WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustic test setup

  1. Status of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup

    Due to the low flux of ultra-high energetic neutrinos induced in interactions of cosmic rays with the cosmic microwave background, very large instrumented volumes and new registration techniques are necessary for their detection. The south polar ice offers the unique opportunity to implement existing Cherenkov techniques as well as registration of radio and acoustic waves from the neutrino interaction. A simulation of a ∼ 120 km3 hybrid optical/radio/acoustic detector showed that event rates of ∼ 10 per year can be achieved. In this simulation the ultrasonic parameters of antarctic ice regarding absorption, scattering and environmental noise pose the key uncertainty. To evaluate the acoustic properties in-situ, the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been created. An array of custom-made ultrasonic sensors and transmitters will be deployed on three strings in the upper 400 m of the holes of the IceCube experiment. The status of the experiment and a first evaluation of its performance are presented here

  2. Status and recent results of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup

    Karg, Timo

    2010-01-01

    The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been deployed to study the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection in Antarctic ice around the South Pole. An array of four strings equipped with acoustic receivers and transmitters, permanently installed in the upper 500 m of boreholes drilled for the IceCube neutrino observatory, and a retrievable transmitter that can be used in the water filled holes before the installation of the IceCube optical strings are used to measure the ice acoustic properties. These include the sound speed and its depth dependence, the attenuation length, the noise level, and the rate and nature of transient background sources in the relevant frequency range from 10 kHz to 100 kHz. SPATS is operating successfully since January 2007 and has been able to either measure or constrain all parameters. We present the latest results of SPATS and discuss their implications for future acoustic neutrino detection activities in Antarctica.

  3. Non-contact test set-up for aeroelasticity in a rotating turbomachine combining a novel acoustic excitation system with tip-timing

    Due to trends in aero-design, aeroelasticity becomes increasingly important in modern turbomachines. Design requirements of turbomachines lead to the development of high aspect ratio blades and blade integral disc designs (blisks), which are especially prone to complex modes of vibration. Therefore, experimental investigations yielding high quality data are required for improving the understanding of aeroelastic effects in turbomachines. One possibility to achieve high quality data is to excite and measure blade vibrations in turbomachines. The major requirement for blade excitation and blade vibration measurements is to minimize interference with the aeroelastic effects to be investigated. Thus in this paper, a non-contact—and thus low interference—experimental set-up for exciting and measuring blade vibrations is proposed and shown to work. A novel acoustic system excites rotor blade vibrations, which are measured with an optical tip-timing system. By performing measurements in an axial compressor, the potential of the acoustic excitation method for investigating aeroelastic effects is explored. The basic principle of this method is described and proven through the analysis of blade responses at different acoustic excitation frequencies and at different rotational speeds. To verify the accuracy of the tip-timing system, amplitudes measured by tip-timing are compared with strain gage measurements. They are found to agree well. Two approaches to vary the nodal diameter (ND) of the excited vibration mode by controlling the acoustic excitation are presented. By combining the different excitable acoustic modes with a phase-lag control, each ND of the investigated 30 blade rotor can be excited individually. This feature of the present acoustic excitation system is of great benefit to aeroelastic investigations and represents one of the main advantages over other excitation methods proposed in the past. In future studies, the acoustic excitation method will be used

  4. Setup for testing LHCb Inner Tracker ladders

    Vasquez Regueiro, P; Voss, H; Nicolas, L

    2007-01-01

    The Inner Tracker of the LHCb experiment is a silicon microstrip detector consisting of 336 detector modules with either one or two sensors. The module production is now underway and we present here the setup employed for module testing during the production. The setup is based on the same electronics that will be used in the final experiment. We perform burn-in and ageing tests with the help of a custom made Temperature Cycling Box controlled with LabVIEW under Windows. The DAQ is done in another PC running Linux. Here we integrate the different C/C++ libraries used to communicate to the LHCb Time and Fast Control system, Experiment Control System and Data Acquisition.

  5. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  6. Practical acoustic emission testing

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  7. Acoustic emission testing

    Grosse, Christian U

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) techniques have been studied in civil engineering for a long time. The techniques are recently going to be more and more applied to practical applications and to be standardized in the codes. This is because the increase of aging structures and disastrous damages due to recent earthquakes urgently demand for maintenance and retrofit of civil structures in service for example. It results in the need for the development of advanced and effective inspection techniques. Thus, AE techniques draw a great attention to diagnostic applications and in material testing. The book covers all levels from the description of AE basics for AE beginners (level of a student) to sophisticated AE algorithms and applications to real large-scale structures as well as the observation of the cracking process in laboratory specimen to study fracture processes.

  8. Test Setup for Axially Loaded Piles in Sand

    Thomassen, Kristina

    The test setup for testing axially static and cyclic loaded piles in sand is described in the following. The purpose for the tests is to examine the tensile capacity of axially loaded piles in dense fully saturated sand. The pile dimensions are chosen to resemble full scale dimension of piles used...

  9. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will explore and test the feasibility and effectiveness of using a cryogenic fluid (liquid nitrogen) to facilitate acoustic suppression in a...

  10. Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The very large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, is currently under construction and is due to...

  11. A Shack Interferometer Setup for Optical Testing in Undergraduate Courses

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Righini, Alberto; Salas, Matias; Sordini, Andrea; Vanzi, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The Shack interferometer is a simple and effective device to test optical surfaces in reflection and optical systems in transmission. An essential setup on a reduced scale with a minimum number of components is presented, suited to gain familiarity and practice with optical testing in a laboratory course for undergraduate students. The basic…

  12. Quick setup of test unit for accelerator control system

    Testing a single hardware unit of an accelerator control system often requires the setup of a program with graphical user interface. Developing a dedicated application for a specific hardware unit test could be time consuming and the application may become obsolete after the unit tests. This paper documents a methodology for quick design and setup of an interface focused on performing unit tests of accelerator equipment with minimum programming work. The method has three components. The first is a generic accelerator device object (ADO) manager which can be used to setup, store, and log testing controls parameters for any unit testing system. The second involves the design of a TAPE (Tool for Automated Procedure Execution) sequence file that specifies and implements all te testing and control logic. The sting third is the design of a PET (parameter editing tool) page that provides the unit tester with all the necessary control parameters required for testing. This approach has been used for testing the horizontal plane of the Stochastic Cooling Motion Control System at RHIC.

  13. Comparison of Silicon Photomultiplier Characteristics using Automated Test Setups

    Bauß, B.; Brogna, A. S.; Büscher, V.; Chau, P.; Degele, R.; Geib, K. H.; Krause, S.; Liu, Y.; Schäfer, U.; Spreckels, R.; Tapprogge, S.; Wanke, R.; Weitzel, Q.

    2016-02-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) are photo-sensors consisting of an array of hundreds to thousands pixels with a typical pitch of 10-100 μm. They exhibit an excellent photon counting and time resolution. Therefore applications of SiPMs are emerging in many fields. In order to characterize SiPMs, the PRISMA Detector Lab at Mainz has established three automated test setups. Setup-A is dedicated to measure the gain, the dark count rate and the optical crosstalk probability. The temperature dependencies are characterized by operating the setup in a climate chamber. Setup-B is an optical system to measure the photon detection efficiency. Setup-C addresses the most challenging aspect of comparing SiPMs which is the uniformity of the active surface. Because of the small pixel size, a micro focus lens is attached to a picosecond laser diode to collimate the beam into the sub-structures of the sensors. A three-axis micro-positioning system moves the SiPMs into the focus of the laser spot and then automatically scans the active surfaces. In this paper we present the measurements of several SiPMs and compare their performance.

  14. Cryogenic actuator testing for the SAFARI ground calibration setup

    de Jonge, C.; Eggens, M.; Nieuwenhuizen, A. C. T.; Detrain, A.; Smit, H.; Dieleman, P.

    2012-09-01

    For the on-ground calibration setup of the SAFARI instrument cryogenic mechanisms are being developed at SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, including a filter wheel, XYZ-scanner and a flipmirror mechanism. Due to the extremely low background radiation requirement of the SAFARI instrument, all of these mechanisms will have to perform their work at 4.5 Kelvin and low-dissipative cryogenic actuators are required to drive these mechanisms. In this paper, the performance of stepper motors, piezoelectric actuators and brushless DC-motors as cryogenic actuators are compared. We tested stepper motor mechanical performance and electrical dissipation at 4K. The actuator requirements, test setup and test results are presented. Furthermore, design considerations and early performance tests of the flipmirror mechanism are discussed. This flipmirror features a 102 x 72 mm aluminum mirror that can be rotated 45°. A Phytron stepper motor with reduction gearbox has been chosen to drive the flipmirror. Testing showed that this motor has a dissipation of 49mW at 4K with a torque of 60Nmm at 100rpm. Thermal modeling of the flipmirror mechanism predicts that with proper thermal strapping the peak temperature of the flipmirror after a single action will be within the background level requirements of the SAFARI instrument. Early tests confirm this result. For low-duty cycle operations commercial stepper motors appear suitable as actuators for test equipment in the SAFARI on ground calibration setup.

  15. A new setup for studying thermal microcracking through acoustic emission monitoring

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Thermal stressing is common in geothermal environments and has been shown in the laboratory to induce changes in the physical and mechanical properties of rocks. These changes are generally considered to be a consequence of the generation of thermal microcracks and debilitating chemical reactions. Thermal microcracks form as a result of the build-up of internal stresses due to: (1) the thermal expansion mismatch between the different phases present in the material, (2) thermal expansion anisotropy within individual minerals, and (3) thermal gradients. The generation of cracks during thermal stressing has been monitored in previous studies using the output of acoustic emissions (AE), a common proxy for microcrack damage, and through microstructural observations. Here we present a new experimental setup which is optimised to record AE from a rock sample at high temperatures and under a servo-controlled uniaxial stress. The design is such that the AE transducer is embedded in the top of the piston, which acts as a continuous wave guide to the sample. In this way, we simplify the ray path geometry whilst minimising the number of interfaces between the microcrack and the transducer, maximising the quality of the signal. This allows for an in-depth study of waveform attributes such as energy, amplitude, counts and duration. Furthermore, the capability of this device to apply a servo-controlled load on the sample, whilst measuring strain in real time, leads to a spectrum of possible tests combining mechanical and thermal stress. It is also an essential feature to eliminate the build-up of stresses through thermal expansion of the pistons and the sample. We plan a systematic experimental study of the AE of thermally stressed rock during heating and cooling cycles. We present results from pilot tests performed on Darley Dale sandstone and Westerly granite. Understanding the effects of thermal stressing in rock is of particular interest at a geothermal site, where

  16. Test setup for the readout electronics of ALICE-PMD

    The readout of the anode signals of the honeycomb chamber with a common cathode structure is to be carried out using gassiplex chips (16 channel CMOS analogue signal processor) developed at CERN. Considering that these chips will be MANAS-16 fabricated in India a comprehensive setup for testing and assembly of chips has been developed at VECC for 3/4 chip boards and associated circuitry like level shifter, repeater and buffer boards

  17. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Lift-Off Acoustics

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janie D.

    2011-01-01

    The lift-off acoustic (LOA) environment is an important design factor for any launch vehicle. For the Ares I vehicle, the LOA environments were derived by scaling flight data from other launch vehicles. The Ares I LOA predicted environments are compared to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) preliminary results.

  18. Magnet Test Setup of the CMS Tracker ready for installation

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The pieces of the Tracker that will be operated in the forthcoming Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) have been transported inside the dummy tracker support tube to the CMS experimental hall (Point 5, Cessy). The operation took place during the night of 12th May, covering the ~15km distance in about three hours. The transport was monitored for shocks, temperature and humidity with the help of the CERN TS-IC section. The Tracker setup comprises segments of the Tracker Inner Barrel (TIB), the Tracker Outer Barrel (TOB) and Tracker EndCaps (TEC) detectors. It represents roughly 1% of the final CMS Tracker. Installation into the solenoid is foreseen to take place on Wednesday 17th May.

  19. Performance tests of external moderators of a PGNAA setup

    Performance tests of external cylindrical moderators of an accelerator-based prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup have been carried out through thermal neutrons and prompt γ-ray yield measurements. The PGNAA setup is to be used for analysis of cement samples. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of geometry of cylindrical moderator on yield of thermal neutrons and prompt γ-rays for two different types of moderator assemblies. One of the moderators was to be used with a small sample and the other to be used with a large sample. Fast and thermal neutron yield was measured inside the sample volume as a function of the front moderator thickness as well as sample length. Neutron yield measurement was carried out at the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals 350 keV pulsed beam accelerator using nuclear track detectors. The pulsed 200 keV deuteron beam with 5 ns pulse width and 31.25 kHz frequency was used to produce 2.8 MeV neutrons via D(d,n) reaction. Neutron yield measurements showed that the large sample moderator has a smaller yield of thermal neutrons as compared to the small sample moderator, which is in complete agreement with the results of Monte Carlo yield calculations of the thermal and fast neutrons from both the moderators. Finally, the prompt γ-ray yield from a Portland cement sample was measured using the two moderators and was compared with each other. As predicted by Monte Carlo simulations, in spite of a smaller yield of thermal neutrons, the large sample moderator has a higher yield of prompt γ-rays

  20. Performance tests of external moderators of a PGNAA setup

    Naqvi, A.A. E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Fazal-ur-Rehman,; Al-Jarallah, M.I.; Abu-Jarad, F.; Maslehuddin, M

    2003-01-01

    Performance tests of external cylindrical moderators of an accelerator-based prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup have been carried out through thermal neutrons and prompt {gamma}-ray yield measurements. The PGNAA setup is to be used for analysis of cement samples. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of geometry of cylindrical moderator on yield of thermal neutrons and prompt {gamma}-rays for two different types of moderator assemblies. One of the moderators was to be used with a small sample and the other to be used with a large sample. Fast and thermal neutron yield was measured inside the sample volume as a function of the front moderator thickness as well as sample length. Neutron yield measurement was carried out at the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals 350 keV pulsed beam accelerator using nuclear track detectors. The pulsed 200 keV deuteron beam with 5 ns pulse width and 31.25 kHz frequency was used to produce 2.8 MeV neutrons via D(d,n) reaction. Neutron yield measurements showed that the large sample moderator has a smaller yield of thermal neutrons as compared to the small sample moderator, which is in complete agreement with the results of Monte Carlo yield calculations of the thermal and fast neutrons from both the moderators. Finally, the prompt {gamma}-ray yield from a Portland cement sample was measured using the two moderators and was compared with each other. As predicted by Monte Carlo simulations, in spite of a smaller yield of thermal neutrons, the large sample moderator has a higher yield of prompt {gamma}-rays.

  1. Performance tests of external moderators of a PGNAA setup.

    Naqvi, A A; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Al-Jarallah, M I; Abu-Jarad, F; Maslehuddin, M

    2003-01-01

    Performance tests of external cylindrical moderators of an accelerator-based prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup have been carried out through thermal neutrons and prompt gamma-ray yield measurements. The PGNAA setup is to be used for analysis of cement samples. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of geometry of cylindrical moderator on yield of thermal neutrons and prompt gamma-rays for two different types of moderator assemblies. One of the moderators was to be used with a small sample and the other to be used with a large sample. Fast and thermal neutron yield was measured inside the sample volume as a function of the front moderator thickness as well as sample length. Neutron yield measurement was carried out at the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals 350 keV pulsed beam accelerator using nuclear track detectors. The pulsed 200 keV deuteron beam with 5 ns pulse width and 31.25 kHz frequency was used to produce 2.8 MeV neutrons via D(d,n) reaction. Neutron yield measurements showed that the large sample moderator has a smaller yield of thermal neutrons as compared to the small sample moderator, which is in complete agreement with the results of Monte Carlo yield calculations of the thermal and fast neutrons from both the moderators. Finally, the prompt gamma-ray yield from a Portland cement sample was measured using the two moderators and was compared with each other. As predicted by Monte Carlo simulations, in spite of a smaller yield of thermal neutrons, the large sample moderator has a higher yield of prompt gamma-rays. PMID:12485660

  2. Validity test of design calculations of a PGNAA setup

    Naqvi, A.A. E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Garwan, M.A

    2004-01-01

    A rectangular moderator has been designed for the prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM) to analyze Portland cement samples. The design of the moderator assembly was obtained using Monte Carlo calculations. The design calculations of the new rectangular moderator of the KFUPM PGNAA setup have been verified experimentally through prompt gamma ray yield measurement as a function of the front moderator thickness. In this study the yield of the 3.54 and 4.94 MeV prompt gamma rays from silicon in a soil sample was measured as a function of thickness of the front moderator of the rectangular moderator. The experimental results were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations. A good agreement has been achieved between the experimental results and the results of the calculations. The experimental results have provided useful information about the PGNAA setup performance, neutron moderation, and gamma ray attenuation in the PGNAA sample.

  3. Validity test of design calculations of a PGNAA setup

    A rectangular moderator has been designed for the prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM) to analyze Portland cement samples. The design of the moderator assembly was obtained using Monte Carlo calculations. The design calculations of the new rectangular moderator of the KFUPM PGNAA setup have been verified experimentally through prompt gamma ray yield measurement as a function of the front moderator thickness. In this study the yield of the 3.54 and 4.94 MeV prompt gamma rays from silicon in a soil sample was measured as a function of thickness of the front moderator of the rectangular moderator. The experimental results were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations. A good agreement has been achieved between the experimental results and the results of the calculations. The experimental results have provided useful information about the PGNAA setup performance, neutron moderation, and gamma ray attenuation in the PGNAA sample

  4. Acoustic Noise Levels of Dental Equipments and Its Association with Fear and Annoyance Levels among Patients Attending Different Dental Clinic Setups in Jaipur, India

    Ganta, Shravani; Nagaraj, Anup; Pareek, Sonia; Atri, Mansi; Singh, Kushpal; Sidiq, Mohsin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Noise is a source of pervasive occupational hazard for practicing dentists and the patients. The sources of dental sounds by various dental equipments can pose as a potential hazard to hearing system and add to the annoyance levels of the patients. The aim of the study was to analyze the noise levels from various equipments and evaluate the effect of acoustic noise stimulus on dental fear and annoyance levels among patients attending different dental clinic setups in Jaipur, India. Methodology: The sampling frame comprised of 180 patients, which included 90 patients attending 10 different private clinics and 90 patients attending a Dental College in Jaipur. The levels of Acoustic Noise Stimulus originating from different equipments were determined using a precision sound level meter/decibulometer. Dental fear among patients was measured using Dental Fear Scale (DFS). Results: Statistical analysis was performed using chi square test and unpaired t-test. The mean background noise levels were found to be maximum in the pre-clinical setup/ laboratory areas (69.23+2.20). Females and the patients attending dental college setup encountered more fear on seeing the drill as compared to the patients attending private clinics (p<0.001). Conclusion: The sources of dental sounds can pose as a potential hazard to hearing system. It was analyzed that the environment in the clinics can directly have an effect on the fear and annoyance levels of patients. Hence it is necessary control the noise from various dental equipments to reduce the fear of patients from visiting a dental clinic. PMID:24959512

  5. Airflow Test of Acoustic Board Samples

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Jensen, Lise Mellergaard

    In the laboratory of Indoor Environmental Engineering, Department of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University an airflow test on 2x10 samples of acoustic board were carried out the 2nd of June 2012. The tests were carried out for Rambøll and STO AG. The test includes connected values of volume flow...

  6. Gas diffusion electrode setup for catalyst testing in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated temperatures

    Wiberg, Gustav Karl Henrik; Fleige, Michael; Arenz, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed description of the construction and testing of an electrochemical cell setup allowing the investigation of a gas diffusion electrode containing carbon supported high surface area catalysts. The setup is designed for measurements in concentrated phosphoric acid at elevated...

  7. Acoustic Test Characterization of Melamine Foam for Usage in NASA's Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The external acoustic liftoff levels predicted for NASA's future heavy lift launch vehicles are expected to be significantly higher than the environment created by today's commercial launch vehicles. This creates a need to develop an improved acoustic attenuation system for future NASA payload fairings. NASA Glenn Research Center initiated an acoustic test series to characterize the acoustic performance of melamine foam, with and without various acoustic enhancements. This testing was denoted as NEMFAT, which stands for NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test, and is the subject of this paper. Both absorption and transmission loss testing of numerous foam configurations were performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory in July 2013. The NEMFAT test data provides an initial acoustic characterization and database of melamine foam for NASA. Because of its acoustic performance and lighter mass relative to fiberglass blankets, melamine foam is being strongly considered for use in the acoustic attenuation systems of NASA's future launch vehicles.

  8. Time reversal signal processing in acoustic emission testing

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Krofta, Josef; Kober, Jan; Dvořáková, Zuzana; Chlada, Milan

    Brno: University of Technology, 2014. s. 10-11. ISBN 978-80-214-5019-6. [European Conference on Non-Destructive Testing (ECNDT 2014) /11./. 06.10.2014-10.10.2014, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : acoustic emission (AE) * ultrasonic testing (UT) * signal processing * source location * time reversal acoustics * acoustic emission * signal processing and transfer Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  9. Evaluation of Reflections in a MIMO OTA Test Setup

    Barrio, Samantha Caporal Del; Franek, Ondrej; Krenz, Gunter; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    With the commercialization of MIMO devices, accurate over-the-air testing has become a major research area in mobile communications. Several test methods are investigated in the related work. This paper discusses the anechoic chamber method and specifically deals with reflections between probes o...

  10. Validation and Simulation of ARES I Scale Model Acoustic Test -1- Pathfinder Development

    Putnam, G. C.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. To take advantage of this data, a digital representation of the ASMAT test setup has been constructed and test firings of the motor have been simulated using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software. Within this first of a series of papers, results from ASMAT simulations with the rocket in a held down configuration and without water suppression have then been compared to acoustic data collected from similar live-fire tests to assess the accuracy of the simulations. Detailed evaluations of the mesh features, mesh length scales relative to acoustic signals, Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy numbers, and spatial residual sources have been performed to support this assessment. Results of acoustic comparisons have shown good correlation with the amplitude and temporal shape of pressure features and reasonable spectral accuracy up to approximately 1000 Hz. Major plume and acoustic features have been well captured including the plume shock structure, the igniter pulse transient, and the ignition overpressure. Finally, acoustic propagation patterns illustrated a previously unconsidered issue of tower placement inline with the high intensity overpressure propagation path.

  11. Setup, tests and results for the ATLAS TileCal Read Out Driver production

    Valero, Alberto; Castillo, V; Cuenca, C; Ferrer, A; Fullana, E; González, V; Higón, E; Munar, A; Poveda, J; Ruiz-Martínez, A; Salvachúa, B; Sanchís, E; Solans, C; Soret, J; Torres, J; Valls, J A

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we describe the performance and test results of the production of the 38 ATLAS TileCal Read Out Drivers (RODs). We first describe the basic hardware specifications and firmware functionality of the modules, the test-bench setup used for production and the test procedure to qualify the boards. We then finally show and discuss the performance results.

  12. Nonlinear acoustic nondestructive testing for concrete durability

    Wu, Hwai-Chung; Warnemuende, Kraig

    2000-06-01

    Several nondestructive testing methods can be used to determine the damage in a concrete structure. Linear ultrasonic techniques, e.g. pulse-velocity and amplitude attenuation, are very common in nondestructive evaluation. Velocity of propagation is not very sensitive to the degrees of damage unless a great deal of micro-damage having evolving into localized macro-damage. This transition typically takes place around 80% of the ultimate compressive strength. Amplitude attenuation is potentially more sensitive than pulse-velocity. However, this method depends strongly on the coupling conditions between transducers and concrete, hence unreliable. A baseline test of the linear acoustics of several mortar samples was conducted. These mortar samples have been previously damaged to different levels. Several other testing methods were also performed on the same samples to form a comparison. The focus is in comparing the sensitivity of a new testing method (Non-linear Acoustic NDE) with several more traditional testing methods. Non-linearity of the material stiffness is expressed in non-linear acoustics as the effect that damage and flaws have on the modulation of a signal as it propagates through the material. Spectral (non-linear) analysis is much more sensitive to lower damage states and less dependent on the repeatability of the coupling of the transducers.

  13. Development of a grinding-specific performance test set-up

    Olesen, C. G.; Larsen, B. H.; Andresen, E. L.;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a performance test set-up for America's Cup grinders. The test set-up had to mimic the on-boat grinding activity and be capable of collecting data for analysis and evaluation of grinding performance. This study included a literature-based analysis of grinding...... an exponentially rising resistance. A custom-made grinding ergometer was developed with computer-controlled resistance and capable of collecting data during the test. The data collected can be used to find measures of grinding performance such as peak power, time to complete and the decline in...... repeated grinding performance....

  14. Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.

    Beattie, Alan G.

    2013-09-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

  15. Subscale Acoustic Testing: Comparison of ALAT and ASMAT

    Houston, Janice D.; Counter, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option. This paper compares the acoustic measurements of two different subscale tests: the 2% Ares Liftoff Acoustic Test conducted at Stennis Space Center and the 5% Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  16. Time reversal signal processing in acoustic emission testing

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Krofta, Josef; Kober, Jan; Dvořáková, Zuzana; Chlada, Milan; Dos Santos, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2014). ISSN 1435-4934. [European Conference on Non-Destructive Testing (ECNDT 2014) /11./. Praha, 06.10.2014-10.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : acoustic emission (AE) * ultrasonic testing (UT) * signal processing * source location * time reversal acoustics * acoustic emission * signal processing and transfer Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.ndt.net/events/ECNDT2014/app/content/Slides/637_Prevorovsky.pdf

  17. Design of Testing Set-up for Nuclear Fuel Rod by Neutron Radiography at CARR

    WEI; Guo-hai; HAN; Song-bai; WANG; Hong-li; HAO; Li-jie; WU; Mei-mei; HE; Lin-feng; WANG; Yu; LIU; Yun-tao; SUN; Kai; CHEN; Dong-feng

    2012-01-01

    <正>An experimental set-up dedicated to non-destructively test a 15 cm long pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear fuel rod by neutron radiography (NR) is designed and fabricated. It consists of three parts: Transport container, imaging block and steel support. The design of the transport container was optimized with Monte-Carlo simulation by the MCNP code.

  18. Emulating Ray-Tracing Channels in Multi-probe Anechoic Chamber Setups for Virtual Drive Testing

    Fan, Wei; Llorente, Ines Carton; Kyösti, Pekka;

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses virtual drive testing (VDT) for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) capable terminals in multi-probe anechoic chamber (MPAC) setups. We propose to perform VDT, via reproducing ray tracing (RT) simulated channels with the field synthesis technique. Simulation results...

  19. Advanced Test Method of Solid Oxide Cells in a Plug-Flow Setup

    Jensen, Søren Højgaard; Hauch, Anne; Hendriksen, Peter Vang;

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of two electrolysis tests of solid oxide cells [Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-YSZ-lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM)/YSZ] tested in a plug-flow setup. An extensively instrumented cell test setup was used, and the tests involved measurements of the cell...... impedance at open-circuit voltage and under current load, the cell voltage, and the in-plane voltage in the electrodes. From the cell-voltage measurements it was evident that a significant passivation of the cells occurred over the first similar to 10 days. Thereafter, the cells reactivated at constant......-circuit voltage before and after electrolysis testing at various gas compositions were used to show that the Ni electrode was affected by the electrolysis operation, whereas the LSM electrode was not....

  20. Development and Test of a Neutron Imaging Setup at the PGAA Instrument at FRM II

    Söllradl, S.; Mühlbauer, M. J.; Kudejova, P.; Türler, A.

    We report on the developments of a neutron tomography setup at the instrument for prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) at the Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum(MLZ). The recent developments are driven by the idea of combining the spatial information obtained with neutron tomography with the elemental information determined with PGAA, i.e. to further combine both techniques to an investigative technique called prompt gamma activation imaging (PGAI).At the PGAA instrument, a cold neutron flux of up to 6 x 1010 cm-2 s-1 (thermal equivalent) is available in the focus of an elliptically tapered neutron guide. In the reported experiments, the divergence of the neutron beam was investigated, the resolution of the installed detector system tested, and a proof-of-principle tomography experiment performed. In our study a formerly used camera box was upgraded with a better camera and an optical resolution of 8 line pairs/mm was achieved. The divergence of the neutron beam was measured by a systematic scan along the beam axis. Based on the acquired data, a neutron imaging setup with a L/D ratio of 200 was installed. The resolution of the setup was testedin combination with a gadolinium test target and different scintillator screens. The test target was irradiated at two positions to determine the maximum resolution and the resolution at the actual sample position. The performance of the installed tomography setup was demonstrated bya tomography experiment of an electric amplifier tube.

  1. TEST BEAM COORDINATION: The 2004 Test Beam Calorimetry set-up in H8

    Aleksa, M; Di Girolamo, B; Ferrari, C; Giugni, D; Santoni, C; Wingerter, I

    A new table has been designed, built and finally mounted to position the LAr cryostat in front of the Tilecal modules. The new table has been connected to the existing Tilecal table to be able to move the full set-up along eta values between 0 and 1.2. The table has been conceived by D. Giugni (INFN Milano and now CERN PH) and modeled by G. Braga (INFN Milano) in spring-summer 2003. The realization of the table has been done by an Italian firm (MatecImpianti, Fenegrò, Como) under the supervision of S. Coelli (INFN Milano) starting August 2003. Figure 1 shows the table assembled at the firm (left). Figure 1: The Tilecal-LAr table: in Fenegro (left) and at CERN (right). In November 2003 the table has been delivered to CERN and put in temporary storage to be assembled after the preparation of the Tilecal zone. In February 2004 two technicians from the firm and the team of technician coordinated by C. Ferrari (CERN AB/ATB), assembled, tested and commissioned the table under the supervision of S. Coelli...

  2. Benchmark test cases for evaluation of computer-based methods for detection of setup errors: realistic digitally reconstructed electronic portal images with known setup errors

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to develop methods and software for computing realistic digitally reconstructed electronic portal images with known setup errors for use as benchmark test cases for evaluation and intercomparison of computer-based methods for image matching and detecting setup errors in electronic portal images. Methods and Materials: An existing software tool for computing digitally reconstructed radiographs was modified to compute simulated megavoltage images. An interface was added to allow the user to specify which setup parameter(s) will contain computer-induced random and systematic errors in a reference beam created during virtual simulation. Other software features include options for adding random and structured noise, Gaussian blurring to simulate geometric unsharpness, histogram matching with a 'typical' electronic portal image, specifying individual preferences for the appearance of the 'gold standard' image, and specifying the number of images generated. The visible male computed tomography data set from the National Library of Medicine was used as the planning image. Results: Digitally reconstructed electronic portal images with known setup errors have been generated and used to evaluate our methods for automatic image matching and error detection. Any number of different sets of test cases can be generated to investigate setup errors involving selected setup parameters and anatomic volumes. This approach has proved to be invaluable for determination of error detection sensitivity under ideal (rigid body) conditions and for guiding further development of image matching and error detection methods. Example images have been successfully exported for similar use at other sites. Conclusions: Because absolute truth is known, digitally reconstructed electronic portal images with known setup errors are well suited for evaluation of computer-aided image matching and error detection methods. High-quality planning images, such as

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing

    This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results

  4. Acoustic Test Results of Melamine Foam with Application to Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    A spacecraft at launch is subjected to a harsh acoustic and vibration environment resulting from the passage of acoustic energy, created during the liftoff of a launch vehicle, through the vehicle's payload fairing. In order to ensure the mission success of the spacecraft it is often necessary to reduce the resulting internal acoustic sound pressure levels through the usage of acoustic attenuation systems. Melamine foam, lining the interior walls of the payload fairing, is often utilized as the main component of such a system. In order to better understand the acoustic properties of melamine foam, with the goal of developing improved acoustic attenuation systems, NASA has recently performed panel level testing on numerous configurations of melamine foam acoustic treatments at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory. Parameters assessed included the foam's thickness and density, as well as the effects of a top outer cover sheet material and mass barriers embedded within the foam. This testing followed the ASTM C423 standard for absorption and the ASTM E90 standard for transmission loss. The acoustic test data obtained and subsequent conclusions are the subjects of this paper.

  5. PC based manual and safety logic card test setup for 235 MWe PHWRs

    Fuel handling controls for 235 MWe PHWR make use of Manual and Logic cards (MLCs) for providing safety interlocks. These cards consist of various type of logic blocks. By connecting these logic blocks all the safety interlocks required for fuel handling controls have been provided. Previously trouble shooting of these cards was done by means of logic probe. Since the method was manual, it was laborious and time consuming. PC based test setup has overcome this drawback and detects the fault at the component level within few seconds. It also gives printout of status of faulty MLC cards. Here motherboard has been designed having slots for insertion of MLC cards. The input/output connection of these cards are coming to two 50 pin FRC connectors. PC communicates through 144 line digital input/output card with MLC card under test. Software is user friendly and outputs suitable input patterns to the card under test and checks for output pattern. It compares this output pattern with compare pattern and detects the fault and displays the symptoms. This system is currently in use at test facility for fuelling machine for 235 MWe PHWR reactor at Refuelling Technology Division, Hall-7. This test setup has been proposed for use at NAPP and future reactors. (author). 4 figs., 1 annexure

  6. On Probe Weighting for MIMO OTA testing in Anechoic Chamber Setups

    Fan, Wei; Kyösti, Pekka; Nuutinen, Jukka-Pekka; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Pedersen, Gert F.

    The multi-probe anechoic chamber method is promising for OTA testing. The reason can be attributed to its potential for enabling evaluating MIMO terminals in realistic environments. The focus of the paper is on investigating how to create desired spatial channel models with the multi-probe anechoic...... chamber setups. Simulation results have shown that with the discussed methods, the number of probes and probe power weights determine to which level the spatial characteristics of the target channel models can be accurately approximated. With the optimized weights, better agreement is achieved for all...

  7. Acoustic emission generated during scratch test of various thin films

    Boháč, Petr; Tomáštík, J.; Čtvrtlík, R.; Dráb, M.; Koula, V.; Cvrk, K.; Jastrabík, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2014), s. 16635. ISSN 1435-4934 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA03010743 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : acoustic emission * scratch test * thin films * AE data analysis * mechanical toughness Subject RIV: BI - Acoustic s

  8. Application of acoustic emission in pressure vessel testing

    Materials of the CrMoV and the NiCrMoV types were tested for integrity using an acoustic emission method developed by SKODA Trust. The materials are used for the production of reactor pressure vessels. The acoustic emission method is employed for determining the beginning of crack formation and crack proliferation. The objective of the tests was to obtain information necessary for evaluating acoustic emission sources in actual components. The use is discussed of a 24-channel system by Trodyne (USA) for testing the integrity of WWER type pressure vessels manufactured by SKODA. (B.S.)

  9. Laser-induced transient grating setup with continuously tunable period

    We present a modification of the laser-induced transient grating setup enabling continuous tuning of the transient grating period. The fine control of the period is accomplished by varying the angle of the diffraction grating used to split excitation and probe beams. The setup has been tested by measuring dispersion of bulk and surface acoustic waves in both transmission and reflection geometries. The presented modification is fully compatible with optical heterodyne detection and can be easily implemented in any transient grating setup

  10. Laser-induced transient grating setup with continuously tunable period

    Vega-Flick, A. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Applied Physics Department, CINVESTAV-Unidad Mérida, Carretera Antigua a Progreso Km 6, Cordemex, Mérida, Yucatán 97310 Mexico (Mexico); Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Nelson, K. A., E-mail: kanelson@mit.edu [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Khanolkar, A.; Abi Ghanem, M.; Boechler, N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Alvarado-Gil, J. J. [Applied Physics Department, CINVESTAV-Unidad Mérida, Carretera Antigua a Progreso Km 6, Cordemex, Mérida, Yucatán 97310 Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-12-15

    We present a modification of the laser-induced transient grating setup enabling continuous tuning of the transient grating period. The fine control of the period is accomplished by varying the angle of the diffraction grating used to split excitation and probe beams. The setup has been tested by measuring dispersion of bulk and surface acoustic waves in both transmission and reflection geometries. The presented modification is fully compatible with optical heterodyne detection and can be easily implemented in any transient grating setup.

  11. Multiple sample setup for testing the hydrothermal stability of adsorbents in thermal energy storage applications

    Thermal energy storage based on adsorption and desorption of water on an adsorbent can achieve high energy storage densities. Many adsorbents lose adsorption capacity when operated under unfavourable hydrothermal conditions during adsorption and desorption. The stability of an adsorbent against stressing hydrothermal conditions is a key issue for its usability in adsorption thermal energy storage. We built an experimental setup that simultaneously controls the hydrothermal conditions of 16 samples arranged in a matrix of four temperatures and four water vapour pressures. This setup allows the testing of potential adsorbents between temperatures of 50 °C and 350 °C and water vapour pressures of up to 32 kPa. A measurement procedure that allows the detection of the hydrothermal stability of an adsorbent after defined time spans has been designed. We verified the functionality of the multiple sample measurements with a microporous adsorbent, a zeolite NaMSX. The hydrothermal stability of this zeolite is tested by water uptake measurements. A standard deviation lower than 1% of the 16 samples for detecting the hydrothermal stability enables setting different conditions in each sample cell. Further, we compared the water uptake measurements by measuring their adsorption isotherms with the volumetric device BELSORP Aqua 3 from Bel Japan. (paper)

  12. High-temperature acoustic test facilities and methods

    Pearson, Jerome

    1994-09-01

    The Wright Laboratory is the Air Force center for air vehicles, responsible for developing advanced technology and incorporating it into new flight vehicles and for continuous technological improvement of operational air vehicles. Part of that responsibility is the problem of acoustic fatigue. With the advent of jet aircraft in the 1950's, acoustic fatigue of aircraft structure became a significant problem. In the 1960's the Wright Laboratory constructed the first large acoustic fatigue test facilities in the United States, and the laboratory has been a dominant factor in high-intensity acoustic testing since that time. This paper discusses some of the intense environments encountered by new and planned Air Force flight vehicles, and describes three new acoustic test facilities of the Wright Laboratory designed for testing structures in these dynamic environments. These new test facilities represent the state of the art in high-temperature, high-intensity acoustic testing and random fatigue testing. They will allow the laboratory scientists and engineers to test the new structures and materials required to withstand the severe environments of captive-carry missiles, augmented lift wings and flaps, exhaust structures of stealth aircraft, and hypersonic vehicle structures well into the twenty-first century.

  13. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2012-01-01

    Launch environments, such as Liftoff Acoustic (LOA) and Ignition Overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA which are used in the development of the vibro-acoustic environments. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe to mitigate at the component level, reduction of the launch environments is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I launch environments and to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to the Ares I LOA predictions and water suppression effectiveness results are presented.

  14. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2012-01-01

    Launch environments, such as Liftoff Acoustic (LOA) and Ignition Overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA which are used in the development of the vibro-acoustic environments. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe to mitigate at the component level, reduction of the launch environments is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I launch environments and to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to the Ares I LOA predictions and water suppression effectiveness results are presented.

  15. Design and test of a flexible electrochemical setup for measurements in aqueous electrolyte solutions at elevated temperature and pressure

    Wiberg, Gustav K. H.; Fleige, Michael J.; Arenz, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a detailed description of the construction and testing of an electrochemical cell allowing measurements at elevated temperature and pressure. The cell consists of a stainless steel pressure vessel containing the electrochemical glass cell exhibiting a three electrode configuration. The design of the working electrode is inspired by conventional rotating disk electrode setups. As demonstrated, the setup can be used to investigate temperature dependent electrochemical processes on polycrystalline platinum and also high surface area type electrocatalysts.

  16. Test Setup for Anechoic Room based MIMO OTA Testing of LTE Terminals

    Carreño, Xavier; Fan, Wei; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum;

    2013-01-01

    introduced into, for example, LTE andWiMAX systems. The main purpose of this testing is to validate that the user equipment will have a good performance in real use. CTIA, 3GPP and COST are spending a big effort in standardizing the OTA testing procedure which is much more complex than similar SISO OTA...

  17. The Testing Behind The Test Facility: The Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada's acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  18. Very high stability systems: LMJ target alignment system and MTG imager test setup

    Compain, Eric; Maquet, Philippe; Kunc, Thierry; Marque, Julien; Lauer-Solelhac, Maxime; Delage, Laurent; Lanternier, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    Most of space instruments and research facilities require test equipment with demanding opto-mechanical stability. In some specific cases, when the stability performance directly drives the final performance of the scientific mission and when feasibility is questionable, specific methods must be implemented for the associated technical risk management. In present paper, we will present our heritage in terms of methodology, design, test and the associated results for two specific systems : the SOPAC-POS and the MOTA, generating new references for future developments. From a performance point of view, we will emphasis on following key parameters : design symmetry, thermal load management, and material and structural choices. From a method point of view the difficulties arise first during design, from the strong coupling between the thermal, mechanical and optical performance models, and then during testing, from the difficulty of conceiving test setup having appropriate performance level. We will present how these limitations have been overcome. SOPAC-POS is the target alignment system of the LMJ, Laser Mega Joule, the French inertial confinement fusion research center. Its stability has been demonstrated by tests in 2014 after 10 years of research and development activities, achieving 1μm stability @ 6m during one hour periods. MOTA is an Optical Ground Support Equipment aiming at qualifying by tests the Flexible Combined Imager (FCI). FCI is an instrument for the meteorological satellite MTG-I, a program of and funded by the European Space Agency and under prime contractorship of Thales Alenia Space. Optimized design will allow to get better than 0.2 μrad stability for one hour periods, as required for MTF measurement.

  19. Comparison of Two High Intensity Acoustic Test Facilities

    Launay, A.; Tadao Sakita, M.; Kim, Youngkey K.

    2004-08-01

    In two different countries, at the same period of time, the institutes in charge of the development of space activities have decided to extend their satellite integration and test center, and to implement a reverberant acoustic chamber. In Brazil the INPE laboratory (LIT : Laboratorio de Integracao e Testes) and in South Korea the KARI laboratory (SITC : Satellite Integration and Test Center) started their projects in July 2000 for the RATF (Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility) and in May 2001 for the HIAC (High Intensity Acoustic Chamber) respectively, writing the technical specifications. The kick-off meetings took place in December 2000 and in February 2002 and the opening ceremonies in December 19, 2002 in Brazil and in August 22, 2003 in Korea. This paper compares the two projects in terms of design choices, manufacturing processes, equipment installed and technical final characteristics.

  20. Acoustics

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  1. Study of the Switching Errors in an RSFQ Switch by Using a Computerized Test Setup

    Kim, Se Hoon; Baek, Seung Hun; Yang, Jung Kuk; Kim, Jun Ho; Kang, Joon Hee [Incheon Univesity, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-10-15

    The problem of fluctuation-induced digital errors in a rapid single flux quantum (RSFQ) circuit has been a very important issue. In this work, we calculated the bit error rate of an RSFQ switch used in superconductive arithmetic logic unit (ALU). RSFQ switch should have a very low error rate in the optimal bias. Theoretical estimates of the RSFQ error rate are on the order of 10{sup -50}per bit operation. In this experiment, we prepared two identical circuits placed in parallel. Each circuit was composed of 10 Josephson transmission lines (JTLs) connected in series with an RSFQ switch placed in the middle of the 10 JTLs. We used a splitter to feed the same input signal to both circuits. The outputs of the two circuits were compared with an RSFQ exclusive OR (XOR) to measure the bit error rate of the RSFQ switch. By using a computerized bit-error-rate test setup, we measured the bit error rate of 2.18 x 10{sup -12} when the bias to the RSFQ switch was 0.398 mA that was quite off from the optimum bias of 0.6 mA.

  2. Study of the Switching Errors in an RSFQ Switch by Using a Computerized Test Setup

    The problem of fluctuation-induced digital errors in a rapid single flux quantum (RSFQ) circuit has been a very important issue. In this work, we calculated the bit error rate of an RSFQ switch used in superconductive arithmetic logic unit (ALU). RSFQ switch should have a very low error rate in the optimal bias. Theoretical estimates of the RSFQ error rate are on the order of 10-50per bit operation. In this experiment, we prepared two identical circuits placed in parallel. Each circuit was composed of 10 Josephson transmission lines (JTLs) connected in series with an RSFQ switch placed in the middle of the 10 JTLs. We used a splitter to feed the same input signal to both circuits. The outputs of the two circuits were compared with an RSFQ exclusive OR (XOR) to measure the bit error rate of the RSFQ switch. By using a computerized bit-error-rate test setup, we measured the bit error rate of 2.18 x 10-12 when the bias to the RSFQ switch was 0.398 mA that was quite off from the optimum bias of 0.6 mA.

  3. Early diagnosis of acoustic neuroma by the vestibular test

    Haid, T.; Rettinger, G.; Berg, M.; Wigand, M.E.

    1981-11-01

    In a series of 390 cases with suspicion of acoustic neurinomas 78 such tumors could be diagnosed, including 12 early stage neurinomas. This relatively high detection quote of small neurinomas is due to a special diagnostical programme: Every patient with unilateral and sensoneural hearingloss, independent of vertigo anamnesis or of the result of X-rays must be further examined by a vestibular test. All 78 patients with acoustic neuroma had pathological vestibular findings. The positional test turned out to be the most sensitive examination in the early diagnosis of acoustic neuromas and yields a still higher incidence than the thermic test: 95% of the patients with a neuroma showed pathological findings in the positional test. Every patient suffering from an unidentified unilateral and sensoneural hearingloss combined with a pathological result in the positional test must be further checked by a cisternomeatography or computerized tomography using airinsufflation. Every fifth of these patients showed typical signs of an acoustic neuroma in the neuroradiological tests. 68 neuromas are operated today and verfied histologically, 10 patients are still waiting for surgical treatment.

  4. The experimental setup of a large field operational test for cooperative driving vehicles at the A270

    Broek, T.H.A. van den; Netten, B.D.; Hoedemaeker, M.; Ploeg, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a large field operational test (FOT) for cooperative driving systems, which take place on a public highway, is discussed. The experimental setup consist of a specific driver support system, which is closely related to cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) systems. Instead of auto

  5. Acoustic-structure coupling scaling laws for model test based steam dryer acoustic fatigue derivations

    Background: In recent years some reactors have experienced significant steam dryer cracking. In some cases, this cracking has necessitated unplanned outages to implement steam dryer repairs and has also resulted in de-rated operation of the affected units. Initial inspection showed it was likely that steam dryer had been damaged by high cycle fatigue due to flow-induced acoustic resonance in the main steam lines. Because of the complexity and acoustic-structure coupling effect, scale model test is adopted to research the mechanism of acoustic fatigue. Purpose: This paper describes the derivations of scaling laws observed to control the system response for phenomena considered to be significant in the real plants. Methods: Basic governing equations of elasticity and acoustics are written in non-dimensional form, non-dimensional groups are defined and derived. Results: Using the reference values in the real plants, the scaling laws and scaling relationships are derived and recognized to enable conversion of model data into real plant predictions. Conclusions: Successful model testing can be achieved if these significant parameters are preserved in the model scale. (author)

  6. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Article's Absorption during Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of a customers aerospace test-article to a simulated acoustic launch environment is typically performed in a reverberant acoustic test chamber. The acoustic pre-test runs that will ensure that the sound pressure levels of this environment can indeed be met by a test facility are normally performed without a test-article dynamic simulator of representative acoustic absorption and size. If an acoustic test facilitys available acoustic power capability becomes maximized with the test-article installed during the actual test then the customers environment requirement may become compromised. In order to understand the risk of not achieving the customers in-tolerance spectrum requirement with the test-article installed, an acoustic power margin evaluation as a function of frequency may be performed by the test facility. The method for this evaluation of acoustic power will be discussed in this paper. This method was recently applied at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Stations Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility for the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program.

  7. Acoustic Emission Defects Localized by Means of Geodetic Iterative Procedure - Algorithms, Tests, AE Experiment

    Kůs, V.; Záveský, M.; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    Granada : University of Granada, 2012 - (Gallego, A.; Ono, K.), s. 1-12 ISBN 978-84-615-9941-7. [Europen Conference on Acoustic Emission Testing/30./ & International Conference on Acoustic Emission/7./. Granada (ES), 12.09.2012-15.09.2012] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : acoustic emissio * geodesic * Newton -Raphson method * iterative source localization Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  8. Development of a Penning trap based set-up for precision tests of the standard model.

    Delauré, Bavo

    This work has presented the development and realization of the WITCH set-up, which is designed to measure the recoil energy spectrum of the daughter ions originating in nuclear -decay. The spectral shape reveals the angular correlation between the neutrino and the -particle, which is sensitive to the nature of the weak interaction, i.e. possible scalar or tensor type contributions. In order to allow detection of the low energy recoil ions, the set-up is equipped with a Penning trap which is in principle able to confine ions of each element in a scattering free environment. This storage device for the radioactive source is coupled to a retardation spectrometer, which performs the energy analysis of the recoil ions and has a solid angle acceptance of almost 2. The setup is installed at the ISOLDE/CERN facility. At present, the set-up installation is close to completion and commissioning of the apparatus has started. A first experiment with a radioactive beam is planned for the second half of 2004. In order to c...

  9. Benchmark test cases for evaluation of computer-based methods for detection of setup errors: realistic digitally reconstructed electronic portal images with known setup errors

    Purpose/Objective: The potential for on-line error detection using electronic portal images (EPIs) has stimulated the investigation of computer-based methods for matching portal images with reference or 'gold standard' images. The lack of absolute truth for clinical images is a major obstacle to the evaluation of these methods. The purpose of this investigation was to create a set of realistic test EPIs with known setup errors for use as a benchmark for evaluation and intercomparison of computer-based methods, including automatic and user-guided techniques, for EPI analysis. Materials and Methods: Digitally reconstructed electronic portal images (DREPIs) were computed using the visible male CT data set from the National Library of Medicine (NLM). (DREPIs are computed using high energy attenuation coefficients to simulate megavoltage images.) The NLM CT data set comprises 512x512x1 mm contiguous slices from the tip of the head to below the knees. The subject was frozen and scanned very soon after non-traumatizing death, and thus the visualized anatomy closely resembles that of a living person, but without breathing and other motion artifacts. Also since dose was not a consideration the signal-to-noise ratio is higher compared with typical 1 mm slices obtained on a living person. Because of the quality of the CT data, the quality of the DREPIs had to be degraded, and modified in other ways, to create realistic test cases. Modifications included: 1) contrast histogram matching to actual EPIs, 2) addition of structured noise by blending an 'open field' EPI image with the DREPI, 3) addition of random unstructured noise, and 4) Gaussian blurring to simulate patient motion and head scatter effects. (It is important to note that there is no standard appearance or quality for EPIs. The appearance of EPIs is quite variable, especially across EPIDs from different manufacturers. Even for a given system, EPIs are quite sensitive to system calibration and acquisition parameters

  10. Could Acoustic Emission Testing Show a Pipe Failure in Advance?

    Soares, S. D.; Teixeira, J. C. G.

    2004-02-01

    During the last 20 years PETROBRAS has been attempting to use Acoustic Emission (AE) as an inspection tool. In this period the AE concept has changed from a revolutionary method to a way of finding areas to make a complete inspection. PETROBRAS has a lot of pressure vessels inspected by AE and with other NDTs techniques to establish their relationship. In other hand, PETROBRAS R&D Center has conducted destructive hydrostatic tests in pipelines samples with artificial defects made by milling. Those tests were monitored by acoustic emission and manual ultrasonic until the complete failure of pipe sample. This article shows the results obtained and a brief proposal of analysis criteria for this environment of test.

  11. Acoustic flight tests of rotorcraft noise-abatement approaches using local differential GPS guidance

    Chen, Robert T. N.; Hindson, William S.; Mueller, Arnold W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the test design, instrumentation set-up, data acquisition, and the results of an acoustic flight experiment to study how noise due to blade-vortex interaction (BVI) may be alleviated. The flight experiment was conducted using the NASA/Army Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) research helicopter. A Local Differential Global Positioning System (LDGPS) was used for precision navigation and cockpit display guidance. A laser-based rotor state measurement system on board the aircraft was used to measure the main rotor tip-path-plane angle-of-attack. Tests were performed at Crows Landing Airfield in northern California with an array of microphones similar to that used in the standard ICAO/FAA noise certification test. The methodology used in the design of a RASCAL-specific, multi-segment, decelerating approach profile for BVI noise abatement is described, and the flight data pertaining to the flight technical errors and the acoustic data for assessing the noise reduction effectiveness are reported.

  12. Development and Test of a Neutron Imaging Setup at the PGAA Instrument at FRM II

    Söllradl, S.; Mühlbauer, M. J.; Kudejova, P.; Türler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We report on the developments of a neutron tomography setup at the instrument for prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) at the Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum(MLZ). The recent developments are driven by the idea of combining the spatial information obtained with neutron tomography with the elemental information determined with PGAA, i.e. to further combine both techniques to an investigative technique called prompt gamma activation imaging (PGAI).At the PGAA instrument, a cold neutron flux of up...

  13. Acoustic tests of Lorentz symmetry using Bulk Acoustic Wave quartz oscillators

    Goryachev, M; Haslinger, Ph; Mizrachi, E; Anderegg, L; Müller, H; Hohensee, M; Tobar, M E

    2016-01-01

    A new method of probing Lorentz invariance in the neutron sector is described. The method is baed on stable quartz bulk acoustic wave oscillators compared on a rotating table. Due to Lorentz-invariance violation, the resonance frequencies of acoustic wave resonators depend on the direction in space via a corresponding dependence of masses of the constituent elements of solids. This dependence is measured via observation of oscillator phase noise built around such devices. The first such experiment now shows sensitivity to violation down to the limit $\\tilde{c}^n_Q=(-1.8\\pm2.2)\\times 10^{-14}$ GeV. Methods to improve the sensitivity are described together with some other applications of the technology in tests of fundamental physics.

  14. Acoustic events during fatigue test of structural steels

    Acoustic emission sensors were applied recording noises during low cycle fatigue tests in steel materials. The test specimens were machined from the base metal (15H2MFA) and the anticorrosive cladding metal (08H18N10T) of the VVER-440/V-213 (Russian designed PWR) reactor pressure vessel. During the first period, the measurements were carried out with isothermal condition at 260 C on GLEEBLE 3800 servo-hydraulic thermal-mechanical simulator. The tests were run under uniaxial tension-compression loading with total strain control. The programmed waveform was triangular for all the fatigue tests with the frequency of 0.08 Hz. The cyclic loading was started from the compressed side. It was observed that besides rare acoustic emission events regular 10 msec Acoustic Barkhausen Noise (ABN) burst were recorded due to 50Hz AC current drive for heating and maintaining the constant temperature. The amplitude of MABN was higher under pressure than during relaxing and drawing-out by a factor of 2-5. We have carried out also thermo-mechanical fatigue experiment with the same strain-controlled mechanical cycle and simultaneous thermal cycle between 150 C and 270 C. The total number of cycles was terminated, when the force level necessary for the original elongation had been reduced to 75% of its original value. Visual examination showed always some at least surface cracks after stopping the fatigue test. ABN events registered during the beginning cycle exhibited different spectra from the middle and especially from the last cycles before the end of the test, where also double ABN bursts could be recorded. At the end of the test explicit AE events could be found by a new technique. The most interesting result is the possibility to use ABN for testing reactor materials, which could have practical application for fatigue testing.

  15. Utilization of acoustic emission in scratch test evaluation

    Tomáštík, J.; Čtvrtlík, Radim; Boháč, Petr; Dráb, M.; Koula, V.; Cvrk, K.; Jastrabík, Lubomír

    Pfafficon: Trans Tech Publications Ltd, 2015 - (Kovalčíková, A.; Lofaj, F.), s. 119-122 ISBN 978-3-03835-555-7. ISSN 1662-9795. [Conference on Local Mechanical Properties (LMP 2014) /11./. Stará Lesná (SK), 12.11.2014-14.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA03010743 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : acoustic emission * scratch test * thin films Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  16. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Enhanced Melamine (ML) Foam Acoustic Test (NEMFAT)

    McNelis, Anne M.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) funded a proposal to achieve initial basic acoustic characterization of ML (melamine) foam, which could serve as a starting point for a future, more comprehensive acoustic test program for ML foam. A project plan was developed and implemented to obtain acoustic test data for both normal and enhanced ML foam. This project became known as the NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test (NEMFAT). This document contains the outcome of the NEMFAT project.

  17. Acoustic interactions between an altitude test facility and jet engine plumes: Theory and experiments

    Ahuja, K. K.; Jones, R. R., III; Tam, C. K.; Massey, K. C.; Fleming, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the described effort was to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in the flow/acoustic interactions experienced in full-scale altitude engine test facilities. This is done by conducting subscale experiments and through development of a theoretical model. Model cold jet experiments with an axisymmetric convergent nozzle are performed in a test setup that stimulates a supersonic jet exhausting into a cylindrical diffuser. The measured data consist of detailed flow visualization data and acoustic spectra for a free and a ducted plume. It is shown that duct resonance is most likely responsible by theoretical calculations. Theoretical calculations also indicate that the higher discrete tones observed in the measurements are related to the screech phenomena. Limited experiments on the sensitivity of a free 2-D, C-D nozzle to externally imposed sound are also presented. It is shown that a 2-D, C-D nozzle with a cutback is less excitable than a 2-D C-D nozzle with no cutback. At a pressure ratio of 1.5 unsteady separation from the diverging walls of the nozzle is noticed. This separation switches from one wall to the opposite wall thus providing an unsteady deflection of the plume. It is shown that this phenomenon is related to the venting provided by the cutback section.

  18. NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory: Five year retrospective

    Cooper, Beth A.; Akers, James C.; Passe, Paul J.

    2005-09-01

    In the five years since the NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) opened its doors in September, 2000, it has developed a comprehensive array of services and products that support hearing conservation goals within NASA and industry. The ATL provides acoustic emission testing and noise control engineering services for a variety of specialized customers, particularly developers of equipment and science experiments manifested for NASA's manned space missions. The ATL aggressively supports the vision of a low-noise on-orbit environment, which facilitates mission success as well as crew health, safety, and comfort. In concert with these goals, the ATL also produces and distributes free educational resources and low-noise advocacy tools for hearing conservation education and awareness. Among these are two compact discs of auditory demonstrations (of phenomena in acoustics, hearing conservation, and communication), and presentations, software packages, and other educational materials for use by engineers, audiologists, and other hearing conservation stakeholders. This presentation will highlight ATL's construction, history, technical capabilities, and current projects and will feature demonstrations of some of the unique educational resource materials that are distributed by the ATL.

  19. Quality Testing of Gaseous Helium Pressure Vessels by Acoustic Emission

    Barranco-Luque, M; Hervé, C; Margaroli, C; Sergo, V

    1998-01-01

    The resistance of pressure equipment is currently tested, before commissioning or at periodic maintenance, by means of normal pressure tests. Defects occurring inside materials during the execution of these tests or not seen by usual non-destructive techniques can remain as undetected potential sources of failure . The acoustic emission (AE) technique can detect and monitor the evolution of such failures. Industrial-size helium cryogenic systems employ cryogens often stored in gaseous form under pressure at ambient temperature. Standard initial and periodic pressure testing imposes operational constraints which other complementary testing methods, such as AE, could significantly alleviate. Recent reception testing of 250 m3 GHe storage vessels with a design pressure of 2.2 MPa for the LEP and LHC cryogenic systems has implemented AE with the above-mentioned aims.

  20. Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility (VATF): User Test Planning Guide

    Fantasia, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the VATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  1. ATLAS TileCal Sub-Module Production at UIUC - Photos of Prototype PMT Test Setup

    Errede, Steve

    2001-01-01

    Photo 1 - Entrance to the lab. Photo 2 - A shot of the center of the lab. Photo 3 - The back of the lab. The Dark Box: Photo 4 - A view of the outside of the Dark Box along with its dry nitrogen system. Photo 5 - A view of the inside of the Dark Box. Photo 6 - The LED holder, beam splitter (removed in this shot), and a pulsing circuit. Photo 7 - The PMT holder. Photo 8 - A possible design for a Stepper Motor controlled filter wheel. Photo 9 - Polishing area for the optical fibers. R&D Work on Stepper Motor/Motion Control: Photo 10 - The complete prototype of the Stepper Motor setup. Photo 11 - The prototype of the Main Stepper Motor Driver Board. Photo 12 - The prototype of the Stepper Motor Power Amplifer. Photo 13 - The prototype of the Stepper Motor LabPC + Interface Board.

  2. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Articles Absorption During Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    It is important to realize that some test-articles may have significant sound absorption that may challenge the acoustic power capabilities of a test facility. Therefore, to mitigate this risk of not being able to meet the customers target spectrum, it is prudent to demonstrate early-on an increased acoustic power capability which compensates for this test-article absorption. This paper describes a concise method to reduce this risk when testing aerospace test-articles which have significant absorption. This method was successfully applied during the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Stations RATF.

  3. Sensor development and calibration for acoustic neutrino detection in ice

    Karg, Timo; Bissok, Martin; Laihem, Karim; Semburg, Benjamin; Tosi, Delia; Collaboration, for the IceCube

    2009-01-01

    A promising approach to measure the expected low flux of cosmic neutrinos at the highest energies (E > 1 EeV) is acoustic detection. There are different in-situ test installations worldwide in water and ice to measure the acoustic properties of the medium with regard to the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection. The parameters of interest include attenuation length, sound speed profile, background noise level and transient backgrounds. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been ...

  4. Application of acoustic emission to the testing pressure tubing materials

    Acoustic emission is one of the promising techniques for the detection of embrittlement. The Zr-2.5 Nb alloy used as pressure tubing material shows slightly low stress intensity factor when it absorbs hydrogen. In this paper, the relationship between acoustic emission count N and stress intensity factor K in the tensile test of edge-notched specimens is described. The K value is proportional to the square root of crack opening displacement phi in the elastic region. The double-notched specimens were cut from pressure tubes, and the single-notched specimens were cut from extruded bars. The crack opening displacement was measured with a clip gauge recommended by ASTM STP 410 Appendix, and the acoustic emission was measured with a Nortec AEMS-4 system and PZT-5 type sensors. The sensors were bonded on the surfaces of the specimens with epoxy adhesive or rubber contact. A peak of the acoustic emission count rate was observed at the yield point of each specimen similarly to many other metals. The N values and the size of plastic zone showed the theoretical relationship following 4th power law, on the other hand, the size of plastic zone depended linearly on the K values in elastic region. The slope and the intersection point of the regression curves for the total N count vs the square root of phi corresponding to the elastic field of stress-strain curves showed almost same values for the specimens of same shape. The influence of the bonding methods was not observed. (Kako, I.)

  5. Potential of acoustic emissions from three point bending tests as rock failure precursors

    Agioutantis Z.; Kaklis K.; Mavrigiannakis S.; Verigakis M.; Vallianatos F.; Saltas V.

    2016-01-01

    Development of failure in brittle materials is associated with microcracks, which release energy in the form of elastic waves called acoustic emissions. This paper presents results from acoustic emission mea-surements obtained during three point bending tests on Nestos marble under laboratory conditions. Acoustic emission activity was monitored using piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors, and the potential for accurate prediction of rock damage based on acoustic emission data was investigated. Damage local-ization was determined based on acoustic emissions generated from the critically stressed region as scat-tered events at stresses below and close to the strength of the material.

  6. Ball screw inspection setup

    Janusz, Rzepka; Sambor, Slawomir; Pienkowski, Janusz; Bielenin, Marcin

    2003-05-01

    In the following paper we describe arrangements of laser interferometer for investigation of screws and for inspection of ball screws. We have constructed two of them, namely: the technological setup for investigations of screw in process of production and the ball screw inspection setup. The former one is used to measure the pitch of screws. The data gathered during measurement is used to calculate the parameters for grinding machine. The later setup is used for testing parameters of complete ball screws. The software supporting this setup makes calculation of parameters of tested ball screw and creation of reports possible. Additionally, the inspection setup is the one that the torque measuring arrangements have been integrated on. Both the arrangements and the software allow for measurements of all parameters during movement of nut in full travel length of the ball screw and make charts and reports.

  7. Quality control of graphite mold by acoustic emission testing

    The brittleness of the graphite used for producing uranium tubes by gravity casting is monitored by acoustic test. Ancillary units, around a central data processing unit, also have a data processing function (micro-informatics) enabling the three following essential functions to be met: (1) control of the movement of integrating waves to five degrees of freedom, (2) control of the monitoring appliance and (3) pre-processing acquisition and presentation of the data. Mention is made of the facilities being used and of the progress of some research work

  8. Acoustic monitoring systems tests at Indian Point Unit 1. Final report

    This report describes the results of a program to test acoustic monitoring systems on Indian Point Unit No. 1 under actual plant operating conditions, less the reactor core. The two types of systems evaluated were the monitoring of acoustic emissions generated by growing flaws and the monitoring of acoustic signals from leaks

  9. Setup a photomultiplier tube test bench for use at LHAASO-KM2A

    Wang, Xu; Tian, Ye; Li, Changyu; Sun, Yansheng; Feng, Cunfeng

    2015-01-01

    To fulfill the requirements of testing the photomultiplier tubes of the electromagnetic detector at the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), a multi-functional PMT test bench with a two-dimensional scanning system is developed. With this 2D scanning system, 16 PMTs are scanned simultaneously to test their uniformity and cathode transit time difference, and we can also perform PMT tests of SPE spectrum, gain vs. high voltage, linear behavior and dark noise. The programmable hardware and intelligent software of the test bench make it convenient to use and provide reliable results. The test methods are described in detail and primary results are presented.

  10. Specification of a cyclist target and test setup for the evaluation of Cyclist-AEB systems

    Montfort, S. van; Camp, O.M.G.C. op den; Fritz, M.; Wimmer, T.

    2015-01-01

    From 2018, AEB systems dedicated to avoid or mitigate car-to-cyclist collisions will be included in the safety assessment by Euro NCAP [1] & [2]. To test such systems, appropriate equipment and a test procedure are being developed in the project CATS (Cyclist-AES Testing System). Accidentology was u

  11. Setup of a photomultiplier tube test bench for use at LHAASO-KM2A

    Wang, Xu; Zhang, Zhong-Quan; Tian, Ye; Du, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Xiao; Shen, Fu-Wang; Li, Chang-Yu; Sun, Yansheng; Feng, Cunfeng

    2015-01-01

    To fulfill the requirements for testing the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) of the electromagnetic detec- tor at the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), a multi-functional PMT test bench with a two dimensional scanning system has been developed. With this 2D scanning system, 16 PMTs can be scanned simultaneously for characteristics tests, including uniformity, cathode transit time difference, single photo-electron spectrum, gain vs. high voltage, linear behavior and dark noise. ...

  12. Towards nondestructive testing of pre-crash systems in a HIL setup

    Ploeg, J.; Hendriks, F.M.; Schouten, N.J.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the developments in the field of ADA systems shifted from comfort oriented systems to safety oriented systems. Consequently, the complexity of testing those systems increased. This leads to a demand for reproducible, efficient and safe testing methods for ADA systems in general, and pre-cr

  13. Test setup for long term reliability investigation of Silicon Carbide MOSFETs

    Baker, Nick; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Beczkowski, Szymon

    2013-01-01

    Silicon Carbide MOSFETs are now widely available and have frequently been demonstrated to offer numerous advantages over Silicon based devices. However, reliability issues remain a significant concern in their realisation in commercial power electronic systems. In this paper, a test bench is...... designed that enables an accelerated power cycling test to be performed on packaged Silicon Carbide MOSFETs (TO-247) under realistic operating conditions. An accelerated power cycling test is then performed, with on-state resistance selected as the observed parameter to detect degradation. On...

  14. Acoustic and Thermal Testing of an Integrated Multilayer Insulation and Broad Area Cooling Shield System

    Wood, Jessica J.; Foster, Lee W.

    2013-01-01

    A Multilayer Insulation (MLI) and Broad Area Cooling (BAC) shield thermal control system shows promise for long-duration storage of cryogenic propellant. The NASA Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) project is investigating the thermal and structural performance of this tank-applied integrated system. The MLI/BAC Shield Acoustic and Thermal Test was performed to evaluate the MLI/BAC shield's structural performance by subjecting it to worst-case launch acoustic loads. Identical thermal tests using Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) were performed before and after the acoustic test. The data from these tests was compared to determine if any degradation occurred in the thermal performance of the system as a result of exposure to the acoustic loads. The thermal test series consisted of two primary components: a passive boil-off test to evaluate the MLI performance and an active cooling test to evaluate the integrated MLI/BAC shield system with chilled vapor circulating through the BAC shield tubes. The acoustic test used loads closely matching the worst-case envelope of all launch vehicles currently under consideration for CPST. Acoustic test results yielded reasonable responses for the given load. The thermal test matrix was completed prior to the acoustic test and successfully repeated after the acoustic test. Data was compared and yielded near identical results, indicating that the MLI/BAC shield configuration tested in this series is an option for structurally implementing this thermal control system concept.

  15. A test beam set-up for the characterization of the Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode technology for particle tracking

    Vilella, A; Trenado, J; Vila, A; Casanova, R; Vos, M; Garrido, L; Dieguez, A

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that avalanche photodiodes operated in the Geiger mode above the breakdown voltage offer a virtually infinite gain and time accuracy in the picosecond range that can be used for single photon detection. However, their performance in particle detection still remains unexplored. In this contribution, we are going to expose different steps that we have taken in order to prove the efficiency of the Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes in the aforementioned field. In particular, we will present a setup for the characterization of these sensors in a test beam. The expected results of the test beam at DESY and CERN have been simulated with Geant4 and will also be exposed.

  16. An improved method/setup for extended testing after the Cigre, Method II

    Henriksen, Mogens; Holbøll, Joachim; Rygal, Roman

    The authors describe an improved version of the Cigre Method II test techinque used for testing the resistance of insulating materials to partial discharges (PDs). The method was extended to continuous PD measurements and pulse analyses. It was sound that parameters such as selective fuse...... discussed. The application of the system showed typical behavior of the discharges and lifetimes that was strongly dependent on the filler type...

  17. Design and building of a new experimental setup for testing hydrogen storage materials

    Andreasen, A.

    2005-01-01

    For hydrogen to become the future energy carrier a suitable way of storing hydrogen is needed, especially if hydrogen is to be used in mobile applications such as cars. To test potential hydrogen storage materials with respect to capacity, kinetics andthermodynamics the Materials Research...

  18. Influence of different test parameters on in vitro drug release from topical diclofenac formulations in a vertical diffusion cell setup.

    Klein, S

    2013-07-01

    In the past decades, the vertical diffusion cell has emerged as a useful device for testing drug release of topical dosage forms. However, to date neither a general USP method nor formulation-related monographs have been published in international pharmacopoeia. The purpose of the present work was to examine the influence of different test parameters in a vertical diffusion cell setup on in vitro drug release from semi-solid preparations for cutaneous application. Diclofenac was selected as the model compound. Release experiments were performed in a 7 ml Microett vertical diffusion cell system. Various test parameters, including the media composition and pH, degassing, membrane material and pore size, stirring speed and stirrer type, were varied. Results obtained with different test parameter settings clearly indicate that both drug properties and instrumental details can have a huge impact on the outcome of in vitro diffusion/drug release studies with the vertical diffusion cell. Thus, the selection of adequate test parameters is crucial for the success of the release experiments and, as shown in the present study, optimal test parameters/conditions need to be established and validated on a case by case study. PMID:23923638

  19. ESTIMATION OF PARAMETERS IN STEP-STRESS ACCELERATED LIFE TESTS FOR THE RAYLEIGH DISTRIBUTION UNDER CENSORING SETUP

    N. Chandra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, step-stress accelerated life test strategy is considered in obtaining the failure time data of the highly reliable items or units or equipment in a specified period of time. It is assumed that life time data of such items follows a Rayleigh distribution with a scale parameter (θ which is the log linear function of the stress levels. The maximum likelihood estimates (MLEs of the scale parameters ( i θ at both the stress levels (s , i = 2,1 i are obtained under a cumulative exposure model. A simulation study is performed to assess the precision of the MLEs on the basis of mean square error (MSE and relative absolute bias (RABias. The coverage probabilities of approximate and bootstrap confidence intervals for the parameters involved under both the censoring setup are numerically examined. In addition to this, asymptotic variance and covariance matrix of the estimators are also presented.

  20. Infrared Thermography Assessment of Thermal Bridges in Building Envelope: Experimental Validation in a Test Room Setup

    Francesco Bianchi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal infrared imaging is a valuable tool to perform non-destructive qualitative tests and to investigate buildings envelope thermal-energy behavior. The assessment of envelope thermal insulation, ventilation, air leakages, and HVAC performance can be implemented through the analysis of each thermogram corresponding to an object surface temperature. Thermography also allows the identification of thermal bridges in buildings’ envelope that, together with windows and doors, constitute one of the weakest component increasing thermal losses. A quantitative methodology was proposed in previous researches by the authors in order to evaluate the effect of such weak point on the energy balance of the whole building. In the present work, in-field experimental measurements were carried out with the purpose of evaluating the energy losses through the envelope of a test room experimental field. In-situ thermal transmittance of walls, ceiling and roof were continuously monitored and each element was characterized by its own thermal insulation capability. Infrared thermography and the proposed quantitative methodology were applied to assess the energy losses due to thermal bridges. The main results show that the procedure confirms to be a reliable tool to quantify the incidence of thermal bridges in the envelope thermal losses.

  1. Integration of Acoustic Detection Equipment into ANTARES

    Lahmann, R; Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Katz, U; Naumann, C; Salomon, K

    2005-01-01

    The ANTARES group at the University of Erlangen is working towards the integration of a set of acoustic sensors into the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope. With this setup, tests of acoustic particle detection methods and background studies shall be performed. The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope, which is currently being constructed in the Mediterranean Sea, will be equipped with the infrastructure to accommodate a 3-dimensional array of photomultipliers for the detection of Cherenkov light. Within this infrastructure, the required resources for acoustic sensors are available: Bandwidth for the transmission of the acoustic data to the shore, electrical power for the off-shore electronics and physical space to install the acoustic sensors and to route the connecting cables (transmitting signals and power) into the electronics containers. It will be explained how the integration will be performed with minimal modifications of the existing ANTARES design and which setup is foreseen for the acquisition of the acoustic data.

  2. Acoustic Performance of Drive Rig Mufflers for Model Scale Engine Testing

    Stephens, David, B.

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft engine component testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) includes acoustic testing of scale model fans and propellers in the 9- by15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). This testing utilizes air driven turbines to deliver power to the article being studied. These air turbines exhaust directly downstream of the model in the wind tunnel test section and have been found to produce significant unwanted noise that reduces the quality of the acoustic measurements of the engine model being tested. This report describes an acoustic test of a muffler designed to mitigate the extraneous turbine noise. The muffler was found to provide acoustic attenuation of at least 8 dB between 700 Hz and 20 kHz which significantly improves the quality of acoustic measurements in the facility.

  3. Microelectronics Radiation Hardness: Test Set-up for the ALICE Pixel Detector

    Meddi, F; CERN. Geneva; Morando, M; Scarlassara, F; Segato, G F; Soramel, F; Vannucci, Luigi; Di Liberto, S

    2000-01-01

    Two different test apparatus were set up to check the radiation hardness of the pixel detector electronic components designed for the ALICE ITS. Motivations and the mainfeatures are described as well as results we reached. Preliminary results on the OMEGA3/LHC1 chip are also presented. List of figures: Figure 1 Expected irradiation dose in ten years for the first layer (r=3.9 cm) of the pixel detectors operating in ALICE Figure 2 a) Chip digital part current (at bias of +3.5V) and b) chip analogue part current (at bias of +1.5V) as function of the cumulated dose for gamma irradiation Figure 3 Pixel efficiency as a function of the strobe delay a) and the annealing elapsed time b) after gamma irradiation Figure 4 a) Chip digital part current (at bias of +3.5V) and b) chip analogue part current (at bias of +1.5V) as function of the cumulated dose for proton irradiation. Pixel efficiency, at different time intervals after proton irradiation, as a function of the strobe delay d) and the threshold scanning c)

  4. Numerical simulation of the tip aerodynamics and acoustics test

    Tejero E, F.; Doerffer, P.; Szulc, O.; Cross, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    The application of an efficient flow control system on helicopter rotor blades may lead to improved aerodynamic performance. Recently, our invention of Rod Vortex Generators (RVGs) has been analyzed for helicopter rotor blades in hover with success. As a step forward, the study has been extended to forward flight conditions. For this reason, a validation of the numerical modelling for a reference helicopter rotor (without flow control) is needed. The article presents a study of the flow-field of the AH-1G helicopter rotor in low-, medium- and high-speed forward flight. The CFD code FLOWer from DLR has proven to be a suitable tool for the aerodynamic analysis of the two-bladed rotor without any artificial wake modelling. It solves the URANS equations with LEA (Linear Explicit Algebraic stress) k-ω model using the chimera overlapping grids technique. Validation of the numerical model uses comparison with the detailed flight test data gathered by Cross J. L. and Watts M. E. during the Tip Aerodynamics and Acoustics Test (TAAT) conducted at NASA in 1981. Satisfactory agreements for all speed regimes and a presence of significant flow separation in high-speed forward flight suggest a possible benefit from the future implementation of RVGs. The numerical results based on the URANS approach are presented not only for a popular, low-speed case commonly used in rotorcraft community for CFD codes validation but preferably for medium- and high-speed test conditions that have not been published to date.

  5. Ultrasonic testing device for pipes with an acoustic coupling liquid

    System for the ultrasonic testing of tubes comprising: a probe consisting of an ultrasonic transducer integral with a mirror receiving the ultrasonic wave emitted by the transducer and centred according to the axis of the probe, a mechanism to move the probe inside the tube under inspection, facilities for detecting ultrasonic echoes returned by the tube. It also features facilities for introducing an acoustic coupling liquid in the capacity included between the tube, the transducer and the mirror when the probe enters the tube being tested as well as for drawing off this liquid when the probe is withdrawn from the tube. These facilities mainly include a soft bag tank filled with the liquid and located at the lower part of the probe and communicating with the capacity to be filled with the liquid. This bag becomes flat when entering the tube after the probe and thus pushes part of the liquid it contains towards this capacity. This liquid assembles again by gravity in the bag when it leaves the tube being tested and returns to its usual shape

  6. Acoustic and microwave tests in a cylindrical cavity for acoustic gas thermometry at high temperature.

    Zhang, K; Feng, X J; Gillis, K; Moldover, M; Zhang, J T; Lin, H; Qu, J F; Duan, Y N

    2016-03-28

    Relative primary acoustic gas thermometry (AGT) determines the ratios of thermodynamic temperatures from measured ratios of acoustic and microwave resonance frequencies in a gas-filled metal cavity on isotherms of interest. When measured in a cavity with known dimensions, the frequencies of acoustic resonances in a gas determine the speed of sound, which is a known function of the thermodynamic temperature T. Changes in the dimensions of the cavity are measured using the frequencies of the cavity's microwave resonances. We explored techniques and materials for AGT at high temperatures using a cylindrical cavity with remote acoustic transducers. We used gas-filled ducts as acoustic waveguides to transmit sound between the cavity at high temperatures and the acoustic transducers at room temperature. We measured non-degenerate acoustic modes in a cylindrical cavity in the range 295 Kacoustic frequencies increased from 2×10(-6) at 295 K to 5×10(-6) at 797 K. In addition, we measured the frequencies of several transverse magnetic (TM) microwave resonances up to 1000 K in order to track changes in the cavity's length L and radius R. The fractional standard deviation of the values of L deduced from three TM modes increased from 3×10(-6) for T<600 K to 57 × 10(-6) at 1000 K. We observed similar inconsistencies in a previous study. PMID:26903106

  7. Development of ultrasonic testing equipment incorporating electromagnetic acoustic transducer

    This paper describes an automatic flaw detection equipment and heat-resistant ultrasonic transducer for plate thickness measurement. The automatic flaw detection equipment is used during in-service inspection. It comprises an angle-beam electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT), mounted on a vehicle, for scanning the pipe surface to be inspected. The EMAT functions without direct contact with the pipe surface through a coupling liquid, the vehicle does not require a guide track installed on the pipe surface, since it is equipped with magnetic wheels that adhere to the pipe, permitting it to travel along the circumferential weld joint of a carbon steel pipe. Another heat-resistant ultrasonic transducer is a normal beam EMAT and is used during plant operation. As a result, the automatic flaw detection equipment could detect a 1 mm deep notch cut on a test piece of 25 mm thick carbon steel plate. The vehicle location accuracy on the piping was ±2 mm. The normal beam EMAT could measure the plate thickness, within ±0.3 mm accuracy for the range of plate thickness 4 mm to 12 mm at 300degC. (author)

  8. Early diagnosis of acoustic neuroma by quantitative neurootological and neuroradiological tests

    Haid, C.T.

    1983-02-01

    Every patient with unilateral and sensoneural loss of hearing, independent of vertigo anamnesis or X-rays must be further examined by a vestibular test. Between 1974 and 1980, 80 acoustic neuromas could be diagnosed, including 12 early stage neuromas. This relatively high detection quote of small neuromas is due to a special diagnostical program: All 80 patients with acoustic neuroma had a pathological vestibular result. The positional test turned out to be the most sensitive examination in the early diagnosis of acoustic neuromas and yields a still higher incidence than the caloric test: 95% of the patients with a neurinoma showed a pathological result in the positional test. So every patient suffering from an unidentified unilateral and sensoneural hearing loss combined with a pathological result in the positional test must be further examined by a cisternomeatography or computerized tomography (using air-insufflation). Every fifth of these patients showed unique hints of an acoustic neuroma in the neuroradiological test.

  9. A Laboratory Test Setup for in Situ Measurements of the Dielectric Properties of Catalyst Powder Samples under Reaction Conditions by Microwave Cavity Perturbation: Set up and Initial Tests

    Markus Dietrich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic behavior of zeolite catalysts for the ammonia-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR of nitrogen oxides (NOX depends strongly on the type of zeolite material. An essential precondition for SCR is a previous ammonia gas adsorption that occurs on acidic sites of the zeolite. In order to understand and develop SCR active materials, it is crucial to know the amount of sorbed ammonia under reaction conditions. To support classical temperature-programmed desorption (TPD experiments, a correlation of the dielectric properties with the catalytic properties and the ammonia sorption under reaction conditions appears promising. In this work, a laboratory test setup, which enables direct measurements of the dielectric properties of catalytic powder samples under a defined gas atmosphere and temperature by microwave cavity perturbation, has been developed. Based on previous investigations and computational simulations, a resonator cavity and a heating system were designed, installed and characterized. The resonator cavity is designed to operate in its TM010 mode at 1.2 GHz. The first measurement of the ammonia loading of an H-ZSM-5 zeolite confirmed the operating performance of the test setup at constant temperatures of up to 300 °C. It showed how both real and imaginary parts of the relative complex permittivity are strongly correlated with the mass of stored ammonia.

  10. Is reverberation time adequate for testing the acoustical quality of unroofed auditoriums?

    Paini, Dario; Gade, Anders Christian; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2006-01-01

    Especially during summertime, public squares, stadiums and other kinds of open spaces, are frequently used for live concerts (pop, jazz, classical, etc.) - both with and without amplification. Based on the first author’s PhD thesis, this paper aims at illustrating whether reverberation time (EDT, T......30) and other acoustical parameters normally used to test the acoustical quality of closed auditoria, such as concert halls, theatres, opera houses, are suitable and sufficient for testing the acoustical quality of open performance spaces. Simulations as well as measurements were carried out to study...... the acoustics of open squares surrounded by hard, vertical, reflecting building facades. Especially when concerts are amplified, echoes or flutter echoes are often found to be the most important characteristic – and problem! Therefore, emphasis was given to finding an acoustical parameter – or a set...

  11. Validation and Simulation of Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test - 3 - Modeling and Evaluating the Effect of Rainbird Water Deluge Inclusion

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Putman, Gabriel C.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. Building on dry simulations of the ASMAT tests with the vehicle at 5 ft. elevation (100 ft. real vehicle elevation), wet simulations of the ASMAT test setup have been performed using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software to explore the effect of rainbird water suppression inclusion on the launch platform deck. Two-phase water simulation has been performed using an energy and mass coupled lagrangian particle system module where liquid phase emissions are segregated into clouds of virtual particles and gas phase mass transfer is accomplished through simple Weber number controlled breakup and boiling models. Comparisons have been performed to the dry 5 ft. elevation cases, using configurations with and without launch mounts. These cases have been used to explore the interaction between rainbird spray patterns and launch mount geometry and evaluate the acoustic sound pressure level knockdown achieved through above-deck rainbird deluge inclusion. This comparison has been anchored with validation from live-fire test data which showed a reduction in rainbird effectiveness with the presence of a launch mount.

  12. A Correlated Study of the Response of a Satellite to Acoustic Radiation Using Statistical Energy Analysis and Acoustic Test Data

    Aerospace payloads, such as satellites, are subjected to vibroacoustic excitation during launch. Sandia's MTI satellite has recently been certified to this environment using a combination of base input random vibration and reverberant acoustic noise. The initial choices for the acoustic and random vibration test specifications were obtained from the launch vehicle Interface Control Document (ICD). In order to tailor the random vibration levels for the laboratory certification testing, it was necessary to determine whether vibration energy was flowing across the launch vehicle interface from the satellite to the launch vehicle or the other direction. For frequencies below 120 Hz this issue was addressed using response limiting techniques based on results from the Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA). However, since the CLA Finite Element Analysis FEA model was only correlated for frequencies below 120 Hz, Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) was considered to be a better choice for predicting the direction of the energy flow for frequencies above 120 Hz. The existing SEA model of the launch vehicle had been developed using the VibroAcoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) computer code[1]. Therefore, the satellite would have to be modeled using VAPEPS as well. As is the case for any computational model, the confidence in its predictive capability increases if one can correlate a sample prediction against experimental data. Fortunately, Sandia had the ideal data set for correlating an SEA model of the MTI satellite--the measured response of a realistic assembly to a reverberant acoustic test that was performed during MTI's qualification test series. The first part of this paper will briefly describe the VAPEPS modeling effort and present the results of the correlation study for the VAPEPS model. The second part of this paper will present the results from a study that used a commercial SEA software package[2] to study the effects of in-plane modes and to evaluate

  13. Use of Acoustic Emission During Scratch Testing for Understanding Adhesion Behavior of Aluminum Nitride Coatings

    Choudhary, R. K.; Mishra, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, acoustic emission during scratch testing of the aluminum nitride coatings formed on stainless steel substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering was analyzed to assess the coating failure. The AlN coatings were formed under the variation of substrate temperature, substrate bias potential, and discharge power. The coatings deposited in the temperature range of 100 to 400 °C showed peak acoustic emission less than 1.5%, indicating ductile nature of the coating. However, for coatings formed with substrate negative bias potential of 20 to 50 V, numerous sharp acoustic bursts with maximum emission approaching 80% were observed, indicating brittle nature of the coatings with large number of defects present. The shift in the intensity of the first major acoustic peak toward higher load, with the increasing bias potential, confirmed improved adhesion of the coating. Also, the higher discharge power resulted in increased acoustic emission.

  14. Use of Acoustic Emission During Scratch Testing for Understanding Adhesion Behavior of Aluminum Nitride Coatings

    Choudhary, R. K.; Mishra, P.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, acoustic emission during scratch testing of the aluminum nitride coatings formed on stainless steel substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering was analyzed to assess the coating failure. The AlN coatings were formed under the variation of substrate temperature, substrate bias potential, and discharge power. The coatings deposited in the temperature range of 100 to 400 °C showed peak acoustic emission less than 1.5%, indicating ductile nature of the coating. However, for coatings formed with substrate negative bias potential of 20 to 50 V, numerous sharp acoustic bursts with maximum emission approaching 80% were observed, indicating brittle nature of the coatings with large number of defects present. The shift in the intensity of the first major acoustic peak toward higher load, with the increasing bias potential, confirmed improved adhesion of the coating. Also, the higher discharge power resulted in increased acoustic emission.

  15. Maneuver Acoustic Flight Test of the Bell 430 Helicopter Data Report

    Watts, Michael E.; Greenwood, Eric; Smith, Charles D.; Snider, Royce; Conner, David A.

    2014-01-01

    A cooperative ight test by NASA, Bell Helicopter and the U.S. Army to characterize the steady state acoustics and measure the maneuver noise of a Bell Helicopter 430 aircraft was accomplished. The test occurred during June/July 2011 at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. This test gathered a total of 410 test points over 10 test days and compiled an extensive database of dynamic maneuver measurements. Three microphone arrays with up to 31 microphon. es in each were used to acquire acoustic data. Aircraft data included Differential Global Positioning System, aircraft state and rotor state information. This paper provides an overview of the test and documents the data acquired.

  16. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Setup

    Reid, Douglas J.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Munley, John T.

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the experimental setup of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR thermosyphon prototype cooling system. A nitrogen thermosyphon prototype of such a system has been built and tested at PNNL. This document presents the experimental setup of the prototype that successfully demonstrated the heat transfer performance of the system.

  17. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors: Fabrication and Testing

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Malone, Vanessa

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of harsh-environment surface acoustic wave sensors for wired and wireless operation. Surface acoustic wave devices with an interdigitated transducer emitter and multiple reflectors were fabricated on langasite substrates. Both wired and wireless temperature sensing was demonstrated using radar-mode (pulse) detection. Temperature resolution of better than ±0.5°C was achieved between 200°C and 600°C. Oxygen sensing was achieved by depositing a layer of ZnO on the propagation path. Although the ZnO layer caused additional attenuation of the surface wave, oxygen sensing was accomplished at temperatures up to 700°C. The results indicate that langasite SAW devices are a potential solution for harsh-environment gas and temperature sensing.

  18. Testing of welded clad pipelines using acoustic emission method

    Recording of signals of acoustic emission (AE) on structure loading enables not only to determine the location of defects, but also to evaluate conditions, which occur in materials in defect neighbourhood, that is to approach to evaluation of a dauger degree of one or another defect. Results of AE recording and analysis on loading of pipelines sections with welded joints on 22 K steel were considered. The behaviour of preliminarily grown fatigue cracks and natural defects of welding origin was compared

  19. Intensity modification of acoustic emission signals under thermocyclic tests of high-temperature steel EP33

    With the help of the acoustic emission (AE) method a study is made into structural and phase transformations in a heat resistant austenitic steel Kh12N22T3MR under conditions of cyclic heating up to 600 deg C and constant tensile loading. Based on the analysis of acoustic emission data the temperature dependence of AE signal intensity on thermal cycling is built and regularities of its variation are established for every test cycle

  20. Flight Acoustic Testing and For the Rotorcraft Noise Data Acquisition Model (RNM)

    Burley, Casey L.; Smith, Charles D.; Conner, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Two acoustic flight tests have been conducted on a remote test range at Eglin Air Force Base in the panhandle of Florida. The first was the "Acoustics Week" flight test conducted in September 2003. The second was the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Acoustics Flight Test conducted in October-November 2005. Benchmark acoustic databases were obtained for a number of rotorcraft and limited fixed wing vehicles for a variety of flight conditions. The databases are important for validation of acoustic prediction programs such as the Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM), as well as for the development of low noise flight procedures and for environmental impact assessments. An overview of RNM capabilities and a detailed description of the RNM/ART (Acoustic Repropagation Technique) process are presented. The RNM/ART process is demonstrated using measured acoustic data for the MD600N. The RNM predictions for a level flyover speed sweep show the highest SEL noise levels on the flight track centerline occurred at the slowest vehicle speeds. At these slower speeds, broadband noise content is elevated compared to noise levels obtained at the higher speeds. A descent angle sweep shows that, in general, ground noise levels increased with increasing descent rates. Vehicle orientation in addition to vehicle position was found to significantly affect the RNM/ART creation of source noise semi-spheres for vehicles with highly directional noise characteristics and only mildly affect those with weak acoustic directionality. Based on these findings, modifications are proposed for RNM/ART to more accurately define vehicle and rotor orientation.

  1. Flight Acoustic Testing and Data Acquisition For the Rotor Noise Model (RNM)

    Conner, David A.; Burley, Casey L.; Smith, Charles D.

    2006-01-01

    Two acoustic flight tests have been conducted on a remote test range at Eglin Air Force Base in the panhandle of Florida. The first was the Acoustics Week flight test conducted in September 2003. The second was the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Acoustics Flight Test conducted in October-November 2005. Benchmark acoustic databases were obtained for a number of rotorcraft and limited fixed wing vehicles for a variety of flight conditions. The databases are important for validation of acoustic prediction programs such as the Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM), as well as for the development of low noise flight procedures and for environmental impact assessments. An overview of RNM capabilities and a detailed description of the RNM/ART (Acoustic Repropagation Technique) process are presented. The RNM/ART process is demonstrated using measured acoustic data for the MD600N. The RNM predictions for a level flyover speed sweep show the highest SEL noise levels on the flight track centerline occurred at the slowest vehicle speeds. At these slower speeds, broadband noise content is elevated compared to noise levels obtained at the higher speeds. A descent angle sweep shows that, in general, ground noise levels increased with increasing descent rates. Vehicle orientation in addition to vehicle position was found to significantly affect the RNM/ART creation of source noise semi-spheres for vehicles with highly directional noise characteristics and only mildly affect those with weak acoustic directionality. Based on these findings, modifications are proposed for RNM/ART to more accurately define vehicle and rotor orientation.

  2. Acoustic Method for Testing the Quality of Sterilized Male Tsetse Flies Glossina Pallidipes

    Tsetse flies are able to emit different acoustic signals. An acoustic method to test the quality of sterilized male tsetse flies was developed. Differences in the sound characteristics between males and females, between sterilized and unsterilized males, and between males sterilized in air and nitrogen, were determined. Also, the acoustic parameters (frequency, time, sound pressure level) of the sounds that are useful as criteria for quality control were determined. It was demonstrated that only the so-called 'feeding sounds' can be used as a quality criterion. Both sexes emitted feeding sounds while feeding on a host. These sounds were also used to find sexual partners, and had an effect on male copulation success. An acoustic sound analysis programme was developed; it automatically measured sound activity (only feeding sounds) under standard conditions (random sample, relative humidity, temperature, light intensity). (author)

  3. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  4. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Human Factors, Controls, and Statistics; Smith, James A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Fuel Performance and Design; Jewell, James Keith [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Fuel Performance and Design

    2015-02-01

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  5. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Flight Test Results for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Cliatt, Larry James; Frederick, Michael A.; Smith, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) program, a 747SP airplane was modified to carry a 2.5 meter telescope in the aft section of the fuselage. The resulting airborne observatory allows for observations above 99 percent of the water vapor in the atmosphere. The open cavity created by the modifications had the potential to significantly affect the airplane in the areas of aerodynamics and acoustics. Several series of flight tests were conducted to clear the airplanes operating envelope for astronomical observations, planned to be performed between the altitudes of 39,000 feet and 45,000 feet. The flight tests were successfully completed. Cavity acoustics were below design limits, and the overall acoustic characteristics of the cavity were better than expected. The modification did have some effects on the stability and control of the airplane, but these effects were not significant. Airplane air data systems were not affected by the modifications. This paper describes the methods used to examine the aerodynamics and acoustic data from the flight tests and provides a discussion of the flight test results in the areas of cavity acoustics, stability and control, and air data.

  6. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Flight Test Results and Results for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Smith, Mark S.; Cliatt, Larry J.; Frederick, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy program, a 747SP airplane was modified to carry a 2.5-m telescope in the aft section of the fuselage. The resulting airborne observatory allows for observations above 99 percent of the water vapor in the atmosphere. The open cavity created by the modifications had the potential to significantly affect the airplane in the areas of aerodynamics and acoustics. Several series of flight tests were conducted to clear the operating envelope of the airplane for astronomical observations, planned to be performed between the altitudes of 35,000 ft and 45,000 ft. The flight tests were successfully completed. Cavity acoustics were below design limits, and the overall acoustic characteristics of the cavity were better than expected. The modification did have some effects on the stability and control of the airplane, but these effects were not significant. Airplane air data systems were not affected by the modifications. This paper describes the methods used to examine the aerodynamics and acoustic data from the flight tests and provides a discussion of the flight-test results in the areas of cavity acoustics, stability and control, and air data.

  7. Acoustic emission testing on an F/A-18 E/F titanium bulkhead

    Martin, Christopher A.; Van Way, Craig B.; Lockyer, Allen J.; Kudva, Jayanth N.; Ziola, Steve M.

    1995-04-01

    An important opportunity recently transpired at Northrop Grumman Corporation to instrument an F/A - 18 E/F titanium bulkhead with broad band acoustic emission sensors during a scheduled structural fatigue test. The overall intention of this effort was to investigate the potential for detecting crack propagation using acoustic transmission signals for a large structural component. Key areas of experimentation and experience included (1) acoustic noise characterization, (2) separation of crack signals from extraneous noise, (3) source location accuracy, and (4) methods of acoustic transducer attachment. Fatigue cracking was observed and monitored by strategically placed acoustic emission sensors. The outcome of the testing indicated that accurate source location still remains enigmatic for non-specialist engineering personnel especially at this level of structural complexity. However, contrary to preconceived expectations, crack events could be readily separated from extraneous noise. A further dividend from the investigation materialized in the form of close correspondence between frequency domain waveforms of the bulkhead test specimen tested and earlier work with thick plates.

  8. Characterization of acoustic lenses with the Foucault test by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Ahmed Mohamed, E. T.; Abdelrahman, A.; Pluta, M.; Grill, W.

    2010-03-01

    In this work, the Foucault knife-edge test, which has traditionally been known as the classic test for optical imaging devices, is used to characterize an acoustic lens for operation at 1.2 GHz. A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) was used as the illumination and detection device utilizing its pinhole instead of the classical knife edge that is normally employed in the Foucault test. Information about the geometrical characteristics, such as the half opening angle of the acoustic lens, were determined as well as the quality of the calotte of the lens used for focusing. The smallest focal spot size that could be achieved with the examined lens employed as a spherical reflector was found to be about 1 μm. By comparison to the idealized resolution a degradation of about a factor of 2 can be deduced. This limits the actual quality of the acoustic focus.

  9. The experimental setup of the Interaction in Crystals for Emission of RADiation collaboration at Mainzer Mikrotron: Design, commissioning, and tests

    Lietti, D.; Backe, H.; Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Berra, A.; Carturan, S.; De Salvador, D.; Germogli, G.; Guidi, V.; Lauth, W.; Mazzolari, A.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.

    2015-04-01

    Silicon/germanium flat/bent crystals are thin devices able to efficiently deflect charged particle GeV-energy beams up to a few hundreds of μrad; moreover, high intensity photons can be efficiently produced in the so-called Multi-Volume Reflection (MVR) and Multiple Volume Reflections in One Crystal (MVROC) conditions. In the last years, the research interest in this field has moved to the dynamic studies of light negative leptons in the low energy range: the possibility to deflect negative particles and to produce high intensity γ sources via the coherent interactions with crystals in the sub-GeV energy range has been proved by the ICE-RAD (Interaction in Crystals for Emission of RADiation) Collaboration at the MAinzer MIkrotron (MAMI, Germany). This paper describes the setup used by the ICE-RAD experiment for the crystals characterization (both in terms of deflection and radiation emission properties): a high precision goniometer is used to align the crystals with the incoming beam, while a silicon based profilometer and an inorganic scintillator reconstruct, respectively, the particle position and the photon spectra after the samples. The crystals manufacturing process and their characterization, the silicon profilometer commissioning at the CERN PS T9 beamline, and the commissioning of the whole setup installed at MAMI are presented.

  10. Design of crude oil storage tank for acoustic emission testing

    The integrity of crude oil storage tank needs to be well managed because they can contain a large inventory of hazardous material and because of the high cost such as cleaning and waste disposal prior to disposal and maintenance. Costs involved in cleaning and inspection can be up to several hundreds thousand Malaysian Ranting. If the floor then proves to be in good condition, these costs have been wasted. Acoustic Emission (AE) is proposed to be use for monitoring the floor of the storage tank on line without doing cleaning and waste disposal. A storage tank will be fabricated for storing the crude oil and then the corrosion process will be monitor using AE method. This paper will discuss the background, material and is technical specification, design and also the difficulties faced during design and fabrication process. (Author)

  11. Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Viryd CS8 Wind Turbine

    Roadman, J.; Huskey, A.

    2013-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of an acoustic noise test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the Viryd CS8 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 11: Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques, IEC 61400-11 Ed.2.1, 2006-11. However, because the Viryd CS8 is a small turbine, as defined by IEC, NREL used 10-second averages instead of 60-second averages and binning by wind speed instead of regression analysis.

  12. Acoustic Noise Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine in Boulder, CO

    Roadman, J.; Huskey, A.

    2013-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of an acoustic noise test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the SWIFT wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 11: Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques, IEC 61400-11 Ed.2.1, 2006-11. However, because the SWIFT is a small turbine, as defined by IEC, NREL used 10-second averages instead of 60-second averages and utilized binning by wind speed instead of regression analysis.

  13. Application of acoustic emission testing as a non-destructive quality control of conrete

    The time dependence of texture changes in concrete is studied in short-time pressure experiments, using the method of acoustic emission testing. These investigations have been performed as a function of strength and composition of the material under study. As a result, the method of acoustic emission testing is shown to be an adequate method to evaluate the evolution and the character of the structural changes. In the case where only the time developement is of interest, a simple electronic method, the pulse-sum-method or pulse rate method can be applied. However only a signal evaluation procedure can give information on the character of the structure changes. (orig./RW)

  14. Characterization of a Setup to test the Impact of High-Amplitude Pressure Waves on Living Cells

    Schmidt, Mischa; Kahlert, Ulf; Wessolleck, Johanna; Maciaczyk, Donata; Merkt, Benjamin; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Osterholz, Jens; Nikkhah, Guido; Steinhauser, Martin O.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of pressure waves on cells may provide several possible applications in biology and medicine including the direct killing of tumors, drug delivery or gene transfection. In this study we characterize the physical properties of mechanical pressure waves generated by a nanosecond laser pulse in a setup with well-defined cell culture conditions. To systematically characterize the system on the relevant length and time scales (micrometers and nanoseconds) we use photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and obtain velocity profiles of the cell culture vessel at the passage of the pressure wave. These profiles serve as input for numerical pressure wave simulations that help to further quantify the pressure conditions on the cellular length scale. On the biological level we demonstrate killing of glioblastoma cells and quantify experimentally the pressure threshold for cell destruction.

  15. Flow and density testing ceramic nuclear fuel by an acoustic method

    Some problems of development and application of the acoustic method for nuclear fuel pellet quality assurance and testing the technology of their fabrication are considered. Dependences of frequences of intrinsic mechanical oscillations of pellets on their geometrical sizes are determined. A nomogram is developed for calculation of the specimen spectra of pellets. The method of hydrostatic weighing in mercury and the acoustic method are stated to have practically the same accuracy of density determination, while the accuracy of the method of hydrostatic weighing in water is more than three times less. It is shown that the acoustic method permits to exercise quality assurance fuel pellets by flaw and density testing, and at the corresponding arrangement of the control only the imaginary density at the relativistic error of 0.4%

  16. Recent experiments on acoustic leak detection

    In the ASB-sodium loop a series of injection experiments with water, helium, argon and nitrogen was performed. The aim of these tests was to get: a comparison of the acoustic signals, generated by water and gas injections with regard to intensity and frequency content; an experimental basis for the design of an acoustic calibration source. The experimental set-up, the variation parameters and first results will be discussed. The principal design of an acoustic calibration source and its range of application will be given. (author)

  17. Acoustic-Modal Testing of the Ares I Launch Abort System Attitude Control Motor Valve

    Davis, R. Benjamin; Fischbach, Sean R.

    2010-01-01

    The Attitude Control Motor (ACM) is being developed for use in the Launch Abort System (LAS) of NASA's Ares I launch vehicle. The ACM consists of a small solid rocket motor and eight actuated pintle valves that directionally allocate.thrust_- 1t.has-been- predicted-that significant unsteady. pressure.fluctuations.will.exist. inside the-valves during operation. The dominant frequencies of these oscillations correspond to the lowest several acoustic natural frequencies of the individual valves. An acoustic finite element model of the fluid volume inside the valve has been critical to the prediction of these frequencies and their associated mode shapes. This work describes an effort to experimentally validate the acoustic finite model of the valve with an acoustic modal test. The modal test involved instrumenting a flight-like valve with six microphones and then exciting the enclosed air with a loudspeaker. The loudspeaker was configured to deliver broadband noise at relatively high sound pressure levels. The aquired microphone signals were post-processed and compared to results generated from the acoustic finite element model. Initial comparisons between the test data and the model results revealed that additional model refinement was necessary. Specifically, the model was updated to implement a complex impedance boundary condition at the entrance to the valve supply tube. This boundary condition models the frequency-dependent impedance that an acoustic wave will encounter as it reaches the end of the supply tube. Upon invoking this boundary condition, significantly improved agreement between the test data and the model was realized.

  18. Statistical fracture of E-glass fibres using a bundle tensile test and acoustic emission monitoring

    R'Mili, M.; Moevus, M.; Godin, N.

    2009-01-01

    Statistical fracture of E-glass fibres using a bundle tensile test and acoustic emission monitoring correspondance: Corresponding author.Tel.: +33472436127; fax: +33472438528. (R?Mili, M.) (R?Mili, M.) Universite de Lyon--> , INSA-Lyon--> , MATEIS--> , 7 Avenue Jean Capelle--> , 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex--> - FRANCE (R?Mili, M.) Universite de Lyon--> , INSA-Lyo...

  19. Analysis of acoustic data from UK sodium/water reaction test facilities

    This paper describes acoustic measurements made during a number of sodium/water reaction experiments in the UK. The tests have included water and steam injections through both realistic (fatigue crack) defects and machined orifices and have covered a range of experimental conditions including those appropriate to the inlet and outlet regions of the EFR steam generators. Injection rates were typically in the range 0.1 to 30 g/s. Where possible, gas injections were also included in the test programme for comparison, since it is anticipated that a practical SGU acoustic leak detection system would include a facility for gas injections to allow system calibration, and to confirm transmission properties within the SGU. The test sections were instrumented with accelerometers on waveguides and in some cases included an under-sodium microphone situated about 300mm above the reaction zone. Tape recordings were made during the tests and used for detailed analysis off-line, although an audible output from one of the acoustic channels was used to monitor the progress of the injections and provide information for the rig operators. A comparison of the signal amplitudes measured during the experiments with typical reactor background noise was made and an estimate of the detection sensitivity of an acoustic monitoring system was deduced. 3 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  20. Testing Time and Frequency Fiber-Optic Link Transfer by Hardware Emulation of Acoustic-Band Optical Noise

    Lipiński Marcin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The low-frequency optical-signal phase noise induced by mechanical vibration of the base occurs in field-deployed fibers. Typical telecommunication data transfer is insensitive to this type of noise but the phenomenon may influence links dedicated to precise Time and Frequency (T&F fiber-optic transfer that exploit the idea of stabilization of phase or propagation delay of the link. To measure effectiveness of suppression of acoustic noise in such a link, a dedicated measurement setup is necessary. The setup should enable to introduce a low-frequency phase corruption to the optical signal in a controllable way. In the paper, a concept of a setup in which the mechanically induced acoustic-band optical signal phase corruption is described and its own features and measured parameters are presented. Next, the experimental measurement results of the T&F transfer TFTS-2 system’s immunity as a function of the fibre-optic length vs. the acoustic-band noise are presented. Then, the dependency of the system immunity on the location of a noise source along the link is also pointed out.

  1. Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Intensity Mapping as a Test of Dark Energy

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; McDonald, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The expansion of the universe appears to be accelerating, and the mysterious anti-gravity agent of this acceleration has been called ``dark energy''. To measure the dynamics of dark energy, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) can be used. Previous discussions of the BAO dark energy test have focused on direct measurements of redshifts of as many as $10^9$ individual galaxies, by observing the 21cm line or by detecting optical emission. Here we show how the study of acoustic oscillation in the ...

  2. Characteristics of acoustic wave from atmospheric nuclear explosions conducted at the USSR Test Sites

    Sokolova, Inna

    2015-04-01

    Availability of the acoustic wave on the record of microbarograph is one of discriminate signs of atmospheric (surface layer of atmosphere) and contact explosions. Nowadays there is large number of air wave records from chemical explosions recorded by the IMS infrasound stations installed during recent decade. But there is small number of air wave records from nuclear explosions as air and contact nuclear explosions had been conducted since 1945 to 1962, before the Limited Test Ban Treaty was signed in 1963 (the treaty banning nuclear weapon tests in the atmosphere, in outer space and under water) by the Great Britain, USSR and USA. That time there was small number of installed microbarographs. First infrasound stations in the USSR appeared in 1954, and by the moment of the USSR collapse the network consisted of 25 infrasound stations, 3 of which were located on Kazakhstan territory - in Kurchatov (East Kazakhstan), in Borovoye Observatory (North Kazakhstan) and Talgar Observatory (Northern Tien Shan). The microbarograph of Talgar Observatory was installed in 1962 and recorded large number of air nuclear explosions conducted at Semipalatinsk Test Site and Novaya Zemlya Test Site. The epicentral distance to the STS was ~700 km, and to Novaya Zemlya Test Site ~3500 km. The historical analog records of the microbarograph were analyzed on the availability of the acoustic wave. The selected records were digitized, the database of acoustic signals from nuclear explosions was created. In addition, acoustic signals from atmospheric nuclear explosions conducted at the USSR Test Sites were recorded by analogue broadband seismic stations at wide range of epicentral distances, 300-3600 km. These signals coincide well by its form and spectral content with records of microbarographs and can be used for monitoring tasks and discrimination in places where infrasound observations are absent. Nuclear explosions which records contained acoustic wave were from 0.03 to 30 kt yield for

  3. Irregular Liesegang-type patterns in gas phase revisited. I. Experimental setup, data processing, and test of the spacing law

    Torres-Guzmán, José C.; Buhse, Thomas; de la Calleja, Elsa María; González-Espinoza, Alfredo; Martínez-Mekler, Gustavo; Montoya-Nava, Fernando; Ramírez-Álvarez, Elizeth; Rivera-Islas, Marco; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Aurora; Müller, Markus F.

    2016-05-01

    Since the early work on Liesegang rings in gels, they have been a reference point for the study of pattern formation in chemical physics. Here we present a variant of the Liesegang experiment in gas phase, where ammonia and hydrochloric acid react within a glass tube producing a precipitate, which deposits along the tube wall producing a spatial pattern. With this apparently simple experiment a wide range of rich phenomenon can be observed due to the presence of convective flows and irregular dynamics reminiscent of turbulent behavior, for which precise measurements are scarce. In this first part of our work, we describe in detail the experimental setup, the method of data acquisition, the image processing, and the procedure used to obtain an intensity profile, which is representative of the amount of precipitate deposited at the tube walls. Special attention is devoted to the techniques rendering a data series reliable for statistical studies and model building, which may contribute to a characterization and understanding of the pattern formation phenomenon under consideration. As a first step in this direction, based on our data, we are able to show that the observed band pattern follows, with slight deviations, the spacing law encountered in common Liesegang rings, despite that the experimental conditions are very different. A further statistical correlation analysis of the data constitutes Paper II of this research.

  4. Acoustic measurements of the boiling stability tests on THORS sodium loop

    Acoustic data of boiling stability tests on the THORS (Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety) facility were obtained using three sodium-immersible high temperature microphones. The data was analyzed in both the time and frequency domains and provides the following information: (1) the acoustic signal due to sodium boiling was clearly observed; (2) the signal level and the repetition rate of boiling pulses are directly proportional to the applied heat flux; (3) a typical boiling pulse consists of a high frequency signal due mainly to the bubble collapses and a low frequency void oscillation; (4) the frequency spectra of the boiling and background pulses can be mostly assigned to various acoustic resonance frequencies of the THORS loop

  5. Electroacoustical simulation of listening room acoustics for project ARCHIMEDES

    Bech, Søren

    1989-01-01

    influence of listening room acoustics on the timbre of reproduced sound. For simulation of the acoustics of a standard listening room, an electroacoustic setup has been built in an anechoic chamber. The setup is based on a computer model of the listening room, and it consists of a number of loudspeakers...... listening room. This paper is a presentation of the system, with special emphasis on the psychoacoustical background of the design. This will include a discussion of choice of experimental procedure, test stimuli, and test subjects as well as purpose built loudspeakers and the DSP system....

  6. Virtual Acoustic Testing of Spacecraft Over a Broad Frequency Range Using FEM, BEM and Sea

    Vansant, K.; Borello, G.; De Langhe, K.; Courjal, A.

    2012-07-01

    During launch, a spacecraft is exposed to high levels of structural and acoustical loading. Acceptance tests are carried out before actual launch mimicking these loading conditions to validate that vibration, force and stress levels, which could damage the payload and lead to mission failure, remain below the design envelopes. The acceptance tests themselves, carried out on the actual payload, imply a risk of overtesting. Simulation models make it possible to carry out these tests in the virtual world. They can be used to derive specifications for the desired shaker, loudspeaker or horn excitation signals and to upfront quantify the risk of overtesting. Simulation also allows to uncover and rectify flaws or sensitivities in the spacecraft design rather quickly and at a low cost. This paper will discuss several simulation models (FEM, BEM and SEA) which can be used to mimic an acoustic acceptance test for different frequency ranges of interest.

  7. Reliable experimental setup to test the pressure modulation of Baerveldt Implant tubes for reducing post-operative hypotony

    Ramani, Ajay

    Glaucoma encompasses a group of conditions that result in damage to the optic nerve and can cause loss of vision and blindness. The nerve is damaged due to an increase in the eye's internal (intraocular) pressure (IOP) above the nominal range of 15 -- 20 mm Hg. There are many treatments available for this group of diseases depending on the complexity and stage of nerve degradation. In extreme cases where drugs or laser surgery do not create better conditions for the patient, ophthalmologists use glaucoma drainage devices to help alleviate the IOP. Many drainage implants have been developed over the years and are in use; but two popular implants are the Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant and the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implant. Baerveldt Implants are non-valved and provide low initial resistance to outflow of fluid, resulting in post-operative complications such as hypotony, where the IOP drops below 5 mm of Hg. Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implants are valved implants which initially restrict the amount of fluid flowing out of the eye. The long term success rates of Baerveldt Implants surpass those of Ahmed Valve Implants because of post-surgical issues; but Baerveldt Implants' initial effectiveness is poor without proper flow restriction. This drives the need to develop new ways to improve the initial effectiveness of Baerveldt Implants. A possible solution proposed by our research team is to place an insert in the Baerveldt Implant tube of inner diameter 305 microns. The insert must be designed to provide flow resistance for the early time frame [e.g., first 30 -- 60 post-operative days] until sufficient scar tissue has formed on the implant. After that initial stage with the insert, the scar tissue will provide the necessary flow resistance to maintain the IOP above 5 mm Hg. The main objective of this project was to develop and validate an experimental apparatus to measure pressure drop across a Baerveldt Implant tube, with and without inserts. This setup will be used in the

  8. Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads of the SSG Kvitsøy Pilot Plant from Extreme Wave Conditions

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Larsen, Brian Juul

    This report presents the preparations done prior to model tests planned for November 2005 focusing on experimental estimation of the surface loads on the wave energy convert (WEC) Seawave Slot-Cone Generator (SSG) due to extreme wave conditions. SSG is a WEC utilizing wave overtopping in multiple...... planned pilot plant site is also modeled. The tests will be carried out at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU) in the 3D deep water wave tank....... reservoirs. In the present SSG setup three reservoirs have been used. Model tests are planned using a model (length scale 1:60) of the SSG prototype at the planned location of a pilot plant at the west coast of the island Kvitsøy near Stavanger, Norway. The properties of the coastal area surrounding the...

  9. Application of acoustic emission analysis as a non-destructive test method for production control

    The application of acoustic emission measurements with a bandpass of 50 kHz - 1,5 MHz for the detection of fatigue-crack propagation in pressure vessels and to the perception of welding cracks is investigated. The method can also be used in laboratory tests for the determination of structural transformations of metals, for examinations in connection with stress-corrosion cracking and for tests of laminated materials. Some possibilities of application and the limits of the methode are shown. (orig.)

  10. Development of a wind energy converter and investigation of its operational function. Part 4: Test setup and results of measurement

    Armbrust, S.; Molly, J. P.

    1982-12-01

    Measurements made during test operations at the MODA.10 plant as well as at a 25 years old 6 kW wind energy converter are presented. The test arrangements, measurement results of both wind energy converters, and the experience gained are described.

  11. Free jet feasibility study of a thermal acoustic shield concept for AST/VCE application-dual flow. Comprehensive data report. Volume 1: Test nozzles and acoustic data

    Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Price, A. O.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic and diagnostic data that were obtained to determine the influence of selected geometric and aerodynamic flow variables of coannular nozzles with thermal acoustic shields are summarized in this comprehensive data report. A total of 136 static and simulated flight acoustic test points were conducted with 9 scale-model nozzles The tested nozzles included baseline (unshielded), 180 deg shielded, and 360 deg shielded dual flow coannular plug configurations. The baseline configurations include a high radius ratio unsuppressed coannular plug nozzle and a coanuular plug nozzle and a coannular plug nozzle with a 20-chute outer stream suppressor. The tests were conducted at nozzle temperatures and pressure typical of operating conditions of variable cycle engine.

  12. Finalizing the CCSDS Space-Data Link Layer Security Protocol: Setup and Execution of the Interoperability Testing

    Fischer, Daniel; Aguilar-Sanchez, Ignacio; Saba, Bruno; Moury, Gilles; Biggerstaff, Craig; Bailey, Brandon; Weiss, Howard; Pilgram, Martin; Richter, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    The protection of data transmitted over the space-link is an issue of growing importance also for civilian space missions. Through the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS), space agencies have reacted to this need by specifying the Space Data-Link Layer Security (SDLS) protocol which provides confidentiality and integrity services for the CCSDS Telemetry (TM), Telecommand (TC) and Advanced Orbiting Services (AOS) space data-link protocols. This paper describes the approach of the CCSDS SDLS working group to specify and execute the necessary interoperability tests. It first details the individual SDLS implementations that have been produced by ESA, NASA, and CNES and then the overall architecture that allows the interoperability tests between them. The paper reports on the results of the interoperability tests and identifies relevant aspects for the evolution of the test environment.

  13. Measurements of the acoustic field on austenitic welds: a way to higher reliability in ultrasonic tests

    In nuclear power plants many of the welds in austenitic tubes have to be inspected by means of ultrasonic techniques. If component-identical test pieces are available, they are used to qualify the ultrasonic test technology. Acoustic field measurements on such test blocks give information whether the beam of the ultrasonic transducer reaches all critical parts of the weld region and which transducer type is best suited. Acoustic fields have been measured at a bimetallic, a V-shaped and a narrow gap weld in test pieces of wall thickness 33, 25 and 17 mm, respectively. Compression wave transducers 45, 60 and 70 and 45 shear wave transducers have been included in the investigation. The results are presented: (1) as acoustic C-scans for one definite probe position, (2) as series of C-scans for the probe moving on a track perpendicular to the weld, (3) as scan along the weld and (4) as effective beam profile. The influence of the scanning electrodynamic probe is also discussed. (orig.)

  14. Hydrophone spatial directivity and the induced difference in HIFU acoustic field test

    Hydrophone has been widely used in testing ultrasonic field distribution. But the hydrophone has a certain directivity, which may bring error in the actual acoustic field measurements. So it is necessary to meet some requirements about the directivity of hydrophone. In the measurement, the spatial directivities of needle hydrophone, membrane hydrophone and robust hydrophone is measured and a comparison about measured data of HIFU acoustic field with them is given. Experimental results indicate that the asymmetric special directivity of hydrophone is due to manufacturing processes and other reasons. As a result, it is not sufficient to test the directivity of hydrophone along one axis. It is necessary to adjust the direction of the hydrophone when characterizing the HIFU field.

  15. Hydrophone spatial directivity and the induced difference in HIFU acoustic field test

    Chen, T; Zhang, D [Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Hu, J M; Huang, W; Zhang, W, E-mail: Chent_qxs@jsfda.gov.cn [Jiangsu Province Institute for Medical Equipment Testing, Nanjing 210012 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Hydrophone has been widely used in testing ultrasonic field distribution. But the hydrophone has a certain directivity, which may bring error in the actual acoustic field measurements. So it is necessary to meet some requirements about the directivity of hydrophone. In the measurement, the spatial directivities of needle hydrophone, membrane hydrophone and robust hydrophone is measured and a comparison about measured data of HIFU acoustic field with them is given. Experimental results indicate that the asymmetric special directivity of hydrophone is due to manufacturing processes and other reasons. As a result, it is not sufficient to test the directivity of hydrophone along one axis. It is necessary to adjust the direction of the hydrophone when characterizing the HIFU field.

  16. Set-up of a pre-test mock-up experiment in preparation for the HCPB Breeder Unit mock-up experimental campaign

    Highlights: ► As preparation for the HCPB-TBM Breeder Unit out-of-pile testing campaign, a pre-test experiment (PREMUX) has been prepared and described. ► A new heater system based on a wire heater matrix has been developed for imitating the neutronic volumetric heating and it is compared with the conventional plate heaters. ► The test section is described and preliminary thermal results with the available models are presented and are to be benchmarked with PREMUX. ► The PREMUX integration in the air cooling loop L-STAR/LL in the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology is shown and future steps are discussed. -- Abstract: The complexity of the experimental set-up for testing a full-scaled Breeder Unit (BU) mock-up for the European Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Test Blanket Module (HCPB-TBM) has motivated to build a pre-test mock-up experiment (PREMUX) consisting of a slice of the BU in the Li4SiO4 region. This pre-test aims at verifying the feasibility of the methods to be used for the subsequent testing of the full-scaled BU mock-up. Key parameters needed for the modeling of the breeder material is also to be determined by the Hot Wire Method (HWM). The modeling tools for the thermo-mechanics of the pebble beds and for the mock-up structure are to be calibrated and validated as well. This paper presents the setting-up of PREMUX in the L-STAR/LL facility at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. A key requirement of the experiments is to mimic the neutronic volumetric heating. A new heater concept is discussed and compared to several conventional heater configurations with respect to the estimated temperature distribution in the pebble beds. The design and integration of the thermocouple system in the heater matrix and pebble beds is also described, as well as other key aspects of the mock-up (dimensions, layout, cooling system, purge gas line, boundary conditions and integration in the test facility). The adequacy of these methods for the full-scaled BU mock-up is

  17. The Evaluation of a Test Device for Human Occupant Restraint (THOR) Under Vertical Loading Conditions: Part 1 - Experimental Setup and Results

    Littell, Justin D.; Annett, Martin S.

    2013-01-01

    A series of 16 vertical tests were conducted on a Test Device for Human Occupant Restraint (THOR) - NT 50th percentile Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The purpose of the tests conducted at NASA LaRC was threefold. The first was to add vertical response data to the growing test database for THOR-NT development and validation. Second, the THOR-NT analytical computational models currently in development must be validated for the vertical loading environment. The computational models have been calibrated for frontal crash environments with concentration on accurately replicating head/neck, thoracic, and lower extremity responses. Finally, familiarity with the THOR ATD is necessary because NASA is interested in evaluating advanced ATDs for use in future flight and research projects. The THOR was subjected to vertical loading conditions ranging between 5 and 16 g in magnitude and 40 to 120 milliseconds (msec) in duration. It was also tested under conditions identical to previous tests conducted on the Hybrid II and III ATDs to allow comparisons to be made. Variations in the test setup were also introduced, such as the addition of a footrest in an attempt to offload some of the impact load into the legs. A full data set of the THOR-NT ATD will be presented and discussed. Results from the tests show that the THOR was largely insensitive to differences in the loading conditions, perhaps due in part to their small magnitudes. THOR responses, when compared to the Hybrid II and III in the lumbar region, demonstrated that the THOR more closely resembled the straight spine Hybrid setup. In the neck region, the THOR behaved more like the Hybrid III. However in both cases, the responses were not identical, indicating that the THOR would show differences in response than the Hybrid II and III ATDs when subjected to identical impact conditions. The addition of a footrest did not significantly affect the THOR response due to the nature of how

  18. The Alcock Paczy\\'nski test with Baryon Acoustic Oscillations: systematic effects for future surveys

    Lepori, Francesca; Di Dio, Enea; Viel, Matteo; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Durrer, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the Alcock Paczy\\'nski (AP) test applied to the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature in the galaxy correlation function. By using a general formalism that includes relativistic effects, we quantify the importance of the linear redshift space distortions and gravitational lensing corrections to the galaxy number density fluctuation. We show that redshift space distortions significantly affect the shape of the correlation function, both in radial and transverse directions, c...

  19. Points in the set-up of tests for fMRI. Toward the delineation of language-competent areas in clinical practice

    This hospital has performed fMRI of language-competent areas of the brain to identify the language-dominant hemisphere and obtain the configuration of the focus in the language-dominant side of the brain. Until now, signals have been detected in only two of fifteen patients who were diagnosed by language tests of a last-syllable word chain. In the present experiment, we tried to have subjects select the type of test. The result was that changes in signals were detected in eight of ten patients. Although the set-up of tests for fMRI is said to hold significant value, clear-cut studies to back this up have rarely been seen. Because clinical medicine treats patients who have difficulty in communication or suffer from aphasia, it is important to take into consideration individual variations and to set up a test suitable for, or achievable by, these individuals. The present method enabled us to avoid failure in examination caused by unsuccessful tests. (author)

  20. KLauS: an ASIC for silicon photomultiplier readout and its application in a setup for production testing of scintillating tiles

    Briggl, K; Hagdorn, R; Harion, T; Schultz-Coulon, H.C; Shen, W

    2014-01-01

    signals from silicon photomultipliers. Developed as an analog front-end for future calorimeters with high granularity as pursued by the AHCAL concept in the CALICE collaboration, the ASIC is designed to measure the charge signal of the sensors in a large dynamic range and with low electronic noise contributions. In order to tune the operation voltage of each sensor individually, an 8-bit DAC to tune the voltage at the input terminal within a range of 2V is implemented. Using an integrated fast comparator with low jitter, the time information can be measured with subnanosecond resolution. The low power consumption of the ASIC can be further decreased using power gating techniques. Future versions of KLauS are under development and will incorporate an ADC with a resolution of up to 12-bits and blocks for digital data transmission. The chip is used in a setup for mass testing and characterization of scintillator tiles for the AHCAL ...

  1. Structural Dynamic Assessment of the GN2 Piping System for NASA's New and Powerful Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    McNelis, Mark E.; Staab, Lucas D.; Akers, James C.; Hughes, WIlliam O.; Chang, Li, C.; Hozman, Aron D.; Henry, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) has led the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA from 2007-2011. SAIC-Benham has completed construction of a new reverberant acoustic test facility to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program and commercial customers. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) is approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and was designed to operate at a maximum empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. Initial checkout acoustic testing was performed on March 2011 by SAIC-Benham at test levels up to 161 dB OASPL. During testing, several branches of the gaseous nitrogen (GN2) piping system, which supply the fluid to the noise generating acoustic modulators, failed at their "t-junctions" connecting the 12 inch supply line to their respective 4 inch branch lines. The problem was initially detected when the oxygen sensors in the horn room indicated a lower than expected oxygen level from which was inferred GN2 leaks in the piping system. In subsequent follow up inspections, cracks were identified in the failed "t-junction" connections through non-destructive evaluation testing . Through structural dynamic modeling of the piping system, the root cause of the "t-junction" connection failures was determined. The structural dynamic assessment identified several possible corrective design improvements to the horn room piping system. The effectiveness of the chosen design repairs were subsequently evaluated in September 2011 during acoustic verification testing to 161 dB OASPL.

  2. Combined UHV/high-pressure catalysis setup for depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization and catalytic testing of model catalysts

    Mayr, Lukas; Rameshan, Raffael; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon; Rameshan, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    An ultra-high vacuum (UHV) setup for "real" and "inverse" model catalyst preparation, depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization, and quantification of catalytic activity and selectivity under technologically relevant conditions is described. Due to the all-quartz reactor attached directly to the UHV-chamber, transfer of the catalyst for in situ testing without intermediate contact to the ambient is possible. The design of the UHV-compatible re-circulating batch reactor setup allows the study of reaction kinetics under close to technically relevant catalytic conditions up to 1273 K without contact to metallic surfaces except those of the catalyst itself. With the attached differentially pumped exchangeable evaporators and the quartz-microbalance thickness monitoring equipment, a reproducible, versatile, and standardised sample preparation is possible. For three-dimensional near-surface sample characterization, the system is equipped with a hemispherical analyser for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron-beam or X-ray-excited Auger-electron spectroscopy, and low-energy ion scattering measurements. Due the dedicated geometry of the X-ray gun (54.7°, "magic angle") and the rotatable sample holder, depth analysis by angle-resolved XPS measurements can be performed. Thus, by the combination of characterisation methods with different information depths, a detailed three-dimensional picture of the electronic and geometric structure of the model catalyst can be obtained. To demonstrate the capability of the described system, comparative results for depth-resolved sample characterization and catalytic testing in methanol steam reforming on PdGa and PdZn near-surface intermetallic phases are shown.

  3. A novel facility for reduced-gravity testing: A setup for studying low-velocity collisions into granular surfaces.

    Sunday, C; Murdoch, N; Cherrier, O; Morales Serrano, S; Valeria Nardi, C; Janin, T; Avila Martinez, I; Gourinat, Y; Mimoun, D

    2016-08-01

    This work presents an experimental design for studying low-velocity collisions into granular surfaces in low-gravity. In the experiment apparatus, reduced-gravity is simulated by releasing a free-falling projectile into a surface container with a downward acceleration less than that of Earth's gravity. The acceleration of the surface is controlled through the use of an Atwood machine, or a system of pulleys and counterweights. The starting height of the surface container and the initial separation distance between the projectile and surface are variable and chosen to accommodate collision velocities up to 20 cm/s and effective accelerations of ∼0.1 to 1.0 m/s(2). Accelerometers, placed on the surface container and inside the projectile, provide acceleration data, while high-speed cameras capture the collision and act as secondary data sources. The experiment is built into an existing 5.5 m drop tower frame and requires the custom design of all components, including the projectile, surface sample container, release mechanism, and deceleration system. Data from calibration tests verify the efficiency of the experiment's deceleration system and provide a quantitative understanding of the performance of the Atwood system. PMID:27587140

  4. Acoustic emission measurement in a 20MJ superconducting magnet system of the cluster test coil

    This paper describes acoustic emission (AE) results which were measured during the second major experiment on the Cluster Test Coil at JAERI. This is the largest superconducting magnet system to date on which acoustic emission measurement has been carried out. The amplitudes and the counting rates of AE are shown as functions of coil operating current on three full current excursions. The amplitude results show the on-going process of emission and reduction during successive runs. A strong tendency of the AE counting rate to increase was observed at high currents after successive runs. The phenomenon of amplitude reduction and counting rate increase is attributed to an energy release change from larger single events to numerous smaller events. (author)

  5. Force Limiting Vibration Tests Evaluated from both Ground Acoustic Tests and FEM Simulations of a Flight Like Vehicle System Assembly

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted a series of ground acoustic tests with the dual goals of informing analytical judgment, and validating analytical methods when estimating vibroacoustic responses of launch vehicle subsystems. The process of repeatedly correlating finite element-simulated responses with test-measured responses has assisted in the development of best practices for modeling and post-processing. In recent work, force transducers were integrated to measure interface forces at the base of avionics box equipment. Other force data was indirectly measured using strain gauges. The combination of these direct and indirect force measurements has been used to support and illustrate the advantages of implementing the Force Limiting approach for equipment qualification tests. The comparison of force response from integrated system level tests to measurements at the same locations during component level vibration tests provides an excellent illustration. A second comparison of the measured response cases from the system level acoustic tests to finite element simulations has also produced some principles for assessing the suitability of Finite Element Models (FEMs) for making vibroacoustics estimates. The results indicate that when FEM models are employed to guide force limiting choices, they should include sufficient detail to represent the apparent mass of the system in the frequency range of interest.

  6. Acoustic emission for on-line reactor monitoring: results of intermediate vessel test monitoring and reactor hot functional testing

    The objective of the acoustic emission (AE)/flaw characterization program is to provide an experimental feasibility evaluation of using the AE method on a continuous basis (during operation and during hydrotest) to detect and analyze flaw growth in reactor pressure vessels and primary piping. This effort is based on earlier results showing that AE has potential for being a valuable addition to nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods with the added unique capability for continuous monitoring, high sensitivity and remote flaw location. Results are reported for the ZB-1 vessel test and the Watts Bar-1 hot functional test

  7. Structural damage claims resulting from acoustic environments developed during static test firing of rocket engines

    Guest, S. H.; Slone, R. M., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    During static testing of multi-million pound thrust rocket engines areas adjacent to the test site have been subjected to the noise generated by rocket engines. Structural damage claims and subjective complaints were filed by those who alleged that the noise levels were excessive. The statistical analysis of these claims and complaints which were filed during these rocket engine development programs led to the determination of a relationship between claims and overall sound pressure level. Community exposure criteria are then assessed based on what can be considered allowable acoustic environments from large rocket engines.

  8. Assessment of the Acoustic Properties of Common Tissue-mimicking Test Phantoms

    Browne, Jacinta; Ramnarine, K.; Watson, A; Hoskins, P

    2003-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) test phantoms incorporating tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) play an important role in the quality control (QC) and performance testing of US equipment. Three commercially available TMMs (ZerdineTM from CIRS Inc.; condensed-milk-based gel from Gammex RMI; urethane-rubber-based from ATS Labs) and a noncommercial agar-based TMM, were investigated. Acoustic properties were measured over the frequency range 2.25 to 15 MHz at a range of ambient temperatures (10 to 35°C). The acous...

  9. Application of Acoustic Emission Testing for the Assessment of Wind Turbine Blade

    Lee, Sang Il; Yun, Dong Jin; Hur, Yong Jin; Kim, Dong Jin [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to verify the applicability of acoustic emission (AE) to detect damage in wind turbine blade. Nondestructive behavior of a GFRP wind turbine blade (WTB) was evaluated using AE analysis under stepwise cyclic loading. AE hits of the blade were correspondence with strain change within 80% of the maximum load. From the analysis of AE signals, the low energy signals due to electrical/mechanical noise were well distinguished from the signals of the blade delamination with higher amplitude or energy. When the AE test is performed with full blade test, AE will play an important role as a major nondestructive technique to assess damages of the WTB.

  10. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube

    William J Murphy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF. Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB, 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs ® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL.

  11. Experimental Setup and Commissioning of a Test Facility for Gain Evaluation of Microchannel-Plate Photomultipliers in High Magnetic Field at Jefferson Lab

    Bringley, Eric; Cao, Tongtong; Ilieva, Yordonka; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Park, Kijun; Zorn, Carl

    2014-09-01

    At the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) a research and development project for a Detector of Internally-Reflected Cherenkov light for the upcoming Electron Ion Collider is underway. One goal is the development of a compact readout camera that can operate in high magnetic fields. Small-size photon sensors, such as Microchannel-Plate Photomultipliers (MCP-PMT), are key components of the readout. Here we present our work to set up and commission a dedicated test facility at JLab where MCP-PMT gain is evaluated in magnetic fields of up to 5 T, and to develop a test procedure and analysis software to determine the gain. We operate the setup in a single-photon mode, where a light-emitting diode delivers photons to the sensor's photocathode. The PMT spectrum is measured with a flash Analog-to-Digital converter (fADC). We model the spectrum as a sum of an exponential background and a convolution of Poisson and Gaussian distributions of the pedestal and multiple photoelectron peaks, respectively. We determine the PMT's gain from the position of the single-photoelectron peak obtained by fitting the fADC spectrum to the model. Our gain uncertainty is <10%. The facility is now established and will have a long-lasting value for sensor tests and beyond-nuclear-physics applications.

  12. Evaluation of corrosion damage of aluminum alloy using acoustic emission testing

    GENG Rongsheng; FU Gangqiang

    2004-01-01

    Current studies are aiming at monitoring corrosion damage of aircraft main structures by using acoustic emission (AE) technique and at supplying useful data for determining calendar life of the aircraft. The characteristics of AE signals produced during accelerating corrosion process are described, and methods for evaluating corrosion damages and determining remaining life of main structures of aircraft using AE testing are outlined. Experimental results have shown that AE technique can detect corrosion damage of aluminum alloy much earlier than conventional non-destructive testing means, such as ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing. Relationship between corrosion damage and AE parameters was obtained through investigating corrosion damage extent and changes of AE signals during accelerating corrosion test, and showing that AE technique can be used to detect early corrosion, investigating corrosion developing trend, and in monitoring and evaluating corrosion damages.

  13. Test method of frequency response based on diamond surface acoustic wave devices

    CHEN Xi-ming; YANG Bao-he; WU Xiao-guo; WU Yi-zhuo

    2011-01-01

    In order to reduce the noises affixed to the signals when testing high frequency devices, a single-port test mode (S11) is used to test frequency response of high frequency (GHz) and dual-port surface acoustic wave devices (SAWDs) in this paper.The feasibility of the test is proved by simulating the Fabry-Perot model. The frequency response of the high-frequency dual-port resonant-type diamond SAWD is measured by S11 and the dual-port test mode (S21), respectively. The results show that the quality factor of the device is 51.29 and the 3 dB bandwidth is 27.8 MHz by S11 -mode measurement, which is better than the S21 mode, and is consistent with the frequency response curve by simulation.

  14. Study of the performances of acoustic emission testing for glass fibre reinforced plastic pipes containing defects

    Glass fibre reinforced plastic pipes are more and more often used, in nuclear power plants, for building or replacement of water pipings classified 'nuclear safety'. Tests have been performed to evaluate the performances of acoustic emission testing for in service inspection of these components. The tests were focused on glass fibre reinforced polyester and vinyl-ester pipes, in as received conditions or containing impacts, and intentionally introduced defects. They have been carried out by CETIM, following the ASTM Standard E 1118 (code CARP), to a maximum pressure lever of 25 Bar The results show that the CARP procedure can be used for detection of defects and evaluation of their noxiousness towards internal pressure: most of the tubes containing low energy impacts could not be distinguished from tubes without defect; on the other hand the important noxiousness of lacks of impregnation of roving layer appeared clearly. Complementary tests have been performed on some tubes at a more important pressure lever, for which the damage of the tubes in enough to deteriorate there elastic properties. The results showed that CARP procedure give valuable informations on damage level. It would be interesting to evaluate acoustic emission on tubes containing realistic in-service degradations. (author). 11 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs., 2 appends

  15. Tests of a Compton imaging prototype in a monoenergetic 4.44 MeV photon field—a benchmark setup for prompt gamma-ray imaging devices

    Golnik, C.; Bemmerer, D.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Hueso-González, F.; Pausch, G.; Römer, K.; Rohling, H.; Schöne, S.; Wagner, L.; Kormoll, T.

    2016-06-01

    The finite range of a proton beam in tissue opens new vistas for the delivery of a highly conformal dose distribution in radiotherapy. However, the actual particle range, and therefore the accurate dose deposition, is sensitive to the tissue composition in the proton path. Range uncertainties, resulting from limited knowledge of this tissue composition or positioning errors, are accounted for in the form of safety margins. Thus, the unverified particle range constrains the principle benefit of proton therapy. Detecting prompt γ-rays, a side product of proton-tissue interaction, aims at an on-line and non-invasive monitoring of the particle range, and therefore towards exploiting the potential of proton therapy. Compton imaging of the spatial prompt γ-ray emission is a promising measurement approach. Prompt γ-rays exhibit emission energies of several MeV. Hence, common radioactive sources cannot provide the energy range a prompt γ-ray imaging device must be designed for. In this work a benchmark measurement-setup for the production of a localized, monoenergetic 4.44 MeV γ-ray source is introduced. At the Tandetron accelerator at the HZDR, the proton-capture resonance reaction 15N(p,α γ4.439)12C is utilized. This reaction provides the same nuclear de-excitation (and γ-ray emission) occurrent as an intense prompt γ-ray line in proton therapy. The emission yield is quantitatively described. A two-stage Compton imaging device, dedicated for prompt γ-ray imaging, is tested at the setup exemplarily. Besides successful imaging tests, the detection efficiency of the prototype at 4.44 MeV is derived from the measured data. Combining this efficiency with the emission yield for prompt γ-rays, the number of valid Compton events, induced by γ-rays in the energy region around 4.44 MeV, is estimated for the prototype being implemented in a therapeutic treatment scenario. As a consequence, the detection efficiency turns out to be a key parameter for prompt

  16. Characterisation and testing of the KM3NeT acoustic positioning system

    Viola S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In underwater neutrino telescopes, the search of point-like sources through the Cherenkov detection technique requires a precise knowledge of the positions of thousands of optical sensors, spread in a volume of a few cubic kilometres. In KM3NeT the optical sensors are hosted in 700 m high semi-rigid structures, called detection units, which move under the effects of underwater currents. These movements are continuously monitored through an underwater positioning system based on acoustic emitters and receivers. In this work, the tests performed on the key elements of the positioning system are presented.

  17. Testing the neutrality of matter by acoustic means in a spherical resonator

    Bressi, G; Della Valle, F; Galeazzi, G; Ruoso, G; Sartori, G

    2011-01-01

    New measurements to test the neutrality of matter by acoustic means are reported. The apparatus is based on a spherical capacitor filled with gaseous SF$_6$ excited by an oscillating electric field. The apparatus has been calibrated measuring the electric polarizability. Assuming charge conservation in the $\\beta$ decay of the neutron, the experiment gives a limit of $\\epsilon_\\text{p-e}\\lesssim1\\cdot10^{-21}$ for the electron-proton charge difference, the same limit holding for the charge of the neutron. Previous measurements are critically reviewed and found incorrect: the present result is the best limit obtained with this technique.

  18. Statistical Test of Distance-Duality Relation with Type Ia Supernovae and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    Ma, Cong; Corasaniti, Pier-Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We use cosmological luminosity distance ($d_L$) from the JLA Type Ia supernovae compilation and angular-diameter distance ($d_A$) based on BOSS and WiggleZ baryon acoustic oscillation measurements to test the distance-duality relation $\\eta \\equiv d_L / [ (1 + z)^2 d_A ] = 1$. The $d_L$ measurements are matched to $d_A$ redshift by a statistically-motivated compression procedure. By means of Monte Carlo methods, non-trivial and correlated distributions of $\\eta$ can be explored in a straightf...

  19. Acoustic emission monitoring of preservice testing at Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Plant in the US during hot functional preservice testing is described. Background, methodology, and results are included. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by the US NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing to AE monitoring during reactor operation. 3 refs., 6 figs

  20. Test setup for accelerated test of high power IGBT modules with online monitoring of Vce and Vf voltage during converter operation

    de Vega, Angel Ruiz; Ghimire, Pramod; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup;

    2014-01-01

    Several accelerated test methods exist in order to study the failures mechanisms of the high power IGBT modules like temperature cycling test or power cycles based on DC current pulses. The main drawback is that the test conditions do not represent the real performance and stress conditions of th...

  1. Acoustic emission for on-line reactor monitoring: results of intermediate vessel test monitoring and reactor hot functional testing

    This article discusses a program designed to develop the use of acoustic emission (AE) methods for continuous surveillance to detect and evaluate flaw growth in reactor pressure boundaries. Technology developed in the laboratory for identifying AE from crack growth and for using AE information to estimate flaw severity is now being evaluated on an intermediate vessel test and on a reactor facility. A vessel, designated ZB-1, has been tested under fatigue loadings with simulated reactor conditions at Mannheim, West Germany, in collaboration with the German Materialpruefungsanstalt (MPA), Stuttgart. Fatigue cracking from machined flaws and in a fabrication weld were both detected clearly by AE. AE data were measured on a US nuclear reactor (Watts Bar, Unit 1) during hot functional preservice testing. This demonstrated that coolant flow noise is a manageable problem and that AE can be detected under operational coolant flow and temperature conditions. (author)

  2. The Alcock Paczy\\'nski test with Baryon Acoustic Oscillations: systematic effects for future surveys

    Lepori, Francesca; Viel, Matteo; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Durrer, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the Alcock Paczy\\'nski (AP) test applied to the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature in the galaxy correlation function. By using a general formalism that includes relativistic effects, we quantify the importance of the linear redshift space distortions and gravitational lensing corrections to the galaxy number density fluctuation. We show that redshift space distortions significantly affect the shape of the correlation function, both in radial and transverse directions, causing different values of galaxy bias to induce offsets up to 1% in the AP test. On the other hand, we find that the lensing correction around the BAO scale modifies the amplitude but not the shape of the correlation function and therefore does not introduce any systematic effect. Furthermore, we investigate in details how the AP test is sensitive to redshift binning: a window function in transverse direction suppresses correlations and shifts the peak position toward smaller angular scales. We determine the correction t...

  3. Cold test with a benchtop set-up for fluidized bed reactor using quartz sand to simulate gasification of coal cokes by concentrated solar radiation

    Gokon, Nobuyuki; Tanabe, Tomoaki; Shimizu, Tadaaki; Kodama, Tatsuya

    2016-05-01

    The impacts of internal circulation of a mixture of coal-coke particles and quartz sand on the fluidization state in a fluidized bed reactor are investigated by a cold test with a benchtop set-up in order to design 10-30 kWth scale prototype windowed fluidized-bed reactor. Firstly, a basic relationship between pressure loss of inlet gas and gas velocity was experimentally examined using quartz sand with different particle sizes by a small-scale quartz tube with a distributor at ambient pressure and temperature. Based on the results, an appropriate particle range of quartz sand and layer height/layer diameter ratio (L/D ratio) was determined for a design of the fluidized bed reactor. Secondly, a windowed reactor mock-up was designed and fabricated for solar coke gasification using quartz sand as a bed material. The pressure loss between the inlet and outlet gases was examined, and descending cokes and sand particles on the sidewall of the reactor was observed in the reactor mock-up. The moving velocity and distance of descending particles/sands from the top to bottom of fluidized bed were measured by the visual observation of the colored tracer particles on outside wall of the reactor.

  4. Sound propagation tests for acoustic detection of simulated sodium-water reaction

    The characteristics of sound propagation in a steam generator were tested in order to investigate the feasibility of an acoustic leak detection by small leak sodium-water reactions. The test model was composed of the vessel filled with water, the inner pipe, the shroud, and two heat transfer coils. Transducers, gas leak nozzles and an underwater speaker were set up for the simulated sound source. The results indicate that the acoustic signal detected at the vessel wall has a comparable SN ratio to the guide pipe or the heat transfer tubes, and that the difference of the RMS values depend on the standing wave, rather than the attenuation by distance or diffractions, Therefore, it was estimated that the sound field in the vessel was reverberant, and the difference between one and two helical coils depends on the sound energy absorption by them. The RMS values in the high frequency range (more than 50 kHz) do not increase in proportion to the gas leak rate, more than about 200 cc/s, because of the attenuation by gas bubbles. (author)

  5. Acoustic Modifications of the Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel and Test Techniques for High-Speed Research Model Testing

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NFAC 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames is being refurbished with a new, deep acoustic lining in the test section which will make the facility nearly anechoic over a large frequency range. The modification history, key elements, and schedule will be discussed. Design features and expected performance gains will be described. Background noise reductions will be summarized. Improvements in aeroacoustic research techniques have been developed and used recently at NFAC on several wind tunnel tests of High Speed Research models. Research on quiet inflow microphones and struts will be described. The Acoustic Survey Apparatus in the 40x80 will be illustrated. A special intensity probe was tested for source localization. Multi-channel, high speed digital data acquisition is now used for acoustics. And most important, phased microphone arrays have been developed and tested which have proven to be very powerful for source identification and increased signal-to-noise ratio. Use of these tools for the HEAT model will be illustrated. In addition, an acoustically absorbent symmetry plane was built to satisfy the HEAT semispan aerodynamic and acoustic requirements. Acoustic performance of that symmetry plane will be shown.

  6. Testing the effectiveness of an acoustic deterrent for gray whales along the Oregon coast

    Lagerquist, Barbara [Oregon State University Marine Mammal Institute; Winsor, Martha [Oregon State University Marine Mammal Institute; Mate, Bruce [Oregon State University Marine Mammal Institute

    2012-12-31

    This study was conducted to determine whether a low-powered sound source could be effective at deterring gray whales from areas that may prove harmful to them. With increased interest in the development of marine renewal energy along the Oregon coast the concern that such development may pose a collision or entanglement risk for gray whales. A successful acoustic deterrent could act as a mitigation tool to prevent harm to whales from such risks. In this study, an acoustic device was moored on the seafloor in the pathway of migrating gray whales off Yaquina Head on the central Oregon coast. Shore-based observers tracked whales with a theodolite (surveyor’s tool) to accurately locate whales as they passed the headland. Individual locations of different whales/whale groups as well as tracklines of the same whale/whale groups were obtained and compared between times with the acoustic device was transmitting and when it was off. Observations were conducted on 51 d between January 1 and April 15, 2012. A total of 143 individual whale locations were collected for a total of 243 whales, as well as 57 tracklines for a total of 142 whales. Inclement weather and equipment problems resulted in very small sample sizes, especially during experimental periods, when the device was transmitting. Because of this, the results of this study were inconclusive. We feel that another season of field testing is warranted to successfully test the effectiveness of the deterrent, but recommend increasing the zone of influence to 3 km to ensure the collection of adequate sample sizes. Steps have been taken to acquire the necessary federal research permit modification to authorize the increased zone of influence and to modify the acoustic device for the increased power. With these changes we are confident we will be able to determine whether the deterrent is effective at deflecting gray whales. A successful deterrent device may serve as a valuable mitigation tool to protect gray whales, and

  7. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for component-loaded curved orthogrid panels typical of launch vehicle skin structures. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was applied to correlate the measured input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application quantifies the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software developed for the RPTF method allows easy replacement of the diffuse acoustic field with other pressure fields such as a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) model suitable for vehicle ascent. Structural responses

  8. Integration of Acoustic Neutrino Detection Methods into ANTARES

    The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope is a water Cherenkov detector currently under construction in the Mediterranean Sea. It is also designed to serve as a platform for investigations of the deep-sea environment. In this context, the ANTARES group at the University of Erlangen will integrate acoustic sensors within the infrastructure of the experiment. With this dedicated setup, tests of acoustic particle detection methods and deep-sea acoustic background studies shall be performed. The aim of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of a future acoustic neutrino telescope in the deep sea operating in the ultra-high energy regime. In these proceedings, the implementation of the project is described in the context of the premises and challenges set by the physics of acoustic particle detection and the integration into an existing infrastructure

  9. Integration of Acoustic Neutrino Detection Methods into ANTARES

    Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Katz, U F; Lahmann, R; Naumann, C; Salomon, K

    2007-01-01

    The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope is a water Cherenkov detector currently under construction in the Mediterranean Sea. It is also designed to serve as a platform for investigations of the deep-sea environment. In this context, the ANTARES group at the University of Erlangen will integrate acoustic sensors within the infrastructure of the experiment. With this dedicated setup, tests of acoustic particle detection methods and deep-sea acoustic background studies shall be performed. The aim of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of a future acoustic neutrino telescope in the deep sea operating in the ultra-high energy regime. In these proceedings, the implementation of the project is described in the context of the premises and challenges set by the physics of acoustic particle detection and the integration into an existing infrastructure.

  10. HADES - Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole

    Semburg, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) is located in the upper part of the optical neutrino observatory IceCube, currently under construction. SPATS consists of four strings at depths between 80 m and 500 m below the surface of the ice with seven stages per string. Each stage is equipped with an acoustic sensor and a transmitter. Three strings (string A-C) were deployed in the austral summer 2006/07. SPATS was extended by a fourth string (string D) with second generation sensors and transmitters in 2007/08. One second generation sensor type HADES (Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole) consists of a ring-shaped piezo-electric element coated with polyurethane. The development of the sensor, optimization of acoustic transmission by acoustic impedance matching and first in-situ results will be discussed.

  11. Acoustic emission testing and estimation of the damage of wind turbine blades

    Wind turbines experience long term fluctuating variable amplitude fatigue loads with occasional large amplitude stochastic peak loads. A methodology for wind turbine blade monitoring using acoustic emission (AE) detection of damage processes in the structure has been developed by the AEGIS consortium, supported by the European Commission. Characteristic results are presented of AE activity during peak loading events and fatigue blade tests to failure in the laboratory. The results presented indicate the kind of results, which could be obtained from monitoring in-service machines. In particular, a dedicated pattern recognition software has been developed which could identify differences from turbine to turbine and help target preventative maintenance. Validation of the software from laboratory tests on blades is presented. (authors)

  12. Monitoring accelerated carbonation on standard Portland cement mortar by nonlinear resonance acoustic test

    Eiras, J. N.; Kundu, T.; Popovics, J. S.; Monzó, J.; Borrachero, M. V.; Payá, J.

    2015-03-01

    Carbonation is an important deleterious process for concrete structures. Carbonation begins when carbon dioxide (CO2) present in the atmosphere reacts with portlandite producing calcium carbonate (CaCO3). In severe carbonation conditions, C-S-H gel is decomposed into silica gel (SiO2.nH2O) and CaCO3. As a result, concrete pore water pH decreases (usually below 10) and eventually steel reinforcing bars become unprotected from corrosion agents. Usually, the carbonation of the cementing matrix reduces the porosity, because CaCO3 crystals (calcite and vaterite) occupy more volume than portlandite. In this study, an accelerated carbonation-ageing process is conducted on Portland cement mortar samples with water to cement ratio of 0.5. The evolution of the carbonation process on mortar is monitored at different levels of ageing until the mortar is almost fully carbonated. A nondestructive technique based on nonlinear acoustic resonance is used to monitor the variation of the constitutive properties upon carbonation. At selected levels of ageing, the compressive strength is obtained. From fractured surfaces the depth of carbonation is determined with phenolphthalein solution. An image analysis of the fractured surfaces is used to quantify the depth of carbonation. The results from resonant acoustic tests revealed a progressive increase of stiffness and a decrease of material nonlinearity.

  13. Excitation and detection of shear horizontal waves with electromagnetic acoustic transducers for nondestructive testing of plates

    Ma, Qingzeng; Jiao, Jingpin; Hu, Ping; Zhong, Xi; Wu, Bin; He, Cunfu

    2014-03-01

    The fundamental shear horizontal(SH0) wave has several unique features that are attractive for long-range nondestructive testing(NDT). By a careful design of the geometric configuration, electromagnetic acoustic transducers(EMATs) have the capability to generate a wide range of guided wave modes, such as Lamb waves and shear-horizontal(SH) waves in plates. However, the performance of EMATs is influenced by their parameters. To evaluate the performance of periodic permanent magnet(PPM) EMATs, a distributed-line-source model is developed to calculate the angular acoustic field cross-section in the far-field. Numerical analysis is conducted to investigate the performance of such EMATs with different geometric parameters, such as period and number of magnet arrays, and inner and outer coil widths. Such parameters have a great influence on the directivity of the generated SH0 waves that arises mainly in the amplitude and width of both main and side lobes. According to the numerical analysis, these parameters are optimized to obtain better directivity. Optimized PPM EMATs are designed and used for NDT of strip plates. Experimental results show that the lateral boundary of the strip plate has no perceivable influence on SH0-wave propagation, thus validating their used in NDT. The proposed model predicts the radiation pattern of PPM EMATs, and can be used for their parameter optimization.

  14. Acoustic Emission and Ultrasonic Characterization of Jurassic Navajo Formation Deformation During Axisymmetric Compression Testing

    Rinehart, A. J.; Dewers, T. A.; Holcomb, D. J.; Broome, S. T.

    2011-12-01

    Linking continuum-scale and microscale brittle damage in rock remains a challenge impacting CO2 sequestration, secondary recovery, structural monitoring, and other geotechnical engineering applications. We examine if the mode of micromechanical failure scales directly up to continuum-scale damage-induced velocity anisotropy. Axisymmetric drained lab-dry compression experiments are performed on facies of moderately cemented finely laminated quartz arenite from the Jurassic Navajo Formation, a target reservoir rock for CO2 sequestration in Utah. The tests are 1 unconfined uniaxial compression test, 1 hydrostatic compression test, and 3 triaxial compression tests. Microscale damage is monitored using acoustic emissions (AE) and continuum scale damage is monitored with ultrasonic velocity scans. During the non-hydrostatic tests, three to five unload loops are performed pre-failure, with one unload loop performed post-failure. While stresses are increasing, AEs are monitored continuously using 1.6-mm diameter, 0.5-mm thick PZT-5A pins attached circumferentially around the cylindrical sample, and with 6-mm diameter, 2-mm thick PZT-5A discs at the ends of the sample. Before and after each unload loop, the test is paused and the AE transducers sequentially emit an ultrasonic pulse to measure wave speeds. The resulting elastic wave is detected by the other AE transducers. Post-test, the changing anisotropic velocity structure of the rock during compression and failure is compared to the locations, frequency, and relative moment tensors of the AEs measured between ultrasonic scans. Pre- and post-test visual and x-ray CT scan observations of the sample are compared to the acoustic metrics. These tiered observations of rock damage will further elucidate the scaling of microscale brittle failure to the continuum-scale This work was supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of

  15. Test-bench system for a borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool

    Liu, Xianping; Ju, Xiaodong; Qiao, Wenxiao; Lu, Junqiang; Men, Baiyong; Liu, Dong

    2016-06-01

    The borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool (BAAR) is a new generation of imaging logging tool, which is able to investigate stratums in a relatively larger range of space around the borehole. The BAAR is designed based on the idea of modularization with a very complex structure, so it has become urgent for us to develop a dedicated test-bench system to debug each module of the BAAR. With the help of a test-bench system introduced in this paper, test and calibration of BAAR can be easily achieved. The test-bench system is designed based on the client/server model. The hardware system mainly consists of a host computer, an embedded controlling board, a bus interface board, a data acquisition board and a telemetry communication board. The host computer serves as the human machine interface and processes the uploaded data. The software running on the host computer is designed based on VC++. The embedded controlling board uses Advanced Reduced Instruction Set Machines 7 (ARM7) as the micro controller and communicates with the host computer via Ethernet. The software for the embedded controlling board is developed based on the operating system uClinux. The bus interface board, data acquisition board and telemetry communication board are designed based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and provide test interfaces for the logging tool. To examine the feasibility of the test-bench system, it was set up to perform a test on BAAR. By analyzing the test results, an unqualified channel of the electronic receiving cabin was discovered. It is suggested that the test-bench system can be used to quickly determine the working condition of sub modules of BAAR and it is of great significance in improving production efficiency and accelerating industrial production of the logging tool.

  16. Evaluation of shrinkage and cracking in concrete of ring test by acoustic emission method

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Chikanori

    2015-03-01

    Drying shrinkage of concrete is one of the typical problems related to reduce durability and defilation of concrete structures. Lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are used to reduce drying shrinkage in Japan. Drying shrinkage is commonly evaluated by methods of measurement for length change of mortar and concrete. In these methods, there is detected strain due to drying shrinkage of free body, although visible cracking does not occur. In this study, the ring test was employed to detect strain and age cracking of concrete. The acoustic emission (AE) method was adopted to detect micro cracking due to shrinkage. It was recognized that in concrete using lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are effective to decrease drying shrinkage and visible cracking. Micro cracking due to shrinkage of this concrete was detected and evaluated by the AE method.

  17. Statistical Test of Distance-Duality Relation with Type Ia Supernovae and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    Ma, Cong

    2016-01-01

    We use cosmological luminosity distance ($d_L$) from the JLA Type Ia supernovae compilation and angular-diameter distance ($d_A$) based on BOSS and WiggleZ baryon acoustic oscillation measurements to test the distance-duality relation $\\eta \\equiv d_L / [ (1 + z)^2 d_A ] = 1$. The $d_L$ measurements are matched to $d_A$ redshift by a statistically-motivated compression procedure. By means of Monte Carlo methods, non-trivial and correlated distributions of $\\eta$ can be explored in a straightforward manner without resorting to a particular evolution template $\\eta(z)$. Assuming Planck cosmological parameter uncertainty, we find 5% constraints in favor of $\\eta = 1$, consistent with the weaker 7--10% constraints obtained using WiggleZ data. These results stand in contrast to previous claims that $\\eta < 1$ has been found close to or above $1\\sigma$ level.

  18. Test charge potential in the presence of electron acoustic waves in multispecies dusty plasma

    An expression for the test charge potential is obtained in a multispecies dusty plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann distributed hot electrons, mobile cold electrons, immobile cold ions, and charge fluctuating isolated dust grains. The plasma response function involving the electron-acoustic waves becomes modified due to the inclusion of the dust-charge perturbations. The analytical and numerical investigations reveal that the Debye-Hueckel screening and wakefield potentials are significantly affected by the plasma parameters such as the equilibrium dust number density, the dust grain radius, and the hot electron temperature. The relevance of the results to laboratory plasma, where the two distinct groups of electrons exist besides the static ions and isolated dust grains, is discussed.

  19. Analysis of acoustic emission signals of fatigue crack growth and corrosion processes. Investigation of the possibilities for continuous condition monitoring of transport containers by acoustic emission testing

    Fatigue crack growth and active corrosion processes are the main causes of structural failures of transport products like road tankers, railway tank cars and ships. To prevent those failures, preventive, time-based maintenance is performed. However, preventive inspections are costly and include the risk of not detecting a defect, which could lead to a failure within the next service period. An alternative is the idea of continuous monitoring of the whole structure by means of acoustic emission testing (AT). With AT, defects within the material shall be detected and repaired directly after their appearance. Acoustic emission testing is an online non-destructive testing method. Acoustic emission (AE) arises from changes within the material and is transported by elastic waves through the material. If the AE event generates enough energy, the elastic wave propagates to the boundaries of the component, produces a displacement in the picometre scale and can be detected by a piezoelectric sensor. The sensor produces an electrical signal. From this AE signal, AE features such as the maximum amplitude or the frequency can be extracted. Methods of signal analysis are used to investigate the time and frequency dependency of signal groups. The purpose of the signal analysis is to connect the AE signal with the originating AE source. If predefined damage mechanisms are identified, referencing the damage condition of the structure is possible. Acoustic emission from events of the actual crack propagation process can for example lead to the crack growth rate or the stress intensity factor, both specific values from fracture mechanics. A new development in the domain of acoustic emission testing is the pattern recognition of AE signals. Specific features are extracted from the AE signals to assign them to their damage mechanisms. In this thesis the AE signals from the damage mechanisms corrosion and fatigue crack growth are compared and analysed. The damage mechanisms were

  20. Experimental Results for Direction of Arrival Estimation with a Single Acoustic Vector Sensor in Shallow Water

    Alper Bereketli; Guldogan, Mehmet B.; Taner Kolcak; Tamer Gudu; Ahmet Levent Avsar

    2015-01-01

    We study the performances of several computationally efficient and simple techniques for estimating direction of arrival (DOA) of an underwater acoustic source using a single acoustic vector sensor (AVS) in shallow water. Underwater AVS is a compact device, which consists of one hydrophone and three accelerometers in a packaged form, measuring scalar pressure and three-dimensional acceleration simultaneously at a single position. A very controlled experimental setup is prepared to test how we...

  1. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission NDE of Composite Crew Module Service Module/Alternate Launch Abort System (CCM SM/ALAS) Test Article Failure Tests

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2010-01-01

    Failure tests of CCM SM/ALAS (Composite Crew Module Service Module / Alternate Launch Abort System) composite panels were conducted during July 10, 2008 and July 24, 2008 at Langley Research Center. This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests.

  2. Background studies for acoustic neutrino detection at the South Pole

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdrmann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Denger, T; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Geisler, M; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; Hülß, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K -H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Krings, T; Kroll, G; Kuehn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nießen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Prikockis, M; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stössl, A; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Stür, M; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Turčan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P

    2011-01-01

    The detection of acoustic signals from ultra-high energy neutrino interactions is a promising method to measure the tiny flux of cosmogenic neutrinos expected on Earth. The energy threshold for this process depends strongly on the absolute noise level in the target material. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), deployed in the upper part of four boreholes of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, has monitored the noise in Antarctic ice at the geographic South Pole for more than two years down to 500 m depth. The noise is very stable and Gaussian distributed. Lacking an in-situ calibration up to now, laboratory measurements have been used to estimate the absolute noise level in the 10 to 50 kHz frequency range to be smaller than 20 mPa. Using a threshold trigger, sensors of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup registered acoustic pulse-like events in the IceCube detector volume and its vicinity. Acoustic signals from refreezing IceCube holes and from anthropogenic sources have been used to localize acoustic e...

  3. Resolution of Forces and Strain Measurements from an Acoustic Ground Test

    Smith, Andrew M.; LaVerde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald; Waldon, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The Conservatism in Typical Vibration Tests was Demonstrated: Vibration test at component level produced conservative force reactions by approximately a factor of 4 (approx.12 dB) as compared to the integrated acoustic test in 2 out of 3 axes. Reaction Forces Estimated at the Base of Equipment Using a Finite Element Based Method were Validated: FEM based estimate of interface forces may be adequate to guide development of vibration test criteria with less conservatism. Element Forces Estimated in Secondary Structure Struts were Validated: Finite element approach provided best estimate of axial strut forces in frequency range below 200 Hz where a rigid lumped mass assumption for the entire electronics box was valid. Models with enough fidelity to represent diminishing apparent mass of equipment are better suited for estimating force reactions across the frequency range. Forward Work: Demonstrate the reduction in conservatism provided by; Current force limited approach and an FEM guided approach. Validate proposed CMS approach to estimate coupled response from uncoupled system characteristics for vibroacoustics.

  4. Can you hear me now? Range-testing a submerged passive acoustic receiver array in a Caribbean coral reef habitat.

    Selby, Thomas H; Hart, Kristen M; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Smith, Brian J; Pollock, Clayton J; Hillis-Starr, Zandy; Lundgren, Ian; Oli, Madan K

    2016-07-01

    Submerged passive acoustic technology allows researchers to investigate spatial and temporal movement patterns of many marine and freshwater species. The technology uses receivers to detect and record acoustic transmissions emitted from tags attached to an individual. Acoustic signal strength naturally attenuates over distance, but numerous environmental variables also affect the probability a tag is detected. Knowledge of receiver range is crucial for designing acoustic arrays and analyzing telemetry data. Here, we present a method for testing a relatively large-scale receiver array in a dynamic Caribbean coastal environment intended for long-term monitoring of multiple species. The U.S. Geological Survey and several academic institutions in collaboration with resource management at Buck Island Reef National Monument (BIRNM), off the coast of St. Croix, recently deployed a 52 passive acoustic receiver array. We targeted 19 array-representative receivers for range-testing by submersing fixed delay interval range-testing tags at various distance intervals in each cardinal direction from a receiver for a minimum of an hour. Using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM), we estimated the probability of detection across the array and assessed the effect of water depth, habitat, wind, temperature, and time of day on the probability of detection. The predicted probability of detection across the entire array at 100 m distance from a receiver was 58.2% (95% CI: 44.0-73.0%) and dropped to 26.0% (95% CI: 11.4-39.3%) 200 m from a receiver indicating a somewhat constrained effective detection range. Detection probability varied across habitat classes with the greatest effective detection range occurring in homogenous sand substrate and the smallest in high rugosity reef. Predicted probability of detection across BIRNM highlights potential gaps in coverage using the current array as well as limitations of passive acoustic technology within a complex coral reef environment

  5. Can you hear me now? Range-testing a submerged passive acoustic receiver array in a Caribbean coral reef habitat

    Selby, Thomas H.; Hart, Kristen M.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Smith, Brian J.; Pollock, Clayton J; Hillis-Star, Zandy M; Lundgren, Ian; Oli, Madan K.

    2016-01-01

    Submerged passive acoustic technology allows researchers to investigate spatial and temporal movement patterns of many marine and freshwater species. The technology uses receivers to detect and record acoustic transmissions emitted from tags attached to an individual. Acoustic signal strength naturally attenuates over distance, but numerous environmental variables also affect the probability a tag is detected. Knowledge of receiver range is crucial for designing acoustic arrays and analyzing telemetry data. Here, we present a method for testing a relatively large-scale receiver array in a dynamic Caribbean coastal environment intended for long-term monitoring of multiple species. The U.S. Geological Survey and several academic institutions in collaboration with resource management at Buck Island Reef National Monument (BIRNM), off the coast of St. Croix, recently deployed a 52 passive acoustic receiver array. We targeted 19 array-representative receivers for range-testing by submersing fixed delay interval range-testing tags at various distance intervals in each cardinal direction from a receiver for a minimum of an hour. Using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM), we estimated the probability of detection across the array and assessed the effect of water depth, habitat, wind, temperature, and time of day on the probability of detection. The predicted probability of detection across the entire array at 100 m distance from a receiver was 58.2% (95% CI: 44.0–73.0%) and dropped to 26.0% (95% CI: 11.4–39.3%) 200 m from a receiver indicating a somewhat constrained effective detection range. Detection probability varied across habitat classes with the greatest effective detection range occurring in homogenous sand substrate and the smallest in high rugosity reef. Predicted probability of detection across BIRNM highlights potential gaps in coverage using the current array as well as limitations of passive acoustic technology within a complex coral reef

  6. The application of the acoustic emission technique to stone decay by sodium sulphate in laboratory tests

    Grossi, C. M.

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission was monitored during salt crystallisation cycles in order to study the mechanisms of rock deterioration by sodium sulphate in laboratory tests. Some porous carbonate stones used in Spanish monuments (Cathedral of Oviedo, Murcia and Seo Vella of Lérida were selected for this study. The acoustic emission detected during the different stages of the cycles (immersion, drying and cooling was interpreted to be the result of the salt behaviour inside the stone. The use of this technique has confirmed that this behaviour depends on salt characteristics (solubility, hydration state and polymorphism of anhydrous sodium sulphate and stone porosity and pore network.

    Para determinar los mecanismos de deterioro de las rocas debidos a la acción del sulfato de sodio, se ha registrado la emisión acústica durante ensayos de cristalización de sales en el laboratorio. Para ello, se han seleccionado tres piedras porosas carbonatadas utilizadas como materiales de construcción en monumentos españoles (Catedrales de Oviedo, Murcia y Seo Vella de Lérida. La emisión acústica detectada durante las diferentes etapas de los ciclos (inmersión, secado y enfriamiento se ha interpretado como debida al comportamiento de la sal en el interior de la piedra. Mediante esta técnica se ha confirmado que este comportamiento depende de las características de la sal (solubilidad, diferentes estados de hidratación y el polimorfismo del sulfato de sodio anhidro y de la porosidad y configuración del sistema poroso de las rocas.

  7. Acoustic emission monitoring of a fatigue test of an F/A-18 bulkhead

    Scala, C. M.; McCardle, J. F.; Bowles, S. J.

    This paper describes the application of acoustic emission (AE) to identify cracking in several fatigue-critical regions on the port and starboard sides of an l/A-18 aircraft bulkhead undergoing fatigue testing. AE data acquisition was carried out using an array of three sensors on each side of the bulkhead. AE features stored by each array included relative arrival times of AE events at the three sensors, event rise time at the first-hit sensor, and the load level and the position on the load cycle of event occurrence. AE data processing involved a comparison between the features of those AE events stored during the fatigue testing and predicted features for cracking in the complex-shaped bulkhead. Feature prediction was based on wave propagation characteristics obtained by Pentel-lead calibration, and the known load cycle dependence of crack-related AE events. The AE processing was completed following failure of the bulkhead, and gave the correct locations of all cracks, greater than about 1 mm in depth, present in the bulkhead during the fatigue testing. The study shows that AE associated with cracking can be distinguished, even when many extraneous sources are present, and demonstrates that AE is a promising technique for nondestructive evaluation of a complex structure such as the F/A-18 bulkhead.

  8. A mechanical experimental setup to simulate vocal folds vibrations. Preliminary results

    Ruty, Nicolas; Pelorson, Xavier; Lopez-Arteaga, Ines; Hirschberg, Avraham

    2005-01-01

    This paper contributes to the understanding of vocal folds oscillation during phonation. In order to test theoretical models of phonation, a new experimental set-up using a deformable vocal folds replica is presented. The replica is shown to be able to produce self sustained oscillations under controlled experimental conditions. Therefore different parameters, such as those related to elasticity, to acoustical coupling or to the subglottal pressure can be quantitatively studied. In this work we focused on the oscillation fundamental frequency and the upstream pressure in order to start (on-set threshold) either end (off-set threshold) oscillations in presence of a downstream acoustical resonator. As an example, it is shown how this data can be used in order to test the theoretical predictions of a simple one-mass model.

  9. Testing of containers made of glass-fiber reinforced plastic with the aid of acoustic emission analysis

    Wolitz, K.; Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis as a quasi-nondestructive test method makes it possible to differentiate clearly, in judging the total behavior of fiber-reinforced plastic composites, between critical failure modes (in the case of unidirectional composites fiber fractures) and non-critical failure modes (delamination processes or matrix fractures). A particular advantage is that, for varying pressure demands on the composites, the emitted acoustic pulses can be analyzed with regard to their amplitude distribution. In addition, definite indications as to how the damages occurred can be obtained from the time curves of the emitted acoustic pulses as well as from the particular frequency spectrum. Distinct analogies can be drawn between the various analytical methods with respect to whether the failure modes can be classified as critical or non-critical.

  10. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  11. Teaching Acoustic Properties of Materials in Secondary School: Testing Sound Insulators

    Hernandez, M. I.; Couso, D.; Pinto, R.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching the acoustic properties of materials is a good way to teach physics concepts, extending them into the technological arena related to materials science. This article describes an innovative approach for teaching sound and acoustics in combination with sound insulating materials in secondary school (15-16-year-old students). Concerning the…

  12. Application of acoustic emission as a monitoring system during hydrostatic tests of nuclear reactor components

    The paper presents the state of art for the surveillance of nuclear reactor components by acoustic emission during hydrostatic tests as obtained during several inspections made by KWU and Battelle-Frankfurt/Main. The following four points are relevant: a) Measures designed to suppress background noise, b) adapted pressure increase rate, c) extensive and practically oriented calibration measurements, d) suitable measuring technique. These necessary preconditions are discussed and results on the wave propagation, location accuracy, attenuation of AE-signals due to geometrical configurations (nozzles) and on the correlation between AE-sources and defects as detected by other NDE-methods presented. Two selected examples of AE-tests on reactor components will demonstrate the results which can be obtained at the present time. These investigations have shown till now that: 1) AE is a sensitive NDE-method, able to detect even very small flaws. The AE-sources lie for the most part in areas of seam welds, welded-on attachments, nozzles, closure studs, or other prominent areas (see rolling track). 2) Indications which were found by AE need not necessarily be detectable by other NDE-methods, e.g. ultrasound. 3) Small leaks can be identified in a short time and can be located within certain limits. An essential point however is that leaks with higher noise level must be sealed off. (orig.)

  13. Evaluating damage potential of cryogenic concrete using acoustic emission sensors and permeability testing

    Kogbara, Reginald B.; Parsaei, Boback; Iyengar, Srinath R.; Grasley, Zachary C.; Masad, Eyad A.; Zollinger, Dan G.

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluates the damage potential of concrete of different mix designs subjected to cryogenic temperatures, using acoustic emission (AE) and permeability testing. The aim is to investigate design methodologies that might be employed to produce concrete that resists damage when cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Such concrete would be suitable for primary containment of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and could replace currently used 9% Ni steel, thereby leading to huge cost savings. In the experiments described, concrete cubes, 150 mm x 150 mm x 150 mm, were cast using four different mix designs. The four mixes employed siliceous river sand as fine aggregate. Moreover, limestone, sandstone, trap rock and lightweight aggregate were individually used as coarse aggregates in the mixes. The concrete samples were then cooled from room temperature (20°C) to cryogenic temperature (-165°C) in a temperature chamber. AE sensors were placed on the concrete cubes during the cryogenic freezing process. The damage potential was evaluated in terms of the growth of damage as determined from AE, as a function of temperature and concrete mixture design. The damage potential observed was validated with water permeability testing. Initial results demonstrate the effects of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the aggregates on damage growth. Concrete damage (cracking) resistance generally decreased with increasing coarse aggregate CTE, and was in the order, limestone ≥ trap rock concrete due to differential CTE of its components.

  14. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Lightning-Damaged CFRP Laminates during Compression-after-Impact Test

    Carbon-fiber reinforced plastic(CFRP) laminates made of nano-particle-coated carbon fibers and damaged by a simulated lightning strike were tested under compression-after-impact(CAI) mode, during which the damage progress due to compressive loading has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). The impact damage was induced not by mechanical loading but by a simulated lightning strike. Conductive nano-particles were coated directly on the fibers, from which CFRP coupons were made. The coupon were subjected to the strikes with a high voltage/current impulse of 10-40 kA within a few . The effects of nano-particle coating and the degree of damage induced by the simulated lightning strikes on AE activities were examined, and the relationship between the compressive residual strength and AE behavior has been evaluated in terms of AE event counts and the onset of AE activity with the compressive loading. The degree of impact damage was also measured in terms of damage area by using ultrasonic C-scan images. The assessment during the CAI tests of damaged CFRP showed that AE monitoring appeared to be useful to differentiate the degree of damage hence the mechanical integrity of composite structures damaged by lightning strikes.

  15. Azimuthal cement evaluation with an acoustic phased-arc array transmitter: numerical simulations and field tests

    Che, Xiao-Hua; Qiao, Wen-Xiao; Ju, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Rui-Jia

    2016-03-01

    We developed a novel cement evaluation logging tool, named the azimuthally acoustic bond tool (AABT), which uses a phased-arc array transmitter with azimuthal detection capability. We combined numerical simulations and field tests to verify the AABT tool. The numerical simulation results showed that the radiation direction of the subarray corresponding to the maximum amplitude of the first arrival matches the azimuth of the channeling when it is behind the casing. With larger channeling size in the circumferential direction, the amplitude difference of the casing wave at different azimuths becomes more evident. The test results showed that the AABT can accurately locate the casing collars and evaluate the cement bond quality with azimuthal resolution at the casing—cement interface, and can visualize the size, depth, and azimuth of channeling. In the case of good casing—cement bonding, the AABT can further evaluate the cement bond quality at the cement—formation interface with azimuthal resolution by using the amplitude map and the velocity of the formation wave.

  16. Comparison of vibro-acoustic stimulation and acupressure effects in nonstress test results and its parameters in pregnant women

    Mahboubeh, Valiani; Masoumeh, Pirhadi; Zahra, Shahshahan

    2013-01-01

    Background: The primary goal of antenatal testing is to identify fetuses at risk of intrauterine neurologic injury or death so that these adverse outcomes can be prevented. We want to assess nonstress test (NST) results and some parameters before and after vibro-acoustic stimulation and acupressure. We did a randomized controlled clinical trial in Shahid-Beheshti Hospital in Isfahan in 2011. Materials and Methods: A total of 64 pregnant women (32-36 weeks) in prenatal care unit were selected ...

  17. A cosmic speed-trap: a gravity-independent test of cosmic acceleration using baryon acoustic oscillations

    Sutherland, Will

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new and highly model-independent test of cosmic acceleration by comparing observations of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale at low and intermediate redshifts: we derive a new inequality relating BAO observables at two distinct redshifts, which must be satisfied for any reasonable homogeneous non-accelerating model, but is violated by models similar to LambdaCDM, due to acceleration in the recent past. This test is fully independent of the theory of gravity (GR or otherw...

  18. Study and Application of Acoustic Emission Testing in Fault Diagnosis of Low-Speed Heavy-Duty Gears

    Peng Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most present studies on the acoustic emission signals of rotating machinery are experiment-oriented, while few of them involve on-spot applications. In this study, a method of redundant second generation wavelet transform based on the principle of interpolated subdivision was developed. With this method, subdivision was not needed during the decomposition. The lengths of approximation signals and detail signals were the same as those of original ones, so the data volume was twice that of original signals; besides, the data redundancy characteristic also guaranteed the excellent analysis effect of the method. The analysis of the acoustic emission data from the faults of on-spot low-speed heavy-duty gears validated the redundant second generation wavelet transform in the processing and denoising of acoustic emission signals. Furthermore, the analysis illustrated that the acoustic emission testing could be used in the fault diagnosis of on-spot low-speed heavy-duty gears and could be a significant supplement to vibration testing diagnosis.

  19. AMADEUS - The Acoustic Neutrino Detection Test System of the ANTARES Deep-Sea Neutrino Telescope

    Aguilar, J A; Albert, A; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; Jesus, A C Assis; Astraatmadja, T; Aubert, J-J; Auer, R; Barbarito, E; Baret, B; Basa, S; Bazzotti, M; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bigongiari, C; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouwhuis, M C; Brown, A; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Camarena, F; Capone, A; Cârloganu, C; Carminati, G; Carr, J; Cassano, B; Castorina, E; Cavasinni, V; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Charvis, Ph; Chiarusi, T; Sen, N Chon; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Cottini, N; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; De Bonis, G; Decowski, M P; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Drouhin, D; Eberl, T; Emanuele, U; Ernenwein, J-P; Escoffier, S; Fehr, F; Fiorello, C; Flaminio, V; Fritsch, U; Fuda, J-L; Gay, P; Giacomelli, G; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; Guillard, G; Halladjian, G; Hallewell, G; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Heine, E; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hößl, J; de Jong, M; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Keller, P; Kooijman, P; Kopper, C; Kouchner, A; Kretschmer, W; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Lambard, G; Larosa, G; Laschinsky, H; Le Provost, H; Lefèvre, D; Lelaizant, G; Lim, G; Presti, D Lo; Loehner, H; Loucatos, S; Louis, F; Lucarelli, F; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Martinez-Mora, J A; Mazure, A; Mongelli, M; Montaruli, T; Morganti, M; Moscoso, L; Motz, H; Naumann, C; Neff, M; Ostasch, R; Palioselitis, D; Pavalas, G E; Payre, P; Petrovic, J; Picot-Clemente, N; Picq, C; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Presani, E; Racca, C; Radu, A; Reed, C; Riccobene, G; Richardt, C; Rujoiu, M; Ruppi, M; Russo, G V; Salesa, F; Sapienza, P; Schöck, F; Schuller, J-P; Shanidze, R; Simeone, F; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Tasca, L; Toscano, S; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vannoni, G; Vecchi, M; Vernin, P; Wijnker, G; de Wolf, E; Yepes, H; Zaborov, D; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; 10.1016/j.nima.2010.09.053

    2010-01-01

    The AMADEUS (ANTARES Modules for the Acoustic Detection Under the Sea) system which is described in this article aims at the investigation of techniques for acoustic detection of neutrinos in the deep sea. It is integrated into the ANTARES neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. Its acoustic sensors, installed at water depths between 2050 and 2300 m, employ piezo-electric elements for the broad-band recording of signals with frequencies ranging up to 125 kHz. The typical sensitivity of the sensors is around -145 dB re 1V/muPa (including preamplifier). Completed in May 2008, AMADEUS consists of six "acoustic clusters", each comprising six acoustic sensors that are arranged at distances of roughly 1 m from each other. Two vertical mechanical structures (so-called lines) of the ANTARES detector host three acoustic clusters each. Spacings between the clusters range from 14.5 to 340 m. Each cluster contains custom-designed electronics boards to amplify and digitise the acoustic signals from the sensors. An on...

  20. Application of fiber grating-based acoustic sensor in progressive failure testing of e-glass/vinylester curve composites

    Azmi, Asrul Izam; Raju, Raju; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports an application of phase shifted fiber Bragg grating (PS-FBG) intensity-type acoustic sensor in a continuous and in-situ failure testing of an E-glass/vinylester top hat stiffener (THS). The narrow transmission channel of the PS-FBG is highly sensitive to small perturbation, hence suitable to be used in an effective acoustic emission (AE) assessment technique. The progressive failure of THS was tested under transverse loading to experimentally simulate the actual loading in practice. Our experimental tests have demonstrated, in good agreement with the commercial piezoelectric sensors, that the important failures information of the THS was successfully recorded by the simple intensity-type PS-FBG sensor.

  1. Spatial Hedonic Pricing Models for Testing the Adequacy of Acoustic Areas in Madrid, Spain

    José-María Montero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic noise is one of the main concerns of large cities. Most of them have classified their territory in acoustic areas and have constructed strategic noise maps. From both sources we have elaborated seven types of acoustic neighbourhoods according to both their noise gap in regard to the legal standard and the percentage of population exposed to noise. A spatial Durbin model has been selected as the strategy that best models the impact of noise on housing prices. However, results for Madrid do not confirm the hedonic theory and indicate, as one of the possibilities, that the official acoustic areas in Madrid could be incorrectly designed.

  2. Characterization of Pump-Induced Acoustics in Space Launch System Main Propulsion System Liquid Hydrogen Feedline Using Airflow Test Data

    Eberhart, C. J.; Snellgrove, L. M.; Zoladz, T. F.

    2015-01-01

    High intensity acoustic edgetones located upstream of the RS-25 Low Pressure Fuel Turbo Pump (LPFTP) were previously observed during Space Launch System (STS) airflow testing of a model Main Propulsion System (MPS) liquid hydrogen (LH2) feedline mated to a modified LPFTP. MPS hardware has been adapted to mitigate the problematic edgetones as part of the Space Launch System (SLS) program. A follow-on airflow test campaign has subjected the adapted hardware to tests mimicking STS-era airflow conditions, and this manuscript describes acoustic environment identification and characterization born from the latest test results. Fluid dynamics responsible for driving discrete excitations were well reproduced using legacy hardware. The modified design was found insensitive to high intensity edgetone-like discretes over the bandwidth of interest to SLS MPS unsteady environments. Rather, the natural acoustics of the test article were observed to respond in a narrowband-random/mixed discrete manner to broadband noise thought generated by the flow field. The intensity of these responses were several orders of magnitude reduced from those driven by edgetones.

  3. Electromagnetic Acoustic Test of the Artificial Defects for a Plate-type Nuclear Fuel

    Most research and test reactors use the nuclear fuel plates which are consisted of a fuel meat in aluminum alloy. Last year, KAERI signed a deal with the Jordan Atomic Energy Commission to build the research reactor and have to supply the plate-type nuclear fuels. For the demands of world market, KAERI started the research and development of the plate-type fuel elements and endeavored to achieve a localization of the plate-type fuel fabrication. For the inspection of plate-type fuel elements to be used in Research Reactors, an immersion pulse-echo ultrasonic technique was applied. This inspection was done under immersion condition, so a nuclear fuel was immersed to be prone to corrosion and needed to have time and cost due to an additional process. The sample that will be examined is a non-ferromagnetic material such as aluminum with a good acousto-elastic property, which requires an effective inspection of a bond quality for a nuclear fuel under a manufacturing environment. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of an Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer (EMAT) technology for an automated inspection of a nuclear fuel without water

  4. AMADEUS-The acoustic neutrino detection test system of the ANTARES deep-sea neutrino telescope

    The AMADEUS (ANTARES Modules for the Acoustic Detection Under the Sea) system which is described in this article aims at the investigation of techniques for acoustic detection of neutrinos in the deep sea. It is integrated into the ANTARES neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. Its acoustic sensors, installed at water depths between 2050 and 2300 m, employ piezo-electric elements for the broad-band recording of signals with frequencies ranging up to 125 kHz. The typical sensitivity of the sensors is around -145 dB re 1 V/μPa (including preamplifier). Completed in May 2008, AMADEUS consists of six 'acoustic clusters', each comprising six acoustic sensors that are arranged at distances of roughly 1 m from each other. Two vertical mechanical structures (so-called lines) of the ANTARES detector host three acoustic clusters each. Spacings between the clusters range from 14.5 to 340 m. Each cluster contains custom-designed electronics boards to amplify and digitise the acoustic signals from the sensors. An on-shore computer cluster is used to process and filter the data stream and store the selected events. The daily volume of recorded data is about 10 GB. The system is operating continuously and automatically, requiring only little human intervention. AMADEUS allows for extensive studies of both transient signals and ambient noise in the deep sea, as well as signal correlations on several length scales and localisation of acoustic point sources. Thus the system is excellently suited to assess the background conditions for the measurement of the bipolar pulses expected to originate from neutrino interactions.

  5. AMADEUS-The acoustic neutrino detection test system of the ANTARES deep-sea neutrino telescope

    Aguilar, J.A. [IFIC - Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, CSIC - Universitat de Valencia, Apdo. de Correos 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Al Samarai, I. [CPPM - Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, CNRS/IN2P3 et Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 Avenue de Luminy, Case 902, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Albert, A. [GRPHE - Institut Universitaire de Technologie de Colmar, 34 rue du Grillenbreit BP 50568, 68008 Colmar (France); Anghinolfi, M. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Anton, G. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Anvar, S. [Direction des Sciences de la Matiere - Institut de Recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers - Service d' Electronique des Detecteurs et d' Informatique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Ardid, M. [Institut d' Investigacio per a la Gestio Integrada de Zones Costaneres (IGIC) - Universitat Politecnica de Valencia. C/ Paranimf 1., 46730 Gandia (Spain); Assis Jesus, A.C.; Astraatmadja, T. [FOM Instituut voor Subatomaire Fysica Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aubert, J.-J. [CPPM - Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, CNRS/IN2P3 et Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 Avenue de Luminy, Case 902, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Auer, R. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Barbarito, E. [INFN - Sezione di Bari, Via E. Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Baret, B. [APC - Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie, UMR 7164 (CNRS, Universite Paris 7 Diderot, CEA, Observatoire de Paris) 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Basa, S. [LAM - Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Pole de l' Etoile Site de Chateau-Gombert, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France)

    2011-01-21

    The AMADEUS (ANTARES Modules for the Acoustic Detection Under the Sea) system which is described in this article aims at the investigation of techniques for acoustic detection of neutrinos in the deep sea. It is integrated into the ANTARES neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. Its acoustic sensors, installed at water depths between 2050 and 2300 m, employ piezo-electric elements for the broad-band recording of signals with frequencies ranging up to 125 kHz. The typical sensitivity of the sensors is around -145 dB re 1 V/{mu}Pa (including preamplifier). Completed in May 2008, AMADEUS consists of six 'acoustic clusters', each comprising six acoustic sensors that are arranged at distances of roughly 1 m from each other. Two vertical mechanical structures (so-called lines) of the ANTARES detector host three acoustic clusters each. Spacings between the clusters range from 14.5 to 340 m. Each cluster contains custom-designed electronics boards to amplify and digitise the acoustic signals from the sensors. An on-shore computer cluster is used to process and filter the data stream and store the selected events. The daily volume of recorded data is about 10 GB. The system is operating continuously and automatically, requiring only little human intervention. AMADEUS allows for extensive studies of both transient signals and ambient noise in the deep sea, as well as signal correlations on several length scales and localisation of acoustic point sources. Thus the system is excellently suited to assess the background conditions for the measurement of the bipolar pulses expected to originate from neutrino interactions.

  6. A methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission signals to identify fracture timing from human cadaver spine impact tests.

    Arun, Mike W J; Yoganandan, Narayan; Stemper, Brian D; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-12-01

    While studies have used acoustic sensors to determine fracture initiation time in biomechanical studies, a systematic procedure is not established to process acoustic signals. The objective of the study was to develop a methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission data using signal processing techniques to identify fracture initiation time. The methodology was developed from testing a human cadaver lumbar spine column. Acoustic sensors were glued to all vertebrae, high-rate impact loading was applied, load-time histories were recorded (load cell), and fracture was documented using CT. Compression fracture occurred to L1 while other vertebrae were intact. FFT of raw voltage-time traces were used to determine an optimum frequency range associated with high decibel levels. Signals were bandpass filtered in this range. Bursting pattern was found in the fractured vertebra while signals from other vertebrae were silent. Bursting time was associated with time of fracture initiation. Force at fracture was determined using this time and force-time data. The methodology is independent of selecting parameters a priori such as fixing a voltage level(s), bandpass frequency and/or using force-time signal, and allows determination of force based on time identified during signal processing. The methodology can be used for different body regions in cadaver experiments. PMID:25241279

  7. Nondestructive testing: use of IR and acoustics methods in buildings pathology

    Esposti, Walter; Meroni, Italo

    1995-03-01

    In the paper the authors present some experiences made using IR and acoustics methods in a non destructive way for the evaluation of situations of degradation in building materials and components. Two studies are presented: (1) detection of the delamination of wall renderings, especially those supporting frescos, by means of IR and sonic investigation; (2) use of infrared thermography for the visualization of fracture zones of walls and steel components under cyclic loads. The possibility of detecting rendering delaminations is based on the different path of the heat diffusion in part of the wall affected by the delamination, compared to the rest of the wall. The difference is caused by the presence of small pockets containing still air. The case study showed makes reference to the analysis of adhesion conditions of a rendering dating back to the IV century, applied on the bell towers of the ancient basilica dedicated to S. Lorenzo in Milan, Italy. The use of infrared thermography for detecting the strength status of materials and components is based on the fact that the strength status of parts of building components can become evident because of heat losses which appear where the component is weaker. The IR observation was made on steel bars subject to traction testing and on lightweight concrete prismatic samples subject to compression testing. The experiences indicate that there is room for this NdT technique to provide some useful answers. Nevertheless it is sure that more experimental work is needed in order to increase the full comprehension of the phenomena which are the basis of their applications for alternative uses.

  8. Comparison between sensitivities of quality control methods using ultrasonic waves, radiography and acoustic emission for the thick welded joint testing

    The testing of the thick welded joints of the nuclear industry is carried out by radiography and ultrasonics on completion of welding. When a fault is found, its repair requires a sometimes deep cut down to the position of the fault, then filling in of the cut by hand welding with a coated electrode. This very costly operation also involves the risk of causing new defects when building up by hand. Listening to the acoustic emission during the welding has been considered in order to seek the possibility of detecting defects when they appear, or soon after. The industrial use of this method would make an instant repair of the defective areas possible at less cost and with greater reliability. The study presented concerns the comparison between the results of the various non-destructive testing methods: radiography, ultrasonics and acoustic emission, for a thick welded joint in which the defects have been brought about

  9. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton;

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design for the...... acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design was...... simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  10. Deep Bleeder Acoustic Coagulation (DBAC)—part II: in vivo testing of a research prototype system

    Sekins, K. Michael; Barnes, Stephen R.; Fan, Liexiang; Hopple, Jerry D.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Kook, John; Lee, Chi-Yin; Maleke, Caroline; Zeng, Xiaozheng; Moreau-Gobard, Romain; Ahiekpor-Dravi, Alexis; Funka-Lea, Gareth; Eaton, John; Wong, Keith; Keneman, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep Bleeder Acoustic Coagulation (DBAC) is an ultrasound image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) method proposed to automatically detect and localize (D&L) and treat deep, bleeding, combat wounds in the limbs of soldiers. A prototype DBAC system consisting of an applicator and control unit was developed for testing on animals. To enhance control, and thus safety, of the ultimate human DBAC autonomous product system, a thermal coagulation strategy that minimized cavit...

  11. Final developments, validation and technology transfer for AE (acoustic emission) and SAFT-UT (Synthetic Aperture Focusing of Ultrasonic Testing)

    The program for validation and technology transfer for acoustic emission (AE) and Synthetic Aperture Focusing of Ultrasonic Testing (SAFT-UT) is designed to accomplish the final step of moving research results into beneficial application. Accomplishments for FY88 in the areas of AE and SAFT-UT data under this program are discussed in this paper. the information is treated under the topics of code activities, field validation, and seminars. Projected FY89 activities will continue to focus on these three areas

  12. Acoustic emission

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  13. High intensity acoustic testing to determine structural fatigue life and to improve reliability in nuclear reactor and aerospace structures

    The author reviews some of the techniques in which high intensity acoustic testing is used in engineering practice. (a) In the nuclear engineering field the simulation of reactor noise due to the CO2 circulator and the use of strain gauges to obtain a response spectrum in order to predict the fatigue life of gas-cooled nuclear reactor structures where a 30 year lifespan is of paramount importance is described. (b) In the satellite field the simulation of the high intensity noise due to the launching rocket motors and the testing of the integrity of the satellite structure and the behaviour of the electronic control system when affected by high intensity acoustic excitation is discussed. The use of acoustic testing to improve the reliability before the launching of the satellite is also considered. (c) In the aircraft and rocket field the generation of high intensity noise to simulate boundary layer pressure fluctuation or turbulence of a flying object or aircraft at various speeds is considered. (Auth.)

  14. Acoustic Data Processing and Transient Signal Analysis for the Hybrid Wing Body 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel Test

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.; Spalt, Taylor B.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    An advanced vehicle concept, the HWB N2A-EXTE aircraft design, was tested in NASA Langley's 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel to study its acoustic characteristics for var- ious propulsion system installation and airframe con gurations. A signi cant upgrade to existing data processing systems was implemented, with a focus on portability and a re- duction in turnaround time. These requirements were met by updating codes originally written for a cluster environment and transferring them to a local workstation while en- abling GPU computing. Post-test, additional processing of the time series was required to remove transient hydrodynamic gusts from some of the microphone time series. A novel automated procedure was developed to analyze and reject contaminated blocks of data, under the assumption that the desired acoustic signal of interest was a band-limited sta- tionary random process, and of lower variance than the hydrodynamic contamination. The procedure is shown to successfully identify and remove contaminated blocks of data and retain the desired acoustic signal. Additional corrections to the data, mainly background subtraction, shear layer refraction calculations, atmospheric attenuation and microphone directivity corrections, were all necessary for initial analysis and noise assessments. These were implemented for the post-processing of spectral data, and are shown to behave as expected.

  15. Quantitative Measures of Anthropogenic Noise on Harbor Porpoises: Testing the Reliability of Acoustic Tag Recordings

    Wisniewska, Danuta Maria; Teilmann, Jonas; Hermannsen, Line;

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several sound and movement recording tags have been developed to sample the acoustic fi eld experienced by cetaceans and their reactions to it. However, little is known about how tag placement and an animal’s orientation in the sound fi eld affect the reliability of on-animal rec......In recent years, several sound and movement recording tags have been developed to sample the acoustic fi eld experienced by cetaceans and their reactions to it. However, little is known about how tag placement and an animal’s orientation in the sound fi eld affect the reliability of on...

  16. Quantitative Measures of Anthropogenic Noise on Harbor Porpoises: Testing the Reliability of Acoustic Tag Recordings.

    Wisniewska, Danuta M; Teilmann, Jonas; Hermannsen, Line; Johnson, Mark; Miller, Lee A; Siebert, Ursula; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several sound and movement recording tags have been developed to sample the acoustic field experienced by cetaceans and their reactions to it. However, little is known about how tag placement and an animal's orientation in the sound field affect the reliability of on-animal recordings as proxies for actual exposure. Here, we quantify sound exposure levels recorded with a DTAG-3 tag on a captive harbor porpoise exposed to vessel noise in a controlled acoustic environment. Results show that flow noise is limiting onboard noise recordings, whereas no evidence of body shading has been found for frequencies of 2-20 kHz. PMID:26611092

  17. Sensor development and calibration for acoustic neutrino detection in ice

    Karg, Timo; Laihem, Karim; Semburg, Benjamin; Tosi, Delia

    2009-01-01

    A promising approach to measure the expected low flux of cosmic neutrinos at the highest energies (E > 1 EeV) is acoustic detection. There are different in-situ test installations worldwide in water and ice to measure the acoustic properties of the medium with regard to the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection. The parameters of interest include attenuation length, sound speed profile, background noise level and transient backgrounds. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been deployed in the upper 500 m of drill holes for the IceCube neutrino observatory at the geographic South Pole. In-situ calibration of sensors under the combined influence of low temperature, high ambient pressure, and ice-sensor acoustic coupling is difficult. We discuss laboratory calibrations in water and ice. Two new laboratory facilities, the Aachen Acoustic Laboratory (AAL) and the Wuppertal Water Tank Test Facility, have been set up. They offer large volumes of bubble free ice (3 m^3) and water (11 m^3) for the devel...

  18. 3D acoustic imaging applied to the Baikal neutrino telescope

    Kebkal, K.G. [EvoLogics GmbH, Blumenstrasse 49, 10243 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: kebkal@evologics.de; Bannasch, R.; Kebkal, O.G. [EvoLogics GmbH, Blumenstrasse 49, 10243 Berlin (Germany); Panfilov, A.I. [Institute for Nuclear Research, 60th October Anniversary pr. 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Wischnewski, R. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, 15735 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2009-04-11

    A hydro-acoustic imaging system was tested in a pilot study on distant localization of elements of the Baikal underwater neutrino telescope. For this innovative approach, based on broad band acoustic echo signals and strictly avoiding any active acoustic elements on the telescope, the imaging system was temporarily installed just below the ice surface, while the telescope stayed in its standard position at 1100 m depth. The system comprised an antenna with four acoustic projectors positioned at the corners of a 50 m square; acoustic pulses were 'linear sweep-spread signals'-multiple-modulated wide-band signals (10{yields}22 kHz) of 51.2 s duration. Three large objects (two string buoys and the central electronics module) were localized by the 3D acoustic imaging, with an accuracy of {approx}0.2 m (along the beam) and {approx}1.0 m (transverse). We discuss signal forms and parameters necessary for improved 3D acoustic imaging of the telescope, and suggest a layout of a possible stationary bottom based 3D imaging setup. The presented technique may be of interest for neutrino telescopes of km{sup 3}-scale and beyond, as a flexible temporary or as a stationary tool to localize basic telescope elements, while these are completely passive.

  19. 3D acoustic imaging applied to the Baikal neutrino telescope

    A hydro-acoustic imaging system was tested in a pilot study on distant localization of elements of the Baikal underwater neutrino telescope. For this innovative approach, based on broad band acoustic echo signals and strictly avoiding any active acoustic elements on the telescope, the imaging system was temporarily installed just below the ice surface, while the telescope stayed in its standard position at 1100 m depth. The system comprised an antenna with four acoustic projectors positioned at the corners of a 50 m square; acoustic pulses were 'linear sweep-spread signals'-multiple-modulated wide-band signals (10→22 kHz) of 51.2 s duration. Three large objects (two string buoys and the central electronics module) were localized by the 3D acoustic imaging, with an accuracy of ∼0.2 m (along the beam) and ∼1.0 m (transverse). We discuss signal forms and parameters necessary for improved 3D acoustic imaging of the telescope, and suggest a layout of a possible stationary bottom based 3D imaging setup. The presented technique may be of interest for neutrino telescopes of km3-scale and beyond, as a flexible temporary or as a stationary tool to localize basic telescope elements, while these are completely passive.

  20. SIMONA: A multi-purpose acoustic data simulator for development and testing of sonar signal processing

    Robert, M.K.; Groen, J.; Konijnendijk, N.J.

    2005-01-01

    The development of undersea defence technologies such as sonar relies heavily on the availability of high quality acoustic data. However, data acquisition is particularly expensive as sea trials involve experienced manpower and costly high-tech equipment. Also, at sea, the environment remains unpred

  1. Screw-Machine Set-Up Operator, Jobbing (mach. shop) 604.380-028--Technical Report on Development of USTES Aptitude Test Battery.

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  2. A Multi-Channel Setup to Study Fractures in Scintillators

    Tantot, A; Briche, R; Lefèvre, G; Manier, B; Zaïm, N; Deschanel, S; Vanel, L; Di Stefano, P C F

    2016-01-01

    To investigate fractoluminescence in scintillating crystals used for particle detection, we have developed a multi-channel setup built around samples of double-cleavage drilled compression (DCDC) geometry in a controllable atmosphere. The setup allows the continuous digitization over hours of various parameters, including the applied load, and the compressive strain of the sample, as well as the acoustic emission. Emitted visible light is recorded with nanosecond resolution, and crack propagation is monitored using infrared lighting and camera. An example of application to Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) is provided.

  3. AMELIA CESTOL Test: Acoustic Characteristics of Circulation Control Wing with Leading- and Trailing-Edge Slot Blowing

    Horne, William C.; Burnside, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    The AMELIA Cruise-Efficient Short Take-off and Landing (CESTOL) configuration concept was developed to meet future requirements of reduced field length, noise, and fuel burn by researchers at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and Georgia Tech Research Institute under sponsorship by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP), Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. The novel configuration includes leading- and trailing-edge circulation control wing (CCW), over-wing podded turbine propulsion simulation (TPS). Extensive aerodynamic measurements of forces, surfaces pressures, and wing surface skin friction measurements were recently measured over a wide range of test conditions in the Arnold Engineering Development Center(AEDC) National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Ft Wind Tunnel. Acoustic measurements of the model were also acquired for each configuration with 7 fixed microphones on a line under the left wing, and with a 48-element, 40-inch diameter phased microphone array under the right wing. This presentation will discuss acoustic characteristics of the CCW system for a variety of tunnel speeds (0 to 120 kts), model configurations (leading edge(LE) and/or trailing-edge(TE) slot blowing, and orientations (incidence and yaw) based on acoustic measurements acquired concurrently with the aerodynamic measurements. The flow coefficient, Cmu= mVSLOT/qSW varied from 0 to 0.88 at 40 kts, and from 0 to 0.15 at 120 kts. Here m is the slot mass flow rate, VSLOT is the slot exit velocity, q is dynamic pressure, and SW is wing surface area. Directivities at selected 1/3 octave bands will be compared with comparable measurements of a 2-D wing at GTRI, as will as microphone array near-field measurements of the right wing at maximum flow rate. The presentation will include discussion of acoustic sensor calibrations as well as characterization of the wind tunnel background noise environment.

  4. Acoustic Noise Test Report for the U.S. Department of Energy 1.5-Megawatt Wind Turbine

    Roadman, Jason [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Huskey, Arlinda [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-07-01

    A series of tests were conducted to characterize the baseline properties and performance of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 1.5-megawatt wind turbine (DOE 1.5) to enable research model development and quantify the effects of future turbine research modifications. The DOE 1.5 is built on the platform of GE's 1.5-MW SLE commercial wind turbine model. It was installed in a nonstandard configuration at the NWTC with the objective of supporting DOE Wind Program research initiatives such as A2e. Therefore, the test results may not represent the performance capabilities of other GE 1.5-MW SLE turbines. The acoustic noise test documented in this report is one of a series of tests carried out to establish a performance baseline for the DOE 1.5 in the NWTC inflow environment.

  5. Scale Model Acoustic Test Validation of IOP-SS Water Prediction using Loci-STREAM-VoF

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). SMAT consists of a 5% scale representation of the ignition overpressure sound-suppression system (IOP-SS) that is being tested to quantify the water flow and induced air entrainment in and around the mobile launcher exhaust hole. This data will be compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations using the newly developed Loci-STREAM Volume of Fluid (VoF) methods. Compressible and incompressible VoF methods have been formulated, and are currently being used to simulate the water flow of SMAT IOP-SS. The test data will be used to qualitatively and quantitatively assess and validate the VoF methods.

  6. From design to flight testing : overview of rotorcraft acoustic research at onera for industrial applications.

    Delrieux, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The reduction of noise emission has become a key commercial argument for helicopter manufacturers, such as Airbus Helicopters. For years, Airbus helicopters has placed emphasis on the good acoustic behavior of its helicopters, as proven by its communication on the fenestron concept, the acceptance of its aircraft for the Grand Canyon tours and the presentation of its recent Bluecopter™ Technology. Thus, Airbus helicopters has become one of leaders in the manufacture of low noise helicopters.S...

  7. Optimising Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Surveys - I: Testing the concordance LCDM cosmology

    Parkinson, David; Blake, Chris; Kunz, Martin; Bassett, Bruce A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Glazebrook, Karl

    2007-01-01

    We optimize the design of future spectroscopic redshift surveys for constraining the dark energy via precision measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), with particular emphasis on the design of the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph (WFMOS). We develop a model that predicts the number density of possible target galaxies as a function of exposure time and redshift. We use this number counts model together with fitting formulae for the accuracy of the BAO measurements to determ...

  8. Testing Thermo-acoustic Sound Generation in Water with Proton and Laser Beams

    Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Naumann, C; Salomon, K; Stegmann, C

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were performed at a proton accelerator and an infrared laser acility to investigate the sound generation caused by the energy deposition of pulsed particle and laser beams in water. The beams with an energy range of 1 PeV to 400 PeV per proton beam spill and up to 10 EeV for the laser pulse were dumped into a water volume and the resulting acoustic signals were recorded with pressure sensitive sensors. Measurements were performed at varying pulse energies, sensor positions, beam diameters and temperatures. The data is well described by simulations based on the thermo-acoustic model. This implies that the primary mechanism for sound generation by the energy deposition of particles propagating in water is the local heating of the media giving rise to an expansion or contraction of the medium resulting in a pressure pulse with bipolar shape. A possible application of this effect would be the acoustical detection of neutrinos with energies greater than 1 EeV.

  9. Testing and verification of a scale-model acoustic propagation system.

    Sagers, Jason D; Ballard, Megan S

    2015-12-01

    This paper discusses the design and operation of a measurement apparatus used to conduct scale-model underwater acoustic propagation experiments, presents experimental results for an idealized waveguide, and compares the measured results to data generated by two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical models. The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of the apparatus for a simple waveguide that primarily exhibits 2D acoustic propagation. The apparatus contains a computer-controlled positioning system that accurately moves a receiving transducer in the water layer above a scale-model bathymetry while a stationary source transducer emits broadband pulsed waveforms. Experimental results are shown for a 2.133 m × 1.219 m bathymetric part possessing a flat-bottom bathymetry with a translationally invariant wedge of 10° slope along one edge. Beamformed results from a synthetic horizontal line array indicate the presence of strong in-plane arrivals along with weaker diffracted and horizontally refracted arrivals. A simulated annealing inversion method is applied to infer values for five waveguide parameters with the largest measurement uncertainty. The inferred values are then used in a 2D method of images model and a 3D adiabatic normal-mode model to simulate the measured acoustic data. PMID:26723314

  10. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.