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Sample records for acoustic wave sensor

  1. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Vibration Sensors

    Jerzy Filipiak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  2. Surface acoustic wave devices for sensor applications

    Bo, Liu; Xiao, Chen; Hualin, Cai; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Xiangguang, Tian; Luqi, Tao; Yi, Yang; Tianling, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have been widely used in different fields and will continue to be of great importance in the foreseeable future. These devices are compact, cost efficient, easy to fabricate, and have a high performance, among other advantages. SAW devices can work as filters, signal processing units, sensors and actuators. They can even work without batteries and operate under harsh environments. In this review, the operating principles of SAW sensors, including temperature sensors, pressure sensors, humidity sensors and biosensors, will be discussed. Several examples and related issues will be presented. Technological trends and future developments will also be discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 60936002, 61025021, 61434001, 61574083), the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2015CB352100), the National Key Project of Science and Technology (No. 2011ZX02403-002) and the Special Fund for Agroscientific Research in the Public Interest of China (No. 201303107). M.A.M is additionally supported by the Postdoctoral Fellowship (PDF) program of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (CPSF).

  3. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  4. Optimization of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors

    Fangqian Xu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of an surface acoustic wave (SAW-based rate sensor incorporating metallic dot arrays was performed by using the approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media. The optimal sensor chip designs, including the material choice of piezoelectric crystals and metallic dots, dot thickness, and sensor operation frequency were determined theoretically. The theoretical predictions were confirmed experimentally by using the developed SAW sensor composed of differential delay line-oscillators and a metallic dot array deposited along the acoustic wave propagation path of the SAW delay lines. A significant improvement in sensor sensitivity was achieved in the case of 128° YX LiNbO3, and a thicker Au dot array, and low operation frequency were used to structure the sensor.

  5. Circuit Design of Surface Acoustic Wave Based Micro Force Sensor

    Yuanyuan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure sensors are commonly used in industrial production and mechanical system. However, resistance strain, piezoresistive sensor, and ceramic capacitive pressure sensors possess limitations, especially in micro force measurement. A surface acoustic wave (SAW based micro force sensor is designed in this paper, which is based on the theories of wavelet transform, SAW detection, and pierce oscillator circuits. Using lithium niobate as the basal material, a mathematical model is established to analyze the frequency, and a peripheral circuit is designed to measure the micro force. The SAW based micro force sensor is tested to show the reasonable design of detection circuit and the stability of frequency and amplitude.

  6. Dual mode acoustic wave sensor for precise pressure reading

    Mu, Xiaojing; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Wang, Yong; Randles, Andrew Benson; Chuan Chai, Kevin Tshun; Cai, Hong; Gu, Yuan Dong

    2014-09-01

    In this letter, a Microelectromechanical system acoustic wave sensor, which has a dual mode (lateral field exited Lamb wave mode and surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode) behavior, is presented for precious pressure change read out. Comb-like interdigital structured electrodes on top of piezoelectric material aluminium nitride (AlN) are used to generate the wave modes. The sensor membrane consists of single crystalline silicon formed by backside-etching of the bulk material of a silicon on insulator wafer having variable device thickness layer (5 μm-50 μm). With this principle, a pressure sensor has been fabricated and mounted on a pressure test package with pressure applied to the backside of the membrane within a range of 0 psi to 300 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency was experimentally measured in the temperature range of -50 °C to 300 °C. This idea demonstrates a piezoelectric based sensor having two modes SAW/Lamb wave for direct physical parameter—pressure readout and temperature cancellation which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications using the dual mode behavior of the sensor and differential readout at the same time.

  7. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors: Fabrication and Testing

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Malone, Vanessa

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of harsh-environment surface acoustic wave sensors for wired and wireless operation. Surface acoustic wave devices with an interdigitated transducer emitter and multiple reflectors were fabricated on langasite substrates. Both wired and wireless temperature sensing was demonstrated using radar-mode (pulse) detection. Temperature resolution of better than ±0.5°C was achieved between 200°C and 600°C. Oxygen sensing was achieved by depositing a layer of ZnO on the propagation path. Although the ZnO layer caused additional attenuation of the surface wave, oxygen sensing was accomplished at temperatures up to 700°C. The results indicate that langasite SAW devices are a potential solution for harsh-environment gas and temperature sensing.

  8. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  9. Passive Wireless Hydrogen Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based hydrogen sensors for NASA application to distributed wireless hydrogen leak...

  10. Passive Wireless Cryogenic Liquid Level Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the continued development of passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) based liquid level sensors for NASA application to cryogenic...

  11. Passive Wireless Hydrogen Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the continued development of passive orthogonal frequency coded (OFC) surface acoustic wave (SAW) based hydrogen sensors for NASA...

  12. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors: Modeling and Verification

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W; Oppenheim, Irving J

    2013-01-01

    We report finite element simulations of the effect of conductive sensing layers on the surface wave velocity of langasite substrates. The simulations include both the mechanical and electrical influences of the conducting sensing layer. We show that three-dimensional simulations are necessary because of the out-of-plane displacements of the commonly used (0, 138.5, 26.7) Euler angle. Measurements of the transducer input admittance in reflective delay-line devices yield a value for the electromechanical coupling coefficient that is in good agreement with the three-dimensional simulations on bare langasite substrate. The input admittance measurements also show evidence of excitation of an additional wave mode and excess loss due to the finger resistance. The results of these simulations and measurements will be useful in the design of surface acoustic wave gas sensors.

  13. PASSIVE WIRELESS MULTI-SENSOR TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE SENSING SYSTEM USING ACOUSTIC WAVE DEVICES Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and multi-sensor systems for NASA application to remote wireless sensing of...

  14. Passive Wireless Multi-Sensor Temperature and Pressure Sensing System Using Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the continued development of passive, orthogonal frequency coded (OFC) surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and multi-sensor systems, an...

  15. On Mass Loading and Dissipation Measured with Acoustic Wave Sensors: A Review

    Marina V. Voinova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize current trends in the analysis of physical properties (surface mass density, viscosity, elasticity, friction, and charge of various thin films measured with a solid-state sensor oscillating in a gaseous or liquid environment. We cover three different types of mechanically oscillating sensors: the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D monitoring, surface acoustic wave (SAW, resonators and magnetoelastic sensors (MESs. The fourth class of novel acoustic wave (AW mass sensors, namely thin-film bulk acoustic resonators (TFBARs on vibrating membranes is discussed in brief. The paper contains a survey of theoretical results and practical applications of the sensors and includes a comprehensive bibliography.

  16. Starch viscoelastic properties studied with an acoustic wave sensor.

    Santos, M D; Gomes, M T S R

    2014-01-01

    Gelatinization and retrogradation of starch was followed in real time with an acoustic wave sensor. This study relies on the monitorization of the frequency of oscillation of a piezoelectric quartz crystal in contact with a 2.5% emulsion of a commercial maize starch, during heating and cooling. The technique showed to be very powerful and sensitive to most of the changes described in the literature, which have been elucidated by some other techniques. The value for the temperature of gelatinization found using the sensor was confirmed by the analysis of the same starch emulsion by polarized light microscopy. Temperatures of gelatinization were found to vary with the sample heating rate, as follows: 73.5 °C at 2.0 °C/min, 66.0 °C at 1.0 °C/min, and 65.0 °C at 0.5 °C/min. Hysteresis of the studied system was evidenced by the frequency shift before heating and after cooling till the initial temperature. Analysis performed on a 1.5% emulsion of a rice starch heated at 2.0 °C/min and cooled as before, evidenced no hysteresis and showed complete reversibility, in which concerns to the series frequency of the piezoelectric quartz crystal. PMID:24274480

  17. Optimization of autonomous magnetic field sensor consisting of giant magnetoimpedance sensor and surface acoustic wave transducer

    Li, Bodong

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a novel autonomous thin film magnetic field sensor consisting of a tri-layer giant magnetoimpedance sensor and a surface acoustic wave transponder. Double and single electrode interdigital transducer (IDT) designs are employed and compared. The integrated sensor is fabricated using standard microfabrication technology. The results show the double electrode IDT has an advantage in terms of the sensitivity. In order to optimize the matching component, a simulation based on P-matrix is carried out. A maximum change of 2.4 dB of the reflection amplitude and a sensitivity of 0.34 dB/Oe are obtained experimentally. © 2012 IEEE.

  18. Passive Wireless Cryogenic Liquid Level Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) based liquid level sensors for NASA application to cryogenic liquid level...

  19. Multi Reflection of Lamb Wave Emission in an Acoustic Waveguide Sensor

    Leonhard Michael Reindl

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid—liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner.

  20. Temperature Frequency Characteristics of Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) Polymer Coated Rayleigh Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Resonators for Gas-Phase Sensor Applications

    Radeva, Ekaterina I.; Esmeryan, Karekin D.; Ivan D. Avramov

    2012-01-01

    Temperature induced frequency shifts may compromise the sensor response of polymer coated acoustic wave gas-phase sensors operating in environments of variable temperature. To correct the sensor data with the temperature response of the sensor the latter must be known. This study presents and discusses temperature frequency characteristics (TFCs) of solid hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) polymer coated sensor resonators using the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (RSAW) mode on ST-cut quartz. Using ...

  1. ST Quartz Acoustic Wave Sensors with Sectional Guiding Layers

    Glen McHale

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of removing a section of guiding layer from the propagation paths of ST-quartz Love wave sensors; this offers the ease of fabrication of a polymer guiding layer whilst retaining the native surface of the quartz which may then be used for the attachment of a sensitizing layer. Data is presented for the rigid and viscous loading, which indicates a small reduction in mass sensitivity compared to a Love wave device. Biosensing capabilities of these discontinuous ‘sectional’ guiding layer devices are demonstrated using protein adsorption from solution.

  2. ST Quartz Acoustic Wave Sensors with Sectional Guiding Layers

    Glen McHale; Paul Roach; Newton, Michael I.

    2008-01-01

    We report the effect of removing a section of guiding layer from the propagation paths of ST-quartz Love wave sensors; this offers the ease of fabrication of a polymer guiding layer whilst retaining the native surface of the quartz which may then be used for the attachment of a sensitizing layer. Data is presented for the rigid and viscous loading, which indicates a small reduction in mass sensitivity compared to a Love wave device. Biosensing capabilities of these discontinuous ‘section...

  3. A Novel Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonator for Filters and Sensors Applications

    Zhixin Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonators are widely applied in filters and gravimetric sensors for physical or biochemical sensing. In this work, a new architecture of BAW resonator is demonstrated, which introduces a pair of reflection layers onto the top of a thin film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR device. The new device can be transformed between type I and type II dispersions by varying the thicknesses of the reflection layers. A computational modeling is developed to fully investigate the acoustic waves and the dispersion types of the device theoretically. The novel structure makes it feasible to fabricate both type resonators in one filter, which offers an effective alternative to improve the pass band flatness in the filter. Additionally, this new device exhibits a high quality factor (Q in the liquid, which opens a possibility for real time measurement in solutions with a superior limitation of detection (LOD in sensor applications.

  4. Theoretical mass sensitivity of Love wave and layer guided acoustic plate mode sensors

    McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael; Martin, Fabrice

    2002-01-01

    A model for the mass sensitivity of Love wave and layer guided shear horizontal acoustic plate mode (SH–APM) sensors is developed by considering the propagation of shear horizontally polarized acoustic waves in a three layer system. A dispersion equation is derived for this three layer system and this is shown to contain the dispersion equation for the two layer system of the substrate and the guiding layer plus a term involving the third layer, which is regarded as a perturbing mass layer. T...

  5. Recent advances in lateral field excited and monolithic spiral coil acoustic transduction bulk acoustic wave sensor platforms

    The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) has been used extensively as a bulk acoustic wave (BAW) platform for applications such as chemical and biological sensors and rate monitors in thin film deposition systems. Although the QCM is capable of measuring mechanical property changes critical in many thin film deposition systems, it cannot measure electrical property changes that can occur in many sensor applications. In this paper we review the recent developments of two novel transducer configurations for BAW sensors. In the first sensor, called the lateral field excited (LFE) sensor, the transverse shear mode (TSM) in AT-cut quartz is excited by two electrodes on the reference surface, resulting in a bare sensing surface which allows both electrical and mechanical properties of target analytes to be measured. In the second sensor, called the monolithic spiral coil acoustic transduction (MSCAT) sensor, the TSM is excited by a photolithographically deposited spiral antenna on the reference surface which can excite high-order harmonics in the substrate, and potentially lead to increased sensitivity. The responses of both the LFE and MSCAT sensors to electrical and mechanical property changes of liquids have been examined and compared to the response of the standard QCM. In addition, results relating to the detection of chemical and biological target analytes using the LFE and MSCAT sensor platforms are presented

  6. Wireless surface acoustic wave sensors for displacement and crack monitoring in concrete structures

    Perry, M.; McKeeman, I.; Saafi, M.; Niewczas, P.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that wireless surface acoustic wave devices can be used to monitor millimetre displacements in crack opening during the cyclic and static loading of reinforced concrete structures. Sensors were packaged to extend their gauge length and to protect them against brittle fracture, before being surface-mounted onto the tensioned surface of a concrete beam. The accuracy of measurements was verified using computational methods and optical-fibre strain sensors. After packaging, the displacement and temperature resolutions of the surface acoustic wave sensors were 10 μ {{m}} and 2 °C respectively. With some further work, these devices could be retrofitted to existing concrete structures to facilitate wireless structural health monitoring.

  7. A Finite Element Model of a MEMS-based Surface Acoustic Wave Hydrogen Sensor

    Walied A. Moussa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen plays a significant role in various industrial applications, but careful handling and continuous monitoring are crucial since it is explosive when mixed with air. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW sensors provide desirable characteristics for hydrogen detection due to their small size, low fabrication cost, ease of integration and high sensitivity. In this paper a finite element model of a Surface Acoustic Wave sensor is developed using ANSYS12© and tested for hydrogen detection. The sensor consists of a YZ-lithium niobate substrate with interdigital electrodes (IDT patterned on the surface. A thin palladium (Pd film is added on the surface of the sensor due to its high affinity for hydrogen. With increased hydrogen absorption the palladium hydride structure undergoes a phase change due to the formation of the β-phase, which deteriorates the crystal structure. Therefore with increasing hydrogen concentration the stiffness and the density are significantly reduced. The values of the modulus of elasticity and the density at different hydrogen concentrations in palladium are utilized in the finite element model to determine the corresponding SAW sensor response. Results indicate that with increasing the hydrogen concentration the wave velocity decreases and the attenuation of the wave is reduced.

  8. Resonance Effects of Bilayered Piezoelectric Films Used for Bulk Acoustic Wave Sensors

    ZHANG Hui; ZHANG Shu-Yi; FAN Li

    2011-01-01

    The resonance vibrations of acoustic sensors with two layers of (1120) textured hexagonal piezoelectric films are studied.When the acoustic and electric fields satisfy a special match condition,i.e.the phase variation of thickness shear mode (TSM) at each film equals π,both piezoelectric layers with opposite polarization directions reduce the first TSM and generate the second TSM with higher frequency and a higher quality factor.The excited second TSM can increase the product of the operating frequency and the quality factor,which is useful for improving the mass sensitivity and resolution of acoustic sensors.Additionally,both of the piezoelectric films have larger thickness and decrease the risk of mechanical damage in device production processes.Thin film bulk acoustic sensors have attracted great attention due to their small sizes,low power consumption and high sensitivity,etc.[1] The thickness shear mode (TSM) is more suitable for liquid sensing applications since much less acoustic energy is transferred into the liquid medium than that of longitudinal acoustic waves,due to the fact that ideal liquids cannot support propagations of shear waves.By using a TSM with a high resonance frequency,sensorsbased on thin film bulk acoustic resonator structures can be fabricated by the fixing of a sensitive coating on the surface of the device.[2] The binding events at the sensitive coating can cause a shift of the resonance frequency.[3]%The resonance vibrations of acoustic sensors with two layers of (1120) textured hexagonal piezoelectric films are studied. When the acoustic and electric fields satisfy a special match condition, I.e. The phase variation of thickness shear mode (TSM) at each film equals it, both piezoelectric layers with opposite polarization directions reduce the first TSM and generate the second TSM with higher frequency and a higher quality factor. The excited second TSM can increase the product of the operating frequency and the quality factor, which

  9. Passive wireless surface acoustic wave sensors for monitoring sequestration sites CO2 emission

    Wang, Yizhong [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Chyu, Minking [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wang, Qing-Ming [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-02-14

    University of Pittsburgh’s Transducer lab has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient CO2 measuring technologies for geological sequestration sites leakage monitoring. A passive wireless CO2 sensing system based on surface acoustic wave technology and carbon nanotube nanocomposite was developed. Surface acoustic wave device was studied to determine the optimum parameters. Delay line structure was adopted as basic sensor structure. CNT polymer nanocomposite was fabricated and tested under different temperature and strain condition for natural environment impact evaluation. Nanocomposite resistance increased for 5 times under pure strain, while the temperature dependence of resistance for CNT solely was -1375ppm/°C. The overall effect of temperature on nanocomposite resistance was -1000ppm/°C. The gas response of the nanocomposite was about 10% resistance increase under pure CO2 . The sensor frequency change was around 300ppm for pure CO2 . With paralyne packaging, the sensor frequency change from relative humidity of 0% to 100% at room temperature decreased from over 1000ppm to less than 100ppm. The lowest detection limit of the sensor is 1% gas concentration, with 36ppm frequency change. Wireless module was tested and showed over one foot transmission distance at preferred parallel orientation.

  10. Response of a Pt-polyyne membrane in surface acoustic wave sensors: Experimental and theoretical approach

    Caliendo, Cinzia; Fratoddi, Ilaria; Russo, Maria Vittoria; Lo Sterzo, Claudio

    2003-06-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor, based on a polymeric sensitive membrane, has been realized for sensor applications and materials characterization. A platinum-containing rigid-rod organometallic polymer [-Pt(PPh3)2(-C≡C-pC6H2(2,5-OC16H33)2-C≡C-)]n (Pt-P-HDOB), obtained by the reaction of cis-[Pt(PPh3)2Cl2] with 1,4-diethynyl-2,5-dihexadeciloxybenzene (HDOB) by means of the recently assessed "Extended one pot" polymerization route, was here studied. The chemical structure and chain length of Pt-P-HDOB polymer were defined by spectroscopic techniques and gel permeation chromatography measurements. The acoustic characterization of the Pt-P-HDOB film was developed with the aid of the perturbation theory applied to different polymer-coated-piezoelectric substrates and the shear modulus of Pt-P-HDOB film have been estimated. A SAW delay line has been implemented on ZnO/Si substrate and a thin polymeric film has been spin deposited on the device surface to realize a chemical sensor. The sensor has been exposed to different chemicals and its response has been measured for different chemical concentrations. High sensitivity and reproducibility of the sensor response to relative humidity and methanol vapors were found.

  11. Integration of thin film giant magnetoimpedance sensor and surface acoustic wave transponder

    Li, Bodong

    2012-03-09

    Passive and remote sensing technology has many potential applications in implantable devices, automation, or structural monitoring. In this paper, a tri-layer thin film giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) sensor with the maximum sensitivity of 16%/Oe and GMI ratio of 44% was combined with a two-port surface acoustic wave(SAW) transponder on a common substrate using standard microfabrication technology resulting in a fully integrated sensor for passive and remote operation. The implementation of the two devices has been optimized by on-chip matching circuits. The measurement results clearly show a magnetic field response at the input port of the SAW transponder that reflects the impedance change of the GMI sensor.

  12. Surface acoustic wave acceleration sensor with high sensitivity incorporating ST-X quartz cantilever beam

    The implementation and performance of a surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based acceleration sensor is described. The sensor was composed of a flexible ST-X quartz cantilever beam with a relatively substantial proof mass at the undamped end, a pattern of a two-port SAW resonator deposited directly on the surface of the beam adjacent to the clamped end for maximum strain sensitivity and a SAW resonator affixed on the metal package base for temperature compensation. The acceleration was directed to the proof mass flex of the cantilever, inducing relative changes in the acoustic propagation characteristics of the SAW traveling along the beams. The frequency signal from the differential oscillation structure utilizing the SAW resonators as the feedback element varies as a function of acceleration. The sensor response mechanism was analyzed theoretically, with the aim of determining the optimized dimension of the cantilever beam. The coupling of modes (COM) model was used to simulate the synchronous SAW resonator prior to fabrication. The oscillator frequency stability was improved using the phase modulation approach; the obtained typical short-term frequency stability ranged up to 1 Hz s−1. The performance of the developed acceleration sensor was evaluated using the precise vibration table and was also evaluated in comparison to the theoretical calculation. A high frequency sensitivity of 29.7 kHz g−1, good linearity and a lower detection limit (∼1 × 10−4 g) were achieved in the measured results. (paper)

  13. An S-FSCW Based Multi-Channel Reader System for Beamforming Applications using Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Pfeffer, C.; Scheiblhofer, S.; Feger, R.; Stelzer, A.

    2011-01-01

    Interrogating multiple surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors located within the same radar beam require techniques to separate the multiple superposing SAW sensor responses. The presented multi-channel reader features four parallel transceiver channels, which are based on the switched frequency-stepped continuous-wave principle and high-speed parallelized baseband electronics. Thus classical beamforming applications including angle of arrival measurement of single SAW tags and the angular separ...

  14. Temperature Measurements on Hot Spots of Power Substations Utilizing Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Cavaco, M. A. M.; Benedet, M. E.; Neto, L. R.

    2011-12-01

    In several applications in the field of metrology, the direct connection of the sensor element with the respective signal-processing unit of the measurement system is not trivial. It can be mentioned, as an example, the measurement of hot points in electric power substations because of the high electrical potential. To solve that problem, two alternatives were studied, one using active surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and other using passive SAW tags. For the passive sensor, a SAW radio-frequency identification (RFID) temperature detector was used. That technology is widely applied for typical transport identification (grain transportation, road traffic control), but its application in the field of metrology is innovative. The variation in temperature makes an alteration in the characteristics of the piezoelectric material of the SAW matrix, changing mostly the resonance frequency. Using SAW-RFID, the problem of measuring temperature basically is directed to the identification of the frequency of resonance of the SAW. The use of active SAW sensors has been demonstrated to be much more satisfactory for the solution of such a problem because of the limitation in the range of the passive sensors.

  15. A surface acoustic wave passive and wireless sensor for magnetic fields, temperature, and humidity

    Li, Bodong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report an integrated single-chip surface acoustic wave sensor with the capability of measuring magnetic field, temperature, and humidity. The sensor is fabricated using a thermally sensitive LiNbO3 substrate, a humidity sensitive hydrogel coating, and a magnetic field sensitive impedance load. The sensor response to individually and simultaneously changing magnetic field, temperature and humidity is characterized by connecting a network analyzer directly to the sensor. Analytical models for each measurand are derived and used to compensate noise due to cross sensitivities. The results show that all three measurands can be monitored in parallel with sensitivities of 75 ppm/°C, 0.13 dB/%R.H. (at 50%R.H.), 0.18 dB/Oe and resolutions of 0.1 °C, 0.4%R.H., 1 Oe for temperature, humidity and magnetic field, respectively. A passive wireless measurement is also conducted on a current line using, which shows the sensors capability to measure both temperature and current signals simultaneously.

  16. Enhanced Sensitivity of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors Incorporating Metallic Dot Arrays

    Wen Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A new surface acoustic wave (SAW-based rate sensor pattern incorporating metallic dot arrays was developed in this paper. Two parallel SAW delay lines with a reverse direction and an operation frequency of 80 MHz on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 wafer are fabricated as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, and mixed oscillation frequency was used to characterize the external rotation. To enhance the Coriolis force effect acting on the SAW propagation, a copper (Cu dot array was deposited along the SAW propagation path of the SAW devices. The approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media was referred to analyze the response mechanisms of the SAW based rate sensor, resulting in determination of the optimal design parameters. To improve the frequency stability of the oscillator, the single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs and combed transducer were used to form the SAW device to minimize the insertion loss and accomplish the single mode selection, respectively. Excellent long-term (measured in hours frequency stability of 0.1 ppm/h was obtained. Using the rate table with high precision, the performance of the developed SAW rate sensor was evaluated experimentally; satisfactory detection sensitivity (16.7 Hz∙deg∙s−1 and good linearity were observed.

  17. An Electronic-Nose Sensor Node Based on a Polymer-Coated Surface Acoustic Wave Array for Wireless Sensor Network Applications

    Kea-Tiong Tang; Cheng-Han Li; Shih-Wen Chiu

    2011-01-01

    This study developed an electronic-nose sensor node based on a polymer-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor array. The sensor node comprised an SAW sensor array, a frequency readout circuit, and an Octopus II wireless module. The sensor array was fabricated on a large K 2 128° YX LiNbO3 sensing substrate. On the surface of this substrate, an interdigital transducer (IDT) was produced with a Cr/Au film as its metallic structure. A mixed-mode frequency readout application specific integrat...

  18. Development of flexible ZnO thin film surface acoustic wave strain sensors on ultrathin glass substrates

    Flexible surface acoustic wave (SAW) strain sensors made on ZnO/ultrathin glass (100 μm) substrates have been developed. The sensitivity of the SAW strain sensors under different strain angles and annealing temperatures, as well as the mechanical stability, are investigated. It was shown that the thickness of ZnO has a strong effect on the sensitivity of the strain sensors, and thicker ZnO makes sensors with better performance. Thermal annealing at a temperature up to 200 °C also improves the sensitivity of the strain sensor significantly. The temperature coefficient of frequency remains unchanged under different strains, showing good thermal stability. A cyclic bending test with the strain varied between zero and 2000 με exhibits good mechanical stability and reliability of SAW strain sensors. All the results demonstrate the great potential of flexible SAW strain sensors for flexible electronic applications. (paper)

  19. Temperature compensation of ball surface acoustic wave sensor by two-frequency measurement using undersampling

    Tsuji, Toshihiro; Oizumi, Toru; Takeda, Nobuo; Akao, Shingo; Tsukahara, Yusuke; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2015-07-01

    To realize a practical two-frequency measurement (TFM) system for precise temperature compensation in a ball surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor, the application of undersampling (US) was investigated. The subtraction coefficient for the temperature compensation in US was theoretically explained. The principle of the TFM system using US was simulated by the decimation of the oversampling (OS) waveform after applying a narrow band-pass filter, and the delay time was measured using a wavelet transform. In the application of the method to trace moisture measurement, the delay time response due to US matched that due to OS with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.9999. Although rms noise was increased by US, the response to the concentration change of 4-17 nmol/mol was measured with a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 20. From these results, it was shown that the precise output of the ball SAW sensor could be obtained even when using US, which was equivalent to that using OS.

  20. Capacitive Sensors for the Long-wave Acoustic Radiation by Directed Waves

    L.V. Zaitseva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Consider from the common position present-day state, prospects and the possibility of non-destructive testing capacitive method using. Developed mathematical model of the process of acoustic wave’s excitation (longitudinal and surface with a capacitor allow carrying out the output signal calculation for the subsequent choice of methods and devices for receiving the acoustic oscillations data. A device layout has been developed for realization of capacitive method. The possibility of excitation and reception of acoustic vibrations by capacitive transducers it has been established.

  1. Evaluating the adhesion of SU-8 thin films using an AlN/Si surface acoustic wave sensor

    A new approach is developed for evaluating the adhesion of SU-8 thin films using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor. The SAW sensor consists of a silicon (Si) substrate coated with a thin aluminum nitride (AlN) film and two sets of inter-digital electrodes (IDT) patterned on the AlN surface. Two sensor configurations are developed in order to evaluate the adhesion of SU-8. In the first configuration the SU-8 layer is patterned on top of a gold film that is deposited on the AlN surface. In the second configuration the gold film is coated with an omnicoat layer prior to patterning the SU-8 film. Omnicoat is an adhesion promoter for SU-8, which is used to increase its adhesion to gold. The frequency responses from both configurations are measured and the shift in the center frequency value is evaluated. The results illustrate that without omnicoat the center frequency shifts to a higher value indicating an increase in the wave velocity. This is because the poor adhesion of the SU-8 layer without omnicoat causes the wave to be more concentrated in the AlN/Si structure and AlN has a higher acoustic wave velocity in comparison to the SU-8 layer. In addition, four SAW sensors operating at four different center frequencies are developed to investigate the change in sensor sensitivity with the increase in center frequency. The results indicate that the sensor sensitivity increases proportionally to the increase in operating frequency. Finally, a theoretical model is developed to calculate the wave dispersion profile for the SU-8/AlN/Si configuration. The interface of the SU-8/AlN layers is modeled as a layer of mass-less springs with stiffness K(N m−3). The shifts in the wave dispersion profile at different levels of interface spring stiffness are compared to the experimental values to evaluate the adhesion of the SU-8 layer. (paper)

  2. A Synthetic Phased Array Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor for Quantifying Bolt Tension

    Rasim Guldiken

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report our findings on implementing a synthetic phased array surface acoustic wave sensor to quantify bolt tension. Maintaining proper bolt tension is important in many fields such as for ensuring safe operation of civil infrastructures. Significant advantages of this relatively simple methodology is its capability to assess bolt tension without any contact with the bolt, thus enabling measurement at inaccessible locations, multiple bolt measurement capability at a time, not requiring data collection during the installation and no calibration requirements. We performed detailed experiments on a custom-built flexible bench-top experimental setup consisting of 1018 steel plate of 12.7 mm (½ in thickness, a 6.4 mm (¼ in grade 8 bolt and a stainless steel washer with 19 mm (¾ in of external diameter. Our results indicate that this method is not only capable of clearly distinguishing properly bolted joints from loosened joints but also capable of quantifying how loose the bolt actually is. We also conducted detailed signal-to-noise (SNR analysis and showed that the SNR value for the entire bolt tension range was sufficient for image reconstruction.

  3. Detection of third-hand smoke on clothing fibers with a surface acoustic wave gas sensor.

    Cheng, Chi-Yung; Huang, Shih-Shen; Yang, Chia-Min; Tang, Kea-Tiong; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2016-01-01

    Third-hand smoke (THS) is a new cigarette-related issue defined as the residual contamination from cigarette smoke after a cigarette is extinguished. To detect THS on three commonly used clothing fibers-wool, cotton, and polyester, we applied two methods to measure the adsorption of THS: one was the gain of mass with an analytical balance after exposure to cigarette smoke; and the other was to detect the THS chemical compounds such as nicotine and 3-ethenylpyridine with a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor composed of coated oxidized hollow mesoporous carbon nanospheres. In the mass measurement, the gain of mass decreased in the order wool, cotton, and polyester; the latter gain was about one tenth that of wool. In the SAW detection, the frequency shift decreased in the same order-wool, cotton, and polyester. The residence period of THS on natural fiber (wool and cotton) is greater than on synthetic polyester fiber. These two tests provide quantitative results of THS on varied clothing fibers, to assess their risk after exposure to cigarette smoke. PMID:26909119

  4. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration

    Hao, Wenchang; Liu, Jiuling; Liu, Minghua; Liang, Yong; He, Shitang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW) sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM) approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM) parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of an R-SAW resonator by a P-matrix cascading technique. Cascading the P-matrixes of unloaded areas with mass loaded areas, the sensitivity for different sensitive areas was obtained by analyzing the frequency shift. The performance of the sensitivity analysis was confirmed by the measured responses from the silicon dioxide (SiO2) deposited on different sensitive areas of R-SAW resonators. It is shown that the mass sensitivity varies strongly for different sensitive areas, and the optimal sensitive area lies towards the center of the device. PMID:27104540

  5. An S-FSCW Based Multi-Channel Reader System for Beamforming Applications using Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    C. Pfeffer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Interrogating multiple surface acoustic wave (SAW sensors located within the same radar beam require techniques to separate the multiple superposing SAW sensor responses. The presented multi-channel reader features four parallel transceiver channels, which are based on the switched frequency-stepped continuous-wave principle and high-speed parallelized baseband electronics. Thus classical beamforming applications including angle of arrival measurement of single SAW tags and the angular separation of multiple SAW sensors are presented and compared to a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO approach. Due to the larger virtual array in the MIMO approach a larger aperture can be synthesized, which leads to significantly better angular separation results. The level analysis for the given system is verified by baseband-power measurements at different readout distances, considering the hardware parameters as well as the free-space propagation aspects. Finally measurements assess the maximum interrogation distance for the system.

  6. Hot target inspection using a welded fibre acoustic wave piezoelectric sensor and a laser-ultrasonic mirror scanner

    The direct attachment of piezoelectric transducers onto hot targets raises formidable challenges as piezoelectric transducers lose their piezoelectric characteristics at elevated temperatures or debond due to thermal expansion coefficient mismatches. We developed a welded fibre acoustic-wave PZT (FAWPZT) sensor to alleviate these temperature limitations. One end of the FAWPZT sensor, made from a stainless steel fibre, was welded onto a stainless steel target plate and the other end was bonded to a PZT sensor. An ultrasonic wave propagation imaging (UWPI) system consists of a laser mirror scanner and a Q-switched pulsed laser (QPL) acting as a non-contact ultrasonic generator was then used to scan a hot target surface with an artificial 2 mm-sized open crack. The result was presented in the form of an ultrasonic wave propagation movie. The damage was detected as a wavefield scattering from the damaged location and its size was evaluated from the plot of amplitude distribution along the propagating wavefront. Sensor performance was briefly discussed and the results confirmed that a FAWPZT sensor combined with a UWPI system has good potential for implementation in hot target integrated structural health management. (technical design note)

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Sensors and actuators based on surface acoustic waves propagating along solid liquid interfaces

    Lindner, Gerhard

    2008-06-01

    The propagation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) along solid-liquid interfaces depends sensitively on the properties of the liquid covering the solid surface and may result in a momentum transfer into the liquid and thus a propulsion effect via acoustic streaming. This review gives an overview of the design of different SAW devices used for the sensing of liquids and the basic mechanisms of the interaction of SAWs with overlaying liquids. In addition, applications of devices based on these phenomena with respect to touch sensing and the measurement of liquid properties such as density, viscosity or the composition of mixed liquids are described, including microfabricated as well as macroscopic devices made from non-piezoelectric materials. With respect to the rapidly growing field of acoustic streaming applications, recent developments in the movement of nanolitre droplets on a single piezoelectric chip, the rather macroscopic approaches to the acoustic pumping of liquids in channels and recent attempts at numerical simulations of acoustic streaming are reported.

  8. Sensors and actuators based on surface acoustic waves propagating along solid-liquid interfaces

    The propagation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) along solid-liquid interfaces depends sensitively on the properties of the liquid covering the solid surface and may result in a momentum transfer into the liquid and thus a propulsion effect via acoustic streaming. This review gives an overview of the design of different SAW devices used for the sensing of liquids and the basic mechanisms of the interaction of SAWs with overlaying liquids. In addition, applications of devices based on these phenomena with respect to touch sensing and the measurement of liquid properties such as density, viscosity or the composition of mixed liquids are described, including microfabricated as well as macroscopic devices made from non-piezoelectric materials. With respect to the rapidly growing field of acoustic streaming applications, recent developments in the movement of nanolitre droplets on a single piezoelectric chip, the rather macroscopic approaches to the acoustic pumping of liquids in channels and recent attempts at numerical simulations of acoustic streaming are reported. (topical review)

  9. Quantitative Determination of Size and Shape of Surface-Bound DNA Using an Acoustic Wave Sensor

    Tsortos, Achilleas; Papadakis, George; Mitsakakis, Konstantinos; Kathryn A. Melzak; Gizeli, Electra

    2008-01-01

    DNA bending plays a significant role in many biological processes, such as gene regulation, DNA replication, and chromosomal packing. Understanding how such processes take place and how they can, in turn, be regulated by artificial agents for individual oriented therapies is of importance to both biology and medicine. In this work, we describe the application of an acoustic wave device for characterizing the conformation of DNA molecules tethered to the device surface via a biotin-neutravidin...

  10. Quantitative determination of size and shape of surface-bound DNA using an acoustic wave sensor.

    Tsortos, Achilleas; Papadakis, George; Mitsakakis, Konstantinos; Melzak, Kathryn A; Gizeli, Electra

    2008-04-01

    DNA bending plays a significant role in many biological processes, such as gene regulation, DNA replication, and chromosomal packing. Understanding how such processes take place and how they can, in turn, be regulated by artificial agents for individual oriented therapies is of importance to both biology and medicine. In this work, we describe the application of an acoustic wave device for characterizing the conformation of DNA molecules tethered to the device surface via a biotin-neutravidin interaction. The acoustic energy dissipation per unit mass observed upon DNA binding is directly related to DNA intrinsic viscosity, providing quantitative information on the size and shape of the tethered molecules. The validity of the above approach was verified by showing that the predesigned geometries of model double-stranded and triple-helix DNA molecules could be quantitatively distinguished: the resolution of the acoustic measurements is sufficient to allow discrimination between same size DNA carrying a bent at different positions along the chain. Furthermore, the significance of this analysis to the study of biologically relevant systems is shown during the evaluation of DNA conformational change upon protein (histone) binding. PMID:18178642

  11. Acoustic optic hybrid (AOH) sensor

    Matthews; Arrieta

    2000-09-01

    The ability of laser vibrometers to receive and process acoustic echoes from the water surface above a submerged target is established and evaluated. Sonar echoes from a submerged target are collected from the water surface by a laser vibrometer. Feasibility of this approach to sensing underwater sound is demonstrated. If the acoustic excitation at an otherwise undisturbed water surface is 195 to 168 dB re: 1 microPa, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), at the vibrometer output, is shown to range from about 46 to 6 dB. Capillary waves and gravity waves at the water surface are expected and shown to have some destructive effect on the process of echo retrieval. A series of experiments to quantify the surface wave effects is described. The wave experiment results are reported. A successful attempt to acquire echoes from a submerged target over a grid of points for further processing into a three-dimensional image is made and described. The data acquisition and beamforming techniques constitute a three-dimensional, acoustic optic, synthetic aperture sonar (SAS). Beamformed images are included. For an aircraft towing acoustic sensors through the water with a mechanical link, this technique holds the promise of increased safety and improved fuel efficiency. PMID:11008811

  12. Mercury Sorption and Desorption on Gold: A Comparative Analysis of Surface Acoustic Wave and Quartz Crystal Microbalance-Based Sensors.

    Kabir, K M Mohibul; Sabri, Ylias M; Esmaielzadeh Kandjani, Ahmad; Matthews, Glenn I; Field, Matthew; Jones, Lathe A; Nafady, Ayman; Ippolito, Samuel J; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2015-08-01

    Microelectromechanical sensors based on surface acoustic wave (SAW) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) transducers possess substantial potential as online elemental mercury (Hg(0)) vapor detectors in industrial stack effluents. In this study, a comparison of SAW- and QCM-based sensors is performed for the detection of low concentrations of Hg(0) vapor (ranging from 24 to 365 ppbv). Experimental measurements and finite element method (FEM) simulations allow the comparison of these sensors with regard to their sensitivity, sorption and desorption characteristics, and response time following Hg(0) vapor exposure at various operating temperatures ranging from 35 to 75 °C. Both of the sensors were fabricated on quartz substrates (ST and AT cut quartz for SAW and QCM devices, respectively) and employed thin gold (Au) layers as the electrodes. The SAW-based sensor exhibited up to ∼111 and ∼39 times higher response magnitudes than did the QCM-based sensor at 35 and 55 °C, respectively, when exposed to Hg(0) vapor concentrations ranging from 24 to 365 ppbv. The Hg(0) sorption and desorption calibration curves of both sensors were found to fit well with the Langmuir extension isotherm at different operating temperatures. Furthermore, the Hg(0) sorption and desorption rate demonstrated by the SAW-based sensor was found to decrease as the operating temperature increased, while the opposite trend was observed for the QCM-based sensor. However, the SAW-based sensor reached the maximum Hg(0) sorption rate faster than the QCM-based sensor regardless of operating temperature, whereas both sensors showed similar response times (t90) at various temperatures. Additionally, the sorption rate data was utilized in this study in order to obtain a faster response time from the sensor upon exposure to Hg(0) vapor. Furthermore, comparative analysis of the developed sensors' selectivity showed that the SAW-based sensor had a higher overall selectivity (90%) than did the QCM

  13. Titanium Dioxide-Based 64∘ YX LiNbO3 Surface Acoustic Wave Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    A. Z. Sadek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous titanium dioxide (TiO2 and gold (Au doped TiO2-based surface acoustic wave (SAW sensors have been investigated as hydrogen gas detectors. The nanocrystal-doped TiO2 films were synthesized through a sol-gel route, mixing a Ti-butoxide-based solution with diluted colloidal gold nanoparticles. The films were deposited via spin coating onto 64∘ YX LiNbO3 SAW transducers in a helium atmosphere. The SAW gas sensors were operated at various temperatures between 150 and 310∘C. It was found that gold doping on TiO2 increased the device sensitivity and reduced the optimum operating temperature.

  14. Comparisons of polymer/gas partition coefficients calculated from responses of thickness shear mode and surface acoustic wave vapor sensors.

    Grate, J W; Kaganove, S N; Bhethanabotla, V R

    1998-01-01

    Apparent partition coefficients, K, for the sorption of toluene by four different polymer thin films on thickness shear mode (TSM) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices are compared. The polymers examined were poly(isobutylene) (PIB), poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH), poly(butadiene) (PBD), and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Independent data on partition coefficients for toluene in these polymers were compiled for comparison, and TSM sensor measurements were made using both oscillator and impedance analysis methods. K values from SAW sensor measurements were about twice those calculated from TSM sensor measurements when the polymers were PIB and PECH, and they were also at least twice the values of the independent partition coefficient data, which is interpreted as indicating that the SAW sensor responds to polymer modulus changes as well as to mass changes. K values from SAW and TSM measurements were in agreement with each other and with independent data when the polymer was PBD. Similarly, K values from the PDMS-coated SAW sensor were not much larger than values from independent measurements. These results indicate that modulus effects were not contributing to the SAW sensor responses in the cases of PBD and PDMS. However, K values from the PDMS-coated TSM device were larger than the values from the SAW device or independent measurements, and the impedance analyzer results indicated that this sensor using our sample of PDMS at the applied thickness did not behave as a simple mass sensor. Differences in behavior among the test polymers on SAW devices are interpreted in terms of their differing viscoelastic properties. PMID:21644612

  15. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  16. Graphene-like nano-sheets for surface acoustic wave gas sensor applications

    Arsat, R.; Breedon, M.; Shafiei, M.; Spizziri, P. G.; Gilje, S.; Kaner, R. B.; Kalantar-zadeh, K.; Wlodarski, W.

    2009-01-01

    The gas sensing properties of graphene-like nano-sheets deposited on 36° YX lithium tantalate (LiTaO 3) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducers are reported. The thin graphene-like nano-sheets were produced via the reduction of graphite oxide which was deposited on SAW interdigitated transducers (IDTs). Their sensing performance was assessed towards hydrogen (H 2) and carbon monoxide (CO) in a synthetic air carrier gas at room temperature (25 °C) and 40 °C. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the deposited graphite oxide (GO) was not completely reduced creating small, graphitic nanocrystals ˜2.7 nm in size.

  17. Acoustic vector sensor signal processing

    SUN Guiqing; LI Qihu; ZHANG Bin

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic vector sensor simultaneously, colocately and directly measures orthogonal components of particle velocity as well as pressure at single point in acoustic field so that is possible to improve performance of traditional underwater acoustic measurement devices or detection systems and extends new ideas for solving practical underwater acoustic engineering problems. Although acoustic vector sensor history of appearing in underwater acoustic area is no long, but with huge and potential military demands, acoustic vector sensor has strong development trend in last decade, it is evolving into a one of important underwater acoustic technology. Under this background, we try to review recent progress in study on acoustic vector sensor signal processing, such as signal detection, DOA estimation, beamforming, and so on.

  18. Molecularly imprinted surface acoustic wave sensors: The synergy of electrochemical and gravimetric transductions in chemical recognition processes

    Chemical sensor based on molecularly imprinted conducting polymers (MICP) is described. Polythiophenes – acetic acid thiophene MICP films with different thicknesses have been electrosynthesized over the sensing area of an original electrochemical surface acoustic wave sensor (ESAW). To investigate the sensing properties of the developed sensor, electrochemical and gravimetric combined transductions have been applied to atrazine (ATZ) detection. Films of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) noted PEDOT as well as non imprinted conducting polymers (NICP), were also prepared, in order to lead a comparative study. The structure of all films was investigated by IR spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Films growth and their doping/undoping processes were investigated by simultaneous gravimetric/electrochemical transduction. Real time measurements highlighted difference between the two polymers electrosynthesis kinetics. MICP and NICP films grow linearly with time, whereas PEDOT film thickness presents a limit value of 1 μm in the implied conditions. Considering ESAW sensor response towards charge “transfer”, a linear relationship between sensor phase variations and charges density have been found for PEDOT film, with a sensitivity of about 470 ° C−1 cm2. The same sensitivity can also be considered for MICP and NICP films up to 200 mC cm−2. Beyond this value, saturation has been observed. This divergence have been attributed to difference in films thicknesses, which led to values of weight ratio MICP (NICP)/PEDOT included between 3 and 4.6 for electropolymerization duration going from 10 s to 30 s. Combined use of electrochemical and gravimetric transductions, using MICP as sensitive layer, have also been considered to highlight the ability of the developed ESAW sensor to detect the specific recognition of polymer functional cavities towards ATZ molecules.

  19. A method for achieving monotonic frequency-temperature response for langasite surface-acoustic-wave high-temperature sensor

    Shaoming, Bao; Yabing, Ke; Yanqing, Zheng; Lina, Cheng; Honglang, Li

    2016-02-01

    To achieve the monotonic frequency-temperature response for a high-temperature langasite (LGS) surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor in a wide temperature range, a method utilizing two substrate cuts with different propagation angles on the same substrate plane was proposed. In this method, the theory of effective permittivity is adopted to calculate the temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF), electromechanical coupling coefficients (k2), and power flow angle (PFA) for different propagation angles on the same substrate plane, and then the two substrate cuts were chosen to have large k2 and small PFA, as well as the difference in their TCFs (ΔTCF) to always have the same sign of their values. The Z-cut LGS substrate plane was taken as an example, and the two suitable substrate cuts with propagation angles of 74 and 80° were chosen to derive a monotonic frequency-temperature response for LGS SAW sensors at -50 to 540 °C. Experiments on a LGS SAW sensor using the above two substrate cuts were designed, and its measured frequency-temperature response at -50 to 540 °C agreed well with the theory, demonstrating the high accuracy of the proposed method.

  20. Concepts and Development of Bio-Inspired Distributed Embedded Wired/Wireless Sensor Array Architectures for Acoustic Wave Sensing in Integrated Aerospace Vehicles

    Ghoshal, Anindya; Prosser, William H.; Kirikera, Goutham; Schulz, Mark J.; Hughes, Derke J.; Orisamolu, Wally

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of acoustic emissions in plate structures and their sensing by embedded or surface bonded piezoelectric sensor arrays. Three different modeling efforts for acoustic emission (AE) wave generation and propagation are discussed briefly along with their advantages and disadvantages. Continuous sensors placed at right angles on a plate are being discussed as a new approach to measure and locate the source of acoustic waves. Evolutionary novel signal processing algorithms and bio-inspired distributed sensor array systems are used on large structures and integrated aerospace vehicles for AE source localization and preliminary results are presented. These systems allow for a great reduction in the amount of data that needs to be processed and also reduce the chances of false alarms from ambient noises. It is envisioned that these biomimetic sensor arrays and signal processing techniques will be useful for both wireless and wired sensor arrays for real time health monitoring of large integrated aerospace vehicles and earth fixed civil structures. The sensor array architectures can also be used with other types of sensors and for other applications.

  1. Strong acoustic wave action

    Gokhberg, M. B.

    1983-07-01

    Experiments devoted to acoustic action on the atmosphere-magnetosphere-ionosphere system using ground based strong explosions are reviewed. The propagation of acoustic waves was observed by ground observations over 2000 km in horizontal direction and to an altitude of 200 km. Magnetic variations up to 100 nT were detected by ARIEL-3 satellite near the epicenter of the explosion connected with the formation of strong field aligned currents in the magnetosphere. The enhancement of VLF emission at 800 km altitude is observed.

  2. Modeling, design, packing and experimental analysis of liquid-phase shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors

    Pollard, Thomas B

    Recent advances in microbiology, computational capabilities, and microelectromechanical-system fabrication techniques permit modeling, design, and fabrication of low-cost, miniature, sensitive and selective liquid-phase sensors and lab-on-a-chip systems. Such devices are expected to replace expensive, time-consuming, and bulky laboratory-based testing equipment. Potential applications for devices include: fluid characterization for material science and industry; chemical analysis in medicine and pharmacology; study of biological processes; food analysis; chemical kinetics analysis; and environmental monitoring. When combined with liquid-phase packaging, sensors based on surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) technology are considered strong candidates. For this reason such devices are focused on in this work; emphasis placed on device modeling and packaging for liquid-phase operation. Regarding modeling, topics considered include mode excitation efficiency of transducers; mode sensitivity based on guiding structure materials/geometries; and use of new piezoelectric materials. On packaging, topics considered include package interfacing with SAW devices, and minimization of packaging effects on device performance. In this work novel numerical models are theoretically developed and implemented to study propagation and transduction characteristics of sensor designs using wave/constitutive equations, Green's functions, and boundary/finite element methods. Using developed simulation tools that consider finite-thickness of all device electrodes, transduction efficiency for SAW transducers with neighboring uniform or periodic guiding electrodes is reported for the first time. Results indicate finite electrode thickness strongly affects efficiency. Using dense electrodes, efficiency is shown to approach 92% and 100% for uniform and periodic electrode guiding, respectively; yielding improved sensor detection limits. A numerical sensitivity analysis is presented targeting viscosity

  3. Measuring Acoustic Wave Transit Time in Furnace Based on Active Acoustic Source Signal

    Zhen Luo; Feng Tian; Xiao-Ping Sun

    2007-01-01

    Accurate measurement of transit time for acoustic wave between two sensors installed on two sides of a furnace is a key to implementing the temperature field measurement technique based on acoustical method. A new method for measuring transit time of acoustic wave based on active acoustic source signal is proposed in this paper, which includes the followings: the time when the acoustic source signal arrives at the two sensors is measured first; then, the difference of two arriving time arguments is computed, thereby we get the transit time of the acoustic wave between two sensors installed on the two sides of the furnace. Avoiding the restriction on acoustic source signal and background noise, the new method can get the transit time of acoustic wave with higher precision and stronger ability of resisting noise interference.

  4. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    The work of this project is concerned with the simulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and topology optimization of SAW devices. SAWs are elastic vibrations that propagate along a material surface and are extensively used in electromechanical filters and resonators in telecommunication. A new...... application is modulation of optical waves in waveguides. This presentation elaborates on how a SAW is generated by interdigital transducers using a 2D model of a piezoelectric, inhomogeneous material implemented in the high-level programming language Comsol Multiphysics. The SAW is send through a model of a...... output waveguide and the MZI can thus be used as an optical switch. It is explained how the mechanical model of the SAW is coupled to a model of the optical waves such that the change in effective refractive index introduced in the MZI arms by the SAW can be calculated. Results of a parameter study of...

  5. Selective Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Organophosphorus Sensor Employing a Host-Guest Self-Assembly Monolayer of β-Cyclodextrin Derivative.

    Pan, Yong; Mu, Ning; Shao, Shengyu; Yang, Liu; Wang, Wen; Xie, Xiao; He, Shitang

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly and molecular imprinting technologies are very attractive technologies for the development of artificial recognition systems and provide chemical recognition based on need and not happenstance. In this paper, we employed a b-cyclodextrin derivative surface acoustic wave (SAW) chemical sensor for detecting the chemical warfare agents (CWAs) sarin (O-Isoprophyl methylphosphonofluoridate, GB). Using sarin acid (isoprophyl hydrogen methylphosphonate) as an imprinting template, mono[6-deoxy-6-[(mercaptodecamethylene)thio

  6. Selective Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Organophosphorus Sensor Employing a Host-Guest Self-Assembly Monolayer of β-Cyclodextrin Derivative

    Yong Pan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembly and molecular imprinting technologies are very attractive technologies for the development of artificial recognition systems and provide chemical recognition based on need and not happenstance. In this paper, we employed a b-cyclodextrin derivative surface acoustic wave (SAW chemical sensor for detecting the chemical warfare agents (CWAs sarin (O-Isoprophyl methylphosphonofluoridate, GB. Using sarin acid (isoprophyl hydrogen methylphosphonate as an imprinting template, mono[6-deoxy-6-[(mercaptodecamethylenethio

  7. Design and characterisation of long period grating (LPG) - based optical fibre sensors for acoustic wave detection

    Gaudron, J.O.

    2015-01-01

    Fibre optic sensors have demonstrated a broad range of commercial potential due to their intrinsic characteristics such as low loss, very small size, light weight and immunity to electromagnetic interference. Representing one type of optical fibre sensors, long period gratings (LPGs) have shown a high sensitivity to a number of parameters, including temperature, strain, refractive index and bending, therefore they have been explored widely for a range of potential sensing applications. This t...

  8. A lateral field excited ZnO film bulk acoustic wave sensor working in viscous environments

    We present a lateral field excited ZnO film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) operated in pure-shear mode and analyze its performances in viscous liquids. The electrodes of the device are located on the film surface and normal to the c-axis of the ZnO film. The proposed device works near 1.44 GHz with a Q-factor up to 360 in air and 310 in water, which are higher than those of the quasi-shear thickness field excited FBAR. The resonant frequency is decreased with the increasing square root of the product of the viscosity and density with a linear dependence in the viscosity below 148.7 mPa s. The mass sensitivity of 670 Hz cm2 ng−1 was measured by monitoring the frequency change during the volatilization of saline solution loaded on the resonator. In addition, the levels of the noise and the mass resolutions were measured in various viscous environments. The proposed device yields the mass resolution of 670 Hz cm2 ng−1 and the high mass resolution of 0.06 ng cm−2. These results indicated that the lateral field excited ZnO FBAR had superior sensitivity for the bio-sensing applications in viscous biological liquids. (paper)

  9. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

  10. Ultrasonic wavequide sensor for NPP acoustic monitoring

    Design of a waveguide sensor for NPP equipment acoustic testing is considered taking as an example a water coolant steam content monitor designed for application in an active emission-receipt regime. The sensor comprises an acoustic transducer, a waveguide with a suspension and a sensitive element. The transducer includes a disk piezoelement of TsTS-19 ceramics. A longitudinal wave waveguide, produced of a steel wire 0.8-1.2 mm in diameter, can transmit signals within the 50-1000 kHz range. A capillar tube 1.6x0.2 mm in diameter and 200 mm long with sealed ends is used as a sensitive element. The sensor operation is based on determining ultrasonic pulse attennuation in the capillar, which changes depending on acoustic wave resistance of the following-round coolant and depends on steam content. In passive regime the sensor may be applied for acoustic-emission monitoring of various equipment. In this case a matching device, providing for emission signal transmission from the monitored object surface to the waveguide, should be introduced instead of the sensitive element

  11. An Effective Quality Control of Pharmacologically Active Volatiles of Houttuynia cordata Thunb by Fast Gas Chromatography-Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor

    Se Yeon Oh

    2015-01-01

    Fast gas chromatography-surface acoustic wave sensor (GC/SAW) has been applied for the detection of the pharmacological volatiles emanated from Houttuynia cordata Thunb which is from South Korea. H. cordata Thunb with unpleasant and fishy odors shows a variety of pharmacological activities such as anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and insect repellent. The aim of this study is to show a novel quality control by GC/SAW methodology for the discrimination of the three different par...

  12. Holographic imaging of surface acoustic waves

    Bruno, Francois; Royer, Daniel; Atlan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We report on an experimental demonstration of surface acoustic waves monitoring on a thin metal plate with heterodyne optical holography. Narrowband imaging of local optical pathlength modulation is achieved with a frequency-tunable time-averaged laser Doppler holographic imaging scheme on a sensor array, at video-rate. This method enables robust and quantitative mapping of out-of-plane vibrations of nanometric amplitudes at radiofrequencies.

  13. Low-intensity ultraviolet detection using a surface acoustic-wave sensor with a Ag-doped ZnO nanoparticle film

    In this paper, we propose a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor with a Ag-doped ZnO nanoparticle film for low-intensity ultraviolet (UV) light detection. With this sensor, Ag doping is shown to effectively enhance ZnO thin film conductivity, thereby improving the SAW sensor sensitivity. Furthermore, it also enlarges the sensor’s linear response range. Prior to fabrication, the response mechanism was analyzed and the SAW device was designed. The ZnO film was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. The sensor response under UV light (365 nm) irradiation was measured using a network analyzer. The characteristic improvement of the SAW UV sensor due to Ag-doping was verified by the amplitude shift of S21 from 0.31 dB to 0.97 dB under UV irradiation of 4 μW cm−2. Also, the enhanced sensitivity and lowest detection limit were evaluated as 0.2 dB/(μW cm−2) and 0.05 μW cm−2, respectively. (paper)

  14. Applications of passive remote surface acoustic wave sensors in high-voltage systems; Einsatz von passiven funkabfragbaren Oberflaechenwellensensoren in der elektrischen Energietechnik

    Teminova, R.

    2007-06-29

    Passive remote Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors have been applied e.g. as temperature, pressure or torque sensors. Their important advantages over standard methods are their passive operating principle, which allows operation without any power supply, as well as the wireless high-frequency signal transmission over distances up to about 10..15 m even through (non metallic) housings. These properties of SAW sensors particularly qualify them for applications in high voltage operational equipment. First experience was gained in a long time field test of surge arrester monitoring based on SAW temperature sensors in a German high-voltage substation. Now, this system has been further developed at Darmstadt University of Technology for other applications, the first of them being an overhead line (OHL) conductor temperature measurement, the second one a temperature monitoring system for of high-voltage disconnectors. After designing and building the sensors, extensive laboratory tests were carried out applying high-voltage, high-current and thermal stress in order to approve the suitability for the intended application. All these tests confirmed the assumption that SAW sensors, due to their passive working principle, are not affected at all by any kind of electrical, magnetic or thermal stress that may occur during service. The complete temperature sensor consists of three parts: a sensor chip, an antenna which receives and transmits the signal from and to the radar unit and a body for installation and for protection against environmental impact. One must find a good compromise between optimizing of thermal, dielectric and high-frequency characteristics and at the same time taking into consideration a simple installation. These requirements on the SAW sensors turned out to be difficult to coordinate. To achieve a high measuring precision is especially difficult. First, a new sensor for OHL application was developed. The OHL conductor temperature sensor had been optimized

  15. Coupled wave sensor technology

    Buried line guided radar sensors have been used successfully for a number of years to provide perimeter security for high value resources. This paper introduces a new complementary sensor advancement at Computing Devices termed 'coupled wave device technology' (CWD). It provides many of the inherent advantages of leakey cable sensors, such as terrain-following and the ability to discriminate between humans and small animals. It also is able to provide a high or wide detection zone, and allows the sensor to be mounted aerially and adjacent to a wall or fence. Several alternative sensors have been developed which include a single-line sensor, a dual-line hybrid sensor that combines the elements of ported coax and CWD technology, and a rapid-deployment portable sensor for temporary or mobile applications. A description of the technology, the sensors, and their characteristics is provided

  16. On the Synchronization of Acoustic Gravity Waves

    Lonngren, Karl E.; Bai, Er-Wei

    Using the model proposed by Stenflo, we demonstrate that acoustic gravity waves found in one region of space can be synchronized with acoustic gravity waves found in another region of space using techniques from modern control theory.

  17. Synthesis of anisotropic swirling surface acoustic waves by inverse filter, towards integrated generators of acoustical vortices

    Riaud, Antoine; Charron, Eric; Bussonnière, Adrien; Matar, Olivier Bou

    2015-01-01

    From radio-electronics signal analysis to biological samples actuation, surface acoustic waves (SAW) are involved in a multitude of modern devices. Despite this versatility, SAW transducers developed up to date only authorize the synthesis of the most simple standing or progressive waves such as plane and focused waves. In particular, acoustical integrated sources able to generate acoustical vortices (the analogue of optical vortices) are missing. In this work, we propose a flexible tool based on inverse filter technique and arrays of SAW transducers enabling the synthesis of prescribed complex wave patterns at the surface of anisotropic media. The potential of this setup is illustrated by the synthesis of a 2D analog of 3D acoustical vortices, namely "swirling surface acoustic waves". Similarly to their 3D counterpart, they appear as concentric structures of bright rings with a phase singularity in their center resulting in a central dark spot. Swirling SAW can be useful in fragile sensors whose neighborhood...

  18. Acoustic sensor for remote measuring of pressure

    Kataev V. F.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with sensors based on delay lines on surface acoustic waves (SAW, having a receiving-emitting and a reflective interdigital transducers (IDT. The dependence of the reflection coefficient of SAW on type and intensity of the load was studied. The authors propose a composite delay line in which the phase of the reflection coefficient depends on the pressure. Pressure leads to a shift of the reflective IDT relative to the transceiver, because they are located on different substrates. The paper also presents functional diagrams of the interrogator.

  19. Nonlinear acoustic-gravity waves

    Stenflo, Lennart; Shukla, P. K.

    2009-01-01

    Previous results on nonlinear acoustic-gravity waves are reconsidered. It turns out that the mathematical techniques used are somewhat similar to those already adopted by the plasma physics community. Consequently, a future interaction between physicists On different fields, e.g in meteorology and plasma physics, can be very fruitful.

  20. Dual-mode acoustic wave biosensors microarrays

    Auner, Gregory W.; Shreve, Gina; Ying, Hao; Newaz, Golam; Hughes, Chantelle; Xu, Jianzeng

    2003-04-01

    We have develop highly sensitive and selective acoustic wave biosensor arrays with signal analysis systems to provide a fingerprint for the real-time identification and quantification of a wide array of bacterial pathogens and environmental health hazards. We have developed an unique highly sensitive dual mode acoustic wave platform prototype that, when combined with phage based selective detection elements, form a durable bacteria sensor. Arrays of these new real-time biosensors are integrated to form a biosensor array on a chip. This research and development program optimizes advanced piezoelectric aluminum nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, novel micromachining processes, advanced device structures, selective phage displays development and immobilization techniques, and system integration and signal analysis technology to develop the biosensor arrays. The dual sensor platform can be programmed to sense in a gas, vapor or liquid environment by switching between acoustic wave resonate modes. Such a dual mode sensor has tremendous implications for applications involving monitoring of pathogenic microorganisms in the clinical setting due to their ability to detect airborne pathogens. This provides a number of applications including hospital settings such as intensive care or other in-patient wards for the reduction of nosocomial infections and maintenance of sterile environments in surgical suites. Monitoring for airborn pathogen transmission in public transportation areas such as airplanes may be useful for implementation of strategies for redution of airborn transmission routes. The ability to use the same sensor in the liquid sensing mode is important for tracing the source of airborn pathogens to local liquid sources. Sensing of pathogens in saliva will be useful for sensing oral pathogens and support of decision-making strategies regarding prevention of transmission and support of treatment strategies.

  1. Wind, waves, and acoustic background levels at Station ALOHA

    Duennebier, Fred K.; Lukas, Roger; Nosal, Eva-Marie; Aucan, JéRome; Weller, Robert A.

    2012-03-01

    Frequency spectra from deep-ocean near-bottom acoustic measurements obtained contemporaneously with wind, wave, and seismic data are described and used to determine the correlations among these data and to discuss possible causal relationships. Microseism energy appears to originate in four distinct regions relative to the hydrophone: wind waves above the sensors contribute microseism energy observed on the ocean floor; a fraction of this local wave energy propagates as seismic waves laterally, and provides a spatially integrated contribution to microseisms observed both in the ocean and on land; waves in storms generate microseism energy in deep water that travels as seismic waves to the sensor; and waves reflected from shorelines provide opposing waves that add to the microseism energy. Correlations of local wind speed with acoustic and seismic spectral time series suggest that the local Longuet-Higgins mechanism is visible in the acoustic spectrum from about 0.4 Hz to 80 Hz. Wind speed and acoustic levels at the hydrophone are poorly correlated below 0.4 Hz, implying that the microseism energy below 0.4 Hz is not typically generated by local winds. Correlation of ocean floor acoustic energy with seismic spectra from Oahu and with wave spectra near Oahu imply that wave reflections from Hawaiian coasts, wave interactions in the deep ocean near Hawaii, and storms far from Hawaii contribute energy to the seismic and acoustic spectra below 0.4 Hz. Wavefield directionality strongly influences the acoustic spectrum at frequencies below about 2 Hz, above which the acoustic levels imply near-isotropic surface wave directionality.

  2. Graphene oxide as sensitive layer in Love-wave surface acoustic wave sensors for the detection of chemical warfare agent simulants.

    Sayago, Isabel; Matatagui, Daniel; Fernández, María Jesús; Fontecha, José Luis; Jurewicz, Izabela; Garriga, Rosa; Muñoz, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    A Love-wave device with graphene oxide (GO) as sensitive layer has been developed for the detection of chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants. Sensitive films were fabricated by airbrushing GO dispersions onto Love-wave devices. The resulting Love-wave sensors detected very low CWA simulant concentrations in synthetic air at room temperature (as low as 0.2 ppm for dimethyl-methylphosphonate, DMMP, a simulant of sarin nerve gas, and 0.75 ppm for dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether, DPGME, a simulant of nitrogen mustard). High responses to DMMP and DPGME were obtained with sensitivities of 3087 and 760 Hz/ppm respectively. Very low limit of detection (LOD) values (9 and 40 ppb for DMMP and DPGME, respectively) were calculated from the achieved experimental data. The sensor exhibited outstanding sensitivity, good linearity and repeatability to all simulants tested. The detection mechanism is here explained in terms of hydrogen bonding formation between the tested CWA simulants and GO. PMID:26653465

  3. Applications of passive remote surface acoustic wave sensors in high-voltage systems; Einsatz von passiven funkabfragbaren Oberflaechenwellensensoren in der elektrischen Energietechnik

    Teminova, R.

    2007-06-29

    Passive remote Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors have been applied e.g. as temperature, pressure or torque sensors. Their important advantages over standard methods are their passive operating principle, which allows operation without any power supply, as well as the wireless high-frequency signal transmission over distances up to about 10..15 m even through (non metallic) housings. These properties of SAW sensors particularly qualify them for applications in high voltage operational equipment. First experience was gained in a long time field test of surge arrester monitoring based on SAW temperature sensors in a German high-voltage substation. Now, this system has been further developed at Darmstadt University of Technology for other applications, the first of them being an overhead line (OHL) conductor temperature measurement, the second one a temperature monitoring system for of high-voltage disconnectors. After designing and building the sensors, extensive laboratory tests were carried out applying high-voltage, high-current and thermal stress in order to approve the suitability for the intended application. All these tests confirmed the assumption that SAW sensors, due to their passive working principle, are not affected at all by any kind of electrical, magnetic or thermal stress that may occur during service. The complete temperature sensor consists of three parts: a sensor chip, an antenna which receives and transmits the signal from and to the radar unit and a body for installation and for protection against environmental impact. One must find a good compromise between optimizing of thermal, dielectric and high-frequency characteristics and at the same time taking into consideration a simple installation. These requirements on the SAW sensors turned out to be difficult to coordinate. To achieve a high measuring precision is especially difficult. First, a new sensor for OHL application was developed. The OHL conductor temperature sensor had been optimized

  4. Characteristic evaluation of acoustic emission sensors

    Jung, Hyun Kyu; Joo, Y. S.; Lee, N. H

    2000-12-01

    This report introduces the various kinds of Acoustic Emission(AE) sensors as well as the basic principle of AE sensors in order to select AE sensor suitably. The described sensors include : high sensitivity sensor, broadband sensor, underwater sensor, miniature sensor, directional sensor, integral pre-amplifier sensor. Sensor has two critical aspects of reliability and repeatability. For the high reliability, sensor has to be calibrated in accordance with ASTM standard E 1106 which explains to measure the characteristics of AE sensor accurately. For investigating the degradation of AE sensor under the severe environment for example the high radiation condition, It is important to perform the repeatability test which is described in detail in according to the ASTM standard E 976. Two kinds of AE sensor applications are also summarized.

  5. Characteristic evaluation of acoustic emission sensors

    This report introduces the various kinds of Acoustic Emission(AE) sensors as well as the basic principle of AE sensors in order to select AE sensor suitably. The described sensors include : high sensitivity sensor, broadband sensor, underwater sensor, miniature sensor, directional sensor, integral pre-amplifier sensor. Sensor has two critical aspects of reliability and repeatability. For the high reliability, sensor has to be calibrated in accordance with ASTM standard E 1106 which explains to measure the characteristics of AE sensor accurately. For investigating the degradation of AE sensor under the severe environment for example the high radiation condition, It is important to perform the repeatability test which is described in detail in according to the ASTM standard E 976. Two kinds of AE sensor applications are also summarized

  6. Ultrasonic waveguide sensor for acoustic monitoring of nuclear power plants

    Waveguide sensors are being increasingly used for acoustic emission monitoring of equipment in nuclear power plants and in systems for acoustic diagnostics of the coolant. In this paper we examine the construction of a waveguide sensor for acoustic monitoring for the example of an impedance sensor for the steam content of water coolant, intended for use in the active emission-reception mode. The dynamic properties of the sensor are determined by the construction and the dimensions of the transducer, and are usually represented by its amplitude-frequency characteristic, which, as a rule, is of the resonance type. The longitudinal-wave waveguide, made from steel wire 0.8-1.2 mm in diameter, can transmit signals in the band 50-1000 kHz. To increase the reliability and the ease of maintenance of the monitoring system the transducer and the waveguide are connected in a detachable manner

  7. Propagation behavior of acoustic wave in wood

    Huadong Xu; Guoqi Xu; Lihai Wang; Lei Yu

    2014-01-01

    We used acoustic tests on a quarter-sawn poplar timbers to study the effects of wood anisotropy and cavity defects on acoustic wave velocity and travel path, and we investigated acoustic wave propagation behavior in wood. The timber specimens were first tested in unmodified condition and then tested after introduction of cavity defects of varying sizes to quantify the transmitting time of acoustic waves in laboratory conditions. Two-dimensional acoustic wave contour maps on the radial section of specimens were then simulated and analyzed based on the experimental data. We tested the relationship between wood grain and acoustic wave velocity as waves passed in various directions through wood. Wood anisotropy has significant effects on both velocity and travel path of acoustic waves, and the velocity of waves passing longitudinally through timbers exceeded the radial velocity. Moreover, cavity defects altered acoustic wave time contours on radial sections of timbers. Acous-tic wave transits from an excitation point to the region behind a cavity in defective wood more slowly than in intact wood.

  8. Ion Acoustic Waves in the Presence of Electron Plasma Waves

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    Long-wavelength ion acoustic waves in the presence of propagating short-wavelength electron plasma waves are examined. The influence of the high frequency oscillations is to decrease the phase velocity and the damping distance of the ion wave.......Long-wavelength ion acoustic waves in the presence of propagating short-wavelength electron plasma waves are examined. The influence of the high frequency oscillations is to decrease the phase velocity and the damping distance of the ion wave....

  9. Acoustic sensor array extracts physiology during movement

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2001-08-01

    An acoustic sensor attached to a person's neck can extract heart and breath sounds, as well as voice and other physiology related to their health and performance. Soldiers, firefighters, law enforcement, and rescue personnel, as well as people at home or in health care facilities, can benefit form being remotely monitored. ARLs acoustic sensor, when worn around a person's neck, picks up the carotid artery and breath sounds very well by matching the sensor's acoustic impedance to that of the body via a gel pad, while airborne noise is minimized by an impedance mismatch. Although the physiological sounds have high SNR, the acoustic sensor also responds to motion-induced artifacts that obscure the meaningful physiology. To exacerbate signal extraction, these interfering signals are usually covariant with the heart sounds, in that as a person walks faster the heart tends to beat faster, and motion noises tend to contain low frequency component similar to the heart sounds. A noise-canceling configuration developed by ARL uses two acoustic sensor on the front sides of the neck as physiology sensors, and two additional acoustic sensor on the back sides of the neck as noise references. Breath and heart sounds, which occur with near symmetry and simultaneously at the two front sensor, will correlate well. The motion noise present on all four sensor will be used to cancel the noise on the two physiology sensors. This report will compare heart rate variability derived from both the acoustic array and from ECG data taken simultaneously on a treadmill test. Acoustically derived breath rate and volume approximations will be introduced as well. A miniature 3- axis accelerometer on the same neckband provides additional noise references to validate footfall and motion activity.

  10. An Effective Quality Control of Pharmacologically Active Volatiles of Houttuynia cordata Thunb by Fast Gas Chromatography-Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor

    Se Yeon Oh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fast gas chromatography-surface acoustic wave sensor (GC/SAW has been applied for the detection of the pharmacological volatiles emanated from Houttuynia cordata Thunb which is from South Korea. H. cordata Thunb with unpleasant and fishy odors shows a variety of pharmacological activities such as anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and insect repellent. The aim of this study is to show a novel quality control by GC/SAW methodology for the discrimination of the three different parts of the plant such as leaves, aerial stems, and underground stems for H. cordata Thunb. Sixteen compounds were identified. β-Myrcene, cis-ocimene and decanal are the dominant volatiles for leaves (71.0% and aerial stems (50.1%. While, monoterpenes (74.6% are the dominant volatiles for underground stems. 2-Undecanone (1.3% and lauraldehyde (3.5% were found to be the characteristic components for leaves. Each part of the plant has its own characteristic fragrance pattern owing to its individual chemical compositions. Moreover, its individual characteristic fragrance patterns are conducive to discrimination of the three different parts of the plant. Consequently, fast GC/SAW can be a useful analytical method for quality control of the different parts of the plant with pharmacological volatiles as it provides second unit analysis, a simple and fragrant pattern recognition.

  11. High-Temperature Surface-Acoustic-Wave Transducer

    Zhao, Xiaoliang; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft-engine rotating equipment usually operates at high temperature and stress. Non-invasive inspection of microcracks in those components poses a challenge for the non-destructive evaluation community. A low-profile ultrasonic guided wave sensor can detect cracks in situ. The key feature of the sensor is that it should withstand high temperatures and excite strong surface wave energy to inspect surface/subsurface cracks. As far as the innovators know at the time of this reporting, there is no existing sensor that is mounted to the rotor disks for crack inspection; the most often used technology includes fluorescent penetrant inspection or eddy-current probes for disassembled part inspection. An efficient, high-temperature, low-profile surface acoustic wave transducer design has been identified and tested for nondestructive evaluation of structures or materials. The development is a Sol-Gel bismuth titanate-based surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor that can generate efficient surface acoustic waves for crack inspection. The produced sensor is very thin (submillimeter), and can generate surface waves up to 540 C. Finite element analysis of the SAW transducer design was performed to predict the sensor behavior, and experimental studies confirmed the results. One major uniqueness of the Sol-Gel bismuth titanate SAW sensor is that it is easy to implement to structures of various shapes. With a spray coating process, the sensor can be applied to surfaces of large curvatures. Second, the sensor is very thin (as a coating) and has very minimal effect on airflow or rotating equipment imbalance. Third, it can withstand temperatures up to 530 C, which is very useful for engine applications where high temperature is an issue.

  12. On Collisionless Damping of Ion Acoustic Waves

    Jensen, Vagn Orla; Petersen, P.I.

    1973-01-01

    Exact theoretical treatments show that the damping of ion acoustic waves in collisionless plasmas does not vanish when the derivative of the undisturbed distribution function at the phase velocity equals zero.......Exact theoretical treatments show that the damping of ion acoustic waves in collisionless plasmas does not vanish when the derivative of the undisturbed distribution function at the phase velocity equals zero....

  13. Development of Surface Acoustic Wave Electronic Nose

    S.K. Jha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes an effective method to design and develop surface acoustic wave (SAW sensor array-based electronic nose systems for specific target applications. The paper suggests that before undertaking full hardware development empirically through hit and trial for sensor selection, it is prudent to develop accurate sensor array simulator for generating synthetic data and optimising sensor array design and pattern recognition system. The latter aspects are most time-consuming and cost-intensive parts in the development of an electronic nose system. This is because most of the electronic sensor platforms, circuit components, and electromechanical parts are available commercially-off-the-shelve (COTS, whereas knowledge about specific polymers and data analysis software are often guarded due to commercial or strategic interests. In this study, an 11-element SAW sensor array is modelled to detect and identify trinitrotoluene (TNT and dinitrotoluene (DNT explosive vapours in the presence of toluene, benzene, di-methyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP and humidity as interferents. Additive noise sources and outliers were included in the model for data generation. The pattern recognition system consists of: (i a preprocessor based on logarithmic data scaling, dimensional autoscaling, and singular value decomposition-based denoising, (ii principal component analysis (PCA-based feature extractor, and (iii an artificial neural network (ANN classifier. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated by presenting detailed PCA analysis and classification results under varied conditions of noise and outlier, and by analysing comparative performance of four classifiers (neural network, k-nearest neighbour, naïve Bayes, and support vector machine.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(4, pp.364-376, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.493

  14. Thin-film bulk acoustic wave resonators - FBAR: fabrication, heterogeneous integration with CMOS technologies and sensor applications

    Campanella Pineda, Humberto

    2008-01-01

    Consultable des del TDX Títol obtingut de la portada digitalitzada El gran impacto de la tecnología FBAR tanto en sistemas de radio frecuencia como más recientemente en sensores han motivado el desarrollo de aplicaciones integradas. Esto implica que los procesos de fabricación deberían lograr producir dispositivos resonadores con un alto factor de calidad, al tiempo que permitir la integración de los FBAR con tecnologías CMOS estándar. De tal manera, esta tesis doctoral aborda dichos re...

  15. Second-order dust acoustic wave theory

    A second-order perturbation theory for non-dispersive, undamped dust acoustic waves is presented. The analysis leads to a second-order wave equation with source terms consisting of (nonlinear) products of first-order terms. The nonlinear effects included in this analysis might be useful in explaining the non-sinusoidal waveforms that are observed with large-amplitude, self-excited dust acoustic waves.

  16. Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves

    Lu, Jiuyang; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2014-01-01

    We propose an efficient design route to generate unidirectional propagation of the designer surface acoustic waves. The whole system consists of a periodically corrugated rigid plate combining with a pair of asymmetric narrow slits. The directionality of the structure-induced surface waves stems from the destructive interference between the evanescent waves emitted from the double slits. The theoretical prediction is validated well by simulations and experiments. Promising applications can be anticipated, such as in designing compact acoustic circuits.

  17. A device for locating acoustic wave emitting sources

    The invention relates to a device for locating acoustic wave emitting sources. A two dimensional sensor network, with diamond-shaped (or the like) meshes, is placed on the surface of a structure in which acoustic wave emitting sources are to be located. The sensors are arranged according to two groups, each of which is connected to a clock and a counter. Every signal fed into a mesh of the network inhibits all the other sensors not belonging to said mesh; the location of the source within the diamond-shaped mesh is achieved by triangulation. This can be applied to the detection of flaws in metal structures, e.g. in nuclear reactor vessels

  18. An invisible acoustic sensor based on parity-time symmetry.

    Fleury, Romain; Sounas, Dimitrios; Alù, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Sensing an incoming signal is typically associated with absorbing a portion of its energy, inherently perturbing the measurement and creating reflections and shadows. Here, in contrast, we demonstrate a non-invasive, shadow-free, invisible sensor for airborne sound waves at audible frequencies, which fully absorbs the impinging signal, without at the same time perturbing its own measurement or creating a shadow. This unique sensing device is based on the unusual scattering properties of a parity-time (PT) symmetric metamaterial device formed by a pair of electro-acoustic resonators loaded with suitably tailored non-Foster electrical circuits, constituting the acoustic equivalent of a coherent perfect absorber coupled to a coherent laser. Beyond the specific application to non-invasive sensing, our work broadly demonstrates the unique relevance of PT-symmetric metamaterials for acoustics, loss compensation and extraordinary wave manipulation. PMID:25562746

  19. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  20. Nonlinear interaction between acoustic gravity waves

    P. Axelsson; J. Larsson; Stenflo, L.

    1996-01-01

    The resonant interaction between three acoustic gravity waves is considered. We improve on the results of previous authors and write the new coupling coefficients in a symmetric form. Particular attention is paid to the low-frequency limit.

  1. Focusing of Acoustic Waves through Acoustic Materials with Subwavelength Structures

    Xiao, Bingmu

    2013-05-01

    In this thesis, wave propagation through acoustic materials with subwavelength slits structures is studied. Guided by the findings, acoustic wave focusing is achieved with a specific material design. By using a parameter retrieving method, an effective medium theory for a slab with periodic subwavelength cut-through slits is successfully derived. The theory is based on eigenfunction solutions to the acoustic wave equation. Numerical simulations are implemented by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for the two-dimensional acoustic wave equation. The theory provides the effective impedance and refractive index functions for the equivalent medium, which can reproduce the transmission and reflection spectral responses of the original structure. I analytically and numerically investigate both the validity and limitations of the theory, and the influences of material and geometry on the effective spectral responses are studied. Results show that large contrasts in impedance and density are conditions that validate the effective medium theory, and this approximation displays a better accuracy for a thick slab with narrow slits in it. Based on the effective medium theory developed, a design of a at slab with a snake shaped" subwavelength structure is proposed as a means of achieving acoustic focusing. The property of focusing is demonstrated by FDTD simulations. Good agreement is observed between the proposed structure and the equivalent lens pre- dicted by the theory, which leads to robust broadband focusing by a thin at slab.

  2. Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring

    Pantea, Cristian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04

    The projects objectives and purpose are to: (1) development a multipurpose acoustic sensor for downhole fluid monitoring in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) reservoirs over typical ranges of pressures and temperatures and demonstrate its capabilities and performance for different EGS systems; (2) determine in real-time and in a single sensor package several parameters - temperature, pressure, fluid flow and fluid properties; (3) needed in nearly every phase of an EGS project, including Testing of Injection and Production Wells, Reservoir Validation, Inter-well Connectivity, Reservoir Scale Up and Reservoir Sustainability. (4) Current sensors are limited to operating at lower temperatures, but the need is for logging at high temperatures. The present project deals with the development of a novel acoustic-based sensor that can work at temperatures up to 374 C, in inhospitable environments.

  3. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja;

    2009-01-01

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10(-15) g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise i...

  4. Audio coding in wireless acoustic sensor networks

    Zahedi, Adel; Østergaard, Jan; Jensen, Søren Holdt;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of source coding for a wireless acoustic sensor network where each node in the network makes its own noisy measurement of the sound field, and communicates with other nodes in the network by sending and receiving encoded versions of the measurements. To make...

  5. An orientation calibration procedure for two acoustic vector sensor configurations

    Basten, T.G.H.; Bree, H.E. de; Yntema, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic vector sensors can be used for far field sound source localization, offering an alternative to far field beamforming. These sensors are able to measure the 3D acoustic particle velocity vector and the scalar value sound pressure. Two sensor configurations exist. The USP probe is based upon three orthogonally placed acoustic particle velocity sensors (Microflowns) and a single sound pressure sensor. In early 2009, also a completely integrated monolithic sound chip became available, wh...

  6. Acoustic sensor for in-pile fuel rod fission gas release measurement

    We have developed a specific acoustic sensor to improve the knowledge of fission gas release in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel rods when irradiated in materials testing reactors. In order to perform experimental programs related to the study of the fission gas release kinetics, the CEA (French Nuclear Energy Commission) acquired the ability to equip a pre-irradiated PWR fuel rod with three sensors, allowing the simultaneous on-line measurements of the following parameters: - fuel temperature with a centre-line thermocouple type C, - internal pressure with a specific counter-pressure sensor, - fraction of fission gas released in the fuel rod with an innovative acoustic sensor. The third detector is the subject of this paper. This original acoustic sensor has been designed to measure the molar mass and pressure of the gas contained in the fuel rod plenum. For in-pile instrumentation, the fraction of fission gas, such as Krypton and Xenon, in Helium, can be deduced online from this measurement. The principle of this acoustical sensor is the following: a piezoelectric transducer generates acoustic waves in a cavity connected to the fuel rod plenum. The acoustic waves are propagated and reflected in this cavity and then detected by the transducer. The data processing of the signal gives the velocity of the acoustic waves and their amplitude, which can be related respectively to the molar mass and to the pressure of the gas. The piezoelectric material of this sensor has been qualified in nuclear conditions (gamma and neutron radiations). The complete sensor has also been specifically designed to be implemented in materials testing reactors conditions. For this purpose some technical points have been studied in details: - fixing of the piezoelectric sample in a reliable way with a suitable signal transmission, - size of the gas cavity to avoid any perturbation of the acoustic waves, - miniaturization of the sensor because of narrow in-pile experimental devices

  7. Exciton transport by surface acoustic waves

    Rudolph, J.; Hey, R.; Santos, P. V.

    2007-05-01

    Long-range acoustic transport of excitons in GaAs quantum wells (QWs) is demonstrated. The mobile strain field of a surface acoustic wave creates a dynamic lateral type I modulation of the conduction and valence bands in a double-quantum-well (DQW) structure. This mobile potential modulation transports long-living indirect excitons in the DQW over several hundreds of μm.

  8. Topological charge pump by surface acoustic waves

    Yi, Zheng; Shi-Ping, Feng; Shi-Jie, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Quantized electron pumping by the surface acoustic wave across barriers created by a sequence of split metal gates is interpreted from the viewpoint of topology. The surface acoustic wave serves as a one-dimensional periodical potential whose energy spectrum possesses the Bloch band structure. The time-dependent phase plays the role of an adiabatic parameter of the Hamiltonian which induces a geometrical phase. The pumping currents are related to the Chern numbers of the filled bands below the Fermi energy. Based on this understanding, we predict a novel effect of quantized but non-monotonous current plateaus simultaneously pumped by two homodromous surface acoustic waves. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374036) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821403).

  9. Research in acoustic and optical wave technology

    Siegman, A. E.; Auld, B. A.; Kino, G. S.; Beasley, M. R.; Byer, R. L.

    1982-04-01

    This report summaries the research progress and activity 1 April 1981 through 31 March 1982. Specific Projects are: (81-1) Interaction of Acoustic and Optical Waves with Domains in Ferroic Fibers with Bulk Materials: (B.A. Auld); (81-2) High T Josephson Junctions & Circuits (M. R. Beasley); (81-3) Optical & Nonlinear Optical Studies of Single Crystal Fibers (R. L. Byer); (81-4) Acoustic Surface Wave Scanning of Optical Images, (G. S. Kino); (81-5) Picosecond Raman Studies of Electronic Solids (A. E. Siegman).

  10. High-sensitivity acoustic sensors from nanofibre webs.

    Lang, Chenhong; Fang, Jian; Shao, Hao; Ding, Xin; Lin, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Considerable interest has been devoted to converting mechanical energy into electricity using polymer nanofibres. In particular, piezoelectric nanofibres produced by electrospinning have shown remarkable mechanical energy-to-electricity conversion ability. However, there is little data for the acoustic-to-electric conversion of electrospun nanofibres. Here we show that electrospun piezoelectric nanofibre webs have a strong acoustic-to-electric conversion ability. Using poly(vinylidene fluoride) as a model polymer and a sensor device that transfers sound directly to the nanofibre layer, we show that the sensor devices can detect low-frequency sound with a sensitivity as high as 266 mV Pa(-1). They can precisely distinguish sound waves in low to middle frequency region. These features make them especially suitable for noise detection. Our nanofibre device has more than five times higher sensitivity than a commercial piezoelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) film device. Electrospun piezoelectric nanofibres may be useful for developing high-performance acoustic sensors. PMID:27005010

  11. Wave Phenomena in an Acoustic Resonant Chamber

    Smith, Mary E.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design and operation of a high Q acoustical resonant chamber which can be used to demonstrate wave phenomena such as three-dimensional normal modes, Q values, densities of states, changes in the speed of sound, Fourier decomposition, damped harmonic oscillations, sound-absorbing properties, and perturbation and scattering problems.…

  12. Enhanced acoustic sensing through wave compression and pressure amplification in anisotropic metamaterials.

    Chen, Yongyao; Liu, Haijun; Reilly, Michael; Bae, Hyungdae; Yu, Miao

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic sensors play an important role in many areas, such as homeland security, navigation, communication, health care and industry. However, the fundamental pressure detection limit hinders the performance of current acoustic sensing technologies. Here, through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, we show that anisotropic acoustic metamaterials can be designed to have strong wave compression effect that renders direct amplification of pressure fields in metamaterials. This enables a sensing mechanism that can help overcome the detection limit of conventional acoustic sensing systems. We further demonstrate a metamaterial-enhanced acoustic sensing system that achieves more than 20 dB signal-to-noise enhancement (over an order of magnitude enhancement in detection limit). With this system, weak acoustic pulse signals overwhelmed by the noise are successfully recovered. This work opens up new vistas for the development of metamaterial-based acoustic sensors with improved performance and functionalities that are highly desirable for many applications. PMID:25316410

  13. An orientation calibration procedure for two acoustic vector sensor configurations

    Basten, T.G.H.; Bree, H.E. de; Yntema, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic vector sensors can be used for far field sound source localization, offering an alternative to far field beamforming. These sensors are able to measure the 3D acoustic particle velocity vector and the scalar value sound pressure. Two sensor configurations exist. The USP probe is based upon

  14. Marble Ageing Characterization by Acoustic Waves

    Boudani, Mohamed El; Wilkie-Chancellier, Nicolas; Martinez, Loïc; Hébert, Ronan; Rolland, Olivier; Forst, Sébastien; Vergès-Belmin, Véronique; Serfaty, Stéphane

    In cultural heritage, statue marble characterization by acoustic waves is a well-known non-destructive method. Such investigations through the statues by time of flight method (TOF) point out sound speeds decrease with ageing. However for outdoor stored statues as the ones in the gardens of Chateau de Versailles, ageing affects mainly the surface of the Carrara marble. The present paper proposes an experimental study of the marble acoustic properties variations during accelerated laboratory ageing. The surface degradation of the marble is reproduced in laboratory for 29 mm thick marble samples by using heating/cooling thermal cycles on one face of a marble plate. Acoustic waves are generated by 1 MHz central frequency contact transducers excited by a voltage pulse placed on both sides of the plate. During the ageing and by using ad hoc transducers, the marble samples are characterized in transmission, along their volume by shear, compressional TOF measurements and along their surface by Rayleigh waves measurements. For Rayleigh waves, both TOF by transducers and laser vibrometry methods are used to detect the Rayleigh wave. The transmission measurements point out a deep decrease of the waves speeds in conjunction with a dramatic decrease of the maximum frequency transmitted. The marble acts as a low pass filter whose characteristic frequency cut decreases with ageing. This pattern occurs also for the Rayleigh wave surface measurements. The speed change in conjunction with the bandwidth translation is shown to be correlated to the material de-structuration during ageing. With a similar behavior but reversed in time, the same king of phenomena have been observed trough sol-gel materials during their structuration from liquid to solid state (Martinez, L. et all (2004). "Chirp-Z analysis for sol-gel transition monitoring". Ultrasonics, 42(1), 507-510.). A model is proposed to interpret the acoustical measurements

  15. Acoustic wave-equation-based earthquake location

    Tong, Ping; Yang, Dinghui; Liu, Qinya; Yang, Xu; Harris, Jerry

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel earthquake location method using acoustic wave-equation-based traveltime inversion. The linear relationship between the location perturbation (δt0, δxs) and the resulting traveltime residual δt of a particular seismic phase, represented by the traveltime sensitivity kernel K(t0, xs) with respect to the earthquake location (t0, xs), is theoretically derived based on the adjoint method. Traveltime sensitivity kernel K(t0, xs) is formulated as a convolution between the forward and adjoint wavefields, which are calculated by numerically solving two acoustic wave equations. The advantage of this newly derived traveltime kernel is that it not only takes into account the earthquake-receiver geometry but also accurately honours the complexity of the velocity model. The earthquake location is obtained by solving a regularized least-squares problem. In 3-D realistic applications, it is computationally expensive to conduct full wave simulations. Therefore, we propose a 2.5-D approach which assumes the forward and adjoint wave simulations within a 2-D vertical plane passing through the earthquake and receiver. Various synthetic examples show the accuracy of this acoustic wave-equation-based earthquake location method. The accuracy and efficiency of the 2.5-D approach for 3-D earthquake location are further verified by its application to the 2004 Big Bear earthquake in Southern California.

  16. A novel sensor for monitoring acoustic cavitation. Part I: Concept, theory, and prototype development.

    Zeqiri, Bajram; Gélat, Pierre N; Hodnett, Mark; Lee, Nigel D

    2003-10-01

    This paper describes a new concept for an ultrasonic cavitation sensor designed specifically for monitoring acoustic emissions generated by small microbubbles when driven by an applied acoustic field. Its novel features include a hollow, open-ended, cylindrical shape, with the sensor being a right circular cylinder of height 32 mm and external diameter 38 mm. The internal diameter of the sensor is 30 mm; its inner surface is fabricated from a 110-microm layer of piezoelectrically active film whose measurement bandwidth is sufficient to enable acoustic emissions up to and beyond 10 MHz to be monitored. When in use, the sensor is immersed within the liquid test medium and high frequency (megahertz) acoustic emissions occurring within the hollow body of the sensor are monitored. In order to shield the sensor response from events occurring outside the cylinder, the outer surface of the sensor cylinder is encapsulated within a special 4-mm thick polyurethane-based cavitation shield with acoustic properties specifically developed to be minimally perturbing to the 40 kHz applied acoustic field but attenuating to ultrasound generated at megahertz frequencies (plane-wave transmission loss > 30 dB at 1 MHz). This paper introduces the rationale behind the new sensor, describing details of its construction and the materials formulation program undertaken to develop the cavitation shield. PMID:14609074

  17. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    Polzikova, N. I.; Alekseev, S. G.; Pyataikin, I. I.; Kotelyanskii, I. M.; Luzanov, V. A.; Orlov, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonator (HBAR) formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  18. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    N. I. Polzikova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonator (HBAR formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  19. Bi-dust acoustic waves

    Martin, P.; Castro, E.; Puerta, J. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado 89000, Caracas 1080A (Venezuela); Valdeblanquez, E. [Universidad del Zulia, facultad de Ingenieria, Apartado 4011-A 526, Maracaibo, Edo. Zulia (Venezuela)

    2006-07-01

    Low frequencies waves in plasmas with two kind of dusty grains have been studied. Each species of dust particle is characterized by the grain radius, which determines its equilibrium charge. Relative velocities between the two kinds of dust grain for the unperturbed plasma is also considered in order to study instabilities and compare with astrophysical and industrial applications. In this analysis, each dust species is handled with a simplified model of kinetic-fluid equations, and the electrons and ions are determined by Boltzmann factors. The low frequency dispersion relation for bi-dust plasma waves with non relative motion between each kind of grain leads to damped waves with two characteristic frequencies. Instabilities are produced by the relative motion between the species. The onset of these instabilities is studied as a function of the plasma dust frequencies and relative velocities among each species. (Author)

  20. Acoustic-gravity waves, theory and application

    Kadri, Usama; Farrell, William E.; Munk, Walter

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) propagate in the ocean under the influence of both the compressibility of sea water and the restoring force of gravity. The gravity dependence vanishes if the wave vector is normal to the ocean surface, but becomes increasingly important as the wave vector acquires a horizontal tilt. They are excited by many sources, including non-linear surface wave interactions, disturbances of the ocean bottom (submarine earthquakes and landslides) and underwater explosions. In this introductory lecture on acoustic-gravity waves, we describe their properties, and their relation to organ pipe modes, to microseisms, and to deep ocean signatures by short surface waves. We discuss the generation of AGW by underwater earthquakes; knowledge of their behaviour with water depth can be applied for the early detection of tsunamis. We also discuss their generation by the non-linear interaction of surface gravity waves, which explains the major role they play in transforming energy from the ocean surface to the crust, as part of the microseisms phenomenon. Finally, they contribute to horizontal water transport at depth, which might affect benthic life.

  1. Acoustic Remote Sensing of Rogue Waves

    Parsons, Wade; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    We propose an early warning system for approaching rogue waves using the remote sensing of acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) - progressive sound waves that propagate at the speed of sound in the ocean. It is believed that AGWs are generated during the formation of rogue waves, carrying information on the rogue waves at near the speed of sound, i.e. much faster than the rogue wave. The capability of identifying those special sound waves would enable detecting rogue waves most efficiently. A lot of promising work has been reported on AGWs in the last few years, part of which in the context of remote sensing as an early detection of tsunami. However, to our knowledge none of the work addresses the problem of rogue waves directly. Although there remains some uncertainty as to the proper definition of a rogue wave, there is little doubt that they exist and no one can dispute the potential destructive power of rogue waves. An early warning system for such extreme waves would become a demanding safety technology. A closed form expression was developed for the pressure induced by an impulsive source at the free surface (the Green's function) from which the solution for more general sources can be developed. In particular, we used the model of the Draupner Wave of January 1st, 1995 as a source and calculated the induced AGW signature. In particular we studied the AGW signature associated with a special feature of this wave, and characteristic of rogue waves, of the absence of any local set-down beneath the main crest and the presence of a large local set-up.

  2. Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves in a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre.

    Beugnot, Jean-Charles; Lebrun, Sylvie; Pauliat, Gilles; Maillotte, Hervé; Laude, Vincent; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    Brillouin scattering in optical fibres is a fundamental interaction between light and sound with important implications ranging from optical sensors to slow and fast light. In usual optical fibres, light both excites and feels shear and longitudinal bulk elastic waves, giving rise to forward-guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering and backward-stimulated Brillouin scattering. In a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre, the situation changes dramatically, as we here report with the first experimental observation of Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves. These Rayleigh-type surface waves travel the wire surface at a specific velocity of 3,400 m s(-1) and backscatter the light with a Doppler shift of about 6 GHz. As these acoustic resonances are sensitive to surface defects or features, surface acoustic wave Brillouin scattering opens new opportunities for various sensing applications, but also in other domains such as microwave photonics and nonlinear plasmonics. PMID:25341638

  3. Development of a MEMS acoustic emission sensor system

    Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Wu, Wei; Wright, Amelia P.

    2007-04-01

    and the second mode frequency, strongly approximating the desirable rigid plate limit. The effect is modeled analytically and is verified experimentally by measurement of the resonance frequencies in the new transducers. Another improvement arises from the use of a pin grid array ceramic package, in which the MEMS chip is acoustically coupled to the structure with only two interfaces, through a ceramic medium that is negligible in thickness when compared to wavelengths of interest. Like other acoustic emission sensors, those on the 2006 MEMS chip are sensitive only to displacements normal to the surface on which the device is mounted. To overcome that long-standing limitation, a new MEMS sensor sensitive to in-plane motion has been designed, featuring a different spring-mass mechanism and creating the signal by the change in capacitance between stationary and moving fingers. Predicted damping is much lower for the case of the in-plane sensor, and squeeze-film damping is used selectively to isolate the desired in-plane mechanical response from any unwanted out-of-plane response. The new spring-mass mechanism satisfies the design rules for the PolyMUMPS fabrication (foundry) process. A 3-D MEMS sensor system is presently being fabricated, collocating two in-plane sensors and one out-of-plane sensor at the mm scale, which is very short compared to the acoustic wavelength of interest for stress waves created by acoustic emission events.

  4. Demodulation of diaphragm based acoustic sensor using Sagnac interferometer with stable phase bias.

    Ma, Jun; Yu, Yongqin; Jin, Wei

    2015-11-01

    A stable phase demodulation system for diaphragm-based acoustic sensors is reported. The system is based on a modified fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer with a stable quadrature phase bias, which is independent of the parameters of the sensor head. The phase bias is achieved passively by introducing a nonreciprocal frequency shift between the counter-propagating waves, avoiding the use of complicated active servo-control. A 100 nm-thick graphite diaphragm-based acoustic sensor interrogated by the proposed demodulation system demonstrated a minimum detectable pressure level of ~450 µPa/Hz(1/2) and an output signal stability of less than 0.35 dB over an 8-hour period. The system may be useful as a universal phase demodulation unit for diaphragm-based acoustic sensors as well as other sensors operating in a reflection mode. PMID:26561196

  5. Surface acoustic wave sensors/gas chromatography; and Low quality natural gas sulfur removal and recovery CNG Claus sulfur recovery process

    Klint, B.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

    1997-12-01

    This topical report consists of the two titled projects. Surface Acoustic Wave/Gas Chromatography (SAW/GC) provides a cost-effective system for collecting real-time field screening data for characterization of vapor streams contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Model 4100 can be used in a field screening mode to produce chromatograms in 10 seconds. This capability will allow a project manager to make immediate decisions and to avoid the long delays and high costs associated with analysis by off-site analytical laboratories. The Model 4100 is currently under evaluation by the California Environmental Protection Agency Technology Certification Program. Initial certification focuses upon the following organics: cis-dichloroethylene, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, tetrachloroethylene, tetrachloroethane, benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and o-xylene. In the second study the CNG Claus process is being evaluated for conversion and recovery of elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide, especially found in low quality natural gas. This report describes the design, construction and operation of a pilot scale plant built to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the integrated CNG Claus process.

  6. Love Acoustic Wave-Based Devices and Molecularly-Imprinted Polymers as Versatile Sensors for Electronic Nose or Tongue for Cancer Monitoring.

    Dejous, Corinne; Hallil, Hamida; Raimbault, Vincent; Lachaud, Jean-Luc; Plano, Bernard; Delépée, Raphaël; Favetta, Patrick; Agrofoglio, Luigi; Rebière, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and actual analytical techniques are restrictive in detecting it. Thus, there is still a challenge, as well as a need, for the development of quantitative non-invasive tools for the diagnosis of cancers and the follow-up care of patients. We introduce first the overall interest of electronic nose or tongue for such application of microsensors arrays with data processing in complex media, either gas (e.g., Volatile Organic Compounds or VOCs as biomarkers in breath) or liquid (e.g., modified nucleosides as urinary biomarkers). Then this is illustrated with a versatile acoustic wave transducer, functionalized with molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIP) synthesized for adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a model for nucleosides. The device including the thin film coating is described, then static measurements with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrical characterization after each step of the sensitive MIP process (deposit, removal of AMP template, capture of AMP target) demonstrate the thin film functionality. Dynamic measurements with a microfluidic setup and four targets are presented afterwards. They show a sensitivity of 5 Hz·ppm(-1) of the non-optimized microsensor for AMP detection, with a specificity of three times compared to PMPA, and almost nil sensitivity to 3'AMP and CMP, in accordance with previously published results on bulk MIP. PMID:27331814

  7. Support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering

    This report discusses the following topics on support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering: Minimum support inversion; forward modelling of elastodynamic wave scattering; minimum support linearized acoustic inversion; support minimized nonlinear acoustic inversion without absolute phase; and support minimized nonlinear elastic inversion

  8. Isomorphic surface acoustic waves on multilayer structures

    Hunt, William D.

    2001-03-01

    There has been growing interest in recent years over the investigation of bulk acoustic waves (BAWs) which propagate along certain directions in anisotropic crystals with a minimum of diffraction. One application of these BAWs is for multichannel acousto-optic devices. The fact that the beams propagate with the minimum diffraction implies that the channels in such a device can be closely packed. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are constrained to be within roughly one acoustic wavelength from the surface, the possibility exists to deposit thin films of isotropic or anisotropic material on the substrate and embue the aggregate multilayer structure with properties not present in the beginning substrate material. The characteristic investigated in this article is the velocity anisotropy which, as is known, predominates SAW diffraction. Specifically, we present a method whereby self-collimating SAWs can be generated on surfaces even though the substrate material itself does not exhibit this behavior. We discuss the particular case of a ZnO layer on (001)-cut -propagating GaAs for which a fair amount of slowness surface data exists. Finally, using angular spectrum of plane waves diffraction theory, we present data which substantiate the claim that self-collimating can more accurately be viewed as isomorphic because the SAW beam profile can propagate without changing its shape.

  9. Reverse Doppler effect in backward spin waves scattered on acoustic waves

    A. V. Chumak; Dhagat, P.; Jander, A.; Serga, A. A.; Hillebrands, B

    2009-01-01

    We report on the observation of reverse Doppler effect in backward spin waves reflected off of surface acoustic waves. The spin waves are excited in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film. Simultaneously, acoustic waves are also generated. The strain induced by the acoustic waves in the magnetostrictive YIG film results in the periodic modulation of the magnetic anisotropy in the film. Thus, in effect, a travelling Bragg grating for the spin waves is produced. The backward spin waves reflecting off...

  10. Non-Linear Excitation of Ion Acoustic Waves

    Michelsen, Poul; Hirsfield, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The excitation of ion acoustic waves by nonlinear coupling of two transverse magnetic waves generated in a microwave cavity was investigated. Measurements of the wave amplitude showed good agreement with calculations based on the Vlasov equation.......The excitation of ion acoustic waves by nonlinear coupling of two transverse magnetic waves generated in a microwave cavity was investigated. Measurements of the wave amplitude showed good agreement with calculations based on the Vlasov equation....

  11. Locating Acoustic Events Based on Large-Scale Sensor Networks

    Hojung Cha; Yungeun Kim; Junho Ahn

    2009-01-01

    Research on acoustic source localization is actively being conducted to enhance accuracy and coverage. However, the performance is inherently limited due to the use of expensive sensor nodes and inefficient communication methods. This paper proposes an acoustic source localization algorithm for a large area that uses low-cost sensor nodes. The proposed mechanism efficiently handles multiple acoustic sources by removing false-positive errors that arise from the different propagation ranges of ...

  12. Balance Transmission Mechanism in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Jiabao Cao; Jinfeng Dou; Shunle Dong

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of underwater acoustic modem technology, underwater acoustic sensor networks (UWASNs) have more applications in long-term monitoring of the deployment area. In the underwater environment, the sensors are costly with limited energy. And acoustic communication medium poses new challenges, including high path loss, low bandwidth, and high energy consumption. Therefore, designing transmission mechanism to decrease energy consumption and to optimize the lifetime of UWASN...

  13. Nonlinear ion acoustic waves scattered by vortexes

    Ohno, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The Kadomtsev--Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy is the archetype of infinite-dimensional integrable systems, which describes nonlinear ion acoustic waves in two-dimensional space. This remarkably ordered system resides on a singular submanifold (leaf) embedded in a larger phase space of more general ion acoustic waves (low-frequency electrostatic perturbations). The KP hierarchy is characterized not only by small amplitudes but also by irrotational (zero-vorticity) velocity fields. In fact, the KP equation is derived by eliminating vorticity at every order of the reductive perturbation. Here we modify the scaling of the velocity field so as to introduce a vortex term. The newly derived system of equations consists of a generalized three-dimensional KP equation and a two-dimensional vortex equation. The former describes `scattering' of vortex-free waves by ambient vortexes that are determined by the latter. We say that the vortexes are `ambient' because they do not receive reciprocal reactions from the waves (i.e.,...

  14. Surface Modification on Acoustic Wave Biosensors for Enhanced Specificity

    Nathan D. Gallant

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in mass loading on the surface of acoustic biosensors result in output frequency shifts which provide precise measurements of analytes. Therefore, to detect a particular biomarker, the sensor delay path must be judiciously designed to maximize sensitivity and specificity. B-cell lymphoma 2 protein (Bcl-2 found in urine is under investigation as a biomarker for non-invasive early detection of ovarian cancer. In this study, surface chemistry and biofunctionalization approaches were evaluated for their effectiveness in presenting antibodies for Bcl-2 capture while minimizing non-specific protein adsorption. The optimal combination of sequentially adsorbing protein A/G, anti-Bcl-2 IgG and Pluronic F127 onto a hydrophobic surface provided the greatest signal-to-noise ratio and enabled the reliable detection of Bcl-2 concentrations below that previously identified for early stage ovarian cancer as characterized by a modified ELISA method. Finally, the optimal surface modification was applied to a prototype acoustic device and the frequency shift for a range of Bcl-2 concentration was quantified to demonstrate the effectiveness in surface acoustic wave (SAW-based detection applications. The surface functionalization approaches demonstrated here to specifically and sensitively detect Bcl-2 in a working ultrasonic MEMS biosensor prototype can easily be modified to detect additional biomarkers and enhance other acoustic biosensors.

  15. Broadband Acoustic Cloak for Ultrasound Waves

    Zhang, Shu; Fang, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Invisibility devices based on coordinate transformation have opened up a new field of considerable interest. Such a device is proposed to render the hidden object undetectable under the flow of light or sound, by guiding and controlling the wave path through an engineered space surrounding the object. We present here the first practical realization of a low-loss and broadband acoustic cloak for underwater ultrasound. This metamaterial cloak is constructed with a network of acoustic circuit elements, namely serial inductors and shunt capacitors. Our experiment clearly shows that the acoustic cloak can effectively bend the ultrasound waves around the hidden object, with reduced scattering and shadow. Due to the non-resonant nature of the building elements, this low loss (~6dB/m) cylindrical cloak exhibits excellent invisibility over a broad frequency range from 52 to 64 kHz in the measurements. The low visibility of the cloaked object for underwater ultrasound shed a light on the fundamental understanding of ma...

  16. Acoustic Sensor for In-Pile Fuel Rod Fission Gas Release Measurement

    Innovative in-pile instrumentation is crucial for advanced experimental programs in research reactors. In this field, we developed a specific acoustic sensor to improve the knowledge of fission gas release in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel rods when irradiated in Material Testing Reactors (MTR). In order to perform experimental programs related to the study of the fission gas release kinetics, the CEA (French Nuclear Energy Commission) acquired the ability to equip a pre-irradiated PWR fuel rod with three sensors, allowing the simultaneous on-line measurements of the following parameters: -fuel temperature with a centreline thermocouple type C -internal pressure with a specific counter-pressure sensor, -fraction of fission gas released in the fuel rod with an innovative acoustic sensor. The third detector, which has been developed and is patent pending by CEA, SCK.CEN (Belgian Nuclear Research Center) and IES (French research laboratory of Montpellier II University and French National Research Center), is the subject of this paper. This original acoustic sensor has been designed to measure the molar mass and pressure of the gas contained in the fuel rod plenum. For in-pile instrumentation, the fraction of fission gas, such as Krypton and Xenon, in Helium, can be deduced on-line from this measurement. The principle of this non destructive and on-line acoustical sensor is the following: a piezoelectric transducer generates acoustic waves in a cavity connected to the fuel rod plenum. The acoustic waves are propagated and reflected in this cavity and then detected by the transducer. The data processing of the signal gives the velocity of the acoustic waves and their amplitude, which can be related respectively to the molar mass and to the pressure of the gas. The piezoelectric material of this sensor has been qualified in nuclear conditions (gamma and neutron radiations). The complete sensor has also been specifically designed to be implemented in MTR conditions

  17. Strongly driven ion acoustic waves in laser produced plasmas

    This paper present an experimental study of ion acoustic waves with wavenumbers corresponding to stimulated Brillouin scattering. Time resolved Thomson scattering in frequency and wavenumber space, has permitted to observe the dispersion relation of the waves as a function of the laser intensity. Apart from observing ion acoustic waves associated with a strong second component is observed at laser intensities above 1013Wcm-2

  18. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors

    Ivan Felis; Juan Antonio Martínez-Mora; Miguel Ardid

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. ...

  19. Simulating acoustic waves in spotted stars

    Papini, Emanuele; Gizon, Laurent; Hanasoge, Shravan M

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic modes of oscillation are affected by stellar activity, however it is unclear how starspots contribute to these changes. Here we investigate the non-magnetic effects of starspots on global modes with angular degree $\\ell \\leq 2$ in highly active stars, and characterize the spot seismic signature on synthetic light curves. We perform 3D time-domain simulations of linear acoustic waves to study their interaction with a model starspot. We model the spot as a 3D change in the sound speed stratification with respect to a convectively stable stellar background, built from solar Model S. We perform a parametric study by considering different depths and perturbation amplitudes. Exact numerical simulations allow investigation of the wavefield-spot interaction beyond first order perturbation theory. The interaction of the axisymmetric modes with the starspot is strongly nonlinear. As mode frequency increases, the frequency shifts for radial modes exceed the value predicted by linear theory, while the shifts for...

  20. Optimizing Voided Piezoelectric Polymers For Acoustic Sensors

    Arvelo, Juan I.

    2009-07-01

    Polymer piezoelectric materials offer lower density and more flexibility than piezoelectric ceramics for applications where rugged and lightweight acoustic sensors are required. This paper discusses constraints imposed by material stiffness and dielectric constants and aims to derive a generalized closed-form solution for optimizing charged foamed polymers. Optimized solutions are reached in the limits of very large and small void fraction and permittivity ratio. The permittivity ratio is the ratio of the dielectric constants of the polymer and the material that fills the voids. Demonstrations indicate that, in the oblique asymptote, the optimized void fraction becomes equivalent to the permittivity ratio. This effort was conducted under the auspices of the Undersea Warfare Business Area (UWBA) Independent Research & Development (IRAD) Board of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL).

  1. Acoustic field distribution of sawtooth wave with nonlinear SBE model

    For precise prediction of the acoustic field distribution of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with an ellipsoid transducer, the nonlinear spheroidal beam equations (SBE) are employed to model acoustic wave propagation in medium. To solve the SBE model with frequency domain algorithm, boundary conditions are obtained for monochromatic and sawtooth waves based on the phase compensation. In numerical analysis, the influence of sinusoidal wave and sawtooth wave on axial pressure distributions are investigated

  2. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    Benone, Carolina L; Herdeiro, Carlos; Radu, Eugen

    2014-01-01

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  3. Wave-Flow Interactions and Acoustic Streaming

    Chafin, Clifford E

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of waves and flows is a challenging topic where a complete resolution has been frustrated by the essential nonlinear features in the hydrodynamic case. Even in the case of EM waves in flowing media, the results are subtle. For a simple shear flow of constant n fluid, incident radiation is shown to be reflected and refracted in an analogous manner to Snell's law. However, the beam intensities differ and the system has an asymmetry in that an internal reflection gap opens at steep incident angles nearly oriented with the shear. For EM waves these effects are generally negligible in real systems but they introduce the topic at a reduced level of complexity of the more interesting acoustic case. Acoustic streaming is suggested, both from theory and experimental data, to be associated with vorticity generation at the driver itself. Bounds on the vorticity in bulk and nonlinear effects demonstrate that the bulk sources, even with attenuation, cannot drive such a strong flow. A review of the velocity...

  4. Development of a passive and remote magnetic microsensor with thin-film giant magnetoimpedance element and surface acoustic wave transponder

    Al Rowais, Hommood

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a wireless magnetic field sensor consisting of a three-layer thin-film giant magnetoimpedance sensor and a surface acoustic wave device on one substrate. The goal of this integration is a passive and remotely interrogated sensor that can be easily mass fabricated using standard microfabrication tools. The design parameters, fabrication process, and a model of the integrated sensor are presented together with experimental results of the sensor. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Simulation of dust-acoustic waves

    The authors use molecular dynamics (MD) and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation methods to investigate the dispersion relation of dust-acoustic waves in a one-dimensional, strongly coupled (Coulomb coupling parameter Λ = ratio of the Coulomb energy to the thermal energy = 120) dusty plasma. They study both cases where the dust is represented by a small number of simulation particles that form into a regular array structure (crystal limit) as well as where the dust is represented by a much larger number of particles (fluid limit)

  6. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals

  7. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry, E-mail: rochtch@iptm.ru; Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Irzhak, Dmitry [Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High-Purity Materials Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Ortega, Luc [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, UMR 8502, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Zizak, Ivo; Erko, Alexei [Institute for Nanometre Optics and Technology, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Insepov, Zinetula [Nazarbayev University Research and Innovation System, 53 Kabanbay Batyr St., Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan)

    2015-09-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  8. Twisted Dust Acoustic Waves in Dusty Plasmas

    Shukla, P K

    2012-01-01

    We examine linear dust acoustic waves (DAWs) in a dusty plasma with strongly correlated dust grains, and discuss possibility of a twisted DA vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). For our purposes, we use the Boltzmann distributed electron and ion density perturbations, the dust continuity and generalized viscoelastic dust momentum equations, and Poisson's equation to obtain a dispersion relation for the modified DAWs. The effects of the polarization force, strong dust couplings, and dust charge fluctuations on the DAW spectrum are examined. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the DAW can propagate as a twisted vortex beam carrying OAM. A twisted DA vortex structure can trap and transport dust particles in dusty plasmas.

  9. An acoustic metasurface design for wave motion conversion of longitudinal waves to transverse waves using topology optimization

    Noguchi, Y.; Yamada, T.; Otomori, M.; Izui, K.; Nishiwaki, S.

    2015-11-01

    This letter presents an acoustic metasurface that converts longitudinal acoustic waves into transverse elastic waves in an acoustic-elastic coupled system. Metasurface configurations are obtained by a level set-based topology optimization method, and we describe the mechanism that changes the direction of the wave motion. Numerical examples of 2D problems with prescribed frequencies of incident acoustic waves are provided, and transverse elastic wave amplitudes are maximized by manipulating the propagation of the acoustic waves. Frequency analysis reveals that each of the different metasurface designs obtained for different wavelengths of incident waves provides peak response at the target frequency.

  10. Development of Acoustic Sensors for the ANTARES Experiment

    Naumann, C L; Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Salomon, K; Naumann, Christopher Lindsay; Anton, Gisela; Graf, Kay; Hoessl, Juergen; Kappes, Alexander; Karg, Timo; Katz, Uli; Lahmann, Robert; Salomon, Karsten

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the possibility of acoustic detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos in water, our group is planning to deploy and operate an array of acoustic sensors using the ANTARES Neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. Therefore, acoustic sensor hardware has to be developed which is both capable of operation under the hostile conditions of the deep sea and at the same time provides the high sensitivity necessary to detect the weak pressure signals resulting from the neutrino's interaction in water. In this paper, two different approaches to building such sensors, as well as performance studies in the laboratory and in situ, are presented.

  11. The anisotropy of attenuation of acoustic waves in acoustic-optic crystals

    On the basis of experimental data on the attenuation of acoustic waves in crystals of lithium niobate and lithium tantalate the components of a complex elasticity tensor have been determined. The surfaces characterizing the anisotropy of the attenuation coefficient of longitudinal and transverse acoustic waves in these crystals were constructed. It is shown that the most noticeable change in the acoustic attenuation for all types of waves is observed when the direction of propagation of the acoustic wave changes from the [111] to [001] axis. (authors)

  12. Characterization of wave physics in acoustic metamaterials using a fiber optic point detector

    Ganye, Randy; Chen, Yongyao; Liu, Haijun; Bae, Hyungdae; Wen, Zhongshan; Yu, Miao

    2016-06-01

    Due to limitations of conventional acoustic probes, full spatial field mapping (both internal and external wave amplitude and phase measurements) in acoustic metamaterials with deep subwavelength structures has not yet been demonstrated. Therefore, many fundamental wave propagation phenomena in acoustic metamaterials remain experimentally unexplored. In this work, we realized a miniature fiber optic acoustic point detector that is capable of omnidirectional detection of complex spatial acoustic fields in various metamaterial structures over a broadband spectrum. By using this probe, we experimentally characterized the wave-structure interactions in an anisotropic metamaterial waveguide. We further demonstrated that the spatial mapping of both internal and external acoustic fields of metamaterial structures can help obtain important wave propagation properties associated with material dispersion and field confinement, and develop an in-depth understanding of the waveguiding physics in metamaterials. The insights and inspirations gained from our experimental studies are valuable not only for the advancement of fundamental metamaterial wave physics but also for the development of functional metamaterial devices such as acoustic lenses, waveguides, and sensors.

  13. Manipulation of transmitted wave front using ultrathin planar acoustic metasurfaces

    Zhai, Shilong; Chen, Huaijun; Ding, Changlin; Shen, Fangliang; Luo, Chunrong; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2015-09-01

    Nowadays, the acoustic devices are developing toward miniaturization. However, conventional materials can hardly satisfy the requirements because of their large size and complex manufacturing process. The introduction of acoustic metasurfaces has broken these restrictions, as they are able to manipulate sound waves at will by utilizing ultrathin planar metamaterials. Here, a simple acoustic metasurface is designed and characterized, whose microstructure is constructed with a cavity filled with air and two elastic membranes on the ends of cavity. By appropriately optimizing the configurations of microstructures, the steering of transmitted wave trajectory is demonstrated, and some extraordinary phenomena are realized at 3.5 kHz, such as planar acoustic axicon, acoustic lens, the conversion from spherical waves to plane waves, and the transformation from propagating waves to surface waves.

  14. Analysis of acoustic reflectors for SAW temperature sensor and wireless measurement of temperature

    In this study, a wireless and non power SAW (surface acoustic wave) temperature sensor was developed. The single inter digital transducer (IDT) of SAW temperature sensor of which resonance frequency is 434 MHz was fabricated on 128.deg rot-X LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate by semiconductor processing technology. To find optimal acoustic reflector for SAW temperature sensor, various kinds of acoustic reflectors were fabricated and their reflection characteristics were analyzed. The IDT type acoustic reflector showed better reflection characteristic than other reflectors. The wireless temperature sensing system consisting of SAW temperature sensor with dipole antenna and a microprocessor based control circuit with dipole antenna for transmitting signal to activate the SAW temperature sensor and receiving the signal from SAW temperature sensor was developed. The result with wireless SAW temperature sensing system showed that the frequency of SAW temperature sensor was linearly decreased with the increase of temperature in the range of 40 to 80.deg.C and the developed wireless SAW temperature sensing system showed the excellent performance with the coefficient of determination of 0.99

  15. Optimal Node Placement in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network

    Felemban, Muhamad

    2011-10-01

    Almost 70% of planet Earth is covered by water. A large percentage of underwater environment is unexplored. In the past two decades, there has been an increase in the interest of exploring and monitoring underwater life among scientists and in industry. Underwater operations are extremely difficult due to the lack of cheap and efficient means. Recently, Wireless Sensor Networks have been introduced in underwater environment applications. However, underwater communication via acoustic waves is subject to several performance limitations, which makes the relevant research issues very different from those on land. In this thesis, we investigate node placement for building an initial Underwater Wireless Sensor Network infrastructure. Firstly, we formulated the problem into a nonlinear mathematic program with objectives of minimizing the total transmission loss under a given number of sensor nodes and targeted volume. We conducted experiments to verify the proposed formulation, which is solved using Matlab optimization tool. We represented each node with a truncated octahedron to fill out the 3D space. The truncated octahedrons are tiled in the 3D space with each node in the center where locations of the nodes are given using 3D coordinates. Results are supported using ns-3 simulator. Results from simulation are consistent with the obtained results from mathematical model with less than 10% error.

  16. Mechanism of an acoustic wave impact on steel during solidification

    K. Nowacki; P. Musiał; T. Lis

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic steel processing in an ingot mould may be the final stage in the process of quality improvement of a steel ingot. The impact of radiation and cavitation pressure as well as the phenomena related to the acoustic wave being emitted and delivered to liquid steel affect various aspects including the internal structure fragmentation, rigidity or density of steel. The article provides an analysis of the mechanism of impact of physical phenomena caused by an acoustic wave affecting the qual...

  17. Visualization of Surface Acoustic Waves in Thin Liquid Films

    Rambach, R. W.; Taiber, J.; C. M. L. Scheck; Meyer, C.; Reboud, J.; Cooper, J M; Franke, T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the propagation path of a surface acoustic wave (SAW), excited with anWe demonstrate that the propagation path of a surface acoustic wave (SAW), excited with an interdigitated transducer (IDT), can be visualized using a thin liquid film dispensed onto a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. The practical advantages of this visualization method are its rapid and simple implementation, with many potential applications including in characterising acoustic pumping within microfl...

  18. Surface acoustic wave based analytical system for the detection of liquid detergents

    Vivancos, José-Luis; Racz, Zoltan; Cole, Marina; Gardner, Julian W.

    2012-01-01

    A novel analytical sensing system has been designed for the characterization and discrimination of different detergents in water. This micro-sensor system could play a key role in the development of more efficient and environmentally-friendly washing machines by enabling the measurement of residual detergents. The sensing system comprises a dual shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) resonator sensor housed within a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chamber. Free and electric...

  19. A Novel Cell-Based Hybrid Acoustic Wave Biosensor with Impedimetric Sensing Capabilities

    Ioana Voiculescu; Anis Nurashikin Nordin; Fang Li; Fei Liu

    2013-01-01

    A novel multiparametric biosensor system based on living cells will be presented. The biosensor system includes two biosensing techniques on a single device: resonant frequency measurements and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS). The multiparametric sensor system is based on the innovative use of the upper electrode of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) resonator as working electrode for the ECIS technique. The QCM acoustic wave sensor consists of a thin AT-cut quartz substrate...

  20. Wave effects on a pressure sensor

    Joseph, A.; DeSa, E.J.; Desa, E.; McKeown, J.; Peshwe, V.B.

    Wave flume experiments indicated that for waves propagating on quiescent waters the sensor's performance improved (i.e. the difference Delta P between the average hydrostatic and measured pressures was small and positive) when the inlet...

  1. A simple and accurate model for Love wave based sensors: Dispersion equation and mass sensitivity

    Jiansheng Liu

    2014-01-01

    Dispersion equation is an important tool for analyzing propagation properties of acoustic waves in layered structures. For Love wave (LW) sensors, the dispersion equation with an isotropic-considered substrate is too rough to get accurate solutions; the full dispersion equation with a piezoelectric-considered substrate is too complicated to get simple and practical expressions for optimizing LW-based sensors. In this work, a dispersion equation is introduced for Love waves in a layered struct...

  2. Development of an acoustic sensor for a geothermal Borehole Televiewer

    Wonn, J.W.

    1979-03-01

    The objective of this project is to upgrade acoustic sensor technology such that appropriate well logging instruments can be made to operate under the hostile environment conditions anticipated in geothermal resource exploration and evaluation. The Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) was selected as the vehicle for this sensor improvement work, primarily because of its demonstrated ability to detect and characterize fractures under sub-geothermal conditions. The work done toward providing an improved sensor for the televiewer is described. An experimental sensor concept was devised, incorporating a thin metal acoustic window, an improved, high-temperature internal coupling fluid, and thermally resistant sensor internals. During an autoclave test, it was successfully demonstrated that the resulting experimental sensor design concept provides the basic target detection and characterization functions required of a fracture mapping, Borehole Televiewer under simulated geothermal conditions. In particular, the experimental sensor remained operational at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi.

  3. Development of an acoustic sensor for a geothermal borehole televiewer

    Wonn, J.W.

    1979-03-01

    The objective of this project is to upgrade acoustic sensor technology such that appropriate well logging instruments can be made to operate under the hostile environment conditions anticipated in geothermal resource exploration and evaluation. The Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) was selected as the vehicle for this sensor improvement work, primarily because of its demonstrated ability to detect and characterize fractures under sub-geothermal conditions. The work done toward providing an improved sensor for the televiewer is described. An experimental sensor concept was devised, incorporating a thin metal acoustic window, an improved, high-temperature internal coupling fluid, and thermally resistant sensor internals. During an autoclave test, it was successfully demonstrated that the resulting experimental sensor design concept provides the basic target detection and characterization functions required of a fracture mapping, Borehole Televiewer under simulated geothermal conditions. In particular, the experimental sensor remained operational at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi.

  4. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors.

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L). PMID:27294937

  5. Low Bandwidth Vocoding using EM Sensor and Acoustic Signal Processing

    Ng, L C; Holzrichter, J F; Larson, P E

    2001-10-25

    Low-power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference [1]. By combining these data with the corresponding acoustic signal, we've demonstrated an almost 10-fold bandwidth reduction in speech compression, compared to a standard 2.4 kbps LPC10 protocol used in the STU-III (Secure Terminal Unit, third generation) telephone. This paper describes a potential EM sensor/acoustic based vocoder implementation.

  6. Speaker verification using combined acoustic and EM sensor signal processing

    Ng, L C; Gable, T J; Holzrichter, J F

    2000-11-10

    Low Power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference. This greatly enhances the quality and quantity of information for many speech related applications. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J. Acoustic. SOC. Am . 103 ( 1) 622 (1998). By combining the Glottal-EM-Sensor (GEMS) with the Acoustic-signals, we've demonstrated an almost 10 fold reduction in error rates from a speaker verification system experiment under a moderate noisy environment (-10dB).

  7. Low Bandwidth Vocoding using EM Sensor and Acoustic Signal Processing

    Low-power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference [1]. By combining these data with the corresponding acoustic signal, we've demonstrated an almost 10-fold bandwidth reduction in speech compression, compared to a standard 2.4 kbps LPC10 protocol used in the STU-III (Secure Terminal Unit, third generation) telephone. This paper describes a potential EM sensor/acoustic based vocoder implementation

  8. Irradiation Behavior and Post-Irradiation Examinations of an Acoustic Sensor Using a Piezoelectric Transducer

    The development of advanced instrumentation for in-pile experiments in Material Testing Reactor constitutes a main goal for the improvement of the nuclear fuel behavior knowledge. In the framework of high burn-up fuel experiments under transient operating conditions, an innovative sensor based on acoustic method was developed by CEA and IES (Southern Electronic Institute).This sensor is used to determine the on-line composition of the gases located in fuel rodlet free volume and thus, allows calculating the molar fractions of fission gases and helium. The main principle of the composition determination by acoustic method consists in measuring the time of flight of an acoustic signal emitted and reflected in a specific cavity. A piezoelectric transducer, driven by a pulse generator, generates the acoustic wave in the cavity. The piezoelectric transducer is a PZT ceramic disk, mainly consisting of lead, zirconium and titanium. This acoustic method was tested with success during a first experiment called REMORA 3, and the results were used to differentiate helium and fission gas release kinetics under transient operating conditions. However, during the irradiation test, acoustic signal degradation was observed, mainly due to irradiation effect but also due to the increasing of the gas temperature. Despite this acoustic signal degradation, the time of flight measurements were carried out with good accuracy throughout the test, thanks to the development of a more efficient signal processing. After experiment, neutronic calculations were performed in order to determine neutron fluence at the level of the piezoelectric transducer. In order to have a better understanding of the acoustic sensor behavior under irradiation, Post Irradiation Examination program was done on piezoelectric transducer and on acoustic coupling material too. These examinations were also realized on a non-irradiated acoustic sensor built in the same conditions and with the same materials and the same

  9. Raising Photoemission Efficiency with Surface Acoustic Waves

    A. Afanasev, F. Hassani, C.E. Korman, V.G. Dudnikov, R.P. Johnson, M. Poelker, K.E.L. Surles-Law

    2012-07-01

    We are developing a novel technique that may help increase the efficiency and reduce costs of photoelectron sources used at electron accelerators. The technique is based on the use of Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW) in piezoelectric materials, such as GaAs, that are commonly used as photocathodes. Piezoelectric fields produced by the traveling SAW spatially separate electrons and holes, reducing their probability of recombination, thereby enhancing the photoemission quantum efficiency of the photocathode. Additional advantages could be increased polarization provided by the enhanced mobility of charge carriers that can be controlled by the SAW and the ionization of optically-generated excitons resulting in the creation of additional electron-hole pairs. It is expected that these novel features will reduce the cost of accelerator operation. A theoretical model for photoemission in the presence of SAW has been developed, and experimental tests of the technique are underway.

  10. Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a quantum plasma

    Mahmood, S. [Physics Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, RS, Porto Alegre 915051-970 (Brazil); Theoretical Physics Division (TPD), PINSTECH P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Haas, F. [Physics Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, RS, Porto Alegre 915051-970 (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    Nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for appropriate boundary conditions and nonlinear periodic wave solutions are obtained. The corresponding analytical solution and numerical plots of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons in the phase plane are presented using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach. The variations in the nonlinear potential of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves are studied at different values of quantum parameter H{sub e} which is the ratio of electron plasmon energy to electron Fermi energy defined for degenerate electrons. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are formed depending on the value of the quantum parameter. The dependence of the wavelength and frequency on nonlinear wave amplitude is also presented.

  11. Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a quantum plasma

    Mahmood, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for appropriate boundary conditions and nonlinear periodic wave solutions are obtained. The corresponding analytical solution and numerical plots of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons in the phase plane are presented using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach. The variations in the nonlinear potential of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves are studied at different values of quantum parameter $H_{e}$ which is the ratio of electron plasmon energy to electron Fermi energy defined for degenerate electrons. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are formed depending on the value of the quantum parameter. The dependence of the wavelength and frequency on nonlinear wave amplitude is also presented.

  12. On Modeling Eavesdropping Attacks in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks †

    Wang, Qiu; Dai, Hong-Ning; Li, Xuran; Wang, Hao; Xiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The security and privacy of underwater acoustic sensor networks has received extensive attention recently due to the proliferation of underwater activities. This paper proposes an analytical model to investigate the eavesdropping attacks in underwater acoustic sensor networks. Our analytical framework considers the impacts of various underwater acoustic channel conditions (such as the acoustic signal frequency, spreading factor and wind speed) and different hydrophones (isotropic hydrophones and array hydrophones) in terms of network nodes and eavesdroppers. We also conduct extensive simulations to evaluate the effectiveness and the accuracy of our proposed model. Empirical results show that our proposed model is quite accurate. In addition, our results also imply that the eavesdropping probability heavily depends on both the underwater acoustic channel conditions and the features of hydrophones. PMID:27213379

  13. On Modeling Eavesdropping Attacks in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Qiu Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The security and privacy of underwater acoustic sensor networks has received extensive attention recently due to the proliferation of underwater activities. This paper proposes an analytical model to investigate the eavesdropping attacks in underwater acoustic sensor networks. Our analytical framework considers the impacts of various underwater acoustic channel conditions (such as the acoustic signal frequency, spreading factor and wind speed and different hydrophones (isotropic hydrophones and array hydrophones in terms of network nodes and eavesdroppers. We also conduct extensive simulations to evaluate the effectiveness and the accuracy of our proposed model. Empirical results show that our proposed model is quite accurate. In addition, our results also imply that the eavesdropping probability heavily depends on both the underwater acoustic channel conditions and the features of hydrophones.

  14. Surface acoustic waves in piezoelectrics with HTSC resonance film structure

    Analysis of surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a periodic film structure of granulated high-temperature superconductor formed on the piezoelectric surface, is conducted. A number of notable features in the SAW characteristics is revealed. SAW parameter dependences on frequency and temperature can be of a resonance character in the region of N-S transition, in a zone, where Josephson currents on intergranular contacts of a superconductor prevail. Evaluations have shown that the resonance peak of attenuation can achieve the value of 100 decibel/cm, and SAW velocity difference in the region of resonance ΔV/V can exceed 10-2. A sharp temperature dependence of these parameters allows one to use the effects to construct bolometric acoustoelectron photoreceivers and other sensors. 9 refs.; 5 figs

  15. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; Carrano, Charles S.

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic waves with periods of 2-4 min and gravity waves with periods of 6-16 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (250-350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of May-July 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wave disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.

  16. A 94-GHz Millimeter-Wave Sensor for Speech Signal Acquisition

    Jianqi Wang; Hua Zhang; Huijun Xue; Hao Lv; Xiao Yu; Yang Zhang; Guohua Lu; Ying Tian; Sheng Li; Xijing Jing

    2013-01-01

    High frequency millimeter-wave (MMW) radar-like sensors enable the detection of speech signals. This novel non-acoustic speech detection method has some special advantages not offered by traditional microphones, such as preventing strong-acoustic interference, high directional sensitivity with penetration, and long detection distance. A 94-GHz MMW radar sensor was employed in this study to test its speech acquisition ability. A 34-GHz zero intermediate frequency radar, a 34-GHz superheterodyn...

  17. Propagation of plate acoustic waves in contact with fluid medium

    Ghatadi Suraji, Nagaraj

    The characteristics of acoustic waves propagating in thin piezoelectric plates in the presence of a fluid medium contacting one or both of the plate surfaces are investigated. If the velocity of plate wave in the substrate is greater than velocity of bulk wave in the fluid, then a plate acoustic wave (PAW) traveling in the substrate will radiate a bulk acoustic wave (BAW) in the fluid. It is found that, under proper conditions, efficient conversion of energy from plate acoustic waves to bulk acoustic waves and vice versa can be obtained. For example, using the fundamental anti symmetric plate wave mode (A0 mode) propagating in a lithium niobate substrate and water as the fluid, total mode conversion loss (PAW to BAW and back from BAW to PAW) of less than 3 dB has been obtained. This mode conversion principle can be used to realize miniature, high efficiency transducers for use in ultrasonic flow meters. Similar type of transducer based on conversion of energy from surface acoustic wave (SAW) to bulk acoustic wave (BAW) has been developed previously. The use of plate waves has several advantages. Since the energy of plate waves is present on both plate surfaces, the inter digital transducer (IDT) can be on the surface opposite from that which is in contact with the fluid. This protects the IDT from possible damage due to the fluid and also simplifies the job of making electrical connections to the IDT. Another advantage is that one has wider choice of substrate materials with plate waves than is the case with SAWs. Preliminary calculations indicate that the mode conversion principle can also be used to generate and detect ultrasonic waves in air. This has potential applications for realizing transducers for use in non-contact ultrasonic's. The design of an ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) chip containing an amplifier and frequency counter for use with ultrasonic transducers is also presented in this thesis.

  18. Non-contact liquid level measurement with electromagnetic–acoustic resonator sensors

    Electromagnetic–acoustic transduction represents an alternative to piezoelectric transduction with unique properties and advantages for resonator sensors. We have shown that such devices are suitable as mass microbalances similar to quartz crystal resonators, and as liquid density and viscosity sensors by exciting a suitable in-plane mode featuring dominant shear vibration. Generating out-of-plane vibrations we have applied these devices also as liquid level sensors. In contrast to classic time-of-flight ultrasonic liquid level sensors, the resolution is not limited by the wavelength, since small frequency changes due to interference effects with a standing acoustic wave are evaluated. For this contribution we have extensively evaluated this liquid level sensing and will present and compare new measurement and modeling results. The model comprises electromagnetic–acoustic interaction with a lossy transmission line representing the acoustic wave in the liquid. In impedance measurements with standard lab equipment a resolution as low as 3 µm at a liquid level of 10 mm and an operating frequency of 275 kHz has been achieved

  19. Embedded Acoustic Sensor Array for Engine Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Feasibility of Noise Telemetry via Wireless Smart Sensors

    Zaman, Afroz; Bauch, Matthew; Raible, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft engines have evolved into a highly complex system to meet ever-increasing demands. The evolution of engine technologies has primarily been driven by fuel efficiency, reliability, as well as engine noise concerns. One of the sources of engine noise is pressure fluctuations that are induced on the stator vanes. These local pressure fluctuations, once produced, propagate and coalesce with the pressure waves originating elsewhere on the stator to form a spinning pressure pattern. Depending on the duct geometry, air flow, and frequency of fluctuations, these spinning pressure patterns are self-sustaining and result in noise which eventually radiate to the far-field from engine. To investigate the nature of vane pressure fluctuations and the resulting engine noise, unsteady pressure signatures from an array of embedded acoustic sensors are recorded as a part of vane noise source diagnostics. Output time signatures from these sensors are routed to a control and data processing station adding complexity to the system and cable loss to the measured signal. "Smart" wireless sensors have data processing capability at the sensor locations which further increases the potential of wireless sensors. Smart sensors can process measured data locally and transmit only the important information through wireless communication. The aim of this wireless noise telemetry task was to demonstrate a single acoustic sensor wireless link for unsteady pressure measurement, and thus, establish the feasibility of distributed smart sensors scheme for aircraft engine vane surface unsteady pressure data transmission and characterization.

  20. Use of acoustic sensors to probe the mechanical properties of liposomes.

    Melzak, Kathryn; Tsortos, Achilleas; Gizeli, Electra

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic sensors probe the response of a thin layer to the mechanical displacement associated with an acoustic wave. Acoustic measurements provide two simultaneous time-resolved signals; one signal is related to the velocity or frequency of the acoustic wave and is mainly a function of adsorbed mass, while the second signal, related to the oscillation amplitude, is associated with energy dissipation and is a function of the viscoelastic properties of the adsorbed layer. The methods described in this chapter explore the relationship between the acoustic measurements of adsorbed liposomes and the mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer. This is carried out using a well-characterized model system consisting of liposomes prepared from an unsaturated phospholipid and a range of mole fractions of cholesterol. Real-time acoustic measurements are shown to be sensitive to changes in the liposome cholesterol content, regardless of the mode of attachment of the liposome to the device surface. This sensitivity is not due to changes in the density of the bilayer, or to changes in the extent of liposome-surface interactions, thus leaving the mechanical properties of the bilayer as the feature that is probably being measured. Some mechanisms by which the acoustic response could be generated are suggested in this chapter. PMID:19913160

  1. Electro-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasmas

    present a rigorous theoretical investigation of electro- acoustic [particularly, dust-ion acoustic (DIA) and dust-acoustic (DA)] solitary waves in dusty plasmas. We employ the reductive perturbation method for small but finite amplitude solitary waves as well as the pseudo-potential approach for arbitrary amplitude ones. We also analyze the effects of non-planar geometry and dust charge fluctuations on both DIA and DA solitary waves, the effect of finite ion-temperature on DIA solitary waves, and the effects of dust-fluid temperature and non-isothermal ion distributions on DA solitary waves. It has been reported that these effects do not only significantly modify the basic features of DIA or DA solitary waves, but also introduce some important new features. The basic features and the underlying physics of DIA and DA solitary waves, which are relevant to space and laboratory dusty plasmas, are briefly discussed. (author)

  2. Detection of Volatile Organics Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Array System

    ANDERSON, LAWRENCE F.; BARTHOLOMEW, JOHN W.; CERNOSEK, RICHARD W.; COLBURN, CHRISTOPHER W.; CROOKS, R.M.; MARTINEZ, R.F.; OSBOURN, GORDON C.; RICCO, A.J.; STATON, ALAN W.; YELTON, WILLIAM G.

    1999-10-14

    A chemical sensing system based on arrays of surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay lines has been developed for identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The individual SAW chemical sensors consist of interdigital transducers patterned on the surface of an ST-cut quartz substrate to launch and detect the acoustic waves and a thin film coating in the SAW propagation path to perturb the acoustic wave velocity and attenuation during analyte sorption. A diverse set of material coatings gives the sensor arrays a degree of chemical sensitivity and selectivity. Materials examined for sensor application include the alkanethiol-based self-assembled monolayer, plasma-processed films, custom-synthesized conventional polymers, dendrimeric polymers, molecular recognition materials, electroplated metal thin films, and porous metal oxides. All of these materials target a specific chemical fi.mctionality and the enhancement of accessible film surface area. Since no one coating provides absolute analyte specificity, the array responses are further analyzed using a visual-empirical region-of-influence (VERI) pattern recognition algorithm. The chemical sensing system consists of a seven-element SAW array with accompanying drive and control electronics, sensor signal acquisition electronics, environmental vapor sampling hardware, and a notebook computer. Based on data gathered for individual sensor responses, greater than 93%-accurate identification can be achieved for any single analyte from a group of 17 VOCs and water.

  3. (3,1) Drive PVDF acoustic displacement sensor

    Caspall, J.J.; Caille, G.W. [Georgia Tech Research Institute, Undersea Research Program Office, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0810 (United States); Jarzynski, J.; McCall, G.S. II [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A (3,1) drive piezofilm vibration sensor is introduced. Operated above the lumped element resonance frequency of 600 Hz, the sensor delivers a voltage signal proportional to displacement over the frequency range of 2 kHz to 8 kHz. It is anticipated that the sensor response is flat above 8 kHz, but calibration has not been performed at higher frequencies. The sensor is very sensitive, detecting acoustic displacements as small as 10{sup {minus}5} nm. Because of its simple design the sensor is robust and easy to assemble. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Controlling acoustic-wave propagation through material anisotropy

    Tehranian, Aref; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Irion, Jeffrey; Isaacs, Jon; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2009-03-01

    Acoustic-wave velocity is strongly direction dependent in an anisotropic medium. This can be used to design composites with preferred acoustic-energy transport characteristics. In a unidirectional fiber-glass composite, for example, the preferred direction corresponds to the fiber orientation which is associated with the highest stiffness and which can be used to guide the momentum and energy of the acoustic waves either away from or toward a region within the material, depending on whether one wishes to avoid or harvest the corresponding stress waves. The main focus of this work is to illustrate this phenomenon using numerical simulations and then check the results experimentally.

  5. In situ calibration of acoustic emission sensors

    Kober, Jan; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    Brno: University of Technology, Brno, 2015 - (Mazal, P.), s. 93-97 ISBN 978-80-214-5262-6. [International Workshop NDT in Progress /8./. Praha (CZ), 12.10.2015-14.10.2015] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : standardisation * Acoustic Emission (AE) * time reversal * calibration * requency response Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  6. A metasurface carpet cloak for electromagnetic, acoustic and water waves

    Yihao Yang; Huaping Wang; Faxin Yu; Zhiwei Xu; Hongsheng Chen

    2016-01-01

    We propose a single low-profile skin metasurface carpet cloak to hide objects with arbitrary shape and size under three different waves, i.e., electromagnetic (EM) waves, acoustic waves and water waves. We first present a metasurface which can control the local reflection phase of these three waves. By taking advantage of this metasurface, we then design a metasurface carpet cloak which provides an additional phase to compensate the phase distortion introduced by a bump, thus restoring the re...

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Study on the Acoustic Wave Energy After the Nonlinear Interaction of Acoustic Waves in Aqueous Media

    兰朝凤; 李凤臣; 陈欢; 卢迪; 杨德森; 张梦

    2015-01-01

    Based on the Burgers equation and Manley-Rowe equation, the derivation about nonlinear interaction of the acoustic waves has been done in this paper. After nonlinear interaction among the low-frequency weak waves and the pump wave, the analytical solutions of acoustic waves’ amplitude in the field are deduced. The relationship between normalized energy of high-frequency and the change of acoustic energy before and after the nonlinear interaction of the acoustic waves is analyzed. The experimental results about the changes of the acoustic energy are presented. The study shows that new frequencies are generated and the energies of the low-frequency are modulated in a long term by the pump waves, which leads the energies of the low-frequency acoustic waves to change in the pulse trend in the process of the nonlinear interaction of the acoustic waves. The increase and decrease of the energies of the low-frequency are observed under certain typical conditions, which lays a foundation for practical engineering applications.

  8. Waveform inversion of acoustic waves for explosion yield estimation

    Kim, K.; Rodgers, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new waveform inversion technique to estimate the energy of near-surface explosions using atmospheric acoustic waves. Conventional methods often employ air blast models based on a homogeneous atmosphere, where the acoustic wave propagation effects (e.g., refraction and diffraction) are not taken into account, and therefore, their accuracy decreases with increasing source-receiver distance. In this study, three-dimensional acoustic simulations are performed with a finite difference method in realistic atmospheres and topography, and the modeled acoustic Green's functions are incorporated into the waveform inversion for the acoustic source time functions. The strength of the acoustic source is related to explosion yield based on a standard air blast model. The technique was applied to local explosions (structure. The presented method can be extended to explosions recorded at far distance provided proper meteorological specifications.

  9. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius. PMID:26558995

  10. Nonlinear propagation and control of acoustic waves in phononic superlattices

    Jiménez, Noé; Picó, Rubén; García-Raffi, Lluís M; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor J

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of intense acoustic waves in a one-dimensional phononic crystal is studied. The medium consists in a structured fluid, formed by a periodic array of fluid layers with alternating linear acoustic properties and quadratic nonlinearity coefficient. The spacing between layers is of the order of the wavelength, therefore Bragg effects such as band-gaps appear. We show that the interplay between strong dispersion and nonlinearity leads to new scenarios of wave propagation. The classical waveform distortion process typical of intense acoustic waves in homogeneous media can be strongly altered when nonlinearly generated harmonics lie inside or close to band gaps. This allows the possibility of engineer a medium in order to get a particular waveform. Examples of this include the design of media with effective (e.g. cubic) nonlinearities, or extremely linear media (where distortion can be cancelled). The presented ideas open a way towards the control of acoustic wave propagation in nonlinear regime.

  11. A Secure Communication Suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Angelica Lo Duca; Gianluca Dini

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a security suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks comprising both fixed and mobile nodes. The security suite is composed of a secure routing protocol and a set of cryptographic primitives aimed at protecting the confidentiality and the integrity of underwater communication while taking into account the unique characteristics and constraints of the acoustic channel. By means of experiments and simulations based on real data, we show that the suite is suitable f...

  12. Modeling and design of surface acoustic wave filters and their military applications

    Marija F. Hribšek

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The operation principles of surface acoustic wave filters (SAW and materials and technology of their fabrication are presented. A special attention is paid to wide and diverse applications of SAW filters in signal processing, communications and chemical sensors, stressing their military applications. An original method, developed by the authors, for the modeling and prediction of SAW filter characteristics is presented. The abilities of the method are illustrated by the examples of chemical SAW sensors for the detection of warfare chemical agents. The designed and fabricated SAW filter PAT-FPO is the base for the special purpose chemical sensors.

  13. Acoustic-Gravity Waves Interacting with a Rectangular Trench

    Usama Kadri

    2014-01-01

    A mathematical solution of the two-dimensional linear problem of an acoustic-gravity wave interacting with a rectangular trench, in a compressible ocean, is presented. Expressions for the flow field on both sides of the trench are derived. The dynamic bottom pressure produced by the acoustic-gravity waves on both sides of the trench is measurable, though on the transmission side it decreases with the trench depth. A successful recording of the bottom pressures could assist in the early detect...

  14. Optical transition radiation in presence of acoustic waves

    Mkrtchyan, A R; Saharian, A A

    2009-01-01

    Transition radiation from relativistic electrons is investigated in an ultrasonic superlattice excited in a finite thickness plate. In the quasi-classical approximation formulae are derived for the vector potential of the electromagnetic field and for the spectral-angular distribution of the radiation intensity. The acoustic waves generate new resonance peaks in the spectral and angular distribution of the radiation intensity. The heights of the peaks can be tuned by choosing the parameters of the acoustic wave.

  15. Use of Acoustic Waves for Pulsating Water Jet Generation

    Foldyna, Josef

    1. Rijeka: InTech Open Access Publisher, 2011 - (Beghi, M.), s. 323-342 ISBN 978-953-307-572-3 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : acoustic waves * pulsating water jet * technology Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools http://www.intechopen.com/books/acoustic-waves-from-microdevices-to-helioseismology

  16. Nozzleless Spray Cooling Using Surface Acoustic Waves

    Ang, Kar Man; Yeo, Leslie; Friend, James; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming Kwang

    2015-11-01

    Due to its reliability and portability, surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomization is an attractive approach for the generation of monodispersed microdroplets in microfluidics devices. Here, we present a nozzleless spray cooling technique via SAW atomization with key advantage of downward scalability by simply increasing the excitation frequency. With generation of micron size droplets through surface destabilization using SAW, the clogging issues commonly encountered by spraying nozzle can be neutralized. Using deionised water, cooling is improved when the atomization rate is increased and the position of the device is optimized such that the atomized droplets can be easily seeded into the upstream of the flow circulation. Cooling is further improved with the use of nanofluids; a suspension of nanoparticles in water. By increasing nanoparticle mass concentration from 1% to 3%, cooling is enhanced due to the deposition and formation of nanoparticle clusters on heated surface and eventually increase the surface area. However, further increase the concentration to 10% reduces the cooling efficiency due to drastic increase in viscosity μ that leads to lower atomization rate which scales as ṁ ~μ - 1 / 2 .

  17. Acoustic Kappa-Density Fluctuation Waves in Suprathermal Kappa Function Fluids

    Collier, Michael R.; Roberts, Aaron; Vinas, Adolfo

    2007-01-01

    We describe a new wave mode similar to the acoustic wave in which both density and velocity fluctuate. Unlike the acoustic wave in which the underlying distribution is Maxwellian, this new wave mode occurs when the underlying distribution is a suprathermal kappa function and involves fluctuations in the power law index, kappa. This wave mode always propagates faster than the acoustic wave with an equivalent effective temperature and becomes the acoustic wave in the Maxwellian limit as kappa g...

  18. Electro-acoustic shock waves in dusty plasmas

    A rigorous theoretical investigation has been made of electro- acoustic [particularly, dust-ion acoustic (DIA) and dust-acoustic (DA)] shock waves in unmagnetized dusty plasmas. The reductive perturbation method has been employed for the study of the small but finite amplitude DIA and DA shock waves. It has been reported that the dust grain charge fluctuation can be one of the candidates for the source of dissipation, and can be responsible for the formation of DIA shock waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma with static charged dust particles. It has also been reported that the strong co-relation among dust particles can be one of the candidates for the source of dissipation, and can be responsible for the formation of DA shock waves in an unmagnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma. The basic features and the underlying physics of DIA and DA shock waves, which are relevant to space and laboratory dusty plasmas, are briefly discussed. (author)

  19. Influences of prolate spheroidal baffle of sound diffraction on spatial directivity of acoustic vector sensor

    2010-01-01

    The directivity of acoustic vector sensor (AVS) will be distorted by the sound diffraction of the AVS carrier. In this paper,the scattering of a plane acoustic wave from a prolate spheroid baffle is considered. At first,the sound diffraction of prolate spheroidal baffle is established,then the mathematical expressions of sound pressure field and particle vibration velocity field of sound diffraction are derived and the characteristic of the directivity of pressure and velocity of sound diffraction field at different frequencies and distances is analyzed. The directivity of AVS is determined by the amplitude and phase difference of diffraction wave and incident wave,which possesses a close relationship with frequency and incident angle. Finally,the calculated results are compared with the experimental results.

  20. Viscosity and density decoupling method using a higher order Lamb wave sensor

    Viscosity and density are two important physical parameters of liquid. Such parameters are widely used for label-free chemical detection. Conventional technologies employ acoustic wave sensors to detect viscosity and density. In these sensors, the liquid under test directly contacts with the surface of the sensor. The produced acoustic wave in the sensor leaks to the adjacent liquid layer, causing a shift in the resonance frequency of the sensor. However, such sensors are not able to separately measure the viscosity and density because these two parameters jointly affect the shift of frequency. Although some indirect methods for decoupling these two parameters have been investigated, either dual-device or simultaneous measurement of frequency and attenuation is required. In this paper, a novel AlN based acoustic wave sensor is developed for decoupling viscosity and density. Multiple higher order modes of Lamb waves are generated in this sensor and employed to interact with the adjacent liquid under test. The frequency change of two unique modes (mode C and mode D) has been found in a linear relationship with viscosity and density, respectively. With this unique feature, viscosity and density of a liquid can be distinguished by a single device, which is promising for potential industrial applications, label-free chemical detection and clinical diagnosis. (paper)

  1. Resonant attenuation of surface acoustic waves by a disordered monolayer of microspheres

    Eliason, J. K.; Vega-Flick, A.; Hiraiwa, M.; Khanolkar, A.; Gan, T.; Boechler, N.; Fang, N.; Nelson, K. A.; Maznev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Attenuation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by a disordered monolayer of polystyrene microspheres is investigated. Surface acoustic wave packets are generated by a pair of crossed laser pulses in a glass substrate coated with a thin aluminum film and detected via the diffraction of a probe laser beam. When a 170 μm-wide strip of micron-sized spheres is placed on the substrate between the excitation and detection spots, strong resonant attenuation of SAWs near 240 MHz is observed. The attenuation is caused by the interaction of SAWs with a contact resonance of the microspheres, as confirmed by acoustic dispersion measurements on the microsphere-coated area. Frequency-selective attenuation of SAWs by such a locally resonant metamaterial may lead to reconfigurable SAW devices and sensors, which can be easily manufactured via self-assembly techniques.

  2. Localization with a Mobile Beacon in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Sangho Lee; Kiseon Kim

    2012-01-01

    Localization is one of the most important issues associated with underwater acoustic sensor networks, especially when sensor nodes are randomly deployed. Given that it is difficult to deploy beacon nodes at predetermined locations, localization schemes with a mobile beacon on the sea surface or along the planned path are inherently convenient, accurate, and energy-efficient. In this paper, we propose a new range-free Localization with a Mobile Beacon (LoMoB). The mobile beacon periodically br...

  3. Fly-ear inspired acoustic sensors for gunshot localization

    Liu, Haijun; Currano, Luke; Gee, Danny; Yang, Benjamin; Yu, Miao

    2009-05-01

    The supersensitive ears of the parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea have inspired researchers to develop bio-inspired directional microphone for sound localization. Although the fly ear is optimized for localizing the narrow-band calling song of crickets at 5 kHz, experiments and simulation have shown that it can amplify directional cues for a wide frequency range. In this article, a theoretical investigation is presented to study the use of fly-ear inspired directional microphones for gunshot localization. Using an equivalent 2-DOF model of the fly ear, the time responses of the fly ear structure to a typical shock wave are obtained and the associated time delay is estimated by using cross-correlation. Both near-field and far-field scenarios are considered. The simulation shows that the fly ear can greatly amplify the time delay by ~20 times, which indicates that with an interaural distance of only 1.2 mm the fly ear is able to generate a time delay comparable to that obtained by a conventional microphone pair with a separation as large as 24 mm. Since the parameters of the fly ear structure can also be tuned for muzzle blast and other impulse stimulus, fly-ear inspired acoustic sensors offers great potential for developing portable gunshot localization systems.

  4. Bio-Inspired Micromechanical Directional Acoustic Sensor

    Swan, William; Alves, Fabio; Karunasiri, Gamani

    Conventional directional sound sensors employ an array of spatially separated microphones and the direction is determined using arrival times and amplitudes. In nature, insects such as the Ormia ochracea fly can determine the direction of sound using a hearing organ much smaller than the wavelength of sound it detects. The fly's eardrums are mechanically coupled, only separated by about 1 mm, and have remarkable directional sensitivity. A micromechanical sensor based on the fly's hearing system was designed and fabricated on a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate using MEMS technology. The sensor consists of two 1 mm2 wings connected using a bridge and to the substrate using two torsional legs. The dimensions of the sensor and material stiffness determine the frequency response of the sensor. The vibration of the wings in response to incident sound at the bending resonance was measured using a laser vibrometer and found to be about 1 μm/Pa. The electronic response of the sensor to sound was measured using integrated comb finger capacitors and found to be about 25 V/Pa. The fabricated sensors showed good directional sensitivity. In this talk, the design, fabrication and characteristics of the directional sound sensor will be described. Supported by ONR and TDSI.

  5. Sensor development and calibration for acoustic neutrino detection in ice

    Karg, Timo; Laihem, Karim; Semburg, Benjamin; Tosi, Delia

    2009-01-01

    A promising approach to measure the expected low flux of cosmic neutrinos at the highest energies (E > 1 EeV) is acoustic detection. There are different in-situ test installations worldwide in water and ice to measure the acoustic properties of the medium with regard to the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection. The parameters of interest include attenuation length, sound speed profile, background noise level and transient backgrounds. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been deployed in the upper 500 m of drill holes for the IceCube neutrino observatory at the geographic South Pole. In-situ calibration of sensors under the combined influence of low temperature, high ambient pressure, and ice-sensor acoustic coupling is difficult. We discuss laboratory calibrations in water and ice. Two new laboratory facilities, the Aachen Acoustic Laboratory (AAL) and the Wuppertal Water Tank Test Facility, have been set up. They offer large volumes of bubble free ice (3 m^3) and water (11 m^3) for the devel...

  6. Probing mechanical properties of liposomes using acoustic sensors.

    Melzak, Kathryn A; Bender, Florian; Tsortos, Achilleas; Gizeli, Electra

    2008-08-19

    Acoustic devices were employed to characterize variations in the mechanical properties (density and viscoelasticity) of liposomes composed of 1-oleoyl-2-palmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and cholesterol. Liposome properties were modified in three ways. In some experiments, the POPC/cholesterol ratio was varied prior to deposition on the device surface. Alternatively, the ratio was changed in situ via either insertion of cholesterol or removal of cholesterol with beta-cyclodextrin. This was done for liposomes adsorbed directly on the device surface and for liposomes attached via a biotin-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) linker. The acoustic measurements make use of two simultaneous time-resolved signals: one signal is related to the velocity of the acoustic wave, while the second is related to dissipation of acoustic energy. Together, they provide information not only about the mass (or density) of the probed medium but also about its viscoelastic properties. The cholesterol-induced increase in the surface density of the lipid bilayer was indeed observed in the acoustic data, but the resulting change in signal was larger than expected from the change in surface density. In addition, increasing the bilayer resistance to stretching was found to lead to a greater dissipation of the acoustic energy. The acoustic response is assessed in terms of the possible distortions of the liposomes and the known effects of cholesterol on the mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer that encloses the aqueous core of the liposome. To aid the interpretation of the acoustic response, it is discussed how the above changes in the lipid bilayer will affect the effective viscoelastic properties of the entire liposome/solvent film on the scale of the acoustic wavelength. It was found that the acoustic device is very sensitive to the mechanical properties of lipid vesicles; the response of the acoustic device is explained, and the basic underlying mechanisms of interaction are

  7. Surface wave patterns on acoustically levitated viscous liquid alloys

    Hong, Z. Y.; Yan, N.; Geng, D. L.; Wei, B.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate two different kinds of surface wave patterns on viscous liquid alloys, which are melted and solidified under acoustic levitation condition. These patterns are consistent with the morphologies of standing capillary waves and ensembles of oscillons, respectively. The rapid solidification of two-dimensional liquid alloy surfaces may hold them down.

  8. Sound source localization using distributed elevated acoustic sensors

    Di, Xiao; Wagstaff, Ronald A.; Anderson, John D.; Gilbert, Kenneth E.

    2009-05-01

    Detecting and localizing impulsive acoustic sources in the daytime using distributed elevated acoustic sensors with large baseline separations has distinct advantages over small ground-based arrays. There are generally two reasons for this: first, during the daytime, because of more direct and less encumbered propagation paths, signal levels are generally larger at altitude than near the ground. Second, larger baselines provide improved localization accuracy. Results are reported from a distributed array of acoustic sensors deployed during an experiment near Bourges, France during June of 2008. The distributed array consisted of microphones and GPS receivers attached to the tether lines of three widely separated aerostats. The sound sources were various impulsive devices. Results from the measurements are presented and discussed. Localization errors (GPS accuracy, propagation calculation, and aerostat motion, etc) are discussed. Possible ways to improve the localization accuracy are suggested.

  9. INTERFERENCE FRINGES OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES AROUND SUNSPOTS

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Zhao Hui; Yang, Ming-Hsu; Liang, Zhi-Chao, E-mail: chou@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Physics Department, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-20

    Solar acoustic waves are scattered by a sunspot due to the interaction between the acoustic waves and the sunspot. The sunspot, excited by the incident wave, generates the scattered wave. The scattered wave is added to the incident wave to form the total wave around the sunspot. The interference fringes between the scattered wave and the incident wave are visible in the intensity of the total wave because the coherent time of the incident wave is of the order of a wave period. The strength of the interference fringes anti-correlates with the width of temporal spectra of the incident wave. The separation between neighboring fringes increases with the incident wavelength and the sunspot size. The strength of the fringes increases with the radial order n of the incident wave from n = 0 to n = 2, and then decreases from n = 2 to n = 5. The interference fringes play a role analogous to holograms in optics. This study suggests the feasibility of using the interference fringes to reconstruct the scattered wavefields of the sunspot, although the quality of the reconstructed wavefields is sensitive to the noise and errors in the interference fringes.

  10. Propagation of Acoustic Waves in Troposphere and Stratosphere

    Kashyap, J M

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic waves are those waves which travel with the speed of sound through a medium. H. Lamb has derived a cutoff frequency for stratified and isothermal medium for the propagation of acoustic waves. In order to find the cutoff frequency many methods were introduced after Lamb's work. In this paper, we have chosen the method to determine cutoff frequencies for acoustic waves propagating in non-isothermal media. This turning point frequency method can be applied to various atmospheres like solar atmosphere, stellar atmosphere, earth's atmosphere etc. Here, we have analytically derived the cutoff frequency and have graphically analyzed and compared with the Lamb's cut-off frequencyfor earth's troposphere, lower and upper stratosphere.

  11. Thermo-acoustic engineering of silicon microresonators via evanescent waves

    A temperature-compensated silicon micromechanical resonator with a quadratic temperature characteristic is realized by acoustic engineering. Energy-trapped resonance modes are synthesized by acoustic coupling of propagating and evanescent extensional waves in waveguides with rectangular cross section. Highly different temperature sensitivity of propagating and evanescent waves is used to engineer the linear temperature coefficient of frequency. The resulted quadratic temperature characteristic has a well-defined turn-over temperature that can be tailored by relative energy distribution between propagating and evanescent acoustic fields. A 76 MHz prototype is implemented in single crystal silicon. Two high quality factor and closely spaced resonance modes, created from efficient energy trapping of extensional waves, are excited through thin aluminum nitride film. Having different evanescent wave constituents and energy distribution across the device, these modes show different turn over points of 67 °C and 87 °C for their quadratic temperature characteristic

  12. Propagation of acoustic gravity waves excited by explosions

    Acoustic gravity waves excited by low-altitude nuclear explosions have been observed in the ionosphere, by H.F. Doppler soundings, at horizontal distances from the source between 100 and 1200 km. The characteristics of the initial shock wave, which is observed at short range, are progressively replaced by those of the atmospheric wave guide. In particular, the dispersion properties of the signal observed in the ionosphere at long range are those of the first acoustic and gravity modes. Detailed study of the propagation times to middle and long range shows that the wave guide is mainly excited by the focalisation of acoustic energy which is produced by non-linear mechanisms at an altitude of about 100 km and at a small horizontal distance from the explosion

  13. Quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves in weak relativistic plasma

    Biswajit Sahu

    2011-06-01

    Small amplitude quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves are studied in an unmagnetized twospecies relativistic quantum plasma system, comprised of electrons and ions. The one-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic model (QHD) is used to obtain a deformed Korteweg–de Vries (dKdV) equation by reductive perturbation method. A linear dispersion relation is also obtained taking into account the relativistic effect. The properties of quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves, obtained from the deformed KdV equation, are studied taking into account the quantum mechanical effects in the weak relativistic limit. It is found that relativistic effects significantly modify the properties of quantum ion-acoustic waves. Also the effect of the quantum parameter on the nature of solitary wave solutions is studied in some detail.

  14. Ionospheric signatures of acoustic waves generated by transient tropospheric forcing

    Zettergren, M. D.; Snively, J. B.

    2013-10-01

    Acoustic waves generated by tropospheric sources may attain significant amplitudes in the thermosphere and overlying ionosphere. Although they are weak precursors to gravity waves in the mesosphere below, acoustic waves may achieve temperature and vertical wind perturbations on the order of approximately tens of Kelvin and m/s throughout the E and F regions. Their perturbations to total electron content are predicted to be detectable by ground-based radar and GPS receivers; they also drive field-aligned currents that may be detectable in situ via magnetometers. Although transient and short lived, ionospheric signatures of acoustic waves may provide new and quantitative insight into the forcing of the upper atmosphere from below.

  15. Thermo-acoustic engineering of silicon microresonators via evanescent waves

    Tabrizian, R., E-mail: rtabrizi@umich.edu [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Ayazi, F. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30308 (United States)

    2015-06-29

    A temperature-compensated silicon micromechanical resonator with a quadratic temperature characteristic is realized by acoustic engineering. Energy-trapped resonance modes are synthesized by acoustic coupling of propagating and evanescent extensional waves in waveguides with rectangular cross section. Highly different temperature sensitivity of propagating and evanescent waves is used to engineer the linear temperature coefficient of frequency. The resulted quadratic temperature characteristic has a well-defined turn-over temperature that can be tailored by relative energy distribution between propagating and evanescent acoustic fields. A 76 MHz prototype is implemented in single crystal silicon. Two high quality factor and closely spaced resonance modes, created from efficient energy trapping of extensional waves, are excited through thin aluminum nitride film. Having different evanescent wave constituents and energy distribution across the device, these modes show different turn over points of 67 °C and 87 °C for their quadratic temperature characteristic.

  16. Separation of acoustic waves in isentropic flow perturbations

    Henke, Christian, E-mail: christian.henke@atlas-elektronik.com

    2015-04-15

    The present contribution investigates the mechanisms of sound generation and propagation in the case of highly-unsteady flows. Based on the linearisation of the isentropic Navier–Stokes equation around a new pathline-averaged base flow, it is demonstrated for the first time that flow perturbations of a non-uniform flow can be split into acoustic and vorticity modes, with the acoustic modes being independent of the vorticity modes. Therefore, we can propose this acoustic perturbation as a general definition of sound. As a consequence of the splitting result, we conclude that the present acoustic perturbation is propagated by the convective wave equation and fulfils Lighthill’s acoustic analogy. Moreover, we can define the deviations of the Navier–Stokes equation from the convective wave equation as “true” sound sources. In contrast to other authors, no assumptions on a slowly varying or irrotational flow are necessary. Using a symmetry argument for the conservation laws, an energy conservation result and a generalisation of the sound intensity are provided. - Highlights: • First splitting of non-uniform flows in acoustic and non-acoustic components. • These result leads to a generalisation of sound which is compatible with Lighthill’s acoustic analogy. • A closed equation for the generation and propagation of sound is given.

  17. Separation of acoustic waves in isentropic flow perturbations

    The present contribution investigates the mechanisms of sound generation and propagation in the case of highly-unsteady flows. Based on the linearisation of the isentropic Navier–Stokes equation around a new pathline-averaged base flow, it is demonstrated for the first time that flow perturbations of a non-uniform flow can be split into acoustic and vorticity modes, with the acoustic modes being independent of the vorticity modes. Therefore, we can propose this acoustic perturbation as a general definition of sound. As a consequence of the splitting result, we conclude that the present acoustic perturbation is propagated by the convective wave equation and fulfils Lighthill’s acoustic analogy. Moreover, we can define the deviations of the Navier–Stokes equation from the convective wave equation as “true” sound sources. In contrast to other authors, no assumptions on a slowly varying or irrotational flow are necessary. Using a symmetry argument for the conservation laws, an energy conservation result and a generalisation of the sound intensity are provided. - Highlights: • First splitting of non-uniform flows in acoustic and non-acoustic components. • These result leads to a generalisation of sound which is compatible with Lighthill’s acoustic analogy. • A closed equation for the generation and propagation of sound is given

  18. Energy Constrained Reliable Routing Optimized Cluster Head Protocol for Multihop under Water Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Padmavathy.T.V; Gayathri.V; Indhumathi.V; Karthiga.G

    2012-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor network is an emerging technique consisting of sensor nodes, and AUVs all working together to sense various phenomenon, converts the sensed information into digital data, storethe digital data and communicate to the base stations through the intermediate nodes. Also UnderwaterAcoustic Sensor Networks are playing a main role in ocean applications. Unfortunately the efficiency of underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks is inferior to that of terrestrial sensor networks ...

  19. MAC and Routing Protocols for Mobile Underwater Acoustic Sensor Swarms

    Noh, Young Tae

    2012-01-01

    Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks (UW-ASNs) have recently been proposed as a way to explore and observe the ocean, which covers two-thirds of the Earth's surface. In particular, we consider a SEA Swarm (Sensor Equipped Aquatic Swarm) architecture for short-term ad hoc real-time aquatic exploration, such as oil and chemical spill monitoring, submarine detection, and surveillance, by deploying drifting sensor nodes (e.g., UCSD Drogues) to the venue of interest that form a swarm and move as a ...

  20. Oblique amplitude modulation of dust-acoustic plasma waves

    Kourakis, I.; Shukla, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical studies are presented of the nonlinear amplitude modulation of dust-acoustic (DA) waves propagating in an unmagnetized three component, weakly-coupled, fully ionized plasma consisting of electrons, positive ions and charged dust particles, considering perturbations oblique to the carrier wave propagation direction. The stability analysis, based on a nonlinear Schroedinger-type equation (NLSE), shows that the wave may become unstable; the stability criteria depend on ...

  1. Transmission Line Based Metamaterials for Acoustic Waves

    Bongard, Frédéric; Lissek, Hervé; Mosig, Juan Ramon

    2011-01-01

    We present our recent work on a one-dimensional acoustic negative refractive index metamaterial based on the concept of dual transmission line extensively investigated in microwave engineering. The proposed structure consists of an acoustic waveguide periodically loaded with membranes realizing the function of series “capacitances” and transversally connected open channels realizing shunt “inductances”. It exhibits a negative refractive index band over almost one octave, from 0.6 to 1 kHz. Us...

  2. Acoustic tweezers via sub–time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves

    Collins, David J.; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides. PMID:27453940

  3. Spin wave acoustics of antiferromagnetic structures as magnetoacoustic metamaterials

    Gulyaev, Yurii V; Tarasenko, Sergei V; Shavrov, Vladimir G

    2011-06-30

    This is a review of research results on conditions under which spatially restricted low-temperature antiferromagnets and their composites can be considered as a special class of acoustic magnetic metamaterials (magnetoacoustic metamaterials). In these, the dynamic magnetoacoustic interaction produces a number of effects that are acoustic analogs of polariton effects and which are currently intensively studied in nonmagnetic acoustic metamaterials. It is shown that the elastostatic approach to the analysis of the magnetoelastic dynamics of spatially restricted compensated magnetics is an effective tool in the search for new types of resonance acoustic anomalies, part of which are typical of the magnetostatic spin wave physics (elastostatic bulk and surface spin waves, nonuniform spin-spin resonances with their participation, etc.). (reviews of topical problems)

  4. Spin wave acoustics of antiferromagnetic structures as magnetoacoustic metamaterials

    This is a review of research results on conditions under which spatially restricted low-temperature antiferromagnets and their composites can be considered as a special class of acoustic magnetic metamaterials (magnetoacoustic metamaterials). In these, the dynamic magnetoacoustic interaction produces a number of effects that are acoustic analogs of polariton effects and which are currently intensively studied in nonmagnetic acoustic metamaterials. It is shown that the elastostatic approach to the analysis of the magnetoelastic dynamics of spatially restricted compensated magnetics is an effective tool in the search for new types of resonance acoustic anomalies, part of which are typical of the magnetostatic spin wave physics (elastostatic bulk and surface spin waves, nonuniform spin-spin resonances with their participation, etc.). (reviews of topical problems)

  5. Simulations, fabrication and characterization of diamond coated Love wave-type SAW sensors

    Talbi, A.; Soltani, A.; Rumeau, A.; Taylor, Andrew; Drbohlavová, L.; Klimša, Ladislav; Kopeček, Jaromír; Fekete, Ladislav; Krečmarová, Marie; Mortet, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 212, č. 11 (2015), 2606-2610. ISSN 1862-6300 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR GA13-31783S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : acoustic sensors * chemical vapor deposition * diamond * nanocrystalline materials * quartz * surface acoustic waves Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.616, year: 2014

  6. Dissipation of acoustic-gravity waves: an asymptotic approach.

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves in the middle and upper atmosphere and long-range propagation of infrasound are strongly affected by air viscosity and thermal conductivity. To characterize the wave dissipation, it is typical to consider idealized environments, which admit plane-wave solutions. Here, an asymptotic approach is developed that relies instead on the assumption that spatial variations of environmental parameters are gradual. It is found that realistic assumptions about the atmosphere lead to rather different predictions for wave damping than do the plane-wave solutions. A modification to the Sutherland-Bass model of infrasound absorption is proposed. PMID:25480091

  7. Second harmonic interference patterns of ion-acoustic waves

    The interaction of two weakly nonlinear sinusoidal ion-acoustic waves produces mainly a fundamental and a second harmonic diffraction pattern. The former is similar to the double slit pattern well known from physical optics, while it is found that the latter resembles a linear pattern generated by the superposition of three waves. The third wave is formed by mutual nonlinear interaction of the two fundamental waves. The intensity of the second harmonic pattern is modulated by the recurrence effect and it depends also on the angle between the local wave vectors. (author)

  8. The study of underwater acoustic communication technology based-on the acoustic vector sensor

    QIAO Gang; SANG Enfang

    2007-01-01

    Underwater acoustic (UWA) communication based on an acoustic vector sensor is studied. The method of joint weighted sound pressure and velocity processing is used in phase modulation high-speed UWA communication system combined with coherent demodulation and adaptive equalization algorithm to demodulate and decode. Whereas the sound intensity could be used instead of pressure for frequency decoding in frequency modulation UWA communication system. The results of theory analysis, simulation calculations and lake trials have shown that either in phase modulation or in frequency modulation UWA communication system, the processing gain can be evidently increased, so that the BER (bit error rate) can be effectively reduced and the telemetry distance can be enlarged by using the acoustic vector sensor.

  9. Accurate sound source localization in a reverberant environment using multiple acoustic sensors

    This paper introduces a new method for the estimation of sound source distance and direction using at least three microphone sensors in indoor environments. Unlike the other methods that normally use approximations in obtaining the time difference between sensors, this method exploits the existed geometrical relationships of the sensors to form an exact solution to estimating the source position. To overcome reverberation, an enhancing pre-process has been used for different sound sources with different spectra, e.g., single frequency, multiple frequencies and different noise shapes. Source direction and distances are estimated from time of sound wave travel and distances of acoustic sensors. Using the method described in this paper a level of 1° accuracy is obtained. Several experimental tests have been undertaken that verify the results. Conclusions and future work are also described

  10. High coupling materials for thin film bulk acoustic wave resonators

    Conde, Janine

    2009-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) filters based on bulk acoustic wave resonances in piezoelectric thin films have become indispensable components in mobile communications. The currently used material, AlN, exhibits many excellent properties for this purpose. However, its bandwidth is often a limiting factor. In addition, no tuning is possible with AlN. Ferroelectrics would offer both larger coupling to achieve larger bandwidths, and tunability. However, their acoustic properties are not well known, especi...

  11. Self excitation of second harmonic ion-acoustic waves in a weakly magnetized plasma

    Electrostatic ion-acoustic waves in a weakly magnetized plasma are investigated experimentally. It is observed that finite amplitudes ion acoustic waves excite a new second harmonic wave train behind the initial ion waves excite a new second harmonic wave train behind the initial ion waves in a parallel magnetic field. The excitation of higher harmonic waves can be explained by non-linearity of finite amplitude ion-acoustic waves. The newly excited second harmonics waves satisfy a dispersion relation of the ion-acoustic waves. (author). 3 refs, 5 figs

  12. Estimation of Shear Wave Velocity in Seafloor Sediment by Seismo-Acoustic Interface Waves:. a Case Study for Geotechnical Application

    Dong, Hefeng; Hovem, Jens M.; Frivik, Svein Arne

    2006-10-01

    Estimates of shear wave velocity profiles in seafloor sediments can be obtained from inversion of measured dispersion relations of seismo-acoustic interface waves propagating along the seabed. The interface wave velocity is directly related to shear wave velocity with value of between 87-96% of the shear wave velocity, dependent on the Poission ratio of the sediments. In this paper we present two different techniques to determine the dispersion relation: a single-sensor method used to determine group velocity and a multi-sensor method used to determine the phase velocity of the interface wave. An inversion technique is used to determine shear wave velocity versus depth and it is based on singular value decomposition and regularization theory. The technique is applied to data acquired at Steinbåen outside Horten in the Oslofjorden (Norway) and compared with the result from independent core measurements taken at the same location. The results show good agreement between the two ways of determining shear wave velocity.

  13. A Secure Communication Suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Angelica Lo Duca

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a security suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks comprising both fixed and mobile nodes. The security suite is composed of a secure routing protocol and a set of cryptographic primitives aimed at protecting the confidentiality and the integrity of underwater communication while taking into account the unique characteristics and constraints of the acoustic channel. By means of experiments and simulations based on real data, we show that the suite is suitable for an underwater networking environment as it introduces limited, and sometimes negligible, communication and power consumption overhead.

  14. On acoustic wave generation in uniform shear flow

    Gogoberidze, G.

    2016-07-01

    The linear dynamics of acoustic waves and vortices in uniform shear flow is studied. For flows with very low shear rates, the dynamics of perturbations is adiabatic and can be described by the WKB approximation. However, for flows with moderate and high shear rates the WKB approximation is not appropriate, and alternative analysis shows that two important phenomena occur: acoustic wave over-reflection and wave generation by vortices. The later phenomenon is a known linear mechanisms for sound generation in shear flows, a mechanism that is related to the continuous spectrum that arises in linear shear flow dynamics. A detailed analytical study of these phenomena is performed and the main quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the radiated acoustic field are obtained and analyzed.

  15. Resonance scattering of radio waves in the acoustically disturbed ionosphere

    It is known that acoustic waves are excited in the atmosphere for a variety of reasons, including seismic oscillations of the earth's surface as a result of earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, explosions, and in the operation of other powerful sources of natural or artificial origin. When sound waves are sufficiently intense, they can create disturbances in the electron density at ionospheric heights. In this paper, we consider the properties of radio wave scattering off such disturbances created by infrasound waves, i.e., we consider Mandel'shtam-Brillouin scattering in the ionosphere. The authors discuss the possibility of a radiophysical enhancement of the effect connected with the phenomenon of resonance scattering of the radiowaves off the disturbances created in the medium by the acoustic wave

  16. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation

    Siegfried Hohmann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application.

  17. Development of a combined surface plasmon resonance/surface acoustic wave device for the characterization of biomolecules

    It is known that acoustic sensor devices, if operated in liquid phase, are sensitive not just to the mass of the analyte but also to various other parameters, such as size, shape, charge and elastic constants of the analyte as well as bound and viscously entrained water. This can be used to extract valuable information about a biomolecule, particularly if the acoustic device is combined with another sensor element which is sensitive to the mass or amount of analyte only. The latter is true in good approximation for various optical sensor techniques. This work reports on the development of a combined surface plasmon resonance/surface acoustic wave sensor system which is designed for the investigation of biomolecules such as proteins or DNA. Results for the deposition of neutravidin and DNA are reported

  18. Effect of Thermal Conduction on Acoustic Waves in Coronal Loops

    Bogdan, T. J.

    2006-05-01

    The influence of classical (Spitzer) thermal conduction on longitudinal acoustic waves in a coronal loop is determined through an idealized but exactly solvable model. The model consists of an isothermal, stratified (constant gravity) atmosphere in which a monochromatic acoustic wave, traveling in the direction of decreasing density, is imposed throughout the lower half of the atmosphere. Based on the linearized equations of motion, the complete steady state (t-->∞) solution is obtained. In addition to the imposed driving wave, the solution also contains reflected and transmitted acoustic and thermal conduction waves. The mode transformation and mixing occurs in the vicinity of the atmospheric layer where the gas pressure passes through a critical value set by the magnitude of the thermal conduction and other model parameters. For 5 minute waves in a million degree loop, this critical pressure is on the order of 8×10-4 in cgs units. Since the apex gas pressure of many coronal loops of current interest is thought to be comfortably in excess of this value, mode mixing and transformation is not likely to be a relevant factor for understanding acoustic waves in these structures. On the other hand, enhanced thermal conductivity as a result of plasma instabilities, for example, could revive the importance of this mechanism for coronal loops. If this mixing layer is present, the calculations show that the pair of thermal conduction waves invariably gains the overwhelming majority of the energy flux of the incoming acoustic wave. This energy is rapidly dissipated in the neighborhood of the mixing layer.

  19. Use of Macro Fibre Composite Transducers as Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Mark Eaton

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The need for ever lighter and more efficient aerospace structures and components has led to continuous optimization pushing the limits of structural performance. In order to ensure continued safe operation during long term service it is desirable to develop a structural health monitoring (SHM system. Acoustic emission (AE offers great potential for real time global monitoring of aerospace structures, however currently available commercial sensors have limitations in size, weight and adaptability to complex structures. This work investigates the potential use of macro-fibre composite (MFC film transducers as AE sensors. Due to the inhomogeneous make-up of MFC transducers their directional dependency was examined and found to have limited effect on signal feature data. However, signal cross-correlations revealed a strong directional dependency. The sensitivity and signal attenuation with distance of MFC sensors were compared with those of commercially available sensors. Although noticeably less sensitive than the commercial sensors, the MFC sensors still had an acceptable operating range. Furthermore, a series of compressive carbon fiber coupon tests were monitored in parallel using both an MFC sensor and a commercially available sensor for comparison. The results showed good agreement of AE trends recorded by both sensors.

  20. A metasurface carpet cloak for electromagnetic, acoustic and water waves

    Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Yu, Faxin; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    We propose a single low-profile skin metasurface carpet cloak to hide objects with arbitrary shape and size under three different waves, i.e., electromagnetic (EM) waves, acoustic waves and water waves. We first present a metasurface which can control the local reflection phase of these three waves. By taking advantage of this metasurface, we then design a metasurface carpet cloak which provides an additional phase to compensate the phase distortion introduced by a bump, thus restoring the reflection waves as if the incident waves impinge onto a flat mirror. The finite element simulation results demonstrate that an object can be hidden under these three kinds of waves with a single metasurface cloak.

  1. Highly asymmetric interaction forces induced by acoustic waves in coupled plate structures

    Fan, Xiying; Zhang, Shenwei; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-01-01

    Mutual forces can be induced between coupled structures when illuminated by external acoustic waves. In this Letter, we propose a concept of asymmetric interaction between two coupled plate-like structures, which is generated by oppositely incident plane waves. Besides the striking contrast in magnitude, the mutual force induced by one of the incidences can be tuned extremely strong due to the resonant excitation of the flexural plate modes. The highly asymmetric interaction with enhanced strength in single side should be potentially useful, such as in designing ultrasound instruments and sensors.

  2. Analysis of Acoustic Wave Propagation in a Thin Moving Fluid

    Joly, Patrick; Weder, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    We study the propagation of acoustic waves in a fluid that is contained in a thin two-dimensional tube, and that it is moving with a velocity profile that only depends on the transversal coordinate of the tube. The governing equations are the Galbrun equations, or, equivalently, the linearized Euler equations. We analyze the approximate model that was recently derived by Bonnet-Bendhia, Durufl\\'e and Joly to describe the propagation of the acoustic waves in the limit when the width of the tub...

  3. Amplification of acoustic evanescent waves using metamaterial slabs.

    Park, Choon Mahn; Park, Jong Jin; Lee, Seung Hwan; Seo, Yong Mun; Kim, Chul Koo; Lee, Sam H

    2011-11-01

    We amplified acoustic evanescent waves using metamaterial slabs with a negative effective density. For the amplifying effect of the slab to overcome the dissipation, it is necessary that the imaginary part of the effective density is much smaller than the real part, a condition not satisfied so far. We report the construction of membrane-based two-dimensional negative-density metamaterials which exhibited remarkably small dissipation. Using a slab of this metamaterial we realized a 17-fold net amplitude gain at a remote distance from the evanescent wave source. Potential applications include acoustic superlensing. PMID:22181610

  4. An Unconditionally Stable Method for Solving the Acoustic Wave Equation

    Zhi-Kai Fu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An unconditionally stable method for solving the time-domain acoustic wave equation using Associated Hermit orthogonal functions is proposed. The second-order time derivatives in acoustic wave equation are expanded by these orthogonal basis functions. By applying Galerkin temporal testing procedure, the time variable can be eliminated from the calculations. The restriction of Courant-Friedrichs-Levy (CFL condition in selecting time step for analyzing thin layer can be avoided. Numerical results show the accuracy and the efficiency of the proposed method.

  5. Study of acoustic signal in the process of resistance spot welding based on array sensor system

    2008-01-01

    This investigation was performed to study acoustic field signal in order to improve RSW quality. Researchers firstly built an acoustic array sensor system, which included 8 MPA-416 acoustic sensors, data acquisition card and LabVIEW. The system obtained the acoustic field information in the process of nugget growing. Due to the nonlinearity field signal, array sensor algorithm was utilized to quantitatively analyze the characteristics of acoustic field and reduced noise. The experiment and calculation results show that array sensor system can acquire acoustic field signal of nugget growing in the RSW process and array processing algorithm based on acoustic field can extract characteristic parameters to evaluate RSW quality. It was concluded that the acoustic array sensor system offers a new methodology for RSW quality inspection.

  6. Theoretical analysis of leaky surface acoustic waves of point-focused acoustic lens and some experiments

    When a point-focused acoustic lens in the scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) is faced to test specimen and defocused to some extent, two effective echoes can be obtained. One is the echo of longitudinal wave, which is normally incident upon the specimen of an on-axis beam in the central region of the lens and is reflected normal to the lens surface, hence detected by the transducer. The other is of leaky surface acoustic waves(LSAW), which are mode converted front a narrow beam of off-axis longitudinal wave, then propagate across the surface of the specimen and reradiate at angles normal to the lens surface, thus detected by the transducer. These two echoes are either interfered or separated with each other depending ell the defocused distance. It turned out theoretically that the LSAW have a narrow focal spot in the central region of the point-focused acoustic lens, whose size is approximately 40% of the LSAW wavelength. On top of that, a wavelength of LSAW is about 50% short as that of longitudinal wave. So, It is expected that high resolution images can be obtained provided LSAW are used in the scanning acoustic microscope.

  7. Cloaking an acoustic sensor with single-negative materials

    Cai, Chen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhu, Xue-Feng [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xu, Tao [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zou, Xin-Ye, E-mail: xyzou@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-07-15

    In this review, a brief introduction is given to the development of acoustic superlens cloaks that allow the cloaked object to receive signals while its presence is not sensed by the surrounding, which can be regarded as “cloaking an acoustic sensor”. Remarkably, the designed cloak consists of single-negative materials with parameters independent of the background medium or the sensor system, which is proven to be a magnifying superlens. This has facilitated significantly the design and fabrication of acoustic cloaks that generally require double-negative materials with customized parameters. Such innovative design has then been simplified further as a multi-layered structure comprising of two alternately arranged complementary media with homogeneous isotropic single-negative materials. Based on this, a scattering analyses method is developed for the numerical simulation of such multi-layered cloak structures, which may serve as an efficient approach for the investigation on such devices.

  8. Cloaking an acoustic sensor with single-negative materials

    In this review, a brief introduction is given to the development of acoustic superlens cloaks that allow the cloaked object to receive signals while its presence is not sensed by the surrounding, which can be regarded as “cloaking an acoustic sensor”. Remarkably, the designed cloak consists of single-negative materials with parameters independent of the background medium or the sensor system, which is proven to be a magnifying superlens. This has facilitated significantly the design and fabrication of acoustic cloaks that generally require double-negative materials with customized parameters. Such innovative design has then been simplified further as a multi-layered structure comprising of two alternately arranged complementary media with homogeneous isotropic single-negative materials. Based on this, a scattering analyses method is developed for the numerical simulation of such multi-layered cloak structures, which may serve as an efficient approach for the investigation on such devices

  9. Understanding Piezo Based Sensors for Acoustic Neutrino Detection

    The ANTARES collaboration is currently installing a neutrino telescope off the French Mediterranean coast to measure diffuse fluxes and point sources of high energy cosmic neutrinos. The complete detector will consist of 900 photomultipliers on 12 detector lines, using 0.01km3 of sea water as target material. As part of the ANTARES deep-sea research infrastructure, the Erlangen group is planning to modify several ANTARES storeys by fitting them with acoustic receivers to study the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection in the deep sea. In this paper, studies of the electromechanical properties of piezoelectric sensors are presented, based on an equivalent circuit diagram for the coupled mechanical and electrical oscillations of a piezoelectric element. A method for obtaining the system parameters as well as derivations of sensor properties like pressure sensitivity and intrinsic noise are treated and results compared to measurements. Finally, a possible application of these results for simulating system response and optimising reconstruction algorithms is discussed

  10. High-performance air acoustic detection and classification sensor

    Porter, Richard; Raines, Robert; Jones, Barry

    2009-05-01

    Acoustic signals are a principal detection modality for unattended sensor systems. However, the performance of these systems is frequently suboptimal due to insufficient dynamic range in small systems or excess power consumption in larger systems. This paper discusses an approach to developing an unattended ground sensor (UGS) system that has the best features of both worlds. This system, developed by McQ Inc., has exceptional dynamic range (> 100 dB) while operating at power levels of 1.5-5 watts. The system also has a user definable signal parameter library and automated detection methodology that will be described.

  11. Stimulated electron-acoustic-wave scattering in a laser plasma

    Intense laser-plasma interaction can be a source of various electronic instabilities. Recently, stimulated backscattering from a trapped electron-acoustic wave (SEAS) (D.S. Montgomery et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 155001 (2001)) was proposed to reinterpret spectra previously attributed to stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) from unrealistically low densities. By particle simulations in a uniform plasma layer, which is overdense for ordinary SRS, strong reflection by SEAS at the electron plasma frequency is found. Transient SEAS reflectivity pulsations are followed by strong relativistic heating of electrons. Physical conditions are explained by three-wave parametric coupling between laser light, standing backscattered wave and slow electron-acoustic wave. Regions in which SEAS reflection can dominate over SRS are singled out. (author)

  12. Reflection and Transmission of Acoustic Waves at Semiconductor - Liquid Interface

    J. N. Sharma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of reflection and transmission characteristics of acoustic waves at the interface of a semiconductor halfspace underlying an inviscid liquid has been carried out. The reflection and transmission coefficients of reflected and transmitted waves have been obtained for quasi-longitudinal (qP wave incident at the interface from fluid to semiconductor. The numerical computations of reflection and transmission coefficients have been carried out with the help of Gauss elimination method by using MATLAB programming for silicon (Si, germanium (Ge and silicon nitride (Si3N4 semiconductors. In order to interpret and compare, the computer simulated results are plotted graphically. The study may be useful in semiconductors, seismology and surface acoustic wave (SAW devices in addition to engines of the space shuttles.

  13. Surface spin-electron acoustic waves in magnetically ordered metals

    Andreev, Pavel A

    2015-01-01

    Degenerate plasmas with motionless ions show existence of three surface waves: the Langmuir wave, the electromagnetic wave, and the zeroth sound. Applying the separated spin evolution quantum hydrodynamics to half-space plasma we demonstrate the existence of the surface spin-electron acoustic wave (SSEAW). We study dispersion of the SSEAW. We show that there is hybridization between the surface Langmuir wave and the SSEAW at rather small spin polarization. In the hybridization area the dispersion branches are located close to each other. In this area there is a strong interaction between these waves leading to the energy exchange. Consequently, generating the Langmuir waves with the frequencies close to hybridization area we can generate the SSEAWs. Thus, we report a method of creation of the SEAWs.

  14. Anisotropic metamaterials for full control of acoustic waves

    Christensen, Johan; García de Abajo, F. Javier

    2012-01-01

    We show that a holey anisotropic metamaterial can exert subwavelength control over sound waves beyond that achieved with naturally occurring materials [Nature Physics 3, 851 (2007)]. We predict that, for appropriate choices of geometrical parameters, these metamaterials support negative refraction, backward wave propagation along a direction opposite with respect to the acoustic energy flow, and subwavelength imaging [Nature Physics 7, 52 (2011)] with both the source and the image situated fa...

  15. Negative refraction and backward waves in layered acoustic metamaterials

    Christensen, Johan; García de Abajo, F. Javier

    2012-01-01

    We investigate layered acoustic metamaterials capable of exhibiting a wide variety of wave propagation phenomena, including backward and forward waves with and without negative refraction. The metamaterials are formed by periodically perforated hard plates, which we describe analytically in the limit of small holes compared to both the period and the separation between plates. In particular, we derive expressions for the index of refraction and the transmission and reflection coefficients of ...

  16. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto; Rendón, Pablo L.

    2015-10-01

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe's linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  17. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe’s linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed

  18. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.velasco@ccadet.unam.mx; Rendón, Pablo L., E-mail: pablo.rendon@ccadet.unam.mx [Grupo de Acústica y Vibraciones, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Apartado Postal 70-186, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico)

    2015-10-28

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe’s linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  19. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry

    Xiong, Jichuan [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Electronic and Optical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, 200 Xiaolingwei, Nanjing 210094 (China); Soft Matter and Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Xu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xdxu@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Soft Matter and Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Glorieux, Christ, E-mail: xdxu@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be [Soft Matter and Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Matsuda, Osamu [Division of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Cheng, Liping [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-05-15

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz.

  20. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz

  1. Acoustic nonlinearity of ultrasonic wave by crack face contacting effect

    Nonlinear acoustic effect accompanied by the propagation of ultrasonic wave has been discussed from log time before and the effort to evaluate material degradation or degree of damage by measuring this effect has been tried in recent. The mechanism for the generation of nonlinear acoustic effect was proposed by several researchers and these previous studies have identified two primary sources of the nonlinearity. One source is the anharmonicity of lattice itself. The other source is associated with the contribution of dislocation displacement. In this paper, an another new source of nonlinearity generated due to the partial contact of crack face when the ultrasonic wave passes through tiny crack is considered. At first, the mechanism of the generation of acoustic nonlinearity at the crack face by half wave model was explained and the relationship between the separation distance of crack faces and. the magnitude of nonlinearity was investigated quantitatively by fourier transform of the half wave and computer simulation. In next, the existence of the proposed new source of nonlinearity at crack face was shown experimentally in the actual case, SAM signal obtained for the Newton ring. From the result, we confirmed that the crack face contacting effect should be considered as a additive source of acoustic nonlinearity when we apply the ultrasonic nonlinearity analysis to the evaluation of material degradation.

  2. Ion Acoustic Waves in the Presence of Langmuir Oscillations

    Pécseli, Hans

    1976-01-01

    The dielectric function for long-wavelength, low-frequency ion acoustic waves in the presence of short-wavelength, high-frequency electron oscillations is presented, where the ions are described by the collision-free Vlasov equation. The effect of the electron oscillations can be appropriately de...

  3. Gasoline identifier based on SH0 plate acoustic waves.

    Kuznetsova, Iren E; Zaitsev, Boris D; Seleznev, Eugenii P; Verona, Enrico

    2016-08-01

    The present paper is devoted to the development of gasoline identifier based on zero order shear-horizontal (SH0) acoustic wave propagating in piezoelectric plate. It has been found that the permittivity of gasoline is increased when its octane number rises. The development of such identifier is experimentally demonstrated to be possible. PMID:27125559

  4. Standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) based multichannel cell sorting

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Lapsley, Michael Ian; Li, Sixing; Guo, Xiang; Chan, Chung Yu Keith; Chiang, I-Kao; Wang, Lin; McCoy, J. Philip; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a novel microfluidic device for cell sorting in continuous flow using tunable standing surface acoustic waves. This method allows individual cells to be precisely directed into five different outlet channels in a single step. It is versatile, simple, label-free, non-invasive, and highly controllable.

  5. Enhancing Plasma Surface Modification using high Intensity and high Power Ultrasonic Acoustic Waves

    2010-01-01

    high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) by at least one ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic wave generator (101 ), wherein the ultrasonic acoustic waves are directed to propagate towards said surface (314) of the object (100) so that a laminar boundary layer (313) of a gas or a...

  6. Zinc oxide thin film acoustic sensor

    Mohammed, Ali Jasim; Salih, Wafaa Mahdi; Hassan, Marwa Abdul Muhsien; Nusseif, Asmaa Deiaa; Kadhum, Haider Abdullah [Department of Physics , College of Science, Al-Mustansiriyah University, Baghdad (Iraq); Mansour, Hazim Louis [Department of Physics , College of Education, Al-Mustansiriyah University, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2013-12-16

    This paper reports the implementation of (750 nm) thickness of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin film for the piezoelectric pressure sensors. The film was prepared and deposited employing the spray pyrolysis technique. XRD results show that the growth preferred orientation is the (002) plane. A polycrystalline thin film (close to mono crystallite like) was obtained. Depending on the Scanning Electron Microscopy photogram, the film homogeneity and thickness were shown. The resonance frequency measured (about 19 kHz) and the damping coefficient was calculated and its value was found to be about (2.5538), the thin film be haves as homogeneous for under and over damped. The thin film pressure sensing was approximately exponentially related with frequency, the thin film was observed to has a good response for mechanical stresses also it is a good material for the piezoelectric properties.

  7. Subwavelength acoustic focusing by surface-wave-resonance enhanced transmission in doubly negative acoustic metamaterials

    We present analytical and numerical analyses of a yet unseen lensing paradigm that is based on a solid metamaterial slab in which the wave excitation source is attached. We propose and demonstrate sub-diffraction-limited acoustic focusing induced by surface resonant states in doubly negative metamaterials. The enhancement of evanescent waves across the metamaterial slab produced by their resonant coupling to surface waves is evidenced and quantitatively determined. The effect of metamaterial parameters on surface states, transmission, and wavenumber bandwidth is clearly identified. Based on this concept consisting of a wave source attached on the metamaterial, a high resolution of λ/28.4 is obtained with the optimum effective physical parameters, opening then an exciting way to design acoustic metamaterials for ultrasonic focused imaging

  8. Subwavelength acoustic focusing by surface-wave-resonance enhanced transmission in doubly negative acoustic metamaterials

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Badreddine Assouar, M., E-mail: Badreddine.Assouar@univ-lorraine.fr; Oudich, Mourad [CNRS, Institut Jean Lamour, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy F-54506 (France); Institut Jean Lamour, University of Lorraine, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP: 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France)

    2014-11-21

    We present analytical and numerical analyses of a yet unseen lensing paradigm that is based on a solid metamaterial slab in which the wave excitation source is attached. We propose and demonstrate sub-diffraction-limited acoustic focusing induced by surface resonant states in doubly negative metamaterials. The enhancement of evanescent waves across the metamaterial slab produced by their resonant coupling to surface waves is evidenced and quantitatively determined. The effect of metamaterial parameters on surface states, transmission, and wavenumber bandwidth is clearly identified. Based on this concept consisting of a wave source attached on the metamaterial, a high resolution of λ/28.4 is obtained with the optimum effective physical parameters, opening then an exciting way to design acoustic metamaterials for ultrasonic focused imaging.

  9. Propagation-invariant waves in acoustic, optical, and radio-wave fields

    Salo, Janne

    2003-01-01

    The physical phenomena considered in this thesis are associated with electromagnetic and acoustic waves that propagate in free space or in homogeneous media without diffraction. The concept of rotationally periodic wave propagation is introduced in the first journal article included in the thesis and it is subsequently used to analyse waves that avoid diffractive deterioration by repeatedly returning to their initial shape, possibly rotated around the optical axis. Such waves constitute an es...

  10. Acoustic Sensor-Based Multiple Object Tracking with Visual Information Association

    Moon Nammee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Object tracking by an acoustic sensor based on particle filtering is extended for the tracking of multiple objects. In order to overcome the inherent limitation of the acoustic sensor for the simultaneous multiple object tracking, support from the visual sensor is considered. Cooperation from the visual sensor, however, is better to be minimized, as the visual sensor's operation requires much higher computational resources than the acoustic sensor-based estimation, especially when the visual sensor is not dedicated to object tracking and deployed for other applications. The acoustic sensor mainly tracks multiple objects, and the visual sensor supports the tracking task only when the acoustic sensor has a difficulty. Several techniques based on particle filtering are used for multiple object tracking by the acoustic sensor, and the limitations of the acoustic sensor are discussed to identify the need for the visual sensor cooperation. Performance of the triggering-based cooperation by the two visual sensors is evaluated and compared with a periodic cooperation in a real environment.

  11. An acoustic transmission sensor for the longitudinal viscosity of fluids

    Antlinger, Hannes; Clara, Stefan; Beigelbeck, Roman; Cerimovic, Samir; Keplinger, Franz; Jakoby, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Physical fluid parameters like viscosity, mass density and sound velocity can be determined utilizing ultrasonic sensors. We introduce the concept of a recently devised transmission based sensor utilizing pressure waves to determine the longitudinal viscosity, bulk viscosity, and second coefficient of viscosity of a sample fluid in a test chamber. A model is presented which allows determining these parameters from measurement values by means of a fit. The setup is particularly suited for liqu...

  12. Plasma-maser instability of the ion acoustics wave in the presence of lower hybrid wave turbulence in inhomogeneous plasma

    M Singh; P N Deka

    2006-03-01

    A theoretical study is made on the generation mechanism of ion acoustics wave in the presence of lower hybrid wave turbulence field in inhomogeneous plasma on the basis of plasma-maser interaction. The lower hybrid wave turbulence field is taken as the low-frequency turbulence field. The growth rate of test high frequency ion acoustics wave is obtained with the involvement of spatial density gradient parameter. A comparative study of the role of density gradient for the generation of ion acoustics wave on the basis of plasma-maser effect is presented. It is found that the density gradient influences the growth rate of ion acoustics wave.

  13. Controlling an acoustic wave with a cylindrically-symmetric gradient-index system

    We present a detailed theoretical description of wave propagation in an acoustic gradient-index system with cylindrical symmetry and demonstrate its potential to numerically control acoustic waves in different ways. The trajectory of an acoustic wave within the system is derived by employing the theory of geometric acoustics, and the validity of the theoretical descriptions is verified numerically by using the finite element method simulation. The results show that by tailoring the distribution function of the refractive index, the proposed system can yield a tunable manipulation of acoustic waves, such as acoustic bending, trapping, and absorbing. (paper)

  14. Synchronization of self-excited dust acoustic waves

    Suranga Ruhunusiri, W. D.; Goree, John

    2012-10-01

    Synchronization is a nonlinear phenomenon where a self-excited oscillation, like a wave in a plasma, interacts with an external driving, resulting in an adjustment of the oscillation frequency. Dust acoustic wave synchronization has been experimentally studied previously in laboratory and in microgravity conditions, e.g. [Pilch PoP 2009] and [Menzel PRL 2010]. We perform a laboratory experiment to study synchronization of self-excited dust acoustic waves. An rf glow discharge argon plasma is formed by applying a low power radio frequency voltage to a lower electrode. A 3D dust cloud is formed by levitating 4.83 micron microspheres inside a glass box placed on the lower electrode. Dust acoustic waves are self-excited with a natural frequency of 22 Hz due to an ion streaming instability. A cross section of the dust cloud is illuminated by a vertical laser sheet and imaged from the side with a digital camera. To synchronize the waves, we sinusoidally modulate the overall ion density. Differently from previous experiments, we use a driving electrode that is separate from the electrode that sustains the plasma, and we characterize synchronization by varying both driving amplitude and frequency.

  15. Localization with a Mobile Beacon in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Sangho Lee

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Localization is one of the most important issues associated with underwater acoustic sensor networks, especially when sensor nodes are randomly deployed. Given that it is difficult to deploy beacon nodes at predetermined locations, localization schemes with a mobile beacon on the sea surface or along the planned path are inherently convenient, accurate, and energy-efficient. In this paper, we propose a new range-free Localization with a Mobile Beacon (LoMoB. The mobile beacon periodically broadcasts a beacon message containing its location. Sensor nodes are individually localized by passively receiving the beacon messages without inter-node communications. For location estimation, a set of potential locations are obtained as candidates for a node’s location and then the node’s location is determined through the weighted mean of all the potential locations with the weights computed based on residuals.

  16. Optical Sensor/Actuator Locations for Active Structural Acoustic Control

    Padula, Sharon L.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Kincaid, Rex K.

    1998-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have extensive experience using active structural acoustic control (ASAC) for aircraft interior noise reduction. One aspect of ASAC involves the selection of optimum locations for microphone sensors and force actuators. This paper explains the importance of sensor/actuator selection, reviews optimization techniques, and summarizes experimental and numerical results. Three combinatorial optimization problems are described. Two involve the determination of the number and position of piezoelectric actuators, and the other involves the determination of the number and location of the sensors. For each case, a solution method is suggested, and typical results are examined. The first case, a simplified problem with simulated data, is used to illustrate the method. The second and third cases are more representative of the potential of the method and use measured data. The three case studies and laboratory test results establish the usefulness of the numerical methods.

  17. Chromospheric heating by acoustic waves compared to radiative cooling

    Sobotka, M; Švanda, M; Jurčák, J; del Moro, D; Berrilli, F

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic and magnetoacoustic waves are among the possible candidate mechanisms that heat the upper layers of solar atmosphere. A weak chromospheric plage near a large solar pore NOAA 11005 was observed on October 15, 2008 in the lines Fe I 617.3 nm and Ca II 853.2 nm with the Interferometric Bidimemsional Spectrometer (IBIS) attached to the Dunn Solar Telescope. Analyzing the Ca II observations with spatial and temporal resolutions of 0.4" and 52 s, the energy deposited by acoustic waves is compared with that released by radiative losses. The deposited acoustic flux is estimated from power spectra of Doppler oscillations measured in the Ca II line core. The radiative losses are calculated using a grid of seven 1D hydrostatic semi-empirical model atmospheres. The comparison shows that the spatial correlation of maps of radiative losses and acoustic flux is 72 %. In quiet chromosphere, the contribution of acoustic energy flux to radiative losses is small, only of about 15 %. In active areas with photospheric ma...

  18. Modulational instability of ion acoustic waves in a magnetised plasma

    The modulational instability of ion acoustic waves is studied in the presence of d.c. magnetic field. It is found that while the instability sets in for wave numbers exceeding 1.47 ksub(D) in the absence of the magnetic field, the switching-on of the magnetic field can generate instability earlier. In general, two regions emerge where the waves can become modulationally unstable. The relative sizes of these regions change as the magnetic field and the angle of propagation are varied. (author)

  19. Wireless SAW Interrogator and Sensor System Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Wireless, passive, Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW), Orthogonal Frequency Coded (OFC) temperature sensors, operating in a multi-sensor environment, developed at the...

  20. A wireless acoustic emission sensor remotely powered by light

    In this paper, wireless sensing of acoustic emission (AE) signals using a battery-free sensor node remotely powered by light is presented. The wireless sensor consists of a piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) for AE signal acquisition and a wireless transponder that performs signal conditioning, frequency conversion, and wireless transmission. For signal conditioning, a voltage follower that consumes less than 2 mW was introduced to buffer the high impedance of the PWAS from the low impedance of the wireless transponder. A photocell-based energy harvester with a stable voltage output was developed to power the voltage follower so that the wireless AE sensor can operate without an external power source. The principle of operation of the battery-free wireless AE sensor node and the sensor interrogation system is described, followed by a detailed description of the hardware implementation. The voltage follower and the wireless channel were characterized by ultrasound pitch–catch and pencil lead break experiments. (paper)

  1. Seismic wave imaging in visco-acoustic media

    WANG Huazhong; ZHANG Libin; MA Zaitian

    2004-01-01

    Realistic representation of the earth may be achieved by combining the mechanical properties of elastic solids and viscousliquids. That is to say, the amplitude will be attenuated withdifferent frequency and the phase will be changed in the seismicdata acquisition. In the seismic data processing, this effect mustbe compensated. In this paper, we put forward a visco-acoustic wavepropagator which is of better calculating stability and tolerablecalculating cost (little more than an acoustic wave propagator).The quite good compensation effect is demonstrated by thenumerical test results with synthetic seismic data and real data.

  2. High Frequency Acoustic Waves in the Sun's Atmosphere

    Fleck, B.; Jefferies, S. M.; McIntosh, S. W.; Severino, G.; Straus, T.; Tarbell, T. D.

    2008-09-01

    This year marks the 60th anniversary of two pioneering papers by Schwarzschild (1948) and Biermann (1948), who independently proposed that acoustic waves generated in the turbulent convection zone play an important role in the heating of the chromosphere and corona. High frequency acoustic waves have remained one of the leading contenders for solving the heating problem of the non-magnetic chromospheres of the Sun and late-type stars ever since. Earlier attempts to determine the acoustic energy flux from ground were compromised by atmospheric seeing, which has its biggest effect on the high frequency parts of the observed signal. Recently, based on a comparison of TRACE observations and 1-D simulations, Fossum & Carlsson (2005, 2006) concluded that high-frequency acoustic waves are not sufficient to heat the solar chromosphere. The same conclusion was reached by Carlsson et al. (2007) from an analysis of Hinode SOT/BFI Ca II H and blue continuum observations. Other authors (e.g. Cuntz et al. 2007; Wedemeyer-Boehm et al. 2007, Kalkofen 2007), however, questioned these results for a number of reasons. Because of its limited spatial resolution and limited sensitivity there are inherent difficulties when comparing TRACE observations with numerical simulations. Further, intensity oscillations are difficult to interpret, as they result from a phase-sensitive mix of temperature and pressure fluctuations, and non-local radiation transfer effects may complicate the picture even more. Here we revisit the role of high frequency acoustic waves in the dynamics and energetics of the Sun's atmosphere using high cadence, high resolution Doppler velocity measurements obtained with SOT/SP and SOT/NFI on Hinode.

  3. Numerics of surface acoustic wave (SAW) driven acoustic streaming and radiation force

    Nama, Nitesh; Barnkob, Rune; Kahler, Christian; Costanzo, Francesco; Jun Huang, Tony

    2015-11-01

    Recently, surface acoustic wave (SAW) based systems have shown great potential for various lab-on-a-chip applications. However, the physical understanding of the precise acoustic fields and associated acoustophoresis is rather limited. In this work, we present a numerical study of the acoustophoretic particle motion inside a SAW-actuated, liquid-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel. We utilize a perturbation approach to divide the flow variables into first- and second-order components. The first-order fields result in a time-averaged acoustic radiation force on suspended particles, as well as the time-averaged body force terms that drive the second-order fields. We model the SAW actuation by a displacement function while we utilize impedance boundary conditions to model the PDMS walls. We identify the precise acoustic fields generated inside the microchannel and investigate a range of particle sizes to characterize the transition from streaming-dominated acoustophoresis to radiation-force-dominated acoustophoresis. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of SAW devices to tune the position of vertical pressure node inside the microchannel by tuning the phase difference between the two incoming surface acoustic waves.

  4. Tuneable film bulk acoustic wave resonators

    Gevorgian, Spartak Sh; Vorobiev, Andrei K

    2013-01-01

    To handle many standards and ever increasing bandwidth requirements, large number of filters and switches are used in transceivers of modern wireless communications systems. It makes the cost, performance, form factor, and power consumption of these systems, including cellular phones, critical issues. At present, the fixed frequency filter banks based on Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators (FBAR) are regarded as one of the most promising technologies to address performance -form factor-cost issues. Even though the FBARs improve the overall performances the complexity of these systems remains high.  Attempts are being made to exclude some of the filters by bringing the digital signal processing (including channel selection) as close to the antennas as possible. However handling the increased interference levels is unrealistic for low-cost battery operated radios. Replacing fixed frequency filter banks by one tuneable filter is the most desired and widely considered scenario. As an example, development of the softwa...

  5. Identification of acoustic wave propagation in a duct line and its application to detection of impact source location based on signal processing

    Shin, Yong Woo; Kim, Min Soo; Lee, Sang Kwon [Inha University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    For the detection of the impact location in a pipeline system, the correlation method has been the conventional method. For the application of the correlation method, the diameter of a duct should be small so that the acoustic wave inside the duct can propagate with nondispersive characteristics, in the form of, for example, a plane wave. This correlation method calculates the cross-correlation between acoustic waves measured at two acceleration sensors attached to a buried duct. It also gives information about the arrival time delay of an acoustic wave between two sensors. These arrival time delays are used for the estimation of the impact location. However, when the diameter of the duct is large, the acoustic waves inside the duct propagate with dispersive characteristics owing to the reflection of the acoustic wave off of the wall of the duct. This dispersive characteristic is related to the acoustic modes inside a duct. Therefore, the correlation method does not work correctly for the detection of the impact location. This paper proposes new methods of accurately measuring the arrival time delay between two sensors attached to duct line system. This method is based on the time-frequency analyses of the short time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT). These methods can discriminate direct waves (non-dispersive waves) and reflective waves (dispersive waves) from the measured wave signals through the time-frequency analysis. The direct wave or the reflective wave is used to estimate the arrival time delay. This delay is used for the identification of the impact location. This systematic method can predict the impact location due to the impact forces of construction equipment with more accuracy than the correlation method

  6. Identification of acoustic wave propagation in a duct line and its application to detection of impact source location based on signal processing

    For the detection of the impact location in a pipeline system, the correlation method has been the conventional method. For the application of the correlation method, the diameter of a duct should be small so that the acoustic wave inside the duct can propagate with nondispersive characteristics, in the form of, for example, a plane wave. This correlation method calculates the cross-correlation between acoustic waves measured at two acceleration sensors attached to a buried duct. It also gives information about the arrival time delay of an acoustic wave between two sensors. These arrival time delays are used for the estimation of the impact location. However, when the diameter of the duct is large, the acoustic waves inside the duct propagate with dispersive characteristics owing to the reflection of the acoustic wave off of the wall of the duct. This dispersive characteristic is related to the acoustic modes inside a duct. Therefore, the correlation method does not work correctly for the detection of the impact location. This paper proposes new methods of accurately measuring the arrival time delay between two sensors attached to duct line system. This method is based on the time-frequency analyses of the short time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT). These methods can discriminate direct waves (non-dispersive waves) and reflective waves (dispersive waves) from the measured wave signals through the time-frequency analysis. The direct wave or the reflective wave is used to estimate the arrival time delay. This delay is used for the identification of the impact location. This systematic method can predict the impact location due to the impact forces of construction equipment with more accuracy than the correlation method

  7. Use of anisotropy to guide acoustic waves along desired trajectories

    Tehranian, Aref; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2010-03-01

    Acoustic stress waves can be guided to follow pre-determined paths in solids, using elastic anisotropy. Recently, there has been intense interest to design materials and structures that can shield specific regions within the material by redirecting the incident stress-waves along desired paths. Some of the proposed techniques involve variable mass density and stiffness. We have designed a material with isotropic mass density but highly anisotropic elasticity that can guide incident waves along desired trajectories. Harmonic excitations are imposed, and it is shown that the stress-wave energy would travel around a protected central region. The model is also evaluated using numerical simulations, which confirm that majority of the stress-wave energy is guided around the central cavity and is delivered exactly to the opposing face in a location corresponding to the incident excitation location.

  8. Single-sensor multispeaker listening with acoustic metamaterials.

    Xie, Yangbo; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Brady, David J; Cummer, Steven A

    2015-08-25

    Designing a "cocktail party listener" that functionally mimics the selective perception of a human auditory system has been pursued over the past decades. By exploiting acoustic metamaterials and compressive sensing, we present here a single-sensor listening device that separates simultaneous overlapping sounds from different sources. The device with a compact array of resonant metamaterials is demonstrated to distinguish three overlapping and independent sources with 96.67% correct audio recognition. Segregation of the audio signals is achieved using physical layer encoding without relying on source characteristics. This hardware approach to multichannel source separation can be applied to robust speech recognition and hearing aids and may be extended to other acoustic imaging and sensing applications. PMID:26261314

  9. Making structured metals transparent for ultrabroadband electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves

    In this review, we present our recent work on making structured metals transparent for broadband electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves via excitation of surface waves. First, we theoretically show that one-dimensional metallic gratings can become transparent and completely antireflective for extremely broadband electromagnetic waves by relying on surface plasmons or spoof surface plasmons. Second, we experimentally demonstrate that metallic gratings with narrow slits are highly transparent for broadband terahertz waves at oblique incidence and high transmission efficiency is insensitive to the metal thickness. Further, we significantly develop oblique metal gratings transparent for broadband electromagnetic waves (including optical waves and terahertz ones) under normal incidence. In the third, we find the principles of broadband transparency for structured metals can be extended from one-dimensional metallic gratings to two-dimensional cases. Moreover, similar phenomena are found in sonic artificially metallic structures, which present the transparency for broadband acoustic waves. These investigations provide guidelines to develop many novel materials and devices, such as transparent conducting panels, antireflective solar cells, and other broadband metamaterials and stealth technologies. - Highlights: • Making structured metals transparent for ultrabroadband electromagnetic waves. • Non-resonant excitation of surface plasmons or spoof surface plasmons. • Sonic artificially metallic structures transparent for broadband acoustic waves

  10. Making structured metals transparent for ultrabroadband electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves

    Fan, Ren-Hao [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Peng, Ru-Wen, E-mail: rwpeng@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Huang, Xian-Rong [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Wang, Mu [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-07-15

    In this review, we present our recent work on making structured metals transparent for broadband electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves via excitation of surface waves. First, we theoretically show that one-dimensional metallic gratings can become transparent and completely antireflective for extremely broadband electromagnetic waves by relying on surface plasmons or spoof surface plasmons. Second, we experimentally demonstrate that metallic gratings with narrow slits are highly transparent for broadband terahertz waves at oblique incidence and high transmission efficiency is insensitive to the metal thickness. Further, we significantly develop oblique metal gratings transparent for broadband electromagnetic waves (including optical waves and terahertz ones) under normal incidence. In the third, we find the principles of broadband transparency for structured metals can be extended from one-dimensional metallic gratings to two-dimensional cases. Moreover, similar phenomena are found in sonic artificially metallic structures, which present the transparency for broadband acoustic waves. These investigations provide guidelines to develop many novel materials and devices, such as transparent conducting panels, antireflective solar cells, and other broadband metamaterials and stealth technologies. - Highlights: • Making structured metals transparent for ultrabroadband electromagnetic waves. • Non-resonant excitation of surface plasmons or spoof surface plasmons. • Sonic artificially metallic structures transparent for broadband acoustic waves.

  11. SILICON COMPATIBLE ACOUSTIC WAVE RESONATORS: DESIGN, FABRICATION AND PERFORMANCE

    Aliza Aini Md Ralib

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Continuous advancement in wireless technology and silicon microfabrication has fueled exciting growth in wireless products. The bulky size of discrete vibrating mechanical devices such as quartz crystals and surface acoustic wave resonators impedes the ultimate miniaturization of single-chip transceivers. Fabrication of acoustic wave resonators on silicon allows complete integration of a resonator with its accompanying circuitry.  Integration leads to enhanced performance, better functionality with reduced cost at large volume production. This paper compiles the state-of-the-art technology of silicon compatible acoustic resonators, which can be integrated with interface circuitry. Typical acoustic wave resonators are surface acoustic wave (SAW and bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonators.  Performance of the resonator is measured in terms of quality factor, resonance frequency and insertion loss. Selection of appropriate piezoelectric material is significant to ensure sufficient electromechanical coupling coefficient is produced to reduce the insertion loss. The insulating passive SiO2 layer acts as a low loss material and aims to increase the quality factor and temperature stability of the design. The integration technique also is influenced by the fabrication process and packaging.  Packageless structure using AlN as the additional isolation layer is proposed to protect the SAW device from the environment for high reliability. Advancement in miniaturization technology of silicon compatible acoustic wave resonators to realize a single chip transceiver system is still needed. ABSTRAK: Kemajuan yang berterusan dalam teknologi tanpa wayar dan silikon telah menguatkan pertumbuhan yang menarik dalam produk tanpa wayar. Saiz yang besar bagi peralatan mekanikal bergetar seperti kristal kuarza menghalang pengecilan untuk merealisasikan peranti cip. Silikon serasi  gelombang akustik resonator mempunyai potensi yang besar untuk menggantikan unsur

  12. Optically tunable acoustic wave band-pass filter

    N. Swinteck

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic properties of a hybrid composite that exhibits both photonic and phononic behavior are investigated numerically with finite-element and finite-difference time-domain simulations. The structure is constituted of a periodic array of photonic resonant cavities embedded in a background superlattice. The resonant cavities contain a photo-elastic chalcogenide glass that undergoes atomic-scale structural reorganization when irradiated with light having energy close to its band-gap. Photo-excitation of the chalcogenide glass changes its elastic properties and, consequently, augments the acoustic transmission spectrum of the composite. By modulating the intensity of light irradiating the hybrid photonic/phononic structure, the position and spectral width of phonon passing-bands can be controlled. This demonstration offers the technological platform for optically-tunable acoustic wave band-pass filters.

  13. Superresolution through the topological shaping of sound with an acoustic vortex wave antenna

    Guild, Matthew D; Martin, Theodore P; Rohde, Charles A; Orris, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate far-field acoustic superresolution using shaped acoustic vortices. Compared with previously proposed near-field methods of acoustic superresolution, in this work we describe how far-field superresolution can be obtained using an acoustic vortex wave antenna. This is accomplished by leveraging the recent advances in optical vortices in conjunction with the topological diversity of a leaky wave antenna design. In particular, the use of an acoustic vortex wave antenna eliminates the need for a complicated phased array consisting of multiple active elements, and enables a superresolving aperture to be achieved with a single simple acoustic source and total aperture size less than a wavelength in diameter. A theoretical formulation is presented for the design of an acoustic vortex wave antenna with arbitrary planar arrangement, and explicit expressions are developed for the radiated acoustic pressure field. This geometric versatility enables variously-shaped acoustic vortex patterns t...

  14. Acoustic detection and localization of weapons fire by unattended ground sensors and aerostat-borne sensors

    Naz, P.; Marty, Ch.; Hengy, S.; Miller, L. S.

    2009-05-01

    The detection and localization of artillery guns on the battlefield is envisaged by means of acoustic and seismic waves. The main objective of this work is to examine the different frequency ranges usable for the detection of small arms, mortars, and artillery guns on the same hardware platform. The main stages of this study have consisted of: data acquisition of the acoustic signals of the different weapons used, signal processing and evaluation of the localization performance for various types of individual arrays, and modeling of the wave propagation in the atmosphere. The study of the propagation effects on the signatures of these weapons is done by comparing the acoustic signals measured during various days, at ground level and at the altitude of our aerostat (typically 200 m). Numerical modeling has also been performed to reinforce the interpretation of the experimental results.

  15. Acoustic measurement of sediment dynamics in the coastal zones using wireless sensor networks

    Sudhakaran, A., II; Paramasivam, A.; Seshachalam, S.; A, C.

    2014-12-01

    Analyzing of the impact of constructive or low energy waves and deconstructive or high energy waves in the ocean are very much significant since they deform the geometry of seashore. The deformation may lead to productive result and also to the end of deteriorate damage. Constructive waves results deposition of sediment which widens the beach where as deconstructive waves results erosion which narrows the beach. Validation of historic sediment transportation and prediction of the direction of movement of seashore is essential to prevent unrecoverable damages by incorporating precautionary measurements to identify the factors that influence sediment transportation if feasible. The objective of this study is to propose a more reliable and energy efficient Information and communication system to model the Coastal Sediment Dynamics. Various factors influencing the sediment drift at a particular region is identified. Consequence of source depth and frequency dependencies of spread pattern in the presence of sediments is modeled. Property of source depth and frequency on sensitivity to values of model parameters are determined. Fundamental physical reasons for these sediment interaction effects are given. Shallow to deep water and internal and external wave model of ocean is obtained intended to get acoustic data assimilation (ADA). Signal processing algorithms are used over the observed data to form a full field acoustic propagation model and construct sound speed profile (SSP). The inversions of data due to uncertainties at various depths are compared. The impact of sediment drift over acoustic data is identified. An energy efficient multipath routing scheme Wireless sensor networks (WSN) is deployed for the well-organized communication of data. The WSN is designed considering increased life time, decreased power consumption, free of threats and attacks. The practical data obtained from the efficient system to model the ocean sediment dynamics are evaluated with remote

  16. Prospects for coupling Surface Acoustic Waves to superconducting qubits

    Gustafsson, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Recent years have seen great development in the quantum control of mechanical resonators. These usually consist of membranes, cantilevers or suspended beams, whose vibrational modes can be cooled to the quantum ground state. This presentation will focus on a different kind of micromechanical system, where the motion is not confined to a mode with fixed boundaries, but propagates along the surface of a microchip. These modes are known as Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs), and superficially resemble ripples on water, moving with low loss along the surfaces of solids. On a piezoelectric substrate, electrode gratings known as Interdigital Transducers (IDTs) can be used to convert power between the electric and acoustic domains. Devices based on this effect are of profound technological importance as filters and analog signal processors in the RF domain. In the realm of quantum information processing, SAWs have primarily been used to transport carriers and excitons through piezoelectric semiconductors, in the electric potential wells propagating along with the mechanical wave. Our approach, however, is different in that we aim to explore the mechanical wave itself as a carrier of quantum information. We have previously shown that a single-electron transistor can be used as a local probe for SAWs, with encouraging sensitivity levels. Building on this, we now investigate the prospects for coupling a SAW beam directly to a superconducting qubit. By merging a circuit model for an IDT with a quasi-classical description of a transmon qubit, we estimate that the qubit can couple to an acoustic transmission line with approximately the same strength as to an electrical one. This type of coupling opens for acoustic analogs of recent experiments in microwave quantum optics, including the generation of non-classical acoustic states.

  17. The origin, history and future of fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for US Navy applications

    Cole, James H.; Bucaro, Joseph A.; Kirkendall, Clay K.; Dandridge, Anthony

    2011-05-01

    Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors were first proposed for US Navy applications 36 years ago. This paper will review the origin, development and deployment of these sensors. Future applications will also be discussed.

  18. Acoustic wave measurements in reactor-grade concretes

    In this paper, five reactor grade concretes were investigated during their initial cure period to gather information which is a suitable data base for interpreting the results of confirmatory reactor safety research programs. In particular, the concretes studied were the concrete proposed for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR), which is a limestone mix with flyash, and two other limestone aggregate mixes and two basaltic-aggregate mixes. The curing process in these concretes was followed with strength tests and with acoustic-wave velocity measurements. The choice of the latter technique was based on the successful programs of several investigators who used acoustic waves to follow the curing process in concrete and this information was also required for instrumentation techniques that are proposed for accident simulation studies. (Auth.)

  19. HF Doppler observations of acoustic waves excited by the earthquake

    Ichinose, T.; Takagi, K.; Tanaka, T.; Okuzawa, T.; Shibata, T.; Sato, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Ogawa, T.

    1985-01-01

    Ionospheric disturbances caused by the earthquake of a relatively small and large epicentral distance have been detected by a network of HF-Doppler sounders in central Japan and Kyoto station, respectively. The HF-Doppler data of a small epicentral distance, together with the seismic data, have been used to formulate a mechanism whereby ionospheric disturbances are produced by the Urakawa-Oki earthquake in Japan. Comparison of the dynamic spectra of these data has revealed experimentally that the atmosphere acts as a low-pass filter for upward-propagating acoustic waves. By surveying the earthquakes for which the magnitude M is larger than 6.0, researchers found the ionospheric effect in 16 cases of 82 seismic events. As almost all these effects have occurred in the daytime, it is considered that it may result from the filtering effect of the upward-propagating acoustic waves.

  20. Electron acoustic solitary waves with kappa-distributed electrons

    Devanandhan, S; Singh, S V; Lakhina, G S, E-mail: satyavir@iigs.iigm.res.in [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (West), Navi Mumbai (India)

    2011-08-01

    Electron acoustic solitary waves are studied in a three-component, unmagnetized plasma composed of hot electrons, fluid cold electrons and ions having finite temperatures. Hot electrons are assumed to have kappa distribution. The Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique is used to study the arbitrary amplitude electron-acoustic solitary waves. It is found that inclusion of cold electron temperature shrinks the existence regime of the solitons, and soliton electric field amplitude decreases with an increase in cold electron temperature. A decrease in spectral index, {kappa}, i.e. an increase in the superthermal component of hot electrons, leads to a decrease in soliton electric field amplitude as well as the soliton velocity range. The soliton solutions do not exist beyond T{sub c}/T{sub h}>0.13 for {kappa}=3.0 and Mach number M=0.9 for the dayside auroral region parameters.

  1. A Statistical Study of Mid-latitude Thunderstorm Characteristics associated with Acoustic and Gravity Waves

    Lay, E. H.; Shao, X. M.; Kendrick, A.

    2014-12-01

    Gravity waves with periods greater than 5 minutes and acoustic waves with periods between 3 and 5 minutes have been detected at ionospheric heights (250-350 km) and associated with severe thunderstorms. Modeling results support these findings, indicating that acoustic waves should be able to reach 250-350 km within ~250 km horizontally of the source, and gravity waves should be able to propagate significantly further. However, the mechanism by which the acoustic waves are generated and the ubiquity of occurrence of both types of wave is unknown. We use GPS total electron content measurements to detect gravity and acoustic waves in the ionosphere. We perform a statistical study from 2005 May - July to compare the occurrence rate and horizontal extent of the waves to storm size and convective height from NEXRAD radar measurements. It is found that both gravity waves and acoustic wave horizontal extent is primarily associated with storm size and not convective height.

  2. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses

    Kolaini, Ali R.

    2014-01-01

    For several decades large reverberant chambers and most recently direct field acoustic testing have been used in the aerospace industry to test larger structures with low surface densities such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify them and to detect faults in the design and fabrication. It has been reported that in reverberant chamber and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes may strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware (Reference 1). In this paper results from a recent reverberant chamber acoustic test of a composite reflector are discussed. These results provide further convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave and structural modes coupling phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to alert test organizations to this phenomenon so that they can account for the potential increase in structural responses and ensure that flight hardware undergoes safe testing. An understanding of the coupling phenomenon may also help minimize the over and/or under testing that could pose un-anticipated structural and flight qualification issues.

  3. Acoustic Waves: A Route to Enhance Sodium Fast Reactor Safety

    The properties of sodium – both thermohydraulic and neutronic – offer a number of advantages when used as a coolant for fourth generation fast reactors. However, the opacity of sodium is a major drawback for the instrumentation. Acoustic waves could be an efficient means to sound this medium. An ultrasonic telemetry instrument called SONAR was used in the Phénix reactor to detect core movement, to check for missing objects and for sub-assembly handling. Acoustic methods were also used in Superphenix and considered for the EFR project as one of the monitoring solutions to detect anomalies. This paper focuses on the efforts made to develop acoustic techniques to meet the system protection and monitoring requirements. It covers various fields: the development of ultrasonic transducers such as the high-temperature ultrasonic transducer (TUSHT) which have recently been re-developed and manufactured, and current research on instrumentation methods using acoustic transducers for ASTRID. This paper discusses the development of acoustic-based instrument techniques as a means to strengthen the primary and secondary sodium system monitoring approach. In the case of TUSHTs, for example, the potential uses are: core monitoring during nominal operation, the detection of core meltdown accident initiators and fuel handling guidance. (author)

  4. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Munley, John T.; Nguyen, Vinh T.; Schultz, John F.

    2005-12-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) task is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic chemical sensing techniques and apply them to detecting proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Our primary application is detecting signatures of WMD production, but LWIR CES techniques are also capable of detecting chemical weapons. The LWIR CES task is concerned exclusively with developing novel point sensors; stand-off detection is addressed by other PNNL tasks and projects. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on LWIR CES sensor development.

  5. Extremely Low-Loss Acoustic Phonons in a Quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonator

    Goryachev, Maxim; Ivanov, Eugene N; Galliou, Serge; Bourquin, Roger; Tobar, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Low-loss, high frequency acoustic resonators cooled to millikelvin temperatures are a topic of great interest for application to hybrid quantum systems. When cooled to 20 mK, we show that resonant acoustic phonon modes in a Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) quartz resonator demonstrate exceptionally low loss (with $Q$-factors of order billions) at frequencies of 15.6 and 65.4 MHz, with a maximum $f.Q$ product of 7.8$\\times10^{16}$ Hz. Given this result, we show that the $Q$-factor in such devices near the quantum ground state can be four orders of magnitude better than previously attained. Such resonators possess the low losses crucial for electromagnetic cooling to the phonon ground state, and the possibility of long coherence and interaction times of a few seconds, allowing multiple quantum gate operations.

  6. Ion acoustic waves in large radio-frequency electric fields

    The propagation of ion acoustic waves (IAW) in high-frequency fields is experimentally studied. The resulting phase-velocity shift and enhanced damping are observed for RF-field amplitudes up to α/sub e/ approximately equal to .5, where α/sub e/ = eE/(m/sub e/ω0v/sub e/) is the normalized amplitude. Good agreement with the theory of Albright is found. (auth)

  7. Surface acoustic wave applications of lithium niobate thin films

    A technique combining metalorganic decomposition and rf sputtering is used to grow lithium niobate (LiNbO3) thin films on diamond/silicon substrates, and surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters are fabricated by depositing interdigital transducers onto the multilayer LiNbO3/diamond/silicon structures. Microwave characterization is achieved by using a network analyzer. Evidence is found for SAW propagation in these structures. These experimental findings agree with theoretical predictions

  8. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Kulikov, Stanislav; Osorio, Ivan; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  9. Electron-acoustic plasma waves: oblique modulation and envelope solitons

    Kourakis, I.; Shukla, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical studies are presented of the amplitude modulation of electron-acoustic waves (EAWs) propagating in space plasmas whose constituents are inertial cold electrons, Boltzmann distributed hot electrons and stationary ions. Perturbations oblique to the carrier EAW propagation direction have been considered. The stability analysis, based on a nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE), reveals that the EAW may become unstable; the stability criteria depend on the angle $\\theta$...

  10. detection of buried objects using acoustic waves

    Many obstacles are faced in removing the buried landmines such as the loss or absence of maps or information about these mines and the high financial costs needed to remove these mines. So that many techniques were designed and developed for demining (detecting and clearing) these buried mines. Each technique has some strengths and drawbacks. This thesis presents a survey on the landmine detection techniques, the strengths and limitations of these techniques are highlighted and compared to show the ideal conditions and the challenges facing each technique. Furthermore, a comparison between these techniques from the points of view of cost, complexity, speed, safety, false alarms in detection and the effect of the environmental conditions is presented. one of the reliable and powerful landmine detection techniques is the Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV)-based Acoustic to Seismic (A/S) landmine detection system. The interpretation of the LDV-based A/S data is performed off-line manually, depending heavily on the skills, experience, alertness and consistency of a trained operator. This requires a significantly long time. Results typically suffer from inconsistency and errors, particularly when dealing with large volumes of data. This thesis proposes several image processing techniques to automate the process of landmine detection from the data scanned by the LDV-based A/S system. The obtained results are so far promising in terms of accuracy, consistency, reliability and processing speed. The previously proposed techniques for landmine detection give high false alarm rates. This thesis proposes some techniques to improve the performance of the automatic object detection techniques. These techniques are based on segmentation, masking, morphology image processing and the wavelet transform. These techniques have achieved a high detection rate.

  11. Numerical study of nonlinear full wave acoustic propagation

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto; Rendon, Pablo L.

    2013-11-01

    With the aim of describing nonlinear acoustic phenomena, a form of the conservation equations for fluid dynamics is presented, deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A CLAWPACK based, 2D finite-volume method using Roe's linearization has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. In order to validate the code, two different tests have been performed: one against a special Taylor shock-like analytic solution, the other against published results on a HIFU system, both with satisfactory results. The code is written for parallel execution on a GPU and improves performance by a factor of over 50 when compared to the standard CLAWPACK Fortran code. This code can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from modest models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, parametric acoustic arrays, to acoustic wave guides. A couple of examples will be presented showing shock formation and oblique interaction. DGAPA PAPIIT IN110411, PAEP UNAM 2013.

  12. Nonlinear progressive acoustic-gravity waves: Exact solutions

    Godin, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    We consider finite-amplitude mechanical waves in an inhomogeneous, compressible fluid in a uniform gravity field. The fluid is assumed to be inviscid, and wave motion is considered as an adiabatic thermodynamic process. The fluid either occupies an unbounded domain or has free and/or rigid boundaries. Wave motion is described by the momentum, continuity, and state equations in Lagrangian coordinates. We consider generic inhomogeneous fluids; no specific assumptions are made regarding the equation of state or spatial variations of the mass density or the sound speed in the absence of waves. The density and the sound speed are piece-wise continuous functions of position. The discontinuities represent fluid-fluid interfaces, such as the air-sea interface. Following a recent work on linear acoustic-gravity waves [O. A. Godin, Incompressible wave motion of compressible fluids, Phys. Rev. Lett., 108, 194501 (2012)], here we investigate a particular class of non-linear wave motions in fluids, in which pressure remains constant in each moving fluid parcel. Exact, analytic solutions of the non-linear hydrodynamics equations are obtained for two distinct scenarios. In the first scenario, the fluid is either unbounded or has a free surface. In the latter case, the exact analytic solution can be interpreted as a progressive surface wave. In the second scenario, the fluid has a free surface and a sloping, plane rigid boundary. Then the exact analytic solution represents an edge wave propagating horizontally along the rigid boundary. In both scenarios, the flow field associated with the finite-amplitude waves is rotational. When the sound speed tends to infinity, our results reduce to well-known finite-amplitude waves in incompressible fluids. In another limit, when the wave amplitude tends to zero, the exact solutions reduce to known results for linear waves in compressible fluids. The possibility of extending the theory to rotating fluids and fluids with a shearing background

  13. Characteristics of acoustic gravity waves obtained from Dynasonde data

    Negrea, Cǎtǎlin; Zabotin, Nikolay; Bullett, Terrence; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Fang, Tzu-Wei; Codrescu, Mihail

    2016-04-01

    Traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) are ubiquitous in the thermosphere-ionosphere and are often assumed to be caused by acoustic gravity waves (AGWs). This study performs an analysis of the TID and AGW activity above Wallops Island, VA, during October 2013. The variations in electron density and ionospheric tilts obtained with the Dynasonde technique are used as primary indicators of wave activity. The temporal and spectral characteristics of the data are discussed in detail, using also results of the Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) and the Global Ionosphere Plasmasphere Model (GIP). The full set of propagation parameters (frequency, and the vertical, zonal and meridional wave vector components) of the TIDs is determined over the 160-220 km height range. A test of the self-consistency of these results within the confines of the theoretical AGW dispersion relation is devised. This is applied to a sample data set of 24 October 2013. A remarkable agreement has been achieved for wave periods between 52 and 21 min, for which we can rigorously claim the TIDs are caused by underlying acoustic gravity waves. The Wallops Island Dynasonde can operate for extended periods at a 2 min cadence, allowing determination of the statistical distributions of propagation parameters. A dominant population of TIDs is identified in the frequency band below 1 mHz, and for it, the distributions of the horizontal wavelengths, vertical wavelengths, and horizontal phase speeds are obtained.

  14. Ion acoustic shock wave in collisional equal mass plasma

    Adak, Ashish, E-mail: ashish-adak@yahoo.com [Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Ghosh, Samiran, E-mail: sran-g@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta, 92, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Chakrabarti, Nikhil, E-mail: nikhil.chakrabarti@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2015-10-15

    The effect of ion-ion collision on the dynamics of nonlinear ion acoustic wave in an unmagnetized pair-ion plasma has been investigated. The two-fluid model has been used to describe the dynamics of both positive and negative ions with equal masses. It is well known that in the dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave, the viscosity mediates wave dissipation in presence of weak nonlinearity and dispersion. This dissipation is responsible for the shock structures in pair-ion plasma. Here, it has been shown that the ion-ion collision in presence of collective phenomena mediated by the plasma current is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation. The analytical and numerical investigations revealed that the ion acoustic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the frequency of ion-ion collision parameter. The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  15. Ion acoustic shock wave in collisional equal mass plasma

    The effect of ion-ion collision on the dynamics of nonlinear ion acoustic wave in an unmagnetized pair-ion plasma has been investigated. The two-fluid model has been used to describe the dynamics of both positive and negative ions with equal masses. It is well known that in the dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave, the viscosity mediates wave dissipation in presence of weak nonlinearity and dispersion. This dissipation is responsible for the shock structures in pair-ion plasma. Here, it has been shown that the ion-ion collision in presence of collective phenomena mediated by the plasma current is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation. The analytical and numerical investigations revealed that the ion acoustic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the frequency of ion-ion collision parameter. The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments

  16. Dust-acoustic rogue waves in a nonextensive plasma.

    Moslem, W M; Sabry, R; El-Labany, S K; Shukla, P K

    2011-12-01

    We present an investigation for the generation of a dust-acoustic rogue wave in a dusty plasma composed of negatively charged dust grains, as well as nonextensive electrons and ions. For this purpose, the reductive perturbation technique is used to obtain a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The critical wave-number threshold k(c), which indicates where the modulational instability sets in, has been determined precisely for various regimes. Two different behaviors of k(c) against the nonextensive parameter q are found. For small k(c), it is found that increasing q would lead to an increase of k(c) until q approaches a certain value q(c), then further increase of q beyond q(c) decreases the value of k(c). For large k(c), the critical wave-number threshold k(c) is always increasing with q. Within the modulational instability region, a random perturbation of the amplitude grows and thus creates dust-acoustic rogue waves. In order to show that the characteristics of the rogue waves are influenced by the plasma parameters, the relevant numerical analysis of the appropriate nonlinear solution is presented. The nonlinear structure, as reported here, could be useful for controlling and maximizing highly energetic pulses in dusty plasmas. PMID:22304203

  17. Micromachined silicon and polymer probes integrated with film-bulk-acoustic-resonator mass sensors

    This paper presents a novel micromachined probe with a miniature film-bulk-acoustic-resonator (FBAR) mass sensor integrated at the tip. The detailed fabrication processes for a silicon microprobe and an SU-8 microprobe are described and discussed. The electrical performances of FBARs integrated on both the microprobes were characterized and compared. The semiconducting silicon was found to degrade the FBAR's quality factor (Q) significantly, due to the GHz electromagnetic wave's energy loss in the low-resistivity silicon. Yet, the FBAR on the SU-8 probe was measured to have a higher Q than that on the silicon probe, as the SU-8 polymer material is highly resistive and electrically insulating. As an application demonstration, the fabricated SU-8 probe was successfully used in detecting Hg2+ concentration in liquids. The integration of a resonant mass sensor with a micromachined probe offers easy access to sensing environment with minimal disturbance to the environment

  18. Enhanced sensitivity of a surface acoustic wave gyroscope using a progressive wave

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based gyroscope with an 80 MHz central frequency was developed on two different piezoelectric substrates (128° YX LiNbO3 and ST-X quartz). A sensor was developed that contained two SAW oscillators. One oscillator was used as the sensing element and had metallic dots in the cavity between the input and output interdigital transducers (IDTs). The other oscillator was used as a reference element. Two oscillators were formed to extract the Coriolis effect by comparing the oscillation frequencies between these two delay lines, and metallic dots were used to induce a Coriolis force. Three different IDT structures were used to obtain a stable progressive SAW. Coupling of modes modeling was conducted prior to fabrication for determining the optimal device parameters. The device was fabricated and then measured on a rate table in accordance with the results of simulation. When the device was subjected to an angular rotation, the oscillation frequencies of the two oscillators were observed to differ. Depending on the angular velocity, the frequency difference was linearly modulated. The obtained sensitivity was approximately 62.57 Hz deg−1 s−1 at angular rates in the range 0–1000 deg s−1 in the case of the LiNbO3 substrate and single-phase unidirectional transducer and combed electrode structure. The dependence of the device performance on the piezoelectric substrate, IDT structure, and temperatures was also characterized. The developed device has good resistance to mechanical shock and stability to temperature

  19. Influence of surface acoustic waves induced acoustic streaming on the kinetics of electrochemical reactions

    Tietze, Sabrina; Schlemmer, Josefine; Lindner, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    The kinetics of electrochemical reactions is controlled by diffusion processes of charge carriers across a boundary layer between the electrode and the electrolyte, which result in a shielding of the electric field inside the electrolyte and a concentration gradient across this boundary layer. In accumulators the diffusion rate determines the rather long time needed for charging, which is a major drawback for electric mobility. This diffusion boundary can be removed by acoustic streaming in the electrolyte induced by surface acoustic waves propagating of the electrode, which results in an increase of the charging current and thus in a reduction of the time needed for charging. For a quantitative study of the influence of acoustic streaming on the charge transport an electropolishing cell with vertically oriented copper electrodes and diluted H3PO4-Propanol electrolytes were used. Lamb waves with various excitation frequencies were exited on the anode with different piezoelectric transducers, which induced acoustic streaming in the overlaying electrolytic liquid. An increase of the polishing current of up to approximately 100 % has been obtained with such a set-up.

  20. Guided wave opto-acoustic device

    Jarecki, Jr., Robert L.; Rakich, Peter Thomas; Camacho, Ryan; Shin, Heedeuk; Cox, Jonathan Albert; Qiu, Wenjun; Wang, Zheng

    2016-02-23

    The various technologies presented herein relate to various hybrid phononic-photonic waveguide structures that can exhibit nonlinear behavior associated with traveling-wave forward stimulated Brillouin scattering (forward-SBS). The various structures can simultaneously guide photons and phonons in a suspended membrane. By utilizing a suspended membrane, a substrate pathway can be eliminated for loss of phonons that suppresses SBS in conventional silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides. Consequently, forward-SBS nonlinear susceptibilities are achievable at about 3000 times greater than achievable with a conventional waveguide system. Owing to the strong phonon-photon coupling achievable with the various embodiments, potential application for the various embodiments presented herein cover a range of radiofrequency (RF) and photonic signal processing applications. Further, the various embodiments presented herein are applicable to applications operating over a wide bandwidth, e.g. 100 MHz to 50 GHz or more.

  1. Ion acoustic and dust acoustic waves at finite size of plasma particles

    We consider the influence of the finite size of ions on the properties of classic plasmas. We focus our attention at the ion acoustic waves for electron-ion plasmas. We also consider the dusty plasmas where we account the finite size of ions and particles of dust and consider the dispersion of dust acoustic waves. The finite size of particles is a classical effect as well as the Coulomb interaction. The finite size of particles considerably contributes to the properties of the dense plasmas in the small wavelength limit. Low temperature dense plasmas, revealing the quantum effects, are also affected by the finite size of plasma particles. Consequently, it is important to consider the finite size of ions in the quantum plasmas as well

  2. Acoustic tests of Lorentz symmetry using Bulk Acoustic Wave quartz oscillators

    Goryachev, M; Haslinger, Ph; Mizrachi, E; Anderegg, L; Müller, H; Hohensee, M; Tobar, M E

    2016-01-01

    A new method of probing Lorentz invariance in the neutron sector is described. The method is baed on stable quartz bulk acoustic wave oscillators compared on a rotating table. Due to Lorentz-invariance violation, the resonance frequencies of acoustic wave resonators depend on the direction in space via a corresponding dependence of masses of the constituent elements of solids. This dependence is measured via observation of oscillator phase noise built around such devices. The first such experiment now shows sensitivity to violation down to the limit $\\tilde{c}^n_Q=(-1.8\\pm2.2)\\times 10^{-14}$ GeV. Methods to improve the sensitivity are described together with some other applications of the technology in tests of fundamental physics.

  3. Film bulk acoustic resonator pressure sensor with self temperature reference

    A novel film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) with two resonant frequencies which have opposite reactions to temperature changes has been designed. The two resonant modes respond differently to changes in temperature and pressure, with the frequency shift being linearly correlated with temperature and pressure changes. By utilizing the FBAR's sealed back trench as a cavity, an on-chip single FBAR sensor suitable for measuring pressure and temperature simultaneously is proposed and demonstrated. The experimental results show that the pressure coefficient of frequency for the lower frequency peak of the FBAR sensors is approximately −17.4 ppm kPa−1, while that for the second peak is approximately −6.1 ppm kPa−1, both of them being much more sensitive than other existing pressure sensors. This dual mode on-chip pressure sensor is simple in structure and operation, can be fabricated at very low cost, and yet requires no specific package, therefore has great potential for applications. (paper)

  4. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Aker, Pam M.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Munley, John T.; Nguyen, Vinh T.; Schultz, John F.

    2004-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) project is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic techniques and apply them to the development of LWIR chemical sensors needed for detecting weapons proliferation. This includes detecting not only the weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) themselves, but also signatures of their production and/or detonation. The LWIR CES project is concerned exclusively with developing point sensors; other portions of PNNL's IR Sensors program address stand off detection. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on our LWIR CES sensor development. During FY02, PNNL investigated three LWIR CES implementations beginning with the easiest to implement, direct cavity-enhanced detection (simple CES), including a technique of intermediate difficulty, cavity-dithered phase-sensitive detection (FM recovery CES) through to the most complex technique, that of resonant sideband cavity-enhanced detection also known as noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy, or NICE-OHMS.

  5. A Survey on Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network Routing Protocols.

    Li, Ning; Martínez, José-Fernán; Meneses Chaus, Juan Manuel; Eckert, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs) have become more and more important in ocean exploration applications, such as ocean monitoring, pollution detection, ocean resource management, underwater device maintenance, etc. In underwater acoustic sensor networks, since the routing protocol guarantees reliable and effective data transmission from the source node to the destination node, routing protocol design is an attractive topic for researchers. There are many routing algorithms have been proposed in recent years. To present the current state of development of UASN routing protocols, we review herein the UASN routing protocol designs reported in recent years. In this paper, all the routing protocols have been classified into different groups according to their characteristics and routing algorithms, such as the non-cross-layer design routing protocol, the traditional cross-layer design routing protocol, and the intelligent algorithm based routing protocol. This is also the first paper that introduces intelligent algorithm-based UASN routing protocols. In addition, in this paper, we investigate the development trends of UASN routing protocols, which can provide researchers with clear and direct insights for further research. PMID:27011193

  6. A Survey on Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network Routing Protocols

    Ning Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs have become more and more important in ocean exploration applications, such as ocean monitoring, pollution detection, ocean resource management, underwater device maintenance, etc. In underwater acoustic sensor networks, since the routing protocol guarantees reliable and effective data transmission from the source node to the destination node, routing protocol design is an attractive topic for researchers. There are many routing algorithms have been proposed in recent years. To present the current state of development of UASN routing protocols, we review herein the UASN routing protocol designs reported in recent years. In this paper, all the routing protocols have been classified into different groups according to their characteristics and routing algorithms, such as the non-cross-layer design routing protocol, the traditional cross-layer design routing protocol, and the intelligent algorithm based routing protocol. This is also the first paper that introduces intelligent algorithm-based UASN routing protocols. In addition, in this paper, we investigate the development trends of UASN routing protocols, which can provide researchers with clear and direct insights for further research.

  7. Single-electron transport driven by surface acoustic waves: Moving quantum dots versus short barriers

    Utko, Pawel; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Lindelof, Poul Erik;

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the response of the acoustoelectric-current driven by a surface-acoustic wave through a quantum point contact in the closed-channel regime. Under proper conditions, the current develops plateaus at integer multiples of ef when the frequency f of the surface-acoustic wave or the...... gate voltage V-g of the point contact is varied. A pronounced 1.1 MHz beat period of the current indicates that the interference of the surface-acoustic wave with reflected waves matters. This is supported by the results obtained after a second independent beam of surface-acoustic wave was added...

  8. Ultrafast strain gauge: Observation of THz radiation coherently generated by acoustic waves

    The study of nanoscale, terahertz frequency (THz) acoustic waves has great potential for elucidating material and chemical interactions as well as nanostructure characterization. Here we report the first observation of terahertz radiation coherently generated by an acoustic wave. Such emission is directly related to the time-dependence of the stress as the acoustic wave crosses an interface between materials of differing piezoelectric response. This phenomenon enables a new class of strain wave metrology that is fundamentally distinct from optical approaches, providing passive remote sensing of the dynamics of acoustic waves with ultrafast time resolution. The new mechanism presented here enables nanostructure measurements not possible using existing optical or x-ray approaches

  9. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution

  10. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Didenkulov, Igor, E-mail: din@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov str., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay, E-mail: nikvas@rf.unn.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  11. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  12. Demonstration of novel high-power acoustic through-the-wall sensor

    Felber, Franklin

    2015-01-01

    A high-power acoustic sensor, capable of detecting and tracking persons through steel walls of cargo containers, trailer truck bodies, and train cars, has been developed and demonstrated. The sensor is based on a new concept for narrowband mechanical-impact acoustic transmitters and matched resonant receivers. The lightweight, compact, and low-cost transmitters produce high-power acoustic pulses at one or more discrete frequencies with little input power. The energy for each pulse is accumula...

  13. Development of Novel Optical Fiber Interferometric Sensors with High Sensitivity for Acoustic Emission Detection

    Deng, Jiangdong

    2004-01-01

    For the purpose of developing a new highly-sensitive and reliable fiber optical acoustic sensor capable of real-time on-line detection of acoustic emissions in power transformers, this dissertation presents the comprehensive research work on the theory, modeling, design, instrumentation, noise analysis, and performance evaluation of a diaphragm-based optical fiber acoustic (DOFIA) sensor system. The optical interference theory and the diaphragm dynamic vibration analysis form the two fou...

  14. Synchronization of the dust acoustic wave under microgravity

    Ruhunusiri, W. D. Suranga; Goree, J.

    2013-10-01

    Synchronization is a nonlinear phenomenon where a self-excited oscillation, like a wave in a plasma, interacts with an external driving, resulting in an adjustment of the oscillation frequency. To prepare for experiments under microgravity conditions using the PK-4 facility on the International Space Station, we perform a laboratory experiment to observe synchronization of the self-excited dust acoustic wave. An rf glow discharge argon plasma is formed by applying a low power radio frequency voltage to a lower electrode. A 3D dust cloud is formed by levitating 4.83 micron microspheres inside a glass box placed on the lower electrode. The dust acoustic wave is self-excited with a natural frequency of 22 Hz due to an ion streaming instability. A cross section of the dust cloud is illuminated by a vertical laser sheet and imaged from the side with a digital camera. To synchronize the wave, we sinusoidally modulate the overall ion density. Differently from previous experiments, we use a driving electrode that is separate from the electrode that sustains the plasma, and we characterize synchronization by varying both driving amplitude and frequency. Supported by NASA's Physical Science Research Program.

  15. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic MHD shear flows

    Uchava, E S; Tevzadze, A G; Poedts, S

    2014-01-01

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic MHD flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model, that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy, but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also impor...

  16. Determination of hydrocarbon levels in water via laser-induced acoustics wave

    Bidin, Noriah; Hossenian, Raheleh; Duralim, Maisarah; Krishnan, Ganesan; Marsin, Faridah Mohd; Nughro, Waskito; Zainal, Jasman

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination in water is a major environmental concern in terms of foreseen collapse of the natural ecosystem. Hydrocarbon level in water was determined by generating acoustic wave via an innovative laser-induced breakdown in conjunction with high-speed photographic coupling with piezoelectric transducer to trace acoustic wave propagation. A Q-switched Nd:YAG (40 mJ) was focused in cuvette-filled hydrocarbon solution at various concentrations (0-2000 ppm) to induce optical breakdown, shock wave generation and later acoustic wave propagation. A nitro-dye (ND) laser (10 mJ) was used as a flash to illuminate and frozen the acoustic wave propagation. Lasers were synchronised using a digital delay generator. The image of acoustic waves was grabbed and recorded via charged couple device (CCD) video camera at the speed of 30 frames/second with the aid of Matrox software version 9. The optical delay (0.8-10.0 μs) between the acoustic wave formation and its frozen time is recorded through photodetectors. A piezo-electric transducer (PZT) was used to trace the acoustic wave (sound signal), which cascades to a digital oscilloscope. The acoustic speed is calculated from the ratio of acoustic wave radius (1-8 mm) and optical time delay. Acoustic wave speed is found to linearly increase with hydrocarbon concentrations. The acoustic signal generation at higher hydrocarbon levels in water is attributed to supplementary mass transfer and impact on the probe. Integrated high-speed photography with transducer detection system authenticated that the signals indeed emerged from the laser-induced acoustic wave instead of photothermal processes. It is established that the acoustic wave speed in water is used as a fingerprint to detect the hydrocarbon levels.

  17. Longitudinal elastic wave propagation characteristics of inertant acoustic metamaterials

    Kulkarni, Prateek P.; Manimala, James M.

    2016-06-01

    Longitudinal elastic wave propagation characteristics of acoustic metamaterials with various inerter configurations are investigated using their representative one-dimensional discrete element lattice models. Inerters are dynamic mass-amplifying mechanical elements that are activated by a difference in acceleration across them. They have a small device mass but can provide a relatively large dynamic mass presence depending on accelerations in systems that employ them. The effect of introducing inerters both in local attachments and in the lattice was examined vis-à-vis the propagation characteristics of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. A simple effective model based on mass, stiffness, or their combined equivalent was used to establish dispersion behavior and quantify attenuation within bandgaps. Depending on inerter configurations in local attachments or in the lattice, both up-shift and down-shift in the bandgap frequency range and their extent are shown to be possible while retaining static mass addition to the host structure to a minimum. Further, frequency-dependent negative and even extreme effective-stiffness regimes are encountered. The feasibility of employing tuned combinations of such mass-delimited inertant configurations to engineer acoustic metamaterials that act as high-pass filters without the use of grounded elements or even as complete longitudinal wave inhibitors is shown. Potential device implications and strategies for practical applications are also discussed.

  18. Energy Trapping in Low Phase Noise Bulk Acoustic Wave Oscillators

    In the design of resonators in low phase noise bulk acoustic wave (BAW) oscillators, maximization of quality factor is the primary target while energy trapping is not typically of concern. Analysis shows that although energy-trapping mode energy outside the electroded region decreases exponentially with distance away from the electrode edge of the wafer, the decaying wave will reflect at the wafer edge to the electroded region and generate a wave with same frequency but different phase which generates mutual modulation with resonant frequency. It is a source of phase noise and mainly affects the near-carrier-frequency phase noise. Two 120 MHz SC-cut 5th overtone UM-1 crystals with similar dynamic equivalent parameters and different shunt capacitances are compared using the same circuit. Experimental results show that energy trapping also needs to be considered in the design of resonators in low phase noise BAW oscillators

  19. Nonlinear acoustic waves in a collisional self-gravitating dusty plasma

    Guo Zhi-Rong; Yang Zeng-Qiang; Yin Bao-Xiang; Sun Mao-Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Using the reductive perturbation method,we investigate the small amplitude nonlinear acoustic wave in a collisional self-gravitating dusty plasma.The result shows that the small amplitude dust acoustic wave can be expressed by a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation,and the nonlinear wave is instable because of the collisions between the neutral gas molecules and the charged particles.

  20. Underwater acoustic wave generation by filamentation of terawatt ultrashort laser pulses

    Jukna, Vytautas; Milián, Carles; Brelet, Yohann; Carbonnel, Jérôme; André, Yves-Bernard; Guillermin, Régine; Sessarego, Jean-Pierre; Fattaccioli, Dominique; Mysyrowicz, André; Couairon, Arnaud; Houard, Aurélien

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic signals generated by filamentation of ultrashort TW laser pulses in water are characterized experimentally. Measurements reveal a strong influence of input pulse duration on the shape and intensity of the acoustic wave. Numerical simulations of the laser pulse nonlinear propagation and the subsequent water hydrodynamics and acoustic wave generation show that the strong acoustic emission is related to the mechanism of superfilamention in water. The elongated shape of the plasma volume where energy is deposited drives the far-field profile of the acoustic signal, which takes the form of a radially directed pressure wave with a single oscillation and a very broad spectrum.

  1. THE INFLUENCE OF WAVE PATTERNS AND FREQUENCY ON THERMO-ACOUSTIC COOLING EFFECT

    CHEN BAIMAN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing environmental challenges, the search for an environmentally benign cooling technology that has simple and robust architecture continues. Thermo-acoustic refrigeration seems to be a promising candidate to fulfil these requirements. In this study, a simple thermo-acoustic refrigeration system was fabricated and tested. The thermo-acoustic refrigerator consists of acoustic driver (loudspeaker, resonator, stack, vacuum system and testing system. The effect of wave patterns and frequency on thermo-acoustic cooling effect was studied. It was found that a square wave pattern would yield superior cooling effects compared to other wave patterns tested.

  2. Visualization of Surface Acoustic Waves in Thin Liquid Films.

    Rambach, R W; Taiber, J; Scheck, C M L; Meyer, C; Reboud, J; Cooper, J M; Franke, T

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the propagation path of a surface acoustic wave (SAW), excited with an interdigitated transducer (IDT), can be visualized using a thin liquid film dispensed onto a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. The practical advantages of this visualization method are its rapid and simple implementation, with many potential applications including in characterising acoustic pumping within microfluidic channels. It also enables low-cost characterisation of IDT designs thereby allowing the determination of anisotropy and orientation of the piezoelectric substrate without the requirement for sophisticated and expensive equipment. Here, we show that the optical visibility of the sound path critically depends on the physical properties of the liquid film and identify heptane and methanol as most contrast rich solvents for visualization of SAW. We also provide a detailed theoretical description of this effect. PMID:26917490

  3. Focusing of Surface Acoustic Wave on a Piezoelectric Crystal

    QIAO Dong-Hai; WANG Cheng-Hao; WANG Zuo-Qing

    2006-01-01

    @@ We investigate the focusing phenomena of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) field generated by a circular-arc interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric crystal. A rigorous vector field theory of surface excitation on the crystal we developed previously is used to evaluate the convergent SAW field instead of the prevalent scalar angular spectrum used in optics. The theoretical results show that the anisotropy of a medium has great impact on the focusing properties of the acoustic beams, such as focal length and symmetrical distributions near the focus. A dark field method is used in experiment to observe the focusing of the SAW field optically. Although the convergent phenomena of SAW field on the anisotropic media or piezoelectric crystals are very complicated,the experimental data are in agreement with those from the rigorous theory.

  4. Visualization of Surface Acoustic Waves in Thin Liquid Films

    Rambach, R. W.; Taiber, J.; Scheck, C. M. L.; Meyer, C.; Reboud, J.; Cooper, J. M.; Franke, T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the propagation path of a surface acoustic wave (SAW), excited with an interdigitated transducer (IDT), can be visualized using a thin liquid film dispensed onto a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. The practical advantages of this visualization method are its rapid and simple implementation, with many potential applications including in characterising acoustic pumping within microfluidic channels. It also enables low-cost characterisation of IDT designs thereby allowing the determination of anisotropy and orientation of the piezoelectric substrate without the requirement for sophisticated and expensive equipment. Here, we show that the optical visibility of the sound path critically depends on the physical properties of the liquid film and identify heptane and methanol as most contrast rich solvents for visualization of SAW. We also provide a detailed theoretical description of this effect. PMID:26917490

  5. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  6. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  7. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a warm plasma

    薛具奎; 段文山; 郎和

    2002-01-01

    Using the standard reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrodinger equation is derived to study themodulational instability of finite-amplitude ion-acoustic waves in a non-magnetized warm plasma. It is found thatthe inclusion of ion temperature in the equation modifies the nature of the ion-acoustic wave stability and the solitonstructures. The effects of ion plasma temperature on the modulational stability and ion-acoustic wave properties areinvestigated in detail.

  8. Molding acoustic, electromagnetic and water waves with a single cloak

    Xu, Jun

    2015-06-09

    We describe two experiments demonstrating that a cylindrical cloak formerly introduced for linear surface liquid waves works equally well for sound and electromagnetic waves. This structured cloak behaves like an acoustic cloak with an effective anisotropic density and an electromagnetic cloak with an effective anisotropic permittivity, respectively. Measured forward scattering for pressure and magnetic fields are in good agreement and provide first evidence of broadband cloaking. Microwave experiments and 3D electromagnetic wave simulations further confirm reduced forward and backscattering when a rectangular metallic obstacle is surrounded by the structured cloak for cloaking frequencies between 2.6 and 7.0 GHz. This suggests, as supported by 2D finite element simulations, sound waves are cloaked between 3 and 8 KHz and linear surface liquid waves between 5 and 16 Hz. Moreover, microwave experiments show the field is reduced by 10 to 30 dB inside the invisibility region, which suggests the multi-wave cloak could be used as a protection against water, sonic or microwaves. © 2015, Nature Publishing Group. All rights reserved.

  9. Molding acoustic, electromagnetic and water waves with a single cloak.

    Xu, Jun; Jiang, Xu; Fang, Nicholas; Georget, Elodie; Abdeddaim, Redha; Geffrin, Jean-Michel; Farhat, Mohamed; Sabouroux, Pierre; Enoch, Stefan; Guenneau, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    We describe two experiments demonstrating that a cylindrical cloak formerly introduced for linear surface liquid waves works equally well for sound and electromagnetic waves. This structured cloak behaves like an acoustic cloak with an effective anisotropic density and an electromagnetic cloak with an effective anisotropic permittivity, respectively. Measured forward scattering for pressure and magnetic fields are in good agreement and provide first evidence of broadband cloaking. Microwave experiments and 3D electromagnetic wave simulations further confirm reduced forward and backscattering when a rectangular metallic obstacle is surrounded by the structured cloak for cloaking frequencies between 2.6 and 7.0 GHz. This suggests, as supported by 2D finite element simulations, sound waves are cloaked between 3 and 8 KHz and linear surface liquid waves between 5 and 16 Hz. Moreover, microwave experiments show the field is reduced by 10 to 30 dB inside the invisibility region, which suggests the multi-wave cloak could be used as a protection against water, sonic or microwaves. PMID:26057934

  10. System and method for sonic wave measurements using an acoustic beam source

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2015-08-11

    A method and system for investigating structure near a borehole are described herein. The method includes generating an acoustic beam by an acoustic source; directing at one or more azimuthal angles the acoustic beam towards a selected location in a vicinity of a borehole; receiving at one or more receivers an acoustic signal, the acoustic signal originating from a reflection or a refraction of the acoustic wave by a material at the selected location; and analyzing the received acoustic signal to characterize features of the material around the borehole.

  11. Underwater blast wave pressure sensor based on polymer film fiber Fabry-Perot cavity.

    Wang, Junjie; Wang, Meng; Xu, Jian; Peng, Li; Yang, Minghong; Xia, Minghe; Jiang, Desheng

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the theoretical and experimental aspects of an optical underwater shock wave sensor based on a polymer film optical fiber Fabry-Perot cavity manufactured by vacuum deposition technology. The transduction mechanism of the sensor involves a normally incident acoustic stress wave that changes the thickness of the polymer film, thereby giving rise to a phase shift. This transient interferometric phase is interrogated by a three-phase-step algorithm. Theoretically, the sensor-acoustic-field interaction principle is analyzed, and the phase modulation sensitivity based on the theory of waves in the layered media is calculated. Experimentally, a static calibration test and a dynamic calibration test are conducted using a piston-type pressure calibration machine and a focusing-type electromagnetic shock wave. Results indicate that the repeatability, hysteresis, nonlinearity, and the overall measurement accuracy of the sensor within the full pressure range of 55 MPa are 1.82%, 0.86%, 1.81%, and 4.49%, respectively. The dynamic response time is less than 0.767 μs. Finally, three aspects that need further study for practical use are pointed out. PMID:25322237

  12. Numerical and experimental study of Lamb wave propagation in a two-dimensional acoustic black hole

    Yan, Shiling; Lomonosov, Alexey M.; Shen, Zhonghua

    2016-06-01

    The propagation of laser-generated Lamb waves in a two-dimensional acoustic black-hole structure was studied numerically and experimentally. The geometrical acoustic theory has been applied to calculate the beam trajectories in the region of the acoustic black hole. The finite element method was also used to study the time evolution of propagating waves. An optical system based on the laser-Doppler vibration method was assembled. The effect of the focusing wave and the reduction in wave speed of the acoustic black hole has been validated.

  13. Coding and Enhancement in Wireless Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Zahedi, Adel; Østergaard, Jan; Jensen, Søren Holdt;

    2015-01-01

    We formulate a new problem which bridges between source coding and enhancement in wireless acoustic sensor networks. We consider a network of wireless microphones, each of which encoding its own measurement under a covariance matrix distortion constraint and sending it to a fusion center. To...... process the data at the center, we use a recent spatio-temporal prediction filter. We assume that a weighted sum-rate for the network is specified. The problem is to allocate optimal distortion matrices to the nodes in order to achieve a maximum output SNR at the fusion center after processing the...... microphones and a sum-rate constraint, we derive the distortion allocation in closed form and will show that if the given sum-rate is higher than a critical value, the stationary points from the KKT conditions lead to distortion allocations which maximize the output SNR of the filter...

  14. Enhanced directional sensitivity of a biomimetic MEMS acoustic localization sensor

    Gee, Danny; Liu, Haijun; Currano, Luke; Yu, Miao

    2010-04-01

    We present an improved microfabricated sound localization sensor for unobtrusive surveillance systems inspired by the tympanic membranes of the parasitoid fly, Ormia ochracea. The device consists of two silicon diaphragms mechanically coupled by a suspended beam that amplifies the difference in time response, dependent on the incident angle of the sound source. Fabrication techniques were modified to reduce residual stresses and improve device uniformity. Enhanced acoustic cues for devices with central pivoting anchors were measured with laser Doppler vibrometry. Device responses to weak excitations demonstrated good sensitivity over environmental noise. An order of magnitude in time difference amplification was measured at 90° incident angles with a directional sensitivity of .39μs/degree. These results provide a foundation for realizing an accurate bio-inspired MEMS directional microphone.

  15. Experimental quiescent drifting dusty plasmas and temporal dust acoustic wave growth

    We report on dust acoustic wave growth rate measurements taken in a dc (anode glow) discharge plasma device. By introducing a mesh with a variable bias 12-17 cm from the anode, we developed a technique to produce a drifting dusty plasma. A secondary dust cloud, free of dust acoustic waves, was trapped adjacent to the anode side of the mesh. When the mesh was returned to its floating potential, the secondary cloud was released and streamed towards the anode and primary dust cloud, spontaneously exciting dust acoustic waves. The amplitude growth of the excited dust acoustic waves was measured directly along with the wavelength and Doppler shifted frequency. These measurements were compared to fluid and kinetic dust acoustic wave theories. As the wave growth saturated a transition from linear to nonlinear waves was observed. The merging of the secondary and primary dust clouds was also observed.

  16. GPS-Acoustic Seafloor Geodesy using a Wave Glider

    Chadwell, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    The conventional approach to implement the GPS-Acoustic technique uses a ship or buoy for the interface between GPS and Acoustics. The high cost and limited availability of ships restricts occupations to infrequent campaign-style measurements. A new approach to address this problem uses a remote controlled, wave-powered sea surface vehicle, the Wave Glider. The Wave Glider uses sea-surface wave action for forward propulsion with both upward and downward motions producing forward thrust. It uses solar energy for power with solar panels charging the onboard 660 W-h battery for near continuous operation. It uses Iridium for communication providing command and control from shore plus status and user data via the satellite link. Given both the sea-surface wave action and solar energy are renewable, the vehicle can operate for extended periods (months) remotely. The vehicle can be launched from a small boat and can travel at ~ 1 kt to locations offshore. We have adapted a Wave Glider for seafloor geodesy by adding a dual frequency GPS receiver embedded in an Inertial Navigation Unit, a second GPS antenna/receiver to align the INU, and a high precision acoustic ranging system. We will report results of initial testing of the system conducted at SIO. In 2014, the new approach will be used for seafloor geodetic measurements of plate motion in the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The project is for a three-year effort to measure plate motion at three sites along an East-West profile at latitude 44.6 N, offshore Newport Oregon. One site will be located on the incoming plate to measure the present day convergence between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates and two additional sites will be located on the continental slope of NA to measure the elastic deformation due to stick-slip behavior on the mega-thrust fault. These new seafloor data will constrain existing models of slip behavior that presently are poorly constrained by land geodetic data 100 km from the deformation front.

  17. Acoustic emission detection with fiber optical sensors for dry cask storage health monitoring

    Lin, Bin; Bao, Jingjing; Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    The increasing number, size, and complexity of nuclear facilities deployed worldwide are increasing the need to maintain readiness and develop innovative sensing materials to monitor important to safety structures (ITS). In the past two decades, an extensive sensor technology development has been used for structural health monitoring (SHM). Technologies for the diagnosis and prognosis of a nuclear system, such as dry cask storage system (DCSS), can improve verification of the health of the structure that can eventually reduce the likelihood of inadvertently failure of a component. Fiber optical sensors have emerged as one of the major SHM technologies developed particularly for temperature and strain measurements. This paper presents the development of optical equipment that is suitable for ultrasonic guided wave detection for active SHM in the MHz range. An experimental study of using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as acoustic emission (AE) sensors was performed on steel blocks. FBG have the advantage of being durable, lightweight, and easily embeddable into composite structures as well as being immune to electromagnetic interference and optically multiplexed. The temperature effect on the FBG sensors was also studied. A multi-channel FBG system was developed and compared with piezoelectric based AE system. The paper ends with conclusions and suggestions for further work.

  18. Acoustic emission location on aluminum alloy structure by using FBG sensors and PSO method

    Lu, Shizeng; Jiang, Mingshun; Sui, Qingmei; Dong, Huijun; Sai, Yaozhang; Jia, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission location is important for finding the structural crack and ensuring the structural safety. In this paper, an acoustic emission location method by using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm were investigated. Four FBG sensors were used to form a sensing network to detect the acoustic emission signals. According to the signals, the quadrilateral array location equations were established. By analyzing the acoustic emission signal propagation characteristics, the solution of location equations was converted to an optimization problem. Thus, acoustic emission location can be achieved by using an improved PSO algorithm, which was realized by using the information fusion of multiple standards PSO, to solve the optimization problem. Finally, acoustic emission location system was established and verified on an aluminum alloy plate. The experimental results showed that the average location error was 0.010 m. This paper provided a reliable method for aluminum alloy structural acoustic emission location.

  19. Combined optical fiber interferometric sensors for the detection of acoustic emission

    LIANG Yi-jun; MU Lin-lin; LIU Jun-feng; YU Xiao-tao

    2008-01-01

    A type of combined optical fiber interferometric acoustic emission sensor is proposed.The sensor can be independent on the laser source and make light interference by matching the lengths of two arms,so it can be used to monitor the health of large structure.Theoretical analyses indicate that the system can be equivalent to the Michelson interferometer with two optical fiber loop reflectors,and its sensitivity has been remarkably increased because of the decrease of the losses of light energy.PZT is powered by DC regulator to control the operating point of the system,so the system can accurately detect feeble vibration which is generated by ultrasonic waves propagating on the surface of solid.The amplitude and the frequency of feeble vibration signal are obtained by detecting the output light intensity of intefferometer and using Fourier transform technique.The results indicate that the system can be used to detect the acoustic emission signals by the frequency characteristics.

  20. Dust-acoustic waves modulational instability and rogue waves in a polarized dusty plasma

    Bouzit, Omar; Tribeche, Mouloud [Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Plasma Physics Group, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2015-10-15

    The polarization force-induced changes in the dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) modulational instability (MI) are examined. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that governs the MI of the DAWs is obtained. It is found that the effect of the polarization term R is to narrow the wave number domain for the onset of instability. The amplitude of the wave envelope decreases as R increases, meaning that the polarization force effects render weaker the associated DA rogue waves. The latter may therefore completely damp in the vicinity of R ∼ 1, i.e., as the polarization force becomes close to the electrostatic one (the net force acting on the dust particles becomes vanishingly small). The DA rogue wave profile is very sensitive to any change in the restoring force acting on the dust particles. It turns out that the polarization effects may completely smear out the DA rogue waves.

  1. Acoustic measurements above a plate carrying Lamb waves

    Talberg, Andreas Sørbrøden

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a set of acoustic measurements conducted on the Statoil funded Behind Casing Logging Set-Up, designed by SINTEF Petroleum Research to resemble an oil well casing. A set of simple simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics were also conducted and the results compared with the measurements. The experiments consists of measuring the pressure wave radiated of a set of Lamb waves propagating in a 3 mm thick steel plate, using the so called pitch-catch method. The Lamb waves were excited by a broadband piezoelectric immersion transducer with center frequency of 1 MHz. Through measurements and analysis the group velocity of the fastest mode in the plate was found to be 3138.5 m/s. Measuring the wave radiated into the water in a grid consisting of 8x33 measuring points, the spreading of the plate wave normal to the direction of propagation was investigated. Comparing the point where the amplitude had decreased 50 % relative to the amplitude measured at the axis pointing straight forward from the tran...

  2. Helioseismology and asteroseismology: looking for gravitational waves in acoustic oscillations

    Lopes, Ilídio [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofísica, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Silk, Joseph, E-mail: ilidio.lopes@tecnico.ulisboa.pt, E-mail: ilopes@uevora.pt, E-mail: silk@astro.ox.ac.uk [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, Paris 75014 (France)

    2014-10-10

    Current helioseismology observations allow the determination of the frequencies and surface velocity amplitudes of solar acoustic modes with exceptionally high precision. In some cases, the frequency accuracy is better than one part in a million. We show that there is a distinct possibility that quadrupole acoustic modes of low order could be excited by gravitational waves (GWs), if the GWs have a strain amplitude in the range 10{sup –20} h {sub –20} with h {sub –20} ∼ 1 or h {sub –20} ∼ 10{sup 3}, as predicted by several types of GW sources, such as galactic ultracompact binaries or extreme mass ratio inspirals and coalescence of black holes. If the damping rate at low order is 10{sup –3}η {sub N} μHz, with η {sub N} ∼ 10{sup –3}-1, as inferred from the theory of stellar pulsations, then GW radiation will lead to a maximum rms surface velocity amplitude of quadrupole modes of the order of h{sub −20}η{sub N}{sup −1}∼ 10{sup –9}-10{sup –3} cm s{sup –1}, on the verge of what is currently detectable via helioseismology. The frequency and sensitivity range probed by helioseismological acoustic modes overlap with, and complement, the capabilities of eLISA for the brightest resolved ultracompact galactic binaries.

  3. Gravitational Wave Detection with High Frequency Phonon Trapping Acoustic Cavities

    Goryachev, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of theoretical predictions for astrophysical and cosmological objects, which emit high frequency ($10^6-10^9$~Hz) Gravitation Waves (GW) or contribute somehow to the stochastic high frequency GW background. Here we propose a new sensitive detector in this frequency band, which is based on existing cryogenic ultra-high quality factor quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave cavity technology, coupled to near-quantum-limited SQUID amplifiers at $20$~mK. We show that spectral strain sensitivities reaching $10^{-22}$ per $\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ per mode is possible, which in principle can cover the frequency range with multiple ($>100$) modes with quality factors varying between $10^6-10^{10}$ allowing wide bandwidth detection. Due to its compactness and well established manufacturing process, the system is easily scalable into arrays and distributed networks that can also impact the overall sensitivity and introduce coincidence analysis to ensure no false detections.

  4. Dromion solutions for nonlinear electron acoustic waves in space plasmas

    S. S. Ghosh

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent high resolution measurements of POLAR and FAST satellites have revealed two-dimensional coherent structures in the polar cap boundary layer (PCBL region. Since the ion temperature is often observed to be greater than the electron temperature in this region, electron acoustic waves can exist as a normal mode of the plasma system. It is shown that the nonlinear evolution of such waves can be modelled by the coupled Davey-Stewartson I equations. These equations, which are a generalization of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation to two dimensions, admit exponentially localized solutions called dromions. A detailed parametric characterization of the regions of existence of such solutions is presented in the context of the PCBL region.

  5. Weakly dissipative dust-ion acoustic wave modulation

    Alinejad, H.; Mahdavi, M.; Shahmansouri, M.

    2016-01-01

    The modulational instability of dust-ion acoustic (DIA) waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma is investigated in the presence of weak dissipations arising due to the low rates (compared to the ion oscillation frequency) of ionization recombination and ion loss. Based on the multiple space and time scales perturbation, a new modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation governing the evolution of modulated DIA waves is derived with a linear damping term. It is shown that the combined action of all dissipative mechanisms due to collisions between particles reveals the permitted maximum time for the occurrence of the modulational instability. The influence on the modulational instability regions of relevant physical parameters such as ion temperature, dust concentration, ionization, recombination and ion loss is numerically examined. It is also found that the recombination frequency controls the instability growth rate, whereas recombination and ion loss make the instability regions wider.

  6. Fabrication od a ZnO/ST-cut quartz based love wave viscosity sensor

    In this paper, we aim to propose a rugged and relatively inexpensive acoustic wave viscometer that is easy to use and to fabricate by the conventional semiconductor manufacturing processes. First, we fabricated five different Love wave acoustic devices based on ZnO/90 degree rotated ST-quartz layered structure and incorporated with Polydimethylsiloxane (PMDS) flow cell. This allows a tiny controlled amount of analyte to be confined solely upon the sensing area between the IDTs of our Love wave sensor, preventing unwanted electric interactions with IDTs. The PDMS liquid flow cell is fabricated by replica molding. Using a simple set of fixture, the flow cell can be clamped onto our Love wave sensor and a constant volume of analyte can be confined on the sensing surface. Finally, five glycerites with different viscosities were prepared for viscosity measurement. The measured results show that the frequency shifts are in good correlation with the known viscosities. We note that results of this study can further be implemented as an easy to use and inexpensive acoustic viscometer.

  7. Fabrication on a ZnO/ST-cut quartz based love wave viscosity sensor

    In this paper, we aim to propose a rugged and relatively inexpensive acoustic wave viscometer that is easy to use and to fabricate by the conventional semiconductor manufacturing processes. First, we fabricated five different Love wave acoustic devices based on ZnO/90 degree rotated ST-quartz layered structure and incorporated with Polydimethylsiloxane (PMDS) flow cell. This allows a tiny controlled amount of analyte to be confined solely upon the sensing area between the IDTs of our Love wave sensor, preventing unwanted electric interactions with IDTs. The PDMS liquid flow cell is fabricated by replica molding. Using a simple set of fixture, the flow cell can be clamped onto our Love wave sensor and a constant volume of analyte can be confined on the sensing surface. Finally, five glycerites with different viscosities were prepared for viscosity measurement. The measured results show that the frequency shifts are in good correlation with the known viscosities. We note that results of this study can further be implemented as an easy to use and inexpensive acoustic viscometer.

  8. Determination of Shear Properties in the Upper Seafloor Using Seismo-acoustic Interface Waves

    Frivik, Svein Arne

    1998-12-31

    This thesis develops methods for recording and analysis of seismo-acoustic interface waves for determination of shear wave velocity as a function of depth and includes this in standard refraction seismic surveying. It investigates different techniques for estimation of dispersion characteristics of the interface waves and demonstrates that multi sensor spectral estimation techniques improve the dispersion estimates. The dispersion estimate of the fundamental interface wave mode is used as input to an object function for a model based linearized inversion. The inversion scheme provides an estimate of the shear wave velocity as a function of depth. Three field surveys were performed. Data were acquired with a standard bottom deployed refraction seismic hydrophone array containing 24 or 48 receivers, with a receiver spacing of 2.5 m. Explosive charges were used as sources. The recording time was increased from 0.5 to 8 s, compared to standard refraction seismic surveys. Shear wave velocity and shear modulus estimates were obtained from all the sites. At one of the sites, geotechnically obtained shear wave parameters were available, and a comparison between the two techniques were performed. the result of the comparison is promising and shows the potential of the technique. Although the result of applying the processing scheme to all three data sets is promising, it appears that survey parameters, like source-array spacing, receiver spacing and type of source might have been optimized for better performance. Based on this limitation, a new processing scheme and a new array configuration is proposed for surveys which integrates the recording and processing of both compressional waves and shear waves. 89 refs., 65 refs., 19 tabs.

  9. PVDF-based acoustic sensors prototype for the study of the thermoacoustic model

    To measure the ultra-hight energy neutrino flux, studies on a larger IceCube neutrino observatory at the south pole have been intensively investigated in the last years. These studies have introduced a hybrid detection concept including radio and acoustic detection in addition to existing optical detection. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) was built and deployed to evaluate the acoustic properties of the South Pole ice for the purpose of assessing the feasibility of an acoustic neutrino detection array. The Aachen Acoustic Laboratory (AAL) is supporting these efforts and providing infrastructures for the calibration of PZT-based acoustic sensors used in SPATS, study of a laser-based thermoacoustic model under laboratory conditions and investigating new piezoelectric materials for use in a next generation of acoustic sensors. In this talk we present the R and D status and first results of an acoustic sensor prototype based on PVDF material (Polyvinylidene Fluoride). With a flat frequency response and sensitivity the PVDF response to a thermoacoustic signal has shown the expected bipolar signal free of any superimposed resonances. The analysis of such a clean bipolar signal allow a deeper insight into understanding the thermoacoustic model and leading to a further development of optimized acoustic sensors for deployment at the South Pole.

  10. Experimental and numerical studies on standing surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    Mao, Zhangming; Xie, Yuliang; Guo, Feng; Ren, Liqiang; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Yuchao; Rufo, Joseph; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-01

    Standing surface acoustic waves (SSAW) are commonly used in microfluidics to manipulate cells and other micro/nano particles. However, except for a simple one-dimensional (1D) harmonic standing waves (HSW) model, a practical model that can predict particle behaviour in SSAW microfluidics is still lacking. Herein, we established a two-dimensional (2D) SSAW microfluidic model based on the basic theory in acoustophoresis and our previous modelling strategy to predict the acoustophoresis of microparticles in SSAW microfluidics. This 2D SSAW microfluidic model considers the effects of boundary vibrations, channel materials, and channel dimensions on the acoustic propagation; as an experimental validation, the acoustophoresis of microparticles under continuous flow through narrow channels made of PDMS and silicon was studied. The experimentally observed motion of the microparticles matched well with the numerical predictions, while the 1D HSW model failed to predict many of the experimental observations. Particularly, the 1D HSW model cannot account for particle aggregation on the sidewall in PDMS channels, which is well explained by our 2D SSAW microfluidic model. Our model can be used for device design and optimization in SSAW microfluidics. PMID:26698361

  11. An innovative acoustic sensor for in-pile fission gas composition measurements

    In this article we propose a new method able to determine the fission gas composition using in situ ultrasonic waves measurements. To do so an acoustic resonator was connected to a fuel rodlet, in order to perform speed of sound measurements of gas mixture (Helium and fission gases) inside the plenum. By using a dedicated signal processing the peaks due to resonant frequencies inside the gas mixture were successfully extracted from the output signal. From these data, the variations of helium and fission gas molar fraction were calculated using an adapted virial state equation. It will be proved that these data provide important information about the kinetics of gas release and about the effects of high neutron and gamma irradiation on piezo-ceramic sensors. (authors)

  12. Calculation of surface acoustic waves in a multilayered piezoelectric structure

    Zhang Zuwei; Wen Zhiyu; Hu Jing

    2013-01-01

    The propagation properties of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in a ZnO-SiO2-Si multilayered piezoelectric structure are calculated by using the recursive asymptotic method.The phase velocities and the electromechanical coupling coefficients for the Rayleigh wave and the Love wave in the different ZnO-SiO2-Si structures are calculated and analyzed.The Love mode wave is found to be predominantly generated since the c-axis of the ZnO film is generally perpendicular to the substrate.In order to prove the calculated results,a Love mode SAW device based on the ZnO-SiO2-Si multilayered structure is fabricated by micromachining,and its frequency responses are detected.The experimental results are found to be mainly consistent with the calculated ones,except for the slightly larger velocities induced by the residual stresses produced in the fabrication process of the films.The deviation of the experimental results from the calculated ones is reduced by thermal annealing.

  13. Suppression of Raman gain by finite level ion acoustic waves in inhomogeneous plasma

    We have examined a complex five-wave Raman scattering event in an inhomogeneous plasma in the presence of a finite level of ion acoustic waves. The first phase involves conventional three-wave stimulated Raman scattering, followed by the decay of the Raman Langmuir wave into either a second Langmuir wave (LDI) or a second scattered light wave (EDI) and an ion acoustic wave, assumed present at a non-thermal level. These decays take place locally so that matching conditions for Raman scattering and the subsidiary decay are coincident. We have shown that the complex Raman gain is sensitive to the source levels for the amplifying waves. For LDI the gain may be suppressed or enhanced depending on the relative intensities of the two Langmuir waves while for EDI the gain is invariably suppressed. Only a very modest level of ion acoustic waves is necessary for this to occur. (authors)

  14. A comparative evaluation of piezoelectric sensors for acoustic emission-based impact location estimation and damage classification in composite structures

    Uprety, Bibhisha; Kim, Sungwon; Mathews, V. John; Adams, Daniel O.

    2015-03-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) based Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is of great interest for detecting impact damage in composite structures. Within the aerospace industry the need to detect and locate these events, even when no visible damage is present, is important both from the maintenance and design perspectives. In this investigation, four commercially available piezoelectric sensors were evaluated for usage in an AE-based SHM system. Of particular interest was comparing the acoustic response of the candidate piezoelectric sensors for impact location estimations as well as damage classification resulting from the impact in fiber-reinforced composite structures. Sensor assessment was performed based on response signal characterization and performance for active testing at 300 kHz and steel-ball drop testing using both aluminum and carbon/epoxy composite plates. Wave mode velocities calculated from the measured arrival times were found to be in good agreement with predictions obtained using both the Disperse code and finite element analysis. Differences in the relative strength of the received wave modes, the overall signal strengths and signal-to-noise ratios were observed through the use of both active testing as well as passive steel-ball drop testing. Further comparative is focusing on assessing AE sensor performance for use in impact location estimation algorithms as well as detecting and classifying damage produced in composite structures due to impact events.

  15. Ion acoustic wave collapse via two-ion wave decay: 2D Vlasov simulation and theory

    Chapman, Thomas; Berger, Richard; Banks, Jeffrey; Brunner, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    The decay of ion acoustic waves (IAWs) via two-ion wave decay may transfer energy from the electric field of the IAWs to the particles, resulting in a significant heating of resonant particles. This process has previously been shown in numerical simulations to decrease the plasma reflectivity due to stimulated Brillouin scattering. Two-ion wave decay is a fundamental property of ion acoustic waves that occurs over most if not all of the parameter space of relevance to inertial confinement fusion experiments, and can lead to a sudden collapse of IAWs. The treatment of all species kinetically, and in particular the electrons, is required to describe the decay process correctly. We present fully kinetic 2D+2V Vlasov simulations of IAWs undergoing decay to a highly nonlinear turbulent state using the code LOKI. The scaling of the decay rate with characteristic plasma parameters and wave amplitude is shown. A new theory describing two-ion wave decay in 2D, that incorporates key kinetic properties of the electrons, is presented and used to explain quantitatively for the first time the observed decay of IAWs. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DoE by LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734. Funded by LDRD 15-ERD-038 and supported by LLNL Grand Challenge allocation.

  16. Modified ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with field-aligned shear flows

    Saleem, H. [Department of Space Science, Institute of Space Technology, 1-Islamabad Highway, Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Research Institute, Pakistan Academy of Sciences, 3-Constitution Avenue G-5/3, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ali, S. [Theoretical Research Institute, Pakistan Academy of Sciences, 3-Constitution Avenue G-5/3, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP) at Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Haque, Q. [Theoretical Research Institute, Pakistan Academy of Sciences, 3-Constitution Avenue G-5/3, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP) at Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-08-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a plasma having field-aligned shear flow. A Korteweg-deVries-type nonlinear equation for a modified ion-acoustic wave is obtained which admits a single pulse soliton solution. The theoretical result has been applied to solar wind plasma at 1 AU for illustration.

  17. Modified ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with field-aligned shear flows

    The nonlinear dynamics of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a plasma having field-aligned shear flow. A Korteweg-deVries-type nonlinear equation for a modified ion-acoustic wave is obtained which admits a single pulse soliton solution. The theoretical result has been applied to solar wind plasma at 1 AU for illustration

  18. Influence of acoustic waves on Radiation Spectra of Argon Gas-discharge Plasma

    Aramyan, A R

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that under the definite regime of interaction of the acoustic waves with low-temperature, partially ionized plasma it is possible to change the intensity of some spectral lines of atomic argon. It is shown also, that the dependence of the intensities of these spectral lines on the intensity of the acoustic wave has a hysteresis behavior.

  19. Detection/classification/quantification of chemical agents using an array of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices

    Milner, G. Martin

    2005-05-01

    ChemSentry is a portable system used to detect, identify, and quantify chemical warfare (CW) agents. Electro chemical (EC) cell sensor technology is used for blood agents and an array of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors is used for nerve and blister agents. The combination of the EC cell and the SAW array provides sufficient sensor information to detect, classify and quantify all CW agents of concern using smaller, lighter, lower cost units. Initial development of the SAW array and processing was a key challenge for ChemSentry requiring several years of fundamental testing of polymers and coating methods to finalize the sensor array design in 2001. Following the finalization of the SAW array, nearly three (3) years of intensive testing in both laboratory and field environments were required in order to gather sufficient data to fully understand the response characteristics. Virtually unbounded permutations of agent characteristics and environmental characteristics must be considered in order to operate against all agents and all environments of interest to the U.S. military and other potential users of ChemSentry. The resulting signal processing design matched to this extensive body of measured data (over 8,000 agent challenges and 10,000 hours of ambient data) is considered to be a significant advance in state-of-the-art for CW agent detection.

  20. Double aperture focusing transducer for controlling microparticle motions in trapezoidal microchannels with surface acoustic waves

    Tan, Ming K.; Tjeung, Ricky; Ervin, Hannah; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James

    2009-09-01

    We present a method for controlling the motion of microparticles suspended in an aqueous solution, which fills in a microchannel fabricated into a piezoelectric substrate, using propagating surface acoustic waves. The cross-sectional shape of this microchannel is trapezoidal, preventing the formation of acoustic standing waves across the channel width and therefore allowing the steering of microparticles. The induced acoustic streaming transports these particles to eliminate the use of external pumps for fluid actuation.

  1. Biomedical signals and sensors II linking acoustic and optic biosignals and biomedical sensors

    Kaniusas, Eugenijus

    2015-01-01

    The book set develops a bridge between physiologic mechanisms and diagnostic human engineering. While the first volume is focused on the interface between physiologic mechanisms and the resultant biosignals, this second volume is devoted to the interface between biosignals and biomedical sensors. That is, in the first volume, the physiologic mechanisms determining biosignals are described from the basic cellular level up to their advanced mutual coordination level. This second volume, considers the genesis of acoustic and optic biosignals and the associated sensing technology from a strategic point of view. As a novelty, this book discusses heterogeneous biosignals within a common frame. This frame comprises both the biosignal formation path from the biosignal source at the physiological level to biosignal propagation in the body, and the biosignal sensing path from the biosignal transmission in the sensor applied on the body up to its conversion to a, usually electric, signal. Some biosignals arise in the co...

  2. Time Reversal Acoustic Structural Health Monitoring Using Array of Embedded Sensors Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) structural health monitoring with an embedded sensor array represents a new approach to in-situ nondestructive evaluation of air-space...

  3. Wireless Acoustic Signal Monitoring Using MEMS sensor and ATmega on LabVIEW Platform

    Swathy L; Lizy Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics and vibrations caused on machine structures can result in faulty or collapse of the whole mechanical system. These acoustics produced by machinery are vital indicators of machine health. Acoustic signals analysis can be used as a tool for locating the problem and thus taking necessary actions. MEMS sensors provide high accurate low size and low cost microphones which can be even used in low cost space applications such as sounding rockets, nano-satellites etc. This paper...

  4. Coherent scattering of CO2 light from ion-acoustic waves

    Scattering of laser radiation from ion-acoustic waves in a plasma is investigated analytically and experimentally. The formulation predicts a coherent component of the scattered power on a largely incoherent background spectrum when the acoustic analog of Bragg's law and Doppler shift conditions are satisfied. The experiment consists of a hybrid CO2 laser system capable of either low power continuous wave or high power pulsed mode operation. A heterodyne light mixing scheme is used to detect the scattered power. The proportionality predicted by the theory is verified by scattering from externally excited acoustic and ion-acoustic waves; continuous wave and pulsed modes in each case. Measurement of the ion-acoustic dispersion relation by continuous wave scattering is also presented

  5. Identification of cavitation signatures using both optical and PZT acoustic sensors

    Vidakovic, M.; Armakolas, I.; Sun, T.; Carlton, J.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the results obtained from monitoring a simulated material cavitation process using both a fibre Bragg grating (FBG)-based acoustic sensor system developed at City University London and a commercial PZT (Piezoelectric Transducer) acoustic sensor, with an aim to identify the cavitation signatures. In the experiment, a sample metal plate with its back surface being instrumented with both sensors is positioned very close to an excitation sonotrode with a standard frequency of 19.5kHz. The data obtained from both sensors are recorded and analyzed, showing a very good agreement.

  6. Investigation of acoustic sensors to detect coconut rhinoceros beetle in Guam

    The coconut rhinoceros beetle, Oryctes rhinoceros, was accidentally introduced into Guam last year and now threatens the Island’s forests and tourist industry. These large insects can be detected easily with acoustic sensors, and procedures are being developed to incorporate acoustic technology int...

  7. Imaging of transient surface acoustic waves by full-field photorefractive interferometry.

    Xiong, Jichuan; Xu, Xiaodong; Glorieux, Christ; Matsuda, Osamu; Cheng, Liping

    2015-05-01

    A stroboscopic full-field imaging technique based on photorefractive interferometry for the visualization of rapidly changing surface displacement fields by using of a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is presented. The photorefractive buildup of the space charge field during and after probe laser pulses is simulated numerically. The resulting anisotropic diffraction upon the refractive index grating and the interference between the polarization-rotated diffracted reference beam and the transmitted signal beam are modeled theoretically. The method is experimentally demonstrated by full-field imaging of the propagation of photoacoustically generated surface acoustic waves with a temporal resolution of nanoseconds. The surface acoustic wave propagation in a 23 mm × 17 mm area on an aluminum plate was visualized with 520 × 696 pixels of the CCD sensor, yielding a spatial resolution of 33 μm. The short pulse duration (8 ns) of the probe laser yields the capability of imaging SAWs with frequencies up to 60 MHz. PMID:26026514

  8. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. I. ACOUSTIC AND INERTIA-GRAVITY WAVES

    This paper is the first of a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases when the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this first part, only waves that are direct solutions of the generic dispersion relation are studied—acoustic and inertia-gravity waves. Concerning inertia-gravity waves, we found that in the cases of short horizontal wavelengths, null background wind, or propagation in the equatorial region, only pure gravity waves are possible, while for the limit of large horizontal wavelengths and/or null static stability, the waves are inertial. The correspondence between classical atmospheric approximations and wave filtering has been examined too, and we carried out a classification of the mesoscale waves found in the clouds of Venus at different vertical levels of its atmosphere. Finally, the classification of waves in exoplanets is discussed and we provide a list of possible candidates with cyclostrophic regimes

  9. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. I. ACOUSTIC AND INERTIA-GRAVITY WAVES

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía, 18008 Granada (Spain); Imamura, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Read, P. L. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Luz, D. [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa (CAAUL), Observatório Astronómico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisboa (Portugal); Piccialli, A., E-mail: peralta@iaa.es [LATMOS, UVSQ, 11 bd dAlembert, 78280 Guyancourt (France)

    2014-07-01

    This paper is the first of a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases when the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this first part, only waves that are direct solutions of the generic dispersion relation are studied—acoustic and inertia-gravity waves. Concerning inertia-gravity waves, we found that in the cases of short horizontal wavelengths, null background wind, or propagation in the equatorial region, only pure gravity waves are possible, while for the limit of large horizontal wavelengths and/or null static stability, the waves are inertial. The correspondence between classical atmospheric approximations and wave filtering has been examined too, and we carried out a classification of the mesoscale waves found in the clouds of Venus at different vertical levels of its atmosphere. Finally, the classification of waves in exoplanets is discussed and we provide a list of possible candidates with cyclostrophic regimes.

  10. Near-field signal acquisition for smartglasses using two acoustic vector-sensors

    Levin, Dovid Y.; Habets, Emanuël A.P.; Gannot, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Smartglasses, in addition to their visual-output capabilities, often contain acoustic sensors for receiving the user's voice. However, operation in noisy environments may lead to significant degradation of the received signal. To address this issue, we propose employing an acoustic sensor array which is mounted on the eyeglasses frames. The signals from the array are processed by an algorithm with the purpose of acquiring the user's desired near-filed speech signal while suppressing noise sig...

  11. Fiber Optic Sensor for Acoustic Detection of Partial Discharges in Oil-Paper Insulated Electrical Systems

    Julio Posada-Roman; Garcia-Souto, Jose A.; Jesus Rubio-Serrano

    2012-01-01

    A fiber optic interferometric sensor with an intrinsic transducer along a length of the fiber is presented for ultrasound measurements of the acoustic emission from partial discharges inside oil-filled power apparatus. The sensor is designed for high sensitivity measurements in a harsh electromagnetic field environment, with wide temperature changes and immersion in oil. It allows enough sensitivity for the application, for which the acoustic pressure is in the range of units of Pa at a frequ...

  12. An acoustic wave equation for pure P wave in 2D TTI media

    Zhan, Ge

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a pure P wave equation for an acoustic 2D TTI media is derived. Compared with conventional TTI coupled equations, the resulting equation is unconditionally stable due to the complete isolation of the SV wave mode. To avoid numerical dispersion and produce high quality images, the rapid expansion method REM is employed for numerical implementation. Synthetic results validate the proposed equation and show that it is a stable algorithm for modeling and reverse time migration RTM in a TTI media for any anisotropic parameter values. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  13. Ion acoustic waves in multi-species plasmas

    This thesis is concerned with the propagation of small amplitude ion acoustic waves through plasmas consisting of electrons and two species of ions, each with a Maxwellian velocity distribution function. The dispersion relation, derived from the Vlasov and Poisson equations, can easily be solved by numerical methods. The thesis is divided into two parts: 1. Stationary ions: when the average velocities of all the species are zero, the waves propagate in two different ways depending on electron-to-ion temperature ratio Theta, heavy-to-light ion mass ratio M, and the light ion concentation f. Either the principal mode in two different ways of the pure heavy ion plasma can be traced continuously to the principal mode of the light ion plasma as the proportion of light ions is steadily increased, or it becomes unobservable due to damping, while a second wave appears and develops into the principal light ion mode. It is shown that critical values of f and Theta governing this behaviour are associated with certain saddle points in the dielectric function. 2. Ion beams: If a mixture of ions is electrostatically accelerated, the two species assume different velocities and an instability may develop. The dependence of marginal stability on Theta, M and f and accelerating voltage E is investigated numerically. The unstable mode may be linked to the principal slow mode of the light ion beam. Higher order mode behaviour is also investigated, and the angular dependence of the instability in three dimensions is discussed. In both cases, a degeneracy appears in the dispersion relation at critical values of parameters. The excitation level of the waves is then very large. This phenomenon is interpreted as a resonance between the two species supporting the wave

  14. A Schamel equation for ion acoustic waves in superthermal plasmas

    Williams, G., E-mail: gwilliams06@qub.ac.uk; Kourakis, I. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Verheest, F. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Hellberg, M. A. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Anowar, M. G. M. [Department of Physics, Begum Rokeya University, Rangpur, Rangpur-5400 (Bangladesh)

    2014-09-15

    An investigation of the propagation of ion acoustic waves in nonthermal plasmas in the presence of trapped electrons has been undertaken. This has been motivated by space and laboratory plasma observations of plasmas containing energetic particles, resulting in long-tailed distributions, in combination with trapped particles, whereby some of the plasma particles are confined to a finite region of phase space. An unmagnetized collisionless electron-ion plasma is considered, featuring a non-Maxwellian-trapped electron distribution, which is modelled by a kappa distribution function combined with a Schamel distribution. The effect of particle trapping has been considered, resulting in an expression for the electron density. Reductive perturbation theory has been used to construct a KdV-like Schamel equation, and examine its behaviour. The relevant configurational parameters in our study include the superthermality index κ and the characteristic trapping parameter β. A pulse-shaped family of solutions is proposed, also depending on the weak soliton speed increment u{sub 0}. The main modification due to an increase in particle trapping is an increase in the amplitude of solitary waves, yet leaving their spatial width practically unaffected. With enhanced superthermality, there is a decrease in both amplitude and width of solitary waves, for any given values of the trapping parameter and of the incremental soliton speed. Only positive polarity excitations were observed in our parametric investigation.

  15. Multiple scattering of a spherical acoustic wave from fluid spheres

    Wu, J. H.; Liu, A. Q.; Chen, H. L.; Chen, T. N.

    2006-02-01

    The multiple scattering of a spherical acoustic wave from an arbitrary number of fluid spheres is investigated theoretically. The tool to attack the multiple scattering problem is a kind of addition formulas for the spherical wave functions, which are presented in the paper, based on the bicentric expansion form of Green function in the spherical coordinates. For an arbitrary configuration of N fluid spheres, the kind of addition formulas permits the field expansions (all referred to the center of each sphere). With these the sound fields scattered by each sphere can be described by a set of N equations. The interactions between any two fluid spheres are taken into account in these equations exactly and their coefficients are coupled through double sums in the spherical wave functions. By truncating the infinite series in the equations depending on certain calculation accuracy and solving the coefficients matrix by using the Gauss-Seidel iteration method, we can obtain the scattered sound field by the configuration of the fluid spheres. Finally, the scattering calculations by using the kind of addition formulas are carried out.

  16. The shock-acoustic waves generated by the earthquakes

    Afraimovich, E L; Plotnikov, A V; Uralov, A M

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the form and dynamics of shock-acoustic waves generated by earthquakes. We use the method for detecting and locating the sources of ionospheric impulsive disturbances, based on using data from a global network of receivers of the GPS navigation system and requiring no a priori information about the place and time of associated effects. The practical implementation of the method is illustrated by a case study of earthquake effects in Turkey in 1999. It was found that in all instances the ionospheric response has the character of an N-wave. The period is 180-390 s, and the amplitude exceeds by a factor of two as a minimum the standard deviation of background fluctuations in total electron content in this range of periods under quite and moderate geomagnetic conditions. The elevation of the wave vector varies through a range of 20-44 degree, and the phase velocity (1100-1300 m/s) approaches the sound velocity at the heights of the ionospheric F-region maximum. The calculated (by neglecting refract...

  17. Dust-acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma with two-temperature nonthermal ions

    Zhi-Jian Zhou; Hong-Yan Wang; Kai-Biao Zhang

    2012-01-01

    By using reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a dusty plasma (containing a negatively charged dust fluid, Boltzmann distributed electrons and two-temperature nonthermal ions) is investigated. The effects of two-temperature nonthermal ions on the basic properties of small but finite amplitude nonlinear dust-acoustic waves are examined. It is found that two-temperature nonthermal ions affect the basic properties of the dust-acoustic solitary waves. It is also observed that only compressive solitary waves exist in this system.

  18. Sensor development and calibration for acoustic neutrino detection in ice

    Karg, Timo; Bissok, Martin; Laihem, Karim; Semburg, Benjamin; Tosi, Delia; Collaboration, for the IceCube

    2009-01-01

    A promising approach to measure the expected low flux of cosmic neutrinos at the highest energies (E > 1 EeV) is acoustic detection. There are different in-situ test installations worldwide in water and ice to measure the acoustic properties of the medium with regard to the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection. The parameters of interest include attenuation length, sound speed profile, background noise level and transient backgrounds. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been ...

  19. Numerical analysis of wave generation and propagation in a focused surface acoustic wave device for potential microfluidics applications.

    Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R

    2009-03-01

    We develop a 3-D finite element model of a focused surface acoustic wave (F-SAW) device based on LiNbO(3) to analyze the wave generation and propagation characteristics for devices operating at MHz frequencies with varying applied input voltages. We compare the F-SAW device to a conventional SAW device with similar substrate dimensions and transducer finger periodicity. SAW devices with concentrically shaped focused interdigital transducer fingers (F-IDTs) are found to excite waves with high intensity and high beam-width compression ratio, confined to a small localized area. F-SAW devices are more sensitive to amplitude variations at regions close to the focal point than conventional SAW devices having uniform IDT configuration. We compute F-SAW induced streaming forces and velocity fields by applying a successive approximation technique to the Navier-Stokes equation (Nyborg's theory). The maximum streaming force obtained at the focal point varies as the square of the applied input voltage. Computed streaming velocities at the focal point in F-SAW devices are at least an order of magnitude higher than those in conventional SAW devices. Simulated frequency response indicates higher insertion losses in F-SAW devices than in conventional devices, reflecting their greater utility as actuators than as sensors. Our simulation findings suggest that F-SAW devices can be utilized effectively for actuation in microfluidic applications involving diffusion limited transport processes. PMID:19411221

  20. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Wave Parameters Near Solar Active Regions

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  1. Nonlinear interaction of kinetic Alfvén waves and ion acoustic waves in coronal loops

    Sharma, Prachi; Yadav, Nitin; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-05-01

    Over the years, coronal heating has been the most fascinating question among the scientific community. In the present article, a heating mechanism has been proposed based on the wave-wave interaction. Under this wave-wave interaction, the high frequency kinetic Alfvén wave interacts with the low frequency ion acoustic wave. These waves are three dimensionally propagating and nonlinearly coupled through ponderomotive nonlinearity. A numerical code based on pseudo-spectral technique has been developed for solving these normalized dynamical equations. Localization of kinetic Alfvén wave field has been examined, and magnetic power spectrum has also been analyzed which shows the cascading of energy to higher wavenumbers, and this cascading has been found to have Kolmogorov scaling, i.e., k-5 /3 . A breakpoint appears after Kolmogorov scaling and next to this spectral break; a steeper scaling has been obtained. The presented nonlinear interaction for coronal loops plasmas is suggested to generate turbulent spectrum having Kolmogorov scaling in the inertial range and steepened scaling in the dissipation range. Since Kolmogorov turbulence is considered as the main source for coronal heating; therefore, the suggested mechanism will be a useful tool to understand the mystery of coronal loop heating through Kolmogorov turbulence and dissipation.

  2. Flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    Jaiswal, Surabhi; Bandyopadhyay, Pintu; Sen, Abhijit

    2015-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of particle flow induced large amplitude shock waves in a dusty plasma. These dust acoustic shocks (DAS) are observed for strongly supersonic flows and have been studied in a U-shaped Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device for charged kaolin dust in a background of Argon plasma. The strong flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change of the dust density near the potential hill is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks. The dynamics of the shocks are captured by fast video pictures of the structures that are illuminated by a laser sheet beam. The physical characteristics of the shock are delineated from a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of plasma parameters and flow speeds. Details of these observations and a physical explanation based on model calculations will be presented.

  3. Statistical analysis of acoustic wave parameters near active regions

    Soares, M Cristina Rabello; Scherrer, Philip H

    2016-01-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyse the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call `nearby regions'), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disc locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring diagram analysis of all active regions observed by HMI during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhancement (the `acoustic halo effect') is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes...

  4. Unvoiced Speech Recognition Using Tissue-Conductive Acoustic Sensor

    Hiroshi Saruwatari

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the use of stethoscope and silicon NAM (nonaudible murmur microphones in automatic speech recognition. NAM microphones are special acoustic sensors, which are attached behind the talker's ear and can capture not only normal (audible speech, but also very quietly uttered speech (nonaudible murmur. As a result, NAM microphones can be applied in automatic speech recognition systems when privacy is desired in human-machine communication. Moreover, NAM microphones show robustness against noise and they might be used in special systems (speech recognition, speech transform, etc. for sound-impaired people. Using adaptation techniques and a small amount of training data, we achieved for a 20 k dictation task a 93.9% word accuracy for nonaudible murmur recognition in a clean environment. In this paper, we also investigate nonaudible murmur recognition in noisy environments and the effect of the Lombard reflex on nonaudible murmur recognition. We also propose three methods to integrate audible speech and nonaudible murmur recognition using a stethoscope NAM microphone with very promising results.

  5. Unvoiced Speech Recognition Using Tissue-Conductive Acoustic Sensor

    Heracleous Panikos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the use of stethoscope and silicon NAM (nonaudible murmur microphones in automatic speech recognition. NAM microphones are special acoustic sensors, which are attached behind the talker's ear and can capture not only normal (audible speech, but also very quietly uttered speech (nonaudible murmur. As a result, NAM microphones can be applied in automatic speech recognition systems when privacy is desired in human-machine communication. Moreover, NAM microphones show robustness against noise and they might be used in special systems (speech recognition, speech transform, etc. for sound-impaired people. Using adaptation techniques and a small amount of training data, we achieved for a 20 k dictation task a word accuracy for nonaudible murmur recognition in a clean environment. In this paper, we also investigate nonaudible murmur recognition in noisy environments and the effect of the Lombard reflex on nonaudible murmur recognition. We also propose three methods to integrate audible speech and nonaudible murmur recognition using a stethoscope NAM microphone with very promising results.

  6. Heterogeneous Nucleation Induced by Capillary Wave During Acoustic Levitation

    吕勇军; 解文军; 魏炳波

    2003-01-01

    The rapid solidification of acoustically levitated drops of Pb-61.9 wt. %Sn eutectic alloy is accomplished. A surface morphology of spreading ripples is observed on a sample undercooled by 15 K. The ripples originate from the centre of sample surface, which is also the heterogeneous nucleation site for eutectic growth. The Faraday instability excited by forced surface vibration has brought about these ripples. They are retained in the solidified sample if the sound pressure level exceeds the threshold pressure required for the appearance of capillary waves.Theoretical calculations indicate that both the pressure and displacement maxima exist in the central part of a levitated drop. The pressure near the sample centre can promote heterogeneous nucleation, which is in agreement qualitatively with the experimental results.

  7. Effect of the streamed negative ions on dust acoustic waves

    The propagation of streaming negative ions in the dust acoustic waves (DAWs) is investigated, including nonlinear effects such as dust charge fluctuation, dust temperature, and the negative ions. The streaming velocity of the negative ions played an essential and effective role in the DAWs characteristics. The dust charge fluctuation shows a remarkable decrease with the negative ions concentration decrement. Increasing of negative ions temperature causes an increase of the dust charge for different ratios of streaming velocity to thermal velocity (υ). Also, both of the amplitude and the width of the soliton solutions have shown strong dependence on υ as well as on the negative ions concentration. The results of this study will be useful for a better understanding of crystallization in dust plasma, especially phase transition governed from fluid state to solid state, and in a variety of modern technology applications such as fabrication of the semiconductor. (author)

  8. Investigation of surface acoustic waves in laser shock peened metals

    Ling Yuan; Gang Yan; Zhonghua Shen; Hangwei Xu; Xiaowu Ni; Jian Lu

    2008-01-01

    Laser shock peening is a well-known method for extending the fatigue life of metal components by introducing near-surface compressive residual stress. The surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are dispersive when the near-surface properties of materials are changed. So the near-surface properties (such as the thickness of hardened layers, elastic properties, residual stresses, etc.) can be analyzed by the phase velocity dispersion. To study the propagation of SAWs in metal samples after peening, a more reasonable experimental method of broadband excitation and reception is introduced. The ultrasonic signals are excited by laser and received by polyvinylindene fluoride (PVDF) transducer. The SAW signals in aluminum alloy materials with different impact times by laser shock peening are detected. Signal spectrum and phase velocity dispersion curves of SAWs are analyzed. Moreover, reasons for dispersion are discussed.

  9. Multilayer-graphene-based amplifier of surface acoustic waves

    The amplification of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by a multilayer graphene (MLG)-based amplifier is studied. The conductivity of massless carriers (electrons or holes) in graphene in an external drift electric field is calculated using Boltzmann’s equation. At some carrier drift velocities, the real part of the variable conductivity becomes negative and MLG can be employed in SAW amplifiers. Amplification of Blustein’s and Rayleigh’s SAWs in CdS, a piezoelectric hexagonal crystal of the symmetry group C6v, is considered. The corresponding equations for SAW propagation in the device are derived and can be applied to other substrate crystals of the same symmetry. The results of the paper indicate that MLG can be considered as a perspective material for SAW amplification and related applications

  10. Meshless RBF based pseudospectral solution of acoustic wave equation

    Mishra, Pankaj K

    2015-01-01

    Chebyshev pseudospectral (PS) methods are reported to provide highly accurate solution using polynomial approximation. Use of polynomial basis functions in PS algorithms limits the formulation to univariate systems constraining it to tensor product grids for multi-dimensions. Recent studies have shown that replacing the polynomial by radial basis functions in pseudospectral method (RBF-PS) has the advantage of using irregular grids for multivariate systems. A RBF-PS algorithm has been presented here for the numerical solution of inhomogeneous Helmholtz's equation using Gaussian RBF for derivative approximation. Efficacy of RBF approximated derivatives has been checked through error analysis comparison with PS method. Comparative study of PS, RBF-PS and finite difference approach for the solution of a linear boundary value problem has been performed. Finally, a typical frequency domain acoustic wave propagation problem has been solved using Dirichlet boundary condition and a point source. The algorithm present...

  11. Multilayer-graphene-based amplifier of surface acoustic waves

    Stanislav O. Yurchenko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The amplification of surface acoustic waves (SAWs by a multilayer graphene (MLG-based amplifier is studied. The conductivity of massless carriers (electrons or holes in graphene in an external drift electric field is calculated using Boltzmann’s equation. At some carrier drift velocities, the real part of the variable conductivity becomes negative and MLG can be employed in SAW amplifiers. Amplification of Blustein’s and Rayleigh’s SAWs in CdS, a piezoelectric hexagonal crystal of the symmetry group C6v, is considered. The corresponding equations for SAW propagation in the device are derived and can be applied to other substrate crystals of the same symmetry. The results of the paper indicate that MLG can be considered as a perspective material for SAW amplification and related applications.

  12. Multilayer-graphene-based amplifier of surface acoustic waves

    Yurchenko, Stanislav O., E-mail: st.yurchenko@mail.ru; Komarov, Kirill A. [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, 2-nd Baumanskaya str. 5, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Pustovoit, Vladislav I. [Scientific and Technological Center of Unique Instrumentation, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    The amplification of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by a multilayer graphene (MLG)-based amplifier is studied. The conductivity of massless carriers (electrons or holes) in graphene in an external drift electric field is calculated using Boltzmann’s equation. At some carrier drift velocities, the real part of the variable conductivity becomes negative and MLG can be employed in SAW amplifiers. Amplification of Blustein’s and Rayleigh’s SAWs in CdS, a piezoelectric hexagonal crystal of the symmetry group C{sub 6v}, is considered. The corresponding equations for SAW propagation in the device are derived and can be applied to other substrate crystals of the same symmetry. The results of the paper indicate that MLG can be considered as a perspective material for SAW amplification and related applications.

  13. [INVITED] Laser generation and detection of ultrafast shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids

    Pezeril, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the up-to-date findings related to ultrafast shear acoustic waves. Recent progress obtained for the laser generation and detection of picosecond shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids is reviewed. Examples in which the transverse isotropic symmetry of the sample structure is broken in order to permit shear acoustic wave generation through sudden laser heating are described in detail. Alternative photo-induced mechanisms for ultrafast shear acoustic generation in metals, semiconductors, insulators, magnetostrictive, piezoelectric and electrostrictive materials are reviewed as well. With reference to key experiments, an all-optical technique employed to probe longitudinal and shear structural dynamics in the GHz frequency range in ultra-thin liquid films is described. This technique, based on specific ultrafast shear acoustic transducers, has opened new perspectives that will be discussed for ultrafast shear acoustic probing of viscoelastic liquids at the nanometer scale.

  14. Study of nonlinear ion- and electron-acoustic waves in multi-component space plasmas

    G. S. Lakhina

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Large amplitude ion-acoustic and electron-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized multi-component plasma system consisting of cold background electrons and ions, a hot electron beam and a hot ion beam are studied using Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique. Three types of solitary waves, namely, slow ion-acoustic, ion-acoustic and electron-acoustic solitons are found provided the Mach numbers exceed the critical values. The slow ion-acoustic solitons have the smallest critical Mach numbers, whereas the electron-acoustic solitons have the largest critical Mach numbers. For the plasma parameters considered here, both type of ion-acoustic solitons have positive potential whereas the electron-acoustic solitons can have either positive or negative potential depending on the fractional number density of the cold electrons relative to that of the ions (or total electrons number density. For a fixed Mach number, increases in the beam speeds of either hot electrons or hot ions can lead to reduction in the amplitudes of the ion-and electron-acoustic solitons. However, the presence of hot electron and hot ion beams have no effect on the amplitudes of slow ion-acoustic modes. Possible application of this model to the electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs observed in the plasma sheet boundary layer is discussed.

  15. Denoising of human speech using combined acoustic and em sensor signal processing

    Ng, L C; Burnett, G C; Holzrichter, J F; Gable, T J

    1999-11-29

    Low Power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference. This greatly enhances the quality and quantify of information for many speech related applications. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J. Acoustic. Soc. Am. 103 (1) 622 (1998). By using combined Glottal-EM- Sensor- and Acoustic-signals, segments of voiced, unvoiced, and no-speech can be reliably defined. Real-time Denoising filters can be constructed to remove noise from the user's corresponding speech signal.

  16. High quality broadband spatial reflections of slow Rayleigh surface acoustic waves modulated by a graded grooved surface

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-01-21

    We report high quality broadband spatial reflections of Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (SAWs) through a graded grooved surface. High quality means that no wave is allowed to transmit and the incident wave is nearly all reflected to the input side. The graded grooved surface is structured by drilling one dimensional array of graded grooves with increased depths on a flat surface. We investigate SAW dispersion relations, wave field distribution at several typical SAW wavelengths, and time evolution of a Gaussian pulse through the graded grooved surface. Results show that the input broadband Rayleigh SAWs can be slowed, spatially enhanced and stopped, and finally reflected to the input side. The study suggests that engraving the flat surface can be used as an efficient and economical way to manipulate Rayleigh SAWs, which has potential application in novel SAW devices such as filters, reflectors, sensors, energy harvesters, and diodes.

  17. Universal instability of dust ion-sound waves and dust-acoustic waves

    It is shown that the dust ion-sound waves (DISW) and the dust-acoustic waves (DAW) are universally unstable for wave numbers less than some critical wave number. The basic dusty plasma state is assumed to be quasi-neutral with balance of the plasma particle absorption on the dust particles and the ionization with the rate proportional to the electron density. An analytical expression for the critical wave numbers, for the frequencies and for the growth rates of DISW and DAW are found using the hydrodynamic description of dusty plasma components with self-consistent treatment of the dust charge variations and by taking into account the change of the ion and electron distributions in the dust charging process. Most of the previous treatment do not take into account the latter process and do not treat the basic state self-consistently. The critical lengths corresponding to these critical wave numbers can be easily achieved in the existing experiments. It is shown that at the wave numbers larger than the critical ones DISW and DAW have a large damping which was not treated previously and which can be also measured. The instabilities found in the present work on their non linear stage can lead to formation of different types of dust self-organized structures. (author)

  18. Excitation of nonlinear ion acoustic waves in CH plasmas

    Feng, Q S; Liu, Z J; Xiao, C Z; Wang, Q; He, X T

    2016-01-01

    Excitation of nonlinear ion acoustic wave (IAW) by an external electric field is demonstrated by Vlasov simulation. The frequency calculated by the dispersion relation with no damping is verified much closer to the resonance frequency of the small-amplitude nonlinear IAW than that calculated by the linear dispersion relation. When the wave number $ k\\lambda_{De} $ increases, the linear Landau damping of the fast mode (its phase velocity is greater than any ion's thermal velocity) increases obviously in the region of $ T_i/T_e < 0.2 $ in which the fast mode is weakly damped mode. As a result, the deviation between the frequency calculated by the linear dispersion relation and that by the dispersion relation with no damping becomes larger with $k\\lambda_{De}$ increasing. When $k\\lambda_{De}$ is not large, such as $k\\lambda_{De}=0.1, 0.3, 0.5$, the nonlinear IAW can be excited by the driver with the linear frequency of the modes. However, when $k\\lambda_{De}$ is large, such as $k\\lambda_{De}=0.7$, the linear ...

  19. Mechanically robust microfluidics and bulk wave acoustics to sort microparticles

    Dauson, Erin R.; Gregory, Kelvin B.; Greve, David W.; Healy, Gregory P.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2016-04-01

    Sorting microparticles (or cells, or bacteria) is significant for scientific, medical and industrial purposes. Research groups have used lithium niobate SAW devices to produce standing waves, and then to align microparticles at the node lines in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, silicone) microfluidic channels. The "tilted angle" (skewed) configuration is a recent breakthrough producing particle trajectories that cross multiple node lines, making it practical to sort particles. However, lithium niobate wafers and PDMS microfluidic channels are not mechanically robust. We demonstrate "tilted angle" microparticle sorting in novel devices that are robust, rapidly prototyped, and manufacturable. We form our microfluidic system in a rigid polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA, acrylic) prism, sandwiched by lead-zirconium-titanate (PZT) wafers, operating in through-thickness mode with inertial backing, that produce standing bulk waves. The overall configuration is compact and mechanically robust, and actuating PZT wafers in through-thickness mode is highly efficient. Moving to this novel configuration introduced new acoustics questions involving internal reflections, but we show experimental images confirming the intended nodal geometry. Microparticles in "tilted angle" devices display undulating trajectories, where deviation from the straight path increases with particle diameter and with excitation voltage to create the mechanism by which particles are sorted. We show a simplified analytical model by which a "phase space" is constructed to characterize effective particle sorting, and we compare our experimental data to the predictions from that simplified model; precise correlation is not expected and is not observed, but the important physical trends from the model are paralleled in the measured particle trajectories.

  20. The dust acoustic waves in three dimensional scalable complex plasma

    Zhukhovitskii, D I

    2015-01-01

    Dust acoustic waves in the bulk of a dust cloud in complex plasma of low pressure gas discharge under microgravity conditions are considered. The dust component of complex plasma is assumed a scalable system that conforms to the ionization equation of state (IEOS) developed in our previous study. We find singular points of this IEOS that determine the behavior of the sound velocity in different regions of the cloud. The fluid approach is utilized to deduce the wave equation that includes the neutral drag term. It is shown that the sound velocity is fully defined by the particle compressibility, which is calculated on the basis of the scalable IEOS. The sound velocities and damping rates calculated for different 3D complex plasmas both in ac and dc discharges demonstrate a good correlation with experimental data that are within the limits of validity of the theory. The theory provides interpretation for the observed independence of the sound velocity on the coordinate and for a weak dependence on the particle ...

  1. Thickness measurement of Ni thin film using dispersion characteristics of a surface acoustic wave

    In this study, we suggest a method to measure the thickness of thin films nondestructively using the dispersion characteristics of a surface acoustic wave propagating along the thin film surface. To measure the thickness of thin films, we deposited thin films with different thicknesses on a Si (100) wafer substrate by controlling the deposit time using the E-beam evaporation method. The thickness of the thin films was measured using a scanning electron microscope. Subsequently, the surface wave velocity of the thin films with different thicknesses was measured using the V(z) curve method of scanning acoustic microscopy. The correlation between the measured thickness and surface acoustic wave velocity was verified. The wave velocity of the film decreased as the film thickness increased. Therefore, thin film thickness can be determined by measuring the dispersion characteristics of the surface acoustic wave velocity.

  2. Evidence of slow magneto-acoustic waves in photospheric observations of a sunspot

    Zharkov, S; Erdélyi, R; Thompson, M J

    2009-01-01

    We show the observational evidence for the presence of MHD waves in the solar photosphere deduced from SOHO MDI Dopplergram velocity observations. The magneto-acoustic oscillations are observed as acoustic power enhancement in the sunspot umbra at high frequency bands in the velocity component transverse to the magnetic field. We use numerical modelling of the wave propagation through localised non-uniform magnetic field concentration along with the same filtering procedure as applied to the observations to identify the observed waves. Underpinned by the results of the numerical simulations we classify the observed oscillations as slow magneto-acoustic waves excited by the trapped sub-photospheric acoustic waves. We consider the potential application of the presented method as a diagnostic tool for magnetohelioseismology.

  3. Kinetic study of ion acoustic twisted waves with kappa distributed electrons

    Arshad, Kashif; Aman-ur-Rehman, Mahmood, Shahzad

    2016-05-01

    The kinetic theory of Landau damping of ion acoustic twisted modes is developed in the presence of orbital angular momentum of the helical (twisted) electric field in plasmas with kappa distributed electrons and Maxwellian ions. The perturbed distribution function and helical electric field are considered to be decomposed by Laguerre-Gaussian mode function defined in cylindrical geometry. The Vlasov-Poisson equation is obtained and solved analytically to obtain the weak damping rates of the ion acoustic twisted waves in a non-thermal plasma. The strong damping effects of ion acoustic twisted waves at low values of temperature ratio of electrons and ions are also obtained by using exact numerical method and illustrated graphically, where the weak damping wave theory fails to explain the phenomenon properly. The obtained results of Landau damping rates of the twisted ion acoustic wave are discussed at different values of azimuthal wave number and non-thermal parameter kappa for electrons.

  4. Generation of thermo-acoustic waves from pulsed solar/IR radiation

    Rahman, Aowabin

    Acoustic waves could potentially be used in a wide range of engineering applications; however, the high energy consumption in generating acoustic waves from electrical energy and the cost associated with the process limit the use of acoustic waves in industrial processes. Acoustic waves converted from solar radiation provide a feasible way of obtaining acoustic energy, without relying on conventional nonrenewable energy sources. One of the goals of this thesis project was to experimentally study the conversion of thermal to acoustic energy using pulsed radiation. The experiments were categorized into "indoor" and "outdoor" experiments, each with a separate experimental setup. The indoor experiments used an IR heater to power the thermo-acoustic lasers and were primarily aimed at studying the effect of various experimental parameters on the amplitude of sound waves in the low frequency range (below 130 Hz). The IR radiation was modulated externally using a chopper wheel and then impinged on a porous solid, which was housed inside a thermo-acoustic (TA) converter. A microphone located at a certain distance from the porous solid inside the TA converter detected the acoustic signals. The "outdoor" experiments, which were targeted at TA conversion at comparatively higher frequencies (in 200 Hz-3 kHz range) used solar energy to power the thermo-acoustic laser. The amplitudes (in RMS) of thermo-acoustic signals obtained in experiments using IR heater as radiation source were in the 80-100 dB range. The frequency of acoustic waves corresponded to the frequency of interceptions of the radiation beam by the chopper. The amplitudes of acoustic waves were influenced by several factors, including the chopping frequency, magnitude of radiation flux, type of porous material, length of porous material, external heating of the TA converter housing, location of microphone within the air column, and design of the TA converter. The time-dependent profile of the thermo-acoustic signals

  5. Generation of surface acoustic wave by laser line array and its frequency characteristics

    Surface acoustic waves are very effective for the inspection of cracks and other defects in near-field region of the sample. Surface acoustic waves were generated by illumination of a sample surface with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser pulse. A multiple slit and a cylindrical lens were used to generate the tone-burst like surface waves. Non contact detection of laser-generated surface acoustic waves was performed with the fiber optic Sagnac interferometer on a carbon steel specimen. Rayleigh wave velocity was obtained by the cross correlation of the signals recorded at different location, and was used to estimate the predominant frequency of the surface wave. Adjustment of the center frequency of the surface wave was performed by changing the distance between the sample and the lens, and the proper range for narrowband frequency was discussed.

  6. Tracking a convoy of multiple targets using acoustic sensor data

    Damarla, T. R.

    2003-08-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm to track a convoy of several targets in a scene using acoustic sensor array data. The tracking algorithm is based on template of the direction of arrival (DOA) angles for the leading target. Often the first target is the closest target to the sensor array and hence the loudest with good signal to noise ratio. Several steps were used to generate a template of the DOA angle for the leading target, namely, (a) the angle at the present instant should be close to the angle at the previous instant and (b) the angle at the present instant should be within error bounds of the predicted value based on the previous values. Once the template of the DOA angles of the leading target is developed, it is used to predict the DOA angle tracks of the remaining targets. In order to generate the tracks for the remaining targets, a track is established if the angles correspond to the initial track values of the first target. Second the time delay between the first track and the remaining tracks are estimated at the highest correlation points between the first track and the remaining tracks. As the vehicles move at different speeds the tracks either compress or expand depending on whether a target is moving fast or slow compared to the first target. The expansion and compression ratios are estimated and used to estimate the predicted DOA angle values of the remaining targets. Based on these predicted DOA angles of the remaining targets the DOA angles obtained from the MVDR or Incoherent MUSIC will be appropriately assigned to proper tracks. Several other rules were developed to avoid mixing the tracks. The algorithm is tested on data collected at Aberdeen Proving Ground with a convoy of 3, 4 and 5 vehicles. Some of the vehicles are tracked and some are wheeled vehicles. The tracking algorithm results are found to be good. The results will be presented at the conference and in the paper.

  7. Experiments on the acoustic solitary wave generated thermoacoustically in a looped tube

    Shimizu, Dai; Sugimoto, Nobumasa

    2015-10-01

    Emergence of an acoustic solitary wave is demonstrated in a gas-filled, looped tube with an array of Helmholtz resonators connected. The solitary wave is generated thermoacoustically and spontaneously by a pair of stacks positioned diametrically on exactly the opposite side of the loop. The temperature gradient is imposed on both stacks in the same sense along the tube. The stacks made of ceramics and of many square pores are sandwiched by hot and cold heat exchangers. The pressure profile measured and the propagation speed show good agreements with the theoretical ones of the acoustic solitary wave obtained by Sugimoto (J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 99, 1971-1976 (1996)).

  8. Optical transition radiation in presence of acoustic waves for an oblique incidence

    Mkrtchyan, A R; Saharian, A A

    2011-01-01

    Forward transition radiation is considered in an ultrasonic superlattice excited in a finite thickness plate under oblique incidence of relativistic electrons. We investigate the influence of acoustic waves on both the intensity and polarization of the radiation. In the quasi-classical approximation, formulas are derived for the vector potential of the electromagnetic field and for the spectral-angular distribution of the radiation intensity. It is shown that the acoustic waves generate new resonance peaks in the spectral and angular distributions. The heights and the location of the peaks can be controlled by choosing the parameters of the acoustic wave. The numerical examples are given for a plate of fused quartz.

  9. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in plasmas with superthermal electrons

    Using the reductive perturbation technique, the modulational instability of ion- acoustic waves in a plasma containing superthermal electrons is studied. It is found that the presence of superthermal electrons significantly changes the instability domain. A Lorentzian (kappa) velocity distribution function is used to model superthermal electrons. It is shown that the presence of superthermal electrons reduces the critical frequency of the modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves. Besides, due to the presence of the superthermal electrons, ion-acoustic waves are unstable on a vaster region. Moreover, the modulational instability growth rate is larger for a larger population of superthermal electrons.

  10. Effect of adiabatic variation of dust charges on dust acoustic solitary waves in magnetized dusty plasmas

    Duan Wen-Shan

    2004-01-01

    The effect of dust charging and the influence of its adiabatic variation on dust acoustic waves is investigated. By employing the reductive perturbation technique we derived a Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation for small amplitude dust acoustic waves. We have analytically verified that there are only rarefactive solitary waves for this system. The instability region for one-dimensional solitary wave under transverse perturbations has also been obtained. The obliquely propagating solitary waves to the z-direction for the ZK equation are given in this paper as well.

  11. Investigation of the thickness effect to impedance analysis results AlGaN acoustic sensor

    Özen, Soner; Bilgiç, Eyüp; Gülmez, Gülay; Şenay, Volkan; Pat, Suat; Korkmaz, Şadan; Mohammadigharehbagh, Reza

    2016-03-01

    In this study, AlGaN acoustic sensors were deposited on aluminum metal substrate by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method, for the first time. Impedance analyses of the fabricated acoustic sensors were investigated for the determining of effect of the nano layer thickness. Thickness values are very close to each others. Fabricated sensors have been fabricated from AlGaN deposited on aluminum substrates. Gallium materials are used in many applications for optoelectronic device and semiconductor technology. Thermionic vacuum arc is the deposition technology for the variously materials and applications field. TVA production parameters and some properties of the deposited layers were investigated. TVA is the fast deposition technology for the gallium compounds and doped gallium compounds. Obtained results that AlGaN layer are very promising material for an acoustic sensor but also TVA is proper fast technology for the production.

  12. Omnidirectional piezo-optical ring sensor for enhanced guided wave structural health monitoring

    This paper presents a novel method for the detection of ultrasonic waves from acoustic emission events using piezoelectric wafer ac3tive sensors (PWAS) and optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing combined with mechanical resonance amplification principles. The method is best suited for detecting the out-of-plane motion of the AE wave with preference for a certain frequency that can be adjusted by design. Several issues are discussed: (a) study the mode shapes of the sensors under different resonance frequencies in order to understand the behavior of the ring in a frequency band of interest; (b) comparison of analytical results and mode shapes with FEM predictions; (c) choice of the final piezo-optical ring sensor shape; (d) testing of the piezo-optical ring sensor prototype; (e) discussion of the ring-sensor test results in comparison with conventional results from PWAS and FBG sensors mounted directly on the test structure. The paper ends with summary, conclusions, and suggestions for further work. (paper)

  13. A Traveling Wave based Communication Mechanism for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Yoshiaki Taniguchi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose and evaluate a selforganizing communication mechanism for wireless sensor networks where a large number of sensor nodes are deployed. To accomplish application-oriented periodic communication without any centralized controls, we adopt traveling wave phenomena of a pulse-coupled oscillator model by regarding sensor nodes as oscillators and emission of radio signals as firing. We first investigate conditions of a phase-response curve to attain wave-formed firing patterns regardless of the initial phase of oscillators. We adopt the derived phase-response curve to accomplish the desired form of message propagation through local and mutual interactions among neighboring sensor nodes. Through simulation experiments, we confirm that our mechanism delivers sensor information to / from a designated node in a more energyefficient manner than other method, although it takes time to generate a traveling wave.

  14. Network Lifetime Extension Based On Network Coding Technique In Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Padmavathy.T.V; T.V, Gayathri.V; Indumathi V; Karthika.G

    2012-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UWASNs) are playing a lot of interest in ocean applications, such as ocean pollution monitoring, ocean animal surveillance, oceanographic data collection, assisted- navigation, and offshore exploration, UWASN is composed of underwater sensors that engage sound to transmit information collected in the ocean. The reason to utilize sound is that radio frequency (RF) signals used by terrestrial sensor networks (TWSNs) can merely transmit a few meters in the wa...

  15. Parallel electric field in the auroral ionosphere: excitation of acoustic waves by Alfvén waves

    P. L. Israelevich

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a new mechanism for the formation of a parallel electric field observed in the auroral ionosphere. For this purpose, the excitation of acoustic waves by propagating Alfvén waves was studied numerically. We find that the magnetic pressure perturbation due to finite amplitude Alfvén waves causes the perturbation of the plasma pressure that propagates in the form of acoustic waves, and gives rise to a parallel electric field. This mechanism explains the observations of the strong parallel electric field in the small-scale electromagnetic perturbations of the auroral ionosphere. For the cases when the parallel electric current in the small-scale auroral perturbations is so strong that the velocity of current carriers exceeds the threshold of the ion sound instability, the excited ion acoustic waves may account for the parallel electric fields as strong as tens of mV/m.

  16. Passive Wireless SAW Humidity Sensors Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the preliminary development of passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) based humidity sensors for NASA application to distributed...

  17. Wireless SAW Based Temperature Gradient Sensor Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prime Photonics proposes design and development of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) based temperature gradient sensor for instrumentation of thermal protection systems...

  18. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic MHD shear flows

    Uchava, E. S.; B. M. Shergelashvili; Tevzadze, A. G.; Poedts, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic MHD flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model, that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy, but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower ...

  19. On-chip manipulation of single microparticles, cells, and organisms using surface acoustic waves

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Kiraly, Brian; Yue, Hongjun; Li, Sixing; Chiang, I-Kao; Shi, Jinjie; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-01-01

    Techniques that can dexterously manipulate single particles, cells, and organisms are invaluable for many applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and physics. Here, we demonstrate standing surface acoustic wave based “acoustic tweezers” that can trap and manipulate single microparticles, cells, and entire organisms (i.e., Caenorhabditis elegans) in a single-layer microfluidic chip. Our acoustic tweezers utilize the wide resonance band of chirped interdigital transducers to achieve re...

  20. Propagation of acoustic edge waves in graphene under quantum Hall effect

    Vikström, Anton

    2014-01-01

    We consider a graphene sheet with a zigzag edge subject to a perpendicular magnetic field and investigate the propagation of in-plane acoustic edge waves under the influence of magnetically induced electronic edge states. In particular is is shown that propagation is significantly blocked for certain frequencies defined by the resonant absorption due to electronic-acoustic interaction. We suggest that strong interaction between the acoustic and electronic edge states in graphene may generate ...

  1. Quantitative determination of protein molecular weight with an acoustic sensor; significance of specific versus non-specific binding.

    Mitsakakis, Konstantinos; Tsortos, Achilleas; Gizeli, Electra

    2014-08-21

    Surface acoustic wave sensors with integrated microfluidics for multi-sample sensing have been implemented in this work towards the quantitative correlation of the acoustic signal with the molecular weight of surface bound proteins investigating different interaction/binding conditions. The results are presented for: (i) four different biotinylated molecules (30 ≤ Mw ≤ 150 kDa) specifically binding to neutravidin; (ii) the same four non-biotinylated molecules, as well as neutravidin, adsorbing onto gold; and (iii) four cardiac marker proteins (86 ≤ Mw ≤ 540 kDa) specifically binding to their homologous antibodies. Surface plasmon resonance was employed as an independent optical mass sensor. A linear relationship was found to exist between the phase change of the acoustic signal and the molecular weight of the proteins in both cases of specific binding. In contrast, non-specific binding of proteins directly onto gold exhibited no such linear relationship. In all three cases phase change was correlated with the bound mass per area. The underlying mechanism behind the different behavior between specific and non-specific binding is discussed by taking into account the geometrical restrictions imposed by the size of the specific biorecognition molecule and the corresponding bound protein. Our results emphasize the quantitative nature of the phase of the acoustic signal in determining the Mw (in the case of specific binding) with a resolution of 15% and the mass of the bound proteins (in all cases), as well as the significance of the biorecognition molecules in deriving the molecular weight from acoustic or optical detectors. PMID:24943453

  2. Enhancing gas-phase reaction in a plasma using high intensity and high power ultrasonic acoustic waves

    2010-01-01

    acoustic energy by at least one ultrasonic high intensity and high power gas-jet acoustic wave generator (101), where said ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves are directed to propagate towards said plasma (104) so that at least a part of said predetermined amount of acoustic energy is......This invention relates to enhancing a gas-phase reaction in a plasma comprising: creating plasma (104) by at least one plasma source (106), and wherein that the method further comprises: generating ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) having a predetermined amount of...... absorbed into said plasma (104), and where a sound pressure level of said generated ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) is at least substantially 140 dB and where an acoustic power of said generated ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102); is at least...

  3. Bifurcations of nonlinear ion-acoustic travelling waves in a multicomponent magnetoplasma with superthermal electrons

    Selim, M. M.; El-Depsy, A.; El-Shamy, E. F.

    2015-12-01

    Properties of nonlinear ion-acoustic travelling waves propagating in a three-dimensional multicomponent magnetoplasma system composed of positive ions, negative ions and superthermal electrons are considered. Using the reductive perturbation technique (RPT), the Zkharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation is derived. The bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems is applied to investigate the existence of the solitary wave solutions and the periodic travelling wave solutions of the resulting ZK equation. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive nonlinear ion-acoustic travelling waves strongly depend on the external magnetic field, the unperturbed positive-to-negative ions density ratio, the direction cosine of the wave propagation vector with the Cartesian coordinates, as well as the superthermal electron parameter. The present model may be useful for describing the formation of nonlinear ion-acoustic travelling wave in certain astrophysical scenarios, such as the D and F-regions of the Earth's ionosphere.

  4. Extraction of Stoneley and acoustic Rayleigh waves from ambient noise on ocean bottom observations

    Tonegawa, T.; Fukao, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Obana, K.; Kodaira, S.; Kaneda, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In the interferometry, the wavefield propagating between two positions can be retrieved by correlating ambient noise recorded on the two positions. This approach is useful for applying to various kinds of wavefield, such as ultrasonic, acoustic (ocean acoustic), and also seismology. Off the Kii Peninsula, Japan, more than 150 short-period (4.5 Hz) seismometers, in which hydrophone is also cosited, had been deployed for ~2 months on 2012 by Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) as a part of 'Research concerning Interaction Between the Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai Earthquakes' funded by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. In this study, correlating ambient noise recorded on the sensors and hydrophones, we attempt to investigate characteristics of wavefield relative to the ocean, sediment, and solid-fluid boundary. The observation period is from Sep. 2012 to Dec. 2012. Station spacing is around 5 km. For 5 lines off the Kii Peninsula, the 30-40 seismometers are distributed at each line. Sampling interval is 200 Hz for both seismometer and hydrophone. The vertical component is just used in this study for correlation analysis. The instruments are located at 100-4800 m in water depth. In the processing for the both records, we applied a bandpass filter of 1-3 Hz, replaced the amplitude to zero if it exceeds a value that was set in this study, and took one-bit normalization. We calculated cross-correlation function (CCF) by using continuous records with a time length of 600 s, stacked the CCFs over the whole observation period. As a result of the analysis for hydrophone, a strong peak can be seen in the CCF for pairs of stations where the separation distance is ~5 km. Although the peak emerges in the CCFs for the separation distance up to 10 km, it disappears in the case that two stations are greater than 15 km separated. As a next approach, along a line off the Kii Peninsula, we aligned CCFs for two stations with

  5. Large amplitude Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves in a relativistic two-fluid plasma

    Large amplitude Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves in a relativistic two-fluid plasma are analysed by the pseudo-potential method. The existence conditions for relativistic nonlinear Langmuir waves depend on the relativistic effect, the particular energy and the ion mass to electron mass ratio. The allowable range of the normalized potential depends on the relativistic effect. It is shown that the Mach number has the significant effect for the formation of relativistic nonlinear ion-acoustic waves rather than the ratio of the ion-acoustic velocity to the velocity of light. The allowable range of the normalized potential depends on the Mach number. The present investigation predicts new findings of relativistic nonlinear Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves in plasmas in which high-speed electrons and ions coexist. (author)

  6. Data-driven and calibration-free Lamb wave source localization with sparse sensor arrays.

    Harley, Joel B; Moura, José M F

    2015-08-01

    Most Lamb wave localization techniques require that we know the wave's velocity characteristics; yet, in many practical scenarios, velocity estimates can be challenging to acquire, are unavailable, or are unreliable because of the complexity of Lamb waves. As a result, there is a significant need for new methods that can reduce a system's reliance on a priori velocity information. This paper addresses this challenge through two novel source localization methods designed for sparse sensor arrays in isotropic media. Both methods exploit the fundamental sparse structure of a Lamb wave's frequency-wavenumber representation. The first method uses sparse recovery techniques to extract velocities from calibration data. The second method uses kurtosis and the support earth mover's distance to measure the sparseness of a Lamb wave's approximate frequency-wavenumber representation. These measures are then used to locate acoustic sources with no prior calibration data. We experimentally study each method with a collection of acoustic emission data measured from a 1.22 m by 1.22 m isotropic aluminum plate. We show that both methods can achieve less than 1 cm localization error and have less systematic error than traditional time-of-arrival localization methods. PMID:26276960

  7. Mesospheric, Thermospheric, and Ionospheric Responses to Acoustic and Gravity Waves Generated by Transient Forcing

    Snively, J. B.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Strong acoustic waves with periods ~1-4 minutes have been confirmed to perturb the ionosphere following their generation by earthquakes [e.g., Garcia et al., GRL, 40(5), 2013] and volcanic eruption events [e.g., Heki, GRL, 33, L14303, 2006]. Clear acoustic and gravity wave signatures have also been reported in ionospheric data above strong tropospheric convection [Nishioka, GRL, 40(21), 2013], and prior modeling results suggest that convectively-generated acoustic waves with ~3-4 minute periods are readily detectable above their sources in TEC [Zettergren and Snively, GRL, 40(20), 2013]. These observations have provided quantitative insight into the coupling of processes occurring near Earth's surface with the upper atmosphere and ionosphere over short time-scales. Here, we investigate acoustic waves and short-period gravity waves generated by sources near ground level, and the observable responses of the mesosphere, lower-thermosphere, and ionosphere (MLTI) systems. Numerical simulations are performed using a nonlinear, compressible, atmospheric dynamics model, in cylindrically-axisymmetric coordinates, to investigate wave generation, upward propagation, steepening, and dissipation. Acoustic waves may produce observable signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer [e.g., Snively, GRL, 40(17), 2013], and can strongly perturb the lower-thermosphere and E- and F-region ionosphere, prior to the arrival of simultaneously-generated gravity waves. Using a coupled multi-fluid ionospheric model [Zettergren and Semeter, JGR, 117(A6), 2012], extended for mid and low latitudes using a 2D dipole magnetic field coordinate system [Zettergren and Snively, GRL, 40(20), 2013], we investigate its response to realistic acoustic wave perturbations. In particular, we demonstrate that the MLT and ionospheric responses are significantly and nonlinearly determined by the acoustic wave source geometry, spectrum, and amplitude, in addition to the local ambient state of the

  8. A method of acoustic wave registration and determination their generation region

    Here is presented a method of acoustic wave registration with using of a synchronous LF broadcasting system. This method of detection and determination of underground nuclear explosion location is based on a registration of ionospheric disturbances induced by acoustic waves at the region of LF sign al reflection. The measuring complex created in the institute of the Ionosphere /1/ allows to register amplitude-frequency characteristics of composite signal from synchronous broadcasting net

  9. Laser-induced acoustic wave generation/propagation/interaction in water in various internal channels

    Ko, Seung Hwan; Lee, Daeho; Pan, Heng; Ryu, Sang-Gil; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Kladias, Nick; Panides, Elias; Domoto, Gerald A.

    2010-01-01

    Short pulsed laser-induced single acoustic wave generation, propagation, interaction within a water-filled internal channel are experimentally and numerically studied. A large-area, short-duration, single-plane acoustic wave was generated by the thermoelastic interaction of a homogenized nanosecond pulsed laser beam with a liquid–solid interface and propagated at the speed of sound in water. Laser flash Schlieren photography was used to visualize the transient interaction of the plane acousti...

  10. Dust-Acoustic Waves in Strongly Coupled Dusty Plasmas Containing Variable-Charge Impurities

    XIE Bai-Song; HE Kai-Fen; M. Y. Yu

    2000-01-01

    A relatively self-consistent theory of dust-acoustic waves in the strongly coupled dusty plasmas containing variable charge impurities is given. Relevant physical processes such as dust elastic relaxation and dust charge relaxation are taken into account. It is shown that the negative dispersion of dust-acoustic waves due to the strong correlation of dusts is enhanced in the presence of dust-neutral collisions.

  11. Surface-Plasmon-Polariton (SPP)-Like Acoustic Surface Waves on Elastic Metamaterials

    Deng, Ke; He, Zhaojian; Ding, Yiqun; Zhao, Heping; Liu, Zhengyou

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dispersion properties of the acoustic surface waves on surface of elastic metamaterials. With an analytical approach, we show that unconventional acoustic surface waves, with dispersion behaviors very similar to the electromagnetic surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on metal surfaces, can exist on the elastic metamaterials around the frequency at which the elastic Lam\\'e's constants satisfy lambda+mu=0. Two typical elastic metamaterials are exemplified to demonstrate such pe...

  12. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field properties unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoaco...

  13. On the wave equation with semilinear porous acoustic boundary conditions

    Graber, Philip Jameson

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this work is to study a model of the wave equation with semilinear porous acoustic boundary conditions with nonlinear boundary/interior sources and a nonlinear boundary/interior damping. First, applying the nonlinear semigroup theory, we show the existence and uniqueness of local in time solutions. The main difficulty in proving the local existence result is that the Neumann boundary conditions experience loss of regularity due to boundary sources. Using an approximation method involving truncated sources and adapting the ideas in Lasiecka and Tataru (1993) [28], we show that the existence of solutions can still be obtained. Second, we prove that under some restrictions on the source terms, then the local solution can be extended to be global in time. In addition, it has been shown that the decay rates of the solution are given implicitly as solutions to a first order ODE and depends on the behavior of the damping terms. In several situations, the obtained ODE can be easily solved and the decay rates can be given explicitly. Third, we show that under some restrictions on the initial data and if the interior source dominates the interior damping term and if the boundary source dominates the boundary damping, then the solution ceases to exists and blows up in finite time. Moreover, in either the absence of the interior source or the boundary source, then we prove that the solution is unbounded and grows as an exponential function. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  14. Surface acoustic wave nebulization facilitating lipid mass spectrometric analysis.

    Yoon, Sung Hwan; Huang, Yue; Edgar, J Scott; Ting, Ying S; Heron, Scott R; Kao, Yuchieh; Li, Yanyan; Masselon, Christophe D; Ernst, Robert K; Goodlett, David R

    2012-08-01

    Surface acoustic wave nebulization (SAWN) is a novel method to transfer nonvolatile analytes directly from the aqueous phase to the gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. The lower ion energetics of SAWN and its planar nature make it appealing for analytically challenging lipid samples. This challenge is a result of their amphipathic nature, labile nature, and tendency to form aggregates, which readily precipitate clogging capillaries used for electrospray ionization (ESI). Here, we report the use of SAWN to characterize the complex glycolipid, lipid A, which serves as the membrane anchor component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and has a pronounced tendency to clog nano-ESI capillaries. We also show that unlike ESI SAWN is capable of ionizing labile phospholipids without fragmentation. Lastly, we compare the ease of use of SAWN to the more conventional infusion-based ESI methods and demonstrate the ability to generate higher order tandem mass spectral data of lipid A for automated structure assignment using our previously reported hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. The ease of generating SAWN-MS(n) data combined with HiTMS interpretation offers the potential for high throughput lipid A structure analysis. PMID:22742654

  15. Acoustic Wave Velocity as a Selection Trait in Eucalyptus nitens

    David Blackburn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in Eucalyptus nitens have revealed favourable genetic correlations exist between acoustic wave velocity (AWV in standing trees and modulus of elasticity (MOE, which can determine the suitability of trees for structural timber and/or engineered wood products. This study investigates the strength and stability of genetic variation in standing tree AWV across a range of environments in Tasmania, where there are a number of large plantation estates and breeding trials. Trees under study were from open-pollinated progeny trials established in 1993. Across sites, for standing tree AWV the ranking of E. nitens races did not change and within-race additive genetic correlations were strong (0.61 to 0.99. Heritabilities (0.16 to 0.74 and coefficients of additive genetic variation (2.6 to 4.8 were moderate for this trait. Correlations between standing tree AWV and both basic density and diameter at breast height (DBH were favourable. Results indicate that there is potential to improve MOE in E. nitens through the exploitation of genetic variation in AWV among and within races, the expression of genetic variation in AWV is relatively stable across different growing environments, and past selection for basic density and growth in pulpwood breeding programs is unlikely to have adversely affected MOE.

  16. Propagation and localization of acoustic waves in Fibonacci phononic circuits

    Aynaou, H [Laboratoire de Dynamique et d' Optique des Materiaux, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mohamed Premier, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Boudouti, E H El [Laboratoire de Dynamique et d' Optique des Materiaux, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mohamed Premier, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Djafari-Rouhani, B [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, UFR de Physique, Universite de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Akjouj, A [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires, UMR CNRS 8024, UFR de Physique, Universite de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Velasco, V R [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-13

    A theoretical investigation is made of acoustic wave propagation in one-dimensional phononic bandgap structures made of slender tube loops pasted together with slender tubes of finite length according to a Fibonacci sequence. The band structure and transmission spectrum is studied for two particular cases. (i) Symmetric loop structures, which are shown to be equivalent to diameter-modulated slender tubes. In this case, it is found that besides the existence of extended and forbidden modes, some narrow frequency bands appear in the transmission spectra inside the gaps as defect modes. The spatial localization of the modes lying in the middle of the bands and at their edges is examined by means of the local density of states. The dependence of the bandgap structure on the slender tube diameters is presented. An analysis of the transmission phase time enables us to derive the group velocity as well as the density of states in these structures. In particular, the stop bands (localized modes) may give rise to unusual (strong normal) dispersion in the gaps, yielding fast (slow) group velocities above (below) the speed of sound. (ii) Asymmetric tube loop structures, where the loops play the role of resonators that may introduce transmission zeros and hence new gaps unnoticed in the case of simple diameter-modulated slender tubes. The Fibonacci scaling property has been checked for both cases (i) and (ii), and it holds for a periodicity of three or six depending on the nature of the substrates surrounding the structure.

  17. Acoustic wave propagation in fluids with coupled chemical reactions

    This investigation presents a hydroacoustic theory which accounts for sound absorption and dispersion in a multicomponent mixture of reacting fluids (assuming a set of first-order acoustic equations without diffusion) such that several coupled reactions can occur simultaneously. General results are obtained in the form of a biquadratic characteristic equation (called the Kirchhoff-Langevin equation) for the complex propagation variable chi = - (α + iω/c) in which α is the attenuation coefficient, c is the phase speed of the progressive wave and ω is the angular frequency. Computer simulations of sound absorption spectra have been made for three different chemical systems, each comprised of two-step chemical reactions using physico-chemical data available in the literature. The chemical systems studied include: (1) water-dioxane, (2) aqueous solutions of glycine and (3) cobalt polyphosphate mixtures. Explicit comparisons are made between the exact biquadratic characteristic solution and the approximate equation (sometimes referred to as a Debye equation) previously applied to interpret the experimental data for the chemical reaction contribution to the absorption versus frequency. The relative chemical reaction and classical viscothermal contributions to the sound absorption are also presented. Several discrepancies that can arise when estimating thermodynamic data (chemical reaction heats or volume changes) for multistep chemical reaction systems when making dilute solution or constant density assumptions are discussed

  18. A Hybrid Path-Oriented Code Assignment CDMA-Based MAC Protocol for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Huifang Chen; Jun-Hong Cui; Lei Xie; Guangyu Fan

    2013-01-01

    Due to the characteristics of underwater acoustic channel, media access control (MAC) protocols designed for underwater acoustic sensor networks (UWASNs) are quite different from those for terrestrial wireless sensor networks. Moreover, in a sink-oriented network with event information generation in a sensor field and message forwarding to the sink hop-by-hop, the sensors near the sink have to transmit more packets than those far from the sink, and then a funneling effect occurs, which leads ...

  19. Dust ion acoustic solitary waves in a collisional dusty plasma with dust grains having Gaussian distribution

    The influence of dust size distribution on the dust ion acoustic solitary waves in a collisional dusty plasma is investigated. It is found that dust size distribution changes the amplitude and width of a solitary wave. A critical wave number is derived for the existence of purely damping mode. A deformed Korteweg-de Vries (dKdV) equation is obtained for the propagation of weakly nonlinear dust ion acoustic solitary waves and the effect of different plasma parameters on the solution of this equation is also presented

  20. Propagation of flexural waves in inhomogeneous plates exhibiting hysteretic nonlinearity: Nonlinear acoustic black holes.

    Gusev, Vitalyi E; Ni, Chenyin; Lomonosov, Alexey; Shen, Zhonghua

    2015-08-01

    Theory accounting for the influence of hysteretic nonlinearity of micro-inhomogeneous material on flexural wave in the plates of continuously varying thickness is developed. For the wedges with thickness increasing as a power law of distance from its edge strong modifications of the wave dynamics with propagation distance are predicted. It is found that nonlinear absorption progressively disappearing with diminishing wave amplitude leads to complete attenuation of acoustic waves in most of the wedges exhibiting black hole phenomenon. It is also demonstrated that black holes exist beyond the geometrical acoustic approximation. Applications include nondestructive evaluation of micro-inhomogeneous materials and vibrations damping. PMID:25937493

  1. Experimental Results for Direction of Arrival Estimation with a Single Acoustic Vector Sensor in Shallow Water

    Alper Bereketli; Guldogan, Mehmet B.; Taner Kolcak; Tamer Gudu; Ahmet Levent Avsar

    2015-01-01

    We study the performances of several computationally efficient and simple techniques for estimating direction of arrival (DOA) of an underwater acoustic source using a single acoustic vector sensor (AVS) in shallow water. Underwater AVS is a compact device, which consists of one hydrophone and three accelerometers in a packaged form, measuring scalar pressure and three-dimensional acceleration simultaneously at a single position. A very controlled experimental setup is prepared to test how we...

  2. New Research on MEMS Acoustic Vector Sensors Used in Pipeline Ground Markers

    Xiaopeng Song

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the demands of current pipeline detection systems, the above-ground marker (AGM system based on sound detection principle has been a major development trend in pipeline technology. A novel MEMS acoustic vector sensor for AGM systems which has advantages of high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, and good low frequency performance has been put forward. Firstly, it is presented that the frequency of the detected sound signal is concentrated in a lower frequency range, and the sound attenuation is relatively low in soil. Secondly, the MEMS acoustic vector sensor structure and basic principles are introduced. Finally, experimental tests are conducted and the results show that in the range of 0°~90°, when r = 5 m, the proposed MEMS acoustic vector sensor can effectively detect sound signals in soil. The measurement errors of all angles are less than 5°.

  3. Distributed feedback fiber laser acoustic emission sensor for concrete structure health monitoring

    Hao, Gengjie; Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Sun, Baochen; Li, Fang

    2014-05-01

    This paper introduces a highly-sensitive fiber optical acoustic emission (AE) sensor and a parameter analysis method aiming at concrete structure health monitoring. Distributed feedback fiber-laser (DFB-FL), which is encapsulated to have a high acoustic sensitivity, is used for sensor unit of the AE sensor. The AE signal of concrete beam in different work stages, based on the four-point bending experiment of the concrete beam, is picked up, and the relationship between the concrete beam work stages and the AE parameter is found. The results indicate that DFB-FLAES can be used as sensitive transducers for recording acoustic events and forecasting the imminent failure of the concrete beam.

  4. Einstein-de Broglie relations for wave packet: the acoustic world

    Simaciu, Ion; Dumitrescu, Gheorghe; Georgeta, Nan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the relations of Einstein-de Broglie type for the wave packets. We assume that the wave packet is a possible model of particle . When studying the behaviour of the wave packet for standing waves, in relation to an accelerated observer (i.e. Rindler observer), there can be demonstrated that the equivalent mass of the packet is the inertial mass. In our scenario, the waves and of the wave packets are depicted by the strain induced/produced in the medium. The properties of the waves, of the wave packet and, generally, of the perturbations in a material medium suggest the existence of an acoustic world. The acoustic world has mechanical and thermodynamical properties. The perturbations that are generated and propagated in the medium are correlated by means of acoustic waves with maximum speed. The observers of this world of disturbances (namely the acoustic world) have senses that are based on the perception of mechanical waves (disturbance of any kind) and apparatus for detecting and acqui...

  5. A 94-GHz millimeter-wave sensor for speech signal acquisition.

    Li, Sheng; Tian, Ying; Lu, Guohua; Zhang, Yang; Lv, Hao; Yu, Xiao; Xue, Huijun; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Jianqi; Jing, Xijing

    2013-01-01

    High frequency millimeter-wave (MMW) radar-like sensors enable the detection of speech signals. This novel non-acoustic speech detection method has some special advantages not offered by traditional microphones, such as preventing strong-acoustic interference, high directional sensitivity with penetration, and long detection distance. A 94-GHz MMW radar sensor was employed in this study to test its speech acquisition ability. A 34-GHz zero intermediate frequency radar, a 34-GHz superheterodyne radar, and a microphone were also used for comparison purposes. A short-time phase-spectrum-compensation algorithm was used to enhance the detected speech. The results reveal that the 94-GHz radar sensor showed the highest sensitivity and obtained the highest speech quality subjective measurement score. This result suggests that the MMW radar sensor has better performance than a traditional microphone in terms of speech detection for detection distances longer than 1 m. As a substitute for the traditional speech acquisition method, this novel speech acquisition method demonstrates a large potential for many speech related applications. PMID:24284764

  6. A 94-GHz Millimeter-Wave Sensor for Speech Signal Acquisition

    Jianqi Wang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available High frequency millimeter-wave (MMW radar-like sensors enable the detection of speech signals. This novel non-acoustic speech detection method has some special advantages not offered by traditional microphones, such as preventing strong-acoustic interference, high directional sensitivity with penetration, and long detection distance. A 94-GHz MMW radar sensor was employed in this study to test its speech acquisition ability. A 34-GHz zero intermediate frequency radar, a 34-GHz superheterodyne radar, and a microphone were also used for comparison purposes. A short-time phase-spectrum-compensation algorithm was used to enhance the detected speech. The results reveal that the 94-GHz radar sensor showed the highest sensitivity and obtained the highest speech quality subjective measurement score. This result suggests that the MMW radar sensor has better performance than a traditional microphone in terms of speech detection for detection distances longer than 1 m. As a substitute for the traditional speech acquisition method, this novel speech acquisition method demonstrates a large potential for many speech related applications.

  7. Mesospheric airglow and ionospheric responses to upward-propagating acoustic and gravity waves above tropospheric sources

    Snively, J. B.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    The existence of acoustic waves (periods ~1-5 minutes) and gravity waves (periods >4 minutes) in the ionosphere above active tropospheric convection has been appreciated for more than forty years [e.g., Georges, Rev. Geophys. and Space Phys., 11(3), 1973]. Likewise, gravity waves exhibiting cylindrical symmetry and curvature of phase fronts have been observed via imaging of the mesospheric airglow layers [e.g., Yue et al., JGR, 118(8), 2013], clearly associated with tropospheric convection; gravity wave signatures have also recently been detected above convection in ionospheric total electron content (TEC) measurements [Lay et al., GRL, 40, 2013]. We here investigate the observable features of acoustic waves, and their relationship to upward-propagating gravity waves generated by the same sources, as they arrive in the mesosphere, lower-thermosphere, and ionosphere (MLTI). Numerical simulations using a nonlinear, cylindrically-axisymmetric, compressible atmospheric dynamics model confirm that acoustic waves generated by transient tropospheric sources may produce "concentric ring" signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer that precede the arrival of gravity waves. As amplitudes increase with altitude and decreasing neutral density, the modeled acoustic waves achieve temperature and vertical wind perturbations on the order of ~10s of Kelvin and m/s throughout the E- and F-region. Using a coupled multi-fluid ionospheric model [Zettergren and Semeter, JGR, 117(A6), 2012], extended for low-latitudes using a 2D dipole magnetic field coordinate system, we investigate acoustic wave perturbations to the ionosphere in the meridional direction. Resulting perturbations are predicted to be detectable by ground-based radar and GPS TEC measurements, or via in situ instrumentation. Although transient and short-lived, the acoustic waves' airglow and ionospheric signatures are likely to in some cases be observable, and may provide important insight into the regional

  8. Wireless Acoustic Signal Monitoring Using MEMS sensor and ATmega on LabVIEW Platform

    Swathy L

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acoustics and vibrations caused on machine structures can result in faulty or collapse of the whole mechanical system. These acoustics produced by machinery are vital indicators of machine health. Acoustic signals analysis can be used as a tool for locating the problem and thus taking necessary actions. MEMS sensors provide high accurate low size and low cost microphones which can be even used in low cost space applications such as sounding rockets, nano-satellites etc. This paper explains the algorithm to extract acoustic signals from ADMP401, which is a high quality, high performance, low power, analog output, bottom-ported omnidirectional MEMS microphone. The sensor output will give the error free data even in noisy conditions. ATmega microcontroller is used to read the data from the sensor and send to LabVIEW software running on the computer which will extract and display the data from the serial port in real time. As rotating structures are those machine parts which may experience high vibration and acoustic noises, the same is implemented in wireless also which helps in extracting acoustic signals from rotating as well as inaccessible parts of the machinery.

  9. Lamb wave sensors array for nonviscous liquid sensing

    CHEN Zhijun; HAN Tao; JI Xiaojun; GUO Huawei; SHI Wenkang

    2006-01-01

    The interdigital transducer (IDT) can excite Lamb wave in a piezoelectric plate loading with a liquid layer, and the phase velocity of Lamb wave is associated with the properties of the liquid layer. In this paper, the concept of effective permittivity is introduced to study the Lamb wave's potential application in liquid sensing. Considering the measuring of ideal nonviscous liquid, the sensors array is designed to sense the density and the dielectric constant of the liquid layer simultaneously. Using LiNbO3 as piezoelectric material, in order to improve the sensors array sensitivity and the electro-mechanical coupling coefficient, the optimized results including plate thicknesses and cut orientations are presented by numerical simulation. These studies show that the Lamb wave sensors array can be potential in liquid sensing.

  10. Droplets displacement and oscillations induced by ultrasonic surface acoustic waves: a quantitative study

    Brunet, P.; Baudoin, M; Matar, O. Bou; Zoueshtiagh, F.

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental study of a droplet interacting with an ultrasonic surface acoustic wave (SAW). Depending on the amplitude of the wave, the drop can either experience an internal flow with its contact-line pinned, or (at higher amplitude) move along the direction of the wave also with internal flow. Both situations appear together with oscillations of the drop free-surface. The physical origins of the internal mixing flow as well as the drop displacement and surface waves are still ...

  11. Development of sensors for the acoustic detection of ultra high energy neutrinos in the deep sea

    In addition to the optical detection system used by the ANTARES detector, a proposal was made to include an acoustic system consisting of several modified ANTARES storeys to investigate the feasibility of building and operating an acoustic particle detection system in the deep sea and at the same time perform an extensive study of the acoustic properties of the deep sea environment. The directional characteristics of the sensors and their placement within the ANTARES detector had to be optimised for the study of the correlation properties of the acoustic noise at different length scales - from below a metre to above 100 metres. The so-called ''equivalent circuit diagram (=ECD) model'' - was applied to predict the acoustic properties of piezo elements, such as sensitivity and intrinsic noise, and was extended by including effects resulting from the geometrical shape of the sensors. A procedure was devised to gain the relevant ECD parameters from electrical impedance measurements of the piezo elements, both free and coupled to a surrounding medium. Based on the findings of this ECD model, intensive design studies were performed with prototype hydrophones using piezo elements as active sensors. The design best suited for the construction of acoustic sensors for ANTARES was determined, and a total of twelve hydrophones were built with a sensitivity of -145 to -140 dB re 1V/μPa between 5 and 50 kHz and an intrinsic noise power density around -90 dB re 1 V/√(Hz), giving a total noise rms of 7 mV in this frequency range. The hydrophones were pressure tested and calibrated for integration into the ANTARES acoustic system. In addition, three so-called Acoustic Modules, sensors in pressure resistant glass spheres with a sensitive bandwidth of about 80 kHz, were developed and built. The calibration procedure employed during the sensor design studies as well as for the final sensors to be installed in the ANTARES framework is presented, together with exemplary results for

  12. Development of sensors for the acoustic detection of ultra high energy neutrinos in the deep sea

    Naumann, C.L.

    2007-09-17

    In addition to the optical detection system used by the ANTARES detector, a proposal was made to include an acoustic system consisting of several modified ANTARES storeys to investigate the feasibility of building and operating an acoustic particle detection system in the deep sea and at the same time perform an extensive study of the acoustic properties of the deep sea environment. The directional characteristics of the sensors and their placement within the ANTARES detector had to be optimised for the study of the correlation properties of the acoustic noise at different length scales - from below a metre to above 100 metres. The so-called 'equivalent circuit diagram (=ECD) model' - was applied to predict the acoustic properties of piezo elements, such as sensitivity and intrinsic noise, and was extended by including effects resulting from the geometrical shape of the sensors. A procedure was devised to gain the relevant ECD parameters from electrical impedance measurements of the piezo elements, both free and coupled to a surrounding medium. Based on the findings of this ECD model, intensive design studies were performed with prototype hydrophones using piezo elements as active sensors. The design best suited for the construction of acoustic sensors for ANTARES was determined, and a total of twelve hydrophones were built with a sensitivity of -145 to -140 dB re 1V/{mu}Pa between 5 and 50 kHz and an intrinsic noise power density around -90 dB re 1 V/{radical}(Hz), giving a total noise rms of 7 mV in this frequency range. The hydrophones were pressure tested and calibrated for integration into the ANTARES acoustic system. In addition, three so-called Acoustic Modules, sensors in pressure resistant glass spheres with a sensitive bandwidth of about 80 kHz, were developed and built. The calibration procedure employed during the sensor design studies as well as for the final sensors to be installed in the ANTARES framework is presented, together with

  13. Symmetrical and anti-symmetrical coherent perfect absorption for acoustic waves

    We investigate tunable acoustic absorption enabled by the coherent control of input waves. It relies on coherent perfect absorption originally proposed in optics. By designing appropriate acoustic metamaterial structures with resonating effective bulk modulus or density, we show that complete absorption of incident waves impinging on the metamaterial can be achieved for either symmetrical or anti-symmetrical inputs in the forward and backward directions. By adjusting the relative phase between the two incident beams, absorption can be tuned effectively from unity to zero, making coherent control useful in applications like acoustic modulators, noise controllers, transducers, and switches

  14. Ion-acoustic solitary waves and spectrally uniform scattering cross section enhancements

    J. Ekeberg; Wannberg, G.; Eliasson, L; Stasiewicz, K.

    2010-01-01

    Spectra measured by incoherent scatter radars are formed predominantly by scattering of the incident signal off ion-acoustic and Langmuir waves in the ionosphere. Occasionally, the upshifted and/or downshifted lines produced by the ion-acoustic waves are enhanced well above thermal levels and referred to as naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines. In this paper, we study another kind of enhancement, which is spectrally uniform over the whole ion-line, i.e. the up- and downshifted shoulder and t...

  15. Topology optimization applied to room acoustic problems and surface acoustic wave devices

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard;

    engineering fields such as mechanism design, fluid problems and photonic and phononic band-gap materials and structures [1,2]. In this project topology optimization is first applied to control acoustic properties in a room [3]. It is shown how the squared sound pressure amplitude in a certain part of a room...... can be minimized either by distribution of reflecting material in a design domain along the ceiling or by distribution of absorbing and reflecting material along all the walls for both 2D and 3D problems. It is also shown how the method can be used to design sound barriers. The main part of the...... shape of the frequency response. To begin with, a 2D model of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer impacted by a SAW is considered and a parameter study of the geometry to get the biggest modulation of the light waves in the interferometer arms is performed. Then a 2D filter is modeled and optimized such that...

  16. Anisotropic metamaterials for full control of acoustic waves.

    Christensen, Johan; García de Abajo, F Javier

    2012-03-23

    We study a class of acoustic metamaterials formed by layers of perforated plates and producing negative refraction and backward propagation of sound. A slab of such material is shown to act as a perfect acoustic lens, yielding images with subwavelength resolution over large distances. Our study constitutes a nontrivial extension of similar concepts from optics to acoustics, capable of sustaining negative refraction over extended angular ranges, with potential application to enhanced imaging for medical and detection purposes, acoustofluidics, and sonochemistry. PMID:22540586

  17. A study on dust acoustic traveling wave solutions and quasiperiodic route to chaos in nonthermal magnetoplasmas

    Saha, Asit; Pal, Nikhil; Saha, Tapash; Ghorui, M. K.; Chatterjee, Prasanta

    2016-06-01

    Bifurcations and chaotic behaviors of dust acoustic traveling waves in magnetoplasmas with nonthermal ions featuring Cairns-Tsallis distribution is investigated on the framework of the further modified Kadomtsev-Petviashili (FMKP) equation. The FMKP equation is derived employing the reductive perturbation technique (RPT). Bifurcations of dust acoustic traveling waves of the FMKP equation is presented. Using the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems, two new analytical traveling wave solutions for solitary and periodic waves are derived depending on the parameters α , α _1, q, l and U. Considering an external periodic perturbation, the chaotic behavior of dust acoustic traveling waves is investigated through quasiperiodic route to chaos. The parameter q significantly affects the chaotic behavior of the perturbed FMKP equation.

  18. Surface acoustic wave-induced precise particle manipulation in a trapezoidal glass microfluidic channel

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) excitation of an acoustic field in a trapezoidal glass microfluidic channel for particle manipulation in continuous flow has been demonstrated. A unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a Y-cut Z-propagation lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate was used to excite a surface acoustic wave at approximately 35 MHz. An SU8 layer was used for adhesive bonding of the superstrate glass layer and the substrate piezoelectric layer. This work extends the use of SAWs for acoustic manipulation to also include glass channels in addition to prior work with mainly poly-di-methyl-siloxane channels. Efficient alignment of 1.9 µm polystyrene particles to narrow nodal regions was successfully demonstrated. In addition, particle alignment with only one IDT active was realized. A finite element method simulation was used to visualize the acoustic field generated in the channel and the possibility of 2D alignment into small nodal regions was demonstrated

  19. Experimental verification of theoretical equations for acoustic radiation force on compressible spherical particles in traveling waves

    Johnson, Kennita A.; Vormohr, Hannah R.; Doinikov, Alexander A.; Bouakaz, Ayache; Shields, C. Wyatt; López, Gabriel P.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Acoustophoresis uses acoustic radiation force to remotely manipulate particles suspended in a host fluid for many scientific, technological, and medical applications, such as acoustic levitation, acoustic coagulation, contrast ultrasound imaging, ultrasound-assisted drug delivery, etc. To estimate the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, equations derived for an inviscid host fluid are commonly used. However, there are theoretical predictions that, in the case of a traveling wave, viscous effects can dramatically change the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, which make the equations obtained for an inviscid host fluid invalid for proper estimation of acoustic radiation forces. To date, experimental verification of these predictions has not been published. Experimental measurements of viscous effects on acoustic radiation forces in a traveling wave were conducted using a confocal optical and acoustic system and values were compared with available theories. Our results show that, even in a low-viscosity fluid such as water, the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces is increased manyfold by viscous effects in comparison with what follows from the equations derived for an inviscid fluid.

  20. Acoustic intensity methods and their applications to vector sensor use and design

    Naluai, Nathan Kahikina

    Applications of acoustic intensity processing methods to vector sensor output signals are investigated for three specific cases: acoustic intensity scattering, spatial correlations of intensities, and conceptual design of a high frequency inertial vector sensor with a novel suspension. An overview of intensity processing is presented and the concept of a complex intensity is illustrated. Measurement techniques for determining the complex intensity spectra from the signals received by a standard acoustic vector sensor are demonstrated. Acoustic intensity processing of signals from SSQ-53D sonobuoys is used to enhance the detection of submerged bodies in bi-static sonar applications. Deep water experiments conducted at Lake Pend Oreille in northern Idaho are described. A submerged body is located between a source and a number of SSQ-53D sonobuoy receivers. Scalar pressure measurements change by less than 0.5 dB when the scattering body is inserted in the field. The phase of the orthogonal intensity component shows repeatable and strong variations of nearly 55°. The classical solution for the spatial correlation of the pressure field is presented. The derivation techniques are expanded to derive previously unsolved analytic forms for the spatial correlations of separated intensity field components based on combinations of the solutions for various pressure and velocity components. Experimental validation of these correlation solutions are performed computationally and in an underwater environment. The computational experiments are designed to test highly controlled variations to the idealized case (e.g. sound field content, transducer phasing issues, additive output noise, etc.) Additional verification is provided from physical tests measuring the correlations between a pair of acoustic vector sensors in a large reverberant tank which is excited acoustically with broadband noise. The results successfully corroborate the derivation methods for correlations of

  1. Characteristics and realization of the second generation surface acoustic wave's wavelet device

    Wen Changbao; Zhu Changchun; Lu Wenke; Liu Qinghong; Liu Junhua

    2006-01-01

    To overcome the bulk acoustic wave (BAW), the triple transit signals and the discontinuous frequency band in the first generation surface acoustic wave's (FGSAW's) wavelet device, the full transfer multistrip coupler (MSC) is applied to implement wavelet device, and a novel structure of the second generation surface acoustic wave's (SGSAW's) wavelet device is proposed. In the SGSAW's wavelet device, the BAW is separated and eliminated in different acoustic propagating tracks, and the triple transit signal is suppressed. For arbitrary wavelet scale device, the center frequency is three times the radius of frequency band, which ensures that the frequency band of the SGSAW's wavelet device is continuous, and avoids losing signals caused by the discontinuation of frequency band. Experimental result confirms that the BAW suppression, ripples in band, receiving loss and insertion loss of the SGSAW's wavelet device are remarkably improved compared with those of the FGSAW's wavelet device.

  2. Dependence of oscillational instabilities on the amplitude of the acoustic wave in single-axis levitators

    Orozco-Santillán, Arturo; Ruiz-Boullosa, Ricardo; Cutanda Henríquez, Vicente;

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that acoustic waves exert forces on a boundary with which they interact; these forces can be so intense that they can compensate for the weight of small objects up to a few grams. In this way, it is possible to maintain solid or liquid samples levitating in a fluid, avoiding...... the use of containers, which may be undesirable for certain applications. Moreover, small samples can be manipulated by means of acoustic waves. In this paper, we report a study on the oscillational instabilities that can appear on a levitated solid sphere in single-axis acoustic devices. A theory...... proportional to the oscillation frequency of the levitated sample. We also present experimental results that show that the oscillational instabilities can be reduced if the amplitude of the acoustic wave is increased; as a result, stable conditions can be obtained where the oscillations of the sphere...

  3. FEM Simulations of Leaky Lamb Wave in Ultrasonic Waveguide Sensor

    As the sodium coolant of a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is opaque to light, a conventional visual inspection cannot be used for carrying out an in-service inspection of the internal structures under a sodium level. An ultrasonic wave should be applied for an under-sodium viewing of the internal structures in a reactor vessel. Recently, a noble plate-type ultrasonic waveguide sensor has been developed for versatile applications in an under-sodium viewing application. The beam profile of a A0-mode leaky Lamb wave of the waveguide sensor affects the resolution of visualization image in under-sodium viewing. In the design and manufacture of the waveguide sensor, the finite element method (FEM) modeling and simulation of the propagation of a leaky Lamb wave is required for the estimation and optimization of the waveguide sensor design parameters. In the previous research, the simple 2D modeling and simulation of the waveguide sensor had been carried out. In this work, FEM simulation of the propagation and radiation of the leaky Lamb wave in the waveguide sensor is performed for the vertical and lateral beam profile analysis using the pseudo 3D modeling including the wedge

  4. Holographic leaky-wave metasurfaces for dual-sensor imaging

    Li, Yun Bo; Li, Lian Lin; Cai, Ben Geng; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-12-01

    Metasurfaces have huge potentials to develop new type imaging systems due to their abilities of controlling electromagnetic waves. Here, we propose a new method for dual-sensor imaging based on cross-like holographic leaky-wave metasurfaces which are composed of hybrid isotropic and anisotropic surface impedance textures. The holographic leaky-wave radiations are generated by special impedance modulations of surface waves excited by the sensor ports. For one independent sensor, the main leaky-wave radiation beam can be scanned by frequency in one-dimensional space, while the frequency scanning in the orthogonal spatial dimension is accomplished by the other sensor. Thus, for a probed object, the imaging plane can be illuminated adequately to obtain the two-dimensional backward scattered fields by the dual-sensor for reconstructing the object. The relativity of beams under different frequencies is very low due to the frequency-scanning beam performance rather than the random beam radiations operated by frequency, and the multi-illuminations with low relativity are very appropriate for multi-mode imaging method with high resolution and anti- noise. Good reconstruction results are given to validate the proposed imaging method.

  5. Miniature inhalation therapy platform using surface acoustic wave microfluidic atomization.

    Qi, Aisha; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y; Morton, David A V; McIntosh, Michelle P; Spiccia, Leone

    2009-08-01

    Pulmonary drug administration requires direct delivery of drug formulations into the lower pulmonary tract and alveoli of the lung in the form of inhaled particles or droplets, providing a distinct advantage over other methods for the treatment of respiratory diseases: the drug can be delivered directly to the site of inflammation, thus reducing the need for systemic exposure and the possibility of adverse effects. However, it is difficult to produce droplets of a drug solution within a narrow monodisperse size range (1-10 microm) needed for deposition in the lower pulmonary tract and alveoli. Here, we demonstrate the use of surface acoustic wave microfluidic atomization as an efficient means to generate appropriate aerosols containing a model drug, the short-acting beta2 agonist salbutamol, for the treatment of asthma. The mean aerosol diameter produced, 2.84+/-0.14 microm, lies well within the optimum size range, confirmed by a twin-stage impinger lung model, demonstrating that approximately 70 to 80% of the drug supplied to the atomizer is deposited within the lung. Our preliminary study explores how to control the aerosol diameter and lung delivery efficiency through the surface tension, viscosity, and input power, and also indicates which factors are irrelevant-like the fluid density. Even over a modest power range of 1-1.5 W, SAW atomization provides a viable and efficient generic nebulization platform for the delivery of drugs via the pulmonary route for the treatment of various diseases. The control offered over the aerosol size, low power requirements, high delivery efficiency, and the miniaturization of the system together suggest the proposed platform represents an attractive alternative to current nebulizers compatible with microfluidic technologies. PMID:19606295

  6. Polymer Optical Fibre Sensors for Endoscopic Opto-Acoustic Imaging

    Broadway, Christian; Gallego, Daniel; Woyessa, Getinet;

    2015-01-01

    Opto-acoustic imaging (OAI) shows particular promise for in-vivo biomedical diagnostics. Its applications include cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and urogenital systems imaging. Opto-acoustic endoscopy (OAE) allows the imaging of body parts through cavities permitting entry. The critical parameter...... in existing publications. A great advantage can be obtained for endoscopy due to a small size and array potential to provide discrete imaging speed improvements. Optical fibre exhibits numerous advantages over conventional piezo-electric transducers, such as immunity from electromagnetic interference...... on the opportunities and challenges of applying this technology in biomedical applications....

  7. Effect of nonthermal ion distribution and dust temperature on nonlinear dust-acoustic solitary waves

    K Annou; R Annou

    2012-01-01

    Dust-acoustic solitary waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma whose constituents are inertial charged dust grains, Boltzmannian electrons and nonthermal ions have been investigated by taking into account finite dust temperature. The pseudopotential has been used to study solitary solution. The existence of solitary waves having negative potential is reported.

  8. Finite element analysis of surface acoustic waves in high aspect ratio electrodes

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2008-01-01

    This paper elaborates on how the finite element method is employed to model surface acoustic waves generated by high aspect ratio electrodes and their interaction with optical waves in a waveguide. With a periodic model it is shown that these electrodes act as a mechanical resonator which slows...

  9. Propagation of Ion-Acoustic Wave in an Inhomogeneous Dusty Plasma with. Dust Charge Fluctuation

    LI Jing-Ju; XIAO De-Long; LI Yang-Fang; MA Jin-Xiu

    2007-01-01

    @@ The propagation of dust ion-acoustic wave in an inhomogeneous dusty plasma is studied by taking the dust charge fluctuation and collisions into account. It is shown that the dust charge fluctuation brings a phase shift to the wave. Furthermore, because of the presence of dust charge fluctuation, a new damping term rises, which makes the damping more sharply.

  10. Lagrangean description of nonlinear dust--ion acoustic waves in dusty plasmas

    Kourakis, I.; Shukla, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    An analytical model is presented for the description of nonlinear dust-ion-acoustic waves propagating in an unmagnetized, collisionless, three component plasma composed of electrons, ions and inertial dust grains. The formulation relies on a Lagrangean approach of the plasma fluid model. The modulational stability of the wave amplitude is investigated. Different types of localized envelope electrostatic excitations are shown to exist.

  11. Ion acoustic waves in a positive ion-negative ion plasma

    Experimentally observed wave profiles of ion acoustic waves in a dispersive positive ion-negative ion plasma, reported in the literature, are compared with those theoretically derived ones. The possibility of physical applications for plasma diagnosis is suggested. (author). 3 refs, 3 figs

  12. The first radial-mode Lorentzian Landau damping of dust acoustic space-charge waves

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-05-01

    The dispersion properties and the first radial-mode Lorentzian Landau damping of a dust acoustic space-charge wave propagating in a cylindrical waveguide dusty plasma which contains nonthermal electrons and ions are investigated by employing the normal mode analysis and the method of separation of variables. It is found that the frequency of dust acoustic space-charge wave increases as the wave number increases as well as the radius of cylindrical plasma does. However, the nonthermal property of the Lorentzian plasma is found to suppress the wave frequency of the dust acoustic space-charge wave. The Landau damping rate of the dust acoustic space-charge wave is derived in a cylindrical waveguide dusty plasma. The damping of the space-charge wave is found to be enhanced as the radius of cylindrical plasma and the nonthermal property increase. The maximum Lorentzian Landau damping rate is also found in a cylindrical waveguide dusty plasma. The variation of the wave frequency and the Landau damping rate due to the nonthermal character and geometric effects are also discussed.

  13. Eulerian Simulation of Acoustic Waves Over Long Range in Realistic Environments

    Chitta, Subhashini; Steinhoff, John

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we describe a new method for computation of long-range acoustics. The approach is a hybrid of near and far-field methods, and is unique in its Eulerian treatment of the far-field propagation. The near-field generated by any existing method to project an acoustic solution onto a spherical surface that surrounds a source. The acoustic field on this source surface is then extended to an arbitrarily large distance in an inhomogeneous far-field. This would normally require an Eulerian solution of the wave equation. However, conventional Eulerian methods have prohibitive grid requirements. This problem is overcome by using a new method, ``Wave Confinement'' (WC) that propagates wave-identifying phase fronts as nonlinear solitary waves that live on grid indefinitely. This involves modification of wave equation by the addition of a nonlinear term without changing the basic conservation properties of the equation. These solitary waves can then be used to ``carry'' the essential integrals of the acoustic wave. For example, arrival time, centroid position and other properties that are invariant as the wave passes a grid point. Because of this property the grid can be made as coarse as necessary, consistent with overall accuracy to resolve atmospheric/ground variations. This work is being funded by the U.S. Army under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program (contract number: # W911W6-12-C-0036). The authors would like to thank Dr. Frank Caradonna and Dr. Ben W. Sim for this support.

  14. Amplification of surface acoustic waves by transverse electric current in piezoelectric semiconductors

    Gulyaev, Yuri V.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that the principal characteristic feature of the surface acoustic waves in piezoelectrics—the presence of an alternating electric field transverse to the surface, which can be of the same order of magnitude as the longitudinal field—may not only give rise to the known transverse...... acoustoelectric effect but also lead to amplification of surface acoustic waves by electron drift perpendicular to the surface. For Love waves in a piezoelectric semiconductor film on a highly conducting substrate, the amplification coefficient is found and the conditions necessary for amplification...

  15. Excitation of Light-Induced Acoustic Waves in Doped Lithium Niobate Crystals

    2006-01-01

    The phenomena of acoustic emission in doped lithium niobate crystals were observed in the process of light-induced quasi-breakdown. It is found that the ultrasonic waves introduce into the crystal have been modulated by the low frequency acoustic waves. Its frequency increases with the rise of the intensity of incident light and its jump period of breakdown is the same as that of the photovoltaic current Ic, the change of light-induced refractive index Δn and the diffracted light intensity L. This effect was explained with the interaction of the three waves and resonant state theory. The experimental results and the theoretical analysis are in conformity.

  16. Mesospheric hydroxyl airglow signatures of acoustic and gravity waves generated by transient tropospheric forcing

    Snively, J. B.

    2013-09-01

    Numerical model results demonstrate that acoustic waves generated by tropospheric sources may produce cylindrical "concentric ring" signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer. They may arrive as precursors to upward propagating gravity waves, generated simultaneously by the same sources, and produce strong temperature perturbations in the thermosphere above. Transient and short-lived, the acoustic wave airglow intensity and temperature signatures are predicted to be detectable by ground-based airglow imaging systems and may provide new insight into the forcing of the upper atmosphere from below.

  17. Bio-Inspired Miniature Direction Finding Acoustic Sensor

    Wilmott, Daniel; Alves, Fabio; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2016-01-01

    A narrowband MEMS direction finding sensor has been developed based on the mechanically coupled ears of the Ormia Ochracea fly. The sensor consists of two wings coupled at the middle and attached to a substrate using two legs. The sensor operates at its bending resonance frequency and has cosine directional characteristics similar to that of a pressure gradient microphone. Thus, the directional response of the sensor is symmetric about the normal axis making the determination of the direction ambiguous. To overcome this shortcoming two sensors were assembled with a canted angle similar to that employed in radar bearing locators. The outputs of two sensors were processed together allowing direction finding with no requirement of knowing the incident sound pressure level. At the bending resonant frequency of the sensors (1.69 kHz) an output voltage of about 25 V/Pa was measured. The angle uncertainty of the bearing of sound ranged from less than 0.3° close to the normal axis (0°) to 3.4° at the limits of coverage (±60°) based on the 30° canted angle used. These findings indicate the great potential to use dual MEMS direction finding sensor assemblies to locate sound sources with high accuracy. PMID:27440657

  18. Analytical Study of Nonlinear Dust Acoustic Waves in Two-Dimensional Dust Plasma with Dust Charge Variation

    LIN Chang; ZHANG Xiu-Lian

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation is analytically investigated by using the formally variable separation approach. New analytical solutions for the governing equation of this system have been obtained for dust acoustic waves in a dust plasma for the first time. We derive exact analytical expressions for the general case of the nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation.

  19. Total transmission and total reflection of acoustic wave by zero index metamaterials loaded with general solid defects

    Wang, Ziyu; Yang, Fan; Liu, Libing; Kang, Ming; Liu, Fengming

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates acoustic wave transmission property through a zero index metamaterials (ZIM) waveguide embedded with a general solid defect. Total transmission and total reflection can be achieved by adjusting the parameters of the solid defect. We comprehensively study how longitudinal/transverse wave speeds of the solid defect affect the acoustic wave propagation through the waveguide. A two-dimensional (2D) acoustic crystals (ACs) system with zero index is used to realize these intr...

  20. A Four-Quadrant PVDF Transducer for Surface Acoustic Wave Detection

    Zhi Chen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF piezoelectric transducer was developed to detect laser-induced surface acoustic waves in a SiO2-thin film–Si-substrate structure. In order to solve the problems related to, firstly, the position of the probe, and secondly, the fact that signals at different points cannot be detected simultaneously during the detection process, a four-quadrant surface acoustic wave PVDF transducer was designed and constructed for the purpose of detecting surface acoustic waves excited by a pulse laser line source. The experimental results of the four-quadrant piezoelectric detection in comparison with the commercial nanoindentation technology were consistent, the relative error is 0.56%, and the system eliminates the piezoelectric surface wave detection direction deviation errors, improves the accuracy of the testing system by 1.30%, achieving the acquisition at the same time at different testing positions of the sample.