.

    Tweten, Dennis J; Okamoto, Ruth J; Schmidt, John L; Garbow, Joel R; Bayly, Philip V

    2015-11-26

    This paper describes a method to estimate mechanical properties of soft, anisotropic materials from measurements of shear waves with specific polarization and propagation directions. This method is applicable to data from magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), which is a method for measuring shear waves in live subjects or in vitro samples. Here, we simulate MRE data using finite element analysis. A nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material model with three parameters (shear modulus, shear anisotropy, and tensile anisotropy) is used, which is appropriate for many fibrous, biological tissues. Both slow and fast shear waves travel concurrently through such a material with speeds that depend on the propagation direction relative to fiber orientation. A three-parameter estimation approach based on directional filtering and isolation of slow and fast shear wave components (directional filter inversion, or DFI) is introduced. Wave speeds of each isolated shear wave component are estimated using local frequency estimation (LFE), and material properties are calculated using weighted least squares. Data from multiple finite element simulations are used to assess the accuracy and reliability of DFI for estimation of anisotropic material parameters. PMID:26476762

  2. Surface waves in an incompressible fluid - Resonant instability due to velocity shear

    The effects of velocity shear on the resonance absorption of incompressible MHD surface waves are studied. It is found that there are generally values of the velocity shear for which the surface wave decay rate becomes zero. In some cases, the resonance absorption goes to zero even for very small velocity shears. It is also found that the resonance absorption can be strongly enhanced at other values of the velocity shear, so the presence of flows may be generally important for determining the effects of resonance absorption, such as might occur in the interaction of p-modes with sunspots. Resonances leading to instability of the global surface mode can exist, and instability can occur for velocity shears significantly below the Kelvin-Helmholtz threshold. These instabilities may play a role in the development or turbulence in regions of strong velocity shear in the solar wind or the earth's magnetosphere. 27 refs

  3. An omnidirectional shear horizontal wave transducer based on ring array of face-shear (d24) piezoelectric ceramics

    Miao, Hongchen; Wang, Qiangzhong; Li, Faxin

    2016-01-01

    The non-dispersive fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) wave in plate-like structures is of practical importance in non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM). Theoretically, an omnidirectional SH0 transducer phased array system can be used to inspect defects in a large plate in the similar manner to the phased array transducers used in medical B-scan ultrasonics. However, very few omnidirectional SH transducers have been proposed so far. In this work, an omnidirectional SH wave piezoelectric transducer (OSH-PT) was proposed which consists of a ring array of twelve face-shear (d24) trapezoidal PZT elements. Each PZT element can produce face-shear deformation under applied voltage, resulting in circumferential shear deformation in the OSH-PT and omnidirectional SH waves in the hosting plate. Both finite element simulations and experiments were conducted to examine the performance of the proposed OSH-PT. Experimental testing shows that the OSH-PT exhibits good omnidirectional properties,...

  4. Variations of shear wave splitting in the 2008 Wen chuan earthquake region

    DING ZhiFeng; WU Yan; WANG Hui; ZHOU XiaoFeng; LI GuiYin

    2008-01-01

    Through the analysis of S-wave particle motion of local events in the shear wave window, the polarization directions of the faster shear wave and the delay times between the faster and the slower shear waves were derived from seismic recordings at the stations near the fault zones. The shear wave splitting results of seven stations in the area of Longmenshan fault zone reveal spatial variation of the polarization directions of the fast shear wave. The directions at stations in the southeastern side of the Longmenshan fault zone (in the Sichuan Basin area) are in the NE direction, whereas the direction at station PWU (in the Plateau), which is in the northwestern side of the faults, is in the EW direction.Systematic changes of the time delays between two split shear waves were also observed. At station L5501 in the southern end of the aftershock zone, the delay times of the slower shear wave decrease systematically after the main shock. After the main shock, the delay times at station PWU were longer than those before the earthquake. Seismic shear wave splitting is caused mostly by stress-aligned microcracks in the rock below the stations. The results demonstrate changes of local stress field during the main-shock and the aftershocks. The stress in the southern part of Wenchuan seismogenic zone was released by the main-shock and the aftershocks. The crustal stresses were transferred to the northeastern part of the zone, resulting in stress increase at station PWU after the main-shock.

  5. Variations of shear wave splitting in the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake region

    2008-01-01

    Through the analysis of S-wave particle motion of local events in the shear wave window, the polariza-tion directions of the faster shear wave and the delay times between the faster and the slower shear waves were derived from seismic recordings at the stations near the fault zones. The shear wave split-ting results of seven stations in the area of Longmenshan fault zone reveal spatial variation of the po-larization directions of the fast shear wave. The directions at stations in the southeastern side of the Longmenshan fault zone (in the Sichuan Basin area) are in the NE direction, whereas the direction at station PWU (in the Plateau), which is in the northwestern side of the faults, is in the EW direction. Systematic changes of the time delays between two split shear waves were also observed. At station L5501 in the southern end of the aftershock zone, the delay times of the slower shear wave decrease systematically after the main shock. After the main shock, the delay times at station PWU were longer than those before the earthquake. Seismic shear wave splitting is caused mostly by stress-aligned microcracks in the rock below the stations. The results demonstrate changes of local stress field dur-ing the main-shock and the aftershocks. The stress in the southern part of Wenchuan seismogenic zone was released by the main-shock and the aftershocks. The crustal stresses were transferred to the northeastern part of the zone, resulting in stress increase at station PWU after the main-shock.

  6. The effect of subducting slabs in global shear wave tomography

    Lu, Chang; Grand, Stephen P.

    2016-05-01

    Subducting slabs create strong short wavelength seismic anomalies in the upper mantle where much of Earth's seismicity is located. As such, they have the potential to bias longer wavelength seismic tomography models. To evaluate the effect of subducting slabs in global tomography, we performed a series of inversions using a global synthetic shear wave traveltime data set for a theoretical slab model based on predicted thermal anomalies within slabs. The spectral element method was applied to predict the traveltime anomalies produced by the 3-D slab model for paths corresponding to our current data used in actual tomography models. Inversion tests have been conducted first using the raw traveltime anomalies to check how well the slabs can be imaged in global tomography without the effect of earthquake mislocation. Our results indicate that most of the slabs can be identified in the inversion result but with smoothed and reduced amplitude. The recovery of the total mass anomaly in slab regions is about 88 per cent. We then performed another inversion test to investigate the effect of mislocation caused by subducting slabs. We found that source mislocation largely removes slab signal and significantly degrades the imaging of subducting slabs-potentially reducing the recovery of mass anomalies in slab regions to only 41 per cent. We tested two source relocation procedures-an iterative relocation inversion and joint relocation inversion. Both methods partially recover the true source locations and improve the inversion results, but the joint inversion method worked significantly better than the iterative method. In all of our inversion tests, the amplitudes of artefact structures in the lower mantle caused by the incorrect imaging of slabs (up to ˜0.5 per cent S velocity anomalies) are comparable to some large-scale lower-mantle heterogeneities seen in global tomography studies. Based on our inversion tests, we suggest including a-priori subducting slabs in the

  7. Improvement of Shear Wave Motion Detection Using Harmonic Imaging in Healthy Human Liver.

    Amador, Carolina; Song, Pengfei; Meixner, Duane D; Chen, Shigao; Urban, Matthew W

    2016-05-01

    Quantification of liver elasticity is a major application of shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) to non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis stages. SWEI measurements can be highly affected by ultrasound image quality. Ultrasound harmonic imaging has exhibited a significant improvement in ultrasound image quality as well as for SWEI measurements. This was previously illustrated in cardiac SWEI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate liver shear wave particle displacement detection and shear wave velocity (SWV) measurements with fundamental and filter-based harmonic ultrasound imaging. In a cohort of 17 patients with no history of liver disease, a 2.9-fold increase in maximum shear wave displacement, a 0.11 m/s decrease in the overall interquartile range and median SWV and a 17.6% increase in the success rate of SWV measurements were obtained when filter-based harmonic imaging was used instead of fundamental imaging. PMID:26803391

  8. Effects of shallow density structure on the inversion for crustal shear wave speeds in surface wave tomography

    Xing, Guangchi; Niu, Fenglin; Chen, Min; Yang, Yingjie

    2016-05-01

    Surface wave tomography routinely uses empirically scaled density model in the inversion of dispersion curves for shear wave speeds of the crust and uppermost mantle. An improperly selected empirical scaling relationship between density and shear wave speed can lead to unrealistic density models beneath certain tectonic formations such as sedimentary basins. Taking the Sichuan basin east to the Tibetan plateau as an example, we investigate the differences between density profiles calculated from four scaling methods and their effects on Rayleigh wave phase velocities. Analytical equations for 1-D layered models and adjoint tomography for 3-D models are used to examine the trade-off between density and S-wave velocity structures at different depth ranges. We demonstrate that shallow density structure can significantly influence phase velocities at short periods, and thereby affect the shear wave speed inversion from phase velocity data. In particular, a deviation of 25 per cent in the initial density model can introduce an error up to 5 per cent in the inverted shear velocity at middle and lower crustal depths. Therefore one must pay enough attention in choosing a proper velocity-density scaling relationship in constructing initial density model in Rayleigh wave inversion for crustal shear velocity structure.

  9. Finite difference modelling to evaluate seismic P wave and shear wave field data

    T. Burschil

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution reflection seismic methods are an established non-destructive tool for engineering tasks. In the near surface, shear wave reflection seismic measurements usually offer a higher spatial resolution in the same effective signal frequency spectrum than P wave data, but data quality varies more strongly. To discuss the causes of these differences, we investigated a P wave and a SH wave reflection seismic profile measured at the same location on Föhr island, and applied reflection seismic processing to the field data as well as finite difference modelling of the seismic wavefield (SOFI FD-code. The simulations calculated were adapted to the acquisition field geometry, comprising 2 m receiver distance and 4 m shot distance along the 1.5 km long P wave and 800 m long SH wave profiles. A Ricker-Wavelet and the use of absorbing frames were first order model parameters. The petrophysical parameters to populate the structural models down to 400 m depth are taken from borehole data, VSP measurements and cross-plot relations. The first simulation of the P wave wavefield was based on a simplified hydrogeological model of the survey location containing six lithostratigraphic units. Single shot data were compared and seismic sections created. Major features like direct wave, refracted waves and reflections are imaged, but the reflectors describing a prominent till layer at ca. 80 m depth was missing. Therefore, the P wave input model was refined and 16 units assigned. These define a laterally more variable velocity model (vP = 1600–2300 m s−1 leading to a much better reproduction of the field data. The SH wave model was adapted accordingly but only led to minor correlation with the field data and produced a higher signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, we suggest to consider for future simulations additional features like intrinsic damping, thin layering, or a near surface weathering layer. These may lead to a better understanding of key

  10. Linking the viscous grain-shearing mechanism of wave propagation in marine sediments to fractional calculus

    Pandey, Vikash; Holm, Sverre

    2016-04-01

    An analogy is drawn between the diffusion-wave equations derived from the fractional Kelvin-Voigt model and those obtained from Buckingham's grain-shearing (GS) model [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 2796-2815 (2000)] of wave propagation in saturated, unconsolidated granular materials. The material impulse response function from the GS model is found to be similar to the power-law memory kernel which is inherent in the framework of fractional calculus. The compressional wave equation and shear wave equation derived from the GS model turn out to be the Kelvin-Voigt fractional-derivative wave equation and the fractional diffusion-wave equation respectively. Also, a physical interpretation of the characteristic fractional-order present in the Kelvin-Voigt fractional derivative wave equation and time-fractional diffusion-wave equation is inferred from the GS model. The shear wave equation from the GS model predicts both diffusion and wave propagation in the fractional framework. The overall goal is intended to show that fractional calculus is not just a mathematical framework which can be used to curve-fit the complex behavior of materials, but rather it can be justified from real physical process of grain-shearing as well.

  11. Seismic anisotropy of the crust in Yunnan,China: Polarizations of fast shear-waves

    SHI Yu-tao; GAO Yuan; WU Jing; LUO Yan; SU You-jin

    2006-01-01

    Using seismic data recorded by Yunnan Telemetry Seismic Network from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2003,the dominant polarization directions of fast shear-waves are obtained at l0 digital seismic stations by SAM technique, a systematic analysis method on shear-wave splitting, in this study. The results show that dominant directions of polarizations of fast shear-waves at most stations are mainly at nearly N-S or NNW direction in Yunnan.The dominant polarization directions of fast shear-waves at stations located on the active faults are consistent with the strike of active faults, directions of regional principal compressive strains measured from GPS data, and basically consistent with regional principal compressive stress. Only a few of stations show complicated polarization pattern of fast shear-waves, or are not consistent with the strike of active faults and the directions of principal GPS compressive strains, which are always located at junction of several faults. The result reflects complicated fault distribution and stress field. The dominant polarization direction of fast shear-wave indicates the direction of the in-situ maximum principal compressive stress is controlled by multiple tectonic aspects such as the regional stress field and faults.

  12. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic MHD shear flows

    Uchava, E S; Tevzadze, A G; Poedts, S

    2014-01-01

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic MHD flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model, that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy, but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also impor...

  13. Linear mechanism of surface gravity wave generation in horizontally sheared flow

    An analysis is presented of a linear mechanism of surface gravity wave generation in a horizontally sheared flow in a fluid layer with free boundary. A free-surface flow of this type is found to be algebraically unstable. The development of instability leads to the formation of surface gravity waves whose amplitude grows with time according to a power law. Flow stability is analyzed by using a nonmodal approach in which the behavior of a spatial Fourier harmonic of a disturbance is considered in a semi-Lagrangian frame of reference moving with the flow. Shear-flow disturbances are divided into two classes (wave and vortex disturbances) depending on the value of potential vorticity. It is shown that vortex disturbances decay with time while the energy of wave disturbances increases indefinitely. Transformation of vortex disturbances into wave ones under strong shear is described.

  14. Free surface waves on shear currents with non-uniform vorticity: third-order solutions

    Free surface waves of moderate amplitude on a fluid endowed with vorticity are calculated by computer-assisted perturbation expansions. Solitary waves are generated by deriving the nonlinear evolution equation (NEE) for the free surface displacement. Another recursive iteration procedure is then performed on the NEE. Properties obtained from second- and third-order expansions are computed explicitly for the case of a linear shear profile, or uniform vorticity distribution. Comparisons with known results in the literature show excellent agreement for small amplitude waves. Applications to non-uniform vorticity distributions are feasible and valuable, as existing methods will generally fail for nonlinear shear currents. Algebraic shear profiles U(y) = aym (a = a constant, m not necessarily an integer) are tested, and backward modes display peculiar properties. Examples include a non-monotonic trend in the half-width of solitary waves and a local maximum in the velocity of the wave.

  15. Over-reflection of slow magnetosonic waves by homogeneous shear flow: Analytical solution

    We have analyzed the amplification of slow magnetosonic (or pseudo-Alfvenic) waves (SMW) in incompressible shear flow. As found here, the amplification depends on the component of the wave-vector perpendicular to the direction of the shear flow. Earlier numerical results are consistent with the general analytic solution for the linearized magnetohydrodynamic equations, derived here for the model case of pure homogeneous shear (without Coriolis force). An asymptotically exact analytical formula for the amplification coefficient is derived for the case when the amplification is sufficiently large.

  16. The Influence of the Shear on the Gravitational Waves in the Early Anisotropic Universe

    Song, Yoogeun

    2016-01-01

    We study the singularity of the congruences for both timelike and null geodesic curves using the expansion of the early anisotropic Bianchi type I Universe. In this paper, we concentrate on the influence of the shear of the timelike and null geodesic congruences in the early Universe. Under some natural conditions, we derive the Raychaudhuri type equation for the expansion and the shear-related equations. Recently, scientists working on the LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) have shown many possibilities to observing the anisotropy of the primordial gravitational wave background radiation. We deduce the evolution equation for the shear that may be responsible for those observational results.

  17. Dispersion relation of drift-wave instability in a collisionless plasma with sheared magnetic field

    Detailed measurements are performed on drift-wave instability in a collisionless plasma column under a sheared magnetic field. The instability is found to be destabilized by the small magnetic shear and has a maximum amplitude at the shear length, where the electron thermal speed is nearly equal to the axial phase velocity (controlled by the shear) of the instability. The dispersion relation of the instability agrees with the local theory, which yields almost the same results as the non-local theory taking into account the measured radial density profile of a slender plasma column. (author)

  18. Magnetic-Field Generation by Randomly Forced Shearing Waves

    Schekochihin, A A; Kleeorin, N; Lesur, G; Mallet, A; McWilliams, J C; Rogachevskii, I; Yousef, T A

    2008-01-01

    A rigorous theory for the generation of a large-scale magnetic field by random nonhelically forced motions of a conducting fluid combined with a linear shear is presented in the analytically tractable limit of Rm << Re << 1. This is a minimal proof-of-concept calculation aiming to put the shear dynamo, a new effect recently reported in a number of numerical experiments, on a firm physical and analytical footing. Numerically observed scalings of the wavenumber and growth rate of the fastest growing mode, previously not understood, are derived analytically. The simplicity of the model suggests that shear dynamo may be a generic property of shear flows -- with ubiquitous relevance to astrophysical systems.

  19. Application of a laser/EMAT system for using shear and LS mode converted waves.

    Murray, P R; Dewhurst, R J

    2002-05-01

    Quantitative time-of-flight analysis of laser-generated shear waves and longitudinal-shear mode-converted waves has demonstrated an effective method for non-contact monitoring of the thickness of metal plates. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser pulses with energies of approximately 18 mJ, delivered to the material surface via an optical fibre and focused to a line source by a cylindrical lens, excited surface waves, longitudinal and shear waves. Bulk waves propagated through the plate to be reflected from the far surface. Returning waves were detected using an electro-magnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) sensitive to in-plane motion. The compilation of B-scans generated as the sensor head was moved along the material's surface to produce a 2-D intensity profile made any changes in the plate thickness easy to visualise. The longitudinal-shear (L-S) and shear-longitudinal (S-L) mode-converted waves provided a method of simultaneously monitoring two different points on the far surface enabling any changes in the material thickness to be clearly identified. This method was used to determine the thickness of aluminium samples ranging in from 5 to 70 mm. PMID:12160043

  20. Determination of Shear Properties in the Upper Seafloor Using Seismo-acoustic Interface Waves

    Frivik, Svein Arne

    1998-12-31

    This thesis develops methods for recording and analysis of seismo-acoustic interface waves for determination of shear wave velocity as a function of depth and includes this in standard refraction seismic surveying. It investigates different techniques for estimation of dispersion characteristics of the interface waves and demonstrates that multi sensor spectral estimation techniques improve the dispersion estimates. The dispersion estimate of the fundamental interface wave mode is used as input to an object function for a model based linearized inversion. The inversion scheme provides an estimate of the shear wave velocity as a function of depth. Three field surveys were performed. Data were acquired with a standard bottom deployed refraction seismic hydrophone array containing 24 or 48 receivers, with a receiver spacing of 2.5 m. Explosive charges were used as sources. The recording time was increased from 0.5 to 8 s, compared to standard refraction seismic surveys. Shear wave velocity and shear modulus estimates were obtained from all the sites. At one of the sites, geotechnically obtained shear wave parameters were available, and a comparison between the two techniques were performed. the result of the comparison is promising and shows the potential of the technique. Although the result of applying the processing scheme to all three data sets is promising, it appears that survey parameters, like source-array spacing, receiver spacing and type of source might have been optimized for better performance. Based on this limitation, a new processing scheme and a new array configuration is proposed for surveys which integrates the recording and processing of both compressional waves and shear waves. 89 refs., 65 refs., 19 tabs.

  1. Modified ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with field-aligned shear flows

    Saleem, H. [Department of Space Science, Institute of Space Technology, 1-Islamabad Highway, Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Research Institute, Pakistan Academy of Sciences, 3-Constitution Avenue G-5/3, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ali, S. [Theoretical Research Institute, Pakistan Academy of Sciences, 3-Constitution Avenue G-5/3, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP) at Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Haque, Q. [Theoretical Research Institute, Pakistan Academy of Sciences, 3-Constitution Avenue G-5/3, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP) at Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-08-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a plasma having field-aligned shear flow. A Korteweg-deVries-type nonlinear equation for a modified ion-acoustic wave is obtained which admits a single pulse soliton solution. The theoretical result has been applied to solar wind plasma at 1 AU for illustration.

  2. Modified ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with field-aligned shear flows

    The nonlinear dynamics of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a plasma having field-aligned shear flow. A Korteweg-deVries-type nonlinear equation for a modified ion-acoustic wave is obtained which admits a single pulse soliton solution. The theoretical result has been applied to solar wind plasma at 1 AU for illustration

  3. Optical coherence tomography detection of shear wave propagation in MCF7 cell modules

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) in MCF7 cell modules (comprised of MCF7 cells and collagen) and based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a piezoelectric transducer transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with an OCT swept source wavelength sweep imaging system. Acoustic radiation force was applied to the MCF7 cell constructs. Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the acoustic radiation force, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these modules. The OCT phase maps are acquired with a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system. We also calculated the tissue mechanical properties based on the propagating shear waves in the MCF7 + collagen phantoms using the Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) of an ultrasound transducer, and measured the shear wave speed with the OCT phase maps. This method lays the foundation for future studies of mechanical property measurements of breast cancer structures, with applications in the study of breast cancer pathologies.

  4. Connecting the grain-shearing mechanism of wave propagation in marine sediments to fractional calculus

    Pandey, Vikash

    2015-01-01

    An analogy is drawn between the diffusion-wave equations derived from the fractional Kelvin-Voigt model and those obtained from Buckingham's grain-shearing (GS) model [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 2796-2815 (2000)] of wave propagation in saturated, unconsolidated granular materials. The material impulse response function from the GS model is found to be similar to the power-law memory kernel which is inherent in the framework of fractional calculus. The compressional wave equation and shear wave equation derived from the GS model turn out to be the Kelvin-Voigt fractional-derivative wave equation and the fractional diffusion-wave equation respectively. Also, a physical interpretation of the characteristic fractional-order present in the Kelvin-Voigt fractional derivative wave equation and time-fractional diffusion-wave equation is inferred from the GS model. The shear wave equation from the GS model predicts both diffusion and wave propagation in the fractional framework. The overall goal is intended to show that...

  5. Quantitative shear-wave optical coherence elastography with a programmable phased array ultrasound as the wave source.

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Huang, Zhihong; Shen, Tueng; Wang, Ruikang K

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to implement a beam-steering ultrasound as the wave source for shear-wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) to achieve an extended range of elastic imaging of the tissue sample. We introduce a linear phased array ultrasound transducer (LPAUT) as the remote and programmable wave source and a phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) as the sensitive shear-wave detector. The LPAUT is programmed to launch acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) focused at desired locations within the range of OCT imaging, upon which the elasticity map of the entire OCT B-scan cross section is recovered by spatial compounding of the elastic maps derived from each launch of AFRIs. We also propose a directional filter to separate the shear-wave propagation at different directions in order to reduce the effect of tissue heterogeneity on the shear-wave propagation within tissue. The feasibility of this proposed approach is then demonstrated by determining the stiffness of tissue-mimicking phantoms with agarose concentrations of 0.5% and 1% and also by imaging the Young's modulus of retinal and choroidal tissues within a porcine eye ball ex vivo. The approach opens up opportunities to combine medical ultrasound imaging and SW-OCE for high-resolution localized quantitative assessment of tissue biomechanical property. PMID:26512505

  6. Rayleigh Wave and Shear Wave Tomography of Northeastern China: Results Coconstrained by Multiple Datasets

    Zhou, T.; Chen, J.; Han, J.; Tian, Y.; Wu, M.; Yang, Y.; Ning, J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate crustal and upper mantle phase velocity structures beneath NorthEastern China (NEC, 40°-54°N, 112°-135°E), a tectonically active region with continental volcanicity divided by active faults. Rayleigh wave phase velocity is obtained respectively by Ambient Noise Method (ANM, Lin et al., GJI, 2009), Two Station Method (TSM, Meier et al., GJI, 2004) and Two Plane Wave Method (TPWM, Yang and Forsyth, JGR, 2005), assuring good frequency coverage. Two-year' events with magnitude Ms>5.5 and epicentral distance Δ>30°recorded by NECESSArray and some permanent stations of CEA are together used in TPWM and TSM, while 1 s continuous seismic observations in the same period are employed in ANM. The period of Rayleigh wave phase velocity spans from 6 s to 150 s, i.e., from 6 s to 30 s (ANM); 30 s to 100 s (TPWM) and 30 s to 150 s (TSM). Shear wave velocity structure of the research region is obtained by Weighted Least Squares Inversion, in which the weight is adopted as function of data quality. Our results not only display close relation with tectonics of this region, such as mountains, sedimentary basins, faults, but also reveal variation feature of crustal thickness. Moreover, our results clearly show that all volcanos in this region have their roots — low velocity zones, among them the roots of Changbai, Jingbohu, Wudalianchi are obviously connected, while the biggest one of Daxinganling is separated. This feature might be result of an early intense eruption in western NEC and a late weak one in eastern NEC.

  7. Validation of recent shear wave velocity models in the United States with full-wave simulation

    Gao, Haiying; Shen, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Interpretations of dynamic processes and the thermal and chemical structure of the Earth depend on the accuracy of Earth models. With the growing number of velocity models constructed with different tomographic methods and seismic data sets, there is an increasing need for a systematic way to validate model accuracy and resolution. This study selects five shear wave velocity models in the U.S. and simulates full-wave propagation within the 3-D structures. Surface-wave signals extracted from ambient seismic noise and regional earthquakes are compared with synthetic waveforms at multiple-frequency bands. Phase delays and cross-correlation coefficients between observed and synthetic waveforms allow us to compare and validate these models quantitatively. In general, measurements from regional earthquakes are consistent with ambient noise results, but appear more scattered, which may result from uncertainty of the earthquake source location, origin time, and moment tensor. Our results show the improvement of model prediction with the increase of seismic data sets and implement of advanced methods. There exists a positive linear trend between phase delay and interstation distance for three models, indicating that on average, these models are faster than the real Earth structure. The phase delays from the jointly inverted model of ambient noise and receiver function have negative means at all periods while without obvious dependence on the interstation distance. The full-wave ambient noise tomographic model predicts more accurate phase arrivals compared to other models. This study suggests a need for an integrated model constructed with multiple seismic waveforms and consideration of anisotropy and attenuation.

  8. Prediction of shear wave velocity using empirical correlations and artificial intelligence methods

    Maleki, Shahoo; Moradzadeh, Ali; Riabi, Reza Ghavami; Gholami, Raoof; Sadeghzadeh, Farhad

    2014-06-01

    Good understanding of mechanical properties of rock formations is essential during the development and production phases of a hydrocarbon reservoir. Conventionally, these properties are estimated from the petrophysical logs with compression and shear sonic data being the main input to the correlations. This is while in many cases the shear sonic data are not acquired during well logging, which may be for cost saving purposes. In this case, shear wave velocity is estimated using available empirical correlations or artificial intelligent methods proposed during the last few decades. In this paper, petrophysical logs corresponding to a well drilled in southern part of Iran were used to estimate the shear wave velocity using empirical correlations as well as two robust artificial intelligence methods knows as Support Vector Regression (SVR) and Back-Propagation Neural Network (BPNN). Although the results obtained by SVR seem to be reliable, the estimated values are not very precise and considering the importance of shear sonic data as the input into different models, this study suggests acquiring shear sonic data during well logging. It is important to note that the benefits of having reliable shear sonic data for estimation of rock formation mechanical properties will compensate the possible additional costs for acquiring a shear log.

  9. Monte Carlo Simulation of Scattered Light with Shear Waves Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force for Acousto-Optic Imaging

    A Monte Carlo method of multiple scattered coherent light with the information of shear wave propagation in scattering media is presented. The established Monte-Carlo algorithm is mainly relative to optical phase variations due to the acoustic-radiation-force shear-wave-induced displacements of light scatterers. Both the distributions and temporal behaviors of optical phase increments in probe locations are obtained. Consequently, shear wave speed is evaluated quantitatively. It is noted that the phase increments exactly track the propagations of shear waves induced by focus-ultrasound radiation force. In addition, attenuations of shear waves are demonstrated in simulation results. By using linear regression processing, the shear wave speed, which is set to 2.1 m/s in simulation, is estimated to be 2.18 m/s and 2.35 m/s at time sampling intervals of 0.2 ms and 0.5 ms, respectively

  10. Research on definition of hard rock shear wave velocity of site for nuclear power plant

    Background: The definition of hard rock shear wave velocity is one of the most critical issues in the work of site selection. Purpose: To make a definition of hard rock site on which the model can be assumed as fixed-base condition, a series of research had been done. Several possible hard rock site soil models were developed. Methods: Shear wave velocity of hard rock had been assumed from 1100 m/s to 3200 m/s. For each case, free field analysis and soil structure analysis had been performed. And responses in soil and key nodes of structure were compared. Results: In free field analysis, responses of models that shear wave velocity below 2400 m/s decreased a lot. In SSI analysis, structure responses didn't change much when shear wave velocity was above 2400 m/s. Conclusions: 2400 m/s was the lowest shear wave velocity for hard rock site for fixed-base assumption. (authors)

  11. Spatial bandwidth enlargement and field enhancement of shear horizontal waves in finite graded piezoelectric layered media

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-09-01

    Shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. Different from the previous studies on SH wave propagation in completely periodic layered media, calculations on band structure and transmission in this paper show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. Harmonic wave simulation by finite element method (FEM) confirms that the reason of bandwidth enlargement is that waves within the band gap ranges are spatially enhanced and stopped by the corresponding graded units. The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially, which shows potential applications in strengthening energy trapping and harvesting. © 2015.

  12. The study of laser array generation of elastic shear wave and surface wave

    The principle of laser light generation of ultrasound is the result of the absorption of light energy by the sample medium that is converted into thermal stress. From literature survey, single laser-generated ultrasound has some limitations. First, the high energy from laser light may cause the ablation on the material surface. Second, the single laser beam generation method is hard to control the beam-width and focusing direction of ultrasound. Third, the single laser-generated ultrasound is unable to enhance the ultrasound signal. The optical fiber phased array generation of ultrasound offer the improvement of the control of the beam-width and focusing direction, and to increase the amplitude of the generated ultrasound in the thermoelastic range. This research investigated the directivity pattern from the in-phased laser array generation of shear wave and surface wave in comparison with old and improved theoretical model. The theoretical data which was filtered by the electronic instruments were compared with the literature data, also.

  13. Shear wave identification near by shallow seismic source

    Vilhelm, Jan; Rudajev, Vladimír.; Živor, Roman

    2010-05-01

    Interference of P- and S-waves occurs during the first period of P-wave when the shallow seismic measurement is realized near the seismic source (the distance is less or equal to one P-wave wavelength). Polarization analysis method (particle motion) is suitable for the determination of S-wave arrival time in these conditions. Three component geophones are usually used in this case for the registration of seismic waves generated by a hammer blow. With regard to P- and S-waves polarization it is advantageous to orientate the three component orthogonal system of geophones so that separate components make an angle of 35.26° to horizontal plane (Galperin geophone configuration). Azimuth angle between separate components is 120° in this case. This configuration insures the equivalent gravity force moments affect all the three components in the same way. It is in the contrast to the standard arrangement of the three component geophone with two horizontal and one vertical component. The inclined arrangement results in equal frequency responses for all the three components. Phase and amplitude characteristics between the components should therefore be the same. This facilitates the S-wave arrival detection. An example of application of this method to the determination of seismic wave propagation velocity anisotropy is presented.

  14. The high resolution shear wave seismic reflection technique

    This report presents the state-of-the-art of the high resolution S-wave reflection technique. Published and unpublished literature has been reviewed and discussions have been held with experts. Result is to confirm that the proposed theoretical and practical basis for identifying aquifer systems using both P- and S-wave reflections is sound. Knowledge of S-wave velocity and P-wave velocity is a powerful tool for assessing the fluid characteristics of subsurface layers. Material properties and lateral changes in material properties such as change from clay to sand, can be inferred from careful dual evaluation of P and S-wave records. The high resolution S-wave reflection technique has seen its greatest application to date as part of geotechnical studies for building foundations in the Far East. Information from this type of study has been evaluated and will be incorporated in field studies. In particular, useful information regarding S-wave sources, noise suppression and recording procedures will be incorporated within the field studies. Case histories indicate that the best type of site for demonstrating the power of the high resolution S-wave technique will be in unconsolidated soil without excessive structural complexities. More complex sites can form the basis for subsequent research after the basic principles of the technique can be established under relatively uncomplicated conditions

  15. Ultrasound Shear Wave Simulation of Breast Tumor Using Nonlinear Tissue Elasticity

    Dae Woo Park

    2016-01-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) can assess the elasticity of tissues, but the shear modulus estimated in SWEI is often less sensitive to a subtle change of the stiffness that produces only small mechanical contrast to the background tissues. Because most soft tissues exhibit mechanical nonlinearity that differs in tissue types, mechanical contrast can be enhanced if the tissues are compressed. In this study, a finite element- (FE-) based simulation was performed for a breast tissue model...

  16. Inertia-gravity waves in inertially stable and unstable shear flows

    Lott, François; Vanneste, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    An inertia-gravity wave (IGW) propagating in a vertically sheared, rotating stratified fluid interacts with the pair of inertial levels that surround the critical level. An exact expression for the form of the IGW is derived here in the case of a linear shear and used to examine this interaction in detail. This expression recovers the classical values of the transmission and reflection coefficients $|T|=\\exp(-\\pi \\mu )$ and $|R|=0$, where $\\mu^2=J(1+\

  17. Guided wave generation, sensing and damage detection using in-plane shear piezoelectric wafers

    This work presents guided wave generation, sensing, and damage detection in metallic plates using in-plane shear (d36 type) piezoelectric wafers as actuators and sensors. The conventional lead zirconate titanate (PZT) based on induced in-plane normal strain (d31 type) has been widely used to excite and receive guided waves in plates, pipes or thin-walled structures. The d36 type of piezoelectric wafer, however, induces in-plane (or called face) shear deformation in the plane normal to its polarization direction. This form of electromechanical coupling generates more significant shear horizontal (SH) waves in certain wave propagation directions, whose amplitudes are much greater than those of Lamb waves. In this paper, an analysis of SH waves generated using in-plane shear electromechanical coupling is firstly presented, followed by a multiphysics finite element analysis for comparison purposes. Voltage responses of both the conventional d31 and the new d36 sensors are obtained for comparison purposes. Results indicate that this type of wafer has the potential to provide a simple quantitative estimation of damage in structural health monitoring. (paper)

  18. Gravity shear waves atop the cirrus layer of intense convective storms

    Stobie, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    Recent visual satellite photographs of certain intense convective storms have revealed concentric wave patterns. A model for the generation and growth of these waves is proposed. The proposed initial generating mechanism is similar to the effect noticed when a pebble is dropped into a calm pond. The penetration of the tropopause by overshooting convection is analogous to the pebble's penetration of the water's surface. The model for wave growth involves instability due to the wind shear resulting from the cirrus outflow. This model is based on an equation for the waves' phase speed which is similar to the Helmholtz equation. It, however, does not assume an incompressible atmosphere, but rather assumes density is a logarithmic function of height. Finally, the model is evaluated on the two mid-latitude and three tropical cases. The data indicate that shearing instability may be a significant factor in the appearance of these waves.

  19. Shear wave velocity and attenuation from pulse-echo studies of Berea sandstone

    Green, D.H. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States); Wang, H.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-06-10

    The pulse-echo spectral-ratio technique has been adapted to the determination of ultrasonic shear wave attenuation in sandstone at variable states of saturation and pressure. The method can measure shear attenuation coefficients in the range 0.5 dB/cm to 8 dB/cm to within {+-}0.5 dB/cm. For the Berea sandstone, this range corresponds to values of the shear quality factor (Q{sub s}) between 10 and 100. Spectra of Q{sub s} show that between 600 and 1100 kHz, Q{sub s} decreases with frequency, particularly at high pressures (up to 700 MPa). Ultrasonic shear wave attenuation in a 90% water-saturated sample was intermediate between that for dry samples and the relatively high attenuation in fully saturated rock. Strong pressure dependence is seen in the shear attenuation for all saturation states, indicating a dominant role of dissipation mechanisms operating within open and compliant cracks. Substantial shear attenuation remains at the highest effective pressure applied to the saturated sample, which may be due to a more {open_quotes}global{close_quotes} fluid-flow loss mechanism. Scattering losses, as described by weak scattering theories for compressional waves, do not appear to be dominant at these frequencies. 46 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Shear wave velocity and attenuation from pulse-echo studies of Berea sandstone

    Green, Douglas H.; Wang, Herbert F.

    1994-06-01

    The pulse-echo spectral-ratio technique has been adapted to the determination of ultrasonic shear wave attenuation in sandstone at variable states of saturation and pressure. The method can measure shear attenuation coefficients in the range 0.5 dB/cm to 8 dB/cm to within +/- 0.5 dB/cm. For the Berea sandstone, this range corresponds to values of the shear quality factor Q(sub s) between 10 and 100. Spectra Q(sub s) show that between 600 and 1110 kHz, Q(sub s) decreases with frequency, particularly at high pressures (up to 70 MPa). Ultrasonic shear wave attenuation in a 90% water-saturated sample was intermediate between that for dry samples and the relatively high attenuation in fully saturated rock. Strong pressure dependence is seen in the shear attentuation for all saturation states, indicating a dominant role of dissipation mechanisms operating within open and compliant cracks. Substantial shear attenuation remains at the highest effective pressure applied to the saturated sample, which may be due to a more 'global' fluid-flow loss mechanism. Scattering losses as described by weak scattering theories for compressional waves, do not appear to be dominant at these frequencies.

  1. Imaging of Shear Waves Induced by Lorentz Force in Soft Tissues

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Cartellier, Florian; Zorgani, Ali; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lafon, Cyril; Catheline, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the first observation of elastic shear waves generated in soft solids using a dynamic electromagnetic field. The first and second experiments of this 5 study showed that Lorentz force can induce a displacement in a soft phantom and that this displacement was detectable by an ultrasound scanner using speckle-tracking algorithms. For a 100 mT magnetic field and a 10 ms, 100 mA peak-to-peak electrical burst, the displacement reached a magnitude of 1 um. In the third experiment, we showed that Lorentz force can induce shear waves in a phantom. A physical model 10 using electromagnetic and elasticity equations was proposed. Computer simulations were in good agreement with experimental results. The shear waves induced by Lorentz force were used in the last experiment to estimate the elasticity of a swine liver sample.

  2. Double atmospheric gravity wave frequency oscillations of sporadic E formed in a horizontal shear flow

    The new theory of sporadic E density oscillation with double atmospheric gravity wave (AGW) frequency in two-dimensional case taking into account ions ambipolar diffusion is presented. It is found that densities of multi-layered sporadic E, formed under the influence of atmospheric vortical perturbation (with vertical wavelength λz≠0) evolving in the horizontal shear flow (shear wave), can oscillate with up to double Brunt-Vaeisaelae frequency under the action of short-period AGW, in which shear wave is transformed. The formation of multi-layered sporadic E (inside regions with vertical thickness about λz/2) and its density changes in every half AGW period close to ions convergence region occur by combined action of ion-neutral collision and Lorentz forcing and can cause additional accumulation of ions responsible for sporadic E density oscillation with double AGW frequency.

  3. Compressional and shear waves in saturated rock during water-stream transition

    Compressional and shear wave velocities were measured in water-filled Berea sandstone as a function of pore pressure, with a constant confining pressure of 300 bars. The measurements were made at room temperature, 1450C, and 1980C. At 1450C, compressional velocity increased from vapor-saturated (low pore pressure) to liquid-saturated (high pore pressure) conditions, whereas shear wave velocity decreased. For compressional waves there was a velocity minimum and increased attenuation near the liquid-vapor transition. The results at 1980C show decreases of both compressional and shear velocities and a small velocity minimum for compressional velocity without marked attenuation. At both temperatures, V/sub p//V/sub s/ and Poisson's ratios increased from steam- to water-saturated rock. The results are compatible with the mechanical effects of mixing steam and water in the pore space near the phase transition and may be applicable to in situ geothermal field evaluation

  4. Twisted shear Alfvén waves with orbital angular momentum

    Shukla, P.K., E-mail: profshukla@yahoo.de [International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences and Institute for Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Centre for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    It is shown that a dispersive shear Alfvén wave (DSAW) in a magnetized plasma can propagate as a twisted Alfvén vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). We obtain a wave equation from the generalized ion vorticity equation and the magnetic field-aligned electron momentum equation that couple the scalar and vector potentials of the DSAW. A twisted shear Alfvén vortex beam can trap and transport plasma particles and energy in magnetoplasmas, such as those in the Earth's auroral zone, in the solar atmosphere, and in Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at University of California, Los Angeles. -- Highlights: ► We present dispersive shear Alfvén waves (DSAWs) with a twist. ► DSAWs carry orbital angular momentum. ► Twisted DSAWs can transport particles and energy in space and laboratory plasmas.

  5. Twisted shear Alfvén waves with orbital angular momentum

    It is shown that a dispersive shear Alfvén wave (DSAW) in a magnetized plasma can propagate as a twisted Alfvén vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). We obtain a wave equation from the generalized ion vorticity equation and the magnetic field-aligned electron momentum equation that couple the scalar and vector potentials of the DSAW. A twisted shear Alfvén vortex beam can trap and transport plasma particles and energy in magnetoplasmas, such as those in the Earth's auroral zone, in the solar atmosphere, and in Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at University of California, Los Angeles. -- Highlights: ► We present dispersive shear Alfvén waves (DSAWs) with a twist. ► DSAWs carry orbital angular momentum. ► Twisted DSAWs can transport particles and energy in space and laboratory plasmas.

  6. The Character of Shear-wave Splitting in Marble in the Critical State of Rupture

    Gao Yuan

    2001-01-01

    This paper mainly observed and analyzed the character of shear-wave splitting in rock specimens while they were in the critical state of rupture. The rock specimens for study are made of Laizhou marble from Shandong, China. A series of records were obtained from two rock specimens when they were in the critical state of rupture. The result shows that, in the critical state just before rock rupture, there may be the phenomenon of rise and fall in the time delay of shear-wave splitting, even though the load was kept constant. That is to say, the time delay of shear-wave splitting may have a falling process before rock rupture.

  7. Variable aspect ratio method in the Xu–White model for shear-wave velocity estimation

    Shear-wave velocity logs are useful for various seismic interpretation applications, including bright spot analyses, amplitude-versus-offset analyses and multicomponent seismic interpretations. This paper presents a method for predicting the shear-wave velocity of argillaceous sandstone from conventional log data and experimental data, based on Gassmann's equations and the Xu–White model. This variable aspect ratio method takes into account all the influences of the matrix nature, shale content, porosity size and pore geometry, and the properties of pore fluid of argillaceous sandstone, replacing the fixed aspect ratio assumption in the conventional Xu–White model. To achieve this, we first use the Xu–White model to derive the bulk and shear modulus of dry rock in a sand–clay mixture. Secondly, we use Gassmann's equations to calculate the fluid-saturated elastic properties, including compressional and shear-wave velocities. Finally, we use the variable aspect ratio method to estimate the shear-wave velocity. The numerical results indicate that the variable aspect ratio method provides an important improvement in the application of the Xu–White model for sand–clay mixtures and allows for a variable aspect ratio log to be introduced into the Xu–White model instead of the constant aspect ratio assumption. This method shows a significant improvement in predicting velocities over the conventional Xu–White model. (paper)

  8. High resolution shear wave reflection surveying for hydrogeological investigations

    The high resolution S-wave method has been developed to be a powerful tool in mapping subsurface lithology and in conducting groundwater investigations. The research has demonstrated that the resolution obtainable using S-waves in a Coastal Plain environment is more than double than that obtained using conventional reflection, which already offers a higher resolution than any other surface method. Where the mapping of thin clay layers functioning as aquitards or thin sand layers functioning as aquifers are critical to the understanding of groundwater flow, S-wave reflections offer unparalleled possibilities for nondestructive exploration. The field experiment at Cooke Crossroads, South Carolina enabled the detection and mapping of beds in the thickness range of one to three feet. The S-wave reflection technique, in combination with conventional P-wave reflection, has potential to directly detect confined and unconfined aquifers. This is a breakthrough technology that still requires additional research before it can be applied on a commercial basis. Aquifer systems were interpreted from the test data at Cooke Crossroads consistent with theoretical model. Additional research is need in assessing the theoretical response of P- and S-waves to subsurface interfaces within unconsolidated sediments of varying moisture content and lithology. More theoretical modeling and in situ testing are needed to bring our knowledge of these phenomena to the level that oil and gas researchers have done for fluids in sandstones

  9. Fracture characterization at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility using shear-wave anisotropy

    Horne, S.A. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); MacBeth, C.D.; Queen, J.; Rizer, W.D.

    1995-12-31

    Two multi-component near-offset VSP experiments are used, in conjunction with borehole data, to characterise the subsurface fracture system at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Oklahoma. Time delays between the fast and slow split shear-waves are observed to correlate with the heavily fractured sandstone formations. Inversion of the shear-wave splitting estimates is achieved using a Genetic Algorithm which incorporates an anisotropic ray tracing scheme. The inversion results suggest that the fracture orientation is sub-vertical. A method of determining fracture dip using an opposite azimuth VSP method is suggested.

  10. Existence of Shear Horizontal Surface Waves in a Magneto-Electro-Elastic Material

    WEI Wei-Yi; LIU Jin-Xi; FANG Dai-Ning

    2009-01-01

    The existence of shear horizontal surface waves in a magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) half-space with hexagonal (6mm) symmetry is investigated.The surface of the MEE half-space is mechanically free, but subjected to four types of electromagnetic boundary conditions.These boundary conditions are electrically open/magnetically closed, electrically open/magnetically open, electrically closed/magnetically open and electrically closed/magnetically closed.It is shown that except for the electrically open/magnetically closed condition, the three other sets of electromagnetic boundary conditions allow the propagation of shear horizontal surface waves.

  11. Measurement of mechanical properties of homogeneous tissue with ultrasonically induced shear waves

    Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2007-03-01

    Fundamental mechanical properties of tissue are altered by many diseases. Regional and systemic diseases can cause changes in tissue properties. Liver stiffness is caused by cirrhosis and fibrosis. Vascular wall stiffness and tone are altered by smoking, diabetes and other diseases. Measurement of tissue mechanical properties has historically been done with palpation. However palpation is subjective, relative, and not quantitative or reproducible. Elastography in which strain is measured due to stress application gives a qualitative estimate of Young's modulus at low frequency. We have developed a method that takes advantage of the fact that the wave equation is local and shear wave propagation depends only on storage and loss moduli in addition to density, which does not vary much in soft tissues. Our method is called shearwave dispersion ultrasonic velocity measurement (SDUV). The method uses ultrasonic radiation force to produce repeated motion in tissue that induces shear waves to propagate. The shear wave propagation speed is measured with pulse echo ultrasound as a function of frequency of the shear wave. The resulting velocity dispersion curve is fit with a Voight model to determine the elastic and viscous moduli of the tissue. Results indicate accurate and precise measurements are possible using this "noninvasive biopsy" method. Measurements in beef along and across the fibers are consistent with the literature values.

  12. On System-Dependent Sources of Uncertainty and Bias in Ultrasonic Quantitative Shear-Wave Imaging.

    Deng, Yufeng; Rouze, Ned C; Palmeri, Mark L; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasonic quantitative shear-wave imaging methods have been developed over the last decade to estimate tissue elasticity by measuring the speed of propagating shear waves following acoustic radiation force excitation. This work discusses eight sources of uncertainty and bias arising from ultrasound system-dependent parameters in ultrasound shear-wave speed (SWS) measurements. Each of the eight sources of error is discussed in the context of a linear, isotropic, elastic, homogeneous medium, combining previously reported analyses with Field II simulations, full-wave 2-D acoustic propagation simulations, and experimental studies. Errors arising from both spatial and temporal sources lead to errors in SWS measurements. Arrival time estimation noise, speckle bias, hardware fluctuations, and phase aberration cause uncertainties (variance) in SWS measurements, while pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and beamforming errors, as well as coupling medium sound speed mismatch, cause biases in SWS measurements (accuracy errors). Calibration of the sources of bias is an important step in the development of shear-wave imaging systems. In a well-calibrated system, where the sources of bias are minimized, and averaging over a region of interest (ROI) is employed to reduce the sources of uncertainty, an SWS error can be expected. PMID:26886980

  13. Shear wave anisotropy from aligned inclusions: ultrasonic frequency dependence of velocity and attenuation

    de Figueiredo, J. J. S.; Schleicher, J.; Stewart, R. R.; Dayur, N.; Omoboya, B.; Wiley, R.; William, A.

    2013-04-01

    To understand their influence on elastic wave propagation, anisotropic cracked media have been widely investigated in many theoretical and experimental studies. In this work, we report on laboratory ultrasound measurements carried out to investigate the effect of source frequency on the elastic parameters (wave velocities and the Thomsen parameter γ) and shear wave attenuation) of fractured anisotropic media. Under controlled conditions, we prepared anisotropic model samples containing penny-shaped rubber inclusions in a solid epoxy resin matrix with crack densities ranging from 0 to 6.2 per cent. Two of the three cracked samples have 10 layers and one has 17 layers. The number of uniform rubber inclusions per layer ranges from 0 to 100. S-wave splitting measurements have shown that scattering effects are more prominent in samples where the seismic wavelength to crack aperture ratio ranges from 1.6 to 1.64 than in others where the ratio varied from 2.72 to 2.85. The sample with the largest cracks showed a magnitude of scattering attenuation three times higher compared with another sample that had small inclusions. Our S-wave ultrasound results demonstrate that elastic scattering, scattering and anelastic attenuation, velocity dispersion and crack size interfere directly in shear wave splitting in a source-frequency dependent manner, resulting in an increase of scattering attenuation and a reduction of shear wave anisotropy with increasing frequency.

  14. Turbulent mixing driven by mean-flow shear and internal gravity waves in oceans and atmospheres

    Baumert, Helmut Z

    2012-01-01

    This study starts with balances deduced by Baumert and Peters (2004, 2005) from results of stratified-shear experiments made in channels and wind tunnels by Itsweire (1984) and Rohr and Van Atta (1987), and of free-decay experiments in a resting stratified tank by Dickey and Mellor (1980). Using a modification of Canuto's (2002) ideas on turbulence and waves, these balances are merged with an (internal) gravity-wave energy balance presented for the open ocean by Gregg (1989), without mean-flow shear. The latter was augmented by a linear (viscous) friction term. Gregg's wave-energy source is interpreted on its long-wave spectral end as internal tides, topography, large-scale wind, and atmospheric low-pressure actions. In addition, internal eigen waves, generated by mean-flow shear, and the aging of the wave field from a virginal (linear) into a saturated state are taken into account. Wave packets and turbulence are treated as particles (vortices, packets) by ensemble kinetics so that the loss terms in all thre...

  15. Wave excitation by nonlinear coupling among shear Alfvén waves in a mirror-confined plasma

    A shear Alfvén wave at slightly below the ion-cyclotron frequency overcomes the ion-cyclotron damping and grows because of the strong anisotropy of the ion temperature in the magnetic mirror configuration, and is called the Alfvén ion-cyclotron (AIC) wave. Density fluctuations caused by the AIC waves and the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves used for ion heating have been detected using a reflectometer in a wide radial region of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasma. Various wave-wave couplings are clearly observed in the density fluctuations in the interior of the plasma, but these couplings are not so clear in the magnetic fluctuations at the plasma edge when measured using a pick-up coil. A radial dependence of the nonlinearity is found, particularly in waves with the difference frequencies of the AIC waves; bispectral analysis shows that such wave-wave coupling is significant near the core, but is not so evident at the periphery. In contrast, nonlinear coupling with the low-frequency background turbulence is quite distinct at the periphery. Nonlinear coupling associated with the AIC waves may play a significant role in the beta- and anisotropy-limits of a mirror-confined plasma through decay of the ICRF heating power and degradation of the plasma confinement by nonlinearly generated waves

  16. Wave excitation by nonlinear coupling among shear Alfvén waves in a mirror-confined plasma

    Ikezoe, R., E-mail: ikezoe@prc.tsukuba.ac.jp; Ichimura, M.; Okada, T.; Hirata, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sumida, S.; Jang, S.; Takeyama, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Wang, X. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    A shear Alfvén wave at slightly below the ion-cyclotron frequency overcomes the ion-cyclotron damping and grows because of the strong anisotropy of the ion temperature in the magnetic mirror configuration, and is called the Alfvén ion-cyclotron (AIC) wave. Density fluctuations caused by the AIC waves and the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves used for ion heating have been detected using a reflectometer in a wide radial region of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasma. Various wave-wave couplings are clearly observed in the density fluctuations in the interior of the plasma, but these couplings are not so clear in the magnetic fluctuations at the plasma edge when measured using a pick-up coil. A radial dependence of the nonlinearity is found, particularly in waves with the difference frequencies of the AIC waves; bispectral analysis shows that such wave-wave coupling is significant near the core, but is not so evident at the periphery. In contrast, nonlinear coupling with the low-frequency background turbulence is quite distinct at the periphery. Nonlinear coupling associated with the AIC waves may play a significant role in the beta- and anisotropy-limits of a mirror-confined plasma through decay of the ICRF heating power and degradation of the plasma confinement by nonlinearly generated waves.

  17. Second-harmonic generation in shear wave beams with different polarizations

    A coupled pair of nonlinear parabolic equations was derived by Zabolotskaya [1] that model the transverse components of the particle motion in a collimated shear wave beam propagating in an isotropic elastic solid. Like the KZK equation, the parabolic equation for shear wave beams accounts consistently for the leading order effects of diffraction, viscosity and nonlinearity. The nonlinearity includes a cubic nonlinear term that is equivalent to that present in plane shear waves, as well as a quadratic nonlinear term that is unique to diffracting beams. The work by Wochner et al. [2] considered shear wave beams with translational polarizations (linear, circular and elliptical), wherein second-order nonlinear effects vanish and the leading order nonlinear effect is third-harmonic generation by the cubic nonlinearity. The purpose of the current work is to investigate the quadratic nonlinear term present in the parabolic equation for shear wave beams by considering second-harmonic generation in Gaussian beams as a second-order nonlinear effect using standard perturbation theory. In order for second-order nonlinear effects to be present, a broader class of source polarizations must be considered that includes not only the familiar translational polarizations, but also polarizations accounting for stretching, shearing and rotation of the source plane. It is found that the polarization of the second harmonic generated by the quadratic nonlinearity is not necessarily the same as the polarization of the source-frequency beam, and we are able to derive a general analytic solution for second-harmonic generation from a Gaussian source condition that gives explicitly the relationship between the polarization of the source-frequency beam and the polarization of the second harmonic

  18. Second-harmonic generation in shear wave beams with different polarizations

    Spratt, Kyle S., E-mail: sprattkyle@gmail.com; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F. [Applied Research Laboratories, The University of Texas at Austin, P. O. Box 8029, Austin, Texas 78713–8029, US (United States)

    2015-10-28

    A coupled pair of nonlinear parabolic equations was derived by Zabolotskaya [1] that model the transverse components of the particle motion in a collimated shear wave beam propagating in an isotropic elastic solid. Like the KZK equation, the parabolic equation for shear wave beams accounts consistently for the leading order effects of diffraction, viscosity and nonlinearity. The nonlinearity includes a cubic nonlinear term that is equivalent to that present in plane shear waves, as well as a quadratic nonlinear term that is unique to diffracting beams. The work by Wochner et al. [2] considered shear wave beams with translational polarizations (linear, circular and elliptical), wherein second-order nonlinear effects vanish and the leading order nonlinear effect is third-harmonic generation by the cubic nonlinearity. The purpose of the current work is to investigate the quadratic nonlinear term present in the parabolic equation for shear wave beams by considering second-harmonic generation in Gaussian beams as a second-order nonlinear effect using standard perturbation theory. In order for second-order nonlinear effects to be present, a broader class of source polarizations must be considered that includes not only the familiar translational polarizations, but also polarizations accounting for stretching, shearing and rotation of the source plane. It is found that the polarization of the second harmonic generated by the quadratic nonlinearity is not necessarily the same as the polarization of the source-frequency beam, and we are able to derive a general analytic solution for second-harmonic generation from a Gaussian source condition that gives explicitly the relationship between the polarization of the source-frequency beam and the polarization of the second harmonic.

  19. The instability of counter-propagating kernel gravity waves in a constant shear flow

    Umurhan, O M; Harnik, N; Lott, F

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism describing the recently developed notion of kernel gravity waves (KGWs) is reviewed and such structures are employed to interpret the unstable dynamics of an example stratified plane parallel shear flow. This flow has constant vertical shear, is infinite in the vertical extent, and characterized by two density jumps of equal magnitude each decreasing successively with height, in which the jumps are located symmetrically away from the midplane of the system. We find that for a suitably defined bulk-Richardson number there exists a band of horizontal wavenumbers which exhibits normal-mode instability. The instability mechanism closely parallels the mechanism responsible for the instability seen in the problem of counter-propagating Rossby waves. In this problem the instability arises out of the interaction of counter-propagating gravity waves. We argue that the instability meets the Hayashi-Young criterion for wave instability. We also argue that the instability is the simplest one that can arise ...

  20. 2D instabilities of surface gravity waves on a linear shear current

    Francius, Marc; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Periodic 2D surface water waves propagating steadily on a rotational current have been studied by many authors (see [1] and references therein). Although the recent important theoretical developments have confirmed that periodic waves can exist over flows with arbitrary vorticity, their stability and their nonlinear evolution have not been much studied extensively so far. In fact, even in the rather simple case of uniform vorticity (linear shear), few papers have been published on the effect of a vertical shear current on the side-band instability of a uniform wave train over finite depth. In most of these studies [2-5], asymptotic expansions and multiple scales method have been used to obtain envelope evolution equations, which allow eventually to formulate a condition of (linear) instability to long modulational perturbations. It is noted here that this instability is often referred in the literature as the Benjamin-Feir or modulational instability. In the present study, we consider the linear stability of finite amplitude two-dimensional, periodic water waves propagating steadily on the free surface of a fluid with constant vorticity and finite depth. First, the steadily propagating surface waves are computed with steepness up to very close to the highest, using a Fourier series expansions and a collocation method, which constitutes a simple extension of Fenton's method [6] to the cases with a linear shear current. Then, the linear stability of these permanent waves to infinitesimal 2D perturbations is developed from the fully nonlinear equations in the framework of normal modes analysis. This linear stability analysis is an extension of [7] to the case of waves in the presence of a linear shear current and permits the determination of the dominant instability as a function of depth and vorticity for a given steepness. The numerical results are used to assess the accuracy of the vor-NLS equation derived in [5] for the characteristics of modulational

  1. Strip waves in vibrated shear-thickening wormlike micellar solutions.

    Epstein, T; Deegan, R D

    2010-06-01

    We present an instability in vertically vibrated dilute wormlike micellar solutions. Above a critical driving acceleration the fluid forms elongated solitary domains of high amplitude waves. We model this instability using a Mathieu equation modified to account for the non-Newtonian character of the fluid. We find that our model successfully reproduces the observed transitions. PMID:20866525

  2. Correlation of liquefaction resistance with shear wave velocity based on laboratory study using bender element

    ZHOU Yan-guo; CHEN Yun-min; KE Han

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies using field case history data yielded new criteria for evaluating liquefaction potential in saturated granular deposits based on in situ, stress-corrected shear wave velocity. However, the conditions of relatively insufficient case histories and limited site conditions in this approach call for additional data to more reliably define liquefaction resistance as a function of shear wave velocity. In this study, a series of undrained cyclic triaxial tests were conducted on saturated sand with shear wave velocity Vs measured by bender element. By normalizing the data with respect to minimum void ratio, the test results, incorporated with previously published laboratory data, statistically revealed good correlation of cyclic shear strength with small-strain shear modulus for sandy soils, which is almost irrespective of soil types and confining pressures. The consequently determined cyclic resistance ratio, CRR, was found to be approximately proportional to Vs4. Liquefaction resistance boundary curves were established by applying this relationship and compared to liquefaction criteria derived from seismic field measurements. Although in the range of Vs1>200 m/s the presented curves are moderately conservative, they are remarkably consistent with the published field performance criteria on the whole.

  3. Drift wave shear damping annulment due to parametric coupling and magnetic field variation

    Nonlinear suppression of the drift wave shear damping by the simultaneous action of a strong standing pump wave and of the magnetic field variation along the magnetic field line is studied using a version of the Hasegawa-Mima equation. The threshold for the parametric destabilization is calculated as a function of the plasma parameters. Destabilization occurs due to the elimination of the energy convection towards the dissipative layer, by both the linear toroidal coupling and nonlinear parametric coupling

  4. Added value of Virtual Touch IQ shear wave elastography in the ultrasound assessment of breast lesions

    Ianculescu, Victor; Ciolovan, Laura Maria [Radiology Department, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Dunant, Ariane [Department of Statistics, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Vielh, Philippe [Department of Biopathology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Mazouni, Chafika [Department of Surgery, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Delaloge, Suzette [Department of Oncology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Dromain, Clarisse [Radiology Department, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Blidaru, Alexandru [Department of Surgery, Bucharest Institute of Oncology, Bucharest (Romania); Balleyguier, Corinne, E-mail: corinne.balleyguier@gustaveroussy.fr [Radiology Department, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); UMR 8081, IR4M, Paris-Sud University, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To determine the diagnostic performance of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Virtual Touch IQ shear wave elastography in the discrimination of benign and malignant breast lesions. Materials and methods: Conventional B-mode and elasticity imaging were used to evaluate 110 breast lesions. Elastographic assessment of breast tissue abnormalities was done using a shear wave based technique, Virtual Touch IQ (VTIQ), implemented on a Siemens Acuson S3000 ultrasound machine. Tissue mechanical properties were interpreted as two-dimensional qualitative and quantitative colour maps displaying relative shear wave velocity. Wave speed measurements in m/s were possible at operator defined regions of interest. The pathologic diagnosis was established on samples obtained by ultrasound guided core biopsy or fine needle aspiration. Results: BIRADS based B-mode evaluation of the 48 benign and 62 malignant lesions achieved 92% sensitivity and 62.5% specificity. Subsequently performed VTIQ elastography relying on visual interpretation of the colour overlay displaying relative shear wave velocities managed similar standalone diagnostic performance with 92% sensitivity and 64.6% specificity. Lesion and surrounding tissue shear wave speed values were calculated and a significant difference was found between the benign and malignant populations (Mann–Whitney U test, p < 0.0001). By selecting a lesion cut-off value of 3.31 m/s we achieved 80.4% sensitivity and 73% specificity. Applying this threshold only to BIRADS 4a masses, we reached overall levels of 92% sensitivity and 72.9% specificity. Conclusion: VTIQ qualitative and quantitative elastography has the potential to further characterise B-mode detected breast lesions, increasing specificity and reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies.

  5. Added value of Virtual Touch IQ shear wave elastography in the ultrasound assessment of breast lesions

    Purpose: To determine the diagnostic performance of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Virtual Touch IQ shear wave elastography in the discrimination of benign and malignant breast lesions. Materials and methods: Conventional B-mode and elasticity imaging were used to evaluate 110 breast lesions. Elastographic assessment of breast tissue abnormalities was done using a shear wave based technique, Virtual Touch IQ (VTIQ), implemented on a Siemens Acuson S3000 ultrasound machine. Tissue mechanical properties were interpreted as two-dimensional qualitative and quantitative colour maps displaying relative shear wave velocity. Wave speed measurements in m/s were possible at operator defined regions of interest. The pathologic diagnosis was established on samples obtained by ultrasound guided core biopsy or fine needle aspiration. Results: BIRADS based B-mode evaluation of the 48 benign and 62 malignant lesions achieved 92% sensitivity and 62.5% specificity. Subsequently performed VTIQ elastography relying on visual interpretation of the colour overlay displaying relative shear wave velocities managed similar standalone diagnostic performance with 92% sensitivity and 64.6% specificity. Lesion and surrounding tissue shear wave speed values were calculated and a significant difference was found between the benign and malignant populations (Mann–Whitney U test, p < 0.0001). By selecting a lesion cut-off value of 3.31 m/s we achieved 80.4% sensitivity and 73% specificity. Applying this threshold only to BIRADS 4a masses, we reached overall levels of 92% sensitivity and 72.9% specificity. Conclusion: VTIQ qualitative and quantitative elastography has the potential to further characterise B-mode detected breast lesions, increasing specificity and reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies

  6. Kinetic structures of shear Alfven and acoustic wave spectra in burning plasmas

    Zonca, F; Biancalani, A; Chavdarovski, I; Chen, L; Di Troia, C; Wang, X, E-mail: fulvio.zonca@enea.it

    2010-11-01

    We present a general theoretical framework for discussing the physics of low frequency fluctuation spectra of shear Alfven and acoustic waves in toroidal plasmas of fusion interest. This framework helps identifying the relevant dynamics and, thus, interpreting experimental observations. We also discuss the roles of such general theoretical framework for verification and validation of numerical simulation codes vs. analytic predictions and experimental results.

  7. Kinetic structures of shear Alfven and acoustic wave spectra in burning plasmas

    We present a general theoretical framework for discussing the physics of low frequency fluctuation spectra of shear Alfven and acoustic waves in toroidal plasmas of fusion interest. This framework helps identifying the relevant dynamics and, thus, interpreting experimental observations. We also discuss the roles of such general theoretical framework for verification and validation of numerical simulation codes vs. analytic predictions and experimental results.

  8. Variational characteristics of shear-wave splitting on the 2001 Shidian earthquakes in Yunnan, China

    高原; 梁维; 丁香; 薛艳; 蔡明军; 刘希强; 苏有锦; 彭立国

    2004-01-01

    In 2001 three earthquakes occurred in Shidian in Yunnan Province, which were the MS=5.2 on April 10, the MS=5.9 on April 12 and the MS=5.3 on June 8. Based on the data from the station Baoshan of Yunnan Telemetry Digital Seismograph Network, the variational characteristics of shear-wave splitting on these series of strong earthquakes has been studied by using the systematic analysis method (SAM) of shear-wave splitting. The result shows the time delays of shear-wave splitting basically increase with earthquake activity intensifying. However the time delays abruptly decrease immediately before strong aftershocks. It accords with the stress relaxation before earthquakes, which was found recently in study on shear-wave splitting. The result suggests it is significant for reducing the harm degree of earthquakes to develop the stress-forecasting on earthquake in strong active tectonic zones and economic developed regions or big cities under the danger of strong earthquakes.

  9. Internal gravity-shear waves in the atmospheric boundary layer from acoustic remote sensing data

    Lyulyukin, V. S.; Kallistratova, M. A.; Kouznetsov, R. D.; Kuznetsov, D. D.; Chunchuzov, I. P.; Chirokova, G. Yu.

    2015-03-01

    The year-round continuous remote sounding of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) by means of the Doppler acoustic radar (sodar) LATAN-3 has been performed at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station of the Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, since 2008. A visual analysis of sodar echograms for four years revealed a large number of wavelike patterns in the intensity field of a scattered sound signal. Similar patterns were occasionally identified before in sodar, radar, and lidar sounding data. These patterns in the form of quasi-periodic inclined stripes, or cat's eyes, arise under stable stratification and significant vertical wind shears and result from the loss of the dynamic stability of the flow. In the foreign literature, these patterns, which we call internal gravity-shear waves, are often associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. In the present paper, sodar echograms are classified according to the presence or absence of wavelike patterns, and a statistical analysis of the frequency of their occurrence by the year and season was performed. A relationship between the occurrence of the patterns and wind shear and between the wave length and amplitude was investigated. The criteria for the identification of gravity-shear waves, meteorological conditions of their excitation, and issues related to their observations were discussed.

  10. Quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography for noncontact mechanical characterization of myocardium

    Wang, Shang; Lopez, Andrew L.; Morikawa, Yuka; Tao, Ge; Li, Jiasong; Larina, Irina V.; Martin, James F.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an emerging low-coherence imaging technique that provides noninvasive assessment of tissue biomechanics with high spatial resolution. Among various OCE methods, the capability of quantitative measurement of tissue elasticity is of great importance for tissue characterization and pathology detection across different samples. Here we report a quantitative OCE technique, termed quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (Q-SWI-OCT), which enables noncontact measurement of tissue Young's modulus based on the ultra-fast imaging of the shear wave propagation inside the sample. A focused air-puff device is used to interrogate the tissue with a low-pressure short-duration air stream that stimulates a localized displacement with the scale at micron level. The propagation of this tissue deformation in the form of shear wave is captured by a phase-sensitive OCT system running with the scan of the M-mode imaging over the path of the wave propagation. The temporal characteristics of the shear wave is quantified based on the cross-correlation of the tissue deformation profiles at all the measurement locations, and linear regression is utilized to fit the data plotted in the domain of time delay versus wave propagation distance. The wave group velocity is thus calculated, which results in the quantitative measurement of the Young's modulus. As the feasibility demonstration, experiments are performed on tissuemimicking phantoms with different agar concentrations and the quantified elasticity values with Q-SWI-OCT agree well with the uniaxial compression tests. For functional characterization of myocardium with this OCE technique, we perform our pilot experiments on ex vivo mouse cardiac muscle tissues with two studies, including 1) elasticity difference of cardiac muscle under relaxation and contract conditions and 2) mechanical heterogeneity of the heart introduced by the muscle fiber orientation. Our results suggest the

  11. Spatial bandwidth enlargement and field enhancement of shear horizontal waves in finite graded piezoelectric layered media

    Xu, Yanlong, E-mail: xuyanlong814@sina.com

    2015-09-04

    Shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. Different from the previous studies on SH wave propagation in completely periodic layered media, calculations on band structure and transmission in this paper show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. Harmonic wave simulation by finite element method (FEM) confirms that the reason of bandwidth enlargement is that waves within the band gap ranges are spatially enhanced and stopped by the corresponding graded units. The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially, which shows potential applications in strengthening energy trapping and harvesting. - Highlights: • Shear horizontal wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. • Calculations on band structure and transmission show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. • Finite element method confirms that waves in band gaps are spatially enhanced and stopped by the graded units. • The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially.

  12. Spatial bandwidth enlargement and field enhancement of shear horizontal waves in finite graded piezoelectric layered media

    Shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. Different from the previous studies on SH wave propagation in completely periodic layered media, calculations on band structure and transmission in this paper show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. Harmonic wave simulation by finite element method (FEM) confirms that the reason of bandwidth enlargement is that waves within the band gap ranges are spatially enhanced and stopped by the corresponding graded units. The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially, which shows potential applications in strengthening energy trapping and harvesting. - Highlights: • Shear horizontal wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. • Calculations on band structure and transmission show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. • Finite element method confirms that waves in band gaps are spatially enhanced and stopped by the graded units. • The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially

  13. Shear wave velocities from noise correlation at local scale

    De Nisco, G.; Nunziata, C.; Vaccari, F.; Panza, G. F.

    2008-07-01

    Cross correlations of ambient seismic noise recordings have been studied to infer shear seismic velocities with depth. Experiments have been done in the crowded and noisy historical centre of Napoli over inter-station distances from 50 m to about 400 m, whereas active seismic spreadings are prohibitive, even for just one receiver. Group velocity dispersion curves have been extracted with FTAN method from the noise cross correlations and then the non linear inversion of them has resulted in Vs profiles with depth. The information of near by stratigraphies and the range of Vs variability for samples of Neapolitan soils and rocks confirms the validity of results obtained with our expeditious procedure. Moreover, the good comparison of noise H/V frequency of the first main peak with 1D and 2D spectral amplifications encourages to continue experiments of noise cross-correlation. If confirmed in other geological settings, the proposed approach could reveal a low cost methodology to obtain reliable and detailed Vs velocity profiles.

  14. Analytical and numerical modeling of non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B.; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface between two solids can be exploited for nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of bond quality. In this study we developed two analytical models for nonlinear imperfect interfaces. The first model uses a finite nonlinear interfacial stiffness representation of an imperfect interface of vanishing thickness, while the second model relies on a thin nonlinear interphase layer to represent an imperfect interface region. The second model is actually a derivative of the first model obtained by calculating the equivalent interfacial stiffness of a thin isotropic nonlinear interphase layer in the quasi-static approximation. The predictions of both analytical models were numerically verified by comparison to COMSOL finite element simulations. These models can accurately predict the excess nonlinearity caused by interface imperfections based on the strength of the reflected and transmitted mixed longitudinal waves produced by them under non-collinear shear wave interrogation.

  15. Flow under standing waves Part 1. Shear stress distribution, energy flux and steady streaming

    Gislason, Kjartan; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Deigaard, Rolf; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    The conditions for energy flux, momentum flux and the resulting streaming velocity are analysed for standing waves formed in front of a fully reflecting wall. The exchange of energy between the outer wave motion and the near bed oscillatory boundary layer is considered, determining the horizontal...... energy flux inside and outside the boundary layer. The momentum balance, the mean shear stress and the resulting time averaged streaming velocities are determined. For a laminar bed boundary layer the analysis of the wave drift gives results similar to the original work of Longuet-Higgins from 1953. The...... work is extended to turbulent bed boundary layers by application of a numerical model. The similarities and differences between laminar and turbulent flow conditions are discussed, and quantitative results for the magnitude of the mean shear stress and drift velocity are presented. Full two...

  16. Feasibility of waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for shallow shear-wave velocity using a genetic algorithm

    Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Tsoflias, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional surface wave inversion for shallow shear (S)-wave velocity relies on the generation of dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves. This constrains the method to only laterally homogeneous (or very smooth laterally heterogeneous) earth models. Waveform inversion directly fits waveforms on seismograms, hence, does not have such a limitation. Waveforms of Rayleigh waves are highly related to S-wave velocities. By inverting the waveforms of Rayleigh waves on a near-surface seismogram, shallow S-wave velocities can be estimated for earth models with strong lateral heterogeneity. We employ genetic algorithm (GA) to perform waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for S-wave velocities. The forward problem is solved by finite-difference modeling in the time domain. The model space is updated by generating offspring models using GA. Final solutions can be found through an iterative waveform-fitting scheme. Inversions based on synthetic records show that the S-wave velocities can be recovered successfully with errors no more than 10% for several typical near-surface earth models. For layered earth models, the proposed method can generate one-dimensional S-wave velocity profiles without the knowledge of initial models. For earth models containing lateral heterogeneity in which case conventional dispersion-curve-based inversion methods are challenging, it is feasible to produce high-resolution S-wave velocity sections by GA waveform inversion with appropriate priori information. The synthetic tests indicate that the GA waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves has the great potential for shallow S-wave velocity imaging with the existence of strong lateral heterogeneity. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Measurement of the viscosity-density product using multiple reflections of ultrasonic shear horizontal waves.

    Greenwood, Margaret S; Adamson, Justus D; Bond, Leonard J

    2006-12-22

    We have developed an on-line computer-controlled sensor, based on ultrasound reflection measurements, to determine the product of the viscosity and density of a liquid or slurry for Newtonian fluids and the shear impedance of the liquid for non-Newtonian fluids. A 14 MHz shear wave transducer is bonded to one side of a 45-90 degrees fused silica wedge and the base is in contract with the liquid. Twenty-eight echoes were observed due to the multiple reflections of an ultrasonic shear horizontal (SH) wave within the wedge. The fast Fourier transform of each echo was obtained for a liquid and for water, which serves as the calibration fluid, and the reflection coefficient at the solid-liquid interface was obtained. Data were obtained for 11 sugar water solutions ranging in concentration from 10% to 66% by weight. The viscosity values are shown to be in good agreement with those obtained independently using a laboratory viscometer. The data acquisition time is 14s and this can be reduced by judicious selection of the echoes for determining the reflection coefficient. The measurement of the density results in a determination of the viscosity for Newtonian fluids or the shear wave velocity for non-Newtonian fluids. The sensor can be deployed for process control in a pipeline, with the base of the wedge as part of the pipeline wall, or immersed in a tank. PMID:16793108

  18. Correlation of densities with shear wave velocities and SPT N values

    Anbazhagan, P.; Uday, Anjali; Moustafa, Sayed S. R.; Al-Arifi, Nassir S. N.

    2016-06-01

    Site effects primarily depend on the shear modulus of subsurface layers, and this is generally estimated from the measured shear wave velocity (V s) and assumed density. Very rarely, densities are measured for amplification estimation because drilling and sampling processes are time consuming and expensive. In this study, an attempt has been made to derive the correlation between the density (dry and wet density) and V s/SPT (standard penetration test) N values using measured data. A total of 354 measured V s and density data sets and 364 SPT N value and density data sets from 23 boreholes have been used in the study. Separate relations have been developed for all soil types as well as fine-grained and coarse-grained soil types. The correlations developed for bulk density were compared with the available data and it was found that the proposed relation matched well with the existing data. A graphical comparison and validation based on the consistency ratio and cumulative frequency curves was performed and the newly developed relations were found to demonstrate good prediction performance. An attempt has also been made to propose a relation between the bulk density and shear wave velocity applicable for a wide range of soil and rock by considering data from this study as well as that of previous studies. These correlations will be useful for predicting the density (bulk and dry) of sites having measured the shear wave velocity and SPT N values.

  19. The effect of wind shear on the formation of roll waves in flows down an incline

    In this paper we investigate the effect of a prescribed superficial shear stress on the generation and structure of roll waves developing from infinitesimal disturbances on the surface of a fluid layer flowing down an incline. The unsteady equations of motion are depth integrated according to the von Karman momentum integral method to obtain a nonhomogeneous system of nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws governing the average flow rate and the thickness of the fluid layer. By conducting a linear stability analysis we obtain an analytical formula for the critical conditions for the onset of instability of a uniform and steady flow in terms of the prescribed surface shear stress. A nonlinear analysis is performed by numerically calculating the nonlinear evolution of a perturbed flow. The calculation is carried out using a TVD finite volume scheme. The source term is handled by implementing the quasi-steady wave propagation algorithm. Conclusions are drawn regarding the effect of the applied surface shear stress parameter and flow conditions on the development and characteristics of the roll waves arising from the instability. In the particular case of zero shear stress applied at the surface, the results are compared with those yielded by an analytical procedure. (author)

  20. Stability of steady rotational water-waves of finite amplitude on arbitrary shear currents

    Seez, William; Abid, Malek; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A versatile solver for the two-dimensional Euler equations with an unknown free-surface has been developed. This code offers the possibility to calculate two-dimensional, steady rotational water-waves of finite amplitude on an arbitrary shear current. Written in PYTHON the code incorporates both pseudo-spectral and finite-difference methods in the discretisation of the equations and thus allows the user to capture waves with large steepnesses. As such it has been possible to establish that, in a counter-flowing situation, the existence of wave solutions is not guaranteed and depends on a pair of parameters representing mass flux and vorticity. This result was predicted, for linear solutions, by Constantin. Furthermore, experimental comparisons, both with and without vorticity, have proven the precision of this code. Finally, waves propagating on top of highly realistic shear currents (exponential profiles under the surface) have been calculated following current profiles such as those used by Nwogu. In addition, a stability analysis routine has been developed to study the stability regimes of base waves calculated with the two-dimensional code. This linear stability analysis is based on three dimensional perturbations of the steady situation which lead to a generalised eigenvalue problem. Common instabilities of the first and second class have been detected, while a third class of wave-instability appears due to the presence of strong vorticity. {1} Adrian Constantin and Walter Strauss. {Exact steady periodic water waves with vorticity}. Communications on Pure and Applied Mathematics, 57(4):481-527, April 2004. Okey G. Nwogu. {Interaction of finite-amplitude waves with vertically sheared current fields}. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 627:179, May 2009.

  1. Shear wave seismic interferometry for lithospheric imaging: Application to southern Mexico

    Frank, J. G.; Ruigrok, E. N.; Wapenaar, K.

    2014-07-01

    Seismic interferometry allows for the creation of new seismic traces by cross correlating existing ones. With sufficient sampling of remote-source positions, it is possible to create a virtual source record by transforming a receiver location into a virtual source. The imaging technique developed here directly retrieves reflectivity information from the subsurface. Other techniques, namely receiver-function and tomography, rely on mode-converted energy and perturbations in a velocity field, respectively, to make inferences regarding structure. We select shear phases as an imaging source because of their lower propagation velocity, sensitivity to melt, and ability to treat vertical shear and horizontal shear wavefields independently. Teleseismic shear phases approximate a plane wave due to the extent of wavefront spread compared to a finite receiver array located on the free surface. The teleseismic shear phase transmission responses are used as input to the seismic interferometry technique. We create virtual shear source records by converting each receiver in the array into a virtual source. By cross correlating the received signals, the complex source character of distant earthquakes is imprinted on the virtual source records as the average autocorrelation of individual source-time functions. We demonstrate a technique that largely removes this imprint by filtering in the common-offset domain. A field data set was selected from the Meso-America Subduction Experiment. Despite the suboptimal remote-source sampling, an image of the lithosphere was produced that confirms features of the subduction zone that were previously found with the receiver-function technique.

  2. Internal inspection of reinforced concrete for nuclear structures using shear wave tomography

    Highlights: • Aging of reinforced concrete used for worldwide nuclear structures is increasing and necessitating evaluation. • Nondestructive evaluation is a tool for assessing the condition of reinforced concrete of nuclear structures. • Ultrasonic shear wave tomography as a stress wave technique has begun to be utilized for investigation of concrete material. • A study using ultrasonic shear wave tomography indicates anomalies vital to the long-term operation of the structure. • The use of this technique has shown to successfully evaluate the internal state of reinforced concrete members. - Abstract: Reinforced concrete is important for nuclear related structures. Therefore, the integrity of structural members consisting of reinforced concrete is germane to the safe operation and longevity of these facilities. Many issues that reduce the likelihood of safe operation and longevity are not visible on the surface of reinforced concrete material. Therefore, an investigation of reinforced concrete material should include techniques which will allow peering into the concrete member and determining its internal state. The performance of nondestructive evaluations is pursuant to this goal. Some of the categories of nondestructive evaluations are electrochemical, magnetism, ground penetrating radar, and ultrasonic testing. A specific ultrasonic testing technique, namely ultrasonic shear wave tomography, is used to determine presence and extent of voids, honeycombs, cracks perpendicular to the surface, and/or delamination. This technique, and others similar to it, has been utilized in the nuclear industry to determine structural conditions

  3. Combined Resistivity and Shear Wave Velocity Soil-type Estimation Beneath a Coastal Protection Levee.

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Goff, D.; Hayashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Unconsolidated Holocene deltaic sediments comprise levee foundation soils in New Orleans, USA. Whereas geotechnical tests at point locations are indispensable for evaluating soil stability, the highly variable sedimentary facies of the Mississippi delta create difficulties to predict soil conditions between test locations. Combined electrical resistivity and seismic shear wave studies, calibrated to geotechnical data, may provide an efficient methodology to predict soil types between geotechnical sites at shallow depths (0- 10 m). The London Avenue Canal levee flank of New Orleans, which failed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, 2005, presents a suitable site in which to pioneer these geophysical relationships. Preliminary cross-plots show electrically resistive, high-shear-wave velocity areas interpreted as low-permeability, resistive silt. In brackish coastal environments, low-resistivity and low-shear-wave-velocity areas may indicate both saturated, unconsolidated sands and low-rigidity clays. Via a polynomial approximation, soil sub-types of sand, silt and clay can be estimated by a cross-plot of S-wave velocity and resistivity. We confirm that existent boring log data fit reasonably well with the polynomial approximation where 2/3 of soil samples fall within their respective bounds—this approach represents a new classification system that could be used for other mid-latitude, fine-grained deltas.

  4. Shear wave velocity structure of northern and North-Eastern Ethiopia

    The non-linear inversion technique known as hedgehog is utilized to define the average crustal structure of North and North-Eastern Ethiopia. To accomplish the task a two dimensional frequency-time analysis is performed to obtain Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves. Six earthquakes recorded by the broad-band digital seismograph installed at the Geophysical Observatory of Addis Ababa University are utilized. The crustal structure between the Gulf of Tadjura (western Gulf of Aden) and Addis Ababa crossing southern Afar (path I) can be approximated by a total thickness of about 22 km with average S-wave velocity in the range 2.3 - 3.9 km/s. The crust-mantle transition is poorly developed at greater depths and the shear wave velocity ranges from 4.0 km/s to 4.3 km/s. If the effect of the plateau part is taken into account the average total crustal thickness is found to be less than 18 km and the average S-wave velocity varies in the range 2.4 - 3.9 km/s. The low shear wave velocity under the Afar crust is consistent with the result of other geophysical studies. For path II, which passes through the border of the Western Ethiopian plateau, the average crustal structure is found to be approximated by a thickness of about 40 km and average S-wave velocity between 3.0 km/s and 3.9 km/s. The crust overlies a lithospheric mantle with a shear wave velocity in the range 4.1-4.4 km/s. (author). 37 refs, 11 figs, 4 tabs

  5. On the possibility of wave-induced chaos in a sheared, stably stratified fluid layer

    W. B. Zimmermann

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Shear flow in a stable stratification provides a waveguide for internal gravity waves. In the inviscid approximation, internal gravity waves are known to be unstable below a threshold in Richardson number. However, in a viscous fluid, at low enough Reynolds number, this threshold recedes to Ri = 0. Nevertheless, even the slightest viscosity strongly damps internal gravity waves when the Richardson number is small (shear forces dominate buoyant forces. In this paper we address the dynamics that approximately govern wave propagation when the Richardson number is small and the fluid is viscous. When Ri ξ = λ1A + λ2Aξξ + λ3Aξξξ + λ4AAξ + b(ξ where ξ is the coordinate of the rest frame of the passing temperature wave whose horizontal profile is b(ξ. The parameters λi are constants that depend on the Reynolds number. The above dynamical system is know to have limit cycle and chaotic attrators when forcing is sinusoidal and wave attenuation negligible.

  6. Excitation and detection of shear horizontal waves with electromagnetic acoustic transducers for nondestructive testing of plates

    Ma, Qingzeng; Jiao, Jingpin; Hu, Ping; Zhong, Xi; Wu, Bin; He, Cunfu

    2014-03-01

    The fundamental shear horizontal(SH0) wave has several unique features that are attractive for long-range nondestructive testing(NDT). By a careful design of the geometric configuration, electromagnetic acoustic transducers(EMATs) have the capability to generate a wide range of guided wave modes, such as Lamb waves and shear-horizontal(SH) waves in plates. However, the performance of EMATs is influenced by their parameters. To evaluate the performance of periodic permanent magnet(PPM) EMATs, a distributed-line-source model is developed to calculate the angular acoustic field cross-section in the far-field. Numerical analysis is conducted to investigate the performance of such EMATs with different geometric parameters, such as period and number of magnet arrays, and inner and outer coil widths. Such parameters have a great influence on the directivity of the generated SH0 waves that arises mainly in the amplitude and width of both main and side lobes. According to the numerical analysis, these parameters are optimized to obtain better directivity. Optimized PPM EMATs are designed and used for NDT of strip plates. Experimental results show that the lateral boundary of the strip plate has no perceivable influence on SH0-wave propagation, thus validating their used in NDT. The proposed model predicts the radiation pattern of PPM EMATs, and can be used for their parameter optimization.

  7. Observation of fast-ion Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with shear Alfven waves

    The Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance (ω-kzvz=Ωf) between fast ions and shear Alfven waves is experimentally investigated (ω, wave frequency; kz, axial wavenumber; vz, fast-ion axial speed; Ωf, fast-ion cyclotron frequency). A test particle beam of fast ions is launched by a Li+ source in the helium plasma of the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman, H. Pfister, Z. Lucky, J. Bamber, D. Leneman, and J. Maggs, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)], with shear Alfven waves (SAW) (amplitude δ B/B up to 1%) launched by a loop antenna. A collimated fast-ion energy analyzer measures the nonclassical spreading of the beam, which is proportional to the resonance with the wave. A resonance spectrum is observed by launching SAWs at 0.3-0.8ωci. Both the magnitude and frequency dependence of the beam-spreading are in agreement with the theoretical prediction using a Monte Carlo Lorentz code that launches fast ions with an initial spread in real/velocity space and random phases relative to the wave. Measured wave magnetic field data are used in the simulation.

  8. Ultrasound Shear Wave Simulation of Breast Tumor Using Nonlinear Tissue Elasticity

    Dae Woo Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI can assess the elasticity of tissues, but the shear modulus estimated in SWEI is often less sensitive to a subtle change of the stiffness that produces only small mechanical contrast to the background tissues. Because most soft tissues exhibit mechanical nonlinearity that differs in tissue types, mechanical contrast can be enhanced if the tissues are compressed. In this study, a finite element- (FE- based simulation was performed for a breast tissue model, which consists of a circular (D: 10 mm, hard tumor and surrounding tissue (soft. The SWEI was performed with 0% to 30% compression of the breast tissue model. The shear modulus of the tumor exhibited noticeably high nonlinearity compared to soft background tissue above 10% overall applied compression. As a result, the elastic modulus contrast of the tumor to the surrounding tissue was increased from 0.46 at 0% compression to 1.45 at 30% compression.

  9. Exact solution of the dispersion equation for electromagnetic waves in sheared relativistic electron beams

    Cuperman, S.; Heristchi, D.

    1992-08-01

    The transcendental dispersion equation for electromagnetic waves propagating in the slow mode in sheared non-neutral relativistic cylindrical electron beams in strong applied magnetic fields is solved exactly. Thus, rather than truncated power series for the modified Bessel functions involved, use is made of modern algorithms able to compute such functions up to 18-digit accuracy. Consequently, new and significantly more important branches of the velocity shear instability are found. When the shear-factor and/or the geometrical parameter a/b (pipe-to-beam radius ratio) are increased, the unstable branches join, and the higher-frequency, larger-wavenumber modes are significantly enhanced. Since analytical solutions of the exact dispersion relation cannot be obtained, it is suggested that in all similar cases the methods proposed and demonstrated here should be used to carry out a rigorous stability analysis.

  10. Experimental verification of nanofluid shear-wave reconversion in ultrasonic fields.

    Forrester, Derek Michael; Huang, Jinrui; Pinfield, Valerie J; Luppé, Francine

    2016-03-14

    Here we present the verification of shear-mediated contributions to multiple scattering of ultrasound in suspensions. Acoustic spectroscopy was carried out with suspensions of silica of differing particle sizes and concentrations in water to find the attenuation at a broad range of frequencies. As the particle sizes approach the nanoscale, commonly used multiple scattering models fail to match experimental results. We develop a new model, taking into account shear mediated contributions, and find excellent agreement with the attenuation spectra obtained using two types of spectrometer. The results determine that shear-wave phenomena must be considered in ultrasound characterisation of nanofluids at even relatively low concentrations of scatterers that are smaller than one micrometre in diameter. PMID:26763173

  11. Mode selective generation of guided waves by systematic optimization of the interfacial shear stress profile

    Piezoelectric transducers are commonly used in structural health monitoring systems to generate and measure ultrasonic guided waves (GWs) by applying interfacial shear and normal stresses to the host structure. In most cases, in order to perform damage detection, advanced signal processing techniques are required, since a minimum of two dispersive modes are propagating in the host structure. In this paper, a systematic approach for mode selection is proposed by optimizing the interfacial shear stress profile applied to the host structure, representing the first step of a global optimization of selective mode actuator design. This approach has the potential of reducing the complexity of signal processing tools as the number of propagating modes could be reduced. Using the superposition principle, an analytical method is first developed for GWs excitation by a finite number of uniform segments, each contributing with a given elementary shear stress profile. Based on this, cost functions are defined in order to minimize the undesired modes and amplify the selected mode and the optimization problem is solved with a parallel genetic algorithm optimization framework. Advantages of this method over more conventional transducers tuning approaches are that (1) the shear stress can be explicitly optimized to both excite one mode and suppress other undesired modes, (2) the size of the excitation area is not constrained and mode-selective excitation is still possible even if excitation width is smaller than all excited wavelengths, and (3) the selectivity is increased and the bandwidth extended. The complexity of the optimal shear stress profile obtained is shown considering two cost functions with various optimal excitation widths and number of segments. Results illustrate that the desired mode (A0 or S0) can be excited dominantly over other modes up to a wave power ratio of 1010 using an optimal shear stress profile. (paper)

  12. Three-dimensional shear wave imaging based on full-field laser speckle contrast imaging with one-dimensional mechanical scanning.

    Chao, Pei-Yu; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-08-22

    The high imaging resolution and motion sensitivity of optical-based shear wave detection has made it an attractive technique in biomechanics studies with potential for improving the capabilities of shear wave elasticity imaging. In this study we implemented laser speckle contrast imaging for two-dimensional (X-Z) tracking of transient shear wave propagation in agarose phantoms. The mechanical disturbances induced by the propagation of the shear wave caused temporal and spatial fluctuations in the local speckle pattern, which manifested as local blurring. By mechanically moving the sample in the third dimension (Y), and performing two-dimensional shear wave imaging at every scan position, the three-dimensional shear wave velocity distribution of the phantom could be reconstructed. Based on comparisons with the reference shear wave velocity measurements obtained using a commercial ultrasound shear wave imaging system, the developed system can estimate the shear wave velocity with an error of less than 6% for homogeneous phantoms with shear moduli ranging from 1.52 kPa to 7.99 kPa. The imaging sensitivity of our system makes it capable of measuring small variations in shear modulus; the estimated standard deviation of the shear modulus was found to be less than 0.07 kPa. A submillimeter spatial resolution for three-dimensional shear wave imaging has been achieved, as demonstrated by the ability to detect a 1-mm-thick stiff plate embedded inside heterogeneous agarose phantoms. PMID:27557169

  13. Near-surface characterization of a geotechnical site in north-east Missouri using shear-wave velocity measurements

    Ismail, A.; Anderson, N.

    2007-01-01

    Shear-wave velocity (Vs) as a function of soil stiffness is an essential parameter in geotechnical characterization of the subsurface. In this study, multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) and downhole methods were used to map the shear-wave velocity-structure and depth to the bed-rock surface at a 125m ?? 125m geotechnical site in Missouri. The main objective was to assess the suitability of the site for constructing a large, heavy building. The acquired multichannel surface wave data were inverted to provide 1D shear-wave velocity profile corresponding to each shot gather. These 1D velocity profiles were interpolated and contoured to generate a suite of 2D shear-wave velocity sections. Integrating the shear-wave velocity data from the MASW method with the downhole velocity data and the available borehole lithologic information enabled us to map shear-wave velocity-structure to a depth on the order of 20m. The bedrock surface, which is dissected by a significant cut-and-fill valley, was imaged. The results suggest that the study site will require special consideration prior to construction. The results also demonstrate the successful use of MASW methods, when integrated with downhole velocity measurements and borehole lithologic information, in the characterization of the near surface at the geotechnical sites. ?? 2007 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  14. Correlation between Shear Wave Velocity and Porosity in Porous Solids and Rocks

    J. Kováčik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The shear wave velocity dependence on porosity was modelled using percolation theory model for the shear modulus porosity dependence. The obtained model is not a power law dependence (no simple scaling with porosity, but a more complex equation. Control parameters of this equation are shear wave velocity of bulk solid, percolation threshold of the material and the characteristic power law exponent for shear modulus porosity dependence. This model is suitable for all porous materials, mortars and porous rocks filled with liquid or gas. In the case of pores filled with gas the model can be further simplified: The term for the ratio of the gas density to the density of solid material can be omitted in the denominator (the ratio is usually in the range of (10−4, 10−3 for all solids. This simplified equation was then tested on the experimental data set for porous ZnO filled with air. Due to lack of reasonable data the scientists are encouraged to test the validity of proposed model using their experimental data.

  15. Finite-amplitude shear-Alfv\\'en waves do not propagate in weakly magnetized collisionless plasmas

    Squire, J; Schekochihin, A A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that low-collisionality plasmas cannot support linearly polarized shear-Alfv\\'en fluctuations above a critical amplitude $\\delta B_{\\perp}/B_{0} \\sim \\beta^{\\,-1/2}$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure. Above this cutoff, a developing fluctuation will generate a pressure anisotropy that is sufficient to destabilize itself through the parallel firehose instability. This causes the wave frequency to approach zero, interrupting the fluctuation before any oscillation. The magnetic field lines rapidly relax into a sequence of angular zig-zag structures. Such a restrictive bound on shear-Alfv\\'en-wave amplitudes has far-reaching implications for the physics of magnetized turbulence in the high-$\\beta$ conditions prevalent in many astrophysical plasmas, as well as for the solar wind at $\\sim 1 \\mathrm{AU}$ where $\\beta \\gtrsim 1$.

  16. Development of a low frequency omnidirectional piezoelectric shear horizontal wave transducer

    Belanger, Pierre; Boivin, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) may offer an alternative to time based maintenance of safety critical components. Ultrasonic guided waves have recently emerged as a prominent option because their propagation carries information regarding the location, severity and types of damage. The fundamental shear horizontal ultrasonic guided wave mode has recently attracted interest in SHM because of its unique properties. This mode is not dispersive and has no attenuation due to fluid loading. In order to cover large areas using an SHM system, omnidirectional transduction is desired. Omnidirectional transduction of SH0 is challenging because of the required torsional surface stress. This paper presents a concept based on the discretisation of a torsional surface stress source using shear piezoelectric trapezoidal elements. Finite element simulation and experimental results are used to demonstrate the performance of this concept. The experimental modal selectivity is 17 dB and the transducer has a true omnidirectional behaviour.

  17. Energetic particle destabilization of shear Alfven waves in stellarators and tokamaks

    An important issue for ignited devices is the resonant destabilization of shear Alfven waves by energetic populations. These instabilities have been observed in a variety of toroidal plasma experiments in recent years, including: beam-destabilized toroidal Alfven instabilities (TAE) in low magnetic field tokamaks, ICRF destabilized TAE's in higher field tokamaks, and global Alfven instabilities (GAE) in low shear stellarators. In addition, excitation and study of these modes is a significant goal of the TFIR-DT program and a component of the ITER physics tasks. The authors have developed a gyrofluid model which includes the wave-particle resonances necessary to excite such instabilities. The TAE linear mode structure is calculated nonperturbatively, including many of the relevant damping mechanisms, such as: continuum damping, non-ideal effects (ion FLR and electron collisionality), and ion/electron Landau damping. This model has been applied to both linear and nonlinear regimes for a range of experimental cases using measured profiles

  18. Scattering of shear waves by an elliptical cavity in a radially inhomogeneous isotropic medium

    Hei, Baoping; Yang, Zailin; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-03-01

    Complex function and general conformal mapping methods are used to investigate the scattering of elastic shear waves by an elliptical cylindrical cavity in a radially inhomogeneous medium. The conformal mappings are introduced to solve scattering by an arbitrary cavity for the Helmholtz equation with variable coefficient through the transformed standard Helmholtz equation with a circular cavity. The medium density depends on the distance from the origin with a power-law variation and the shear elastic modulus is constant. The complex-value displacements and stresses of the inhomogeneous medium are explicitly obtained and the distributions of the dynamic stress for the case of an elliptical cavity are discussed. The accuracy of the present approach is verified by comparing the present solution results with the available published data. Numerical results demonstrate that the wave number, inhomogeneous parameters and different values of aspect ratio have significant influence on the dynamic stress concentration factors around the elliptical cavity.

  19. Bond slip detection of concrete-encased composite structure using shear wave based active sensing approach

    Zeng, Lei; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Kong, Qingzhao; Huo, Linsheng; Lim, Ing; Li, Mo; Song, Gangbing

    2015-12-01

    Concrete-encased composite structure exhibits improved strength, ductility and fire resistance compared to traditional reinforced concrete, by incorporating the advantages of both steel and concrete materials. A major drawback of this type of structure is the bond slip introduced between steel and concrete, which directly reduces the load capacity of the structure. In this paper, an active sensing approach using shear waves to provide monitoring and early warning of the development of bond slip in the concrete-encased composite structure is proposed. A specimen of concrete-encased composite structure was investigated. In this active sensing approach, shear mode smart aggregates (SAs) embedded in the concrete act as actuators and generate desired shear stress waves. Distributed piezoceramic transducers installed in the cavities of steel plates act as sensors and detect the wave response from shear mode SAs. Bond slip acts as a form of stress relief and attenuates the wave propagation energy. Experimental results from the time domain analysis clearly indicate that the amplitudes of received signal by lead zirconate titanate sensors decreased when bond slip occurred. In addition, a wavelet packet-based analysis was developed to compute the received signal energy values, which can be used to determine the initiation and development of bond slip in concrete-encased composite structure. In order to establish the validity of the proposed method, a 3D finite element analysis of the concrete-steel bond model is further performed with the aid of the commercial finite element package, Abaqus, and the numerical results are compared with the results obtained in experimental study.

  20. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic MHD shear flows

    Uchava, E. S.; B. M. Shergelashvili; Tevzadze, A. G.; Poedts, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic MHD flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model, that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy, but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower ...

  1. Effect of Shear on Ultrasonic Flow Measurement Using Nonaxisymmetric Wave Modes

    Yong Chen; Yiyong Huang; Xiaoqian Chen; Dengpeng Hu

    2014-01-01

    Nonaxisymmetric wave propagation in an inviscid fluid with a pipeline shear flow is investigated. Mathematical equation is deduced from the conservations of mass and momentum, leading to a second-order differential equation in terms of the acoustic pressure. Meanwhile a general boundary condition is formulated to cover different types of wall configurations. A semianalytical method based on the Fourier-Bessel theory is provided to transform the differential equation to algebraic equations. Nu...

  2. Arterial Stiffness Estimation by Shear Wave Elastography: Validation in Phantoms with Mechanical Testing.

    Maksuti, Elira; Widman, Erik; Larsson, David; Urban, Matthew W; Larsson, Matilda; Bjällmark, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent risk factor found to correlate with a wide range of cardiovascular diseases. It has been suggested that shear wave elastography (SWE) can be used to quantitatively measure local arterial shear modulus, but an accuracy assessment of the technique for arterial applications has not yet been performed. In this study, the influence of confined geometry on shear modulus estimation, by both group and phase velocity analysis, was assessed, and the accuracy of SWE in comparison with mechanical testing was measured in nine pressurized arterial phantoms. The results indicated that group velocity with an infinite medium assumption estimated shear modulus values incorrectly in comparison with mechanical testing in arterial phantoms (6.7 ± 0.0 kPa from group velocity and 30.5 ± 0.4 kPa from mechanical testing). To the contrary, SWE measurements based on phase velocity analysis (30.6 ± 3.2 kPa) were in good agreement with mechanical testing, with a relative error between the two techniques of 8.8 ± 6.0% in the shear modulus range evaluated (40-100 kPa). SWE by phase velocity analysis was validated to accurately measure stiffness in arterial phantoms. PMID:26454623

  3. Propagation of shear elastic and electromagnetic waves in one dimensional piezoelectric and piezomagnetic composites.

    Shi, P; Chen, C Q; Zou, W N

    2015-01-01

    Coupled shear (SH) elastic and electromagnetic (EM) waves propagating oblique to a one dimensional periodic piezoelectric and piezomagnetic composite are investigated using the transfer matrix method. Closed-form expression of the dispersion relations is derived. We find that the band structures of the periodic composite show simultaneously the features of phononic and photonic crystals. Strong interaction between the elastic and EM waves near the center of the Brillouin zone (i.e., phonon-polariton) is revealed. It is shown the elastic branch of the band structures is more sensitive to the piezoelectric effect while the phonon-polariton is more sensitive to the piezomagnetic effect of the composite. PMID:25200701

  4. Radiation of a Plane Shear Wave from an Elastic Waveguide to a Composite Elastic Space

    Grigoryan E.Kh.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The radiation of a plane shear wave from an elastic strip (waveguide to an elastic space is investigated in this paper. The strip is embedded into a space and is partially bonded with it. A given plane shear wave propagates from the free part of the strip and radiates into the composite space. The problem’s solution is led to a system of two uncoupled functional Wiener-Hopf type equations which are solved via the method of factorization. Closed form expressions are obtained which determine the wavefield in all the parts of the strip and space. Asymptotic expressions are provided which represent the wavefield in the far field and in the neighborhood of the contact zones. From these formulas it follows that: a in the cases of several values of the ratio of the wave numbers of the strip and space the order of vanishing of the volume wave in the strip becomes less and equal to the one in the case of a homogeneous material, b the radiated volume wave in the strip has a velocity of propagation equal to the volume wave’s velocity in the space.

  5. Shear Wave Elastography in the Living, Perfused, Post-Delivery Placenta.

    McAleavey, Stephen A; Parker, Kevin J; Ormachea, Juvenal; Wood, Ronald W; Stodgell, Christopher J; Katzman, Philip J; Pressman, Eva K; Miller, Richard K

    2016-06-01

    The placenta is the critical interface between the mother and the developing fetus and is essential for survival and growth. Despite the widespread use of ultrasound imaging and Doppler in obstetrics and gynecology and the recent growth of elastographic technologies, little is known about the biomechanical (elastic shear wave) properties of the placenta and the range of normal and pathologic parameters that are present. This study uses a well-developed protocol for perfusing whole placentas, post-delivery, to maintain tissue integrity and function for hours. In this model, the placenta is living, whole and maintained within normal physiologic parameters such as flow, arterial pressure and oxygen, throughout examination by ultrasound, Doppler and shear wave elastography. The preliminary results indicate that normal placental tissue on the fetal side has shear wave speeds on the order of 2 m/s, in a range similar to those of animal livers. Some abnormalities are found outside this range, and thus, elastographic measures of the placenta may provide useful assessments related to the state of the tissue. PMID:27006269

  6. Variation of shear and compressional wave modulus upon saturation for pure pre-compacted sands

    Bhuiyan, M. H.; Holt, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    Gassmann's fluid substitution theory is commonly used to predict seismic velocity change upon change in saturation, and is hence essential for 4-D seismic and AVO studies. This paper addresses the basics assumptions of the Gassmann theory, in order to see how well they are fulfilled in controlled laboratory experiments. Our focus is to investigate the sensitivity of shear modulus to fluid saturation, and the predictability of Gassmann's fluid substitution theory for P-wave modulus. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in dry and saturated (3.5 wt per cent NaCl) unconsolidated clean sands (Ottawa and Columbia) were measured in an oedometer test system (uniaxial strain conditions) over a range of 0.5-10 MPa external vertical stress. This study shows shear modulus hardening upon brine saturation, which is consistent with previous data found in the literature. Analysis of the data shows that most of the hardening of the ultrasonic shear modulus may be explained by Biot dispersion. Isotropic Gassmann's fluid substitution is found to underestimate the P-wave modulus upon fluid saturation. However, adding the Biot dispersion effect improves the prediction. More work is required to obtain good measurements of parameters influencing dispersion, such as tortuosity, which is very ambiguous and challenging to measure accurately.

  7. Variation of shear and compressional wave modulus upon saturation for pure pre-compacted sands

    Bhuiyan, M. H.; Holt, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    Gassmann's fluid substitution theory is commonly used to predict seismic velocity change upon change in saturation, and is hence essential for 4D seismic and AVO studies. This paper addresses the basics assumptions of the Gassmann theory, in order to see how well they are fulfilled in controlled laboratory experiments. Our focus is to investigate the sensitivity of shear modulus to fluid saturation, and the predictability of Gassmann's fluid substitution theory for P-wave modulus. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in dry and saturated (3.5wt% NaCl) unconsolidated clean sands (Ottawa and Columbia) were measured in an oedometer test system (uniaxial strain conditions) over a range of 0.5 MPa to 10 MPa external vertical stress. This study shows shear modulus hardening upon brine saturation, which is consistent with previous data found in the literature. Analysis of the data shows that most of the hardening of the ultrasonic shear modulus may be explained by Biot dispersion. Isotropic Gassmann's fluid substitution is found to underestimate the P-wave modulus upon fluid saturation. However, adding the Biot dispersion effect improves the prediction. More work is required to obtain good measurements of parameters influencing dispersion, such as tortuosity, which is very ambiguous and challenging to measure accurately.

  8. Shear horizontal surface acoustic waves in a magneto-electro-elastic system

    Eskandari, Shahin; Shodja, Hossein M.

    2016-04-01

    Propagation of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves (SHSAWs) within a functionally graded magneto-electro-elastic (FGMEE) half-space was previously presented (Shodja HM, Eskandari S, Eskandari M. J. Eng. Math. 2015, 1-18) In contrast, the current paper considers propagation of SHSAWs in a medium consisting of an FGMEE layer perfectly bonded to a homogeneous MEE substrate. When the FGMEE layer is described by some special inhomogeneity functions - all the MEE properties have the same variation in depth which may or may not be identical to that of the density - we obtain the exact closed-form solution for the MEE fields. Additionally, certain special inhomogeneity functions with monotonically decreasing bulk shear wave velocity in depth are considered, and the associated boundary value problem is solved using power series solution. This problem in the limit as the layer thickness goes to infinity collapses to an FGMEE half-space with decreasing bulk shear wave velocity in depth. It is shown that in such a medium SHSAW does not propagate. Using power series solution we can afford to consider some FGMEE layers of practical importance, where the composition of the MEE obeys a prescribed volume fraction variation. The dispersive behavior of SHSAWs in the presence of such layers is also examined.

  9. Quantitative shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) with acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) induced by phase array transducer

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Shear Wave Optical Coherence Elastography (SW-OCE) uses the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative measurement of localized shear modulus, making it a valuable technique for the elasticity characterization of tissues such as skin and ocular tissue. One of the main challenges in shear wave elastography is to induce a reliable source of shear wave; most of nowadays techniques use external vibrators which have several drawbacks such as limited wave propagation range and/or difficulties in non-invasive scans requiring precisions, accuracy. Thus, we propose linear phase array ultrasound transducer as a remote wave source, combined with the high-speed, 47,000-frame-per-second Shear-wave visualization provided by phase-sensitive OCT. In this study, we observed for the first time shear waves induced by a 128 element linear array ultrasound imaging transducer, while the ultrasound and OCT images (within the OCE detection range) were triggered simultaneously. Acoustic radiation force impulses are induced by emitting 10 MHz tone-bursts of sub-millisecond durations (between 50 μm - 100 μm). Ultrasound beam steering is achieved by programming appropriate phase delay, covering a lateral range of 10 mm and full OCT axial (depth) range in the imaging sample. Tissue-mimicking phantoms with agarose concentration of 0.5% and 1% was used in the SW-OCE measurements as the only imaging samples. The results show extensive improvements over the range of SW-OCE elasticity map; such improvements can also be seen over shear wave velocities in softer and stiffer phantoms, as well as determining the boundary of multiple inclusions with different stiffness. This approach opens up the feasibility to combine medical ultrasound imaging and SW-OCE for high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  10. On the theory of MHD waves in a shear flow of a magnetized turbulent plasma

    Mishonov, Todor M.; Maneva, Yana G.; Dimitrov, Zlatan D.; Hristov, Tihomir S.

    The set of equations for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in a shear flow is consecutively derived. This investigation is devoted on the wave heating of space plasmas. The proposed scenario involves the presence of a self-sustained turbulence and magnetic field. In the framework of Langevin--Burgers approach the influence of the turbulence is described by an additional external random force in the MHD system. Kinetic equation for the spectral density of the slow magnetosonic (Alfvénic) mode is derived in the short wavelength (WKB) approximation. The results show a pressing need for conduction of numerical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with a random driver to take into account the influence of the long wavelength modes and to give a more precise analytical assessment of the short ones. Realistic MC calculations for the heating rate and shear stress tensor should give an answer to the perplexing problem for the missing viscosity in accretion disks and reveal why the quasars are the most powerful sources of light in the universe. It is supposed that the heating mechanism by alfvén waves absorption is common for many kinds of space plasmas from solar corona to active galactic nuclei and the solution of these longstanding puzzles deserves active interdisciplinary research. The work is illustrated by typical solutions of MHD equations and their spectral densities obtained by numerical calculations or by analytical solutions with the help of Heun functions. The amplification coefficient of slow magnetosonic wave in shear flow is analytically calculated. Pictorially speaking, if in WKB approximation we treat Alfvén waves as particles -- this amplification is effect of ``lasing of alfvons.''

  11. Generation of shear Alfvén waves by repetitive electron heating

    Wang, Y.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; Van Compernolle, B.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2016-01-01

    ELF/ULF waves are powerful tools for submarine communication, geophysical mapping, and radiation belt remediation. However, due to their large wavelength (on the order of 102-104 km or 0.1-10 RE) it is difficult to launch them using ground-based antennas. Alternatively, these waves can be generated by modulating the temperature of the ionosphere using ground-based HF transmitters. The paper reports a detailed laboratory study on the generation of shear Alfvén waves by repetitive electron heating. The experiments were conducted on the large plasma device at University of California, Los Angeles. In the experiment, 10 pulses of high-power microwaves (250 kW, 1 µs each) near the plasma frequency modulated at a variable fraction between 0.1 and 1.0 of fci are launched transverse to the background field. In addition to bulk electron heating the interaction generates a population of fast electrons in the tail of the distribution function. The field-aligned current carried by the fast electrons acts as an antenna that radiates shear Alfvén waves. It is demonstrated that a shear Alfvén wave at a controllable, arbitrary frequency (f microwave pulses. The radiation pattern and power dependence of the virtual antenna are also presented. The experiments provide a novel virtual antenna concept relevant to the equatorial region where the Earth's magnetic field is horizontal and the field-aligned plasma density gradient is small. The results are important to design of new mobile ionospheric heaters for equatorial and middle latitude locations.

  12. Cluster observations of Shear-mode surface waves diverging from Geomagnetic Tail reconnection

    Dai, L.; Wygant, J. R.; Dombeck, J. P.; Cattell, C. A.; Thaller, S. A.; Mouikis, C.; Balogh, A.; Reme, H.

    2010-12-01

    We present the first Cluster spacecraft study of the intense (δB/B~0.5, δE/VAB~0.5) equatorial plane surface waves diverging from magnetic reconnection in the geomagnetic tail at ~17 Re. Using phase lag analysis with multi-spacecraft measurements, we quantitatively determine the wavelength and phase velocity of the waves with spacecraft frame frequencies from 0.03 Hz to 1 Hz and wavelengths from much larger (4Re) than to comparable to the H+ gyroradius (~300km). The phase velocities track the strong variations in the equatorial plane projection of the reconnection outflow velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field. The propagation direction and wavelength of the observed surface waves resemble those of flapping waves of the magnetotail current sheet, suggesting a same origin shared by both of these waves. The observed waves appear ubiquitous in the outflows near magnetotail reconnection. Evidence is found that the observed waves are associated with velocity shear in reconnection outflows. Analysis shows that observed waves are associated with strong field-aligned Alfvenic Poynting flux directed away from the reconnection region toward Earth. These observations present a scenario in which the observed surface waves are driven and convected through a velocity-shear type instability by high-speed (~1000km) reconnection outflows tending to slow down due to power dissipation through Poynting flux. The mapped Poynting flux (100ergs/cm2s) and longitudinal scales (10-100 km) to 100km altitude suggest that the observed waves and their motions are an important boundary condition for night-side aurora. Figure: a) The BX-GSM in the geomagnetic tail current sheet. b) The phase difference wavelet spectrum between Bz_GSM from SC2 and SC3, used to determine the wave phase velocity, is correlated with the reconnection outflow velocity (represented by H+ VX-GSM) c) The spacecraft trajectory through magnetotail reconnection. d) The observed equatorial plane surface wave

  13. The Peano-series solution for modeling shear horizontal waves in piezoelectric plates

    Ben Ghozlen M.H.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The shear horizontal (SH wave devices have been widely used in electroacoustic. To improve their performance, the phase velocity dispersion and the electromechanical coupling coefficient of the Lamb wave should be calculated exactly in the design. Therefore, this work is to analyze exactly the Lamb waves polarized in the SH direction in homogeneous plate pie.zoelectric material (PZT-5H. An alternative method is proposed to solve the wave equation in such a structure without using the standard method based on the electromechanical partial waves. This method is based on an analytical solution, the matricant explicitly expressed under the Peano series expansion form. Two types of configuration have been addressed, namely the open circuited and the short circuited. Results confirm that the SH wave provides a number of attractive properties for use in sensing and signal processing applications. It has been found that the phase velocity remains nearly constant for all values of h/λ (h is the plate thickness, λ the acoustic wavelength. Secondly the SH0 wave mode can provide very high electromechanical coupling. Graphical representations of electrical and mechanical amounts function of depth are made, they are in agreement with the continuity rules. The developed Peano technique is in agreement with the classical approach, and can be suitable with cylindrical geometry.

  14. Areal and Shear Strain Coupling of PBO Borehole Strainmeters From Teleseismic Surface Waves

    Roeloffs, E.; McCausland, W.

    2007-12-01

    In order to compare borehole strainmeter data with tectonic models, we must know the coupling parameters relating elastic deformation of the strainmeter to strain in the surrounding rock. At least two coupling parameters are required: the ratios of instrument areal and shear strain to formation areal and shear strain, respectively. These coupling parameters depend on the relative elastic moduli of the formation, grout, and strainmeter, and typical elastic moduli yield nominal coupling parameters of 1.5 and 3. More accurate coupling parameters must be determined by analyzing each strainmeter's response to a known deformation source after the instrument has been grouted into the borehole. Borehole strainmeters installed by the National Science Foundation-funded Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) consist of four gauges, sampled at 20 Hz, that measure extension along distinct azimuths. Teleseismic Love and Rayleigh waves that produce fractional gauge elongations > 10-7 , such as those from the M8.3 Kuril Islands earthquake of November 15, 2006, can be used to constrain the coupling parameters. A planar Love or Rayleigh wave is expected to have a simple strain field that produces the same waveform on all four gauges of a strainmeter. The two-parameter coupling model is consistent with the variation of surface wave amplitudes as functions of azimuth for the borehole strainmeter data analyzed to date, although most of the PBO strainmeters require that differences in the relative gains of the four gauges be estimated as well. Fits to the data can be improved for some strainmeters by allowing for two distinct shear strain coupling parameters, and/or for a small (grout with a relatively low elastic modulus. Surface waves are well recorded by some strainmeters that do not record earth tides, demonstrating that for some borehole strainmeter installations, coupling may decrease at long periods.

  15. Shallow shear-wave reflection seismics in the tsunami struck Krueng Aceh River Basin, Sumatra

    U. Polom

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the project "Management of Georisk" (MANGEONAD of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR, Hanover, high resolution shallow shear-wave reflection seismics was applied in the Indonesian province Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam, North Sumatra in cooperation with the Government of Indonesia, local counterparts, and the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences, Hanover. The investigations were expected to support classification of earthquake site effects for the reconstruction of buildings and infrastructure as well as for groundwater exploration. The study focussed on the city of Banda Aceh and the surroundings of Aceh Besar. The shear-wave seismic surveys were done parallel to standard geoengineering investigations like cone penetrometer tests to support subsequent site specific statistical calibration. They were also partly supplemented by shallow p-wave seismics for the identification of (a elastic subsurface parameters and (b zones with abundance of groundwater. Evaluation of seismic site effects based on shallow reflection seismics has in fact been found to be a highly useful method in Aceh province. In particular, use of a vibratory seismic source was essential for successful application of shear-wave seismics in the city of Banda Aceh and in areas with compacted ground like on farm tracks in the surroundings, presenting mostly agricultural land use areas. We thus were able to explore the mechanical stiffness of the subsurface down to 100 m depth, occasionally even deeper, with remarkably high resolution. The results were transferred into geotechnical site classification in terms of the International Building Code (IBC, 2003. The seismic images give also insights into the history of the basin sedimentation processes of the Krueng Aceh River delta, which is relevant for the exploration of new areas for construction of safe foundations of buildings and for identification of fresh water aquifers in the tsunami

  16. Subsurface structure of the Nojima fault from dipole shear velocity/anisotropy and borehole Stoneley wave

    Ito, H. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Yamamoto, H.; Brie, A.

    1996-10-01

    Fracture and permeability in the fault zone of the active fault drilling at the Nojima fault were evaluated from acoustic waveforms. There were several permeable intervals in the fault zone. There was strong Stoneley wave attenuation, very large S-Se below the fault and in the interval above the fault. In the fault zone, there were also several short intervals where S-Se was very large; 667 m-674 m and 706 m-710 m. In these intervals, the Stoneley attenuation was large, but there was no Stoneley reflection from within the interval. Reflections were observed at the upper and lower boundaries, going away from the bed up above, and down below. In this well, the shear wave was very strongly attenuated at and below the fault zone. The fast shear azimuth changed at the fault. The slowness anisotropy was fairly strong above the fault from 602 m to 612 m, but smaller below the fault. The changes in fast shear azimuth were much more pronounced near the fault, which suggested a strong influence of the fault. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  17. The impact of hepatic pressurization on liver shear wave speed estimates in constrained versus unconstrained conditions

    Increased hepatic venous pressure can be observed in patients with advanced liver disease and congestive heart failure. This elevated portal pressure also leads to variation in acoustic radiation-force-derived shear wave-based liver stiffness estimates. These changes in stiffness metrics with hepatic interstitial pressure may confound stiffness-based predictions of liver fibrosis stage. The underlying mechanism for this observed stiffening behavior with pressurization is not well understood and is not explained with commonly used linear elastic mechanical models. An experiment was designed to determine whether the stiffness increase exhibited with hepatic pressurization results from a strain-dependent hyperelastic behavior. Six excised canine livers were subjected to variations in interstitial pressure through cannulation of the portal vein and closure of the hepatic artery and hepatic vein under constrained conditions (in which the liver was not free to expand) and unconstrained conditions. Radiation-force-derived shear wave speed estimates were obtained and correlated with pressure. Estimates of hepatic shear stiffness increased with changes in interstitial pressure over a physiologically relevant range of pressures (0–35 mmHg) from 1.5 to 3.5 m s−1. These increases were observed only under conditions in which the liver was free to expand while pressurized. This behavior is consistent with hyperelastic nonlinear material models that could be used in the future to explore methods for estimating hepatic interstitial pressure noninvasively. (paper)

  18. Direct Numerical Simulations of Small-Scale Gravity Wave Instability Dynamics in Variable Stratification and Shear

    Mixa, T.; Fritts, D. C.; Laughman, B.; Wang, L.; Kantha, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple observations provide compelling evidence that gravity wave dissipation events often occur in multi-scale environments having highly-structured wind and stability profiles extending from the stable boundary layer into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Such events tend to be highly localized and thus yield local energy and momentum deposition and efficient secondary gravity wave generation expected to have strong influences at higher altitudes [e.g., Fritts et al., 2013; Baumgarten and Fritts, 2014]. Lidars, radars, and airglow imagers typically cannot achieve the spatial resolution needed to fully quantify these small-scale instability dynamics. Hence, we employ high-resolution modeling to explore these dynamics in representative environments. Specifically, we describe numerical studies of gravity wave packets impinging on a sheet of high stratification and shear and the resulting instabilities and impacts on the gravity wave amplitude and momentum flux for various flow and gravity wave parameters. References: Baumgarten, Gerd, and David C. Fritts (2014). Quantifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability dynamics observed in noctilucent clouds: 1. Methods and observations. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 119.15, 9324-9337. Fritts, D. C., Wang, L., & Werne, J. A. (2013). Gravity wave-fine structure interactions. Part I: Influences of fine structure form and orientation on flow evolution and instability. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(12), 3710-3734.

  19. Stochastic ion heating by an electrostatic wave in a sheared magnetic field

    Effects of the shear of the magnetic field on the stochastic acceleration of ions due to an electrostatic wave with a frequency in the lower-hybrid range are considered. An appropriate Hamiltonian formalism is used to analyze the equations of motion numerically and theoretically. The surface of section method is used to visualize the solutions and to compare these with the theoretical predictions. From this analysis it appears that there exists an upper adiabatic barrier for the stochastic region which seems to be responsible for the formation of a hot tail in the ion velocity distribution. In addition to lowering the threshold for the onset of stochasticity, the effect of shear is to shift the tail structure to lower values of the velocities. Consequently, these results might help to improve the efficiency of heating by external radiation in the lower-hybrid frequency range

  20. Effect of Stress and Saturation on Shear Wave Anisotropy: Laboratory Observations Using Laser Doppler Interferometry

    Lebedev, M.; Collet, O.; Bona, A.; Gurevich, B.

    2015-12-01

    Estimations of hydrocarbon and water resources as well as reservoir management during production are the main challenges facing the resource recovery industry nowadays. The recently discovered reservoirs are not only deep but they are also located in complicated geological formations. Hence, the effect of anisotropy on reservoir imaging becomes significant. Shear wave (S-wave) splitting has been observed in the field and laboratory experiments for decades. Despite the fact that S-wave splitting is widely used for evaluation of subsurface anisotropy, the effects of stresses as well fluid saturation on anisotropy have not been understood in detail. In this paper we present the laboratory study of the effect of stress and saturation on S-wave splitting for a Bentheim sandstone sample. The cubic sample (50mm3), porosity 22%, density 1890kg/m3) was placed into a true-triaxial cell. The sample was subjected to several combinations of stresses varying from 0 to 10MPa and applied to the sample in two directions (X and Y), while no stress was applied to the sample in the Z-direction. The sample's bedding was nearly oriented parallel to Y-Z plane. The ultrasonic S-waves were exited at a frequency of 0.5MHz by a piezoelectric transducer and were propagating in the Z-direction. Upon wave arrival onto the free surface the displacement of the surface was monitored by a Laser Doppler interferometer. Hodograms of the central point of the dry sample (Fig. 1) demonstrate how S-wave polarizations for both "fast" and "slow" S-waves change when increasing the stress in the X direction, while the stress in direction Y is kept constant at 3 MPa. Polarization of the fast S wave is shifted towards the X-axis (axis of the maximum stress). While both S-wave velocities increase with stress, the anisotropy level remains the same. No shift of polarization of fast wave was observed when the stress along the Y-axis was kept at 3 MPa, while the stress along the X-axis was increasing. However, in

  1. Shear-Wave Velocity Structure Around the Korean Peninsula Using the Rayleigh Wave Signature of the North Korea Underground Nuclear Explosion on May 25, 2009

    Kim, G.; Shin, J.; Chi, H. C.; Sheen, D.; Park, J.; Cho, C.

    2011-12-01

    The crustal structure around the Korean Peninsula was investigated by analyzing the Rayleigh waves generated from the 2nd North Korea underground nuclear explosion on May 25, 2009. Group velocity dispersion curves were measured from vertical component waveforms of 20 broadband stations in the range of 194 to 1183 km from the test site. The measured dispersion curves were inverted to get shear-wave velocity models for depths from 0 to 50 km. The dispersion curves and the velocity models clearly show lateral variations in the crustal structure, which could be more clearly classified into the North Korea-Northeast China group, the Western Margin of the East Sea group, and the Japan Basin group. For each group, an averaged dispersion curve and an averaged velocity model were measured. The averaged shear-wave velocity model of the North Korea-Northeast China group shows that the mean shear-wave velocity of the Moho discontinuity, which is known to be located at approximately 35 km, is 4.37 km/s with a standard deviation of 0.15 km/s. The averaged shear-wave velocity model of the Japan Basin group shows a mean shear-wave velocity of 4.26 km/s with a standard deviation of 0.14 km/s in the layer between 16 and 22 km. The averaged shear-wave velocity model of the Western Margin of the East Sea group shows characteristics of a transition zone between the North Korea-Northeast China group, which represents continental crust, and the Japan Basin group, which represents oceanic crust. The mean shear-wave velocity in the layer between 16 and 22 km is 4.12 km/s with a standard deviation of 0.05 km/s.

  2. Lithospheric deformation in the Canadian Appalachians: evidence from shear wave splitting

    Gilligan, Amy; Bastow, Ian D.; Watson, Emma; Darbyshire, Fiona A.; Levin, Vadim; Menke, William; Lane, Victoria; Hawthorn, David; Boyce, Alistair; Liddell, Mitchell V.; Petrescu, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Plate-scale deformation is expected to impart seismic anisotropic fabrics on the lithosphere. Determination of the fast shear wave orientation (φ) and the delay time between the fast and slow split shear waves (δt) via SKS splitting can help place spatial and temporal constraints on lithospheric deformation. The Canadian Appalachians experienced multiple episodes of deformation during the Phanerozoic: accretionary collisions during the Palaeozoic prior to the collision between Laurentia and Gondwana, and rifting related to the Mesozoic opening of the North Atlantic. However, the extent to which extensional events have overprinted older orogenic trends is uncertain. We address this issue through measurements of seismic anisotropy beneath the Canadian Appalachians, computing shear wave splitting parameters (φ, δt) for new and existing seismic stations in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Average δt values of 1.2 s, relatively short length scale (≥100 km) splitting parameter variations, and a lack of correlation with absolute plate motion direction and mantle flow models, demonstrate that fossil lithospheric anisotropic fabrics dominate our results. Most fast directions parallel Appalachian orogenic trends observed at the surface, while δt values point towards coherent deformation of the crust and mantle lithosphere. Mesozoic rifting had minimal impact on our study area, except locally within the Bay of Fundy and in southern Nova Scotia, where fast directions are subparallel to the opening direction of Mesozoic rifting; associated δt values of >1 s require an anisotropic layer that spans both the crust and mantle, meaning the formation of the Bay of Fundy was not merely a thin-skinned tectonic event.

  3. Potential use of point shear wave elastography for the pancreas: A single center prospective study

    Kawada, Natsuko, E-mail: kawada-na@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Pathology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan); Department of Gastroenterology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Tanaka, Sachiko, E-mail: sachi686@cocoa.plala.or.jp [Osaka Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, 1-6-107, Morinomiya, Johtoh, Osaka 536-8588 (Japan); Uehara, Hiroyuki, E-mail: uehara-hi@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan); Ohkawa, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: okawa-ka@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan); Yamai, Takuo, E-mail: yamai-ta@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan); Takada, Ryoji, E-mail: takada-ry@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan); Shiroeda, Hisakazu, E-mail: shiroeda@kanazawa-med.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Arisawa, Tomiyasu, E-mail: tarisawa@kanazawa-med.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Tomita, Yasuhiko, E-mail: tomota-ya@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Pathology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    Aim: Clinical use of point shear wave elastography for the liver has been established, however, few studies demonstrated its usefulness for the pancreas. A prospective study was conducted to clarify its feasibility for the pancreas and its usefulness for the identification of high risk group for pancreatic cancer. Patients and methods: Consecutive eighty-five patients underwent point shear wave elastography for the pancreas. The success rate of shear wave velocity (SWV) measurement, that is the number of successful measurements over total 10 measurements, was recorded. The SWV of the pancreas measured at non-tumorous area was compared between patients with and without pancreatic cancer. Factors associated with high SWV were determined by logistic regression model. Results: Sixty patients were included, of these 18 had pancreatic cancer. The success rate of 100% was achieved at the head, the body and the tail of the pancreas in 80%, 83%, and 68% of the patients, respectively. The success rate of ≥80% was achieved in 100%, 100%, and 96% of the patients, respectively. Although mean SWV of the pancreas harboring pancreatic cancer tended to be higher compared with that of the pancreas without cancer (1.51 ± 0.45 m/s vs 1.43 ± 0.28 m/s), they did not reach statistical significance. Multivariate analysis showed that increased amount of alcohol intake was associated with high SWV. Conclusion: The SWV of the pancreas was measured with excellent success rate. However, tendency of higher SWV obtained from the pancreas harboring pancreatic cancer needed to be further investigated.

  4. Potential use of point shear wave elastography for the pancreas: A single center prospective study

    Aim: Clinical use of point shear wave elastography for the liver has been established, however, few studies demonstrated its usefulness for the pancreas. A prospective study was conducted to clarify its feasibility for the pancreas and its usefulness for the identification of high risk group for pancreatic cancer. Patients and methods: Consecutive eighty-five patients underwent point shear wave elastography for the pancreas. The success rate of shear wave velocity (SWV) measurement, that is the number of successful measurements over total 10 measurements, was recorded. The SWV of the pancreas measured at non-tumorous area was compared between patients with and without pancreatic cancer. Factors associated with high SWV were determined by logistic regression model. Results: Sixty patients were included, of these 18 had pancreatic cancer. The success rate of 100% was achieved at the head, the body and the tail of the pancreas in 80%, 83%, and 68% of the patients, respectively. The success rate of ≥80% was achieved in 100%, 100%, and 96% of the patients, respectively. Although mean SWV of the pancreas harboring pancreatic cancer tended to be higher compared with that of the pancreas without cancer (1.51 ± 0.45 m/s vs 1.43 ± 0.28 m/s), they did not reach statistical significance. Multivariate analysis showed that increased amount of alcohol intake was associated with high SWV. Conclusion: The SWV of the pancreas was measured with excellent success rate. However, tendency of higher SWV obtained from the pancreas harboring pancreatic cancer needed to be further investigated

  5. Concurrent Visualization of Acoustic Radiation Force Displacement and Shear Wave Propagation with 7T MRI.

    Liu, Yu; Fite, Brett Z; Mahakian, Lisa M; Johnson, Sarah M; Larrat, Benoit; Dumont, Erik; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2015-01-01

    Manual palpation is a common and very informative diagnostic tool based on estimation of changes in the stiffness of tissues that result from pathology. In the case of a small lesion or a lesion that is located deep within the body, it is difficult for changes in mechanical properties of tissue to be detected or evaluated via palpation. Furthermore, palpation is non-quantitative and cannot be used to localize the lesion. Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) can also be used to evaluate the properties of biological tissues non-invasively. In this study, an MRgFUS system combines high field (7T) MR and 3 MHz focused ultrasound to provide high resolution MR imaging and a small ultrasonic interrogation region (~0.5 x 0.5 x 2 mm), as compared with current clinical systems. MR-Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging (MR-ARFI) provides a reliable and efficient method for beam localization by detecting micron-scale displacements induced by ultrasound mechanical forces. The first aim of this study is to develop a sequence that can concurrently quantify acoustic radiation force displacements and image the resulting transient shear wave. Our motivation in combining these two measurements is to develop a technique that can rapidly provide both ARFI and shear wave velocity estimation data, making it suitable for use in interventional radiology. Secondly, we validate this sequence in vivo by estimating the displacement before and after high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation, and we validate the shear wave velocity in vitro using tissue-mimicking gelatin and tofu phantoms. Such rapid acquisitions are especially useful in interventional radiology applications where minimizing scan time is highly desirable. PMID:26439259

  6. Lithospheric deformation in the Canadian Appalachians: evidence from shear wave splitting

    Gilligan, Amy; Bastow, Ian D.; Watson, Emma; Darbyshire, Fiona A.; Levin, Vadim; Menke, William; Lane, Victoria; Hawthorn, David; Boyce, Alistair; Liddell, Mitchell V.; Petrescu, Laura

    2016-06-01

    SUMMARYPlate-scale deformation is expected to impart seismic anisotropic fabrics on the lithosphere. Determination of the fast shear wave orientation (φ) and the delay-time between the fast and slow split shear waves (δt) via SKS splitting can help place spatial and temporal constraints on lithospheric deformation. The Canadian Appalachians experienced multiple episodes of deformation during the Phanerozoic: accretionary collisions during the Paleozoic prior to the collision between Laurentia and Gondwana, and rifting related to the Mesozoic opening of the North Atlantic. However, the extent to which extensional events have overprinted older orogenic trends is uncertain. We address this issue through measurements of seismic anisotropy beneath the Canadian Appalachians, computing shear wave splitting parameters (φ, δt) for new and existing seismic stations in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Average δt values of 1.2 s, relatively short length-scale (≥100 km) splitting parameter variations, and a lack of correlation with absolute plate motion direction and mantle flow models, demonstrate that fossil lithospheric anisotropic fabrics dominate our results. Most fast directions parallel Appalachian orogenic trends observed at the surface, while δt values point towards coherent deformation of the crust and mantle lithosphere. Mesozoic rifting had minimal impact on our study area, except locally within the Bay of Fundy and in southern Nova Scotia, where fast directions are sub-parallel to the opening direction of Mesozoic rifting; associated δt values of > 1 s require an anisotropic layer that spans both the crust and mantle, meaning the formation of the Bay of Fundy was not merely a thin-skinned tectonic event.

  7. Concurrent Visualization of Acoustic Radiation Force Displacement and Shear Wave Propagation with 7T MRI.

    Yu Liu

    Full Text Available Manual palpation is a common and very informative diagnostic tool based on estimation of changes in the stiffness of tissues that result from pathology. In the case of a small lesion or a lesion that is located deep within the body, it is difficult for changes in mechanical properties of tissue to be detected or evaluated via palpation. Furthermore, palpation is non-quantitative and cannot be used to localize the lesion. Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS can also be used to evaluate the properties of biological tissues non-invasively. In this study, an MRgFUS system combines high field (7T MR and 3 MHz focused ultrasound to provide high resolution MR imaging and a small ultrasonic interrogation region (~0.5 x 0.5 x 2 mm, as compared with current clinical systems. MR-Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging (MR-ARFI provides a reliable and efficient method for beam localization by detecting micron-scale displacements induced by ultrasound mechanical forces. The first aim of this study is to develop a sequence that can concurrently quantify acoustic radiation force displacements and image the resulting transient shear wave. Our motivation in combining these two measurements is to develop a technique that can rapidly provide both ARFI and shear wave velocity estimation data, making it suitable for use in interventional radiology. Secondly, we validate this sequence in vivo by estimating the displacement before and after high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU ablation, and we validate the shear wave velocity in vitro using tissue-mimicking gelatin and tofu phantoms. Such rapid acquisitions are especially useful in interventional radiology applications where minimizing scan time is highly desirable.

  8. Anisotropic Shear-wave Velocity Structure of East Asian Upper Mantle from Waveform Tomography

    Chong, J.; Yuan, H.; French, S. W.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Ni, S.

    2012-12-01

    East Asia is a seismically active region featuring active tectonic belts, such as the Himalaya collision zone, western Pacific subduction zones and the Tianshan- Baikal tectonic belt. In this study, we applied full waveform time domain tomography to image 3D isotropic, radially and azimuthally anisotropic upper mantle shear velocity structure of East Asia. High quality teleseismic waveforms were collected for both permanent and temporary stations in the target and its adjacent regions, providing good ray path coverage of the study region. Fundamental and overtone wave packets, filtered down to 60 sec, were inverted for isotropic and radially anisotropic shear wave structure using normal mode asymptotic coupling theory (NACT: Li and Romanowicz, 1995). Joint inversion of SKS measurements and seismic waveforms was then carried out following the methodology described in (Marone and Romanowicz, 2007). The 3D velocity model shows strong lateral heterogeneities in the target region, which correlate well with the surface geology in East Asia. Our model shows that Indian lithosphere has subducted beneath Tibet with a different northern reach from western to eastern Tibet,. We also find variations of the slab geometry in Western Pacific subduction zones. Old and stable regions, such as, Indian shield, Siberia platform, Tarim and Yangtze blocks are found to have higher shear wave velocity in the upper mantle. Lower velocity anomalies are found in regions like Baikal rift, Tienshan, Indochina block, and the regions along Japan island-Ryukyu Trench and Izu-bonin Trench. The dominant fast and slow velocity boundaries in the study region are well correlated with tectonic belts, such as the central Asian orogenic belt and Alty/Qilian-Qinling/Dabie orogenic belt. Our radially anisotropic model shows Vsh> Vsv in oceanic regions and at larger depths(>300km), and Vsv > Vsh in some orogenic zones.. We'll show preliminary results of azimuthally anisotropic joint inversion of SKS

  9. Plasma turbulence driven by transversely large-scale standing shear Alfvén waves

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study generation of turbulence consisting of transversely small-scale dispersive Alfvén and electrostatic waves when plasma is driven by a large-scale standing shear Alfvén wave (LS-SAW). The standing wave is set up by reflecting a propagating LS-SAW. The ponderomotive force of the standing wave generates transversely large-scale density modifications consisting of density cavities and enhancements. The drifts of the charged particles driven by the ponderomotive force and those directly caused by the fields of the standing LS-SAW generate non-thermal features in the plasma. Parametric instabilities driven by the inherent plasma nonlinearities associated with the LS-SAW in combination with the non-thermal features generate small-scale electromagnetic and electrostatic waves, yielding a broad frequency spectrum ranging from below the source frequency of the LS-SAW to ion cyclotron and lower hybrid frequencies and beyond. The power spectrum of the turbulence has peaks at distinct perpendicular wave numbers (k⊥) lying in the range de−1-6de−1, de being the electron inertial length, suggesting non-local parametric decay from small to large k⊥. The turbulence spectrum encompassing both electromagnetic and electrostatic fluctuations is also broadband in parallel wave number (k||). In a standing-wave supported density cavity, the ratio of the perpendicular electric to magnetic field amplitude is R(k⊥) = |E⊥(k⊥)/|B⊥(k⊥)| ≪ VA for k⊥de A is the Alfvén velocity. The characteristic features of the broadband plasma turbulence are compared with those available from satellite observations in space plasmas.

  10. Modulation of Atmospheric Nonisothermality and Wind Shears on the Propagation of Seismic Tsunami-Excited Gravity Waves

    John Z. G. Ma

    2016-01-01

    We study the modulation of atmospheric nonisothermality and wind shears on the propagation of seismic tsunami-excited gravity waves by virtue of the vertical wavenumber, m (with its imaginary and real parts, m i and m r , respectively), within a correlated characteristic range of tsunami wave periods in tens of minutes. A ge...

  11. Shear wave splitting in the records of German Regional Seismic Network.

    L. P. Vinnik; V. G. Krishna; Rainer Kind; P. Bormann; K. Stammler;  

    1994-01-01

    Estimates of the parameters of shear-wave splitting in the records of SKS and SKKS of the new German Regional Seismograph Network (GRSN) for one-layer model show large azimuthal variations at some stations of the network. It is found that the variations are compatible with the presence of two anisotropic mantle layers in the region of the South German Triangle (SGT); the fast direction in the upper layer is between N-S and NE-SW, close to the previously reported estimates of the fast directio...

  12. Shear wave vibrometry evaluation in transverse isotropic tissue mimicking phantoms and skeletal muscle

    Ultrasound radiation force-based methods can quantitatively evaluate tissue viscoelastic material properties. One of the limitations of the current methods is neglecting the inherent anisotropy nature of certain tissues. To explore the phenomenon of anisotropy in a laboratory setting, we created two phantom designs incorporating fibrous and fishing line material with preferential orientations. Four phantoms were made in a cube-shaped mold; both designs were arranged in multiple layers and embedded in porcine gelatin using two different concentrations (8%, 14%). An excised sample of pork tenderloin was also studied. Measurements were made in the phantoms and the pork muscle at different angles by rotating the phantom with respect to the transducer, where 0° and 180° were defined along the fibers, and 90° and 270° across the fibers. Shear waves were generated and measured by a Verasonics ultrasound system equipped with a linear array transducer. For the fibrous phantom, the mean and standard deviations of the shear wave speeds along (0°) and across the fibers (90°) with 8% gelatin were 3.60  ±  0.03 and 3.18  ±  0.12 m s−1 and with 14% gelatin were 4.10  ±  0.11 and 3.90  ±  0.02 m s−1. For the fishing line material phantom, the mean and standard deviations of the shear wave speeds along (0°) and across the fibers (90°) with 8% gelatin were 2.86  ±  0.20 and 2.44  ±  0.24 m s−1 and with 14% gelatin were 3.40  ±  0.09 and 2.84  ±  0.14 m s−1. For the pork muscle, the mean and standard deviations of the shear wave speeds along the fibers (0°) at two different locations were 3.83  ±  0.16 and 3.86  ±  0.12 m s−1 and across the fibers (90°) were 2.73  ±  0.18 and 2.70  ±  0.16 m s−1, respectively. The fibrous and fishing line gelatin-based phantoms exhibited anisotropy that resembles that observed in the pork muscle. (paper)

  13. Comment on 'Statistical correlations of shear wave velocity and penetration resistance for soils'

    A discussion is presented on a study that introduces statistical correlations between shear wave velocity (Vs) and Standard Penetration Test N (SPT-N) values. Selected key information on in situ methods that provide the best available options to obtain correlations between Vs and SPT-N is summarized with the limitations of other in situ methods. Effects of in situ tests used in the study and methodology for compilation and assessment of Vs/SPT-N data pairs are evaluated and possible uncertainties inherent in the presented correlation due to approximations and missing details are emphasized. (comments and replies)

  14. Comparison between 3D Supersonic Shear Wave Elastography and Magnetic Resonance Elastography: a preliminary experimental study

    Yue, Jinlong; Tardieu, Marion; Julea, Felicia; Chami, Linda; Lucidarme, Olivier; Maître, Xavier; Pellot-Barakat, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound Supersonic Shear Wave Elastog-raphy (SSWE) as well as Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) allow accessing the mechanical properties of human tissues. SSWE is usually performed using a 2D probe. 3D SSWE is now available but needs to be validated. We compared 3D SSWE with both 2D SSWE and MRE which is inherently 3D on a breast phantom. We found that 3D SSWE is reproducible and provides elasticity estimates comparable to those obtained with the validated 2D SSWE. We also showed that...

  15. Tomoelastography by multifrequency wave number recovery from time-harmonic propagating shear waves.

    Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Guo, Jing; Dittmann, Florian; Hirsch, Sebastian; Barnhill, Eric; Jöhrens, Korinna; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2016-05-01

    Palpation is one of the most sensitive, effective diagnostic practices, motivating the quantitative and spatially resolved determination of soft tissue elasticity parameters by medical ultrasound or MRI. However, this so-called elastography often suffers from limited anatomical resolution due to noise and insufficient elastic deformation, currently precluding its use as a tomographic modality on its own. We here introduce an efficient way of processing wave images acquired by multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography (MMRE), which relies on wave number reconstruction at different harmonic frequencies followed by their amplitude-weighted averaging prior to inversion. This results in compound maps of wave speed, which reveal variations in tissue elasticity in a tomographic fashion, i.e. an unmasked, slice-wise display of anatomical details at pixel-wise resolution. The method is demonstrated using MMRE data from the literature including abdominal and pelvic organs such as the liver, spleen, uterus body and uterus cervix. Even in small regions with low wave amplitudes, such as nucleus pulposus and spinal cord, elastic parameters consistent with literature values were obtained. Overall, the proposed method provides a simple and noise-robust strategy of in-plane wave analysis of MMRE data, with a pixel-wise resolution producing superior detail to MRE direct inversion methods. PMID:26845371

  16. Inertial effects on thin-film wave structures with imposed surface shear on an inclined plane

    Sivapuratharasu, M.; Hibberd, S.; Hubbard, M. E.; Power, H.

    2016-06-01

    This study provides an extended approach to the mathematical simulation of thin-film flow on a flat inclined plane relevant to flows subject to high surface shear. Motivated by modelling thin-film structures within an industrial context, wave structures are investigated for flows with moderate inertial effects and small film depth aspect ratio ε. Approximations are made assuming a Reynolds number, Re ∼ O(ε-1) and depth-averaging used to simplify the governing Navier-Stokes equations. A parallel Stokes flow is expected in the absence of any wave disturbance and a generalisation for the flow is based on a local quadratic profile. This approach provides a more general system which includes inertial effects and is solved numerically. Flow structures are compared with studies for Stokes flow in the limit of negligible inertial effects. Both two-tier and three-tier wave disturbances are used to study film profile evolution. A parametric study is provided for wave disturbances with increasing film Reynolds number. An evaluation of standing wave and transient film profiles is undertaken and identifies new profiles not previously predicted when inertial effects are neglected.

  17. Comparison between shear wave ultrasonic examination and radiographic examination of some austenitic stainless steel pipe welds

    This paper compares the results of the ultrasonic and radiographic examinations of five austenitic pipe to pipe welds, which contained different types of intentional weld defects. Both the ultrasonic and radiographic examinations were made under laboratory conditions, and thus the results cannot directly be generalized to workshop examinations. The ultrasonic examination was performed using a conventional shear wave angle beam technique due to the geometric conditions of the welds. Longitudinal wave angle beam probes were not used in this work. Comparison between the results of the ultrasonic and radiographic examinations leads to the conclusion that neither method gives quite satisfactory results. Both methods missed some defects and the correlation between the results of the methods was not very good. In the ultrasonic examination the most difficult problem was the evaluation of the defects. (author)

  18. Asymmetric first order shear horizontal guided waves propagation in a tapered plate

    In this paper, through numerical simulation of the first order shear horizontal guided waves propagation in a homogeneous tapered plate, we have realized sound unidirectional transmission based on the mode conversion mechanism. We also find that the contrast transmission ratio of unidirectional transmission is highly influenced by the slope angle of tapered edge. And the working frequency range of the asymmetric transmission can be easily controlled by the height of tapered surface or the thickness of slab. This asymmetric system shows potentially significant applications in various sound devices. - Highlights: • We study the sound unidirectional transmission for SH1 guided wave in a homogeneous tapered plate. • The contrast transmission ratio of unidirectional transmission is highly influenced by the slope angle. • The working frequency range of unidirectional transmission can be easily controlled by structure parameters

  19. Solar Wind Driving of Magnetospheric ULF Waves: Pulsations Driven by Velocity Shear at the Magnetopause

    Claudepierre, S G; Wiltberger, M; 10.1029/2007JA012890

    2010-01-01

    We present results from global, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar wind/magnetosphere interaction. These MHD simulations are used to study ultra low frequency (ULF) pulsations in the Earth's magnetosphere driven by shear instabilities at the flanks of the magnetopause. We drive the simulations with idealized, constant solar wind input parameters, ensuring that any discrete ULF pulsations generated in the simulation magnetosphere are not due to fluctuations in the solar wind. The simulations presented in this study are driven by purely southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, changing only the solar wind driving velocity while holding all of the other solar wind input parameters constant. We find surface waves near the dawn and dusk flank magnetopause and show that these waves are generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. We also find that two KH modes are generated near the magnetopause boundary. One mode, the magnetopause KH mode, propagates tailwa...

  20. High Temperature Shear Horizontal Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer for Guided Wave Inspection

    Maria Kogia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Guided Wave Testing (GWT using novel Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs is proposed for the inspection of large structures operating at high temperatures. To date, high temperature EMATs have been developed only for thickness measurements and they are not suitable for GWT. A pair of water-cooled EMATs capable of exciting and receiving Shear Horizontal (SH0 waves for GWT with optimal high temperature properties (up to 500 °C has been developed. Thermal and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD simulations of the EMAT design have been performed and experimentally validated. The optimal thermal EMAT design, material selection and operating conditions were calculated. The EMAT was successfully tested regarding its thermal and GWT performance from ambient temperature to 500 °C.

  1. High Temperature Shear Horizontal Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer for Guided Wave Inspection.

    Kogia, Maria; Gan, Tat-Hean; Balachandran, Wamadeva; Livadas, Makis; Kappatos, Vassilios; Szabo, Istvan; Mohimi, Abbas; Round, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Guided Wave Testing (GWT) using novel Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) is proposed for the inspection of large structures operating at high temperatures. To date, high temperature EMATs have been developed only for thickness measurements and they are not suitable for GWT. A pair of water-cooled EMATs capable of exciting and receiving Shear Horizontal (SH₀) waves for GWT with optimal high temperature properties (up to 500 °C) has been developed. Thermal and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the EMAT design have been performed and experimentally validated. The optimal thermal EMAT design, material selection and operating conditions were calculated. The EMAT was successfully tested regarding its thermal and GWT performance from ambient temperature to 500 °C. PMID:27110792

  2. Anomalous absorption of bulk shear sagittal acoustic waves in a layered structure with viscous fluid

    Gramotnev, D K; Nieminen, T A; Gramotnev, Dmitri K.; Mather, Melissa L.; Nieminen, Timo A.

    2003-01-01

    It is demonstrated theoretically that the absorptivity of bulk shear sagittal waves by an ultra-thin layer of viscous fluid between two different elastic media has a strong maximum (in some cases as good as 100%) at an optimal layer thickness. This thickness is usually much smaller than the penetration depths and lengths of transverse and longitudinal waves in the fluid. The angular dependencies of the absorptivity are demonstrated to have significant and unusual structure near critical angles of incidence. The effect of non-Newtonian properties and non-uniformities of the fluid layer on the absorptivity is also investigated. In particular, it is shown that the absorption in a thin layer of viscous fluid is much more sensitive to non-zero relaxation time(s) in the fluid layer than the absorption at an isolated solid-fluid interface.

  3. Effect of Shear on Ultrasonic Flow Measurement Using Nonaxisymmetric Wave Modes

    Yong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonaxisymmetric wave propagation in an inviscid fluid with a pipeline shear flow is investigated. Mathematical equation is deduced from the conservations of mass and momentum, leading to a second-order differential equation in terms of the acoustic pressure. Meanwhile a general boundary condition is formulated to cover different types of wall configurations. A semianalytical method based on the Fourier-Bessel theory is provided to transform the differential equation to algebraic equations. Numerical analysis of phase velocity and wave attenuation in water is addressed in the laminar and turbulent flow. Meanwhile comparison among different kinds of boundary condition is given. In the end, the measurement performance of an ultrasonic flow meter is demonstrated.

  4. Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance of fast ions with circularly polarized shear Alfven waves

    The Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance between fast ions and shear Alfven waves (SAWs) has been experimentally investigated with a test-particle fast-ion (Li+) beam launched in the helium plasma of the Large Plasma Device [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)]. Left- or right-hand circularly polarized SAWs are launched by an antenna with four current channels. A collimated fast-ion energy analyzer characterizes the resonance by measuring the nonclassical spreading of the averaged beam signal. Left-hand circularly polarized SAWs resonate with the fast ions but right-hand circularly polarized SAWs do not. The measured fast-ion profiles are compared with simulations by a Monte Carlo Lorentz code that uses the measured wave field data.

  5. A kinetic theory of trapped electron driven drift wave turbulence in a sheared magnetic field

    A kinetic theory of collisionless and dissipative trapped electron driven drift wave turbulence in a sheared magnetic field is presented. Weak turbulence theory is employed to calculate the nonlinear electron and ion responses and to derive a wave kinetic equation that determines the nonlinear evolution of trapped electron mode turbulence. Saturated fluctuation spectrum is calculated using the condition of nonlinear saturation. The turbulent transport coefficients are in turn calculated using saturated fluctuation spectrum. Due to the disparity in the three different radial scale lengths of the slab-like eigenmode: Δ (trapped electron layer width), xt (turning point width) and xi (Landau damping point), Δ t i, we find that ion Compton scattering rather than trapped electron Compton scattering is the dominant nonlinear saturation mechanism. Ion Compton scattering transfers wave energy from short to long wavelengths where the wave energy is shear damped. As a consequence, a saturated fluctuation spectrum |φ|2(kθ) ∼ kθ-α (α = 2 and 3 for the dissipative and collisionless regime, respectively) occurs for kθρs θρs > 1. The predicted fluctuation level and transport coefficients are well below the ''mixing length'' estimate. This is due to the contribution of radial wavenumbers xt-1 r ≤ ρi-1 to the nonlinear couplings, the effect of radial localization of trapped electron response to a layer of width, Δ, and the weak turbulence factor left-angle(γel)/(ωrvecκ)right-angle rveck < 1, which enters the saturation level. 18 refs., 1 tab

  6. Use of shear waves for diagnosis and ablation monitoring of prostate cancer: a feasibility study

    Gomez, A.; Rus, G.; Saffari, N.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains as a major healthcare issue. Limitations in current diagnosis and treatment monitoring techniques imply that there is still a need for improvements. The efficacy of prostate cancer diagnosis is still low, generating under and over diagnoses. High intensity focused ultrasound ablation is an emerging treatment modality, which enables the noninvasive ablation of pathogenic tissue. Clinical trials are being carried out to evaluate its longterm efficacy as a focal treatment for prostate cancer. Successful treatment of prostate cancer using non-invasive modalities is critically dependent on accurate diagnostic means and is greatly benefited by a real-time monitoring system. While magnetic resonance imaging remains the gold standard for prostate imaging, its wider implementation for prostate cancer diagnosis remains prohibitively expensive. Conventional ultrasound is currently limited to guiding biopsy. Elastography techniques are emerging as a promising real-time imaging method, as cancer nodules are usually stiffer than adjacent healthy prostatic tissue. In this paper, a new transurethral approach is proposed, using shear waves for diagnosis and ablation monitoring of prostate cancer. A finite-difference time domain model is developed for studying the feasibility of the method, and an inverse problem technique based on genetic algorithms is proposed for reconstructing the location, size and stiffness parameters of the tumour. Preliminary results indicate that the use of shear waves for diagnosis and monitoring ablation of prostate cancer is feasible.

  7. Shear wave elastography for detection of prostate cancer: A preliminary study

    To assess the diagnostic value of shear wave elastography (SWE) for prostate cancer detection. In this retrospective study, 87 patients with the suspicion of prostate cancer (prostate-specific antigen > 4 ng/mL and abnormal digital rectal examination) underwent a protocol-based systematic 12-core biopsy followed by targeted biopsy at hypoechoic areas on grey-scale ultrasound. Prior to biopsy, SWE was performed by placing two circular 5 mm-sized regions of interest (ROIs) along the estimated biopsy tract in each sector and one ROI for hypoechoic lesions. SWE parameters, S (mean stiffness) and R (mean stiffness ratio), were calculated and compared regarding different histopathologic tissues and their accuracy for diagnosing prostate cancer was analyzed. SWE parameters were correlated with Gleason score and were compared between indolent ( 43.9 kPa and 60.8%, 66.4%, and 0.653, respectively, for R > 3. Both, S and R showed a significant correlation with Gleason score (r ≥ 0.296, p ≤ 0.008) and were significantly different between indolent and aggressive prostate cancer (p ≤ 0.006). Shear wave elastographic parameters are significantly different between prostate cancer and benign prostate tissue and correlate with Gleason score.

  8. One-dimensional seismic response of two-layer soil deposits with shear wave velocity inversion

    The paper presents the results of a parametric study with the purpose of investigating the 1D linear and equivalent linear seismic response of a 30 meters two-layer soil deposits characterized by a stiff layer overlying a soft layer. The thickness of the soft layer was assumed equal to 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 H, being H the total thickness of the deposit. The shear wave velocity of the soft layer was assumed equal to Vs = 90 and 180 m/s while for the stiff layer Vs = 360, 500 and 700 m/s were considered. Six accelerograms extracted by an Italian database characterized by different predominant periods ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 s were used as input outcropping motion. For the equivalent liner analyses, the accelerograms were scaled at three different values of peak ground acceleration (PGA), namely 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 g. The numerical results show that the two-layer ground motion is generally deamplified in terms of PGA with respect to the outcrop PGA. This reduction is mainly controlled by the shear wave velocity of the soft layer, being larger for lower Vs values, by the amount of nonlinearity experienced by the soft soil during the seismic shaking and, to a minor extent, by the thickness of the soft soil layer

  9. Crustal shear-wave velocity structure beneath Sumatra from receiver function modeling

    Bora, Dipok K.; Borah, Kajaljyoti; Goyal, Ayush

    2016-05-01

    We estimated the shear-wave velocity structure and Vp/Vs ratio of the crust beneath the Sumatra region by inverting stacked receiver functions from five three-component broadband seismic stations, located in diverse geologic setting, using a well known non-linear direct search approach, Neighborhood Algorithm (NA). Inversion results show significant variation of sediment layer thicknesses from 1 km beneath the backarc basin (station BKNI and PMBI) to 3-7 km beneath the coastal part of Sumatra region (station LHMI and MNAI) and Nias island (station GSI). Average sediment layer shear velocity (Vss) beneath all the stations is observed to be less (∼1.35 km/s) and their corresponding Vp/Vs ratio is very high (∼2.2-3.0). Crustal thickness beneath Sumatra region varies between 27 and 35 km, with exception of 19 km beneath Nias island, with average crustal Vs ∼3.1-3.4 km/s (Vp/Vs ∼1.8). It is well known that thick sediments with low Vs (and high Vp/Vs) amplify seismic waves even from a small-magnitude earthquake, which can cause huge damage in the zone. This study can provide the useful information of the crust for the Sumatra region. Since, Sumatra is an earthquake prone zone, which suffered the strong shaking of Great Andaman-Sumatra earthquake; this study can also be helpful for seismic hazard assessment.

  10. Effect of Vertically Propagating Shear Waves on Seismic Behavior of Circular Tunnels

    Tohid Akhlaghi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seismic design loads for tunnels are characterized in terms of the deformations imposed on the structure by surrounding ground. The free-field ground deformations due to a seismic event are estimated, and the tunnel is designed to accommodate these deformations. Vertically propagating shear waves are the predominant form of earthquake loading that causes the ovaling deformations of circular tunnels to develop, resulting in a distortion of the cross sectional shape of the tunnel lining. In this paper, seismic behavior of circular tunnels has been investigated due to propagation of shear waves in the vertical direction using quasi-static analytical approaches as well as numerical methods. Analytical approaches are based on the closed-form solutions which compute the forces in the lining due to equivalent static ovaling deformations, while the numerical method carries out dynamic, nonlinear soil-structure interaction analysis. Based on comparisons made, the accuracy and reliability of the analytical solutions are evaluated and discussed. The results show that the axial forces determined using the analytical approaches are in acceptable agreement with numerical analysis results, while the computed bending moments are less comparable and show significant discrepancies. The differences between the analytical approaches are also investigated and addressed.

  11. Doppler ultrasound detection of shear waves remotely induced in tissue phantoms and tissue in vitro.

    Barannik, E A; Girnyk, A; Tovstiak, V; Marusenko, A I; Emelianov, S Y; Sarvazyan, A P

    2002-05-01

    In shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI), mechanical excitation within the tissue is remotely generated using radiation force of focused ultrasound. The induced shear strain is subsequently detected to estimate visco-elastic properties of tissue and thus aid diagnostics. In this paper, the mechanical response of tissue to radiation force was detected using a modified ultrasound Doppler technique. The experiments were performed on tissue mimicking and tissue containing phantoms using a commercial diagnostic scanner. This scanner was modified to control both the pushing and probing beams. The pushing beam was fired repetitively along a single direction while interlaced probing beams swept the surrounding region of interest to detect the induced motion. The detectability of inhomogeneous inclusions using ultrasonic Doppler SWEI method has been demonstrated in this study. The displacement fields measured in elastic phantoms clearly reveal the oscillatory nature of the mechanical relaxation processes in response to impulsive load due to the boundary effects. This relaxation dynamics was also present in cooked muscle tissue, but was not detected in more viscous and less elastic phantom and raw muscles. Presence of a local heterogeneity in the vicinity of the focal region of the pushing beam results in generation of a standing wave field pattern which is manifested in the oscillatory response of the excited region of the tissue. There has been made an assumption that dynamic characteristics of the relaxation process may be used for visualization of inhomogeneities. PMID:12160057

  12. Shear wave velocities inferred from surface wave dispersion beneath the Pribram array in the Czech Republic

    Gaždová, Renata; Kolínský, Petr; Málek, Jiří; Vilhelm, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2008), s. 247-255. ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300460705 Grant ostatní: GA UK(CZ) 236/2006/B- GEO /PrF Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : surface waves * frequency-time analysis * group velocity Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure www.irsm.cas.cz/abstracts/AGG/AGG3_151/2_Gazdova.pdf

  13. Shear-wave velocity and site-amplification factors for 50 Australian sites determined by the spectral analysis of surface waves method

    Kayen, Robert E.; Carkin, Bradley A.; Allen, Trevor; Collins, Clive; McPherson, Andrew; Minasian, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional shear-wave velocity (VS ) profiles are presented at 50 strong motion sites in New South Wales and Victoria, Australia. The VS profiles are estimated with the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) method. The SASW method is a noninvasive method that indirectly estimates the VS at depth from variations in the Rayleigh wave phase velocity at the surface.

  14. The Upper Mantle Anisotropy around the Ordos Block in China from Shear Wave Splitting

    Wang, L.; Mi, N.; Huang, Z.; Xu, M.; Li, H.; Yu, D.

    2010-12-01

    Affected by the India-Eurasia collision and subsequent intrusion of the India plate into the Eurasia plate during the Cenozoic, the western China manifests mainly as intense shortening and uplifting, while the eastern China shows widespread extension caused by the subduction of the western Pacific plate. The Ordos is a stable block lies between the Eastern China and Western China, which is surrounded by active thrust belts and extensional graben systems. Investigations on the uppermantle deformation and flowing pattern beneath the Ordos will help to illuminate how those two different geodynamical processes affect the intracontinental deformation in China. Based on the seismic data from five portable broadband seismic arrays deployed in the southern Ordos from 2004 to 2010, we implemented the technology of Silver and Chan [1991] to investigate the upper mantle anisotropy in this area. Well-recorded SKS and SKKS phases are used to estimate the shear wave splitting parameters. The calculation results show distinct anisotropy in the upper mantle beneath the Ordos area. The anisotropy in different tectonic units gives different characteristics. To the southwest of the Ordos, the orientations of anisotropy are NNW-SSE, which are subparallel to the thrust belt and boundary faults between the Ordos and the Northeast Tibetan Plateau, mapping a clockwise mantle flow induced by the eastward extrusion of the Northeast Tibetan Plateau and deflected by the stable Ordos block. To the south of the Ordos, mantle flow direction is nearly E-W, parallel to the strike-slip direction of the Weihe graben system, indicating an eastward mantle flow from the NE Tibetan plateau to the eastern part of China. To the east of the Ordos, the direction of fast S-wave is changing slowly from NWW-SSE to E-W, perpendicular to the main tectonic direction in Shanxi graben system, showing an extension feature similar to that of the North China. Above results illuminate much information on the mass

  15. Shear wave anisotropy beneath the Andes from the BANJO, SEDA, and PISCO experiments

    Polet, J.; Silver, P. G.; Beck, S.; Wallace, T.; Zandt, G.; Ruppert, S.; Kind, R.; Rudloff, A.

    2000-03-01

    We present the results of a detailed shear wave splitting analysis of data collected by three temporary broadband deployments located in central western South America: the Broadband Andean Joint experiment (BANJO), a 1000-km-long east-west line at 20°S, and the Projecto de Investigacion Sismologica de la Cordillera Occidental (PISCO) and Seismic Exploration of the Deep Altiplano (SEDA), deployed several hunderd kilometers north and south of this line. We determined the splitting parameters ϕ (fast polarization direction) and δt (splitting delay time) for waves that sample the above- and below-slab regions: teleseismic *KS and S, ScS waves from local deep-focus events, as well as S waves from intermediate-focus events that sample only the above-slab region. All but one of the *KS stacks for the BANJO stations show E-W fast directions with δt varying between 0.4 and 1.5 s. However, for *KS recorded at most of the SEDA and PISCO stations, and for local deep-focus S events north and south of BANJO, there is a rotation of ϕ to a more nearly trench parallel direction. The splitting parameters for above-slab paths, determined from events around 200 km deep to western stations, yield small delay times (≤0.3 s) and N-S fast polarization directions. Assuming the anisotropy is limited to the top 400 km of the mantle (olivine stability field), these data suggest the following spatial distribution of anisotropy. For the above-slab component, as one goes from east (where *KS reflects the above-slab component) to west, ϕ changes from E-W to N-S, and delay times are substantially reduced. This change may mark the transition from the Brazilian craton to actively deforming (E-W shortening) Andean mantle. We see no evidence for the strain field expected for either corner flow or shear in the mantle wedge associated with relative plate motion. The small delay times for above-slab paths in the west require the existence of significant, spatially varying below-slab anisotropy to

  16. Solar wind driving of magnetospheric ULF waves: Pulsations driven by velocity shear at the magnetopause

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Elkington, S. R.; Wiltberger, M.

    2008-05-01

    We present results from global, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar wind/magnetosphere interaction. These MHD simulations are used to study ultra low frequency (ULF) pulsations in the Earth's magnetosphere driven by shear instabilities at the flanks of the magnetopause. We drive the simulations with idealized, constant solar wind input parameters, ensuring that any discrete ULF pulsations generated in the simulation magnetosphere are not due to fluctuations in the solar wind. The simulations presented in this study are driven by purely southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, changing only the solar wind driving velocity while holding all of the other solar wind input parameters constant. We find surface waves near the dawn and dusk flank magnetopause and show that these waves are generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. We also find that two KH modes are generated near the magnetopause boundary. One mode, the magnetopause KH mode, propagates tailward along the magnetopause boundary. The other mode, the inner KH mode, propagates tailward along the inner edge of the boundary layer (IEBL). We find large vortical structures associated with the inner KH mode that are centered on the IEBL. The phase velocities, wavelengths, and frequencies of the two KH modes are computed. The KH waves are found to be fairly monochromatic with well-defined wavelengths. In addition, the inner and magnetopause KH modes are coupled and lead to a coupled oscillation of the low-latitude boundary layer. The boundary layer thickness, d, is computed and we find maximum wave growth for kd = 0.5-1.0, where k is the wave number, consistent with the linear theory of the KH instability. We comment briefly on the effectiveness of these KH waves in the energization and transport of radiation belt electrons.

  17. Rayleigh wave phase velocities, shear wave structure and azimuthal anisotropy beneath southern California

    Yang, Y.; Forsyth, D. W.

    2003-12-01

    We use normal mode Rayleigh wave phase and amplitude data recorded at the TriNet network in southern California to invert for phase velocities at periods from 25 to 143 s. These phase velocities were used to obtain 3-D S-wave velocity structure in the upper mantle. Phase velocities on the Pacific plate side of the plate boundary are systematically higher than on the North American side, suggesting that seismic velocity contrast between these two plates extends to the upper mantle. In the upper mantle, there is a pronounced low velocity anomaly beneath the Long Valley/Mono Lake region, which has not been observed by previous tomographic studies. This low velocity anomaly is consistent with melting extending to the base of the crust beneath this part of the western Basin and Range province, as suggested based on the composition of late Cenozoic basalts (Wang et al., JGT, 2002). There is a high velocity anomaly under the Transverse Range and a slightly slow velocity anomaly under the Salton Trough, both of which have been observed in previous body and/or surface wave tomographic studies. Assuming uniform anisotropic structure in the whole study area, the strength of anisotropy is about 2.5% at all periods. However, the fast direction varies with period. The fast direction of apparent anisotropy is nearly W-E at periods less than 50 s, consistent with the fast polarization axis of SKS splitting measurements in Southern California. At periods larger than 67s, the fast direction changes to NW-SE, subparallel to the plate boundary. This two-layer azimuthal anisotropy structure is in contrast to the one-layer SKS splitting model for southern California, implying that lateral heterogeneity may affect the apparent anisotropy of long-period surface waves. If anisotropy is allowed to vary laterally in our models, we find a minimum in azimuthal anisotropy in the vicinity of the Transverse Range, suggesting possible more vertical alignment of the olivine a-axis in a region of

  18. Water Waves from General, Time-Dependent Surface Pressure Distribution in the Presence of a Shear Current

    Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    We obtain a general solution for the water waves resulting from a general, time-dependent surface pressure distribution, in the presence of a shear current of uniform vorticity beneath the surface, in three dimensions. Linearized governing equations and boundary conditions including the effects of gravity, a distributed external pressure disturbance, and constant finite depth, are solved analytically, and particular attention is paid to classic initial value problems: an initial pressure impulse and a steady pressure distribution which appears suddenly. In the present paper, good agreement with previous results is demonstrated. We subsequently show both analytically and numerically how transient waves from a suddenly appearing steady pressure distribution vanis for large times, and steady ship waves remain. The transient contribution to wave resistance was derived. The results show that a shear current has significant impact on the transient wave motions, resulting in asymmetry between upstream and downstream...

  19. Waves from an oscillating point source with a free surface in the presence of a shear current

    Ellingsen, Simen Å

    2016-01-01

    We investigate analytically the linearized water wave radiation problem for an oscillating submerged point source in an inviscid shear flow with a free surface. A constant depth is taken into account and the shear flow increases linearly with depth. The surface velocity relative to the source is taken to be zero, so that Doppler effects are absent. We solve the linearized Euler equations to calculate the resulting wave field as well as its far-field asymptotics. For values of the Froude number $F^2=\\omega^2 D/g$ ($\\omega$: oscillation frequency, $D$ submergence depth) below a resonant value $F^2_\\text{res}$ the wave field splits cleanly into separate contributions from regular dispersive propagating waves and non-dispersive "critical waves" resulting from a critical layer-like street of flow structures directly downstream of the source. In the sub-resonant regime the regular waves behave like sheared ring waves while the critical layer wave forms a street of a constant width of order $D\\sqrt{S/\\omega}$ ($S$ i...

  20. Modulation of Atmospheric Nonisothermality and Wind Shears on the Propagation of Seismic Tsunami-Excited Gravity Waves

    John Z. G. Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the modulation of atmospheric nonisothermality and wind shears on the propagation of seismic tsunami-excited gravity waves by virtue of the vertical wavenumber, m (with its imaginary and real parts, m i and m r , respectively, within a correlated characteristic range of tsunami wave periods in tens of minutes. A generalized dispersion relation of inertio-acoustic-gravity (IAG waves is obtained by relaxing constraints on Hines’ idealized locally-isothermal, shear-free and rotation-free model to accommodate a realistic atmosphere featured by altitude-dependent nonisothermality (up to 100 K/km and wind shears (up to 100 m/s per km. The obtained solutions recover all of the known wave modes below the 200-km altitude where dissipative terms are assumed negligible. Results include: (1 nonisothermality and wind shears divide the atmosphere into a sandwich-like structure of five layers within the 200-km altitude in view of the wave growth in amplitudes: Layer I (0–18 km, Layer II (18–87 km, Layer III (87–125 km, Layer IV (125–175 km and Layer V (175–200 km; (2 in Layers I, III and V, the magnitude of m i is smaller than Hines’ imaginary vertical wavenumber ( m i H , referring to an attenuated growth in the amplitudes of upward propagating waves; on the contrary, in Layers II and IV, the magnitude of m i is larger than that of m i H , providing a pumped growth from Hines’ model; (3 nonisothermality and wind shears enhance m r substantially at an ∼100-km altitude for a tsunami wave period T t s longer than 30 min. While Hines’ model provides that the maximal value of m r 2 is ∼0.05 (1/km 2 , this magnitude is doubled by the nonisothermal effect and quadrupled by the joint nonisothermal and wind shear effect. The modulations are weaker at altitudes outside 80–140-km heights; (4 nonisothermality and wind shears expand the definition of the observation-defined “damping factor”, β: relative to Hines’ classical wave

  1. Compressional and Shear Wave Velocities of an Antigorite Rock at 1 GPa up to 550C

    Yano, H.; Watanabe, T.; Yoneda, A.

    2008-12-01

    Serpentines play key roles in the water transportation in a subduction zone, the slab-mantle coupling and the generation of slab earthquakes. Geophysical mapping of serpentinized regions is important for understanding of subduction zone processes. There are three major forms of serpentine: antigorite, lizardite and chrysotile. Antigorite is stable up to 600°C at 1 GPa, while lizardite and chrysotile are stable below 300°C. Watanabe et al. (2007) showed that High-T type (containing antigorite) serpentinized peridotites have distinctive higher velocity and lower Poisson's ratio than Low-T type (containing lizardite and/or chrysotile) with the same density. Seismological observations on warm subduction zones like Costa Rica should be interpreted on the basis of antigorite properties. However, our knowledge on elastic properties of antigorite is still lacking. We have measured compressional and shear wave velocities on an antigorite rock at 1 GPa up to 550°C. The rock sample is mostly composed of antigorite (>95 vol.%) and grains are well aligned. The lineation is interpreted to be parallel to crystallographic b-axis, and cleavages normal to c-axis. Measuremens were made with various directions of propagation and oscillation. Reflecting the crystallographic structure, the sample shows strong anisotropy of velocity. The fastest direction of compressional wave is the b-axis direction (8.39±0.04 km/s at 550°C), and the slowest the c-axis direction (5.78±0.06 km/s at 550°C). No significant temperature dependence of Vp is observed in the b-axis direction, while Vp decreases by 3.3% from room temperature to 550°C in the c-axis direction. Shear wave velocity propagating in the c-axis direction at 550°C is 3.15±0.05 km/s and 3.44±0.03 km/s for oscillating parallel to the a- and b-axes, respectively. We can estimate elastic moduli of an antigorite single crystal from measured velocities on the assumption of orthorhombic symmetry of elasticity, and then calculate

  2. Science Letters: New solutions of shear waves in piezoelectric cubic crystals

    ZAKHARENKO A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic wave propagation in piezoelectric crystals of classes 43m and 23 is studied. The crystals Tl3VS4 and Tl3TaSe4 (-43m) of the Chalcogenide family and the crystal Bi12TiO20 (23) possess strong piezoelectric effect. Because the surface Bleustein-Gulyaev waves cannot exist in piezoelectric cubic crystals, it was concluded that new solutions for shear-horizontal surface acoustic waves (SH-SAWs) are found in the monocrystals using different electrical boundary conditions such as electrically "short" and "open" free-surfaces for the unique [ 101] direction of wave propagation. For the crystal Tl3TaSe4 with coefficient of electromechanical coupling (CEMC) Ke2=e2/(C×g)~1/3, the phase velocity Vph for the new SH-SAWs can be calculated with the following formula: Vph=(Va+Vt)/2, where Vt is the speed of bulk SH-wave, Vt=Vt4(1+Ke2)1/2, Va=aKVt4, aK=2[Ke(1+Ke2)1/2-Ke2]1/2,and Vt4=(C44/ρ)1/2. It was found that the CEMC K2 evaluation for Tl3TaSe4 gave the value of K2=2(Vf-Vm)/Vf~O.047 (~4.7%),where Vf~848 m/s and Vm~828 m/s are the new-SAW velocities for the free and metallized surfaces, respectively. This high value of K2(Tl3TaSe4) is significantly greater than K2(Tl3VS4)~3% and about five times that of K2(Bi12TiO20).

  3. Reynolds averaged theory of turbulent shear flows over undulating beds and formation of sand waves.

    Bose, Sujit K; Dey, Subhasish

    2009-09-01

    Based on the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations and the time-averaged continuity equation, a theory of turbulent shear flow over an undulating sand bed is developed addressing the instability criterion of plane sand beds in free-surface flows leading to the formation of sand waves. In the analysis, the integration of RANS equations leads to generalized Saint Venant equations, in which the time-averaged streamwise velocity is characterized by a power law obtained from turbulence closure, treating the curvilinear streamlines by the Boussinesq approximation. As a consequence, the modified pressure distribution has a departure from the traditionally linear hydrostatic pressure distribution. The instability analysis of a plane sand bed yields the curves of the Froude number versus nondimensional wave number, determining an instability zone for which at lower Froude numbers (less than 0.8), the plane bed becomes unstable with the formation of dunes; whereas at higher Froude numbers, the plane bed becomes unstable with the formation of standing waves and antidunes. For higher Froude numbers, the experimental data for antidunes lie within the unstable zone; while for lower Froude numbers, the same is found for dunes with some experimental scatter. PMID:19905209

  4. Interaction between mountain waves and shear flow in an inertial layer

    Xie, Jin-Han

    2016-01-01

    Mountain-generated inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) affect the dynamics of both the atmosphere and the ocean through the mean force they exert as they interact with the flow. A key to this interaction is the presence of critical-level singularities or, when planetary rotation is taken into account, inertial-level singularities, where the Doppler-shifted wave frequency matches the local Coriolis frequency. We examine the role of the latter singularities by studying the steady wavepacket generated by a multiscale mountain in a rotating linear shear flow at low Rossby number. Using a combination of WKB and saddle-point approximations, we provide an explicit description of the form of the wavepacket, of the mean forcing it induces, and of the mean-flow response. We identify two distinguished regimes of wave propagation: Regime I applies far enough from a dominant inertial level for the standard ray-tracing approximation to be valid; Regime II applies to a thin region where the wavepacket structure is controlled by th...

  5. Shear wave splitting in the Isparta Angle, southwestern Turkey: Anisotropic complexity in the mantle

    Aslihan Şapaş; Aysun Boztepe-G\\ddot{u}ney

    2009-02-01

    This study presents shear wave splitting analysis results observed at ISP (Isparta)broadband station in the Isparta Angle,southwestern Turkey.We selected 21 good quality seismic events out of nearly 357 earthquakes and calculated splitting parameters (polarization direction of fast wave, and delay time between fast and slow waves, ) from mainly SKS and a few SKKS phases of the selected 21 seismic events. Then, we compared calculated splitting parameters at ISP station (56° ≤ ≤ 205° ; 0.37s ≤ t ≤ 4s) with those previously calculated at ANTO (Ankara) and ISK (˙Istanbul)stations (27° ≤ ≤ 59°; 0.6s ≤ t ≤ 2.4s and 26° ≤ ≤ 54° ;0.6s ≤ t ≤ 1.5s) which are located at 230 and 379 km away from ISP station in central and northwestern Turkey, respectively.The backazimuthal variations of the splitting parameters at ISP station indicate a different and complex mantle polarization anisotropy for the Isparta Angle in southwestern Turkey compared to those obtained for Ankara and Īstanbul stations.

  6. Observations of neutral winds, wind shears, and wave structure during a sporadic-E/QP event

    R. T. Tsunoda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The second Sporadic E Experiment over Kyushu (SEEK-2 was carried out on 3 August 2002, during an active sporadic-E event that also showed quasi-periodic (QP echoes. Two rockets were launched into the event from Kagoshima Space Center in southern Japan 15 min apart. Both carried a suite of instruments, but the second rocket also released a trimethyl aluminum (TMA trail to measure the neutral winds and turbulence structure. In a number of earlier measurements in similar conditions, large winds and shears that were either unstable or close to instability were observed in the altitude range where the ionization layer occurred. The SEEK-2 wind measurements showed similar vertical structure, but unlike earlier experiments, there was a significant difference between the up-leg and down-leg wind profiles. In addition, wave or billow-like fluctuations were evident in the up-leg portion of the trail, while the lower portion of the down-leg trail was found to have extremely strong turbulence that led to a rapid break-up of the trail. The large east-west gradient in the winds and the strong turbulence have not been observed before. The wind profiles and shears, as well as the qualitative characteristics of the strong turbulence are presented, along with a discussion of the implications of the dynamical features. Keywords. Ionosphere (Mid-latitude ionosphere; Ionospheric irregularities; Electric field and currents

  7. Spatial variations of shear wave anisotropy near the San Jacinto Fault Zone in Southern California

    Li, Zefeng; Peng, Zhigang; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Vernon, Frank L.

    2015-12-01

    We examine crustal anisotropy at several scales along and across the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ) by systematically measuring shear wave splitting (SWS) parameters. The analyzed data are recorded by 86 stations during 2012-2014, including five linear dense arrays crossing the SJFZ at different locations and other autonomous stations within 15 km from the main fault trace. Shear phase arrivals and SWS parameters (fast directions and delay times) are obtained with automated methods. The measurement quality is then assessed using multiple criteria, resulting in 23,000 high-quality measurements. We find clear contrast of fast directions between the SW and NE sides of the SJFZ. Stations on the SW side have fast directions consistent overall with the maximum horizontal compression direction (SHmax), while stations on the NE side show mixed patterns likely reflecting lithological/topographic variations combined with fault zone damage. The fast directions in the Anza gap section with relatively simple fault geometry agree with the inferred SHmax, and the delay times at an array within that section are smaller than those observed at other across-fault arrays. These indications of less pronounced damage zone in the Anza section compared to other segments of the SJFZ are correlated generally with geometrical properties of the surface traces. Significant variations of fast directions on several across-fault arrays, with station spacing on the orders of a few tens of meters, suggest that shallow fault structures and near-surface layers play an important role in controlling the SWS parameters.

  8. Shear wave dispersion behaviors of soft, vascularized tissues from the microchannel flow model

    Parker, K. J.; Ormachea, J.; McAleavey, S. A.; Wood, R. W.; Carroll-Nellenback, J. J.; Miller, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    The frequency dependent behavior of tissue stiffness and the dispersion of shear waves in tissue can be measured in a number of ways, using integrated imaging systems. The microchannel flow model, which considers the effects of fluid flow in the branching vasculature and microchannels of soft tissues, makes specific predictions about the nature of dispersion. In this paper we introduce a more general form of the 4 parameter equation for stress relaxation based on the microchannel flow model, and then derive the general frequency domain equation for the complex modulus. Dispersion measurements in liver (ex vivo) and whole perfused placenta (post-delivery) correspond to the predictions from theory, guided by independent stress relaxation measurements and consideration of the vascular tree structure.

  9. Shear-wave splitting in Ethiopia: Precambrian mantle anisotropy locally modified by Neogene rifting

    Gashawbeza, Ewenet M.; Klemperer, Simon L.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Walker, Kristoffer T.; Keranen, Katie M.

    2004-09-01

    Twenty-six broadband seismic stations in an areal array spanning 500 × 500 km across Ethiopia were used for shear-wave splitting studies. Our results show small-to-moderate delay times (0.5-1.7s) with fast-polarization azimuths sub-parallel to the orientation of the East African Rift (NNE-SSW) and also to the Proterozoic tectonic fabric across the entire studied area. Our results imply Ethiopian upper-mantle anisotropy is controlled largely by the Proterozoic accretion of the Mozambique belt, with possible minor effects within the rift due to aligned cracks or melt pockets parallel to the rift axis. Our observations are not consistent with anisotropy created by asthenospheric flow parallel either to the Cenozoic extension direction (NW-SE) or to the modern absolute plate motion direction (NNW-SSE), or to asthenospheric radial flow from the ``Afar'' plume.

  10. Ion waves driven by shear flow in a relativistic degenerate astrophysical plasma

    KHAN SHABBIR A; BAKHTIAR-UD-DIN; ILYAS MUHAMMAD; WAZIR ZAFAR

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the existence and propagation of low-frequency (in comparison to ion cyclotron frequency) electrostatic ion waves in highly dense inhomogeneous astrophysical magnetoplasma comprising relativistic degenerate electrons and non-degenerate ions. The dispersion equation is obtained by Fourier analysis under mean-field quantum hydrodynamics approximationfor various limits of the ratio of rest mass energy to Fermi energy of electrons, relevant to ultrarelativistic, weakly-relativistic and non-relativistic regimes. It is found that the system admits an oscillatory instability under certain condition in the presence of velocity shear parallel to ambient magnetic field. The dispersive role of plasma density and magnetic field is also discussed parametrically in the scenario of dense and degenerate astrophysical plasmas.

  11. The interaction between fishbone modes and shear Alfvén waves in tokamak plasmas

    He, Hongda; Liu, Yueqiang; Dong, J. Q.; Hao, G. Z.; Wu, Tingting; He, Zhixiong; Zhao, K.

    2016-05-01

    The resonant interaction between the energetic particle triggered fishbone mode and the shear Alfvén waves is computationally investigated and firmly demonstrated based on a tokamak plasma equilibrium, using the self-consistent MHD-kinetic hybrid code MARS-K (Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503). This type of continuum resonance, occurring critically due to the mode’s toroidal rotation in the plasma frame, significantly modifies the eigenmode structure of the fishbone instability, by introducing two large peaks of the perturbed parallel current density near but offside the q  =  1 rational surface (q is the safety factor). The self-consistently computed radial plasma displacement substantially differs from that being assumed in the conventional fishbone theory.

  12. Shear wave elastography of the placenta in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Yuksel, Mehmet Aytac; Kilic, Fahrettin; Kayadibi, Yasemin; Alici Davutoglu, Ebru; Imamoglu, Metehan; Bakan, Selim; Mihmanli, Ismail; Kantarci, Fatih; Madazli, Riza

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate placental elasticty in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and non-diabetic controls. Thirty-three pregnant women with GDM according to the current criteria of the American Diabetes Association and 43 healthy pregnant women who were admitted to the antenatal clinic were recruited for this case-control study. Elasticity values of both the peripheral and the central parts of the placentas of the patients in both groups were determined by shear wave elastography (SWE) imaging. Mean elasticity values of both the central and the peripheral part of the placentas were significantly higher in GDM pregnancies (p  0.05). SWE imaging technology might provide a quantitative assessment of the morphological pathologies of placentas in pregnant women with GDM. PMID:27012734

  13. Variability and origin of seismic anisotropy across eastern Canada: Evidence from shear wave splitting measurements

    Darbyshire, F. A.; Bastow, I. D.; Forte, A. M.; Hobbs, T. E.; Calvel, A.; Gonzalez-Monteza, A.; Schow, B.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of seismic anisotropy in continental regions are frequently interpreted with respect to past tectonic processes, preserved in the lithosphere as "fossil" fabrics. Models of the present-day sublithospheric flow (often using absolute plate motion as a proxy) are also used to explain the observations. Discriminating between these different sources of seismic anisotropy is particularly challenging beneath shields, whose thick (≥200 km) lithospheric roots may record a protracted history of deformation and strongly influence underlying mantle flow. Eastern Canada, where the geological record spans ˜3 Ga of Earth history, is an ideal region to address this issue. We use shear wave splitting measurements of core phases such as SKS to define upper mantle anisotropy using the orientation of the fast-polarization direction ϕ and delay time δt between fast and slow shear wave arrivals. Comparison with structural trends in surface geology and aeromagnetic data helps to determine the contribution of fossil lithospheric fabrics to the anisotropy. We also assess the influence of sublithospheric mantle flow via flow directions derived from global geodynamic models. Fast-polarization orientations are generally ENE-WSW to ESE-WNW across the region, but significant lateral variability in splitting parameters on a ≤100 km scale implies a lithospheric contribution to the results. Correlations with structural geologic and magnetic trends are not ubiquitous, however, nor are correlations with geodynamically predicted mantle flow directions. We therefore consider that the splitting parameters likely record a combination of the present-day mantle flow and older lithospheric fabrics. Consideration of both sources of anisotropy is critical in shield regions when interpreting splitting observations.

  14. Assessment of impact factors on shear wave based liver stiffness measurement.

    Ling, Wenwu; Lu, Qiang; Quan, Jierong; Ma, Lin; Luo, Yan

    2013-02-01

    Shear wave based ultrasound elastographies have been implemented as non-invasive methods for quantitative assessment of liver stiffness. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies that have investigated impact factors on liver stiffness measurement (LSM). Moreover, standard examination protocols for LSM are still lacking in clinical practice. Our study aimed to assess the impact factors on LSM to establish its standard examination protocols in clinical practice. We applied shear wave based elastography point quantification (ElastPQ) in 21 healthy individuals to determine the impact of liver location (segments I-VIII), breathing phase (end-inspiration and end-expiration), probe position (sub-costal and inter-costal position) and examiner on LSM. Additional studies in 175 healthy individuals were also performed to determine the influence of gender and age on liver stiffness. We found significant impact of liver location on LSM, while the liver segment V displayed the lowest coefficient of variation (CV 21%). The liver stiffness at the end-expiration was significantly higher than that at the end-inspiration (P=2.1E-05). The liver stiffness was 8% higher in men than in women (3.8 ± 0.7 kPa vs. 3.5 ± 0.4 kPa, P=0.0168). In contrast, the liver stiffness was comparable in the different probe positions, examiners and age groups (P>0.05). In conclusion, this study reveals significant impact from liver location, breathing phase and gender on LSM, while furthermore strengthening the necessity for the development of standard examination protocols on LSM. PMID:23116805

  15. Effects of a poloidally asymmetric ionization source on toroidal drift wave stability and the generation of sheared parallel flow

    The effects of a poloidally asymmetric ionization source on both dissipative toroidal drift wave stability and the generation of mean sheared parallel flow are examined. The first part of this work extends the development of a local model of ionization-driven drift wave turbulence [Phys. Fluids B 4, 877 (1992)] to include the effects of magnetic shear and poloidal source asymmetry, as well as poloidal mode coupling due to both magnetic drifts and the source asymmetry. Numerical and analytic investigation confirm that ionization effects can destabilize collisional toroidal drift waves. However, the mode structure is determined primarily by the magnetic drifts, and is not overly effected by the poloidal source asymmetry. The ionization source drives a purely inward particle flux, which can explain the anomalously rapid uptake of particles which occurs in response to gas puffing. In the second part of this work, the role poloidal asymmetries in both the source and turbulent particle diffusion play in the generation of sheared mean parallel flow is examined. Analysis indicates that predictions of sonic parallel shear flow [vparallel(r)∼cs] are an unphysical result of the assumption of purely parallel flow (i.e., vperpendicular=0) and the neglect of turbulent parallel momentum transport. Results indicate that the flow produced is subcritical to the parallel shear flow instability when diamagnetic effects are properly considered

  16. No steady water waves of small amplitude are supported by a shear flow with still free surface

    Kozlov, Vladimir; Kuznetsov, Nikolay

    2012-01-01

    The two-dimensional free-boundary problem describing steady gravity waves with vorticity on water of finite depth is considered. It is proved that no small-amplitude waves are supported by a horizontal shear flow whose free surface is still in a coordinate frame such that the flow is time-independent in it. The class of vorticity distributions for which such flows exist includes all positive constant distributions, as well as linear and quadric ones with arbitrary positive coefficients.

  17. Effects of cavitation-enhanced heating in high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment on shear wave imaging

    Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Nagaoka, Ryo; Takagi, Ryo; Goto, Kota; Yoshizawa, Shin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is a less invasive method of cancer treatment, in which ultrasound is generated outside the body and focused at the tumor tissue to be thermally coagulated. To enhance the safety, accuracy, and efficiency of HIFU therapy, “multiple-triggered HIFU” has been proposed as a method of cavitation-enhanced heating to shorten treatment time. In this study, we also propose shear wave elastography (SWE) to noninvasively monitor the cavitation-enhanced heating. Results show that the increase in shear wave velocity was observed in the coagulation area, but it was significantly slower when cavitation occurred. This suggests that the cavitation-enhanced heating requires a significantly longer cooling time before the accurate measurement of shear modulus than heating without generating bubbles.

  18. Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary waves driven by sheared zonal winds in the E-layer ionosphere

    Futatani, S.; Horton, W.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Kaladze, T. D.

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear simulations of electromagnetic Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the presence of a shearless and sheared zonal flows in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer are carried out. The simulations show that the nonlinear action of the vortex structures keeps the solitary character in the presence of shearless zonal winds as well as the ideal solutions of solitary vortex in the absence of zonal winds. In the presence of sheared zonal winds, the zonal flows result in breaking into separate multiple smaller pieces. A passively convected scalar field is shown to clarify the transport associated with the vortices. The work shows that the zonal shear flows provide an energy source into the vortex structure according to the shear rate of the zonal winds.

  19. Rossby-Khantadze Electromagnetic Planetary Waves Driven by Sheared Zonal Winds in the E-Layer Ionosphere

    Futatani, S.; Horton, W.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Kaladze, T.

    2014-10-01

    Nonlinear simulations are carried out for planetary scale [ >1000 km] electromagnetic Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the presence of a sheared zonal flow in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer. A variety of sheared flow profiles are studied. We shown that the nonlinear dynamics with the sheared zonal flows provides an energy source into the vortex structures. The energy transfer through the Reynolds stress tensor produces growth of the stable vortices under a variety of conditions. The energy accumulation breaks the vortex structure into multiple species according to the non-uniformity of profile of the external zonal shear flows. S. Futatani, W. Horton, T. D. Kaladze, Phys. Plasmas 20, 102903 (2013). T. D. Kaladze, L. Z. Kahlon, W. Horton. O Pokhotelov, and O. Onishenchenko, EPL 106, A05302 (2014).

  20. Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary waves driven by sheared zonal winds in the E-layer ionosphere

    Nonlinear simulations of electromagnetic Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the presence of a shearless and sheared zonal flows in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer are carried out. The simulations show that the nonlinear action of the vortex structures keeps the solitary character in the presence of shearless zonal winds as well as the ideal solutions of solitary vortex in the absence of zonal winds. In the presence of sheared zonal winds, the zonal flows result in breaking into separate multiple smaller pieces. A passively convected scalar field is shown to clarify the transport associated with the vortices. The work shows that the zonal shear flows provide an energy source into the vortex structure according to the shear rate of the zonal winds

  1. Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary waves driven by sheared zonal winds in the E-layer ionosphere

    Futatani, S. [Department of Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (CASE), Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Barcelona (Spain); Horton, W. [Applied Research Laboratory and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Kahlon, L. Z. [Department of Physics, Forman Christian College, Ferozepur Road, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan); Kaladze, T. D. [Physics Department, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); I. Vekua Institute of Applied Mathematics, Tbilisi State University, 2 University str., 0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Nonlinear simulations of electromagnetic Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the presence of a shearless and sheared zonal flows in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer are carried out. The simulations show that the nonlinear action of the vortex structures keeps the solitary character in the presence of shearless zonal winds as well as the ideal solutions of solitary vortex in the absence of zonal winds. In the presence of sheared zonal winds, the zonal flows result in breaking into separate multiple smaller pieces. A passively convected scalar field is shown to clarify the transport associated with the vortices. The work shows that the zonal shear flows provide an energy source into the vortex structure according to the shear rate of the zonal winds.

  2. Shear wave splitting from local events beneath the Ryukyu arc : Trench-parallel anisotropy in the mantle wedge

    Long, Maureen D.; Hilst, R.D. van der

    2006-01-01

    We present shear wave splitting measurements from local slab earthquakes at eight seismic stations of the Japanese F-net array located in the Ryukyu arc. We obtained high-quality splitting measurements for 70 event-station pairs and found that the majority of the measured fast directions were parall

  3. Bulk Shear-Wave Transduction Experiments Using Magnetostrictive Transducers with a Thin Fe-Co Alloy Patch

    Recently, the results of many studies have clarified the successful performance of magnetostrictive transducers in which a ferromagnetic patch is used for the transduction of guided shear waves; this is because a thin ferromagnetic patch with strong magnetostriction is very useful for generating and detecting shear wave. This investigation deals with bulk shear wave transduction by means of magnetostriction; on the other hand, the existing studies have been focused on guided shear waves. A modular transducer was developed: this transducer comprised a coil, magnets, and a thin ferromagnetic patch that was made of Fe-Co alloy. Some experiments were conducted to verify the performance of the developed transducer. Radiation directivity pattern of the developed transducer was obtained, and a test to detect the damage on a side drill hole of a steel block specimen was carried out. From the results of these tests, the good performance of the transducer for nondestructive testing was verified on the basis of the signal-to-noise ratio and narrow beam directivity

  4. Observation of Shear-wave Splitting from Microseismicity Induced by Hydraulic Fracturing – A Non-VTI Story

    Kolínský, Petr; Eisner, L.; Grechka, V.; Jurick, D.; Duncan, P.

    Amsterdam : EAGE, 2009. X014. [European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers Conference /71./. 08.06.2009-11.06.2009, Amsterdam] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : shear wave splitting * anisotropy * VTI Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure http://earthdoc.eage.org/detail.php?pubid=24174

  5. Analytical study of dispersion relations for shear horizontal wave propagation in plates with periodic stubs

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-08-01

    The coupled mode theory with coupling of diffraction modes and waveguide modes is usually used on the calculations of transmission and reflection coefficients for electromagnetic waves traveling through periodic sub-wavelength structures. In this paper, I extend this method to derive analytical solutions of high-order dispersion relations for shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in elastic plates with periodic stubs. In the long wavelength regime, the explicit expression is obtained by this theory and derived specially by employing an effective medium. This indicates that the periodical stubs are equivalent to an effective homogenous layer in the long wavelength. Notably, in the short wavelength regime, high-order diffraction modes in the plate and high-order waveguide modes in the stubs are considered with modes coupling to compute the band structures. Numerical results of the coupled mode theory fit pretty well with the results of the finite element method (FEM). In addition, the band structures\\' evolution with the height of the stubs and the thickness of the plate shows clearly that the method can predict well the Bragg band gaps, locally resonant band gaps and high-order symmetric and anti-symmetric thickness-twist modes for the periodically structured plates. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  6. The lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia: Young volcanism in an old shield

    Tang, Zheng; Julià, Jordi; Zahran, Hani; Mai, P. Martin

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia by conducting H-κ stacking analysis and jointly inverting teleseismic P-receiver functions and fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave group velocities at 56 broadband stations deployed by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). The study region, the Arabian plate, is traditionally divided into the western Arabian shield and the eastern Arabian platform: The Arabian shield itself is a complicated mélange of crustal material, composed of several Proterozoic terrains separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks (locally known as harrats). The Arabian platform is primarily covered by 8 to 10 km of Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. Our results reveal high Vp/Vs ratios in the region of Harrat Lunayyir, which are interpreted as solidified magma intrusions from old magmatic episodes in the shield. Our results also indicate slow velocities and large upper mantle lid temperatures below the southern and northern tips of the Arabian shield, when compared with the values obtained for the central shield. We argue that our inferred patterns of lid velocity and temperature are due to heating by thermal conduction from the Afar plume (and, possibly, the Jordan plume), and that volcanism in western Arabia may result from small-scale adiabatic ascent of magma diapirs.

  7. Seismic anisotropy of northeastern Algeria from shear-wave splitting analysis

    Radi, Zohir; Yelles-Chaouche, Abdelkrim; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-11-01

    There are few studies of internal deformation under northern Africa; here we present such a study. We analyze teleseismic shear-wave splitting for northeast Algeria, to improve our knowledge of lithospheric and asthenospheric deformation mechanisms in this region. We study waveform data generated by tens of teleseismic events recorded at five recently installed broadband (BB) stations in Algeria. These stations cover an area 2° across, extending from the Tellian geological units in the North to the Saharan Atlas units in the South. Analysis of SKS-wave splitting results insignificant spatial variations in fast polarization orientation, over a scale length of at most 100 km. The seismic anisotropy shows three clear spatial patterns. A general ENE-WSW orientation is observed under the stations in the north. This polarization orientation follows the direction of the Tell Atlas mountain chain, which is perpendicular to the convergence direction between Africa and Eurasia. Delay times vary significantly across the region, between 0.6 and 2.0 s. At several stations there is an indication of a WNW-ESE polarization orientation, which is apparently related to a later geodynamic evolutionary phase in this region. A third pattern of seismic anisotropy emerges in the South, with an orientation of roughly N-S. We discuss these observations in light of geodynamic models and present-day geodetic motion.

  8. The lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia: Young volcanism in an old shield

    Tang, Zheng

    2016-05-11

    We investigate the lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia by conducting H-κ stacking analysis and jointly inverting teleseismic P-receiver functions and fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave group velocities at 56 broadband stations deployed by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). The study region, the Arabian plate, is traditionally divided into the western Arabian shield and the eastern Arabian platform: The Arabian shield itself is a complicated mélange of crustal material, composed of several Proterozoic terrains separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks (locally known as harrats). The Arabian platform is primarily covered by 8 to 10 km of Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. Our results reveal high Vp/Vs ratios in the region of Harrat Lunayyir, which are interpreted as solidified magma intrusions from old magmatic episodes in the shield. Our results also indicate slow velocities and large upper mantle lid temperatures below the southern and northern tips of the Arabian shield, when compared with the values obtained for the central shield. We argue that our inferred patterns of lid velocity and temperature are due to heating by thermal conduction from the Afar plume (and, possibly, the Jordan plume), and that volcanism in western Arabia may result from small-scale adiabatic ascent of magma diapirs.

  9. Drift wave spectra and enhanced transport in plasmas with magnetic shear

    We investigate the potentialities of nonlinear scattering of waves off ions as a stabilizing mechanism of drift turbulence in plasmas with magnetic shear. The failure of the random phase averaging procedure and the local character of the interaction in frequency space are the starting point of a reformulation of weak turbulence theory. In particular, the usual integral equation is transformed into a system of two first order differential equations coupling the spectra I(ksub(theta)) and I(ksub(theta)-1). The density fluctuation spectrum, which is obtained analytically, has some desirable features in reference to experiment. Firstly, |eta tilde|ksub(theta)2 behaves asymptotically (ksub(theta) → infinity) as ksub(theta)-4; secondly, the high mode numbers (ksub(theta)asub(s) >1) contribute about 80% to the cross field diffusion while the low mode numbers (ksub(theta)asub(s) <1) provide about 80% of the squared density fluctuation. In discussing the transport properties we emphasize the possible role of anomalous heat transfer from electrons to ions. The spectrum of convective cells formed in the interaction of drift waves is obtained; their contribution to the diffusion is found to be negligible, at least in the plasma core. (author)

  10. A comparison of four geophysical methods for determining the shear wave velocity of soils

    Anderson, N.; Thitimakorn, T.; Ismail, A.; Hoffman, D.

    2007-01-01

    The Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) routinely acquires seismic cone penetrometer (SCPT) shear wave velocity control as part of the routine investigation of soils within the Mississippi Embayment. In an effort to ensure their geotechnical investigations are as effective and efficient as possible, the SCPT tool and several available alternatives (crosshole [CH]; multichannel analysis of surface waves [MASW]; and refraction microtremor [ReMi]) were evaluated and compared on the basis of field data acquired at two test sites in southeast Missouri. These four methods were ranked in terms of accuracy, functionality, cost, other considerations, and overall utility. It is concluded that MASW data are generally more reliable than SCPT data, comparable to quality ReMi data, and only slightly less accurate than CH data. However, the other advantages of MASW generally make it a superior choice over the CH, SCPT, and ReMi methods for general soil classification purposes to depths of 30 m. MASW data are less expensive than CH data and SCPT data and can normally be acquired in areas inaccessible to drill and SCPT rigs. In contrast to the MASW tool, quality ReMi data can be acquired only in areas where there are interpretable levels of "passive" acoustic energy and only when the geophone array is aligned with the source(s) of such energy.

  11. PICASSO: Shear velocities in the Western Mediterranean from Rayleigh Wave tomography

    Palomeras, I.; Thurner, S.; Levander, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Western Mediterranean has been affected by complex subduction and slab rollback, simultaneously with compression due to African-European convergence. The deformed region occupies a wide area from the intra-continental Atlas mountain belt in Morocco to the southern Iberian Massif in Spain. Evolutionary models of the Western Mediterranean invoke extensive slab rollback and compression in the Cenozoic, as well as likely upper mantle delamination scenarios during formation of the Alboran domain, the Betics, Rif, and Atlas Mountains. PICASSO (Program to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) is a multidisciplinary, international investigation of the Alboran System and surrounding areas. In this study we have analyzed data from the 95 PICASSO broadband stations with data from the Spanish IberArray and Siberia Array in Spain and Morocco, the University of Muenster array in the Atlas Mountains and the permanent Spanish and Portuguese networks. We present Rayleigh wave tomography results made from 168 teleseimic events recorded by 237 stations from April 2009 to April 2011. We measured Rayleigh phase velocities using the two-plane-wave method to remove complications due to multi-pathing, and finite-frequency kernels to improve lateral resolution. Phase velocities were then inverted for shear velocity structure on a grid of 0.5 by 0.5 degree to form a well-resolved 3D shear velocity model to 230 km depth. Our results show low S-velocities (2.9 km/s) in the crust beneath the Gibraltar Strait. Low upper mantle S-velocities are mapped beneath the Middle and High Atlas at ~60 km depth suggesting an elevated asthenosphere beneath these young mountain belts, in agreement with receiver functions analysis (Thurner et al, this session). Beneath the Western Alboran Sea, upper-mantle velocities change laterally from high velocities (>4.5 km/s) in the east to lower velocities to the west (~4.3 km/s). The Rayleigh wave tomography is consistent with P-tomography that

  12. Comparison of Non-Axisymmetric Dynamic Response of Imperfectly Bonded Buried Orthotropic Thick and Thin Fluid filled Cylindrical Shell due to Incident Shear Wave (SH Wave

    Rakesh Singh Rajput,

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the effect of fluid presence on the non-axisymmetric dynamic response of imperfectly bonded buried orthotropic thick and thin fluid filled pipeline due to incident horizontal shear wave. In the thin shell theory the effect of shear deformation and rotary inertia is not considered. The pipeline has been modeled as an infinite cylindrical shell imperfectly bonded to surrounding. An approach similar to Dwivedi and Upadhyay (1989 has been followed wherein a thin layer is assumed between the shell and the surrounding medium (soil such that this layer possesses the properties of stiffness and damping both. The degree of imperfection of the bond is varied by changing the stiffness and the damping parameters of this layer. Although a general formulation including P-, SV- and SHwave excitations has been presented, numerical results are given for the case of incident SH-waves only. When it is excited by seismic-wave there are two types of soil movements that take place at the time of earthquake both around the epicenter. One is vertical movement (up and down of the soil and due to this movement the shearwave (S-V and S-H is developed on the surface of the pipe and other is horizontal movement (compressive or extend of the soil due to this the longitudinal wave or pressure wave or P-wave is developed on the surface of the pipe. Since it is not possible to condense the results for P-, SV- and SH-waves into one paper, in this paper theresults concerning only the shear waves (SH Wave are to be presented..With increasing urban population and its dependence on utility services, dynamic response of pipelines to seismic excitation has become a subject of importance.

  13. A threshold value in Shear Wave elastography to rule out malignant thyroid nodules: A reality?

    Veyrieres, J.-B., E-mail: jbveyrieres@hotmail.fr [Département d’imagerie médicale, Hôpital d’Instruction des Armées St Anne, Bd Saint Anne, BP 20545 Toulon cedex (France); Albarel, F., E-mail: frederique.albarel@ap-hm.fr [Département médical d’endocrinologie et des pathologies métaboliques, Hôpital Universitaire la Timone, Assistance publique des Hôpitaux de Marseille, 264 rue Saint Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); Lombard, J. Vaillant, E-mail: Josiane.vaillant@ap-hm.fr [Département d’imagerie médicale, Hôpital Universitaire la Timone, Assistance publique des Hôpitaux de Marseille, 264 rue Saint Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); Berbis, J., E-mail: Julie.berbis@ap-hm.fr [Département de santé publique, Université de Médecine, 27, Bd Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); Sebag, F., E-mail: frederic.sebag@ap-hm.fr [Département de chirurgie des pathologies endocriniennes et métaboliques, Hôpital Universitaire la Timone, Assistance publique des Hôpitaux de Marseille, 264 rue Saint Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); and others

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: To evaluate hability of a threshold value in ShearWave™ elastography to rule out malignant thyroid nodules while studying its pertinence in association with morphological signs. Equipment and methods: 148 patients (110 women and 38 men; 52.5 y.o. 15.8) referred for surgery of thyroid nodules underwent standard ultrasound as well as elastography. Characteristics of the morphological signs and maximum elastographic index were calculated in relation to histology. Association of morphological signs alone and then of elastography was also evaluated. One hundred and fifty one nodules were studied on a double-blind basis. Results: 297 nodules were studied. Thirty-five cancers were detected (11.6%). Elastographic index was higher in malignant nodules (115 kPa 60.4) than in benign nodules (41 kPa 25.8) (p < 0.001, Student's t-test). Cut off value of 66 kPa was the best to discriminate malignant nodules with a sensitivity of 80% (CI 95%, 62.5; 90.9) and a specificity of 90.5% (CI 95%, 86.1; 93.6) (p = 0.0001). Association of elastography and morphological ultrasound signs presented a sensitivity of 97% (CI 95%, 83.3; 99.8) and a negative predictive value of 99.5% (CI 95%, 95.6; 99.9). Interobserver reproducibility proved to be excellent with an interclass correlation of 0.97 (CI 95%, 0.96; 0.98) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The 66 kPa threshold in Shear Wave elastography is the best ultrasound sign to rule out malignant thyroid nodules. The method is simple, quantitative, reproducible and usable in the study of nodules larger than 3 cm. Progress must still be made in the study of calcified nodules and follicular tumors.

  14. Performance of shear wave elastography for differentiation of benign and malignant solid breast masses.

    Guiling Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To perform a meta-analysis assessing the ability of shear wave elastography (SWE to identify malignant breast masses. METHODS: PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the ISI Web of Knowledge were searched for studies evaluating the accuracy of SWE for identifying malignant breast masses. The diagnostic accuracy of SWE was evaluated according to sensitivity, specificity, and hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic (HSROC curves. An analysis was also performed according to the SWE mode used: supersonic shear imaging (SSI and the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI technique. The clinical utility of SWE for identifying malignant breast masses was evaluated using analysis of Fagan plot. RESULTS: A total of 9 studies, including 1888 women and 2000 breast masses, were analyzed. Summary sensitivities and specificities were 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88-0.94 and 0.82 (95% CI, 0.75-0.87 by SSI and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.81-0.94 and 0.91 (95% CI, 0.84-0.95 by ARFI, respectively. The HSROCs for SSI and ARFI were 0.92 (95% CI, 0.90-0.94 and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.93-0.97, respectively. SSI and ARFI were both very informative, with probabilities of 83% and 91%, respectively, for correctly differentiating between benign and malignant breast masses following a "positive" measurement (over the threshold value and probabilities of disease as low as 10% and 11%, respectively, following a "negative" measurement (below the threshold value when the pre-test probability was 50%. CONCLUSIONS: SWE could be used as a good identification tool for the classification of breast masses.

  15. Shear Wave Splitting Results from the Coast Mountains Batholith, British Columbia

    Frassetto, A.; Zandt, G.; Dueker, K.; Calkins, J.

    2007-12-01

    The main goal of the interdisciplinary Batholiths continental dynamics project is to understand how the composition, structure, and fabric of the crust and mantle evolved following the emplacement of the Coast Mountains Batholith (CMB). The major issue related to the CMB is determining whether crustal melting and distillation generated an ultramafic root as in the Sierra Nevada and if so, determining the ultimate fate of this material. A key element of this analysis involves characterizing mantle anisotropy throughout the region. We utilize a dataset of 45 broadband seismometers deployed between June 2005 and September 2006. These stations were deployed along two transects approximately 200 km apart across the Insular superterrane, Coast Shear Zone, CMB, and interior plateau. This study presents new shear wave anisotropy results calculated from teleseismic SKS phases collected across the Batholiths array. At this time we have constraints from the highest quality event, analyzed using the methods from Silver and Chan (1991). Further analysis will include all good quality SKS phases. Previously the only anisotropy measurement is a well constrained null value from permanent station at Bella Bella, BC (BBB) just west of the batholith along the southern seismic transect. Stations to the east of BBB show splits of ~1.5 seconds along an ENE-WSW fast direction. This major increase in SKS anisotropy over a small spatial interval may result from shallow mantle flow beneath the batholith or a frozen fabric within the lithosphere. Stations along the northern transect show a somewhat smaller average splitting time of 1.2 s and a clockwise rotation of the fast direction into roughly E-W. We aim to resolve whether our initial anisotropy measurements, which are generally consistent along each seismic transect but comparatively different between transects, result from a regional flow pattern within the asthenosphere or an already established fabric within the lithosphere, including

  16. Reflection and Transmission Coefficients for an Incident Plane Shear Wave at an Interface Separating Two Dissimilar Poroelastic Solids

    Liu, Xu; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2014-09-01

    Using Biot's poroelasticity theory, we derive expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a plane shear wave incident on an interface separating two different poroelastic solids. The coefficients are formulated as a function of the wave incidence angle, frequency and rock properties. Specific cases calculated include the boundary between water-saturated sand and water-saturated sandstone and the gas-water interface in sand. The results show a very different interface response to that of an incident P wave. Plane SV wave incidence does not significantly excite the Biot slow P wave if the frequency of the wave is below the transition frequency. Above this frequency, an incident plane SV wave can generate a mode-converted slow Biot P wave which is actually a normal propagating wave and not highly attenuating as in the usual (diffusive) case. For an incident SV wave onto a gas-water interface, even at very high frequency, there is no significant Biot second P wave produced. For small incident angles, the gas-water interface is essentially transparent. With increasing angles, there can arise an unusual "definitive angle" in the reflection/transmission coefficient curves which is related to the change of fluid viscosity on both sides of the interface and provides a possible new means for underground fluid assessment.

  17. Stochastic electron dynamics due to drift waves in a sheared magnetic field and other drift motion problems

    Electron motion in a single electrostatic wave in a sheared magnetic field is shown to become stochastic in the presence of a second wave at an amplitude well below that obtained from the overlapping pendulum resonance approximation. The enhanced stochasticity occurs for low parallel velocity electrons for which the parallel trapping motion from eE/sub parallel//m interacts strongly with the E x B trapping motion due to the presence of magnetic shear. The guiding-center equations for single particle electron orbits in given fields are investigated using both analytical and numerical techniques. The model assumes a slab magnetic field geometry with shear and two electrostatic plane waves propagating at an angle with respect to each other. Collisions and the self-consistent effect of the electron motion upon the fields are ignored. The guiding-center motion in an inertial reference frame moving in phase with the two waves is given by a two degree-of-freedom, autonomous Hamiltonian system. The single wave particle motion may be reduced to a two parameter family of one degree-of-freedom Hamiltonians which bifurcate from a pendulum phase space to a topology with three chains of elliptic and hyperbolic fixed points separated in radius about the mode-rational surface. In the presence of a perturbing wave with a different helicity, electrons in the small parallel velocity regime become stochastic at an amplitude scaling as the fourth root of the wave potential. The results obtained for stochastic motion apply directly to the problem of electron diffusion in drift waves occurring in toroidal fusion confinement devices. The effect of an adiabatically changing radial electric field upon guiding-center orbits in tokamaks is also investigated. This perturbation causes a radial polarization drift of trapped particle tokamak orbits

  18. Analysis of Seismic Anisotropy Across Central Anatolia by Shear Wave Splitting

    Pamir, Dilekcan; Abgarmi, Bizhan; Arda Özacar, A.

    2014-05-01

    Analysis of Seismic Anisotropy Across Central Anatolia by Shear Wave Splitting Dilekcan Pamir, Bizhan Abgarmi, A. Arda Özacar Department of Geological Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU), Dumlupinar Bulvari 1, 06800 Ankara, Turkey Central Anatolia holds the key to connect the theories about the ongoing tectonic escape, the African Plate subduction along Cyprus Arc and the indenter-style collision of Arabian Plate along Bitlis Suture. However, the shear wave splitting measurements which are needed to characterize seismic anisotropy are very sparse in the region. Recently, seismic data recorded by national seismic networks (KOERI, ERI-DAD) with dense coverage, provided a unique opportunity to analyze the effect of present slab geometry (slab tears, slab break-off) on mantle deformation and test different models of anisotropy forming mechanisms. In this study, the anisotropic structure beneath the Central Anatolia is investigated via splitting of SKS and SKKS phases recorded at 46 broadband seismic stations. Our measurements yielded 1171 well-constrained splitting and 433 null results. Overall, the region displays NE-SW trending fast splitting directions and delay times on the order of 1 sec. On the other hand, a large number of stations which are spatially correlated with Cyprus Slab, Neogene volcanism and major tectonic structures present significant back azimuthal variations on splitting parameters that cannot be explained by one-layered anisotropy with horizontal symmetry. Thus, we have modeled anisotropy for two-layered structures using a forward approach and identified NE-SW trending fast splitting directions with delay times close to 1 sec at the lower layer and N-S, NW-SE trending fast splitting with limited time delays (0.1 - 0.3 sec) at the upper layer. Fast directions and delay times of the lower layer are similar to one-layered anisotropy and parallel or sub-parallel to the absolute plate motions which favors asthenospheric flow model

  19. The Effects of Realistic Geological Heterogeneity on Seismic Modeling: Applications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-Surface Tunnel Detection

    Sherman, Christopher Scott

    Naturally occurring geologic heterogeneity is an important, but often overlooked, aspect of seismic wave propagation. This dissertation presents a strategy for modeling the effects of heterogeneity using a combination of geostatistics and Finite Difference simulation. In the first chapter, I discuss my motivations for studying geologic heterogeneity and seis- mic wave propagation. Models based upon fractal statistics are powerful tools in geophysics for modeling heterogeneity. The important features of these fractal models are illustrated using borehole log data from an oil well and geomorphological observations from a site in Death Valley, California. A large part of the computational work presented in this disserta- tion was completed using the Finite Difference Code E3D. I discuss the Python-based user interface for E3D and the computational strategies for working with heterogeneous models developed over the course of this research. The second chapter explores a phenomenon observed for wave propagation in heteroge- neous media - the generation of unexpected shear wave phases in the near-source region. In spite of their popularity amongst seismic researchers, approximate methods for modeling wave propagation in these media, such as the Born and Rytov methods or Radiative Trans- fer Theory, are incapable of explaining these shear waves. This is primarily due to these method's assumptions regarding the coupling of near-source terms with the heterogeneities and mode conversion. To determine the source of these shear waves, I generate a suite of 3D synthetic heterogeneous fractal geologic models and use E3D to simulate the wave propaga- tion for a vertical point force on the surface of the models. I also present a methodology for calculating the effective source radiation patterns from the models. The numerical results show that, due to a combination of mode conversion and coupling with near-source hetero- geneity, shear wave energy on the order of 10% of the

  20. Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class A viral and bacterial detection.

    Branch, Darren W.; Huber, Dale L.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2008-10-01

    The rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms is critical to human health and safety. To achieve a high level of sensitivity for fluidic detection applications, we have developed a 330 MHz Love wave acoustic biosensor on 36{sup o} YX Lithium Tantalate (LTO). Each die has four delay-line detection channels, permitting simultaneous measurement of multiple analytes or for parallel detection of single analyte containing samples. Crucial to our biosensor was the development of a transducer that excites the shear horizontal (SH) mode, through optimization of the transducer, minimizing propagation losses and reducing undesirable modes. Detection was achieved by comparing the reference phase of an input signal to the phase shift from the biosensor using an integrated electronic multi-readout system connected to a laptop computer or PDA. The Love wave acoustic arrays were centered at 330 MHz, shifting to 325-328 MHz after application of the silicon dioxide waveguides. The insertion loss was -6 dB with an out-of-band rejection of 35 dB. The amplitude and phase ripple were 2.5 dB p-p and 2-3{sup o} p-p, respectively. Time-domain gating confirmed propagation of the SH mode while showing suppression of the triple transit. Antigen capture and mass detection experiments demonstrate a sensitivity of 7.19 {+-} 0.74{sup o} mm{sup 2}/ng with a detection limit of 6.7 {+-} 0.40 pg/mm{sup 2} for each channel.

  1. Shear wave velocity mapping of Hat Yai district, southern Thailand: implication for seismic site classification

    Soil characteristics play an important role in the degree of ground shaking due to local site amplification during an earthquake. The objectives of this work are to study shear wave velocity (Vs) distribution in the near surface, and to develop a seismic site classification map for soil effect characterization and seismic hazard assessment in Hat Yai district, southern Thailand. The Vs determination based on the multichannel analysis of surface waves technique, has been carried out and analyzed at 70 measuring sites throughout the district. On the basis of the weighted-average Vs in the upper 30 m depth (Vs30), a seismic site classification map, based on the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) standard has been developed. It is found that the NEHRP site class in Hat Yai can be classified into four groups in accordance with the value of Vs30 within the range of about 150 to 1160 m s−1. Most parts of the study area are typically classified as site class C and D. Site class C is mostly found within the colluvial and terrace deposits in the western and eastern part of the area, whereas site class D is concentrated in the alluvial sediment of the middle and northern flood plain areas. A small portion of site class B is observed in the western mountain ranges, where there is a thin overburden on the firm rock. There is a remarkably low Vs30 value at only one site, located near the main stream in the northern part of the study area. The results imply that the soil characteristics in the central and northern Hat Yai district pose a medium to high amplification rate with respect to the other regions. Although Vs data alone are insufficient to verify the potential of the amplification of ground shaking, this study provides an initial attempt to understand seismic hazards in the study area. (paper)

  2. Feasibility Study of Texture Analysis Using Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography to Predict Malignancy in Thyroid Nodules.

    Bhatia, Kunwar Suryaveer Singh; Lam, Absalom Chung Lung; Pang, Sze Wing Angel; Wang, Defeng; Ahuja, Anil Tejbhan

    2016-07-01

    Textural analysis of ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) was evaluated to discriminate benign and malignant thyroid nodules. Sixteen papillary thyroid cancers and 89 benign hyperplastic nodules in 105 patients underwent SWE using four static pre-compression levels. Fifteen gray level co-occurrence matrix textural features and six absolute SWE indices were computed from SWE images. Diagnostic performances of each SWE index for malignancy were calculated and compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and optimal models were generated at each pre-compression level. The optimal model comprised two SWE textural features at the highest pre-compression level, which attained AUC, sensitivity and specificity of 0.973, 97.5% and 90.0%, respectively. By comparison, absolute SWE indices attained AUC of 0.709 as well as 18.8% sensitivity and 95.8% specificity. These preliminary results suggest SWE textural analysis can distinguish benign and malignant thyroid nodules and SWE spatial heterogeneity is greater in malignant nodules. PMID:27126245

  3. Shear wave attenuation and micro-fluidics in water-saturated sand and glass beads.

    Chotiros, Nicholas P; Isakson, Marcia J

    2014-06-01

    An improvement in the modeling of shear wave attenuation and speed in water-saturated sand and glass beads is introduced. Some dry and water-saturated materials are known to follow a constant-Q model in which the attenuation, expressed as Q(-1), is independent of frequency. The associated loss mechanism is thought to lie within the solid frame. A second loss mechanism in fluid-saturated porous materials is the viscous loss due to relative motion between pore fluid and solid frame predicted by the Biot-Stoll model. It contains a relaxation process that makes the Q(-1) change with frequency, reaching a peak at a characteristic frequency. Examination of the published measurements above 1 kHz, particularly those of Brunson (Ph.D. thesis, Oregon State University, Corvalis, 1983), shows another peak, which is explained in terms of a relaxation process associated with the squirt flow process at the grain-grain contact. In the process of deriving a model for this phenomenon, it is necessary to consider the micro-fluidic effects associated with the flow within a thin film of water confined in the gap at the grain-grain contact and the resulting increase in the effective viscosity of water. The result is an extended Biot model that is applicable over a broad band of frequencies. PMID:24907791

  4. Qualitative pattern classification of shear wave elastography for breast masses: How it correlates to quantitative measurements

    Objective: To determine the correlation of qualitative shear wave elastography (SWE) pattern classification to quantitative SWE measurements and whether it is representative of quantitative SWE values with similar performances. Methods: From October 2012 to January 2013, 267 breast masses of 236 women (mean age: 45.12 ± 10.54 years, range: 21–88 years) who had undergone ultrasonography (US), SWE, and subsequent biopsy were included. US BI-RADS final assessment and qualitative and quantitative SWE measurements were recorded. Correlation between pattern classification and mean elasticity, maximum elasticity, elasticity ratio and standard deviation were evaluated. Diagnostic performances of grayscale US, SWE parameters, and US combined to SWE values were calculated and compared. Results: Of the 267 breast masses, 208 (77.9%) were benign and 59 (22.1%) were malignant. Pattern classifications significantly correlated with all quantitative SWE measurements, showing highest correlation with maximum elasticity, r = 0.721 (P < 0.001). Sensitivity was significantly decreased in US combined to SWE measurements to grayscale US: 69.5–89.8% to 100.0%, while specificity was significantly improved: 62.5–81.7% to 13.9% (P < 0.001). Area under the ROC curve (Az) did not show significant differences between grayscale US to US combined to SWE (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Pattern classification shows high correlation to maximum stiffness and may be representative of quantitative SWE values. When combined to grayscale US, SWE improves specificity of US

  5. Models of lithosphere and asthenosphere anisotropic structure of the Yellowstone hot spot from shear wave splitting

    Waite, G.P.; Schutt, D.L.; Smith, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    Teleseismic shear wave splitting measured at 56 continuous and temporary seismographs deployed in a 500 km by 600 km area around the Yellowstone hot spot indicates that fast anisotropy in the mantle is parallel to the direction of plate motion under most of the array. The average split time from all stations of 0.9 s is typical of continental stations. There is little evidence for plume-induced radial strain, suggesting that any contribution of gravitationally spreading plume material is undetectably small with respect to the plate motion velocity. Two stations within Yellowstone have splitting measurements indicating the apparent fast anisotropy direction (??) is nearly perpendicular to plate motion. These stations are ???30 km from stations with ?? parallel to plate motion. The 70?? rotation over 30 km suggests a shallow source of anisotropy; however, split times for these stations are more than 2 s. We suggest melt-filled, stress-oriented cracks in the lithosphere are responsible for the anomalous ?? orientations within Yellowstone. Stations southeast of Yellowstone have measurements of ?? oriented NNW to WNW at high angles to the plate motion direction. The Archean lithosphere beneath these stations may have significant anisotropy capable of producing the observed splitting. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Uncertainty Estimation of Shear-wave Velocity Structure from Bayesian Inversion of Microtremor Array Dispersion Data

    Dosso, S. E.; Molnar, S.; Cassidy, J.

    2010-12-01

    Bayesian inversion of microtremor array dispersion data is applied, with evaluation of data errors and model parameterization, to produce the most-probable shear-wave velocity (VS) profile together with quantitative uncertainty estimates. Generally, the most important property characterizing earthquake site response is the subsurface VS structure. The microtremor array method determines phase velocity dispersion of Rayleigh surface waves from multi-instrument recordings of urban noise. Inversion of dispersion curves for VS structure is a non-unique and nonlinear problem such that meaningful evaluation of confidence intervals is required. Quantitative uncertainty estimation requires not only a nonlinear inversion approach that samples models proportional to their probability, but also rigorous estimation of the data error statistics and an appropriate model parameterization. A Bayesian formulation represents the solution of the inverse problem in terms of the posterior probability density (PPD) of the geophysical model parameters. Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods are used with an efficient implementation of Metropolis-Hastings sampling to provide an unbiased sample from the PPD to compute parameter uncertainties and inter-relationships. Nonparametric estimation of a data error covariance matrix from residual analysis is applied with rigorous a posteriori statistical tests to validate the covariance estimate and the assumption of a Gaussian error distribution. The most appropriate model parameterization is determined using the Bayesian information criterion (BIC), which provides the simplest model consistent with the resolving power of the data. Parameter uncertainties are found to be under-estimated when data error correlations are neglected and when compressional-wave velocity and/or density (nuisance) parameters are fixed in the inversion. Bayesian inversion of microtremor array data is applied at two sites in British Columbia, the area of highest seismic risk in

  7. Influence of Food Intake on 2-D Shear Wave Elastography Assessment of Liver Stiffness in Healthy Subjects.

    Gersak, Mariana M; Badea, Radu; Lenghel, Lavinia M; Vasilescu, Dan; Botar-Jid, Carolina; Dudea, Sorin M

    2016-06-01

    Transient elastography and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse imaging are useful non-invasive methods for liver stiffness estimation, although both are influenced by food intake. The aim of the work described here was to identify liver stiffness variation after a standardized meal using 2-D shear wave elastography. Liver stiffness was estimated in 31 apparently healthy subjects, under fasting conditions and after a standardized meal (20, 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120 min after food intake). In most of the cases, liver stiffness values increased between 20 and 40 min after the meal (p food intake, liver stiffness values were significantly lower compared with liver stiffness values under fasting conditions (p food intake (p food intake on liver stiffness estimation, 2-D shear wave elastography should be performed only under fasting conditions. PMID:26947447

  8. Scalar evolution equations for shear waves in incompressible solids: a simple derivation of the Z, ZK, KZK and KP equations

    Destrade, M.

    2010-12-08

    We study the propagation of two-dimensional finite-amplitude shear waves in a nonlinear pre-strained incompressible solid, and derive several asymptotic amplitude equations in a simple, consistent and rigorous manner. The scalar Zabolotskaya (Z) equation is shown to be the asymptotic limit of the equations of motion for all elastic generalized neo-Hookean solids (with strain energy depending only on the first principal invariant of Cauchy-Green strain). However, we show that the Z equation cannot be a scalar equation for the propagation of two-dimensional shear waves in general elastic materials (with strain energy depending on the first and second principal invariants of strain). Then, we introduce dispersive and dissipative terms to deduce the scalar Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP), Zabolotskaya-Khokhlov (ZK) and Khokhlov- Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equations of incompressible solid mechanics. © 2010 The Royal Society.

  9. Quaternary layer anomalies around the Carlsberg Fault zone mapped with high-resolution shear-wave seismics south of Copenhagen

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Nielsen, Lars;

    , although none of the mapped earthquakes appear to have occurred on the Carlsberg Fault. We examined the fault evolution by a combination of very high resolution onshore shear-wave seismic data, one conventional onshore seismic profile and marine reflection seismic profiles. The chalk stratigraphy and the...... localization of the fault zone at depth was inferred from previous studies by other authors. We extrapolated the Jurassic and Triassic stratigraphy from the Pomeranian Bay to the area of investigation. The fault zone shows a flower structure in the Triassic as well as in Cretaceous sediments. The faulting...... below. In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the 30 m of the upward continuation of the Carlsberg Fault zone. In our area of investigation, the fault zone appears to comprise normal block faults and one reverse block fault showing the complexity of the fault zone. The observed faults appear to affect...

  10. Reliability and Efficiency in Shear-Wave Velocity Inversion Methods and Practical Considerations for Multi-Mode Surface Wave Inversion Technique

    Hosseini, M.; Pezeshk, S.

    2011-12-01

    Multi-channel Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) and the inversion for shear-wave velocity have been quite popular considering the low cost. The MASW method has been widely researched in the last three decades as a non-invasive procedure to determine shear-wave velocity of shallow subsurface. The MASW method can provide results accurate enough to replace the invasive downhole seismic survey which requires a borehole and is more time consuming and will cost more. The MASW method results suffer from inherent non-uniqueness problem. The reduction of such non-uniqueness can greatly improve the accuracy and reliability of inverted profiles. Such improvement can include imposing boundaries and constraints on the range of shear-wave velocity of layers and considering the higher modes of Rayleigh wave propagation and consideration for higher modes is not a simple task. The reliability of the forward method which is used in the inversion process, is one of the crucial items to be evaluated, and there are cases that some forward method algorithms fails to find the roots related to higher modes correctly, and in such cases there will be jumps in dispersion curves to higher modes. The computer environment under which the forward method is being developed is important. In some cases the computational efficiency of the inversion process is completely depended on the computation environment. Furthermore it is important to use a global search technique to try to obtain the global optimum solution instead of local ones. Also, due to the nature of inversion process, there are several parameters which their values affect the results of inverted shear-wave velocity profile such as the initial model, poison ratio, etc. To reduce uncertainties, we need to run the inversion procedure several times considering different parameters which can be quite time consuming and impractical. To overcome such limitations, an algorithm is designed to launch the shear-wave velocity inversion

  11. Converging ultrasonic shear-vertical waves generated by a double-line laser and its application for surface defect detection

    A double-line laser source as an irradiation pattern for the generation of ultrasonic waves is proposed. Simulated results show that the shear-vertical (SV) waves generated by the double-line laser source superimpose and produce a convergence effect at the center axis with a fixed angle. The amplitude of the converging SV wave is significantly improved compared to the ultrasonic field generated by a single-line source under the same condition of the thermoelastic regime. Simulations show good agreement with experimental results, which demonstrate that the SV waves in a steel plate subjected to the double-line laser source converge efficiently at the center axis. Then, a method using the converging SV to detect surface defect on a steel plate is proposed. The characterization of the surface defect has been quantitatively measured with high accuracy by the well-designed double-line source. (author)

  12. 转换波AVO反演速度比各横波反射系数%Converted wave AVO inversion for average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient

    魏修成; 陈天胜; 季玉新

    2008-01-01

    Based on the empirical Gardner equation describing the relationship between density and compressional wave velocity, the converted wave reflection coefficient extrema attributes for AVO analysis are proposed and the relations between the extrema position and amplitude, average velocity ratio across the interface, and shear wave reflection coefficient are derived. The extrema position is a monotonically decreasing function of average velocity ratio, and the extrema amplitude is a function of average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient. For theoretical models, the average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient are inverted from the extrema position and amplitude obtained from fitting a power function to converted wave AVO curves. Shear wave reflection coefficient sections have clearer physical meaning than conventional converted wave stacked sections and establish the theoretical foundation for geological structural interpretation and event correlation. 'The method of inverting average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient from the extrema position and amplitude obtained from fitting a power function is applied to real CCP gathers. The inverted average velocity ratios are consistent with those computed from compressional and shear wave well logs.

  13. Specimen ferromagnetism and the behaviour of electromagnetic ultrasonic shear-wave transducers below and above the Curie point

    Interest in the potentialities of electromagnetic ultrasonic transducers for non-destructive testing was re-awakened about 1968 and since then a goodly number of articles have appeared concerning transducers design, performance and use. The aim of this report is to fill a gap by describing the relations between theoretical and actual performance of shear-wave transducers, used on magnetic and on non-magnetic specimens: in particular to trace the phenomena occuring as the temperature of a magnetic specimen (mild steel) is raised through the Curie point. At the transmitting transducer generation of ultrasonic wave is almost exclusively by Lorentz forces applied to the skin of the specimen; at the receiver transduction is via Faraday induction. Wave attenuation in mild steel above the curie point hampers the use of shear waves, but does not render unusable there. An anomaly in performance with mild steel specimens just above the Curie temperature is discussed, which necessitates a brief consideration of electromagnetic longitudinal wave transducers, where the need to invoke magnetostriction as a dominant phenomenon is expressed. (Auhtor)

  14. Anisotropic polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel phantom for shear wave elastography in fibrous biological soft tissue: a multimodality characterization

    Shear wave elastography imaging techniques provide quantitative measurement of soft tissues elastic properties. Tendons, muscles and cerebral tissues are composed of fibers, which induce a strong anisotropic effect on the mechanical behavior. Currently, these tissues cannot be accurately represented by existing elastography phantoms. Recently, a novel approach for orthotropic hydrogel mimicking soft tissues has been developed (Millon et al 2006 J. Biomed. Mater. Res. B 305–11). The mechanical anisotropy is induced in a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel by stretching the physical crosslinks of the polymeric chains while undergoing freeze/thaw cycles. In the present study we propose an original multimodality imaging characterization of this new transverse isotropic (TI) PVA hydrogel. Multiple properties were investigated using a large variety of techniques at different scales compared with an isotropic PVA hydrogel undergoing similar imaging and rheology protocols. The anisotropic mechanical (dynamic and static) properties were studied using supersonic shear wave imaging technique, full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT) strain imaging and classical linear rheometry using dynamic mechanical analysis. The anisotropic optical and ultrasonic spatial coherence properties were measured by FFOCT volumetric imaging and backscatter tensor imaging, respectively. Correlation of mechanical and optical properties demonstrates the complementarity of these techniques for the study of anisotropy on a multi-scale range as well as the potential of this TI phantom as fibrous tissue-mimicking phantom for shear wave elastographic applications. (paper)

  15. Mantle lithosphere transition from the East European Craton to the Variscan Bohemian Massif imaged by shear-wave splitting

    L. Vecsey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyse splitting of teleseismic shear-wave recorded during the PASSEQ passive experiment (2006–2008 focussed on the upper mantle structure across the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ. 1009 pairs of the delay times of the slow split-shear waves and orientations of the polarized fast-shear waves exhibit lateral variations across the array, as well as backazimuth dependences of measurements at individual stations. While a distinct regionalization of the splitting parameters exists in the Phanerozoic part of Europe, a correlation with the large-scale tectonics around the TESZ and in the East European Craton (EEC is less evident. No general and abrupt change in the splitting parameters (anisotropic structure can be related to the Teisseyre–Tornquist Zone (TTZ, marking the edge of the Precambrian province on the surface. Instead, regional variations of anisotropic structure were found along the TESZ/TTZ. We suggest a south-westward continuation of the Precambrian mantle lithosphere beneath the TESZ and the adjacent Phanerozoic part of Europe, probably as far as towards the Bohemian Massif.

  16. Anisotropic polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel phantom for shear wave elastography in fibrous biological soft tissue: a multimodality characterization

    Chatelin, Simon; Bernal, Miguel; Deffieux, Thomas; Papadacci, Clément; Flaud, Patrice; Nahas, Amir; Boccara, Claude; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-11-01

    Shear wave elastography imaging techniques provide quantitative measurement of soft tissues elastic properties. Tendons, muscles and cerebral tissues are composed of fibers, which induce a strong anisotropic effect on the mechanical behavior. Currently, these tissues cannot be accurately represented by existing elastography phantoms. Recently, a novel approach for orthotropic hydrogel mimicking soft tissues has been developed (Millon et al 2006 J. Biomed. Mater. Res. B 305-11). The mechanical anisotropy is induced in a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel by stretching the physical crosslinks of the polymeric chains while undergoing freeze/thaw cycles. In the present study we propose an original multimodality imaging characterization of this new transverse isotropic (TI) PVA hydrogel. Multiple properties were investigated using a large variety of techniques at different scales compared with an isotropic PVA hydrogel undergoing similar imaging and rheology protocols. The anisotropic mechanical (dynamic and static) properties were studied using supersonic shear wave imaging technique, full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT) strain imaging and classical linear rheometry using dynamic mechanical analysis. The anisotropic optical and ultrasonic spatial coherence properties were measured by FFOCT volumetric imaging and backscatter tensor imaging, respectively. Correlation of mechanical and optical properties demonstrates the complementarity of these techniques for the study of anisotropy on a multi-scale range as well as the potential of this TI phantom as fibrous tissue-mimicking phantom for shear wave elastographic applications.

  17. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Shallow Shear-Wave Velocities for Las Vegas, Nevada, Using Sediment Type

    Barbara Luke; Helena Murvosh; Wanda Taylor; Jeff Wagoner

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of near-surface shear-wave velocity in the deep alluvial basin underlying the metropolitan area of Las Vegas, Nevada (USA), is being developed for earthquake site response projections. The velocity dataset, which includes 230 measurements, is interpolated across the model using depth-dependent correlations of velocity with sediment type. The sediment-type database contains more than 1 400 well and borehole logs. Sediment sequences reported in logs are assigned to one of four units. A characteristic shear-wave velocity profile b developed for each unit by analyzing closely spaced pairs of velocity profiles and well or borehole logs. The resulting velocity model exhibits reasonable values and patterns, although it does not explicitly honor the measured shear-wave velocity profiles. Site response investigations that applied a preliminary version of the velocity model support a two-zone ground-shaking hazard model for the valley. Areas in which clay predominates in the upper 30 m are predicted to have stronger ground motions than the rest of the basin.

  18. Investigation of the effects of myocardial anisotropy for shear wave elastography using impulsive force and harmonic vibration

    Urban, Matthew W.; Qiang, Bo; Song, Pengfei; Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2016-01-01

    The myocardium is known to be an anisotropic medium where the muscle fiber orientation changes through the thickness of the wall. Shear wave elastography methods use propagating waves which are measured by ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to characterize the mechanical properties of various tissues. Ultrasound- or MR-based methods have been used and the excitation frequency ranges for these various methods cover a large range from 24-500 Hz. Some of the ultrasound-based methods have been shown to be able to estimate the fiber direction. We constructed a model with layers of elastic, transversely isotropic materials that were oriented at different angles to simulate the heart wall in systole and diastole. We investigated the effect of frequency on the wave propagation and the estimation of fiber direction and wave speeds in the different layers of the assembled models. We found that waves propagating at low frequencies such as 30 or 50 Hz showed low sensitivity to the fiber direction but also had substantial bias in estimating the wave speeds in the layers. Using waves with higher frequency content (>200 Hz) allowed for more accurate fiber direction and wave speed estimation. These results have particular relevance for MR- and ultrasound-based elastography applications in the heart.

  19. Wave propagation against current : a study of the effects of vertical shears of the mean current on the geometrical focusing of water waves

    Charland, Jenna; Touboul, Julien; Rey, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Wave propagation against current : a study of the effects of vertical shears of the mean current on the geometrical focusing of water waves J. Charland * **, J. Touboul **, V. Rey ** jenna.charland@univ-tln.fr * Direction Générale de l'Armement, CNRS Délégation Normandie ** Université de Toulon, 83957 La Garde, France Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO) Aix Marseille Université, 13288 Marseille, France CNRS/INSU, IRD, MIO, UM 110 In the nearshore area, both wave propagation and currents are influenced by the bathymetry. For a better understanding of wave - current interactions in the presence of a 3D bathymetry, a large scale experiment was carried out in the Ocean Basin FIRST, Toulon, France. The 3D bathymetry consisted of two symmetric underwater mounds on both sides in the mean wave direction. The water depth at the top the mounds was hm=1,5m, the slopes of the mounds were of about 1:3, the water depth was h=3 m elsewhere. For opposite current conditions (U of order 0.30m/s), a huge focusing of the wave up to twice its incident amplitude was observed in the central part of the basin for T=1.4s. Since deep water conditions are verified, the wave amplification is ascribed to the current field. The mean velocity fields at a water depth hC=0.25m was measured by the use of an electromagnetic current meter. The results have been published in Rey et al [4]. The elliptic form of the "mild slope" equation including a uniform current on the water column (Chen et al [1]) was then used for the calculations. The calculated wave amplification of factor 1.2 is significantly smaller than observed experimentally (factor 2). So, the purpose of this study is to understand the physical processes which explain this gap. As demonstrated by Kharif & Pelinovsky [2], geometrical focusing of waves is able to modify significantly the local wave amplitude. We consider this process here. Since vertical velocity profiles measured at some locations have shown significant

  20. Preliminary results of near-surface shear-wave velocities derived from inverting surface-wave dispersion curves in Wonju, Korea

    Kim, K. Y.; Jung, J.; Kim, C.; Ali, A.

    2013-12-01

    To estimate near-surface shear-wave velocities (Vs) in Wonju, Korea, active and passive surface-wave data were recorded at 4 and 6 sites, respectively, using 24 4.5-Hz vertical geophones and an engineering seismograph. An 8-kg wooden hammer was used for the active seismic source. The ground motions of 8.2 s length at each geophone location were digitized at a 2-ms sample rate. The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) methods were used for the active and passive data to derive dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves. Shear-wave profiles inverted from the dispersion curves indicate that 182 < Vs < 557 ms/ in the unconsolidated overburden layer and 375 < Vs < 1128 m/s in the consolidated rock. The basement depths are estimated at depths between 13 and 25 m. Average Vs to a 30 m depth (Vs30) were also computed using Vs values in the overburden and underlying basement layers. The estimated Vs30 are in the range of 224-602 m/s, with an average of 415 m/s. Most of the Wonju area is thus in NEHRP Site Class C ('Very dense soil and soft rock') defined by the velocity interval 360 < Vs30 < 760 m/s.

  1. Shear wave splitting analyses in Tian Shan: Geodynamic implications of complex seismic anisotropy

    Cherie, Solomon G.; Gao, Stephen S.; Liu, Kelly H.; Elsheikh, Ahmed A.; Kong, Fansheng; Reed, Cory A.; Yang, Bin B.

    2016-06-01

    The Tian Shan is a tectonically complex intracontinental orogenic belt situated between the Tarim Basin and the Kazakh Shield. The vast majority of the previous shear wave splitting (SWS) measurements were presented as station averages, which are only valid when the anisotropy structure can be approximated by a single layer of anisotropy with a horizontal axis of symmetry, i.e., a model of simple anisotropy. A variety of anisotropy-forming hypotheses have been proposed based on the station-averaged measurements. In this study, we measure the splitting parameters at 25 stations that recorded high-quality data from a wide back azimuthal range for the purpose of identifying and characterizing complex anisotropy. Among the 25 stations, 15 of them show systematic azimuthal variations in the observed splitting parameters with a 90° periodicity that is consistent with a model of two-layered anisotropy. The fast orientations of the upper layer range from 50° to 90° measured clockwise from the north, which are subparallel to the strike of the orogenic belt, and the splitting times are between 0.9 and 1.9 s. The corresponding values for the lower layer are -45° to -85° and 1.2-2.2 s, respectively. The remaining 10 stations demonstrate azimuthally invariant splitting parameters with strike-parallel fast orientations, and can be represented by a single layer of anisotropy with a horizontal axis of symmetry. We propose that the strike-parallel anisotropy is caused by lithospheric shortening, and anisotropy in the lower layer is associated with WNW-ward flow of asthenospheric material sandwiched between the subducting Tarim lithosphere and the thick Kazakh lithospheric root.

  2. On the source-frequency dependence of fracture-orientation estimates from shear-wave transmission experiments

    Santos, Leo K.; de Figueiredo, J. J. S.; Omoboya, Bode; Schleicher, Jörg; Stewart, Robert R.; Dyaur, Nikolay

    2015-03-01

    Shear-wave propagation through anisotropic fractured or cracked media can provide valuable information about these fracture swarms and their orientations. The main goal of this work is to recover information about fracture orientation based on the shear waveforms (S-waveforms). For this study, we carried out ultrasonic S-wave measurements in a synthetic physical model made of epoxy resin (isotropic matrix proxy), with small cylindrical rubber strips as inclusions (artificial cracks) inserted in it to simulate a homogeneous anisotropic medium. In these experiments, we used low, intermediate, and high frequency shear-wave sources, with frequencies 90, 431, and 840 kHz. We integrated and interpreted the resulting S-wave seismograms, cross-correlation panels and anisotropic parameter-analysis curves. We were able to estimate the crack orientation in single-orientation fracture zones. The high frequency peaks associated with scattered S-waves provided interpretable information about the fracture orientations when the propagation direction was parallel to the fracture plane. The analysis was possible utilizing results from frequency-versus-polarization-angle curves. Moreover, we applied a bandpass filtering process to the intermediate and high frequency seismograms in order to obtain low frequency seismograms. A spectral analysis using frequency-wavenumber (F-K) spectra supports this filtering process. The results obtained using an analysis of cross-correlograms and the Thomsen parameter γ extracted from filtered high-frequency data were quite similar to those obtained using a low-frequency source. This highlighted the possibility of using less expensive high-frequency sources to recover information about the fracture set.

  3. Advantages of using multichannel analysis of Love waves (MALW) in determining near-surface shear-wave velocity

    Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Miller, R. D.; Cakir, R.

    2011-12-01

    Surface-wave techniques have been given increasingly more attention by the near-surface community with applications to a variety of problems. Studies on high-frequency surface-wave techniques have been focused primarily on Rayleigh waves. There is much less attention on utilizing Love waves than Rayleigh waves in the near-surface community. Recent improvements in data-acquisition techniques and development of software make SH-wave data acquisition and processing easier. In addition, Love-wave analysis only results in SH-wave velocities, which suggests that we may benefit from analyzing SH-wave data using Love-wave inversion. Numerical results of SH waves and data from Kansas, Wyoming, Arizona, Washington, and Wuhan, China demonstrated three advantages of analyzing SH-wave data using multichannel analysis of Love waves (MALW). 1) Generally images of Love-wave energy are cleaner and sharper than those generated from Rayleigh waves. Owing to a long geophone spread commonly used in an SH-wave refraction survey, images of Love-wave energy are even much cleaner and sharper, which makes picking phase velocities of Love waves easier and more accurate. 2) Numerical results showed that because Love waves are independent of P-wave velocity, dispersion curves of Love waves are simpler than Rayleigh waves. "Mode kissing" (suggested by Robert Stewart) is an undesired and frequently occurred phenomenon in Rayleigh-wave analysis that causes mode misidentification. Fortunately, this phenomenon is less common in images of Love-wave energy than Rayleigh waves. 3) Real-world examples showed that inversion of Love-wave dispersion curves is less dependent on initial models and more stable than Rayleigh waves. This is because of being independent of P-wave velocity fewer unknowns in the MALW method not only make dispersion curves of Love waves simpler also reduces the degree of nonuniqueness, which leads to more stable inversion of Love-wave dispersion curves. Results also demonstrated

  4. Frequency- and stress-dependent changes in shear-wave velocity dispersion in water-saturated, unconsolidated sand

    Ghose, R.

    2009-04-01

    Anelastic processes in the earth causes dissipation of seismic energy. Because of the fundamental laws of causality, the dissipation effects demand a frequency-dependent change of elastic moduli, and therefore, dispersion in elastic wave velocities. Assessing the dispersion of seismic shear waves in the unconsolidated subsoil is important for at least 3 reasons: 1) shear-wave velocity (Vs) is a key parameter in all dynamic loading problems; the frequency of the observed shear waves in field, downhole and laboratory measurements varies widely (20 Hz - 10 kHz), and consequently an uncertainty resulting from an unknown or poorly known estimate of dispersion may translate into erroneous evaluation and potential risks, 2) generally Vs-dispersion is considered negligible for the frequency range of practical interest; it is important to check this assumption and modify the site evaluation results, if necessary, and 3) the underlying soil-physics of any observed dispersion can be useful in estimating an unknown soil physical parameter. In the present research, we have concentrated on Vs dispersion in saturated sand in laboratory, under varying vertical and horizontal stress levels that are realistic in the context of shallow subsoil investigations. We explored theoretical models to obtain insight from our experimental findings. Laboratory experiments involving array seismic measurements and accurate stress control present clear evidence of dispersive shear-wave velocity in saturated sand in the frequency range 2-16 kHz. The change of Vs as a function of frequency is clearly nonlinear. For low frequencies, as observed in the field data, our result indicates significant dispersion and, therefore, nonlinear variation of attenuation. This has important implication on site evaluation using Vs. Significantly, the data allows us to distinguish a frequency-dependence of the velocity dispersion. The relative importance of fluid motion relative to the skeleton frame (Biot theory

  5. Global Subducting Slab Entrainment of Oceanic Asthenosphere: Re-examination of Sub-Slab Shear-Wave Splitting Patterns

    Song, T.; Liu, L.; Kawakatsu, H.

    2011-12-01

    Oceanic asthenosphere is characterized as a low seismic velocity, low viscosity, and strongly anisotropic channel separating from the oceanic lithosphere through a sharp shear wave velocity contrast. It has been a great challenge to reconcile all these observations and ultimately illuminate the fate of oceanic asthenosphere near convergent plate margins. Sub-slab shear wave splitting patterns are particularly useful to address the fate of oceanic asthenosphere since they are directly linked to deformation induced by the mantle flow beneath the subducting slab. To address slab entrainment of oceanic asthenosphere through shear wave splitting, it is important to recognize that oceanic asthenosphere is characterized by azimuthal anisotropy (1-3%) as well as strong P wave and S wave radial anisotropy (3-7%) for horizontally travelling P wave (VPH > VPV) and S wave (VSH > VSV), making it effectively an orthorhombic medium. Here we show that entrained asthenosphere predicts sub-slab SKS splitting pattern, where the fast splitting direction changes from predominantly trench-normal under shallow subduction zones to predominantly trench-parallel under relatively steep subduction zones. This result can be recognized by the 90 degrees shift in the polarization of the fast wave at about 20 degrees incident angle, where VSH equals to VSV forming a classical point singularity (Crampin, 1991). The thickness of the entrained asthenosphere is estimated to be on the order of 100 km, which predicts SKS splitting time varying from 0.5 seconds to 2 seconds. After briefly discussing improvement of the millefeuille model (Kawakatsu et al. 2009) of the asthenosphere upon this new constraint and long wave Backus averaging of orthorhombic solid and melt, we will illustrate that, in the range of observed trench migration speed, dynamic models of 2-D mantle convection with temperature-dependent viscosity do support thick subducting slab entrainment of asthenosphere under ranges of

  6. Higher-order Korteweg-de Vries models for internal solitary waves in a stratified shear flow with a free surface

    Grimshaw, R.; E. Pelinovsky; Poloukhina, O.

    2002-01-01

    A higher-order extension of the familiar Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for internal solitary waves in a density- and current-stratified shear flow with a free surface. All coefficients of this extended Korteweg-de Vries equation are expressed in terms of integrals of the modal function for the linear long-wave theory. An illustrative example of a two-layer shear flow is considered, for which we discuss the parameter dependence of t...

  7. Wave propagation in a viscous fluid with a pipeline shear mean flow and application for ultrasonic flow meter

    Chen, Yong; Huang, Yiyong; Chen, Xiaoqian

    2013-11-01

    This paper deals with the problem of wave propagation in a compressible viscous fluid confined by a rigid-walled circular pipeline in the presence of a shear mean flow. On the assumption of isentropic and axisymmetric wave propagation, the convected acoustic equations are mathematically deduced from the conservations of continuity and momentum, leading to a set of coupled second-order differential equations with respect of the acoustic pressure and velocity components in radial and axial directions. A solution based on the Fourier-Bessel theory, which is complete and orthogonal in Lebesgue space, is introduced to transform the differential equations to an infinite set of homogeneous algebraic equations, thus the wave number can be calculated due to the existence condition of a non-trivial solution. After the discussion of the method's convergence, the cut-off frequency of the wave mode is theoretically analyzed. Furthermore, wave attenuation of the first four wave modes due to fluid viscosity is numerically studied in the presence of the laminar and turbulent flow profiles. Meanwhile, the measurement performance of an ultrasonic flow meter based on the difference of downstream and upstream wave propagations is parametrically addressed.

  8. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  9. Observation and modeling of mixing-layer development in high-energy-density, blast-wave-driven shear flow

    In this work, we examine the hydrodynamics of high-energy-density (HED) shear flows. Experiments, consisting of two materials of differing density, use the OMEGA-60 laser to drive a blast wave at a pressure of ∼50 Mbar into one of the media, creating a shear flow in the resulting shocked system. The interface between the two materials is Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable, and a mixing layer of growing width develops due to the shear. To theoretically analyze the instability's behavior, we rely on two sources of information. First, the interface spectrum is well-characterized, which allows us to identify how the shock front and the subsequent shear in the post-shock flow interact with the interface. These observations provide direct evidence that vortex merger dominates the evolution of the interface structure. Second, simulations calibrated to the experiment allow us to estimate the time-dependent evolution of the deposition of vorticity at the interface. The overall result is that we are able to choose a hydrodynamic model for the system, and consequently examine how well the flow in this HED system corresponds to a classical hydrodynamic description

  10. Analysis of Shear-horizontal Vibrations of Crystal Plates for Acoustic Wave Resonators and Sensors

    Liu, Bo

    2010-01-01

    In this work, theoretical analysis of shear-horizontal vibrations of crystal plates under lateral electric field excitation (LFE) without and with a fluid layer is presented. A crystal plate with separated electrodes under thickness electric field excitation (TFE) in contact with a fluid layer is also analyzed.We have started with analyzing the coupled face-shear (FS) and thickness-twist (TT) motions of piezoelectric plates with lateral electric fields, using the Mindlin's first-order theory ...

  11. Shear wave elastography of thyroid nodules for the prediction of malignancy in a large scale study

    Highlights: •Elasticity indices of malignant thyroid nodules were higher than those of benign. •High elasticity indices were the independent predictors of thyroid malignancy. •SWE evaluation could be useful as adjunctive tool for thyroid cancer diagnosis. -- Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this study is to validate the usefulness of shear wave elastography (SWE) in predicting thyroid malignancy with a large-scale quantitative SWE data. Methods: This restrospective study included 476 thyroid nodules in 453 patients who underwent gray-scale US and SWE before US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNA) or surgical excision were included. Gray-scale findings and SWE elasticity indices (EIs) were retrospectively reviewed and compared between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. The optimal cut-off values of EIs for predicting malignancy were determined. The diagnostic performances of gray-scale US and SWE for predicting malignancy were analyzed. The diagnostic performance was compared between the gray-scale US findings only and the combined use of gray-scale US findings with SWEs. Results: All EIs of malignant thyroid nodules were significantly higher than those of benign nodules (p ≤ .001). The optimal cut-off value of each EI for predicting malignancy was 85.2 kPa of Emean, 94.0 kPa of Emax, 54.0 kPa of Emin. Emean (OR 3.071, p = .005) and Emax (OR 3.015, p = .003) were the independent predictors of thyroid malignancy. Combined use of gray-scale US findings and each EI showed elevated sensitivity (95.0–95.5% vs 92.9%, p ≤ .005) and AUC (0.820–0.834 vs 0.769, p ≤ .005) for predicting malignancy, compared with the use of only gray-scale US findings. Conclusions: Quantitative parameters of SWE were the independent predictors of thyroid malignancy and SWE evaluation combined with gray-scale US was adjunctive to the diagnostic performance of gray-scale US for predicting thyroid malignancy

  12. Computer-aided diagnosis based on quantitative elastographic features with supersonic shear wave imaging.

    Xiao, Yang; Zeng, Jie; Niu, Lili; Zeng, Qingjing; Wu, Tao; Wang, Congzhi; Zheng, Rongqin; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-02-01

    Supersonic shear wave imaging (SSI) has recently been explored as a technique to evaluate tissue elasticity modulus and has become a valuable tool for tumor characterization. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system that can acquire quantitative elastographic information from color SSI elastography images automatically and objectively for the purpose of classifying benign and malignant breast tumors. Conventional ultrasonography (US) and SSI elastography images of 125 breast tumors (81 benign, 44 malignant), in 93 consecutive patients (mean age: 40 y, age range: 16-75 y), were obtained. After reconstruction of tissue elasticity data and automatic segmentation of each breast tumor, 10 quantitative elastographic features of the tumor and peri-tumoral areas, respectively (elasticity modulus mean, maximum and standard deviation, hardness degree and elasticity ratio), were computed and evaluated. A support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used for optimum classification via combination of these features. The B-mode Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) was used to compare gray-scale US and SSI elastography with respect to diagnostic performance. Histopathologic examination was used as the reference standard. Student's t-test, the Mann-Whitney U-test, the point biserial correlation coefficient and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were performed for statistical analysis. As a result, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of benign/malignant classification were 95.2% (119/125), 90.9% (40/44), 97.5% (79/81), 95.2% (40/42) and 95.2% (79/83) for the CAD scheme, respectively, and 79.2% (99/125), 90.9% (40/44), 72.8% (59/81), 64.5% (40/62) and 93.7% (59/63) for BI-RADS assessment, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az value) for the proposed CAD system using the combination of elastographic features was

  13. Investigation of lithospheric deformation and mantle anisotropy beneath Central Anatolia from Shear Wave Splitting Analysis

    Teoman, U.; Polat, G.; Sandvol, E. A.; Turkelli, N.; Kahraman, M.; Özacar, A.; Beck, S. L.; Delph, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    With the primary objective of investigating the upper mantle anisotropy beneath central Anatolia-Turkey, we have performed shear wave splitting analysis and calculated the fast polarization directions and time-delays benefiting from teleseismic earthquakes recorded by a dense temporary seismic network consisting of 65 broadband sensors that were deployed in early May 2013 and operated for two years as a part of CD-CAT project (Continental Dynamics Central Anatolian Tectonics, funded by NSF with instruments supplied by PASSCAL depository). To further enhance the station coverage in the region, we also included data from 45 permanent broadband stations of Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI). During the analysis, we have used the SplitLab software to determine splitting parameters of the records from only SKS and SKKS phases. Our initial results were derived from teleseismic earthquakes (with magnitudes greater than 5.8) that occurred within the time period from May-2013 to 2014. The average fast polarization directions obtained from stations located in the vicinity of the East Anatolia Fault Zone are well aligned with the fault trend indicating NE-SW orientations. Furthermore, we did not observe significant variations in the polarization directions and the delay times along the fault zone. Stations deployed in the vicinity of Central Anatolian fault zone exhibit N-S fast directions in good agreement with the fault trend. The average delay time for the whole study area is slightly higher than 1 second. Rapid spatial variations in splitting parameters are observed only in Adana region and the surrounding area. This probably suggests that the contribution of crustal anisotropy to mantle anisotropy is quite high. This observation is also consistent with the known tectonic structure of this region, which is presumably related to fabrics within deep crustal rocks preserving a record of deformation. This point should also need to be supported with

  14. Shear-wave elastography contributes to accurate tumour size estimation when assessing small breast cancers

    Aim: To assess whether the size of peritumoural stiffness (PTS) on shear-wave elastography (SWE) for small primary breast cancers (≤15 mm) was associated with size discrepancies between grey-scale ultrasound (GSUS) and final histological size and whether the addition of PTS size to GSUS size might result in more accurate tumour size estimation when compared to final histological size. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis of 86 consecutive patients between August 2011 and February 2013 who underwent breast-conserving surgery for tumours of size ≤15 mm at ultrasound was carried out. The size of PTS stiffness was compared to mean GSUS size, mean histological size, and the extent of size discrepancy between GSUS and histology. PTS size and GSUS were combined and compared to the final histological size. Results: PTS of >3 mm was associated with a larger mean final histological size (16 versus 11.3 mm, p < 0.001). PTS size of >3 mm was associated with a higher frequency of underestimation of final histological size by GSUS of >5 mm (63% versus 18%, p < 0.001). The combination of PTS and GSUS size led to accurate estimation of the final histological size (p = 0.03). The size of PTS was not associated with margin involvement (p = 0.27). Conclusion: PTS extending beyond 3 mm from the grey-scale abnormality is significantly associated with underestimation of tumour size of >5 mm for small invasive breast cancers. Taking into account the size of PTS also led to accurate estimation of the final histological size. Further studies are required to assess the relationship of the extent of SWE stiffness and margin status. - Highlights: • Peritumoural stiffness of greater than 3 mm was associated with larger tumour size. • Underestimation of tumour size by ultrasound was associated with peri-tumoural stiffness size. • Combining peri-tumoural stiffness size to ultrasound produced accurate tumour size estimation

  15. Effects of finite electron mean free path on the attenuation, electromagnetic generation, and detection of ultrasonic shear waves in superconductors

    Use of the general many-body formalism allows us to derive a system of equations describing the propagation of electromagnetic shear waves coupled to ultrasonic shear waves in normal and superconducting metals with arbitrary electron mean free paths. From this system of equations we derive general expressions in terms of correlation functions for the attenuation coefficient as well as for the generation and detection (radiation) efficiency of ultrasonic shear waves, assuming specular reflection. It is shown that, for arbitrary mean free path, generation and radiation efficiency are equal. Furthermore, they are related in a simple way to the residual surface resistance caused by ultrasound generation. In order to incorporate the frictional force between electrons and lattice, a reactive part of which remains finite even at T=0, one has to introduce the current-stress tensor correlation function. The calculation of this correlation function for an impure BCS superconductor is more complicated than the calculation of the conductivity from the current-current correlation function. If suitable normalized, electromagnetic contribution to the attenuation coefficient depends on mean free path only through the conductivity. For sufficiently short mean free path the generation and radiation efficiency in a superconductor can become equal to and even larger than the efficiency in the normal metal because the frictional force, which opposes the electromagnetic field driving the ions, is less effective in the superconducting than in the normal state. It is shown that the interpretation of experiments on the radiation efficiency in superconducting tin has to be modified when the finite electron mean free path is taken into account. Agreement between theory and experiment can still be achieved by a suitable choice of the Fermi velocity and the mean free path. The London penetration depth calculated from this Fermi velocity turns out to be smaller than generally accepted values

  16. Shear wave splitting, vP/vS, and GPS during a time of enhanced activity at Aso caldera, Kyushu

    Unglert, K.; Savage, M. K.; Fournier, N.; Ohkura, T.; Abe, Y.

    2011-11-01

    We performed shear wave splitting analyses and calculated vP/vS-ratios on local earthquakes recorded at seven stations around Aso volcano, Japan, between 2001 and 2008. The mean vP/vS of 1.61 ± 0.01 from all stations is among the lowest average values found anywhere in the world. A temporal change of shear wave splitting fast polarization is observed at one station. Additionally, spatial variations of shear wave splitting delay times and vP/vS-ratios show a correlation at three stations. We suggest that stress-controlled anisotropy dominates at these stations. GPS baselines and 2D strain reveal extension in the caldera in 2003, and compression before and after 2003. Strain shortening axes indicate either a variation in regional stress or a local stress source that overprints the regional field in 2003. Baseline changes correlate with periods of increased low frequency seismic activity located deeper than 15 km. Compaction and degassing of a previously reported sill at approximately 15 km depth could lead to constantly high pressure of volcanic gases over a wide area and explain the generally low vP/vS-ratios and the observed compression in the caldera. We propose that a small volume of magma intruded into the sill in 2003, caused extension at the surface, and triggered ash eruptions between 2003 and 2005. Associated localized migration of gases in overpressured cracks with aspect ratios potentially ˜0.5 in the upper crust with porosities ≥0.1 could be the source of changes in seismic anisotropy, and explain the slight variations observed in vP/vS.

  17. Short Term Changes in Shear Wave Splitting at Sierra Negra Volcano, 2010: Possible Indicator of a Magmatic Intrusion

    Anzieta, J. C.; Ruiz, M. C.; Ebinger, C. J.; Geist, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Sierra Negra volcano, Galapagos, is a basaltic shield volcano with the largest caldera (7x10 km) in the islands. Frequent eruptions have been dated, with a time interval between them typically in the order of decades (7 were confirmed in the last century), the last one occurred in 2005. We present new results from a shear wave splitting study performed at Sierra Negra volcano using nearly two years (Aug 2009-Jun 2011) of data obtained from SIGNET (Sierra Negra Integrated Geophysical Network) project. Changes in fast shear wave polarity are detected during the period of 4-10 June 2010, which are interpreted as the result of a crustal (6-10 km) magmatic intrusion event. The goal of this study was to determine the state of crustal stress at and around Sierra Negra in order to establish how different possible stress sources (i.e. the Galapagos spreading center, the Nazca plate movement along the insular platform, the loads of Sierra Negra and its interaction with nearby active volcanoes) are controlling volcanism within the region, as well as to test the method as a potential tool for detecting and forecasting changes in eruptive activity. Shear wave splitting (SWS) is an indicator of seismic anisotropy and is expected in volcanic regions as explained by extensive-dilatancy anisotropy (EDA) theory. Thus, we selected the SWS method to identify the local and regional state of stress. In stations far from the caldera two regional main stress directions are determined, oriented N-S or E-W, which may be associated with either the influence of the Galapagos spreading center or to the Nazca plate movement respectively. SWS results around the caldera were stable and agreed with radial or circumferential fissure strikes. During the 4-10 June 2010 however, daily seismic event rates increased reaching average monthly event numbers in just a few days. The majority of these events were located in the southeastern part of Sierra Negra's edifice. In this period the polarization

  18. Travelling-Wave Similarity Solutions for an Unsteady Shear-Stress-Driven Dry Patch in a Flowing Film

    We investigate unsteady flow of a thin film of Newtonian fluid around a symmetric slender dry patch moving with constant velocity on an inclined planar substrate, the flow being driven by a prescribed constant shear stress at the free surface of the film (which would be of uniform thickness in the absence of the dry patch). We obtain a novel unsteady travelling-wave similarity solution which predicts that the dry patch has a parabolic shape and that the film thickness increases monotonically away from the dry patch. (author)

  19. Drift-wave spectra obtained from the theory of nonlinear ion-Landau damping in sheared magnetic field

    The local character, in poloidal mode-number space, of the resonant nonlinear interaction of drift waves with ions in a sheared magnetic field permits an analytical determination of the spectrum. Important processes underlying the stabilization are energy cascade and transfer, respectively, in ''close'' (k'/sub Theta/approx. =k/sub Theta/) and ''distant'' (k'/sub Theta/a/sub s/approx. =1/k/sub Theta/a/sub s/) interactions. The spectral index n = 4 of the high-mode-number tail is independent of the excitation mechanism

  20. The dynamic behavior of two collinear cracks in magneto-electro-elastic composites under harmonic anti-plane shear waves

    SUN Yu-guo; WU Lin-zhi

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of two collinear cracks in magneto-electro-elastic composites under harmonic anti-plane shear waves is studied using the Schmidt method for the permeable crack surface conditions. By using the Fourier transform, the problem can be solved with a set of triple integral equations in which the unknown variable is the jump of the displacements across the crack surfaces. In solving the triple integral equations, the jump of the displacements across the crack surface is expanded in a series of Jacobi polynomials. It can be obtained that the stress field is independent of the electric field and the magnetic flux.

  1. Preliminary Results of Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity Models and Seismic Site Conditions in Gangneung, Korea Using Rayleigh-Wave Dispersion Curves

    Ali, A.; Kim, K. Y.

    2014-12-01

    To determine the near-surface shear wave velocities (Vs) and seismic site characteristics in densely populated areas in Gangneung on the eastern coast of Korea, passive and active surface waves were recorded at 117 sites of low altitude using twelve or twenty four 4.5-Hz geophones and a 24-channel engineering seismograph during this year. An 8-kg wooden hammer was used as an active source. The seismic waves were recorded for 8 to 30 s and digitized at 125 to 500 Hz sample rates. Dispersion images of the Rayleigh waves were obtained by the extended spatial autocorrelation (ESPAC) method. At 46 recording sites, the overburden layer was too thick to investigate bedrock with this shallow geophysical method. Shear-wave velocity models were derived from the estimated dispersion curves using the damped least-squares inversion scheme. From these 1-D velocity models, estimated mean values of Vs at the top of bedrock, depth to the bedrock, average Vs of the overburden layer, and average Vs of the top 30-m depth (Vs30) are 672±37 m/s, 17±0.5 m, 253±9 m/s, and 343±15 m/s, respectively, in the 95% confidence range. The estimated values from the inverted profiles were interpolated to yield maps for the entire low altitude area. Most of the investigated areas in Gangneung belong to NEHRP site class D (58%), C (34%), E (4%), and B (4%). In downtown area, both the lower estimates of Vs30 and thick overburden layer make it more prone to significant ground amplifications. The computed correlation coefficients (r) of Vs30 with elevation and topographic gradient, on linear scales, are 0.7 and 0.6, respectively.

  2. Regional variation in shear-wave polarization anisotropy of the crust in southwest Japan as estimated by splitting analysis of Ps-converted waves on receiver functions

    Nagaya, Mamoru; Oda, Hitoshi; Kamimoto, Tetsuro

    2011-07-01

    Regional variation in shear-wave polarization anisotropy of the crust is investigated in the Kyushu, Chugoku, Shikoku and Kinki districts, southwest Japan, using Ps-converted phases generated at the Moho discontinuity. The Ps phases on radial and transverse receiver functions are analyzed to determine shear-wave splitting parameters of fast polarization direction and time lag by waveform cross-correction analysis. As a result, the fast polarization directions are shown to be obviously different between the Chugoku district and the Kyushu and Shikoku districts, which are separated from each other by the Seto Inland Sea. In the Kyushu, Shikoku and south Kinki districts, the Ps phases exhibit fast polarization directions ranging from E-W to NW-SE. The polarization directions are not only consistent with those of S waves from shallow crustal earthquakes but also parallel to the direction of maximum horizontal compression acting on southwest Japan and the strike directions of metamorphic belts, accretionary zones and rift zones. Thus the polarization anisotropy is understood to reflect mainly the upper crustal anisotropy that is attributable to stress-induced vertical cracks and geological lineament structure. On the other hand, in the Chugoku and north Kinki districts, fast polarization directions are in a range from N-S to NE-SW. They are not consistent with the tectonic stress field and the S-wave splitting observed for shallow crustal earthquakes. The disagreement between the fast polarization directions estimated from the S waves and the Ps-converted phases is interpreted as arising because the lower crustal anisotropy attributed to mineral preferred orientation has a significant influence on the Ps-phase splitting. The regional variation in Ps-phase polarization anisotropy of the crust in southwest Japan is dependent on which anisotropy of the upper and lower crust is prominently reflected in the Moho Ps-phase splitting.

  3. Pearson相关系数法快慢横波波场分离%Wave filed separation of fast-slow shear waves by Pearson correlation coefficient method

    王凯; 冯晅; 刘财

    2012-01-01

    横波分裂是各向异性介质的重要特征,当横波或转换波穿过各向异性介质到达地面时,地面三分量检波器的x分量和y分量接收到的地震记录中都会同时存在快横波和慢横波.将快横波和慢横波进行分离,进而计算介质的各向异性参数是多分量数据处理中重要的一步.将数学中的Pearson相关系数引入到多分量地震勘探中,提出了Pearson相关系数法进行旋转角度识别,进而分离快、慢横波波场.相比于传统的互相关法,Pearson相关系数法从精度、抗噪性能和计算效率上都有提高.%Shear-wave splitting is an important characteristic of anisotropic media. Generally, when S or P-SV waves reach to the ground through anisotropic media, the seismic record received by x component and y component of three-component detector contains fast wave and slow wave simultaneously- Separating fast wave and slow wave and then calculating the anisotropic parameters of media are an important step in multi-component data processing. The authors introduce the Pearson correlation coefficients into multi-component seismic exploration and propose the Pearson correlation coefficients to detect the rotation angle and then separate the fast wave and slow wave. Compared with the traditional cross-correlation method, the Pearson correlation coefficient method is better in accuracy, noise immunity and computational efficiency.

  4. On the absence of dissipative instability of negative energy waves in hydrodynamic shear flows

    Chatterjee, S; Joarder, P. S.

    1997-01-01

    Stability criterion for the surface gravity capillary waves in a flowing two-layered fluid system with viscous dissipation is investigated. It is seen that the dissipative instability of negative energy waves is absent,- contrary to what earlier authors have concluded. Their error is identified to arise from an erroneous choice of the dissipation law, in which the wave profile velocity is wrongly equated to the particle velocity. Our corrected dissipation law is also shown to restore Galilean...

  5. A new impulsive seismic shear wave source for near-surface (0-30 m) seismic studies

    Crane, J. M.; Lorenzo, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Estimates of elastic moduli and fluid content in shallow (0-30 m) natural soils below artificial flood containment structures can be particularly useful in levee monitoring as well as seismic hazard studies. Shear wave moduli may be estimated from horizontally polarized, shear wave experiments. However, long profiles (>10 km) with dense receiver and shot spacings (hammer blows to ground-planted stationary targets. Our source is coupled to the ground with steel spikes and the powder charge can be detonated mechanically or electronically. Electrical fuses show repeatability in start times of seismic amplitudes equivalent to three 4-kg sledge-hammer blows. We test this device to elucidate near subsurface sediment properties at former levee breach sites in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Our radio-telemetric seismic acquisition system uses an in-house landstreamer, consisting of 14-Hz horizontal component geophones, coupled to steel plates. Reflected, refracted and surface arrivals resulting from a single shot of this seismic source are comparable in signal, noise, and frequency composition to three stacked hammer blows to a ground-planted stationary target.

  6. Measurement of intrinsic and scattering attenuation of shear waves in two sedimentary basins and comparison to crystalline sites in Germany

    Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    We developed an improved method for the separation of intrinsic and scattering attenuation of seismic shear waves by envelope inversion called Qopen. The method optimizes the fit between Green's functions for the acoustic, isotropic radiative transfer theory and observed energy densities of earthquakes. The inversion allows the determination of scattering and intrinsic attenuation, site corrections and spectral source energies for the investigated frequency bands. Source displacement spectrum and the seismic moment of the analysed events can be estimated from the obtained spectral source energies. We report intrinsic and scattering attenuation coefficients of shear waves near three geothermal reservoirs in Germany for frequencies between 1 and 70 Hz. The geothermal reservoirs are located in Insheim, Landau (both Upper Rhine Graben) and Unterhaching (Molasse basin). We compare these three sedimentary sites to two sites located in crystalline rock with respect to scattering and intrinsic attenuation. The inverse quality factor for intrinsic attenuation is constant in sediments for frequencies smaller than 10 Hz and decreasing for higher frequencies. For crystalline rock, it is on a lower level and strictly monotonic decreasing with frequency. Intrinsic attenuation dominates scattering except for the Upper Rhine Graben, where scattering is dominant for frequencies below 10 Hz. Observed source displacement spectra show a high-frequency fall-off greater than or equal to 3.

  7. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    C. Krafft

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  8. Shear wave velocity profile estimation by integrated analysis of active and passive seismic data from small aperture arrays

    Lontsi, A. M.; Ohrnberger, M.; Krüger, F.

    2016-07-01

    We present an integrated approach for deriving the 1D shear wave velocity (Vs) information at few tens to hundreds of meters down to the first strong impedance contrast in typical sedimentary environments. We use multiple small aperture seismic arrays in 1D and 2D configuration to record active and passive seismic surface wave data at two selected geotechnical sites in Germany (Horstwalde & Löbnitz). Standard methods for data processing include the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method that exploits the high frequency content in the active data and the sliding window frequency-wavenumber (f-k) as well as the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) methods that exploit the low frequency content in passive seismic data. Applied individually, each of the passive methods might be influenced by any source directivity in the noise wavefield. The advantages of active shot data (known source location) and passive microtremor (low frequency content) recording may be combined using a correlation based approach applied to the passive data in the so called Interferometric Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (IMASW). In this study, we apply those methods to jointly determine and interpret the dispersion characteristics of surface waves recorded at Horstwalde and Löbnitz. The reliability of the dispersion curves is controlled by applying strict limits on the interpretable range of wavelengths in the analysis and further avoiding potentially biased phase velocity estimates from the passive f-k method by comparing to those derived from the SPatial AutoCorrelation method (SPAC). From our investigation at these two sites, the joint analysis as proposed allows mode extraction in a wide frequency range (~ 0.6-35 Hz at Horstwalde and ~ 1.5-25 Hz at Löbnitz) and consequently improves the Vs profile inversion. To obtain the shear wave velocity profiles, we make use of a global inversion approach based on the neighborhood algorithm to invert the interpreted branches of the

  9. Acoustic and electrical logging for evaluation of resistivity and shear and compressional wave velocities of foundation of Kakrapar Nuclear Power Plant

    The construction of unit 3 and 4 of Kakrapar Atomic Power Plant (KAPP) was proposed on the Deccan traps of Cretaceous age, comprising of mostly amygdaloidal basalt overlain by about 7-8 m thick silty soil. Electrical resistivity and shear and compressional wave velocity of subsurface formation were required to be assessed in situ for design of foundation of crucial structures like turbo-generator and reactor building of KAPP units 3 and 4. This paper deals with acoustic and electric logging at KAPP for assessing nature of foundation and determination of in-situ shear and compressional wave velocities of subsurface rock. The resistivity and shear and compressional wave velocities thus determined were utilized for design of crucial structures of KAPP. (author)

  10. Comparison of bed shear under non-breaking and breaking solitary waves

    JayaKumar, S.; Baldock, T.E.

    and bores of different amplitudes were generated. The typical wave paddle motion and resultant non-breaking solitary wave profiles generated is presented in Fig.2 whereas the paddle motion and resulting solitary bore profile is shown in Fig.3. For each... the forces generated on subsea infrastructure. Tsunamis are one such potential hazard 1 Research Higher Degree Candidate, School of Civil Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072...

  11. James Clerk Maxwell Prize for Plasma Physics Talk: On Nonlinear Physics of Shear Alfv'en Waves

    Chen, Liu

    2012-10-01

    Shear Alfv'en Waves (SAW) are electromagnetic oscillations prevalent in laboratory and nature magnetized plasmas. Due to its anisotropic propagation property, it is well known that the linear wave propagation and dispersiveness of SAW are fundamentally affected by plasma nonuniformities and magnetic field geometries; for example, the existence of continuous spectrum, spectral gaps, and discrete eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas. This talk will discuss the crucial roles that nonuniformity and geometry could also play in the physics of nonlinear SAW interactions. More specifically, the focus will be on the Alfv'enic state and its breaking up by finite compressibility, non-ideal kinetic effects, and geometry. In the case of compressibility, finite ion-Larmor-radius effects are shown to qualitatively and quantitatively modify the three-wave parametric decays via the ion-sound perturbations. In the case of geometry, the spontaneous excitation of zonal structures by toroidal Alfv'en eigenmodes is investigated; demonstrating that, for realistic tokamak geometries, zonal current dominates over zonal flow. [4pt] Present address: Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

  12. Stochastic ion heating by an electrostatic wave in a sheared magnetic field

    The hot ion tail in the ion velocity distribution observed in lower-hybrid heating experiments has motivated lately a considerable amount of research interest in the mechanism responsible for its formation. Special attention was given to the possibility that stochastic acceleration of ions due to electrostatic waves propagating in the plasma may play an important role in this unexpected and unwanted strong heating of a selective part of the ion population. Considering r.f. electrostatic waves propagating in the plasma perpendicularly to the homogeneous magnetic field, Fukuyama et al., and Karney and Bers have demonstrated the possibility of stochastic ion heating due to nonlinear resonances between the motion in the electrostatic wave and cyclotron oscillations

  13. Transient and 2-Dimensional Shear-Wave Elastography Provide Comparable Assessment of Alcoholic Liver Fibrosis and Cirrhosis

    Thiele, Maja; Detlefsen, Sönke; Møller, Linda Maria Sevelsted;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Alcohol abuse causes half of all deaths from cirrhosis in the West, but few tools are available for noninvasive diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease. We evaluated 2 elastography techniques for diagnosis of alcoholic fibrosis and cirrhosis; liver biopsy with Ishak score and...... biopsy after an overnight fast. RESULTS: Transient elastography and 2-dimensional shear wave elastography identified subjects in each group with significant fibrosis (Ishak score ≥3) and cirrhosis (Ishak score ≥5) with high accuracy (area under the curve ≥0.92). There was no difference in diagnostic...... predictive value for cirrhosis was >66% in the high-risk group vs approximately 50% in the low-risk group. Evidence of alcohol-induced damage to cholangiocytes, but not ongoing alcohol abuse, affected liver stiffness. The collagen-proportionate area correlated with Ishak grades and accurately identified...

  14. Double layer anisotropy beneath the New Madrid seismic zone and adjacent areas: insights from teleseismic shear wave splitting

    Moikwathai Dax Moidaki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A total of 93 well-defined PKS, 54 SKKS, and 126 SKS shear-wave splitting parameters are determined at 25 broadband seismic stations in an approximately 1000 by 1000 km2 area centered at the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ in order to test the existence of two anisotropic layers and to map the direction and strength of mantle fabrics. The individual splitting parameters suggest a significant and systematic spatial and azimuthal variation in the splitting parameters. The azimuthal variations at most stations can be explained as the results of present SW ward asthenospheric flow and NNE trending lithospheric fabrics formed during past orogenic events. In the NMSZ, rift-parallel fast directions (potentially related to a long-rift flow and rift-orthogonal fast directions from small-scale mantle convection are not observed. In addition, reduction in splitting times as a result of vertical asthenospheric flow is not observed.

  15. Seismic response due to travelling shear wave including soil-structure interaction with base-mat uplift

    The seismic response due to a travelling shear wave is investigated. The resulting input consists of a translational- and a torsional-acceleration time history. The combined result of the translational and torsional elastic response (the latter arises even in an axisymmetric structure) will not, in general, be larger than that encountered in the case of a spatially uniform earthquake. If the footing slips or becomes partially separated from the soil, a nonlinear dynamic analysis is performed. Substantial motions in all three directions will take place. A nuclear-reactor building is used for illustration. The peak structural responses and the floor - response spectra are found to be highly nonlinear for high acceleration input values

  16. Retrieval of Moho-reflected shear wave arrivals from ambient seismic noise

    Zhan, Zhongwen; Ni, Sidao; Helmberger, Don V.; Clayton, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical studies on ambient seismic noise (ASN) predict that complete Green's function between seismic stations can be retrieved from cross correlation. However, only fundamental mode surface waves emerge in most studies involving real data. Here we show that Moho-reflected body wave (SmS) and its multiples can be identified with ASN for station pairs near their critical distances in the short period band (1–5 s). We also show that an uneven distribution of noise sources, such as mining ac...

  17. On the propagation of gravity waves in a hydrostatic, compressible fluid with vertical wind shear

    Wiin-Nielsen, A.

    2011-01-01

    The speed of propagation of the vertical modes of gravity waves is found in a non-rotating hydrostatic and compressible fluid with a vertical variation of mean temperature and wind. The analysis is based on a set of linearized equations, and it is assumed that the basic flow as well as the perturbations are hydrostatic. We are therefore concerned with one of the possible wave-type solutions to the primitive equations as they are being used in studies of the general circulation of the atmosphe...

  18. Precise shear waves absorption measurements by the Elasto-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy method

    Klinkosz, T

    2003-01-01

    The essential feature of the method is the employment of elasto-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (EMRS) for precise measurement of the absorption of transverse elastic waves introduced into a biological sample. Such a measurement can be accomplished by combining the EMRS method with such methods, in which collective dislocations of spins are induced by external physical factors, e.g. variable electric field, strong magnetic field gradient or longitudinal elastic wave. This has been illustrated herein on the example of Electrical Mobility Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (EMMRS).

  19. Generation of intermediately-long sea waves by weakly sheared winds

    Chernyavski, V M; Golbraikh, E; Mond, M

    2010-01-01

    The present work concerns the numeric modeling of the sea-wave instability under the effect of the logarithmic-wind profile at hurricane conditions. Non-linear effects, such as wave breaking, foam production, etc. Powell et al. (2003), Shtemler et al. (2010) are ignored. The central point of the study is the calculation of the wave growth rate, which is proportional to the fractional input energy from the wind to the wave exponentially varied with time. The present modeling demonstrates that the Miles-type model applying Charnock's formula for roughness to the hurricane-wind parameters underestimates the growth rate from 5 to 40 times as compared with the model employing the roughness and friction velocity adopted from experimental data for hurricane winds.1 This occurs due to Charnock's formula fails at large wind speeds. The stability characteristics found on the base of the hurricane-wind experimental parameters are consistent with the other results of the observations. Obtained in the present study a maxi...

  20. Generation of intermediately-long sea waves by weakly sheared winds

    Chernyavski, V M; Golbraikh, E; Mond, M

    2010-01-01

    The present work concerns the numeric modeling of the sea-wave instability under the effect of the logarithmic wind at hurricane conditions (ignoring non-linear effects, such as wave breaking, foam production, etc. Powell et al. (2003)^1, Shtemler et al. (2003)^2. The central point of the study is the calculation of the growth rate, which is proportional to the fractional input energy from the wind to the wave exponentially varied with time. The present modeling demonstrates that the Miles-type model applying Charnock's formula Charnock (1955)^3 for roughness to the hurricane -wind parameters underestimates the growth rate of the wind waves 5-40 times as compared with the model employing the roughness and friction velocity adopted from experimental data for hurricane winds.^1 This occurs due to Charnock's formula fails at large wind speeds. The stability characteristics obtained on the base of the hurricane-wind experimental parameters are self-consistent with the other results of the observations. A maximum ...

  1. On the feasibility of nonlinear assessment of fatigue damage in hardened IN718 specimens based on non-collinear shear wave mixing

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B.; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that various ultrasonic wave mixing techniques can be exploited for assessing the nonlinearity of both intact and damaged materials. It has been reported that one particular type of ultrasonic wave mixing, non-collinear shear wave mixing, is sensitive to the excess nonlinearity caused by plastic deformation and low-cycle fatigue in Al2014-T4 aluminum alloy. In this study we investigated the feasibility of using the same non-collinear shear wave mixing technique to detect plastic deformation and fatigue damage in fully hardened IN718 engine alloy specimens. We implemented numerous technical improvements over the earlier developed non-collinear shear wave mixing system to improve its detection sensitivity and image resolution. In spite of these enhancements, we found that in fully hardened IN718 this technique is sensitive only to plastic deformation and, to a much lesser degree, to highly accelerated low-cycle fatigue, but it is not sensitive to either typical low-cycle fatigue or high-cycle fatigue. These observations highlight a potential deficiency in our current understanding of nonlinear material-wave interaction and suggest that further research is needed to explain why certain classes of dislocation networks remain hidden from this type of inspection.

  2. Study of the dynamic behavior of earthflows through the analysis of shear wave velocity in the landslide's body

    Bertello, Lara

    2015-04-01

    Over the first year of my PhD, I carried out a literature search about earthflows features and dynamics and conducted periodic ReMi-MASW campaigns to assess the temporal variation of shear velocity for several landslides that were recently reactivated. Literature search was conducted to review recent works related to shear wave velocity as an indicator for rheological changes in clay materials (Mainsant et al., 2012). From January to August 2014 I carried out numerous ReMi-MASW surveys to characterize several active earthflows in the Emilia-Romagna Apennines. I did these measures both inside and outside the landslide's bodies, usually during the first ten days after the reactivation. At first, these measures indicate low shear waves velocity inside the landslide and high velocity outside. This is due to the different consistence of the materials, to the different water content and to the void index. Then I repeated the measures over time in the same places on the same landslide, in order to detect the variability of Vs over time in correlations with the landslide's movements. Periodic ReMi-MASW survey were conducted on the following landslides: • The Montevecchio (FC) earthflow was reactivated the 1th of February 2014 (estimated volume of 240.000 m³) and increased the movement's velocity around the 7th of February 2014, after intense precipitations. Analyzing the data collected inside the landslide's body, I observed an increase of Vs over time, due to the decrease of landslide velocity; • The Silla (BO) complex landslide reactivated the 10th of February 2014 (estimated volume of 900.000 m³), and moved downslope with a maximum velocity in the order of several m/hour. Studying the data, it is possible to notice how the Vs increase over time only in the lower portion of the landslide. In fact the upper portion is still active, so the Vs remained unchanged over time. • the Puzzola-Grizzana Morandi (BO) complex landslide. This landslide was reactivated the 10th

  3. Tunnel effect of fractal fault and transient S-wave velocity rupture (TSVR) of in-plane shear fault

    1999-01-01

    Transient S-wave velocity rupture (TSVR) means the velocity of fault rupture propagation is between S-wave velocity βand P-wave velocity α. Its existing in the rupture of in-plane (i.e. strike-slip) fault has been proved, but in 2-dimensional classical model, there are two difficulties in transient S-wave velocity rupture, i.e., initialization difficulty and divergence difficulty in interpreting the realization of TSVR. The initialization difficulty means, when v↑vR (Rayleigh wave velocity), the dynamic stress strength factor K2(t)→+0, and changes from positive into negative in the interval (vR,β). How v transit the forbidden of (vR,β)? The divergence difficulty means K2(t)→+ when v↓. Here we introduce the concept of fractal and tunnel effect that exist everywhere in fault. The structure of all the faults is fractal with multiple cracks. The velocity of fault rupture is differentiate of the length of the fault respect to time, so the rupture velocity is also fractal. The tunnel effect means the dynamic rupture crosses over the interval of the cracks, and the coalescence of the intervals is slower than the propagation of disturbance. Suppose the area of earthquake nucleation is critical or sub-critical propagation everywhere, the arriving of disturbance triggers or accelerates the propagation of cracks tip at once, and the observation system cannot distinguish the front of disturbance and the tip of fracture. Then the speed of disturbance may be identified as fracture velocity, and the phenomenon of TSVR appears, which is an apparent velocity. The real reason of apparent velocity is that the mathematics model of shear rupture is simplified of complex process originally. The dual character of rupture velocity means that the apparent velocity of fault and the real velocity of micro-crack extending, which are different in physics, but are unified in rupture criterion. Introducing the above-mentioned concept to the calculation of K2 (t), the difficulty of

  4. An automatic differentiation-based gradient method for inversion of the shear wave equation in magnetic resonance elastography: specific application in fibrous soft tissues

    Chatelin, Simon; Charpentier, Isabelle; Corbin, Nadège; Meylheuc, Laurence; Vappou, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative and accurate measurement of in vivo mechanical properties using dynamic elastography has been the scope of many research efforts over the past two decades. Most of the shear-wave-based inverse approaches for magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) make the assumption of isotropic viscoelasticity. In this paper, we propose a quantitative gradient method for inversion of the shear wave equation in anisotropic media derived from a full waveform description using analytical viscoelastic Green formalism and automatic differentiation. The abilities and performances of the proposed identification method are first evaluated on numerical phantoms calculated in a transversely isotropic medium, and subsequently on experimental MRE data measured on an isotropic hydrogel phantom, on an anisotropic cryogel phantom and on an ex vivo fibrous muscle. The experiments are carried out by coupling circular shear wave profiles generated by acoustic radiation force and MRE acquisition of the wave front. Shear modulus values obtained by our MRE method are compared to those obtained by rheometry in the isotropic hydrogel phantom, and are found to be in good agreement despite non-overlapping frequency ranges. Both the cryogel and the ex vivo muscle are found to be anisotropic. Stiffness values in the longitudinal direction are found to be 1.8 times and 1.9 times higher than those in the transverse direction for the cryogel and the muscle, respectively. The proposed method shows great perspectives and substantial benefits for the in vivo quantitative investigation of complex mechanical properties in fibrous soft tissues.

  5. Source study of local coalfield events using the modal synthesis of shear and surface waves

    MacBeth, C.D.; Redmayne, D.W.

    1989-10-01

    Results from the BGS LOWNET array from the Midlothian coalfield in Scotland have been studied. Vertical component seismograms have been analysed using a waveform matching technique based on the modal summation method for constructing synthetic seismograms. Results of the analysis are applied to S and surface wave portions of the seismogram. Effects of different earth structures, source depths, source orientation, and type of event, rockburst or triggered earthquake 2-3 km from the mine workings, can be evaluated.

  6. Topographically forced long waves on a sheared coastal current. Part 1. The weakly nonlinear response

    Clarke, S. R.; Johnson, E. R.

    1997-01-01

    The flow of a constant-vorticity current past coastal topography is investigated in the long-wave weakly nonlinear limit. In contrast to other near-critical weakly nonlinear systems this problem does not exhibit hydraulically controlled solutions. It is shown that near criticality the evolution of the vorticity interface is governed by a forced BDA (Benjamin-Davis-Acrivos) equation. The solutions of this equation are discussed and two distinct near-critical flow regimes are identified. Owing ...

  7. Inversion of surface wave data for subsurface shear wave velocity profiles characterized by a thick buried low-velocity layer

    Farrugia, Daniela; Paolucci, Enrico; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2016-08-01

    The islands composing the Maltese archipelago (Central Mediterranean) are characterized by a four-layer sequence of limestones and clays. A common feature found in the western half of the archipelago is Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) plateaus and hillcaps covering a soft Blue Clay (BC) layer which can be up to 75 m thick. The BC layer introduces a velocity inversion in the stratigraphy, implying that the VS30 (traveltime average sear wave velocity (VS) in the upper 30 m) parameter is not always suitable for seismic microzonation purposes. Such a layer may produce amplification effects, however might not be included in the VS30 calculations. In this investigation, VS profiles at seven sites characterized by such a lithological sequence are obtained by a joint inversion of the single-station Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratios (H/V or HVSR) and effective dispersion curves from array measurements analysed using the Extended Spatial Auto-Correlation technique. The lithological sequence gives rise to a ubiquitous H/V peak between 1 and 2 Hz. All the effective dispersion curves obtained exhibit a `normal' dispersive trend at low frequencies, followed by an inverse dispersive trend at higher frequencies. This shape is tentatively explained in terms of the presence of higher mode Rayleigh waves, which are commonly present in such scenarios. Comparisons made with the results obtained at the only site in Malta where the BC is missing below the UCL suggest that the characteristics observed at the other seven sites are due to the presence of the soft layer. The final profiles reveal a variation in the VS of the clay layer with respect to the depth of burial and some regional variations in the UCL layer. This study presents a step towards a holistic seismic risk assessment that includes the implications on the site effects induced by the buried clay layer. Such assessments have not yet been done for Malta.

  8. Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography for Liver Disease. A Critical Appraisal of the Many Actors on the Stage.

    Piscaglia, F; Salvatore, V; Mulazzani, L; Cantisani, V; Schiavone, C

    2016-02-01

    In the last 12 - 18 months nearly all ultrasound manufacturers have arrived to implement ultrasound shear wave elastography modality in their equipment for the assessment of chronic liver disease; the few remaining players are expected to follow in 2016.When all manufacturers rush to a new technology at the same time, it is evident that the clinical demand for this information is of utmost value. Around 1990, there was similar demand for color Doppler ultrasound; high demand for contrast-enhanced ultrasonography was evident at the beginning of this century, and around 2010 demand increased for strain elastography. However, some issues regarding the new shear wave ultrasound technologies must be noted to avoid misuse of the resulting information for clinical decisions. As new articles are expected to appear in 2016 reporting the findings of the new technologies from various companies, we felt that the beginning of this year was the right time to present an appraisal of these issues. We likewise expect that in the meantime EFSUMB will release a new update of the existing guidelines 1 2.The first ultrasound elastography method became available 13 years ago in the form of transient elastography with Fibroscan(®) 3. It was the first technique providing non-invasive quantitive information about the stiffness of the liver and hence regarding the amount of fibrosis in chronic liver disease 3. The innovation was enormous, since a non-invasive modality was finally available to provide findings otherwise achievable only by liver biopsy. In fact, prior to ultrasound elastography, a combination of conventional and Doppler ultrasound parameters were utilized to inform the physician about the presence of cirrhosis and portal hypertension 4. However, skilled operators were required, reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy were suboptimal, and it was not possible to differentiate the pre-cirrhotic stages of fibrosis. All these limitations were substantially improved by

  9. Comparison of ultrasound B-mode, strain imaging, acoustic radiation force impulse displacement and shear wave velocity imaging using real time clinical breast images

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2016-04-01

    It has been observed that many pathological process increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. In order to image tissue stiffness using ultrasound, a mechanical compression is applied to tissues of interest and local tissue deformation is measured. Based on the mechanical excitation, ultrasound stiffness imaging methods are classified as compression or strain imaging which is based on external compression and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging which is based on force generated by focused ultrasound. When ultrasound is focused on tissue, shear wave is generated in lateral direction and shear wave velocity is proportional to stiffness of tissues. The work presented in this paper investigates strain elastography and ARFI imaging in clinical cancer diagnostics using real time patient data. Ultrasound B-mode imaging, strain imaging, ARFI displacement and ARFI shear wave velocity imaging were conducted on 50 patients (31 Benign and 23 malignant categories) using Siemens S2000 machine. True modulus contrast values were calculated from the measured shear wave velocities. For ultrasound B-mode, ARFI displacement imaging and strain imaging, observed image contrast and Contrast to Noise Ratio were calculated for benign and malignant cancers. Observed contrast values were compared based on the true modulus contrast values calculated from shear wave velocity imaging. In addition to that, student unpaired t-test was conducted for all the four techniques and box plots are presented. Results show that, strain imaging is better for malignant cancers whereas ARFI imaging is superior than strain imaging and B-mode for benign lesions representations.

  10. Compressional and Shear Wave Structure of the Upper Crust Beneath the Endeavour Segment, Juan De Fuca Ridge

    Kim, E.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Weekly, R. T.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We present tomographic images of the compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocity structure of the upper crust beneath the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This ridge segment is bounded by the Endeavour and Cobb overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) to the north and south, respectively. Near the segment center an axial magma chamber (AMC) reflector underlies 5 hydrothermal vent fields. Our analysis uses data from the Endeavour tomography (ETOMO) experiment. A prior study of the Vp structure indicates that the shallow crust of the Endeavour segment is strongly heterogeneous [Weekly et al., 2014]. Beneath the OSCs Vp is anomalously low, indicating tectonic fracturing. Near the segment center, upper crustal Vp is relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields, likely due to infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed immediately above the AMC, reflecting increased fracturing or higher temperatures. Anisotropic tomography reveals large amplitude ridge-parallel seismic anisotropy on-axis (>10%), but decreases in the off-axis direction over 5-10 km. Here we use crustal S-wave phases (Sg) — generated by P-to-S conversions near the seafloor — to better constrain crustal properties. Over half the OBSs in the ETOMO experiment recorded horizontal data on two channels that are of sufficiently high quality that we can orient the geophones using the polarizations of water waves from shots within 12 km. For these OBSs, crustal Sg phases are commonly visible out to ranges of ~20-25 km. We invert the Sg data separately for Vs structure, and also jointly invert Pg and Sg data to constrain the Vp/Vs ratio. Preliminary inversions indicate that Vs and Vp/Vs varies both laterally and vertically. These results imply strong lateral variations in both the physical (e.g., crack density and aspect ratio) and chemical (e.g., hydration) properties of oceanic crust.

  11. Shear Bloch waves and coupled phonon-polariton in periodic piezoelectric waveguides.

    Piliposyan, D G; Ghazaryan, K B; Piliposian, G T

    2014-02-01

    Coupled electro-elastic SH waves propagating in a periodic piezoelectric finite-width waveguide are considered in the framework of the full system of Maxwell's electrodynamic equations. We investigate Bloch-Floquet waves under homogeneous or alternating boundary conditions for the elastic and electromagnetic fields along the guide walls. Zero frequency stop bands, trapped modes as well as some anomalous features due to piezoelectricity are identified. For mixed boundary conditions, by modulating the ratio of the length of the unit cell to the width of the waveguide, the minimum widths of the stop bands can be moved to the middle of the Brillouin zone. The dispersion equation has been investigated also for phonon-polariton band gaps. It is shown that for waveguides at acoustic frequencies, acousto-optic coupling gives rise to polariton behavior at wavelengths much larger than the length of the unit cell but at optical frequencies polariton resonance occurs at wavelengths comparable with the period of the waveguide. PMID:24139302

  12. Interaction of Water Waves and a Submerged Parabolic Obstacle in the Presence of a Following Uniform/Shear Current Using RANS Model

    Yen-Lung Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper simulates regular waves propagating over a submerged parabolic obstacle in the presence of a uniform/shear current using a two-dimensional numerical model, named COBRAS (Cornell Breaking and Structure. The numerical model solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations and the free surface deformation is tracked using the volume of fluid method (VOF. The capability of the numerical model to simulate regular waves with a uniform or shear current over a constant water depth is first validated with available analytical solutions and experimental data. Comparisons among the experimental data, analytical solutions, and present numerical results show good agreements. Then, regular waves propagating over a submerged parabolic obstacle with a following current are investigated. Detailed discussions including those on the velocity and vorticity fields and the relation between free surface and vorticity are given.

  13. Shear velocity model for the westernmost Mediterranean from ambient noise and ballistic finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography

    Palomeras, I.; Villasenor, A.; Thurner, S.; Levander, A.; Gallart, J.; Harnafi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The westernmost Mediterranean comprises the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco, separated by the Alboran Sea and the Algerian Basin. From north to south this region consists of the Pyrenees, resulting from Iberia-Eurasia collision; the Iberian Massif, which has been undeformed since the end of the Paleozoic; the Central System and Iberian Chain, regions with intracontinental Oligocene-Miocene deformation; the Gibraltar Arc (Betics, Rif and Alboran terranes), resulting from post-Oligocene subduction roll-back; and the Atlas Mountains. We analyzed data from recent broad-band array deployments and permanent stations in the area (IberArray and Siberia arrays, the PICASSO array, the University of Munster array, and the Spanish, Portuguese and Moroccan National Networks) to characterize its lithospheric structure. The combined array of 350 stations has an average interstation spacing of ~60 km. We calculated the Rayleigh waves phase velocities from ambient noise (periods 4 to 40 s) and teleseismic events (periods 20 to 167 s). We inverted the phase velocities to obtain a shear velocity model for the lithosphere to ~200 km depth. Our results correlate well with the surface expression of the main structural units with higher crustal velocity for the Iberian Massif than for the Alpine Iberia and Atlas Mountains. The Gibraltar Arc has lower crustal shear velocities than the regional average at all crustal depths. It also shows an arc shaped anomaly with high upper mantle velocities (>4.6 km/s) at shallow depths (Atlas, the northeastern end of the Betic Mountains and the Late Cenozoic volcanic fields in Iberia and Morocco, indicative of high temperatures at relatively shallow depths, and suggesting that the lithosphere has been removed beneath these areas.

  14. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  15. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  16. Shear-wave elastography and immunohistochemical profiles in invasive breast cancer: Evaluation of maximum and mean elasticity values

    Ganau, Sergi, E-mail: sganau@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Andreu, Francisco Javier, E-mail: xandreu@tauli.cat [Pathology Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Escribano, Fernanda, E-mail: fescribano@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Martín, Amaya, E-mail: amartino@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Tortajada, Lidia, E-mail: ltortajada@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Villajos, Maite, E-mail: mvillajos@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Shear wave elastography provides a quantitative assessment of the hardness of breast lesions. •The hardness of breast lesions correlates with lesion size: larger lesions are harder than smaller ones. •Histologic type and grade do not correlate clearly with elastography parameters. •HER2, luminal B HER2+, and triple-negative tumors have lower maximum hardness and mean hardness than other tumor types. •Half the tumors classified as BI-RADS 3 were luminal A and half were HER2. -- Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the correlations of maximum stiffness (Emax) and mean stiffness (Emean) of invasive carcinomas on shear-wave elastography (SWE) with St. Gallen consensus tumor phenotypes. Methods: We used an ultrasound system with SWE capabilities to prospectively study 190 women with 216 histologically confirmed invasive breast cancers. We obtained one elastogram for each lesion. We correlated Emax and Emean with tumor size, histologic type and grade, estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER2 expression, the Ki67 proliferation index, and the five St. Gallen molecular subtypes: luminal A, luminal B without HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2−), luminal B with HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2+), HER2, and triple negative. Results: Lesions larger than 20 mm had significantly higher Emax (148.04 kPa) and Emean (118.32 kPa) (P = 0.005) than smaller lesions. We found no statistically significant correlations between elasticity parameters and histologic type and grade or molecular subtypes, although tumors with HER2 overexpression regardless whether they expressed hormone receptors (luminal B HER2+ and HER2 phenotypes) and triple-negative tumors had lower Emax and Emean than the others. We assessed the B-mode ultrasound findings of the lesions with some of the Emax or Emean values less than or equal to 80 kPa; only four of these had ultrasound findings suggestive of a benign lesion (two with luminal A phenotype and two with HER2 phenotype). Conclusions: We

  17. New process model for the Dead Sea sinkholes at Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan, derived from shear-wave reflection seismics

    Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Polom, Ulrich; Alrshdan, Hussam; Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Sawarieh, Ali; Dahm, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    In October 2013 a shear wave reflection seismic pilot study was carried out at the most destructive sinkhole site in Jordan, close to the village of Ghor Al Haditha at the South-East end of the Dead Sea. The investigation is part of the DEad SEa Research Venue (DESERVE), a virtual institute of the Helmholtz Association, designed as a cross-disciplinary and cooperative international project of the Helmholtz Centers KIT, GFZ, and UFZ, and their partners. Since nearly 30 years - apparently contemporaneous to the rapid decrease of the Dead Sea level - ongoing unknown sinkhole processes in the subsurface continuously compromise farming areas, housings, industrial sites, and infrastructure at the investigation site, resulting in massive destructions. Similar processes are observed also at the western border of the Dead Sea. Although many geophysical studies have been carried out at the site since more than 20 years, the subsurface structure and the process itself is quite unknown until yet. In recent years, a massive salt layer at 40 m depth or more was proposed below alluvial fan deposits, which was the target of this reflection seismic pilot study. We spent 10 days in the field and acquired four shear-wave reflection seismic profiles of 1.8 km total length to yield a high-resolution structural image of the subsurface. The lines cover in NW-SE and NE-SW direction the sinkhole-affected area as close as possible to recent collapse structures. There is no evidence for the hypothesized shallow salt layer, at least not down to 100 m probably up to 200 m depth. Instead, the detected subsurface structures show a complex interlock of alluvial fan deposits and marine sedimentation layers of the Dead Sea between 0-200 m depth. Therefore, we propose a new hypothesis for the sinkhole processes in the region: salt-rich marine clay layers are present in the fresh water contact zones inside the alluvial fan, which are destabilized and mobilized by dissolution of the salt contained

  18. Shear-wave elastography and immunohistochemical profiles in invasive breast cancer: Evaluation of maximum and mean elasticity values

    Highlights: •Shear wave elastography provides a quantitative assessment of the hardness of breast lesions. •The hardness of breast lesions correlates with lesion size: larger lesions are harder than smaller ones. •Histologic type and grade do not correlate clearly with elastography parameters. •HER2, luminal B HER2+, and triple-negative tumors have lower maximum hardness and mean hardness than other tumor types. •Half the tumors classified as BI-RADS 3 were luminal A and half were HER2. -- Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the correlations of maximum stiffness (Emax) and mean stiffness (Emean) of invasive carcinomas on shear-wave elastography (SWE) with St. Gallen consensus tumor phenotypes. Methods: We used an ultrasound system with SWE capabilities to prospectively study 190 women with 216 histologically confirmed invasive breast cancers. We obtained one elastogram for each lesion. We correlated Emax and Emean with tumor size, histologic type and grade, estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER2 expression, the Ki67 proliferation index, and the five St. Gallen molecular subtypes: luminal A, luminal B without HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2−), luminal B with HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2+), HER2, and triple negative. Results: Lesions larger than 20 mm had significantly higher Emax (148.04 kPa) and Emean (118.32 kPa) (P = 0.005) than smaller lesions. We found no statistically significant correlations between elasticity parameters and histologic type and grade or molecular subtypes, although tumors with HER2 overexpression regardless whether they expressed hormone receptors (luminal B HER2+ and HER2 phenotypes) and triple-negative tumors had lower Emax and Emean than the others. We assessed the B-mode ultrasound findings of the lesions with some of the Emax or Emean values less than or equal to 80 kPa; only four of these had ultrasound findings suggestive of a benign lesion (two with luminal A phenotype and two with HER2 phenotype). Conclusions: We

  19. Non-linear 3D Born Shear Wave Tomography in Southeastern Asia

    Cao, A.; Panning, M.; Kim, A.; Romanowicz, B.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a 3D radially anisotropic shear velocity model of the upper mantle in southeastern Asia from the inversion of long period seismic multimode waveforms. Our approach is based on normal mode perturbation theory, specifically, on a recent modification of the Born approximation, which we call "N-Born", and which includes a non-linear term that allows the accurate inclusion of accumulated phase shifts which arise when the wavepath traverses a spatially extended region with a smooth velocity anomaly of constant sign. We apply the N-Born approximation in the forward modeling part and calculate linear 3D Born kernels in the inverse part. Our starting model is a 3D radially anisotropic model which we derived from a large dataset of teleseismic multimode long period waveforms in the period range 60 to 400 s, using a finite-frequency 2D approximation (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). This model covered a larger region of East Asia (longitude 30 to 150 degrees and latitude -10 to 60 degrees), while our N-Born model is restricted to a smaller subregion (longitude 75 to 150 degrees and latitude 0 to 45 degrees) for computational efficiency. In this subregion, our N-Born isotropic and anisotropic models are both parameterized at relatively short wavelengths corresponding to a spherical spline level 6 (~200km). Our N-Born model can fit waveforms as well as the NACT model, with up to ~ 83% variance reduction. While the models agree in general, the N-Born isotropic model shows a stronger fast velocity anomaly beneath the Tibetan plateau in the depth range of 150 km to 250 km, which disappears at greater depth, consistent with other studies. More importantly, the N-Born anisotropic model can recover well the downwelling structure associated with subducted slabs. Beneath the Tibet plateau, radial anisotropy shows VSH>VSV, which is indicative of horizontal rather than vertical flow and may help distinguish between end member models of the tectonics of Tibet.

  20. Shear-wave structure of the Lower-Tagus Valley region from ambient noise tomography

    Silveira, Graça; Matos, Catarina; Dias, Nuno; Custódio, Susana; Morais, Iolanda

    2014-05-01

    The Lower Tagus Valley (LTV), located on Western Portugal, has a record of significant historical and instrumental seismicity. Knowledge of its subsurface structure is invaluable to better assess seismicity, earthquake source processes and associated risks. Ambient noise tomography is an efficient tool to illuminate crustal structure, providing a resolution which mainly depends of network coverage. Since 2006 the permanent Portuguese broadband (BB) seismic network expanded significantly. More recently a temporary dense BB network was deployed in Portugal, filling gaps between permanent stations and providing an excellent opportunity to study the shallow crustal structure beneath the LTV. Dispersion measurements were computed for each station pair using empirical Green's functions generated by cross-correlating one-day-length seismic ambient-noise records. To improve the seismic ambient noise signal extraction we apply a phase cross-correlation method, followed by time-frequency domain phase weighted stack. Group-velocities were inverted to obtain S-wave velocity profiles between station pairs. The models will be compared with models gathered from Ps receiver functions. The results obtained for the LTV will be integrated on a previous larger scale noise tomography performed on the entire Penisula. The models will be compared with models gathered from Ps receiver functions. The results obtained for the crust using both methods are consistent. This work is supported by project AQUAREL (PTDC/CTE-GIX/116819/2010) and a contribution to project QuakeLoc-PT (PTDC/GEO-FIQ/3522/2012).

  1. c-Axis zig-zag ZnO film ultrasonic transducers for designing longitudinal and shear wave resonant frequencies and modes.

    Yanagitani, Takahiko; Morisato, Naoki; Takayanagi, Shinji; Matsukawa, Mami; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2011-05-01

    A method for designing frequencies and modes in ultrasonic transducers above the very-high-frequency (VHF) range is required for ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation and acoustic mass sensors. To obtain the desired longitudinal and shear wave conversion loss characteristics in the transducer, we propose the use of a c-axis zig-zag structure consisting of multilayered c-axis 23° tilted ZnO piezoelectric films. In this structure, every layer has the same thickness, and the c-axis tilt directions in odd and even layers are symmetric with respect to the film surface normal. c-axis zig-zag crystal growth was achieved by using a SiO(2) low-temperature buffer layer. The frequency characteristics of the multilayered transducer were predicted using a transmission line model based on Mason's equivalent circuit. We experimentally demonstrated two types of transducers: those exciting longitudinal and shear waves simultaneously at the same frequency, and those exciting shear waves with suppressed longitudinal waves. PMID:21622061

  2. Staging of Hepatic Fibrosis: Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Elastography and Shear Wave Elastography in the Same Individuals

    To cross-validate liver stiffness (LS) measured on shear wave elastography (SWE) and on magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in the same individuals. We included 94 liver transplantation (LT) recipients and 114 liver donors who underwent either MRE or SWE before surgery or biopsy. We determined the technical success rates and the incidence of unreliable LS measurements (LSM) of SWE and MRE. Among the 69 patients who underwent both MRE and SWE, the median and coefficient of variation (CV) of the LSM from each examination were compared and correlated. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve in both examinations were calculated in order to exclude the presence of hepatic fibrosis (HF). The technical success rates of MRE and SWE were 96.4% and 92.2%, respectively (p = 0.17), and all of the technical failures occurred in LT recipients. SWE showed 13.1% unreliable LSM, whereas MRE showed no such case (p < 0.05). There was moderate correlation in the LSM in both examinations (r = 0.67). SWE showed a significantly larger median LSM and CV than MRE. Both examinations showed similar diagnostic performance for excluding HF (Az; 0.989, 1.000, respectively). MRE and SWE show moderate correlation in their LSMs, although SWE shows higher incidence of unreliable LSMs in cirrhotic liver

  3. Staging of Hepatic Fibrosis: Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Elastography and Shear Wave Elastography in the Same Individuals

    Yoon, Jeong Hee [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Hyun Sik; Yu, Mi Hye; Joo, Ijin; Lee, Eun Sun; Sohn, Ji Young [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Boon [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    To cross-validate liver stiffness (LS) measured on shear wave elastography (SWE) and on magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in the same individuals. We included 94 liver transplantation (LT) recipients and 114 liver donors who underwent either MRE or SWE before surgery or biopsy. We determined the technical success rates and the incidence of unreliable LS measurements (LSM) of SWE and MRE. Among the 69 patients who underwent both MRE and SWE, the median and coefficient of variation (CV) of the LSM from each examination were compared and correlated. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve in both examinations were calculated in order to exclude the presence of hepatic fibrosis (HF). The technical success rates of MRE and SWE were 96.4% and 92.2%, respectively (p = 0.17), and all of the technical failures occurred in LT recipients. SWE showed 13.1% unreliable LSM, whereas MRE showed no such case (p < 0.05). There was moderate correlation in the LSM in both examinations (r = 0.67). SWE showed a significantly larger median LSM and CV than MRE. Both examinations showed similar diagnostic performance for excluding HF (Az; 0.989, 1.000, respectively). MRE and SWE show moderate correlation in their LSMs, although SWE shows higher incidence of unreliable LSMs in cirrhotic liver.

  4. The nonlocal solution of two parallel cracks in functionally graded materials subjected to harmonic anti-plane shear waves

    Jun Liang; Shiping Wu; Shanyi Du

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamic interaction of two parallel cracks in functionally graded materials (FGMs) is investigated by means of the non-local theory. To make the analysis tractable, the shear modulus and the material den-sity are assumed to vary exponentially with the coordinate vertical to the crack. To reduce mathematical difficulties, a one-dimensional non-local kemel is used instead of a two-dimensional one for the dynamic problem to obtain stress fields near the crack tips. By use of the Fourier transform,the problem can be solved with the help of two pairs of dual integral equations, in which the unknown variables are the jumps of displacements across the crack surfaces. To solve the dual integral equations, the jumps of displace-ments across the crack surfaces are expanded in a series of Jacobi polynomials. Unlike the classical elasticity solu-tions, it is found that no stress singularity is present at the crack tips. The non-local elastic solutions yield a finite hoop stress at the crack tips. The present result provides theoret-ical references helpful for evaluating relevant strength and preventing material failure of FGMs with initial cracks. The magnitude of the finite stress field depends on relevant param-eters, such as the crack length, the distance between two parallel cracks, the parameter describing the FGMs, the fre-quency of the incident waves and the lattice parameter of materials.

  5. Hepatic and Splenic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Velocity Elastography in Children with Liver Disease Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    Teresa Cañas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CFLD is the second cause of mortality in these patients. The diagnosis is difficult because none of the available tests are specific enough. Noninvasive elastographic techniques have been proven to be useful to diagnose hepatic fibrosis. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI imaging is an elastography imaging system. The purpose of the work was to study the utility of liver and spleen ARFI Imaging in the detection of CFLD. Method. 72 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF were studied and received ARFI imaging in the liver and in the spleen. SWV values were compared with the values of 60 healthy controls. Results. Comparing the SWV values of CFLD with the control healthy group, values in the right lobe were higher in patients with CFLD. We found a SWV RHL cut-off value to detect CFLD of 1.27 m/s with a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 90.5%. CF patients were found to have higher SWC spleen values than the control group. Conclusions. ARFI shear wave elastography in the right hepatic lobe is a noninvasive technique useful to detect CFLD in our sample of patients. Splenic SWV values are higher in CF patients, without any clinical consequence.

  6. Monitoring Radiofrequency Ablation Using Ultrasound Envelope Statistics and Shear Wave Elastography in the Periablation Period: An In Vitro Feasibility Study.

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wan, Yung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive method for treating tumors. Shear wave elastography (SWE) has been widely applied in evaluating tissue stiffness and final ablation size after RFA. However, the usefulness of periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA remains unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the correlation between periablation SWE imaging and final ablation size. An in vitro porcine liver model was used for experimental validation (n = 36). During RFA with a power of 50 W, SWE images were collected using a clinical ultrasound system. To evaluate the effects of tissue temperature and gas bubbles during RFA, changes in the ablation temperature were recorded, and image echo patterns were measured using B-mode and ultrasound statistical parametric images. After RFA, the gross pathology of each tissue sample was compared with the region of change in the corresponding periablation SWE image. The experimental results showed that the tissue temperature at the ablation site varied between 70°C and 100°C. Hyperechoic regions and changes were observed in the echo amplitude distribution induced by gas bubbles. Under this condition, the confounding effects (including the temperature increase, tissue stiffness increase, and presence of gas bubbles) resulted in artifacts in the periablation SWE images, and the corresponding region correlated with the estimated final ablation size obtained from the gross pathology (r = 0.8). The findings confirm the feasibility of using periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA. PMID:27603012

  7. Feasibility of transient elastography versus real-time two-dimensional shear wave elastography in difficult-to-scan patients

    Staugaard, Benjamin; Christensen, Peer Brehm; Mössner, Belinda;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Transient elastography (TE) is hampered in some patients by failures and unreliable results. We hypothesized that real time two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2D-SWE), the FibroScan XL probe, and repeated TE exams, could be used to obtain reliable liver stiffness......-SWE. RESULTS: The initial TE exam was successful in 93% (1835/1975) of patients. Success rate increased from 89% to 96% when the XL probe became available (OR: 1.07, 95% CI 1.06-1.09). Likewise, re-examining those with a failed or unreliable TE led to a reliable TE in 96% of patients. Combining availability of...... the XL probe with TE re-examination resulted in a 99.5% success rate on a per-patient level. When comparing the feasibility of TE vs. 2D-SWE, 96% (52/54) of patients obtained a reliable TE, while 2D-SWE was reliable in 63% (34/54, p < 0.001). The odds of a successful 2D-SWE exam decreased with higher...

  8. Inversion of surface-wave data for subsurface shear-wave velocity profiles characterised by a thick buried low-velocity layer

    Farrugia, Daniela; Paolucci, Enrico; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2016-05-01

    The islands composing the Maltese archipelago (Central Mediterranean) are characterised by a four-layer sequence of limestones and clays. A common feature found in the western half of the archipelago is Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) plateaus and hillcaps covering a soft Blue Clay (BC) layer which can be up to 75 m thick. The BC layer introduces a velocity inversion in the stratigraphy, implying that the VS30 (travel-time average shear-wave velocity (VS) in the upper 30 m) parameter is not always suitable for seismic microzonation purposes. Such a layer may produce amplification effects, however might not be included in the VS30 calculations. In this investigation, VS profiles at seven sites characterised by such a lithological sequence are obtained by a joint inversion of the single-station Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratios (H/V or HVSR) and effective dispersion curves from array measurements analysed using the Extended Spatial Auto-Correlation (ESAC) technique. The lithological sequence gives rise to a ubiquitous H/V peak between 1 and 2 Hz. All the effective dispersion curves obtained exhibit a `normal' dispersive trend at low frequencies, followed by an inverse dispersive trend at higher frequencies. This shape is tentatively explained in terms of the presence of higher mode Rayleigh waves, which are commonly present in such scenarios. Comparisons made with the results obtained at the only site in Malta where the BC is missing below the UCL suggest that the characteristics observed at the other seven sites are due to the presence of the soft layer. The final profiles reveal a variation in the VS of the clay layer with respect to the depth of burial and some regional variations in the UCL layer. This study presents a step towards a holistic seismic risk assessment that includes the implications on the site effects induced by the buried clay layer. Such assessments have not yet been done for Malta.

  9. Upper mantle shear wave velocity structure beneath northern Victoria Land, Antarctica: Volcanism and uplift in the northern Transantarctic Mountains

    Graw, Jordan H.; Adams, Aubreya N.; Hansen, Samantha E.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Hackworth, Lauren; Park, Yongcheol

    2016-09-01

    The Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) are the largest non-compressional mountain range on Earth, and while a variety of uplift mechanisms have been proposed, the origin of the TAMs is still a matter of great debate. Most previous seismic investigations of the TAMs have focused on a central portion of the mountain range, near Ross Island, providing little along-strike constraint on the upper mantle structure, which is needed to better assess competing uplift models. Using data recorded by the recently deployed Transantarctic Mountains Northern Network, as well as data from the Transantarctic Mountains Seismic Experiment and from five stations operated by the Korea Polar Research Institute, we investigate the upper mantle structure beneath a previously unexplored portion of the mountain range. Rayleigh wave phase velocities are calculated using a two-plane wave approximation and are inverted for shear wave velocity structure. Our model shows a low velocity zone (LVZ; ∼4.24 km s-1) at ∼160 km depth offshore and adjacent to Mt. Melbourne. This LVZ extends inland and vertically upwards, with more lateral coverage above ∼100 km depth beneath the northern TAMs and Victoria Land. A prominent LVZ (∼4.16-4.24 km s-1) also exists at ∼150 km depth beneath Ross Island, which agrees with previous results in the TAMs near the McMurdo Dry Valleys, and relatively slow velocities (∼4.24-4.32 km s-1) along the Terror Rift connect the low velocity anomalies. We propose that the LVZs reflect rift-related decompression melting and provide thermally buoyant support for the TAMs uplift, consistent with proposed flexural models. We also suggest that heating, and hence uplift, along the mountain front is not uniform and that the shallower LVZ beneath northern Victoria Land provides greater thermal support, leading to higher bedrock topography in the northern TAMs. Young (0-15 Ma) volcanic rocks associated with the Hallett and the Erebus Volcanic Provinces are situated directly

  10. Breast Lesions: Quantitative Diagnosis Using Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Liu, Baoxian; Zheng, Yanling; Huang, Guangliang; Lin, Manxia; Shan, Quanyuan; Lu, Ying; Tian, Wenshuo; Xie, Xiaoyan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to estimate the diagnostic performance of shear wave elastography (SWE) in differentiating malignant from benign breast lesions. A literature search of PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus up to November 2014 was conducted. A summary receiver operating characteristic curve was constructed, and pooled weighted estimates of sensitivity and specificity were calculated using a bivariate mixed-effects regression model. Thirty-three studies, which included a total of 5838 lesions (2093 malignant, 3745 benign) from 5397 patients, were finally analyzed. Summary sensitivity and specificity were 0.886 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.858-0.909) and 0.866 (95% CI, 0.833-0.894), respectively. The pooled diagnostic odds ratio was 50.410 (95% CI, 34.972-72.664). And the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of SWE was 0.94 (95% CI, 0.91-0.96). No publication bias existed among these studies (p = 0.245). In the subgroup analysis, sensitivity and specificity were 0.862 (95% CI, 0.811-0.901) and 0.875 (95% CI, 0.793-0.928) among 1552 lesions from 1429 patients in the 12 studies using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and 0.897 (95% CI, 0.863-0.923) and 0.863 (95% CI, 0.831-0.889) among another 4436 lesions from 4097 patients in the 21 studies using supersonic shear imaging. When analysis confined to 9 studies evaluated the diagnostic performance of combination SWE and conventional ultrasound, the area under the curve was 0.96 (95% CI, 0.94-0.97), yielding a sensitivity of 0.971 (95% CI, 0.941-0.986) and specificity of 0.801 (95% CI, 0.733-0.856). SWE seems to be a good quantitative method for differentiating breast lesions, with promise for integration into routine imaging protocols. PMID:26778289

  11. Crack Features and Shear-Wave Splitting Associated with Fracture Extension during Hydraulic Stimulation of the Geothermal Reservoir in Soultz-sous-Forêts

    Adelinet M.; Dorbath C.; Calò M.; Dorbath L.; Le Ravalec M.

    2016-01-01

    The recent tomography results obtained within the scope of the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) European Soultz project led us to revisit the meso-fracturing properties of Soultz test site. In this paper, we develop a novel approach coupling effective medium modeling and shear-wave splitting to characterize the evolution of crack properties throughout the hydraulic stimulation process. The stimulation experiment performed in 2000 consisted of 3 successive injection steps spanning over 6 days....

  12. Crust and upper mantle in Dronning Maud Land/Antarctica retrieved from shear-wave splitting, receiver functions, seismic refraction and 3-D gravity modelling

    Bayer, Bettina; Müller, Christina; Geissler, Wolfram; Eaton, D. W.; Jokat, Wilfried; Eckstaller, Alfons

    2007-01-01

    The crust and upper mantle of Dronning Maud Land (DML), Antarctica, have been investigated using teleseismic data from broadband seismograph stations deployed at temporary and permanent locations and recordings from a seismic refraction experiment. For shear-wave splitting analyses the observed anisotropy can in most cases be related to major tectonic events that formed the geological features of the present-day Antarctic continent. We rule out an anisotropic contribution from recent asthenos...

  13. Downhole Measurements of Shear- and Compression-Wave Velocities in Boreholes C4993, C4996, C4997 and C4998 at the Waste Treatment Plant DOE Hanford Site.

    Redpath, Bruce B.

    2007-04-27

    This report describes the procedures and the results of a series of downhole measurements of shear- and compression-wave velocities performed as part of the Seismic Boreholes Project at the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The measurements were made in several stages from October 2006 through early February 2007. Although some fieldwork was carried out in conjunction with the University of Texas at Austin (UT), all data acquired by UT personnel are reported separately by that organization.

  14. Modulational instability of ultra-low-frequency shear dust Alfvén waves in a plasma medium of positive and negatively charged dust fluids

    The propagation of finite amplitude ultra-low-frequency shear dust Alfvén (SDA) waves, and their modulational instability in a magnetized plasma medium of positive and negatively charged dust fluids have been theoretically investigated by using the reductive perturbation method. The derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived to examine the stability analysis of such SDA waves. It is found that the SDA waves propagating in such an opposite polarity dust plasma medium are modulationally unstable, and that the instability criterion and the growth rate of these unstable SDA waves in such a novel opposite polarity dust plasma medium are found to be significantly different from those in electron–ion or electron–positron plasma media. The implications of the present investigation in different space environments and laboratory devices are briefly discussed.

  15. Modulational instability of ultra-low-frequency shear dust Alfvén waves in a plasma medium of positive and negatively charged dust fluids

    Mamun, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    The propagation of finite amplitude ultra-low-frequency shear dust Alfvén (SDA) waves, and their modulational instability in a magnetized plasma medium of positive and negatively charged dust fluids have been theoretically investigated by using the reductive perturbation method. The derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived to examine the stability analysis of such SDA waves. It is found that the SDA waves propagating in such an opposite polarity dust plasma medium are modulationally unstable, and that the instability criterion and the growth rate of these unstable SDA waves in such a novel opposite polarity dust plasma medium are found to be significantly different from those in electron–ion or electron–positron plasma media. The implications of the present investigation in different space environments and laboratory devices are briefly discussed.

  16. Crack Features and Shear-Wave Splitting Associated with Fracture Extension during Hydraulic Stimulation of the Geothermal Reservoir in Soultz-sous-Forêts

    Adelinet M.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent tomography results obtained within the scope of the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS European Soultz project led us to revisit the meso-fracturing properties of Soultz test site. In this paper, we develop a novel approach coupling effective medium modeling and shear-wave splitting to characterize the evolution of crack properties throughout the hydraulic stimulation process. The stimulation experiment performed in 2000 consisted of 3 successive injection steps spanning over 6 days. An accurate 4-D tomographic image was first carried out based upon the travel-times measured for the induced seismicity [Calò M., Dorbath C., Cornet F.H., Cuenot N. (2011 Large-scale aseismic motion identified through 4-D P-wave tomography, Geophys. J. Int. 186, 1295-1314]. The current study shows how to take advantage of the resulting compressional wave (Calò et al., 2011 and shear-wave velocity models. These are given as input data to an anisotropic effective medium model and converted into crack properties. In short, the effective medium model aims to estimate the impact of cracks on velocities. It refers to a crack-free matrix and 2 families of penny-shaped cracks with orientations in agreement with the main observed geological features: North-South strike and dip of 65°East and 65°West [Genter A., Traineau H. (1996 Analysis of macroscopic fractures in granite in the HDR geothermal well EPS-1, Soultz-sous-Forêts, France, J. Vol. Geoth. Res. 72, 121-141], respectively. The resulting output data are the spatial distributions of crack features (lengths and apertures within the 3-D geological formation. We point out that a flow rate increase results in a crack shortening in the area imaged by both compressional and shear waves, especially in the upper part of the reservoir. Conversely, the crack length, estimated during continuous injection rate phases, is higher than during the increasing injection rate phases. A possible explanation for this is that

  17. Generation of Shear Alfvén Waves by Repetitive High Power Microwave Pulses Near the Electron Plasma Frequency - A laboratory study of a ``Virtual Antenna''

    Wang, Yuhou; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; van Compernolle, Bart; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-11-01

    ELF / ULF waves are important in terrestrial radio communications but difficult to launch using ground-based structures due to their enormous wavelengths. In spite of this generation of such waves by field-aligned ionospheric heating modulation was first demonstrated using the HAARP facility. In the future heaters near the equator will be constructed and laboratory experiments on cross-field wave propagation could be key to the program's success. Here we report a detailed laboratory study conducted on the Large Plasma Device (LaPD) at UCLA. In this experiment, ten rapid pulses of high power microwaves (250 kW X-band) near the plasma frequency were launched transverse to the background field, and were modulated at a variable fraction (0.1-1.0) of fci. Along with bulk electron heating and density modification, the microwave pulses generated a population of fast electrons. The field-aligned current carried by the fast electrons acted as an antenna that radiated shear Alfvén waves. It was demonstrated that a controllable arbitrary frequency (f shear Alfvén wave can be generated by this method. The radiation pattern, frequency variation and power dependence of the virtual antenna is also presented. This work is supported by an AFOSR MURI award, and conducted at the Basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA funded by DoE and NSF.

  18. Amount of gas hydrate estimated from compressional- and shear-wave velocities at the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well

    Lee, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    The amount of in situ gas hydrate concentrated in the sediment pore space at the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well was estimated by using compressional-wave (P-wave) and shear-wave (S-wave) downhole log measurements. A weighted equation developed for relating the amount of gas hydrate concentrated in the pore space of unconsolidated sediments to the increase of seismic velocities was applied to the acoustic logs with porosities derived from the formation density log. A weight of 1.56 (W=1.56) and the exponent of 1 (n=1) provided consistent estimates of gas hydrate concentration from the S-wave and the P-wave logs. Gas hydrate concentration is as much as 80% in the pore spaces, and the average gas hydrate concentration within the gas-hydrate-bearing section from 897 m to 1110 m (excluding zones where there is no gas hydrate) was calculated at 39.0% when using P-wave data and 37.8% when using S-wave data.

  19. Comparisons of polymer/gas partition coefficients calculated from responses of thickness shear mode and surface acoustic wave vapor sensors.

    Grate, J W; Kaganove, S N; Bhethanabotla, V R

    1998-01-01

    Apparent partition coefficients, K, for the sorption of toluene by four different polymer thin films on thickness shear mode (TSM) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices are compared. The polymers examined were poly(isobutylene) (PIB), poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH), poly(butadiene) (PBD), and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Independent data on partition coefficients for toluene in these polymers were compiled for comparison, and TSM sensor measurements were made using both oscillator and impedance analysis methods. K values from SAW sensor measurements were about twice those calculated from TSM sensor measurements when the polymers were PIB and PECH, and they were also at least twice the values of the independent partition coefficient data, which is interpreted as indicating that the SAW sensor responds to polymer modulus changes as well as to mass changes. K values from SAW and TSM measurements were in agreement with each other and with independent data when the polymer was PBD. Similarly, K values from the PDMS-coated SAW sensor were not much larger than values from independent measurements. These results indicate that modulus effects were not contributing to the SAW sensor responses in the cases of PBD and PDMS. However, K values from the PDMS-coated TSM device were larger than the values from the SAW device or independent measurements, and the impedance analyzer results indicated that this sensor using our sample of PDMS at the applied thickness did not behave as a simple mass sensor. Differences in behavior among the test polymers on SAW devices are interpreted in terms of their differing viscoelastic properties. PMID:21644612

  20. An Experimental Study of the Potential Biological Effects Associated with 2-D Shear Wave Elastography on the Neonatal Brain.

    Li, Changtian; Zhang, Changsheng; Li, Junlai; Cao, Xiaolin; Song, Danfei

    2016-07-01

    2-D Shear wave elastography (SWE) imaging is widely used in clinical practice, and some researchers have applied this technique in the evaluation of neonatal brains. However, the immediate and long-term impacts of dynamic radiation force exposure on the neonatal central nervous system remain unknown. In this study, we exposed neonatal mice to 2-D SWE scanning for 10 min, 20 min and 30 min under diagnostic mode (mechanical index [MI]: 1.3; thermal index [TI]: 0.5), respectively. For the control group, the neonatal mice were sham irradiated for 30 min with the machine powered off. Their brains were collected and analyzed using histologic staining and western blot analysis at 24 h and 3 mo after the 2-D SWE scanning. The Morris water maze (MWM) test was used to assess learning and memory function of the mice at 3 mo of age. The results indicated that using 2-D SWE in evaluating brains of neonatal mice does not cause detectable histologic changes, nor does it have long-term effects on their learning and memory abilities. However, the PI3 K/AKT/mTOR pathway was disturbed when the 2-D SWE scanning lasted for more than 30 min, and the expression of p-PKCa was suppressed by 10 min or more in 2-D SWE scanning. Although these injuries may be self-repaired as the mice grow, more attention should be paid to the scanning duration when applying 2-D-SWE elastography in the assessment of neonatal brains. PMID:27112914

  1. Quantified Mechanical Properties of the Deltoid Muscle Using the Shear Wave Elastography: Potential Implications for Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Hatta, Taku; Giambini, Hugo; Sukegawa, Koji; Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Sperling, John W.; Steinmann, Scott P.; Itoi, Eiji; An, Kai-Nan

    2016-01-01

    The deltoid muscle plays a critical role in the biomechanics of shoulders undergoing reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). However, both pre- and postoperative assessment of the deltoid muscle quality still remains challenging. The purposes of this study were to establish a novel methodology of shear wave elastography (SWE) to quantify the mechanical properties of the deltoid muscle, and to investigate the reliability of this technique using cadaveric shoulders for the purpose of RSA. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were obtained. The deltoid muscles were divided into 5 segments (A1, A2, M, P1 and P2) according to the muscle fiber orientation and SWE values were measured for each segment. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). To measure the response of muscle tension during RSA, the humeral shaft was osteotomized and subsequently elongated by an external fixator (intact to 15 mm elongation). SWE of the deltoid muscle was measured under each stretch condition. Intra- and inter-observer reliability of SWE measurements for all regions showed 0.761–0.963 and 0.718–0.947 for ICC(2,1). Especially, SWE measurements for segments A2 and M presented satisfactory repeatability. Elongated deltoid muscles by the external fixator showed a progressive increase in passive stiffness for all muscular segments. Especially, SWE outcomes of segments A2 and M reliably showed an exponential growth upon stretching (R2 = 0.558 and 0.593). Segmental measurements using SWE could be reliably and feasibly used to quantitatively assess the mechanical properties of the deltoid muscle, especially in the anterior and middle portions. This novel technique based on the anatomical features may provide helpful information of the deltoid muscle properties during treatment of RSA. PMID:27152934

  2. Assessment of Liver and Spleen Stiffness in Patients With Myelofibrosis Using FibroScan and Shear Wave Elastography.

    Webb, Muriel; Shibolet, Oren; Halpern, Zamir; Nagar, Meital; Amariglio, Ninette; Levit, Stella; Steinberg, David M; Santo, Erwin; Salomon, Ophira

    2015-09-01

    Liver stiffness and spleen stiffness in patients with myelofibrosis have traditionally been assessed through manual palpation and thus influenced by interobserver variability. In this article, for the first time, liver stiffness and spleen stiffness of patients with myelofibrosis were evaluated through FibroScan and shear wave elastography (SWE). Nine patients with myelofibrosis comprised the study group. They were compared with 11 patients with liver cirrhosis and 8 healthy volunteers. Before the FibroScan study, all patients underwent ultrasound study to delineate the left intercostal space for validated measurements. In patients with myelofibrosis, the mean stiffness of the spleen was 41.3 and 32.9 kilopascals (kPa) through FibroScan and SWE, respectively. The mean stiffness of the liver was 7.8 kPa through FibroScan and 10.4 kPa through SWE. The stiffness of the spleen in patients with cirrhosis was even higher, reaching a mean of 58.5 kPa through FibroScan and 40.5 kPa through SWE. The means were considerably lower among the healthy controls (13.5 and 18.1 kPa, respectively). The correlation between spleen stiffness among the patients with cirrhosis is negative and opposite in direction (r = -0.35) in comparison with the patients with myelofibrosis (r = 0.78). Among the patients with liver cirrhosis and myelofibrosis, spleen size was weakly related to spleen stiffness as assessed through SWE (r = 0.49) but had almost no relation to the FibroScan measure (r = 0.13). The FibroScan and SWE of the spleen have little ability to distinguish between the patients with myelofibrosis and cirrhosis, but they do differentiate both patient groups from the healthy controls. The stiffness of spleen and liver as measured through FibroScan and SWE was not correlated to the longevity of myelofibrosis. PMID:26366688

  3. Comparison of diagnostic value of conventional ultrasonography and shear wave elastography in the prediction of thyroid lesions malignancy.

    Ewelina Szczepanek-Parulska

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Thyroid nodular disease (TND is a very common disorder. However, since the rate of malignancy is reported to be 3-10%, only a minority of patients require aggressive surgical treatment. As a result, there is a need for diagnostic tools which would allow for a reliable differentiation between benign and malignant nodules. Although a number of conventional ultrasonographic (US features are proved to be markers of malignancy, Shear Wave Elastography (SWE is considered to be an improvement of conventional US. The aim of this study was to compare conventional US markers and SWE diagnostic values in the differentiation of benign and malignant thyroid nodules. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients referred for thyroidectomy, irrespective of the indications, underwent a US thyroid examination prospectively. Patients with TND were included into the study. Results of the US and SWE examinations were compared with post-surgical histopathology. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty two patients with 393 thyroid nodules were included into the study. Twenty two patients were diagnosed with cancer. SWE turned out to be a predictor of malignancy superior to any other conventional US markers (OR=54.5 using qualitative scales and 40.8 using quantitative data on maximal stiffness with a threshold of 50 kPa. CONCLUSIONS: Although most conventional US markers of malignancy prove to be significant, none of them are characterized by both high sensitivity and specificity. SWE seems to be an important step forward, allowing for a more reliable distinction of benign and malignant thyroid nodules. Our study, assessing SWE properties on the highest number of thyroid lesions at the time of publication, confirms the high diagnostic value of this technique. It also indicates that a quantitative evaluation of thyroid lesions is not superior to simpler qualitative methods.

  4. Constraints on mantle flow at the Caribbean-South American plate boundary inferred from shear wave splitting

    Growdon, Mark A.; Pavlis, Gary L.; Niu, Fenglin; Vernon, Frank L.; Rendon, Herbert

    2009-02-01

    We measured shear wave splitting from SKS and SKKS data recorded by temporary stations deployed as part of the Broadband Onshore-Offshore Lithospheric Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles Arc Region project and the national seismic network of Venezuela. Approximately 3000 station-event pairs yielded ˜300 with visible SKS and/or SKKS phases. We obtained 63 measurements at 39 of the 82 stations in the network using the method of Silver and Chan (1991) and conventional quality criteria. We combined our results with previous measurements made by Russo et al. (1996). The most prominent feature in the data is an area of large (>2.0 s) lag times with roughly east-west fast axes in northeastern Venezuela. Mineral physics models show split times this large are difficult to explain with horizontal foliation, but are more feasible with anisotropy characterized by a coherent vertical foliation and an east-west fast axis extending over most of the upper 250 km of the mantle. We interpret the large split times in northeastern Venezuela as a consequence of eastward translation of the Atlantic slab, which has left a strong vertical foliation in its wake parallel to the plate boundary. The peak split times correspond closely with the point the slab intersects the base of the anisotropic asthenosphere at 250 km. Away from this area of large split times the measured times fall to more standard values, but an east-west fast axis still predominates. We suggest this is linked to the rapidly varying strain field at the southern edge of the Atlantic which quickly disrupts the coherent strain field that causes the very large split times in northeastern Venezuela.

  5. Role of shear-wave elastography (SWE) in complex cystic and solid breast lesions in comparison with conventional ultrasound

    Lee, Bo Eun; Chung, Jin, E-mail: aqua0724@ewha.ac.kr; Cha, Eun-Suk; Lee, Jee Eun; Kim, Jeoung Hyun

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Complex cystic lesions have a broad spectrum of malignancy rate. • SWE is useful to evaluate cystic breast lesions. • Cutoff value of Emax was 108.5 kPa, for predicting malignancy. • Using this cutoff value, sensitivity of 86.7% and specificity of 97.3%. • SWE could reduce unnecessary biopsies in complex cystic and solid breast lesions. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the additional role of shear-wave elastography (SWE) in differential diagnosis of complex cystic and solid breast lesions. Materials and methods: From January 2013 to November 2013, 140 complex cystic and solid breast lesions from 139 consecutive patients were performed ultrasound and SWE prior to biopsy. BI-RADS ultrasound final assessment and SWE parameters were recorded for each lesion. Histopathologic diagnosis was used as the reference standard. Results: Among the 140 lesions, 30 lesions (21.4%) were malignant. The mean maximum elasticity (Emax) of malignant lesions (184.3 kPa) was significantly higher than that of benign lesions (45.5 kPa) (P < 0.001). Homogeneity of elasticity and color pattern were significantly different from malignancy and benign lesions (P < 0.05). Emax with cutoff value at 108.5 kPa showed Az value of 0.968 (95% CI, 0.932–0.985) with sensitivity of 86.7% and specificity of 97.3%. Using this cutoff value, false-positive rate was 2.7% and false-negative rate was 13.3%. By applying an Emax value of 108.5 kPa or less as a criterion for downgrading BI-RADS category 4a lesions to category 3 lesions, 103/123 (83.7%) lesions could be downgraded to category 3 lesions. Conclusion: Additional use of SWE could reduce unnecessary benign biopsies in complex cystic and solid breast lesions.

  6. Role of shear-wave elastography (SWE) in complex cystic and solid breast lesions in comparison with conventional ultrasound

    Highlights: • Complex cystic lesions have a broad spectrum of malignancy rate. • SWE is useful to evaluate cystic breast lesions. • Cutoff value of Emax was 108.5 kPa, for predicting malignancy. • Using this cutoff value, sensitivity of 86.7% and specificity of 97.3%. • SWE could reduce unnecessary biopsies in complex cystic and solid breast lesions. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the additional role of shear-wave elastography (SWE) in differential diagnosis of complex cystic and solid breast lesions. Materials and methods: From January 2013 to November 2013, 140 complex cystic and solid breast lesions from 139 consecutive patients were performed ultrasound and SWE prior to biopsy. BI-RADS ultrasound final assessment and SWE parameters were recorded for each lesion. Histopathologic diagnosis was used as the reference standard. Results: Among the 140 lesions, 30 lesions (21.4%) were malignant. The mean maximum elasticity (Emax) of malignant lesions (184.3 kPa) was significantly higher than that of benign lesions (45.5 kPa) (P < 0.001). Homogeneity of elasticity and color pattern were significantly different from malignancy and benign lesions (P < 0.05). Emax with cutoff value at 108.5 kPa showed Az value of 0.968 (95% CI, 0.932–0.985) with sensitivity of 86.7% and specificity of 97.3%. Using this cutoff value, false-positive rate was 2.7% and false-negative rate was 13.3%. By applying an Emax value of 108.5 kPa or less as a criterion for downgrading BI-RADS category 4a lesions to category 3 lesions, 103/123 (83.7%) lesions could be downgraded to category 3 lesions. Conclusion: Additional use of SWE could reduce unnecessary benign biopsies in complex cystic and solid breast lesions

  7. Modeling, design, packing and experimental analysis of liquid-phase shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors

    Pollard, Thomas B

    Recent advances in microbiology, computational capabilities, and microelectromechanical-system fabrication techniques permit modeling, design, and fabrication of low-cost, miniature, sensitive and selective liquid-phase sensors and lab-on-a-chip systems. Such devices are expected to replace expensive, time-consuming, and bulky laboratory-based testing equipment. Potential applications for devices include: fluid characterization for material science and industry; chemical analysis in medicine and pharmacology; study of biological processes; food analysis; chemical kinetics analysis; and environmental monitoring. When combined with liquid-phase packaging, sensors based on surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) technology are considered strong candidates. For this reason such devices are focused on in this work; emphasis placed on device modeling and packaging for liquid-phase operation. Regarding modeling, topics considered include mode excitation efficiency of transducers; mode sensitivity based on guiding structure materials/geometries; and use of new piezoelectric materials. On packaging, topics considered include package interfacing with SAW devices, and minimization of packaging effects on device performance. In this work novel numerical models are theoretically developed and implemented to study propagation and transduction characteristics of sensor designs using wave/constitutive equations, Green's functions, and boundary/finite element methods. Using developed simulation tools that consider finite-thickness of all device electrodes, transduction efficiency for SAW transducers with neighboring uniform or periodic guiding electrodes is reported for the first time. Results indicate finite electrode thickness strongly affects efficiency. Using dense electrodes, efficiency is shown to approach 92% and 100% for uniform and periodic electrode guiding, respectively; yielding improved sensor detection limits. A numerical sensitivity analysis is presented targeting viscosity

  8. Low-level vertical wind shear effects on the gravity wave breaking over an isolated two-dimensional orography

    Xu-Wei Bao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Flow regimes of dry, stratified flow passing over an isolated two-dimensional (2-D orography mainly concentrate at two stagnation points. One occurs on the upslope of the orography owing to flow blocking; another is related to gravity wave breaking (GWB over the leeside. Smith (1979 put forward a hypothesis that the occurring of GWB is suppressed when the low-level vertical wind shear (VWS exceeds some value. In the present study, a theoretical solution in a two-layer linear model of orographic flow with a VWS over a bell-shaped 2-D orography is developed to investigate the effect of VWS on GWB's occurring over a range of surface Froude number Fr0=U0/Nh (U0 is surface wind speed, h is orography height and N is stability parameter, over which the GWB occurs first and the upstream flow blocking is excluded. Based on previous simulations and experiments, the range of surface Froude number selected is 0.6 ≤ Fr0≤2.0. Based on this solution, the conditions of surface wind speed (U0 and one-to-one matching critical VWS (Δuc for GWB's occurring are discussed. Over the selected range of Fr0, GWB's occurring will be suppressed if the VWS (Δu is larger than Δuc at given U0. Moreover, there is a maximum value of Δuc over the selected range of Fr0, which is labelled as Δumax, and its matching surface wind speed by U0m. Once the Δu is larger than Δumax, the flow will pass over the orography without GWB's occurring. That means, over the selected range of Fr0, the flow regime of 2-D orographic flow related to GWB occurring primarily will be absent when Δu > Δumax, regardless of the value for U0. In addition, the vertical profile of atmospheric stability and height of VWS could result in different features of mountain wave, which leads to different Δuc and Δumax for the GWB's occurring. The possible inaccuracy of estimated Δuc in the present linear model is also discussed.

  9. Shear wave velocity inversion and its influence on seismic site response: case studies from Malta and Catania (Italy)

    D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline; Panzera, Francesco; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work is to study some particular geological sequences on the Maltese islands and in the city of Catania (Southern Italy). Geologically the two sites are quite different but several measurement points in both localities are characterised by sequences that represent a significant shear wave velocity inversion. The Maltese islands in the Central Mediterranean are composed of a simple 4-layer sedimentary sequence of Oligocene-Miocene limestones and clays. In particular, limestones overlying a clayey formation represent the shallower lithotypes that characterize the surficial geology in a large portion of the Maltese archipelago. On the contrary, the present geologic features of the Catania area are the result of tectonic uplift, sea level changes and lava flows originating from Etna eruptions. The area shows complex features with lateral heterogeneities at a local scale, due to the presence of volcanic and sedimentary units. In this study we make use of ambient noise recordings as well as moderate magnitude earthquakes in order to study the role of local geology on the site response in Catania. The recorded data were processed through standard and horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios. Results of ambient noise and earthquake analysis, although showing significant differences in amplitude, are comparable in frequency. On the lava flows spectral ratios, significant amplification of the vertical component, that appear related to velocity inversion, were observed. Our findings appear linked to the complex wave-field generated by the lithologic heterogeneities existing in the area which seem to be related to alternating outcropping sediments and basaltic lavas. On the Maltese islands the main aim of this study was to identify any differences in site response, both in frequency and amplification, observed on different outcrops. All the investigated sites exhibit a clear and consistent peak in the frequency range of 1 Hz to 2 Hz. This is tentatively

  10. Upper Mantle Shear Wave Anisotropy for Stations in Mexico and its Relationship to Subduction at the Middle America Trench

    van Benthem, S. A.; Valenzuela, R. W.

    2007-05-01

    We have calculated the splitting parameters that describe upper mantle shear wave anisotropy under stations in continental Mexico located over the subducting Cocos Plate. SKS and SKKS arrivals recorded on both the radial and transverse horizontal components were used. The splitting parameters which quantify anisotropy are the delay time (δt) and the fast polarization direction (φ). The anisotropy is calculated using the approach by Silver and Chan [1991]. A time segment containing the SKS arrival is selected from both horizontal components. The space of possible solutions is then searched in one-degree intervals with φ ranging between 0 and 180°. Specifically, the coordinate axes are rotated every 1 degree increment and the autocorrelation and crosscorrelation between the components is calculated. For each value of φ, the solution space is also searched in 0.05 s increments. Next the eigenvalues corresponding to each δt and φ combination are calculated. In the presence of noise, the desired solution will be given by the matrix which is most nearly singular. In order to check our results, we apply a correction in the amount of the measured δt and φ to the original records and then rotate them to make sure that the anisotropy disappears. The shapes and the difference in the arrival times of the fast and slow waves are compared to make sure that the result is robust. As a further check, the polarization of the particle motion for the radial and transverse components before and after correction is plotted. The records used were taken from Mexico's Servicio Sismológico Nacional broadband network [Singh et al., 1997]. The orientation of the fast polarization direction, φ, can be explained by the absolute motion of the North American plate for some of the stations. Most of the stations, however, require a different explanation for the orientation of φ. For example, the orientation of φ for stations Platanillo (PLIG), Yautepec (YAIG), and Popocatépetl (PPIG

  11. Inversion of surface wave data for shear wave velocity profiles: Case studies of thick buried low-velocity layers in Malta

    Farrugia, Daniela; Paolucci, Enrico; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2015-04-01

    The islands composing the Maltese archipelago (Central Mediterranean) are characterised by a four layer sequence of limestones and clays, with the Lower Coralline Limestone being the oldest exposed layer. The hard Globigerina Limestone (GL) overlies this layer and is found outcropping in the eastern part of Malta and western part of Gozo. The rest of the islands are characterised by Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) plateaus and hillcaps covering a soft Blue Clay (BC) layer which can be up to 75 m thick. Thus the BC layer introduces a velocity inversion in the stratigraphy, and makes the Vs30 parameter not always suitable for seismic microzonation purposes. Such a layer may still produce amplification effects, however would not contribute to the numerical mean of Vs in the upper 30m. Moreover, buildings are being increasingly constructed on this type of geological foundation. Obtaining the shear wave (Vs) profiles of the different layers around the islands is the first step needed for a detailed study of local seismic site response. A survey of Vs in each type of lithology and around the islands has never been undertaken. Array measurements of ambient noise using vertical geophones were carried out at six sites in Malta and one in Gozo, characterised by the buried low-velocity layer. The array was set up in an L-shaped configuration and the Extended Spatial Autocorrelation (ESAC) technique was used to extract Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. The effective dispersion curve obtained at all the sites exhibited a 'normal' dispersive trend (i.e. velocity decreases with increasing frequency) at low frequencies, followed by an inverse dispersive trend at high frequencies. Such a shape can be tentatively explained in terms of the presence of higher mode Rayleigh waves, which are generally present when a stiff layer overlies a softer layer. Additionally a series of three-component ambient noise measurements were taken at each of the sites and H/V curves obtained. The

  12. Study on the application of shear-wave elastography to thin-layered media and tubular structure: Finite-element analysis and experiment verification

    Jang, Jun-keun; Kondo, Kengo; Namita, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Shear-wave elastography (SWE) enables the noninvasive and quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of human soft tissue. Generally, shear-wave velocity (C S) can be estimated using the time-of-flight (TOF) method. Young’s modulus is then calculated directly from the estimated C S. However, because shear waves in thin-layered media propagate as guided waves, C S cannot be accurately estimated using the conventional TOF method. Leaky Lamb dispersion analysis (LLDA) has recently been proposed to overcome this problem. In this study, we performed both experimental and finite-element (FE) analyses to evaluate the advantages of LLDA over TOF. In FE analysis, we investigated why the conventional TOF is ineffective for thin-layered media. In phantom experiments, C S results estimated using the two methods were compared for 1.5 and 2% agar plates and tube phantoms. Furthermore, it was shown that Lamb waves can be applied to tubular structures by extracting lateral waves traveling in the long axis direction of the tube using a two-dimensional window. Also, the effects of the inner radius and stiffness (or shear wavelength) of the tube on the estimation performance of LLDA were experimentally discussed. In phantom experiments, the results indicated good agreement between LLDA (plate phantoms of 2 mm thickness: 5.0 m/s for 1.5% agar and 7.2 m/s for 2% agar; tube phantoms with 2 mm thickness and 2 mm inner radius: 5.1 m/s for 1.5% agar and 7.0 m/s for 2% agar; tube phantoms with 2 mm thickness and 4 mm inner radius: 5.3 m/s for 1.5% agar and 7.3 m/s for 2% agar) and SWE measurements (bulk phantoms: 5.3 m/s ± 0.27 for 1.5% agar and 7.3 m/s ± 0.54 for 2% agar).

  13. Review article "Remarks on factors influencing shear wave velocities and their role in evaluating susceptibilities to earthquake-triggered slope instability: case study for the Campania area (Italy"

    V. Paoletti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Shear wave velocities have a fundamental role in connection with the mitigation of seismic hazards, as their low values are the main causes of site amplification phenomena and can significantly influence the susceptibility of a territory to seismic-induced landslides. The shear wave velocity (Vs and modulus (G of each lithological unit are influenced by factors such as the degree of fracturing and faulting, the porosity, the clay amount and the precipitation, with the latter two influencing the unit water content. In this paper we discuss how these factors can affect the Vs values and report the results of different analyses that quantify the reduction in the rock Vs and shear modulus values connected to the presence of clay and water. We also show that significant results in assessing seismic-induced slope failure susceptibility for land planning targets could be achieved through a careful evaluation, based only on literature studies, of the geo-lithological and geo-seismic features of the study area.

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy of Real-Time Shear Wave Elastography for Staging of Liver Fibrosis: A Meta-Analysis

    Li, Changtian; Zhang, Changsheng; Li, Junlai; Huo, Huiping; Song, Danfei

    2016-01-01

    Background The present meta-analysis, based on previous studies, was aimed to evaluate the test accuracy of real-time shear wave elastography (SWE) for the staging of liver fibrosis. Material/Methods A systematic search on MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar databases was conducted, and data on SWE tests and liver fibrosis staging were collected. For each cut-off stage of fibrosis (F≥2, F≥3, and F≥4), pooled results of sensitivity, specificity, and area under summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve were analyzed. The study heterogeneity was evaluated by χ2 and I2 tests. I2>50% or P≤0.05 indicates there was heterogeneity, and then a random-effects model was applied. Otherwise, the fixed-effects model was used. The publication bias was evaluated using Deeks funnel plots asymmetry test and Fagan plot analysis was performed. Results Finally, 934 patients from 8 published studies were included in the analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SWE for F≥2 were 85.0% (95% CI, 82–88%) and 81% (95% CI, 71–88%), respectively. The area under the SROC curve with 95% CI was presented as 0.88 (95% CI, 85–91%). The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SWE for F≥3 were 90.0% (95% CI, 83.0–95.0%) and 81.0% (95% CI, 75.0–86.0%), respectively, corresponding to an area of SROC of 0.94 (95% CI, 92–96%). The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SWE for F≥4 were 87.0% (95% CI, 80.0–92.0%) and 88.0% (95% CI, 80.0–93.0%), respectively, corresponding to an area of SROC of 0.92 (95% CI, 89–94%). Conclusions The overall accuracy of SWE is high and clinically useful for the staging of liver fibrosis. Compared to the results of meta-analyses on other tests, such as RTE, TE, and ARFI, the performance of SWE is nearly identical in accuracy for the evaluation of cirrhosis. For the evaluation of significant liver fibrosis (F≥2), the overall accuracy of SWE seems to be similar to ARFI, but more accurate than RTE and TE. PMID

  15. Investigation of remnant versus active deformation in the lithosphere beneath south Africa from shear-wave splitting

    emuh, M.; Nyblade, A.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    South Africa is comprised of several continental blocks formed during previous collisional events, which date back 2-3 Ga. The three main blocks known as the Pietersburg, Kimberley, and Witwatersrand blocks are delineated by ancient subduction boundaries such as the Colesberg lineament. We consider whether these continental blocks retain remnant deformation at lithospheric depths from ancient collisional events or are governed by stresses due to current plate motion and mantle flow. We use shear-wave splitting methods to study seismic anisotropy from teleseismic phases. Splitting measurements are obtained by minimizing the smallest eigenvalue, maximizing the ratio of the smallest and largest eigenvalues, and rotation correlation, using the graphical user interface Splitlab. We only consider results that show consistency between multiple methods. The seismic data was collected from a new deployment of AfricaArray stations in south Africa and consists of 28 earthquake events. Earthquakes used in this study have a good azimuthal distribution with the poorest coverage only in the NW and S directions. Stations located within the Witwatersrand block display consistent results with a NE fast direction and an average delay time of 1.01 +/- 0.4 s. One station west of the Colesberg lineament in the Kimberley block yields a NW-SE fast direction for all measurements and is nearly perpendicular to results from stations east of this boundary. Stations south of Kaapvaal craton show dependence on the back azimuth of earthquake arrivals. Paths which travel through the Namaqua-Natal fold belt all produce N-S fast directions with average delay times of 0.9 s. Raypaths that travel through the southern Saldania fold belt produce NW-SE fast directions. We suggest that seismic anisotropy in this region represents active deformation in the Witwatersrand block dictated by current tectonic stresses and absolute plate motion. Remnant fabric from ancient tectonic collisional events may still

  16. Diagnostic Accuracy of Real-Time Shear Wave Elastography for Staging of Liver Fibrosis: A Meta-Analysis.

    Li, Changtian; Zhang, Changsheng; Li, Junlai; Huo, Huiping; Song, Danfei

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The present meta-analysis, based on previous studies, was aimed to evaluate the test accuracy of real-time shear wave elastography (SWE) for the staging of liver fibrosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS A systematic search on MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar databases was conducted, and data on SWE tests and liver fibrosis staging were collected. For each cut-off stage of fibrosis (F≥2, F≥3, and F≥4), pooled results of sensitivity, specificity, and area under summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve were analyzed. The study heterogeneity was evaluated by χ2 and I2 tests. I2>50% or P≤0.05 indicates there was heterogeneity, and then a random-effects model was applied. Otherwise, the fixed-effects model was used. The publication bias was evaluated using Deeks funnel plots asymmetry test and Fagan plot analysis was performed. RESULTS Finally, 934 patients from 8 published studies were included in the analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SWE for F≥2 were 85.0% (95% CI, 82-88%) and 81% (95% CI, 71-88%), respectively. The area under the SROC curve with 95% CI was presented as 0.88 (95% CI, 85-91%). The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SWE for F≥3 were 90.0% (95% CI, 83.0-95.0%) and 81.0% (95% CI, 75.0-86.0%), respectively, corresponding to an area of SROC of 0.94 (95% CI, 92-96%). The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SWE for F≥4 were 87.0% (95% CI, 80.0-92.0%) and 88.0% (95% CI, 80.0-93.0%), respectively, corresponding to an area of SROC of 0.92 (95% CI, 89-94%). CONCLUSIONS The overall accuracy of SWE is high and clinically useful for the staging of liver fibrosis. Compared to the results of meta-analyses on other tests, such as RTE, TE, and ARFI, the performance of SWE is nearly identical in accuracy for the evaluation of cirrhosis. For the evaluation of significant liver fibrosis (F≥2), the overall accuracy of SWE seems to be similar to ARFI, but more accurate than RTE and TE. PMID:27102449

  17. Improved Dead Sea sinkhole site characterization at Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan, based on repeated shear wave reflection seismic profiling

    Polom, Ulrich; Alrshdan, Hussam; Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Sawarieh, Ali; Dahm, Torsten; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    In October 2014 a high-resolution shallow shear wave reflection seismic survey was carried out at the Dead Sea sinkhole site Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan. It extended a survey undertaken in 2013, also in order to gather time-lapse profiles. In the framework of the DEad SEa Research Venue (DESERVE), a virtual institute of the Helmholtz Association and international partners, this investigation is part of a cross-disciplinary and cooperative international project of the Helmholtz Centers KIT, GFZ, and UFZ. At the investigation site, characterized by alluvial fan deposits, ongoing subsidence and sinkhole processes in the subsurface create massive reshaping of farming areas, including the destruction of housings, industrial sites, and infrastructure. The sinkhole hazard at the Dead Sea is significant, since similar processes are observed at several coastal segments of the Dead Sea. The new survey (in total 2.1 profile km) was targeted to improve the knowledge about the subsurface structures and to confine the results of the initial survey (1.8 km profile km), with respect to the presence or non-presence of a massive salt layer proposed at nearly 40 m depth. This salt layer is the central part of a widely established process hypothesis to generate shallow cavities by salt subrosion, which subsequently collapse to sinkholes at the surface. Results of the initial survey carried out in 2013 highlighted a new process hypothesis of subsurface mass transport by Dead Sea mud mobilization enclosed in the alluvial fan, so that an extended survey was undertaken in 2014. This, indeed, confirmed that there are no reflection seismic signal responses that would be expected to occur in the presence of a massive salt layer. Since evaluation of both hypothesis by new drilling could not be carried out due to safety reasons and permissions, it remained unclear which hypothesis is valid for the investigation site. However, we combined the 2013 and 2014 reflection seismic profiles and the

  18. Shear wave anisotropy beneath the volcanic front in South Kyushu area, Japan: Development of C-type olivine CPO under H2O-rich conditions

    Terada, Tadashi; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Mizukami, Tomoyuki

    2013-08-01

    wave splitting from local intermediate-depth earthquakes is investigated to detect the anisotropic structure in the mantle wedge beneath the South Kyushu area, Japan. We observed shear wave splitting with NEE-SWW to NWW-SEE polarization directions and delay times of 0.04-0.63 s. Trench-normal shear wave polarization anisotropy with a delay time greater than 0.3 s probably overlaps in the high VP/VS region at a depth of 100-150 km beneath the volcanic front. Model calculations for the cause of the anisotropy suggest that the development of "C-type" olivine crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) with a trench-parallel b axis concentration and a trench-normal a axis concentration best reproduces observations compared to A-, B-, or E-type olivine CPOs and antigorite CPO. We conclude that a thick anisotropic layer, approximately 50 km, is formed by concentration of interstitial fluid in peridotite. We briefly discuss the mechanism carrying water to the deep mantle wedge. A possible explanation is that interstitial fluids in the mantle wedge are effectively released because of a decrease in dihedral angles of olivine-fluid interfaces at 150 km depth. Our results imply a close relation between the high density of explosive volcanoes in the South Kyushu area and the underlying water-rich mantle.

  19. A self-consistent synthesis description of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and scale-dependent auroral process using shear Alfvén wave

    Yoshikawa, A.; Amm, O.; Vanhamäki, H.; Fujii, R.

    2011-08-01

    In order to correctly describe the dynamical behavior of the magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI) coupling system and the scale-dependent auroral process, we develop a synthesis formulation that combines the process of (1) the inverse Walen separation of MHD disturbance into parallel- and antiparallel-propagating shear Alfvén wave to the ambient magnetic field, (2) the shear Alfvén wave reflection process including (3) the scale-dependent electrostatic coupling process through the linearized Knight relation, (4) two-layer ionosphere model, and (5) dynamic conductance variations. A novel procedure that applies the inverse Walen relation to the incompressional MHD disturbances at the inner boundary of the MHD region enables to extract the component of the shear Alfvén wave incident to the ionosphere. The extracted incident electric field supplies an electromotive force for the generation of the MI coupling system, and the reflected electric field is generated such that it totally satisfies the synthesis MI-coupling equation. A three-dimensional ionospheric current system is represented by a two-layer model in which the Pedersen and the Hall current are confined in the separated layers, which are connected by field-aligned currents driven by the linear current-voltage relation between two layers. Hence, our scheme possibly reproduces two types of the scale-dependent MI-decoupling process of the perpendicular potential structure: due to the parallel potential drop at the auroral acceleration region and the other due to the parallel potential differences inside the ionosphere. Our newly formulation may be well suited for description of scale-dependent auroral process and mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamics interlocked with the dynamical development of magnetospheric processes.

  20. High-resolution shear-wave seismics across the Carlsberg Fault zone south of Copenhagen - Implications for linking Mesozoic and late Pleistocene structures

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Nielsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    The Carlsberg Fault zone (CFZ) is a NNW-SSE striking structure close to the transition zone between the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. We examine the fault evolution by combining very-high-resolution onshore shear-wave seismic data, one conventional onshore seismic profile and marine reflection seismic profiles. The faulting geometry indicates a strong influence of Triassic subsidence and rifting in the Central European Basin System. Growth strata within the CFZ surrounding Höllviken Graben reveal syntectonic sedimentation in the Lower Triassic, indicating the opening to be a result of Triassic rifting. In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. These findings contrast the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighboring structures, such as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image faulting in Quaternary and Danian layers in the CFZ. The portable compact vibrator source ElViS III S8 was used to acquire a 1150 m long seismic section on the island Amager, south of Copenhagen. The shallow subsurface in the investigation area is dominated by Quaternary glacial till deposits in the upper 5-11 m and Danian limestone below. In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the uppermost 30 m of the western part of CFZ. The complex fault zone comprises normal block faults and one reverse block fault. The observed faults cut through the Danian as well as the Quaternary overburden. Hence, there are strong indicators for ongoing faulting, like mapped faulting in Quaternary sediments and ongoing subsidence of the eastern block of the CFZ as interpreted by other authors. The lack of earthquakes localized in the fault zone implies that either the frequency of occurring earthquakes is too small to be recorded in the observation time-span, or that the movement of the shallow sub-surface layers may be due to other sources than purely tectonic processes.

  1. A new electrical and mechanically detonatable shear wave source for near surface (0-30 m) seismic acquisition

    Crane, J. M.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Harris, J. B.

    2013-04-01

    We present a new, impulsive, horizontal shear source capable of performing long shot profiles in a time-efficient and repeatable manner. The new shear source is ground-coupled by eight 1/2″ (1.27 cm) × 2″ (5.08 cm) steel spikes. Blank shotshells (12-gauge) used as energy sources can be either mechanically or electrically detonated. Electrical fuses have a start time repeatability of hammer blows. To ensure complete safety, the shotshell holder is surrounded by a protective 6″ (15.24 cm)-thick barrel, a push-and-twist-locked breach, and a safety pin. We conducted field tests at the 17th Street Canal levee breach site in New Orleans, Louisiana (30.017° N 90.121° W) and at an instrumented test borehole at Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi (32.325° N 93.182° W) to compare our new source and a traditional hammer impact source. The new shear source produces a broader-band of frequencies (30-100 Hz cf. 30-60 Hz). Signal generated by the new shear source has signal-to-noise ratios equivalent to ~ 3 stacked hammer blows to the hammer impact source. Ideal source signals must be broadband in frequency, have a high SNR, be consistent, and have precise start times; all traits of the new shear source.

  2. Generation of a pseudo-2D shear-wave velocity section by inversion of a series of 1D dispersion curves

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves utilizes a multichannel recording system to estimate near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities from high-frequency Rayleigh waves. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity (vS) section is constructed by aligning 1D models at the midpoint of each receiver spread and using a spatial interpolation scheme. The horizontal resolution of the section is therefore most influenced by the receiver spread length and the source interval. The receiver spread length sets the theoretical lower limit and any vS structure with its lateral dimension smaller than this length will not be properly resolved in the final vS section. A source interval smaller than the spread length will not improve the horizontal resolution because spatial smearing has already been introduced by the receiver spread. In this paper, we first analyze the horizontal resolution of a pair of synthetic traces. Resolution analysis shows that (1) a pair of traces with a smaller receiver spacing achieves higher horizontal resolution of inverted S-wave velocities but results in a larger relative error; (2) the relative error of the phase velocity at a high frequency is smaller than at a low frequency; and (3) a relative error of the inverted S-wave velocity is affected by the signal-to-noise ratio of data. These results provide us with a guideline to balance the trade-off between receiver spacing (horizontal resolution) and accuracy of the inverted S-wave velocity. We then present a scheme to generate a pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section with high horizontal resolution using multichannel records by inverting high-frequency surface-wave dispersion curves calculated through cross-correlation combined with a phase-shift scanning method. This method chooses only a pair of consecutive traces within a shot gather to calculate a dispersion curve. We finally invert surface-wave dispersion curves of synthetic and real-world data. Inversion results of both synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that

  3. Ground-motion site effects from multimethod shear-wave velocity characterization at 16 seismograph stations deployed for aftershocks of the August 2011 Mineral, Virginia earthquake

    Stephenson, William J.; Odum, Jackson K.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Williams, Robert A.; Angster, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    We characterize shear-wave velocity versus depth (Vs profile) at 16 portable seismograph sites through the epicentral region of the 2011 Mw 5.8 Mineral (Virginia, USA) earthquake to investigate ground-motion site effects in the area. We used a multimethod acquisition and analysis approach, where active-source horizontal shear (SH) wave reflection and refraction as well as active-source multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and passive-source refraction microtremor (ReMi) Rayleigh wave dispersion were interpreted separately. The time-averaged shear-wave velocity to a depth of 30 m (Vs30), interpreted bedrock depth, and site resonant frequency were estimated from the best-fit Vs profile of each method at each location for analysis. Using the median Vs30 value (270–715 m/s) as representative of a given site, we estimate that all 16 sites are National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site class C or D. Based on a comparison of simplified mapped surface geology to median Vs30 at our sites, we do not see clear evidence for using surface geologic units as a proxy for Vs30 in the epicentral region, although this may primarily be because the units are similar in age (Paleozoic) and may have similar bulk seismic properties. We compare resonant frequencies calculated from ambient noise horizontal:vertical spectral ratios (HVSR) at available sites to predicted site frequencies (generally between 1.9 and 7.6 Hz) derived from the median bedrock depth and average Vs to bedrock. Robust linear regression of HVSR to both site frequency and Vs30 demonstrate moderate correlation to each, and thus both appear to be generally representative of site response in this region. Based on Kendall tau rank correlation testing, we find that Vs30 and the site frequency calculated from average Vs to median interpreted bedrock depth can both be considered reliable predictors of weak-motion site effects in the epicentral region.

  4. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves and Down-Hole Tests in the Archeological "Palatine Hill" Area (Rome, Italy): Evaluation and Influence of 2D Effects on the Shear Wave Velocity

    Di Fiore, V.; Cavuoto, G.; Tarallo, D.; Punzo, M.; Evangelista, L.

    2016-05-01

    A joint analysis of down-hole (DH) and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) measurements offers a complete evaluation of shear wave velocity profiles, especially for sites where a strong lateral variability is expected, such as archeological sites. In this complex stratigraphic setting, the high "subsoil anisotropy" (i.e., sharp lithological changes due to the presence of anthropogenic backfill deposits and/or buried man-made structures) implies a different role for DH and MASW tests. This paper discusses some results of a broad experimental program conducted on the Palatine Hill, one of the most ancient areas of the city of Rome (Italy). The experiments were part of a project on seismic microzoning and consisted of 20 MASW and 11 DH tests. The main objective of this study was to examine the difficulties related to the interpretation of the DH and MASW tests and the reliability limits inherent in the application of the noninvasive method in complex stratigraphic settings. As is well known, DH tests provide good determinations of shear wave velocities (Vs) for different lithologies and man-made materials, whereas MASW tests provide average values for the subsoil volume investigated. The data obtained from each method with blind tests were compared and were correlated to site-specific subsurface conditions, including lateral variability. Differences between punctual (DH) and global (MASW) Vs measurements are discussed, quantifying the errors by synthetic comparison and by site response analyses. This study demonstrates that, for archeological sites, VS profiles obtained from the DH and MASW methods differ by more than 15 %. However, the local site effect showed comparable results in terms of natural frequencies, whereas the resolution of the inverted shear wave velocity was influenced by the fundamental mode of propagation.

  5. Investigation of Soil Liquefaction Potential around Efteni Lake in Duzce Turkey: Using Empirical Relationships between Shear Wave Velocity and SPT Blow Count (N

    Ali Ateş

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the liquefaction potential of a liquefaction-prone area is important for geotechnical earthquake engineering, both for assessment for site selection and for planning and new constructions. The liquefaction potential index for the city of Duzce in northwestern Turkey using the empirical relationships between the Standard Penetration Test (SPT and the Shear Wave Velocity Test (VS was investigated in this study. After, VS values based on SPT blow counts (N were obtained from the alluvial soils in the city of Duzce. The liquefaction potential indexes of the soils were determined using the empirical relationships between the Standard Penetration Test (SPT and the Shear Wave Velocity Test (VS calculating for a probable earthquake of MW=7.2. In the result of the study, the liquefaction potential index (LPI values were interpreted and compared evaluating the SPT N blow count values obtained from the study area. Based on the empirical relationships assumed for the soils, it was observed that there was not a perfect agreement between the results of the two methods. The liquefaction potential index values using the SPT N blow counts were found to be lower than those of the VS method.

  6. Character of the Caribbean-Gônave-North America plate boundaries in the upper mantle based on shear-wave splitting

    Benford, B.; Tikoff, B.; DeMets, C.

    2012-12-01

    We present new shear-wave splitting measurements of SKS, SKKS, PKS, and sSKS phases from eight stations in the northern Caribbean. Prior to this work, shear-wave splitting analysis of the northern Caribbean boundary was only evaluated at a station in Puerto Rico. Stations that lie within several tens of kilometers of microplate boundaries have mean fast polarization directions parallel to the boundary and have delay times greater than 1 s. Stations more than several tens of kilometers away from microplate boundaries show no evidence for an anisotropic upper mantle. Stations in Cuba and Jamaica have fast axes oriented ˜100° with delay times of ˜1.5 s, indicating that the east-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults that define the north and south boundaries of the Gônave microplate continue into the upper mantle. A station located in Antigua, where the North America plate subducts beneath the Caribbean plate, has a high degree of splitting with the fast axis parallel to the trench. Based on our results, the deformation related to the presence of microplates in the northern Caribbean extends into the upper mantle.

  7. Shear wave splitting as a proxy for stress forecast of the case of the 2006 Manyas-Kus Golu (Mb = 5.3 earthquake

    S. Ergintav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The 2006 Mb = 5.3 Manyas-Kus Golu (Manyas earthquake has been retrospectively "stress-forecasted" using variations in time-delays of seismic shear wave splitting to evaluate the time and magnitude at which stress-modified microcracking reaches fracture criticality within the stressed volume where strain is released. We processed micro earthquakes recorded by 29 TURDEP (Multi-Disciplinary Earthquake Research in High Risk Regions of Turkey and 33 KOERI (Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute stations in the Marmara region by using the aspect-ratio cross-correlation and systematic analysis of crustal anisotropy methods. The aim of the analysis is to determine changes in delay-times, hence changes in stress, before and after the 2006 Manyas earthquake. We observed that clear decreases in delay times before the impending event, especially at the station GEMT are consistent with the anisotropic poro-elasticity (APE model of fluid-rock deformation, but we could not observe similar changes at other stations surrounding the main event. The logarithms of the duration of the stress-accumulation are proportional (self-similar to the magnitude of the impending event. Although time and magnitude of th 2005 Manyas earthquake could have been stress-forecasted, as has been recognized elsewhere, shear-wave splitting does not appear to provide direct information about the location of impending earthquakes.

  8. Ultra-wideband ladder filters using zero-th shear mode plate wave in ultrathin LiNbO3 plate with apodized interdigital transducers

    Kadota, Michio; Tanaka, Shuji

    2016-07-01

    There are two kinds of plate waves propagating in a thin plate, Lamb and shear horizontal (SH) waves. The former has a velocity higher than 15,000 m/s when the plate is very thin. On the contrary, 0th SH (SH0) mode plate wave in an ultrathin LiNbO3 plate has an electro-mechanical coupling factor larger than 50%. Authors fabricated an ultra-wideband T-type ladder filter with a relative bandwidth (BW) of 41% using the SH0 mode plate wave. Although the BW of the filter fully covers the digital TV band in Japan, it does not have sufficient margin at the lower and higher end of BW. Besides, periodic small ripples due to transverse mode in pass-band of the filter were observed. In this study π-type ladder filters were fabricated by changing the pitch ratio of interdigital transducer (IDT) of parallel and series arm resonators (PR(IDT)) to control the BW, and by apodizing IDTs to improve the periodic small ripples due to transverse mode. Ultra-wideband filters without periodic small transverse mode with ultrawide bandwidth from 41 to 49% were fabricated. The BWs fully cover ultrawide digital television bands in Japan and U.S.A. These filters with an ultrawide BW and a steep characteristic show the possibility to be applied to a reported cognitive radio system and other communication systems requiring an ultrawide BW.

  9. A new approach to obtaining a 3D shear wave velocity model of the crust and upper mantle: An application to eastern Turkey

    Delph, Jonathan R.; Zandt, George; Beck, Susan L.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach to the joint inversion of surface wave dispersion data and receiver functions by utilizing Common Conversion Point (CCP) stacking to reconcile the different sampling domains of the two datasets. Utilizing CCP stacking allows us to suppress noise in the data by waveform stacking, and correct for backazimuthal variations and complex crustal structure by mapping receiver functions back to their theoretical location. When applied to eastern Turkey, this approach leads to a higher resolution image of the subsurface and clearly delineates different tectonic features in eastern Turkey that were not apparent using other approaches. We observe that the slow seismic velocities near the Karliova Triple Junction correlate to moderate strain rates and high heat flow, which leads to a rheologically weak crust that has allowed for the upward propagation of Miocene and younger volcanics near the triple junction. We find seismically fast, presumably rigid blocks located in the southeastern Anatolian Plate and Arabian Plate are separated by a band of low shear wave velocities that correspond to the East Anatolian Fault Zone, which is consistent with the presence of fluids in the fault zone. We observe that the Arabian Plate has underthrust the Eurasian Plate as far as the northern boundary of the Bitlis Massif, which can explain the high exhumation rates in the Bitlis Massif as a result of slab break-off of the Arabian oceanic lithosphere. We also find a shallow (~ 33 km) anomaly beneath eastern Turkey that we interpret as a localized wedge of mantle that was underthrust by a crustal fragment during the collision of Arabia and Eurasia. These observations are possible because of the high-resolution images obtained by combining common conversion point receiver function stacks with ambient noise dispersion data to create a data-driven three-dimensional shear wave velocity model.

  10. High-resolution shear-wave reflection profiling to image offset in unconsolidated near-surface sediments

    Bailey, Bevin L.

    S-wave reflection profiling has many theoretical advantages, when compared to P-wave profiling, such as high-resolution potential, greater sensitivities to lithologic changes and insensitivity to the water table and pore fluids, and could be particularly useful in near-surface settings. However, S-wave surveys can be plagued by processing pitfalls unique to near-surface studies such as interference of Love waves with reflections, and the stacking of Love waves as coherent noise, leading to possible misinterpretations of the subsurface. Two lines of S-wave data are processed and used to locate previously unknown faults in Quaternary sediments in a region where earthquake activity poses a threat to surface structures. This study provides clear examples of processing pitfalls such as Love waves with hyperbolic appearances on shot gathers, and a CMP section with coherent noise that is easily misinterpreted as reflections. This study demonstrates pros and cons of using SH reflection data in the near surface.

  11. Multitude of Core-Localized Shear Alfvén Waves in a High-Temperature Fusion Plasma

    Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Berk, H. L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Doyle, E. J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Fonck, R. J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Gorelenkov, N. N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Holcomb, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kramer, G. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Jayakumar, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); La Haye, R. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); McKee, G. R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Makowski, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Peebles, W. A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Rhodes, T. L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Solomon, W. M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); VanZeeland, M. A. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zeng, L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Evidence is provided for a multitude of discrete frequency Alfvén waves in the core of magnetically confined high-temperature fusion plasmas. Multiple diagnostic instruments verify wave excitation over a wide spatial range from the device size at the longest wavelengths down to the thermal ion Larmor radius. At the shortest scales, the poloidal wavelengths are like the scale length of electrostatic drift wave turbulence. Theoretical analysis verifies a dominant interaction of the modes with particles in the thermal ion distribution traveling well below the Alfvén velocity.

  12. Stochastic resonance in a nonlinear model of a rotating, stratified shear flow, with a simple stochastic inertia-gravity wave parameterization

    P. D. Williams

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a numerical study of the impact of short, fast inertia-gravity waves on the large-scale, slowly-evolving flow with which they co-exist. A nonlinear quasi-geostrophic numerical model of a stratified shear flow is used to simulate, at reasonably high resolution, the evolution of a large-scale mode which grows due to baroclinic instability and equilibrates at finite amplitude. Ageostrophic inertia-gravity modes are filtered out of the model by construction, but their effects on the balanced flow are incorporated using a simple stochastic parameterization of the potential vorticity anomalies which they induce. The model simulates a rotating, two-layer annulus laboratory experiment, in which we recently observed systematic inertia-gravity wave generation by an evolving, large-scale flow. We find that the impact of the small-amplitude stochastic contribution to the potential vorticity tendency, on the model balanced flow, is generally small, as expected. In certain circumstances, however, the parameterized fast waves can exert a dominant influence. In a flow which is baroclinically-unstable to a range of zonal wavenumbers, and in which there is a close match between the growth rates of the multiple modes, the stochastic waves can strongly affect wavenumber selection. This is illustrated by a flow in which the parameterized fast modes dramatically re-partition the probability-density function for equilibrated large-scale zonal wavenumber. In a second case study, the stochastic perturbations are shown to force spontaneous wavenumber transitions in the large-scale flow, which do not occur in their absence. These phenomena are due to a stochastic resonance effect. They add to the evidence that deterministic parameterizations in general circulation models, of subgrid-scale processes such as gravity wave drag, cannot always adequately capture the full details of the nonlinear interaction.

  13. Frequency and wave number dependence of the shear correlator in strongly coupled hot Yang-Mills theory

    We use AdS/QCD duality to compute the finite temperature Green's function G(ω,k;T) of the shear operator T12 for all ω, k in hot Yang-Mills theory in the strongly coupled domain. The goal is to assess how the existence of scales like the transition temperature and glueball masses affect the correlator computed in the scalefree conformal N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. We observe sizeable effects for T close to Tc which rapidly disappear with increasing T. Quantitative agreement of these predictions with future lattice Monte Carlo data would suggest that QCD matter in this temperature range is strongly interacting.

  14. Relative excitation of the seismic shear waves Sn and Lg as a function of source depth and their propagation from Melanesia and Banda arcs to Australia

    J. OLIVER

    1977-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY. - Seismic activity associated with the collision of the continental
    part of the Australian plate with the oceanic Melanesian arcs along Papua New
    Guinea and the Banda arc provides an unusual opportunity to study the relative
    excitation of the seismic shear waves Sn and Lg. These waves are produced by
    earthquakes located along the arcs in the upper 200 km of the earth and are
    recorded by the Australian WWSSN Stations at Charters Towers (CTA and Alice
    Springs (ASP. The paths to these stations are predominantly continental. The data
    clearly show that for events located at crustal depths, Lg is the predominant phase
    on the records and Sn is either absent or very weak. For events deeper than about
    50-70 km, Sn becomes the predominant phase on the records. These observations
    arc in qualitative agreement with the explanations of Sn and Lg as higher
    modes of surface waves, for the particle displacement amplitudes are maximum
    within the crust for Lg and maximum within the lid of the lithospheric mantle
    for Sn. The data suggest that either the crustal wave guide for Lg is more
    efficient than that for Sn, or that Lg is more easily excited than Sn. No clear
    Lg is observed from shallow earthquakes when the length of the segment of the
    path crossing oceanic structure is greater than about 200 km. Also, widespread
    Quaternary volcanism within the « stable » area of central Papua New Guinea
    to the south of the mobile belt does not seem to affect the efficient transmission
    of high-frequency (1 Hz shear energy.
    The paths from events located along the New Hebrides, Solomon, and New
    Britain arcs to Australia traverse oceanic structure, and no Lg is observed from
    these paths. The inefficient propagation of Sn along these paths from both
    shallow and intermediate-depth events can be explained as follows: 1 For
    the New Hebrides case, the

  15. Electric Field Observations of Plasma Convection, Shear, Alfven Waves, and other Phenomena Observed on Sounding Rockets in the Cusp and Boundary Layer

    Pfaff, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    On December 14,2002, a NASA Black Brant X sounding rocket was launched equatorward from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen (79 N) into the dayside cusp and subsequently cut across the open/closed field line boundary, reaching an apogee of771 km. The launch occurred during Bz negative conditions with strong By negative that was changing during the flight. SuperDarn (CUTLASS) radar and subsequent model patterns reveal a strong westward/poleward convection, indicating that the rocket traversed a rotational reversal in the afternoon merging cell. The payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particle, suprathermal electron and ion, and thermal plasma data. We provide an overview of the main observations and focus on the DC electric field results, comparing the measured E x B plasma drifts in detail with the CUTLASS radar observations of plasma drifts gathered simultaneously in the same volume. The in situ DC electric fields reveal steady poleward flows within the cusp with strong shears at the interface of the closed/open field lines and within the boundary layer. We use the observations to discuss ionospheric signatures of the open/closed character of the cusp/low latitude boundary layer as a function of the IMF. The electric field and plasma density data also reveal the presence of very strong plasma irregularities with a large range of scales (10 m to 10 km) that exist within the open field line cusp region yet disappear when the payload was equatorward of the cusp on closed field lines. These intense low frequency wave observations are consistent with strong scintillations observed on the ground at Ny Alesund during the flight. We present detailed wave characteristics and discuss them in terms of Alfven waves and static irregularities that pervade the cusp region at all altitudes.

  16. Final report for DOE-FG02-02ER54688: Study of nonlinear interactions between counterpropagating shear Alfven waves

    Carter, T A

    2006-11-16

    Final report for DOE Plasma Physics Junior Faculty Development award DOE-FG02-02ER54688. Reports on research undertaken from 8/1/2002 until 5/15/2006, investigating nonlinear interactions between Alfven waves in a laboratory experiment.

  17. The 3-D structure of shear wave in South China and the southward extension of Tanlu fault

    2001-01-01

    By processing the CSND Rayleigh wave data with the matched filterFTAN technique, Rayleigh wave disper- sion for southeast China is obtained. The 4°×4°S wave dispersion of the pure path is calculated using random inversion scheme, and 3-D S wave velocity structure is set up. Incorporating the above-mentioned results with wide angle seismic sounding data, we studied structure framework and the extending of faults in this area, which demonstrates that the depth of Moho in South China varies from 30 to 40 km, shallower from west to east. The depth of Moho varies from 25 to 28 km for the offshore. The depth of the asthenosphere in upper mantle varies from 60 to 100 km. The depth difference of layers at the two sides of Tanlu fault is more than 10 km at the south part of the Yangtze River, and the fault extends downward more than 170 km. The fault exceeds the main land at Hainan Island and slips into the southern China Sea. Both Tanlu fault and the huge bend of gravity gradient anomaly are influenced by deep latent tectonics.

  18. Shear instabilities in granular flows.

    Goldfarb, David J; Glasser, Benjamin J; Shinbrot, Troy

    2002-01-17

    Unstable waves have been long studied in fluid shear layers. These waves affect transport in the atmosphere and oceans, in addition to slipstream stability behind ships, aeroplanes and heat-transfer devices. Corresponding instabilities in granular flows have not been previously documented, despite the importance of these flows in geophysical and industrial systems. Here we report that breaking waves can form at the interface between two streams of identical grains flowing on an inclined plane downstream of a splitter plate. Changes in either the shear rate or the angle of incline cause such waves to appear abruptly. We analyse a granular flow model that agrees qualitatively with our experimental data; the model suggests that the waves result from competition between shear and extensional strains in the flowing granular bed. We propose a dimensionless shear number that governs the transition between steady and wavy flows. PMID:11797003

  19. Self-Similar Wave Produced by Local Perturbation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz Shear-Layer Instability

    Hoepffner, Jérôme; Blumenthal, Ralf; Zaleski, Stéphane

    2011-03-01

    We show that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability excited by a localized perturbation yields a self-similar wave. The instability of the mixing layer was first conceived by Helmholtz as the inevitable growth of any localized irregularity into a spiral, but the search and uncovering of the resulting self-similar evolution was hindered by the technical success of Kelvin’s wavelike perturbation theory. The identification of a self-similar solution is useful since its specific structure is witness of a subtle nonlinear equilibrium among the forces involved. By simulating numerically the Navier-Stokes equations, we analyze the properties of the wave: growth rate, propagation speed and the dependency of its shape upon the density ratio of the two phases of the mixing layer.

  20. Development of a NEHRP site classification map of Chiang Mai city, Thailand, based on shear-wave velocity using the MASW technique

    To account for site amplification and seismic hazard mapping, the shear-wave velocity (Vs) profile to a depth of 30 m (Vs(30)) is an important parameter and can be used to calculate the ground motion for specific site conditions. In this study, the near-surface Vs profiles of soils were collected at 44 sites in Chiang Mai city using the multi-channel analysis of surface-wave technique. The Vs of each tested location was average weighted to Vs(30) based on the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) criteria. The average Vs(30) value of the alluvium soils was about 362 m s−1, which falls between NEHRP site classes C and D. The average Vs(30) values of flood plain, fluvial clay and natural levee soils (at 300, 299 and 311 m s−1, respectively) all equated to NEHRP class D. The colluvial deposits in the north-western part of the city were mainly composed of gravel, coarse sand and rock fragments, and were assigned to class C (average Vs(30) of 412 m s−1). Soils with lower Vs values will experience higher earthquake ground shaking than those of the bedrock. Accordingly the major part of Chiang Mai city may experience substantial ground shaking due to the amplification in the soft soils. (paper)

  1. The non-local theory solution of a Griffith crack in functionally graded materials subjected to the harmonic anti-plane shear waves

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamic stress field near crack tips in the functionally graded materials subjected to the harmonic anti-plane shear stress waves was investi- gated by means of the non-local theory. The traditional concepts of the non-local theory were extended to solve the fracture problem of functionally graded materials. To make the analysis tractable, it was assumed that the material properties vary exponentially with coordinate parallel to the crack. By use of the Fourier transform, the problem can be solved with the help of a pair of dual integral equations, in which the unknown variable was the displacement on the crack surfaces. To solve the dual integral equations, the displacement on the crack surfaces was expanded in a series of Jacobi polynomials. Unlike the classical elasticity solutions, it is found that no stress singularities are present at crack tips. The non-local elastic solutions yield a finite hoop stress at crack tips, thus allowing us to use the maximum stress as a fracture criterion. The magnitude of the finite dynamic stress field depends on the crack length, the parameter describing the functionally graded materials, the circular frequency of the incident waves and the lattice parameter of materials.

  2. The non-local theory solution of a Griffith crack in functionally graded materials subjected to the harmonic anti-plane shear waves

    ZHANG PeiWei; ZHOU ZhenGong; WU LinZhi

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamic stress field near crack tips in the functionally graded materials subjected to the harmonic anti-plane shear stress waves was investigated by means of the non-local theory. The traditional concepts of the non-local theory were extended to solve the fracture problem of functionally graded materials.To make the analysis tractable, it was assumed that the material properties vary exponentially with coordinate parallel to the crack. By use of the Fourier transform,the problem can be solved with the help of a pair of dual integral equations, in which the unknown variable was the displacement on the crack surfaces. To solve the dual integral equations, the displacement on the crack surfaces was expanded in a series of Jacobi polynomials. Unlike the classical elasticity solutions, it is found that no stress singularities are present at crack tips. The non-local elastic solutions yield a finite hoop stress at crack tips, thus allowing us to use the maximum stress as a fracture criterion. The magnitude of the finite dynamic stress field depends on the crack length, the parameter describing the functionally graded materials, the circular frequency of the incident waves and the lattice parameter of materials.

  3. Shear Wave Structure of Umbria and Marche, Italy, Strong Motion Seismometer Sites Affected by the 1997-98 Umbria-Marche, Italy, Earthquake Sequence

    Kayen, Robert; Scasserra, Giuseppe; Stewart, Jonathan P.; Lanzo, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    A long sequence of earthquakes, eight with magnitudes between 5 and 6, struck the Umbria and Marche regions of central Italy between September 26, 1997 and July 1998. The earthquake swarm caused severe structural damage, particularly to masonry buildings, and resulted in the loss of twelve lives and about 150 injuries. The source of the events was a single seismogenic structure that consists of several faults with a prevailing northwest-southeast strike and crosses the Umbria-Marche border. The focal mechanism of the largest shocks indicates that the events were the product of shallow extensional normal faulting along a NE-SW extension perpendicular to the trend of the Apennines. The network of analog seismometer stations in the Umbria and Marche regions recorded motions of the main September and October 1997 events and a dense array of mobile digital stations, installed since September 29, recorded most of the swarm. The permanent national network Rete Accelerometrica Nazionale (RAN) is administered and maintained by Dipartimento delle Protezione Civile (DPC: Civil Protection Department); the temporary array was managed by Servizio Sismico Nazionale (SSN) in cooperation with small agencies and Universities. ENEA, the operator of many seismometer stations in Umbria, is the public Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment. Many of the temporary and permanent stations in the Italian seismic network have little or no characterization of seismic velocities. In this study, we investigated 17 Italian sites using an active-source approach that employs low frequency harmonic waves to measure the dispersive nature of surface waves in the ground. We used the Spectral Analysis of Surface Wave (SASW) approach, coupled with an array of harmonic-wave electro-mechanical sources that are driven in-phase to excite the ground. An inversion algorithm using a non-linear least-squares best-fit method is used to compute shear wave velocities for up to 100

  4. The coupling between internal waves and shear-induced turbulence in stellar radiation zones: the critical layer

    Alvan, Lucie; Decressin, Thibaut

    2013-01-01

    Internal gravity waves (hereafter IGWs) are known as one of the candidates for explaining the angular velocity profile in the Sun and in solar-type main-sequence and evolved stars, due to their role in the transport of angular momentum. Our bringing concerns critical layers, a process poorly explored in stellar physics, defined as the location where the local relative frequency of a given wave to the rotational frequency of the fluid tends to zero (i.e that corresponds to co-rotation resonances). IGW propagate through stably-stratified radiative regions, where they extract or deposit angular momentum through two processes: radiative and viscous dampings and critical layers. Our goal is to obtain a complete picture of the effects of this latters. First, we expose a mathematical resolution of the equation of propagation for IGWs in adiabatic and non-adiabatic cases near critical layers. Then, the use of a dynamical stellar evolution code, which treats the secular transport of angular momentum, allows us to appl...

  5. A Comprehensive Study of Fracture Patterns and Densities in The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir Using Microearthquake Shear-Wave Splitting Tomography

    Peter E. Malin; Eylon Shalev; Min Lou; Silas M. Simiyu; Anastasia Stroujkova; Windy McCausland

    2004-02-24

    In this project we developed a method for using seismic S-wave data to map the patterns and densities of sub-surface fractures in the NW Geysers Geothermal Field/ (1) This project adds to both the general methods needed to characterize the geothermal production fractures that supply steam for power generation and to the specific knowledge of these in the Geysers area. (2)By locating zones of high fracture density it will be possible to reduce the cost of geothermal power development with the targeting of high production geothermal wells. (3) The results of the project having been transferred to both US based and international geothermal research and exploration agencies and concerns by several published papers and meeting presentations, and through the distribution of the data handling and other software codes we developed.

  6. In Vivo Evaluation of Cervical Stiffness Evolution during Induced Ripening Using Shear Wave Elastography, Histology and 2 Photon Excitation Microscopy: Insight from an Animal Model.

    Laura Peralta

    Full Text Available Prematurity affects 11% of the births and is the main cause of infant mortality. On the opposite case, the failure of induction of parturition in the case of delayed spontaneous birth is associated with fetal suffering. Both conditions are associated with precocious and/or delayed cervical ripening. Quantitative and objective information about the temporal evolution of the cervical ripening may provide a complementary method to identify cases at risk of preterm delivery and to assess the likelihood of successful induction of labour. In this study, the cervical stiffness was measured in vivo in pregnant sheep by using Shear Wave Elastography (SWE. This technique assesses the stiffness of tissue through the measurement of shear waves speed (SWS. In the present study, 9 pregnant ewes were used. Cervical ripening was induced at 127 days of pregnancy (term: 145 days by dexamethasone injection in 5 animals, while 4 animals were used as control. Elastographic images of the cervix were obtained by two independent operators every 4 hours during 24 hours after injection to monitor the cervical maturation induced by the dexamethasone. Based on the measurements of SWS during vaginal ultrasound examination, the stiffness in the second ring of the cervix was quantified over a circular region of interest of 5 mm diameter. SWS was found to decrease significantly in the first 4-8 hours after dexamethasone compared to controls, which was associated with cervical ripening induced by dexamethasone (from 1.779 m/s ± 0.548 m/s, p < 0.0005, to 1.291 m/s ± 0.516 m/s, p < 0.000. Consequently a drop in the cervical elasticity was quantified too (from 9.5 kPa ± 0.9 kPa, p < 0.0005, to 5.0 kPa ± 0.8 kPa, p < 0.000. Moreover, SWE measurements were highly reproducible between both operators at all times. Cervical ripening induced by dexamethasone was confirmed by the significant increase in maternal plasma Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, as evidenced by the assay of its

  7. Shear-wave velocity structure at Mt. Etna from inversion of Rayleigh-wave dispersion patterns (2 s < T < 20 s

    Roberto Scarpa

    2010-05-01

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    In the present study, we investigated the dispersion characteristics of medium-to-long period Rayleigh waves (2 s < T < 20 s using both single-station techniques (multiple-filter analysis, and phase-match filter and multichannel techniques (horizontal slowness [p] and angular frequency [~] stack, and cross-correlation to determine the velocity structure for the Mt. Etna volcano. We applied these techniques to a dataset of teleseisms, as regional and local earthquakes recorded by two broad-band seismic arrays installed at Mt. Etna in 2002 and 2005, during two seismic surveys organized by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV, sezione di Napoli. The dispersion curves obtained showed phase velocities ranging from 1.5 km/s to 4.0 km/s in the frequency band 0.05 Hz to 0.45 Hz. We inverted the average phase velocity dispersion curves using a non-linear approach, to obtain a set of shear-wave velocity

  8. Shear wave attenuation estimated from the spectral decay rate in the vicinity of the Petropavlovsk station, Kamchatka

    Gusev, A. A.; Guseva, E. M.

    2016-07-01

    The parameters of S-wave attenuation (the total effect of absorption and scattering) near the Petropavlovsk (PET) station in Kamchatka were estimated by means of the spectral method through an original procedure. The spectral method typically analyzes the changes with distance of the shape of spectra of the acceleration records assuming that the acceleration spectrum at the earthquake source is flat. In reality, this assumption is violated: the source acceleration spectra often have a high-frequency cutoff (the source-controlled f max) which limits the spectral working bandwidth. Ignoring this phenomenon not only leads to a broad scatter of the individual estimates but also causes systematic errors in the form of overestimation of losses. In the approach applied in the present study, we primarily estimated the frequency of the mentioned high-frequency cutoff and then constructed the loss estimates only within the frequency range where the source spectrum is approximately flat. The shape of the source spectrum was preliminarily assessed by the approximate loss compensation technique. For this purpose, we used the tentative attenuation estimates which are close to the final ones. The difference in the logarithms of the spectral amplitudes at the edges of the working bandwidth is the input for calculating the attenuation. We used the digital accelerograms from the PET station, with 80 samples per second digitization rate, and based on them, we calculated the averaged spectrum of the S-waves as the root mean square along two horizontal components. Our analysis incorporates 384 spectra from the local earthquakes with M = 4-6.5 at the hypocentral distances ranging from 80 to 220 km. By applying the nonlinear least-square method, we found the following parameters of the loss model: the Q-factor Q 0 = 156 ± 33 at frequency f = 1 Hz for the distance interval r = 0-100 km; the exponent in the power-law relationship describing the growth of the Q-factor with frequency,

  9. Shear-wave velocity characterization of the USGS Hawaiian strong-motion network on the Island of Hawaii and development of an NEHRP site-class map

    Wong, I.G.; Stokoe, K.H., II; Cox, B.R.; Yuan, J.; Knudsen, K.-L.; Terra, F.; Okubo, P.; Lin, Y.-C.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the level and nature of ground shaking in Hawaii for the purposes of earthquake hazard mitigation and seismic design, empirical groundmotion prediction models are desired. To develop such empirical relationships, knowledge of the subsurface site conditions beneath strong-motion stations is critical. Thus, as a first step to develop ground-motion prediction models for Hawaii, spectralanalysis-of-surface-waves (SASW) profiling was performed at the 22 free-field U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) strong-motion sites on the Big Island to obtain shear-wave velocity (VS) data. Nineteen of these stations recorded the 2006 Kiholo Bay moment magnitude (M) 6.7 earthquake, and 17 stations recorded the triggered M 6.0 Mahukona earthquake. VS profiling was performed to reach depths of more than 100 ft. Most of the USGS stations are situated on sites underlain by basalt, based on surficial geologic maps. However, the sites have varying degrees of weathering and soil development. The remaining strong-motion stations are located on alluvium or volcanic ash. VS30 (average VS in the top 30 m) values for the stations on basalt ranged from 906 to 1908 ft/s [National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site classes C and D], because most sites were covered with soil of variable thickness. Based on these data, an NEHRP site-class map was developed for the Big Island. These new VS data will be a significant input into an update of the USGS statewide hazard maps and to the operation of ShakeMap on the island of Hawaii.

  10. Method for improving data collection SNR of shear waves at shallow strata%提高浅层横波数据采集信噪比的方法

    李铭铭; 孔庆河; 张文德; 王晓娇

    2012-01-01

    为了取得信噪比较高的野外采集数据,根据浅层横波的激发与接收特点,通过对横波偏振特性分析、震源重量分析、激发面积(震源组合)分析,得出在野外采集时,利用横波偏振特性进行反向激发相减,可以提高浅层横波资料的信噪比;通过试验选取最佳的激发面积和选择合适的震源重量也能提高横波资料的信噪比.%In order to achieve a high SNR field data collection, based on the exciting and receiving characteristics of shallow shear waves, this study analyzes the polarization properties, source weight, and exciting area. It found that using transverse wave polarization properties, the reverse excitation phase reduction can improve the signal-to-noise ratio of shallow shear wave data. In addition, optimal stimulation area and appropriate source weight can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the shear wave data.

  11. Combined plate motion and density driven flow in the asthenosphere beneath Saudi Arabia: Evidence from shear-wave splitting and seismic anisotropy

    Hansen, S; Schwartz, S

    2006-02-08

    A comprehensive study of mantle anisotropy along the Red Sea and across Saudi Arabia was performed by analyzing shear-wave splitting recorded by stations from three different seismic networks: the largest, most widely distributed array of stations examined across Saudi Arabia to date. Stations near the Gulf of Aqaba display fast orientations that are aligned parallel to the Dead Sea Transform Fault, most likely related to the strike-slip motion between Africa and Arabia. However, most of our observations across Saudi Arabia are statistically the same, showing a consistent pattern of north-south oriented fast directions with delay times averaging about 1.4 s. Fossilized anisotropy related to the Proterozoic assembly of the Arabian Shield may contribute to the pattern but is not sufficient to fully explain the observations. We feel that the uniform anisotropic signature across Saudi Arabia is best explained by a combination of plate and density driven flow in the asthenosphere. By combining the northeast oriented flow associated with absolute plate motion with the northwest oriented flow associated with the channelized Afar plume along the Red Sea, we obtain a north-south oriented resultant that matches our splitting observations and supports models of active rifting processes. This explains why the north-south orientation of the fast polarization direction is so pervasive across the vast Arabian Plate.

  12. Optimal Elasticity cut-off value for discriminating Healthy to Pathological Fibrotic patients employing Fuzzy C-Means automatic segmentation in Liver Shear Wave Elastography images

    Gatos, Ilias; Tsantis, Stavros; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini; Theotokas, Ioannis; Zoumpoulis, Pavlos S.; Kagadis, George C.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine an optimal elasticity cut-off value for discriminating Healthy from Pathological fibrotic patients by means of Fuzzy C-Means automatic segmentation and maximum participation cluster mean value employment in Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) images. The clinical dataset comprised 32 subjects (16 Healthy and 16 histological or Fibroscan verified Chronic Liver Disease). An experienced Radiologist performed SWE measurement placing a region of interest (ROI) on each subject's right liver lobe providing a SWE image for each patient. Subsequently Fuzzy C-Means clustering was performed on every SWE image utilizing 5 clusters. Mean Stiffness value and pixels number of each cluster were calculated. The mean stiffness value feature of the cluster with maximum pixels number was then fed as input for ROC analysis. The selected Mean Stiffness value feature an Area Under the Curve (AUC) of 0.8633 with Optimum Cut-off value of 7.5 kPa with sensitivity and specificity values of 0.8438 and 0.875 and balanced accuracy of 0.8594. Examiner's classification measurements exhibited sensitivity, specificity and balanced accuracy value of 0.8125 with 7.1 kPa cutoff value. A new promising automatic algorithm was implemented with more objective criteria of defining optimum elasticity cut-off values for discriminating fibrosis stages for SWE. More subjects are needed in order to define if this algorithm is an objective tool to outperform manual ROI selection.

  13. Long distance coupling of lower hybrid waves in ITER relevant edge conditions in jet reversed shear plasmas

    A significant step towards demonstrating the feasibility of coupling Lower Hybrid (LH) waves in ITER has been achieved in the latest LH current drive experiments in JET. The local electron density in front of the LH launcher was increased by injecting gas (D2 or CD4) from a dedicated gas injection module magnetically connected to the launcher. P(LHCD) = 3 MW was coupled with an average reflection coefficient of 5%, at a distance between the last closed flux surface and the launcher of 10 cm, in plasmas with an internal transport barrier (ITB) and H-mode edge, with type 1 and type 3 ELMs (edge localized modes). Following a modification of the gas injection system, in order to optimise the gas localisation with respect to the LH launcher, injection of D2 proved to be more efficient than CD4. A D2 flux of 5-8 x 1021 el/s was required at 9 cm. The plasma performance (neutron rate, H-factor, ion temperature) was similar with D2 and CD4. An additional advantage with D2 injection was found, as it reduced the amplitude of the ELMs, which further facilitated the LH coupling. Furthermore, preliminary results of the study of the behaviour of electron density profile in the scrape-off layer during injection of C2H6 and C3H8 are reported. Finally, the appearance of hot spots, resulting from parasitic absorption of LHCD power in front of the launcher mouth, was studied in the long distance discharges with near gas injection. (authors)

  14. Seismic Site Classification and Correlation between Standard Penetration Test N Value and Shear Wave Velocity for Lucknow City in Indo-Gangetic Basin

    Anbazhagan, P.; Kumar, Abhishek; Sitharam, T. G.

    2013-03-01

    Subsurface lithology and seismic site classification of Lucknow urban center located in the central part of the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) are presented based on detailed shallow subsurface investigations and borehole analysis. These are done by carrying out 47 seismic surface wave tests using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and 23 boreholes drilled up to 30 m with standard penetration test (SPT) N values. Subsurface lithology profiles drawn from the drilled boreholes show low- to medium-compressibility clay and silty to poorly graded sand available till depth of 30 m. In addition, deeper boreholes (depth >150 m) were collected from the Lucknow Jal Nigam (Water Corporation), Government of Uttar Pradesh to understand deeper subsoil stratification. Deeper boreholes in this paper refer to those with depth over 150 m. These reports show the presence of clay mix with sand and Kankar at some locations till a depth of 150 m, followed by layers of sand, clay, and Kankar up to 400 m. Based on the available details, shallow and deeper cross-sections through Lucknow are presented. Shear wave velocity (SWV) and N-SPT values were measured for the study area using MASW and SPT testing. Measured SWV and N-SPT values for the same locations were found to be comparable. These values were used to estimate 30 m average values of N-SPT ( N 30) and SWV ( V {s/30}) for seismic site classification of the study area as per the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) soil classification system. Based on the NEHRP classification, the entire study area is classified into site class C and D based on V {s/30} and site class D and E based on N 30. The issue of larger amplification during future seismic events is highlighted for a major part of the study area which comes under site class D and E. Also, the mismatch of site classes based on N 30 and V {s/30} raises the question of the suitability of the NEHRP classification system for the study region. Further, 17 sets

  15. Assessment of liver fibrosis with 2-D shear wave elastography in comparison to transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in patients with chronic liver disease.

    Gerber, Ludmila; Kasper, Daniela; Fitting, Daniel; Knop, Viola; Vermehren, Annika; Sprinzl, Kathrin; Hansmann, Martin L; Herrmann, Eva; Bojunga, Joerg; Albert, Joerg; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2-D SWE) is an ultrasound-based elastography method integrated into a conventional ultrasound machine. It can evaluate larger regions of interest and, therefore, might be better at determining the overall fibrosis distribution. The aim of this prospective study was to compare 2-D SWE with the two best evaluated liver elastography methods, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse (point SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse) imaging, in the same population group. The study included 132 patients with chronic hepatopathies, in which liver stiffness was evaluated using transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and 2-D SWE. The reference methods were liver biopsy for the assessment of liver fibrosis (n = 101) and magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis (n = 31). No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy, assessed as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC), was found between the three elastography methods (2-D SWE, transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging) for the diagnosis of significant and advanced fibrosis and liver cirrhosis in the "per protocol" (AUROCs for fibrosis stages ≥2: 0.90, 0.95 and 0.91; for fibrosis stage [F] ≥3: 0.93, 0.95 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.92, 0.96 and 0.92) and "intention to diagnose" cohort (AUROCs for F ≥2: 0.87, 0.92 and 0.91; for F ≥3: 0.91, 0.93 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.88, 0.90 and 0.89). Therefore, 2-D SWE, ARFI imaging and transient elastography seem to be comparably good methods for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis. PMID:26116161

  16. Zonal flow formation in the presence of ambient mean shear

    Hsu, Pei-Chun; Diamond, P. H. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences and Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0424 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The effect of mean shear flows on zonal flow formation is considered in the contexts of plasma drift wave turbulence and quasi-geostrophic turbulence models. The generation of zonal flows by modulational instability in the presence of large-scale mean shear flows is studied using the method of characteristics as applied to the wave kinetic equation. It is shown that mean shear flows reduce the modulational instability growth rate by shortening the coherency time of the wave spectrum with the zonal shear. The scalings of zonal flow growth rate and turbulent vorticity flux with mean shear are determined in the strong shear limit.

  17. The inversion of shear wave slowness's radial variations based on the dipole flexural mode dispersion%基于偶极弯曲波频散的横波慢度径向分布反演

    马明明; 陈浩; 何晓; 王秀明

    2013-01-01

    本文针对地层横波慢度径向分层模型,分析了地层横波慢度的径向非均匀性对弯曲波频散的影响.基于径向非均匀与均匀模型之间弯曲波频散的差异,结合微扰法和Backus-Gilbert (BG)理论建立了反演横波慢度径向分布的方程,求取了地层横波慢度的径向分布.在无噪声和参数误差时,反演结果较好地反映了实际地层横波慢度的径向分布,当井孔流体或井外地层纵波慢度的选取误差在10%内变化时,反演结果基本保持不变;存在信噪比(SNR)为20 dB(信号的功率为噪声的100倍)或10 dB(信号的功率为噪声的10倍)噪声时,反演结果没有发生明显的改变,其相对误差基本控制在10%以内,可见噪声对反演结果的影响不大.以上反演结果说明,本文采用的结合微扰法和BG理论的反演方法来估测地层横波慢度的径向分布时,具有很好的鲁棒性,可以被用于现场了解井壁周围的地层性质.%Abstract The effect of shear wave slowness's radial heterogeneities on dipole flexural mode dispersions is analyzed for shear wave slowness's radially layered model.Perturbation method and Backus-Gilbert(BG) theory are used for the inversion of shear wave slowness radial variations based on the difference of flexural wave dispersions between radially heterogeneous and homogeneous formations.When there is no noise and error of other parameters,the radial variations of the inverted shear wave slowness agree very well with the assumed radial profile.When the choice of slowness for the borehole fluid or formation compressional wave has a deviation from the true value within 10 percent,the inverted radial variations of shear wave slowness almost remains unchanged.When there exists noise with SNR (Signal Noise Ratio) of 20 dB or 10 dB,the relative error of the inversion results is within 10 percent,which means the impact of noise on the inversion results is little.From the inversion results described

  18. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Apoutou N'Djin, W.; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion’s extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n=11 ) and mapped (n= 7 ). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n  =  3), then atrial (left, n= 2 ) and ventricular (left n=1 , right n=1 ) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5   ±   0.1 kPa to 6.0   ±   0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3   ±   0.3 kPa to 13.5   ±   9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3   ±   5.5 kPa (versus 4.4   ±   1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3   ±   10.3 kPa (versus 12.2   ±   4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8   ±   13

  19. Median of wave-current bottom shear stress in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_median.SHP)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  20. 95th percentile of wave-current bottom shear stress in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_95th_perc.SHP)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  1. High-Q energy trapping of temperature-stable shear waves with Lamé cross-sectional polarization in a single crystal silicon waveguide

    Tabrizian, R.; Daruwalla, A.; Ayazi, F.

    2016-03-01

    A multi-port electrostatically driven silicon acoustic cavity is implemented that efficiently traps the energy of a temperature-stable eigen-mode with Lamé cross-sectional polarization. Dispersive behavior of propagating and evanescent guided waves in a ⟨100⟩-aligned single crystal silicon waveguide is used to engineer the acoustic energy distribution of a specific shear eigen-mode that is well known for its low temperature sensitivity when implemented in doped single crystal silicon. Such an acoustic energy trapping in the central region of the acoustic cavity geometry and far from substrate obviates the need for narrow tethers that are conventionally used for non-destructive and high quality factor (Q) energy suspension in MEMS resonators; therefore, the acoustically engineered waveguide can simultaneously serve as in-situ self-oven by passing large uniformly distributed DC currents through its body and without any concern about perturbing the mode shape or deforming narrow supports. Such a stable thermo-structural performance besides large turnover temperatures than can be realized in Lamé eigen-modes make this device suitable for implementation of ultra-stable oven-controlled oscillators. 78 MHz prototypes implemented in arsenic-doped single crystal silicon substrates with different resistivity are transduced by in- and out-of-plane narrow-gap capacitive ports, showing high Q of ˜43k. The low resistivity device shows an overall temperature-induced frequency drift of 200 ppm over the range of -20 °C to 80 °C, which is ˜15× smaller compared to overall frequency drift measured for the similar yet high resistivity device in the same temperature range. Furthermore, a frequency tuning of ˜2100 ppm is achieved in high resistivity device by passing 45 mA DC current through its body. Continuous operation of the device under such a self-ovenizing current over 10 days did not induce frequency instability or degradation in Q.

  2. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates

  3. Study on influence of soil liquefaction on shear-wave velocity of soil-stone mixture%细粒土液化对土石混合料剪切波速的影响研究

    张宇辉; 张献民

    2011-01-01

    To study the shear-wave velocity variation law of soil-stone mixtures due to alteration of water content and mass percent of stone, by using sandy soil, silt containing sand and low liquid - limit clay, large laboratory vibration compaction equipment was designed and the test was conducted under the condition of different water content and different soil-stone proportion. The model of correlation between dry density of fine-grained soil and shear-wave velocity during the course of increasing of water content was was proposed. The influencing law of soil with different water content on shear-wave velocity of soil - stone mixture with connatural soil. The results show that when the dry density remains unchanged, the shear-wave velocity of soil decreases along with water content increases. When the water content remains unchanged, shear-wave velocity of soil increases with increaseing of water content while water content is small, the velocity of mixture increases, and the velocity varies comparable gibbous parabolically with the increasing of dry density while water content is close to liquefaction point, then the trend of velocity of mixture is similar to the one of soil with the lagging of turning point. The change of velocity of mixture caused by water ratio decreases with increasing of stone content. This conclusion is valuable in compaction degree evaluation of soil-stone mixture by the shear-wave velocity.%设计室内大型振动击实仪,对砂土、含砂粉土、低液限黏性土3种土样的纯土试件和土石混合试件进行了不同含水量、不同含石量情况下试件剪切波速对比试验.建立细粒土随含水率增大至液化过程中,细粒土干密度与剪切波速相关模型.研究不同含水率细粒土对同性质土体土石混填料剪切波速的影响规律.结果表明:干密度一定时,细粒土剪切波速随含水率的增大而减小.含水率相同,当含水率较小时,细粒土剪切波速随干密度的增大而

  4. Gelation under shear

    Butler, B.D.; Hanley, H.J.M.; Straty, G.C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States); Muzny, C.D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    An experimental small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of dense silica gels, prepared from suspensions of 24 nm colloidal silica particles at several volume fractions {theta} is discussed. Provided that {theta}{approx_lt}0.18, the scattered intensity at small wave vectors q increases as the gelation proceeds, and the structure factor S(q, t {yields} {infinity}) of the gel exhibits apparent power law behavior. Power law behavior is also observed, even for samples with {theta}>0.18, when the gel is formed under an applied shear. Shear also enhances the diffraction maximum corresponding to the inter-particle contact distance of the gel. Difficulties encountered when trying to interpret SANS data from these dense systems are outlined. Results of computer simulations intended to mimic gel formation, including computations of S(q, t), are discussed. Comments on a method to extract a fractal dimension characterizing the gel are included.

  5. Assessment of plantar fasciitis using shear wave elastography%剪切波弹性成像评价足底筋膜炎

    张立宁; 万文博; 张立海; 肖红雨; 罗渝昆; 费翔; 郑志新; 唐佩福

    2014-01-01

    目的:利用剪切波弹性成像技术比较不同年龄段正常人及足底筋膜炎患者的足底筋膜的厚度和硬度。方法对23名足底筋膜炎患者和30例健康志愿者进行剪切波弹性超声检查,测量足底筋膜跟骨止点及距离跟骨止点1 cm处的厚度和弹性模量值。结果老年组足底筋膜明显比年轻组厚(P=0.005),弹性模量值明显比年轻组小(P=0.000)。足底筋膜炎组足底筋膜厚度明显比老年组厚(P=0.001),弹性模量值明显比老年组小(P=0.000)。足底筋膜炎组的足底筋膜跟骨止点处弹性模量值比距离跟骨止点处1 cm的筋膜弹性值低(P=0.000),而健康志愿者年轻组和老年组的两个位置的弹性模量差异无统计学意义(P=0.172, P=0.126)。结论剪切波弹性成像能定量评估足底筋膜的硬度,足底筋膜的硬度随年龄增加而变小,足底筋膜炎的筋膜硬度较正常筋膜变小。%Objective To assess the stiffness and thickness of the plantar fascia using shear wave elastography (SWE) in healthy volunteers of different ages and in patients with plantar fasciitis. Methods The bilateral feet of 30 healthy volunteers and 23 patients with plantar fasciitis were examined with SWE. The plantar fascia thickness and elasticity modulus value were measured at the insertion of the calcaneus and at 1 cm from the insertion. Results The elderly volunteers had a significantly greater plantar fascia thickness measured using conventional ultrasound (P=0.005) and a significantly lower elasticity modulus value than the young volunteers (P=0.000). The patients with fasciitis had a significantly greater plantar fascia thickness (P=0.001) and a lower elasticity modulus value than the elderly volunteers (P=0.000). The elasticity modulus value was significantly lower at the calcaneus insertion than at 1 cm from the insertion in patients with fasciitis (P=0.000) but showed no significantly difference between the

  6. Shear wave velocity for the upper 30 m: Combining a 3D voxel model and seismic CPTS for the Groningen gas field, the Netherlands.

    Dambrink, Roula; Gunnink, Jan; Stafleu, Jan; de Lange, Ger; Kruiver, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    The Groningen gas field in the Netherlands is one of the largest gas fields of Europe and has been in production since the 1960's. Due to the progressive depletion of the reservoir, induced seismic activity has increased in recent years. In 2012, an earthquake of magnitude 3.6 initiated further research in prediction and management of risks related to man-induced earthquakes. Last year the government decided to reduce the gas extraction for this reason. One of the topics of concern is the large difference in earthquake-related damage to buildings which, in addition to the distance to the epicenter, appears to be also related to the composition of the shallow subsurface. To improve the spatial distribution of Shear Wave Velocities (Vs) in the shallow subsurface, used for hazard prediction, the Geological Survey of the Netherlands and Deltares constructed a Vs30 map of the upper 30 m of the gas field. In this map a high-resolution geological model (GeoTOP) is combined with seismic cone penetration tests (SCPT) from the area. The GeoTOP model is a 3D voxel model of the upper 50 m, in which each voxel (100x100x0.5 m) is attributed with lithostratigraphy and the most likely lithological class (peat, clay, fine sand, etc.). To obtain statistical distributions (with mean and standard deviation) of Vs for each combination of lithostratigraphical unit and lithoclass, 60 SCPTs were analyzed. In this way, it was possible to assign a specific Vs to each voxel in the model. For each voxel in the stack of voxels that covers the upper 30 m (i.e. 60 voxels), a Vs value was randomly drawn from the statistical distribution of the lithostratigraphical - lithoclass combination it belongs to. The Vs30 for each voxelstack is then calculated using the harmonic mean of the Vs of the 60 voxels. By repeating this procedure 100 times, an (average) Vs30 map and the uncertainty in Vs30 has been constructed. Using the procedure described above we were able to delineate zones with distinct Vs30

  7. Shear wave splitting of the 2009 L'Aquila seismic sequence: fluid saturated microcracks and crustal fractures in the Abruzzi region (Central Apennines, Italy)

    Baccheschi, P.; Pastori, M.; Margheriti, L.; Piccinini, D.

    2016-03-01

    The Abruzzi region is located in the Central Apennines Neogene fold-and-thrust belt and has one of the highest seismogenic potential in Italy, with high and diffuse crustal seismicity related to NE-SW oriented extension. In this study, we investigate the detailed spatial variation in shear wave splitting providing high-resolution anisotropic structure beneath the L'Aquila region. To accomplish this, we performed a systematic analysis of crustal anisotropic parameters: fast polarization direction (ϕ) and delay time (δt). We benefit from the dense coverage of seismic stations operating in the area and from a catalogue of several accurate earthquake locations of the 2009 L'Aquila seismic sequence, related to the Mw 6.1 2009 L'Aquila main shock, to describe in detail the geometry of the anisotropic volume around the active faults that ruptured. The spatial variations both in ϕ and δt suggest a complex anisotropic structure beneath the region caused by a combination of both structural- and stress-induced mechanisms. The average ϕ is NNW-SSE oriented (N141°), showing clear similarity both with the local fault strike and the SHmax. In the central part of the study area fast axes are oriented NW-SE, while moving towards the northeastern and northwestern sectors the fast directions clearly diverge from the general trend of NW-SE and rotate accordingly to the local fault strikes. The above-mentioned fault-parallel ϕ distribution suggests that the observed anisotropy is mostly controlled by the local fault-related structure. Toward the southeast fast directions become orthogonal both to strike of the local mapped faults and to the SHmax. Here, ϕ are predominantly oriented NE-SW; we interpret this orientation as due to the presence of a highly fractured and overpressurized rock volume which should be responsible of the 90° flips in ϕ and the increase in δt. Another possible mechanism for NE-SW orientation of ϕ in the southeastern sector could be ascribed to the

  8. Wave

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for t...

  9. Wave

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  10. Cumulation of a spherically converging shock wave in metals and its dependence on elastic-plastic properties, phase transitions, spall and shear fractures

    Kozlov, E. A.; Petrovtsev, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    Consideration is given to results of experimental and theoretical investigations how alpha-epsilon- phase transition in the unalloyed iron and the 30KhGSA steel and its absence in the austenitic 12Kh18N10T stainless steel influence processes under explosive deformation of spheres made of these materials. Polymorphous transition is shown to significantly effect on: - amount of explosion-products energy transferred to a sphere, - evolution of the converging-wave structure and its parameters, profiles of stress wave and temperature T(R,t) for some Lagrangian particles along the sphere radius, - character of energy cumulation under spherical convergence of waves.

  11. 3-D Shear Wave Velocity Model of Mexico and South US: Bridging Seismic Networks with Ambient Noise Cross-Correlations (C1) and Correlation of Coda of Correlations (C3).

    Spica, Zack; Perton, Mathieu; Calò, Marco; Legrand, Denis; Córdoba Montiel, Francisco; Iglesias, Arturo

    2016-07-01

    This work presents an innovative strategy to enhance the resolution of surface wave tomography obtained from ambient noise cross-correlation (C1) by bridging asynchronous seismic networks through the correlation of coda of correlations (C3). Rayleigh wave group dispersion curves show consistent results between synchronous and asynchronous stations. Rayleigh wave group travel times are inverted to construct velocity-period maps with unprecedented resolution for a region covering Mexico and the southern United States. The resulting period maps are then used to regionalize dispersion curves in order to obtain local 1-D shear velocity models (VS) of the crust and uppermost mantle in every cell of a grid of 0.4°. The 1-D structures are obtained by iteratively adding layers until reaching a given misfit, and a global tomography model is considered as an input for depths below 150 km. Finally, a high-resolution 3-D VS model is obtained from these inversions. The major structures observed in the 3-D model are in agreement with the tectonic-geodynamic features and with previous regional and local studies. It also offers new insights to understand the present and past tectonic evolution of the region.

  12. 3-D shear wave velocity model of Mexico and South US: bridging seismic networks with ambient noise cross-correlations (C1) and correlation of coda of correlations (C3)

    Spica, Zack; Perton, Mathieu; Calò, Marco; Legrand, Denis; Córdoba-Montiel, Francisco; Iglesias, Arturo

    2016-09-01

    This work presents an innovative strategy to enhance the resolution of surface wave tomography obtained from ambient noise cross-correlation (C1) by bridging asynchronous seismic networks through the correlation of coda of correlations (C3). Rayleigh wave group dispersion curves show consistent results between synchronous and asynchronous stations. Rayleigh wave group traveltimes are inverted to construct velocity-period maps with unprecedented resolution for a region covering Mexico and the southern United States. The resulting period maps are then used to regionalize dispersion curves in order to obtain local 1-D shear velocity models (VS) of the crust and uppermost mantle in every cell of a grid of 0.4°. The 1-D structures are obtained by iteratively adding layers until reaching a given misfit, and a global tomography model is considered as an input for depths below 150 km. Finally, a high-resolution 3-D VS model is obtained from these inversions. The major structures observed in the 3-D model are in agreement with the tectonic-geodynamic features and with previous regional and local studies. It also offers new insights to understand the present and past tectonic evolution of the region.

  13. Dynamic shear deformation in high purity Fe

    Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bingert, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Carl P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Mike F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The forced shear test specimen, first developed by Meyer et al. [Meyer L. et al., Critical Adiabatic Shear Strength of Low Alloyed Steel Under Compressive Loading, Metallurgical Applications of Shock Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena (Marcel Decker, 1986), 657; Hartmann K. et al., Metallurgical Effects on Impact Loaded Materials, Shock Waves and High Strain rate Phenomena in Metals (Plenum, 1981), 325-337.], has been utilized in a number of studies. While the geometry of this specimen does not allow for the microstructure to exactly define the location of shear band formation and the overall mechanical response of a specimen is highly sensitive to the geometry utilized, the forced shear specimen is useful for characterizing the influence of parameters such as strain rate, temperature, strain, and load on the microstructural evolution within a shear band. Additionally, many studies have utilized this geometry to advance the understanding of shear band development. In this study, by varying the geometry, specifically the ratio of the inner hole to the outer hat diameter, the dynamic shear localization response of high purity Fe was examined. Post mortem characterization was performed to quantify the width of the localizations and examine the microstructural and textural evolution of shear deformation in a bcc metal. Increased instability in mechanical response is strongly linked with development of enhanced intergranular misorientations, high angle boundaries, and classical shear textures characterized through orientation distribution functions.

  14. Study of shear wave attenuation field variations in Central Asia region using records of nuclear and chemical explosions at the Semipalatinsk Test Site

    The temporal variations of amplitude ratio of Lg and Pg, Lg and P waves were studied using the 1964-2000 records of more than 200 underground nuclear and chemical calibration explosions obtained at the Northern Tien Shan TLG station, KURK station (Eastern Kazakhstan), BRVK (Kokchetav Massif), GRM (Southern Tien Shan) located at epicentral distances of 77-1400 km. Variations in this parameter with time are shown to be significantly different for different paths. The spatial-temporal variations of the seismic wave attenuation field are presumably associated with the ascent of juvenile fluids through large deep faults. (author)

  15. Evidence for tropospheric wind shear excitation of high-phase-speed gravity waves reaching the mesosphere using the ray-tracing technique

    M. Pramitha; M. Venkat Ratnam; Taori, A.; B. V. Krishna Murthy; D. Pallamraju; S. Vijaya Bhaskar Rao

    2015-01-01

    Sources and propagation characteristics of high-frequency gravity waves observed in the mesosphere using airglow emissions from Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E) and Hyderabad (17.5° N, 78.5° E) are investigated using reverse ray tracing. Wave amplitudes are also traced back, including both radiative and diffusive damping. The ray tracing is performed using background temperature and wind data obtained from the MSISE-90 and HWM-07 models, respectively. For the Gadanki region, the s...

  16. Three dimensional shear wave velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in South China Sea and its adjacent regions by surface waveform inversion

    2001-01-01

    We assembled approximately 328 seismic records. The data set wasfrom 4 digitally recording long-period and broadband stations of CDSN. We carried out the inversion based on the partitioned waveform inversion (PWI). It partitions the large-scale optimization problem into a number of independent small-scale problems. We adopted surface waveform inversion with an equal block (2°′2°) discretization in order to acquire the images of shear velocity structure at different depths (from surface to 430 km) in the crust and upper-mantle. The resolution of all these anomalies has been established with 2check-board2 resolution tests. These results show significant difference in velocity, lithosphere and asthenosphere structure between South China Sea and its adjacent regions.

  17. Shear-Wave Splitting in a Critical Crust: the Next Step Biréfringence des ondes transversales dans les croûtes critiques : la prochaine étape

    Crampin S.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Arguably, shear-wave splitting displaying azimuthal anisotropy has not lived up to its initial promise of opening a new window for understanding cracks and stress in the crust. This paper reviews two recent related developments which appear to renew these initial hopes and provide new opportunities for monitoring, modelling, and even predicting, the (pre-fracturing deformation of fluid-saturated microcracked rock. A recently developed model of anisotropic poro-elasticity (APE for the stress-induced evolution of fluid-saturated microcracked rock matches a wide range of otherwise inexplicable or dissociated phenomena and appears to be a good first-order approximation to the evolution of fluid-saturated microcracked rock. Since the parameters that control small-scale (pre-fracturing deformation also control shear-wave splitting, it appears that the evolution of fluid-saturated microcracked rock can be directly monitored by shear-wave splitting, and the response to future changes predicted by APE. The success of APE-modelling and observations of shear-wave splitting imply that almost all rock is close to a state of fracture criticality associated with the percolation threshold, when shear-strength is lost and through-going fractures can propagate. This confirms other evidence for the self-organized criticality of in situ rock. The significance of this identification is that the small-scale physics that controls the whole phenomena can now be identified as the stress-induced manipulation of fluids around intergranular microcracks. This has the possibly unique advantage amongst critical systems that details of the pre-fracturing deformation and the approach to the criticality threshold (in this case the proximity to fracturing can be monitored at each locality by appropriate observations of shear-wave splitting. This paper reviews the these developments and discusses their implications and applications, particularly the implications of self

  18. Shear-wave velocity model of the basin of Santiago de Chile derived from ambient noise measurements for the determination of seismic site conditions and amplification

    Pilz, M.; Parolai, S.; Picozzi, M.; Wang, R.; Leyton, F.; Campos, J. A.; Zschau, J.

    2009-12-01

    Generally, the most intense shaking during an earthquake occurs near the rupture fault and decreases with distance away from the fault. However, in a single earthquake the shaking at one site can easily be several times stronger than at another site, even when their distance from the rupture fault is the same. Such site effects are mainly caused by the softness of the soil near the surface and by the thickness of the sediments above hard rock. Seismic site characterization therefore requires usually substantial investment both in time and money for geophysical data acquisition. On the other hand, the necessity of estimating seismic risk for large urban areas like Santiago de Chile wants for at least a first order classification of soil and building vulnerability and therefore needs the definition of proxies. Recently, Wald and Allen (2007) suggested that the slope of topography might serve as a suitable parameter for the estimation of site effects irrespective of the spatial resolution used. Measurements of seismic noise at 146 sites have been carried out in the northern part of Santiago de Chile to determine the fundamental resonance frequency of the sites. The spatial variation in the thickness of the sedimentary cover, known from previous gravimetric investigations, varies significantly over short scale and is roughly retrieved from the peak in the horizontal-to-vertical (H/V) ratios of ambient noise. We inverted the H/V spectra individually for receiving local S-wave velocity profiles. For the inversion procedure, we also used additional geological and geophysical information. The resulting 3D model was derived for a 26 km X 12 km area by interpolation between the single S-wave velocity profiles with a kriging technique and shows good agreement with the few existing velocity profiles but also allows to image the entire area as well as deeper parts of the basin in more detail. Significant variations in the S-wave velocity-depth gradient are found. The wealth of

  19. 基于TDC的L_(CR)波切向应力检测方法的研究%METHOD WITH TDC FOR EVALUATING SHEAR STRESS BY LCR WAVE

    戴仙金; 丁杰雄; 李凌轩

    2010-01-01

    基于固体中声速与应力的关系以及临界折射纵波(critically refracted longitudinal wave, L_(CR))的产生机理,提出一种利用LCR波从表面检测物体内部切向应力的实施方法,并对测量系统的硬件结构和工作原理进行详细阐述.针对应力改变导致的LCR波传播时间的微量变化,系统采用基于逻辑门绝对传输时间原理工作的"时间-数字转换器"(time to digital converter,TDC)来满足高精度的时间间隔测量要求.在测量过程中采用"单端发射-双端接收"的布局模式进一步降低测量误差,以提高应力检测的精度.

  20. High Prevalence of Liver Fibrosis in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Monoinfection and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Hepatitis-B Co-infection as Assessed by Shear Wave Elastography: Study at a Teaching Hospital in Kenya

    Gitau, Samuel Nguku; Vinayak, Sudhir; Silaba, Micah; Adam, Rodney; Shah, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of liver fibrosis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) monoinfection versus those with HIV hepatitis-B virus (HBV) co-infection as assessed with shear wave elastography (SWE) in a tertiary sub-Saharan Africa hospital. Materials and Methods: A total of 105 consecutive patients, 70 with HIV monoinfection and 35 with HIV-HBV co-infection, had liver elastography obtained using SWE to assess for the presence of liver fibrosis the cutoff of which was 5.6 kPa. Assessment of aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) score (a noninvasive serum biomarker of liver fibrosis) in these patients was also done. Results: The prevalence of liver fibrosis was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in patients with HIV-HBV co-infection, 25.7%, compared to those with HIV monoinfection, 7.1%. APRI score was greater in patients with HIV-HBV co-infection than those with HIV monoinfection. HIV co-infection with HBV accelerates progression to liver fibrosis. Association of a low cluster of differentiation 4 (CD-4) count with advanced fibrosis supports earlier starting of antiretroviral therapy to prevent rapid progression of liver disease in HIV-positive patients. Conclusion: In view of the high prevalence of liver fibrosis in patients with HIV-HBV co-infection, regular monitoring of the disease progression is recommended. PMID:27403400

  1. Reduced shear power spectrum

    Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Northwestern U.; Shapiro, Charles; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  2. Measurement of the dynamic shear modulus of surface layers I. Theory

    Waterman, Herman A.

    1984-01-01

    In measuring the dynamic surface-shear modulus of a surface layer on a liquid, conditions may occur—low-shear modulus and/or high frequencies—which promote wave-propagation effects to play a predominant role. A theory is presented with the help of which the (complex) wave number of the wave in the l

  3. Spiral morphology and galactic shear rate

    Grand, Robert J J; Cropper, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Spiral galaxies are observed to exhibit a range of morphologies, in particular in the shape of spiral arms. A key diagnostic parameter is the pitch angle, which describes how tightly wound the spiral arms are. Observationally and analytically, a correlation between pitch angle and galactic shear rate has been detected. For the first time, we perform a suite of N-body simulations to calculate and compare the pitch angles of both individual density waves and overall spiral structure by use of two independent techniques. We find that higher galactic shear rates produce more tightly wound spiral arms, both in individual mode patterns (density waves) and in the overall density enhancement. Although the mode pattern pitch angles by construction remain constant with time, the overall logarithmic spiral arm winds over time, which is consistent with both the observational scatter in pitch angle versus shear seen from observations, and the recent idea that multiple mode patterns may interfere with each other to create ...

  4. Stationary spectra in a sheared plasma (linear limit)

    The short-wave low-frequency stationary spectra of correlated electromagnetic fluctuations in a sheared current-currying plasma, are obtained in a linear approximation. Even being weak, the shear may considerably alter the spectral characteristics of plasma perturbations. 3 refs. (author)

  5. Wave Loads on Cylinders

    Burcharth, H. F.; Frigaard, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Wave loads may be defined as time varying forces on a body resulting from the wave induced flow fields which surrounds the body in whole or in part. Such unsteady fluid forces are the net result of pressure and shear forces integrated over the instantaneous wetted area.......Wave loads may be defined as time varying forces on a body resulting from the wave induced flow fields which surrounds the body in whole or in part. Such unsteady fluid forces are the net result of pressure and shear forces integrated over the instantaneous wetted area....

  6. On Howard's Conjecture in Heterogeneous Shear Flow Problem

    R G Shandil; Jagjit Singh

    2003-11-01

    Howard's conjecture, which states that in the linear instability problem of inviscid heterogeneous parallel shear flow growth rate of an arbitrary unstable wave must approach zero as the wave length decreases to zero, is established in a mathematically rigorous fashion for plane parallel heterogeneous shear flows with negligible buoyancy force $g \\ll 1$ (Miles J W, J. Fluid Mech. 10 (1961) 496–508), where is the basic heterogeneity distribution function).

  7. Which are the cut-off values of 2D-Shear Wave Elastography (2D-SWE) liver stiffness measurements predicting different stages of liver fibrosis, considering Transient Elastography (TE) as the reference method?

    Sporea, Ioan, E-mail: isporea@umft.ro; Bota, Simona, E-mail: bota_simona1982@yahoo.com; Gradinaru-Taşcău, Oana, E-mail: bluonmyown@yahoo.com; Şirli, Roxana, E-mail: roxanasirli@gmail.com; Popescu, Alina, E-mail: alinamircea.popescu@gmail.com; Jurchiş, Ana, E-mail: ana.jurchis@yahoo.com

    2014-03-15

    Introduction: To identify liver stiffness (LS) cut-off values assessed by means of 2D-Shear Wave Elastography (2D-SWE) for predicting different stages of liver fibrosis, considering Transient Elastography (TE) as the reference method. Methods: Our prospective study included 383 consecutive subjects, with or without hepatopathies, in which LS was evaluated by means of TE and 2D-SWE. To discriminate between various stages of fibrosis by TE we used the following LS cut-offs (kPa): F1-6, F2-7.2, F3-9.6 and F4-14.5. Results: The rate of reliable LS measurements was similar for TE and 2D-SWE: 73.9% vs. 79.9%, p = 0.06. Older age and higher BMI were associated for both TE and 2D-SWE with the impossibility to obtain reliable LS measurements. Reliable LS measurements by both elastographic methods were obtained in 65.2% of patients. A significant correlation was found between TE and 2D-SWE measurements (r = 0.68). The best LS cut-off values assessed by 2D-SWE for predicting different stages of liver fibrosis were: F ≥ 1: >7.1 kPa (AUROC = 0.825); F ≥ 2: >7.8 kPa (AUROC = 0.859); F ≥ 3: >8 kPa (AUROC = 0.897) and for F = 4: >11.5 kPa (AUROC = 0.914). Conclusions: 2D-SWE is a reliable method for the non-invasive evaluation of liver fibrosis, considering TE as the reference method. The accuracy of 2D-SWE measurements increased with the severity of liver fibrosis.

  8. Which are the cut-off values of 2D-Shear Wave Elastography (2D-SWE) liver stiffness measurements predicting different stages of liver fibrosis, considering Transient Elastography (TE) as the reference method?

    Introduction: To identify liver stiffness (LS) cut-off values assessed by means of 2D-Shear Wave Elastography (2D-SWE) for predicting different stages of liver fibrosis, considering Transient Elastography (TE) as the reference method. Methods: Our prospective study included 383 consecutive subjects, with or without hepatopathies, in which LS was evaluated by means of TE and 2D-SWE. To discriminate between various stages of fibrosis by TE we used the following LS cut-offs (kPa): F1-6, F2-7.2, F3-9.6 and F4-14.5. Results: The rate of reliable LS measurements was similar for TE and 2D-SWE: 73.9% vs. 79.9%, p = 0.06. Older age and higher BMI were associated for both TE and 2D-SWE with the impossibility to obtain reliable LS measurements. Reliable LS measurements by both elastographic methods were obtained in 65.2% of patients. A significant correlation was found between TE and 2D-SWE measurements (r = 0.68). The best LS cut-off values assessed by 2D-SWE for predicting different stages of liver fibrosis were: F ≥ 1: >7.1 kPa (AUROC = 0.825); F ≥ 2: >7.8 kPa (AUROC = 0.859); F ≥ 3: >8 kPa (AUROC = 0.897) and for F = 4: >11.5 kPa (AUROC = 0.914). Conclusions: 2D-SWE is a reliable method for the non-invasive evaluation of liver fibrosis, considering TE as the reference method. The accuracy of 2D-SWE measurements increased with the severity of liver fibrosis

  9. The influence of viscosity on the shear strain remotely induced by focused ultrasound in viscoelastic media.

    Barannik, E A; Girnyk, S A; Tovstiak, V V; Marusenko, A I; Volokhov, V A; Sarvazyan, A P; Emelianov, S Y

    2004-05-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI), an emerging acoustic technology for medical diagnostics, is based on remote generation of shear waves in tissue by radiation force in the focal region of an ultrasonic beam. In this study, the feasibility of Doppler ultrasonic technique to visualize the remotely induced shear waves was demonstrated. The generation of shear displacement in the focal region of a pulsed 1-MHz ultrasound beam with pulse duration of approximately about 2 ms and intensity levels on the order of 145 W/cm2, and consequent propagation of shear wave in tissue-mimicking and muscle tissue in vitro, were measured. The analysis of temporal behavior of shear displacement within the focal plane allowed estimation of shear wave velocities. The velocities were 4 and 7 m/s in hard phantom and tissue containing phantom, respectively. The measured shear displacements on the order of micrometers in gel-based phantoms are in reasonable agreement with theoretical estimates derived from an earlier developed model of shear wave generation by radiation force of focused ultrasound. The study revealed significant dependence of shear strain on the medium viscosity. The complex oscillatory character of shear strain relaxation in viscoelastic phantom and muscle tissue in vitro was observed. PMID:15139649

  10. Measuring Ultrasonic Shear-Wave Velocity

    Nummelin, J.

    1983-01-01

    New technique improves accuracy of measurements of ultrasonic shearwave velocity. Technique eliminates need to measure incident sound angle. Technique contains groove in which steel sphere is placed. Sphere act as reference point for measuring path lengths and propagation times. Velocity measurements are within 1 percent of published data.

  11. Pressure-shear experiments on granular materials.

    Reinhart, William Dodd (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Thornhill, Tom Finley, III (, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Alexander, C. Scott (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-10-01

    Pressure-shear experiments were performed on granular tungsten carbide and sand using a newly-refurbished slotted barrel gun. The sample is a thin layer of the granular material sandwiched between driver and anvil plates that remain elastic. Because of the obliquity, impact generates both a longitudinal wave, which compresses the sample, and a shear wave that probes the strength of the sample. Laser velocity interferometry is employed to measure the velocity history of the free surface of the anvil. Since the driver and anvil remain elastic, analysis of the results is, in principal, straightforward. Experiments were performed at pressures up to nearly 2 GPa using titanium plates and at higher pressure using zirconium plates. Those done with the titanium plates produced values of shear stress of 0.1-0.2 GPa, with the value increasing with pressure. On the other hand, those experiments conducted with zirconia anvils display results that may be related to slipping at an interface and shear stresses mostly at 0.1 GPa or less. Recovered samples display much greater particle fracture than is observed in planar loading, suggesting that shearing is a very effective mechanism for comminution of the grains.

  12. Half interpercentile range (half of the difference between the 16th and 84th percentiles) of wave-current bottom shear stress in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_hIPR.SHP)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  13. U.S. Geological Survey calculated median of wave-current bottom shear stress in the South Atlantic Bight from May 2010 to May 2011 (SAB_median, polygon shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  14. U.S. Geological Survey calculated 95th percentile of wave-current bottom shear stress for the South Atlantic Bight for May 2010 to May 2011 (SAB_95th_perc, polygon shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  15. Direct bed stress measurements under solitary tsunami-type waves and breaking tsunami wave fronts

    JayaKumar, S.; Baldock, T.E.

    , the force measured by the shear plate includes the bed shear stress and the pressure gradient force from the wave. Linear wave theory is often used to estimate (Rankin and Hires, 2000) and eliminate the pressure gradient from the total force so... for selected solitary waves generated in laboratory that are comparable with the theory Parameters Cyclone (shallow) Cyclone (deep) Tsunami-1 (shallow) Tsunami-2 (shallow) Tsunami-1 (deep) Tsunami-2 (deep) Wave height (m) 20 20 1 1 1 1 Wave...

  16. Maslov Shear-Waveforms in Highly Anisotropic Shales and Implications for Shear-Wave Splitting Analyses Formes d'onde transversales de Maslov dans les argiles fortement anisotropes et implications dans les analyses de biréfringence des ondes transversales

    Caddick J.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Shales are the most common sedimentary rocks in hydrocarbon environments often forming the source rock and trapping rock for a reservoir. Due to the platey nature of the constituent grains, shales are commonly anisotropic. In this paper we calculate seismic waveforms for highly anisotropic shales using Maslov asymptotic theory (MAT. This theory is an extension of classical ray theory which provides valid waveforms in regions of caustics (wavefront folding where ray theory amplitudes are unstable. Asymptotic ray theory (ART is based on the Fermat or geometrical ray which connects the source and receiver. In contrast, the Maslov solution integrates the contributions from neighbouring non-Fermat rays. Raypaths, travel-times, amplitudes and synthetic seismograms are presented for three highly anisotropic shales using a very simple 1D model comprised of an anisotropic shale overlying an isotropic shale. The ART waveforms fail to account for complex waveform effects due to triplications. In comparison, the MAT waveforms predict nonsingular amplitudes at wavefront cusps and it predicts the diffracted signals from these cusps. A Maslov solution which integrates ray contributions over a single slowness component will break down when rays focus in 3D (at a point rather than along a line. One of the tested shales shows such a point caustic and integration over 2 slowness components is required to remove the amplitude singularity. Finally, we examine the effects of wavefront triplications on Alford rotations which are used to estimate shear-wave splitting. In such cases, the rotation successfully finds the fast shear-wave polarization, but it can be unreliable in its estimate of the time separation. Les argiles sont les roches sédimentaires les plus répandues dans l'environnement des hydrocarbures, et forment souvent la roche mère et la roche des pièges pétrolifères. En raison de la structure en plaques des grains, les argiles sont g

  17. Cross Shear Roll Bonding

    Bay, Niels; Bjerregaard, Henrik; Petersen, Søren. B;

    1994-01-01

    The present paper describes an investigation of roll bonding an AlZn alloy to mild steel. Application of cross shear roll bonding, where the two equal sized rolls run with different peripheral speed, is shown to give better bond strength than conventional roll bonding. Improvements of up to 20......-23% in bond strength are found and full bond strength is obtained at a reduction of 50% whereas 65% is required in case of conventional roll bonding. Pseudo cross shear roll bonding, where the cross shear effect is obtained by running two equal sized rolls with different speed, gives the same results....

  18. Stochastic parametric resonance in shear flows

    F. J. Poulin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-periodic shear flows can give rise to Parametric Instability (PI, as in the case of the Mathieu equation (Stoker, 1950; Nayfeh and Mook, 1995. This mechanism results from a resonance between the oscillatory basic state and waves that are superimposed on it. Farrell and Ioannou (1996a, b explain that PI occurs because the snap-shots of the velocity profile are subject to transient growth. If the flows were purely steady the transient growth would subside and not have any long lasting effect. However, the coupling between transient growth and the time variation of the basic state create PI. Mathematically, transient growth, and therefore PI, are due to the nonorthogonal eigenspace in the linearized system. Poulin et al. (2003 studied a time-periodic barotropic shear flow that exhibited PI, and thereby produced mixing at the interface between Potential Vorticity (PV fronts. The instability led to the formation of vortices that were stretched. A later study of an oscillatory current in the Cape Cod Bay illustrated that PI can occur in realistic shear flows (Poulin and Flierl, 2005. These studies assumed that the basic state was periodic with a constant frequency and amplitude. In this work we study a shear flow similar to that found in Poulin et al. (2003, but now where the magnitude of vorticity is a stochastic variable. We determine that in the case of stochastic shear flows the transient growth of perturbations of the snapshots of the basic state still generate PI.

  19. Experimental observation of the shear Alfven resonance in a tokamak

    Experiments in Tokapole II have demonstrated the shear Alfven resonance in a tokamak by direct probe measurement of the wave magnetic field within the plasma. The resonance is driven by external antennas and is identified as radially localized enhancements of the poloidal wave magnetic field. The radial location agrees with calculations which include toroidicity and noncircularity of the plasma cross-section. Other properties such as polarization, radial width, risetime, and wave enhancement also agree with MHD theory

  20. Local shear in general magnetic stellarator geometry

    There has been relatively little work on microturbulence in stellarators. Bhattacharjee et al. gave a purely numerical illustration of linear instability for the simplest cold ion electrostatic drift wave using a general magnetic geometry ballooning mode representation. This approach was recently extended by N. Dominguez et al. with emphasis on analytic formulas derived from a single stellarator harmonic and a treatment of dissipative helical well trapped electron modes. Neither paper treats the puzzling question: How are high-m modes radially localized in stellarators with weak or no global shear? Since diffusion is likely proportional to the square of radial mode widths, this is as important as determining the growth rate. This paper argues that modes are localized by local shear not global shear. Local shear arises from the fact that the helical ripple from the external coils providing the stellarator transform increase with radius. The authors note that local curvature from the helical ripple can localize the modes along the field lines. Thus they argue that stellarators with no global shear and favorable average curvature (W7-AS) should have the same basic transport as torsatrons (Heliotron and ATF) with global shear and average unfavorable curvature. In detail they derive a complete along the field line nonlinear ballooning mode formalism in magnetic coordinates for general stellarator geometry. They apply this to the case of a single helical harmonic. For illustration, they derive a formula for diffusion from collisionless helically trapped electrons modes proportional to the square of the local shear. The model diffusion matches the universal gyroBohm LHD stellarator scaling