WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustic scattering

  1. Seamount acoustic scattering

    Boehlert, George W.

    The cover of the March 1 issue of Eos showed a time series of acoustic scattering above Southeast Hancock Seamount (29°48‧N, 178°05‧E) on July 17-18, 1984. In a comment on that cover Martin Hovland (Eos, August 2, p. 760) argued that gas or “other far reaching causes” may be involved in the observed acoustic signals. He favors a hypothesis that acoustic scattering observed above a seeping pockmark in the North Sea is a combination of bubbles, stable microbubbles, and pelagic organisms and infers that this may be a more general phenomenon and indeed plays a role in the attraction of organisms to seamounts

  2. Inverse acoustic problem of N homogeneous scatterers

    Berntsen, Svend

    The three-dimensional inverse acoustic medium problem of N homogeneous objects with known geometry and location is considered. It is proven that one scattering experiment is sufficient for the unique determination of the complex wavenumbers of the objects. The mapping from the scattered fields at a...

  3. On Near-cloak in Acoustic Scattering

    Liu, Hongyu

    2012-01-01

    We consider invisibility cloaking of active/radiating objects in acoustic scattering via the approach of transformation optics. A general lossy layer is incorporated into the construction of the near-cloaking devices. We derive very accurate estimates of the scattering amplitude in terms of the regularization parameter and the material parameters of the lossy layer in different settings. Our results on the one hand show how to cloak active contents more efficiently, and on the other hand indicate the optimal choice of choosing the lossy layer.

  4. Support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering

    This report discusses the following topics on support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering: Minimum support inversion; forward modelling of elastodynamic wave scattering; minimum support linearized acoustic inversion; support minimized nonlinear acoustic inversion without absolute phase; and support minimized nonlinear elastic inversion

  5. Acoustic scattering from a submerged cylindrical shell coated with locally resonant acoustic metamaterials

    Using the multilayered cylinder model, we study acoustic scattering from a submerged cylindrical shell coated with locally resonant acoustic metamaterials, which exhibit locally negative effective mass densities. A spring model is introduced to replace the traditional transfer matrix, which may be singular in the negative mass region. The backscattering form function and the scattering cross section are calculated to discuss the acoustic properties of the coated submerged cylindrical shell. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  6. Nonlinear ion acoustic waves scattered by vortexes

    Ohno, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The Kadomtsev--Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy is the archetype of infinite-dimensional integrable systems, which describes nonlinear ion acoustic waves in two-dimensional space. This remarkably ordered system resides on a singular submanifold (leaf) embedded in a larger phase space of more general ion acoustic waves (low-frequency electrostatic perturbations). The KP hierarchy is characterized not only by small amplitudes but also by irrotational (zero-vorticity) velocity fields. In fact, the KP equation is derived by eliminating vorticity at every order of the reductive perturbation. Here we modify the scaling of the velocity field so as to introduce a vortex term. The newly derived system of equations consists of a generalized three-dimensional KP equation and a two-dimensional vortex equation. The former describes `scattering' of vortex-free waves by ambient vortexes that are determined by the latter. We say that the vortexes are `ambient' because they do not receive reciprocal reactions from the waves (i.e.,...

  7. Acoustic scattering from a submerged cylindrical shell coated with locally resonant acoustic metamaterials

    Li Li; Wen Ji-Hong; Cai Li; Zhao Hong-Gang; Wen Xi-Sen

    2013-01-01

    Using the multilayered cylinder model,we study acoustic scattering from a submerged cylindrical shell coated with locally resonant acoustic metamaterials,which exhibit locally negative effective mass densities.A spring model is introduced to replace the traditional transfer matrix,which may be singular in the negative mass region.The backscattering form function and the scattering cross section are calculated to discuss the acoustic properties of the coated submerged cylindrical shell.

  8. Investigation on acoustic holography reconstruction of scattering field of target

    BAO Xuemei; HE Zuoyong

    2000-01-01

    The BEM-based (Boundary EIement Method) scattering near field acoustic holography technique, which can be used to reconstruct the scattering sound field on the surface of a target and predict the whole scattering field from measured scattering near field, is described.First, the fundamental equations of this method and the related separation method for scattering field are brought forward. Then the problems such as the affect of different hologram to reconstructed result, the availability of singular value filter method and the applicability of separation method for scattering field are analyzed by means of numerical simulation.

  9. High frequency and pulse scattering physical acoustics

    Pierce, Allan D

    1992-01-01

    High Frequency and Pulse Scattering investigates high frequency and pulse scattering, with emphasis on the phenomenon of echoes from objects. Geometrical and catastrophe optics methods in scattering are discussed, along with the scattering of sound pulses and the ringing of target resonances. Caustics and associated diffraction catastrophes are also examined.Comprised of two chapters, this volume begins with a detailed account of geometrically based approximation methods in scattering theory, focusing on waves transmitted through fluid and elastic scatterers and glory scattering; surface ray r

  10. Acoustic scattering properties of freshwater invertebrates

    Frouzová, Jaroslava; Kubečka, Jan; Matěna, Josef

    Netherlands : Delft University of Technology, 2004 - (Simons, D.), s. 319-324 ISBN 90-5986-079-9. [European Conference on Underwater Acoustic /7./. Delft (NL), 05.07.2004-08.07.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6017201 Keywords : invertebrates * target strength Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  11. Acoustic confinement and Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in integrated optical waveguides

    Poulton, Christopher G; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2013-01-01

    We examine the effect of acoustic mode confinement on Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in optical waveguides that consist of a guiding core embedded in a solid substrate. We find that SBS can arise due to coupling to acoustic modes in three different regimes. First, the acoustic modes may be guided by total internal reflection; in this case the SBS gain depends directly on the degree of confinement of the acoustic mode in the core, which is in turn determined by the acoustic V-parameter. Second, the acoustic modes may be leaky, but may nevertheless have a sufficiently long lifetime to have a large effect on the SBS gain; the lifetime of acoustic modes in this regime depends not only on the contrast in acoustic properties between the core and the cladding, but is also highly dependent on the waveguide dimensions. Finally SBS may occur due to coupling to free modes, which exist even in the absence of acoustic confinement; we find that the cumulative effect of coupling to these non-confined modes results in signi...

  12. Robustness of Acoustic Scattering Cancellation to Parameter Variations

    Claudia Guattari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This contribution aims at investigating the possibility to cloak a spherical object from an acoustic wave by applying the scattering cancellation approach. In electromagnetism, the scattering problem is treated using the Mie expansion technique, through which the scattered field by a spherical object can be represented as a superposition of TE and TM spherical harmonics. It is possible to extend this concept to the acoustic field by defining an analogous approach; the pressure field, generated by an elastic wave impinging on a spherical object, can be expressed applying the Mie expansion technique, as well. In acoustics, to achieve scattering suppression at a given frequency, the constitutive parameters to control are density and compressibility. By varying these parameter values, it is possible to define an engineered material with anomalous properties, which cannot be found in nature, able to reduce the scattering cross-section (SCS from a spherical object. We propose a study about the effectiveness of the SCS reduction from an elastic sphere coated with a properly-designed acoustic metamaterial. The sensitivity of the SCS to parameter variations is analyzed for different coating thicknesses and sphere dimensions. Our analysis is supported by both the analytical modelling of the structure and numerical simulations.

  13. Scattering from objects and surfaces in room acoustical simulations

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho;

    2016-01-01

    been implemented in the simulation tool PARISM (Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Method). Scattering from objects and surfaces is likely to be strongly frequency dependent and the frequency dependence can depend on their sizes, shapes and structure. The importance of the frequency...

  14. Resonance scattering of radio waves in the acoustically disturbed ionosphere

    It is known that acoustic waves are excited in the atmosphere for a variety of reasons, including seismic oscillations of the earth's surface as a result of earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, explosions, and in the operation of other powerful sources of natural or artificial origin. When sound waves are sufficiently intense, they can create disturbances in the electron density at ionospheric heights. In this paper, we consider the properties of radio wave scattering off such disturbances created by infrasound waves, i.e., we consider Mandel'shtam-Brillouin scattering in the ionosphere. The authors discuss the possibility of a radiophysical enhancement of the effect connected with the phenomenon of resonance scattering of the radiowaves off the disturbances created in the medium by the acoustic wave

  15. A time domain sampling method for inverse acoustic scattering problems

    Guo, Yukun; Hömberg, Dietmar; Hu, Guanghui; Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu

    2016-06-01

    This work concerns the inverse scattering problems of imaging unknown/inaccessible scatterers by transient acoustic near-field measurements. Based on the analysis of the migration method, we propose efficient and effective sampling schemes for imaging small and extended scatterers from knowledge of time-dependent scattered data due to incident impulsive point sources. Though the inverse scattering problems are known to be nonlinear and ill-posed, the proposed imaging algorithms are totally "direct" involving only integral calculations on the measurement surface. Theoretical justifications are presented and numerical experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our methods. In particular, the proposed static imaging functionals enhance the performance of the total focusing method (TFM) and the dynamic imaging functionals show analogous behavior to the time reversal inversion but without solving time-dependent wave equations.

  16. Acoustic orbital angular momentum transfer to matter by chiral scattering

    Wunenburger, Régis; Israel Vazquez Lozano, Juan; Brasselet, Etienne

    2015-10-01

    We report on orbital angular momentum exchange between sound and matter mediated by a non-dissipative chiral scattering process. An experimental demonstration is made possible by irradiating a three-dimensional printed, spiral-shaped chiral object with an incident ultrasonic beam carrying zero orbital angular momentum. Chiral refraction is shown to impart a nonzero orbital angular momentum to the scattered field and to rotate the object. This result constitutes a proof of concept of a novel kind of acoustic angular manipulation of matter.

  17. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution

  18. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Didenkulov, Igor, E-mail: din@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov str., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay, E-mail: nikvas@rf.unn.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  19. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  20. Multiple scattering formulation of two-dimensional acoustic and electromagnetic metamaterials

    Torrent Martí, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa Moreno-Cid, José

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a multiple scattering formulation of two dimensional acoustic metamaterials. It is shown that in the low frequency limit multiple scattering allows us to define frequency-dependent effective acoustic parameters for arrays of both ordered and disordered cylinders. This formulation can lead to both positive and negative acoustic parameters, where the acoustic parameters are the scalar bulk modulus and the tensorial mass density and, therefore, anisotropic wave propagation is ...

  1. Stimulated electron-acoustic-wave scattering in a laser plasma

    Intense laser-plasma interaction can be a source of various electronic instabilities. Recently, stimulated backscattering from a trapped electron-acoustic wave (SEAS) (D.S. Montgomery et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 155001 (2001)) was proposed to reinterpret spectra previously attributed to stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) from unrealistically low densities. By particle simulations in a uniform plasma layer, which is overdense for ordinary SRS, strong reflection by SEAS at the electron plasma frequency is found. Transient SEAS reflectivity pulsations are followed by strong relativistic heating of electrons. Physical conditions are explained by three-wave parametric coupling between laser light, standing backscattered wave and slow electron-acoustic wave. Regions in which SEAS reflection can dominate over SRS are singled out. (author)

  2. Multiple scattering of a spherical acoustic wave from fluid spheres

    Wu, J. H.; Liu, A. Q.; Chen, H. L.; Chen, T. N.

    2006-02-01

    The multiple scattering of a spherical acoustic wave from an arbitrary number of fluid spheres is investigated theoretically. The tool to attack the multiple scattering problem is a kind of addition formulas for the spherical wave functions, which are presented in the paper, based on the bicentric expansion form of Green function in the spherical coordinates. For an arbitrary configuration of N fluid spheres, the kind of addition formulas permits the field expansions (all referred to the center of each sphere). With these the sound fields scattered by each sphere can be described by a set of N equations. The interactions between any two fluid spheres are taken into account in these equations exactly and their coefficients are coupled through double sums in the spherical wave functions. By truncating the infinite series in the equations depending on certain calculation accuracy and solving the coefficients matrix by using the Gauss-Seidel iteration method, we can obtain the scattered sound field by the configuration of the fluid spheres. Finally, the scattering calculations by using the kind of addition formulas are carried out.

  3. Acoustic and elastic multiple scattering and radiation from cylindrical structures

    Amirkulova, Feruza Abdukadirovna

    Multiple scattering (MS) and radiation of waves by a system of scatterers is of great theoretical and practical importance and is required in a wide variety of physical contexts such as the implementation of "invisibility" cloaks, the effective parameter characterization, and the fabrication of dynamically tunable structures, etc. The dissertation develops fast, rapidly convergent iterative techniques to expedite the solution of MS problems. The formulation of MS problems reduces to a system of linear algebraic equations using Graf's theorem and separation of variables. The iterative techniques are developed using Neumann expansion and Block Toeplitz structure of the linear system; they are very general, and suitable for parallel computations and a large number of MS problems, i.e. acoustic, elastic, electromagnetic, etc., and used for the first time to solve MS problems. The theory is implemented in Matlab and FORTRAN, and the theoretical predictions are compared to computations obtained by COMSOL. To formulate the MS problem, the transition matrix is obtained by analyzing an acoustic and an elastic single scattering of incident waves by elastic isotropic and anisotropic solids. The mathematical model of wave scattering from multilayered cylindrical and spherical structures is developed by means of an exact solution of dynamic 3D elasticity theory. The recursive impedance matrix algorithm is derived for radially heterogeneous anisotropic solids. An explicit method for finding the impedance in piecewise uniform, transverse-isotropic material is proposed; the solution is compared to elasticity theory solutions involving Buchwald potentials. Furthermore, active exterior cloaking devices are modeled for acoustic and elastic media using multipole sources. A cloaking device can render an object invisible to some incident waves as seen by some external observer. The active cloak is generated by a discrete set of multipole sources that destructively interfere with an

  4. Coherent scattering of CO2 light from ion-acoustic waves

    Scattering of laser radiation from ion-acoustic waves in a plasma is investigated analytically and experimentally. The formulation predicts a coherent component of the scattered power on a largely incoherent background spectrum when the acoustic analog of Bragg's law and Doppler shift conditions are satisfied. The experiment consists of a hybrid CO2 laser system capable of either low power continuous wave or high power pulsed mode operation. A heterodyne light mixing scheme is used to detect the scattered power. The proportionality predicted by the theory is verified by scattering from externally excited acoustic and ion-acoustic waves; continuous wave and pulsed modes in each case. Measurement of the ion-acoustic dispersion relation by continuous wave scattering is also presented

  5. Multiscale analysis of the acoustic scattering by many scatterers of impedance type

    Challa, Durga Prasad; Sini, Mourad

    2016-06-01

    We are concerned with the acoustic scattering problem, at a frequency {κ}, by many small obstacles of arbitrary shapes with impedance boundary condition. These scatterers are assumed to be included in a bounded domain {Ω} in R^3 which is embedded in an acoustic background characterized by an eventually locally varying index of refraction. The collection of the scatterers {D_m, m=1,ldots,M} is modeled by four parameters: their number M, their maximum radius a, their minimum distance d and the surface impedances {λ_m, m=1,ldots,M}. We consider the parameters M, d and {λ_m}'s having the following scaling properties: {M:=M(a)=O(a^{-s}), d:=d(a)≈ a^t} and {λ_m:=λ_m(a)=λ_{m,0}a^{-β}}, as {a→ 0}, with non negative constants s, t and {β} and complex numbers {λ_{m, 0}}'s with eventually negative imaginary parts. We derive the asymptotic expansion of the far-fields with explicit error estimate in terms of a, as {a→ 0}. The dominant term is the Foldy-Lax field corresponding to the scattering by the point-like scatterers located at the centers {z_m}'s of the scatterers {D_m}'s with {λ_m \\vert partial D_m\\vert} as the related scattering coefficients. This asymptotic expansion is justified under the following conditions a ≤ a_0, \\vert Re (λ_{m,0})\\vert ≥ λ_-,quad \\vertλ_{m,0}\\vert ≤ λ_+,quad β < 1,quad 0 ≤ s ≤2-β,quads/3 ≤ t and the error of the approximation is {C a^{3-2β-s}}, as {a → 0}, where the positive constants {a_0, λ_-,λ_+} and C depend only on the a priori uniform bounds of the Lipschitz characters of the obstacles {D_m}'s and the ones of {M(a)a^s} and {d(a)/a^t}. We do not assume the periodicity in distributing the small scatterers. In addition, the scatterers can be arbitrary close since t can be arbitrary large, i.e., we can handle the mesoscale regime. Finally, for spherical scatterers, we can also allow the limit case {β=1} with a slightly better error of the approximation.

  6. Identification of aero-acoustic scattering matrices from large eddy simulation: Application to whistling orifices induct

    The identification of the aero-acoustic scattering matrix of an orifice in a duct is achieved by computational fluid dynamics.The methodology first consists in performing a large eddy simulation of a turbulent compressible flow, with superimposed broadband acoustic excitations. After extracting time series of acoustic data with a specific filter, system identification techniques are applied. They allow us to determine the components of the acoustic scattering matrix of the orifice. Following the same procedure, a previous paper determines the scattering features of a sudden area expansion. In the present paper, the focus is on whistling orifices.The whistling ability of the tested orifice is evaluated by deriving the acoustic power balance from the scattering matrix. Comparisons with experiments at two different Mach numbers show a good agreement.The potential whistling frequency range is well predicted in terms of frequency and amplitude. (authors)

  7. Negative refraction induced acoustic concentrator and the effects of scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage

    Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2012-07-01

    We present a three-dimensional acoustic concentrator capable of significantly enhancing the sound intensity in the compressive region with scattering cancellation, imaging, and mirage effects. The concentrator shell is built by isotropic gradient negative-index materials, which together with an exterior host medium slab constructs a pair of complementary media. The enhancement factor, which can approach infinity by tuning the geometric parameters, is always much higher than that of a traditional concentrator made by positive-index materials with the same size. The acoustic scattering theory is applied to derive the pressure field distribution of the concentrator, which is consistent with the numerical full-wave simulations. The inherent acoustic impedance match at the interfaces of the shell as well as the inverse processes of “negative refraction—progressive curvature—negative refraction” for arbitrary sound rays can exactly cancel the scattering of the concentrator. In addition, the concentrator shell can also function as an acoustic spherical magnifying superlens, which produces a perfect image with the same shape, with bigger geometric and acoustic parameters located at a shifted position. Then some acoustic mirages are observed whereby the waves radiated from (scattered by) an object located in the center region may seem to be radiated from (scattered by) its image. Based on the mirage effect, we further propose an intriguing acoustic transformer which can transform the sound scattering pattern of one object into another object at will with arbitrary geometric, acoustic, and location parameters.

  8. Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves in a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre.

    Beugnot, Jean-Charles; Lebrun, Sylvie; Pauliat, Gilles; Maillotte, Hervé; Laude, Vincent; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    Brillouin scattering in optical fibres is a fundamental interaction between light and sound with important implications ranging from optical sensors to slow and fast light. In usual optical fibres, light both excites and feels shear and longitudinal bulk elastic waves, giving rise to forward-guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering and backward-stimulated Brillouin scattering. In a subwavelength-diameter optical fibre, the situation changes dramatically, as we here report with the first experimental observation of Brillouin light scattering from surface acoustic waves. These Rayleigh-type surface waves travel the wire surface at a specific velocity of 3,400 m s(-1) and backscatter the light with a Doppler shift of about 6 GHz. As these acoustic resonances are sensitive to surface defects or features, surface acoustic wave Brillouin scattering opens new opportunities for various sensing applications, but also in other domains such as microwave photonics and nonlinear plasmonics. PMID:25341638

  9. Scattering coefficients and gray-body factor for 1D BEC acoustic black holes: Exact results

    Fabbri, Alessandro; Balbinot, Roberto; Anderson, Paul R.

    2016-03-01

    A complete set of exact analytic solutions to the mode equation is found in the region exterior to the acoustic horizon for a class of 1D Bose-Einstein condensate acoustic black holes. From these, analytic expressions for the scattering coefficients and gray-body factor are obtained. The results are used to verify previous predictions regarding the behaviors of the scattering coefficients and gray-body factor in the low-frequency limit.

  10. Scattering coefficients and gray-body factor for 1D BEC acoustic black holes: exact results

    Fabbri, Alessandro; Anderson, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    A complete set of exact analytic solutions to the mode equation are found in the region exterior to the acoustic horizon for a class of 1D Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) acoustic black holes. From these, analytic expressions for the scattering coefficients and gray-body factor are obtained. The results are used to verify previous predictions regarding the behaviors of the scattering coefficients and gray-body factor in the low frequency limit.

  11. Ion-acoustic solitary waves and spectrally uniform scattering cross section enhancements

    J. Ekeberg; Wannberg, G.; Eliasson, L; Stasiewicz, K.

    2010-01-01

    Spectra measured by incoherent scatter radars are formed predominantly by scattering of the incident signal off ion-acoustic and Langmuir waves in the ionosphere. Occasionally, the upshifted and/or downshifted lines produced by the ion-acoustic waves are enhanced well above thermal levels and referred to as naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines. In this paper, we study another kind of enhancement, which is spectrally uniform over the whole ion-line, i.e. the up- and downshifted shoulder and t...

  12. Practical methods to define scattering coefficients in a room acoustics computer model

    Zeng, Xiangyang; Christensen, Claus Lynge; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2006-01-01

    obtaining the data becomes quite time consuming thus increasing the cost of design. In this paper, practical methods to define scattering coefficients, which is based on an approach of modeling surface scattering and scattering caused by limited size of surface as well as edge diffraction are presented. The...... predicted and measured acoustic parameters in real rooms have been compared in order to verify the practical approaches recommended in the paper....

  13. Acoustic Estimates of Distribution and Biomass of Different Acoustic Scattering Types Between the New England Shelf Break and Slope Waters

    McLaren, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    Due to their great ecological significance, mesopelagic fishes are attracting a wider audience on account of the large biomass they represent. Data from the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) provided the opportunity to explore an unknown region of the North-West Atlantic, adjacent to one of the most productive fisheries in the world. Acoustic data collected during the cruise required the identification of acoustically distinct scattering types to make inferences on the migrations, distributions and biomass of mesopelagic scattering layers. Six scattering types were identified by the proposed method in our data and traces their migrations and distributions in the top 200m of the water column. This method was able to detect and trace the movements of three scattering types to 1000m depth, two of which can be further subdivided. This process of identification enabled the development of three physically-derived target-strength models adapted to traceable acoustic scattering types for the analysis of biomass and length distribution to 1000m depth. The abundance and distribution of acoustic targets varied closely in relation to varying physical environments associated with a warm core ring in the New England continental Shelf break region. The continental shelf break produces biomass density estimates that are twice as high as the warm core ring and the surrounding continental slope waters are an order of magnitude lower than either estimate. Biomass associated with distinct layers is assessed and any benefits brought about by upwelling at the edge of the warm core ring are shown not to result in higher abundance of deepwater species. Finally, asymmetric diurnal migrations in shelf break waters contrasts markedly with the symmetry of migrating layers within the warm ring, both in structure and density estimates, supporting a theory of predatorial and nutritional constraints to migrating pelagic species.

  14. Temperature Dependence of Brillouin Light Scattering Spectra of Acoustic Phonons in Silicon

    Somerville, Kevin; Klimovich, Nikita; An, Kyongmo; Sullivan, Sean; Weathers, Annie; Shi, Li; Li, Xiaoqin

    2015-03-01

    Thermal management represents an outstanding challenge in many areas of technology. Electrons, optical phonons, and acoustic phonons are often driven out of local equilibrium in electronic devices or during laser-material interaction processes. Interest in non-equilibrium transport processes has motivated the development of Raman spectroscopy as a local temperature sensor of optical phonons and intermediate frequency acoustic phonons, whereas Brillouin light scattering (BLS) has recently been explored as a temperature sensor of low-frequency acoustic phonons. Here, we report temperature dependent BLS spectra of silicon, with Raman spectra taken simultaneously for comparison. The origins of the observed temperature dependence of the BLS peak position, linewidth, and intensity are examined in order to evaluate their potential use as temperature sensors for acoustic phonons. We determine that the integrated BLS intensity can be used measure the temperature of specific acoustic phonon modes. This work is supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) Thermal Transport Processes Program under Grant CBET-1336968.

  15. Acoustic orbital angular momentum transfer to matter by chiral scattering

    Wunenburger, Régis; Israel, Juan; Lozano, Vazquez; Brasselet, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    We report on orbital angular momentum exchange between sound and matter mediated by a non-dissipative chiral scattering process. An experimental demonstration is made possible by irradiating a three-dimensional printed, spiral-shaped chiral object with an incident ultrasonic beam carrying zero orbital angular momentum. Chiral refraction is shown to impart a nonzero orbital angular momentum to the scattered field and to rotate the object. This result constitutes a proof of concept of a novel k...

  16. Initial Integration of Noise Prediction Tools for Acoustic Scattering Effects

    Nark, Douglas M.; Burley, Casey L.; Tinetti, Ana; Rawls, John W.

    2008-01-01

    This effort provides an initial glimpse at NASA capabilities available in predicting the scattering of fan noise from a non-conventional aircraft configuration. The Aircraft NOise Prediction Program, Fast Scattering Code, and the Rotorcraft Noise Model were coupled to provide increased fidelity models of scattering effects on engine fan noise sources. The integration of these codes led to the identification of several keys issues entailed in applying such multi-fidelity approaches. In particular, for prediction at noise certification points, the inclusion of distributed sources leads to complications with the source semi-sphere approach. Computational resource requirements limit the use of the higher fidelity scattering code to predict radiated sound pressure levels for full scale configurations at relevant frequencies. And, the ability to more accurately represent complex shielding surfaces in current lower fidelity models is necessary for general application to scattering predictions. This initial step in determining the potential benefits/costs of these new methods over the existing capabilities illustrates a number of the issues that must be addressed in the development of next generation aircraft system noise prediction tools.

  17. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V., E-mail: niko200707@mail.ru; Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A. [Department of Acoustics, Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kreider, Wayne [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th St. Seattle WA 98105 (United States); Sapozhnikov, Oleg A. [Department of Acoustics, Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th St. Seattle WA 98105 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter.

  18. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter

  19. Conditions for the Observation of Two Ion-Acoustic Waves via Thomson Scattering

    郑坚; 胡广月; 王哲斌; 俞昌旋; 刘万东

    2003-01-01

    Observation of two ion-acoustic waves via Thomson scattering can provide precise measurements of plasma parameters. The conditions for the observation of two ion-acoustic modes in a two-ion plasmaare discussed.The ratio of electron temperature Te to ion temperature Ti is the critical parameter for the presence of two ion-acoustic modes, which should be in the range of 4/ZL(<~)Te/Ti(<~)2AH/ZHAL, where ZL,H are the charge states of light and heavy ions, and AL,H are the atomic numbers of light and heavy ions, respectively. As the temperature ratio varies in this range, the concentration of heavy ions must increase with the ratio Te/Ti so that the two ion-acoustic modes can have the same fluctuation levels.

  20. Temperature dependence of Brillouin light scattering spectra of acoustic phonons in silicon

    Electrons, optical phonons, and acoustic phonons are often driven out of local equilibrium in electronic devices or during laser-material interaction processes. The need for a better understanding of such non-equilibrium transport processes has motivated the development of Raman spectroscopy as a local temperature sensor of optical phonons and intermediate frequency acoustic phonons, whereas Brillouin light scattering (BLS) has recently been explored as a temperature sensor of low-frequency acoustic phonons. Here, we report the measured BLS spectra of silicon at different temperatures. The origins of the observed temperature dependence of the BLS peak position, linewidth, and intensity are examined in order to evaluate their potential use as temperature sensors for acoustic phonons

  1. Difference-frequency generation in nonlinear scattering of acoustic waves by a rigid sphere

    Silva, Glauber T

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the partial-wave expansion method is applied to describe the difference-frequency pressure generated in a nonlinear scattering of two acoustic waves with an arbitrary wavefront by means of a rigid sphere. Particularly, the difference-frequency generation is analyzed in the nonlinear scattering with a spherical scatterer involving two intersecting plane waves in the following configurations: collinear, crossing at right angles, and counter-propagating. For the sake simplicity, the plane waves are assumed to be spatially located in a spherical region which diameter is smaller than the difference-frequency wavelength. Such arrangements can be experimentally accomplished in vibro-acoustography and nonlinear acoustic tomography techniques. It turns out to be that when the sphere radius is of the order of the primary wavelengths, and the downshift ratio (i.e. the ratio between the fundamental frequency and the difference-frequency) is larger than five, difference-frequency generation is mostly due to...

  2. Detection of nonlinear picosecond acoustic pulses by time-resolved Brillouin scattering

    In time-resolved Brillouin scattering (also called picosecond ultrasonic interferometry), the time evolution of the spatial Fourier component of an optically excited acoustic strain distribution is monitored. The wave number is determined by the momentum conservation in photon-phonon interaction. For linear acoustic waves propagating in a homogeneous medium, the detected time-domain signal of the optical probe transient reflectivity shows a sinusoidal oscillation at a constant frequency known as the Brillouin frequency. This oscillation is a result of heterodyning the constant reflection from the sample surface with the Brillouin-scattered field. Here, we present an analytical theory for the nonlinear reshaping of a propagating, finite amplitude picosecond acoustic pulse, which results in a time-dependence of the observed frequency. In particular, we examine the conditions under which this information can be used to study the time-evolution of the weak-shock front speed. Depending on the initial strain pulse parameters and the time interval of its nonlinear transformation, our theory predicts the detected frequency to either be monotonically decreasing or oscillating in time. We support these theoretical predictions by comparison with available experimental data. In general, we find that picosecond ultrasonic interferometry of nonlinear acoustic pulses provides access to the nonlinear acoustic properties of a medium spanning most of the GHz frequency range

  3. Angular oscillation of solid scatterers in response to progressive planar acoustic waves: do fish otoliths rock?

    Krysl, Petr; Hawkins, Anthony D; Schilt, Carl; Cranford, Ted W

    2012-01-01

    Fish can sense a wide variety of sounds by means of the otolith organs of the inner ear. Among the incompletely understood components of this process are the patterns of movement of the otoliths vis-à-vis fish head or whole-body movement. How complex are the motions? How does the otolith organ respond to sounds from different directions and frequencies? In the present work we examine the responses of a dense rigid scatterer (representing the otolith) suspended in an acoustic fluid to low-frequency planar progressive acoustic waves. A simple mechanical model, which predicts both translational and angular oscillation, is formulated. The responses of simple shapes (sphere and hemisphere) are analyzed with an acoustic finite element model. The hemispherical scatterer is found to oscillate both in the direction of the propagation of the progressive waves and also in the plane of the wavefront as a result of angular motion. The models predict that this characteristic will be shared by other irregularly-shaped scatterers, including fish otoliths, which could provide the fish hearing mechanisms with an additional component of oscillation and therefore one more source of acoustical cues. PMID:22912710

  4. Ion-acoustic solitary waves and spectrally uniform scattering cross section enhancements

    J. Ekeberg

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Spectra measured by incoherent scatter radars are formed predominantly by scattering of the incident signal off ion-acoustic and Langmuir waves in the ionosphere. Occasionally, the upshifted and/or downshifted lines produced by the ion-acoustic waves are enhanced well above thermal levels and referred to as naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines. In this paper, we study another kind of enhancement, which is spectrally uniform over the whole ion-line, i.e. the up- and downshifted shoulder and the spectral valley in between. Based on observations made with the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR facility, we investigate the transient and spectrally uniform power enhancements, which can be explained by ion-acoustic solitary waves. We use a theory of nonlinear waves in a magnetized plasma to determine the properties of such waves and evaluate their effects on scattered signals measured by ESR. We suggest a new mechanism that can explain backscattered power enhancements by one order of magnitude above the thermal level and show that it is consistent with observations.

  5. Photoacoustic tomography based on the Green's function retrieval with ultrasound interferometry for sample partially behind an acoustically scattering layer

    Yin, Jie; Tao, Chao; Cai, Peng; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-06-01

    Acoustically inhomogeneous mediums with multiple scattering are often the nightmare of photoacoustic tomography. In order to break this limitation, a photoacoustic tomography scheme combining ultrasound interferometry and time reversal is proposed to achieve images in acoustically scattering medium. An ultrasound interferometry is developed to determine the unknown Green's function of strong scattering tissue. Using the determined Greens' function, a time-reversal process is carried out to restore images behind an acoustically inhomogeneous layer from the scattering photoacoustic signals. This method effectively decreases the false contrast, noise, and position deviation of images induced by the multiple scattering. Phantom experiment is carried out to validate the method. Therefore, the proposed method could have potential value in extending the biomedical applications of photoacoustic tomography in acoustically inhomogeneous tissue.

  6. Guided acoustic and optical waves in silicon-on-insulator for Brillouin scattering and optomechanics

    Sarabalis, Christopher J; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study silicon waveguides on silica showing that it is possible to simultaneously guide optical and acoustic waves in the technologically important silicon on insulator (SOI) material system. Thin waveguides, or fins, exhibit geometrically softened mechanical modes at gigahertz frequencies with phase velocities below the Rayleigh velocity in glass, eliminating acoustic radiation losses. We propose slot waveguides on glass with telecom optical frequencies and strong radiation pressure forces resulting in Brillouin gains on the order of 500 and 50,000 1/(Wm) for backward and forward Brillouin scattering, respectively.

  7. Parameter derivation for an acoustic cloak based on scattering theory and realization with tunable metamaterials

    Shen, Huijie; Wen, Jihong; Païdoussis, Michael P.; Yu, Dianlong; Cai, Li; Wen, Xisen

    2013-09-01

    This work derives the set of acoustic parameters of a metamaterial for an ideal cylindrical cloak through scattering theory. A multilayered cloak with homogeneous isotropic materials is introduced to approximate the ideal cloak. An active metamaterial, consisting of active arrays of acoustic cavities separated by piezo-diaphragms, is addressed to achieve the required parameters for each layer of the multilayered cloak. In particular, with the aid of a multi-control strategy that takes into account the coupling between adjacent cells, the effective parameters for the cloak can be accurately realized.

  8. Parameter derivation for an acoustic cloak based on scattering theory and realization with tunable metamaterials

    This work derives the set of acoustic parameters of a metamaterial for an ideal cylindrical cloak through scattering theory. A multilayered cloak with homogeneous isotropic materials is introduced to approximate the ideal cloak. An active metamaterial, consisting of active arrays of acoustic cavities separated by piezo-diaphragms, is addressed to achieve the required parameters for each layer of the multilayered cloak. In particular, with the aid of a multi-control strategy that takes into account the coupling between adjacent cells, the effective parameters for the cloak can be accurately realized. (paper)

  9. Experiment Observation on Acoustic Forward Scattering for Underwater Moving Object Detection

    LEI Bo; MA Yuan-Liang; YANG Kun-De

    2011-01-01

    The problem of detecting an object in shallow water by observing changes in the acoustic field as the object passes between an acoustic source and receiver is addressed. A signal processing scheme based on forward scattering is proposed to detect the perturbed field in the presence of the moving object. The periodic LFM wideband signal is transmitted and a sudden change of field is acquired using a normalized median filter. The experimental results on the lake show that the proposed scheme is successful for the detection of a slowly moving object in the bistatic blind zone.

  10. Axisymmetric scattering of an acoustical Bessel beam by a rigid fixed spheroid.

    Mitri, Farid G

    2015-10-01

    Based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustic scattering of a zeroth-order Bessel acoustic beam centered on a rigid fixed (oblate or prolate) spheroid is provided. The unknown scattering coefficients of the spheroid are determined by solving a system of linear equations derived for the Neumann boundary condition. Numerical results for the modulus of the backscattered pressure (θ = π) in the near field and the backscattering form function in the far field for both prolate and oblate spheroids are presented and discussed, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid), the half-cone angle of the Bessel beam, and the dimensionless frequency. The plots display periodic oscillations (versus the dimensionless frequency) because of the interference of specularly reflected waves in the backscattering direction with circumferential Franz' waves circumnavigating the surface of the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the 3-D directivity patterns illustrate the near- and far-field axisymmetric scattering. Investigations in underwater acoustics, particle levitation, scattering, and the detection of submerged elongated objects and other related applications utilizing Bessel waves would benefit from the results of the present study. PMID:26470043

  11. Classification of underwater targets from autonomous underwater vehicle sampled bistatic acoustic scattered fields.

    Fischell, Erin M; Schmidt, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    One of the long term goals of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) minehunting is to have multiple inexpensive AUVs in a harbor autonomously classify hazards. Existing acoustic methods for target classification using AUV-based sensing, such as sidescan and synthetic aperture sonar, require an expensive payload on each outfitted vehicle and post-processing and/or image interpretation. A vehicle payload and machine learning classification methodology using bistatic angle dependence of target scattering amplitudes between a fixed acoustic source and target has been developed for onboard, fully autonomous classification with lower cost-per-vehicle. To achieve the high-quality, densely sampled three-dimensional (3D) bistatic scattering data required by this research, vehicle sampling behaviors and an acoustic payload for precision timed data acquisition with a 16 element nose array were demonstrated. 3D bistatic scattered field data were collected by an AUV around spherical and cylindrical targets insonified by a 7-9 kHz fixed source. The collected data were compared to simulated scattering models. Classification and confidence estimation were shown for the sphere versus cylinder case on the resulting real and simulated bistatic amplitude data. The final models were used for classification of simulated targets in real time in the LAMSS MOOS-IvP simulation package [M. Benjamin, H. Schmidt, P. Newman, and J. Leonard, J. Field Rob. 27, 834-875 (2010)]. PMID:26723332

  12. Depolarized guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    Zhong, Wenjia Elser née; Elser, Dominique; Heim, Bettina; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    By performing quantum-noise-limited optical heterodyne detection, we observe polarization noise in light after propagation through a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF). We compare the noise spectrum to the one of a standard fiber and find an increase of noise even though the light is mainly transmitted in air in a hollow-core PCF. Combined with our simulation of the acoustic vibrational modes in the hollow-core PCF, we are offering an explanation for the polarization noise with a variation of guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering (GAWBS). Here, instead of modulating the strain in the fiber core as in a solid core fiber, the acoustic vibrations in hollow-core PCF influence the effective refractive index by modulating the geometry of the photonic crystal structure. This induces polarization noise in the light guided by the photonic crystal structure.

  13. Multiple scattering formulation of two-dimensional acoustic and electromagnetic metamaterials

    A multiple scattering formulation of two-dimensional (2D) acoustic metamaterials is presented. This approach is comprehensive and can lead to frequency-dependent effective parameters (scalar bulk modulus and tensorial mass density), as it is possible to have not only positive or negative ellipsoidal refractive index, but also positive or negative hyperbolic refractive index. The correction due to multiple scattering interactions is included in the theory and it is demonstrated that its contribution is important only for lattices with high filling fractions. Since the surface fields on the scatterers are mainly responsible for the anomalous behavior of the resulting effective medium, complex scatterers can be used to engineer the frequency response. Anisotropic effects are also discussed within this formulation and some numerical examples are reported. A homogenization theory is also extended to electromagnetic wave propagation in 2D lattices of dielectric structures, where Mie resonances are found to be responsible for the metamaterial behavior.

  14. Multiple scattering formulation of two-dimensional acoustic and electromagnetic metamaterials

    Torrent, Daniel; Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose, E-mail: datorma1@upvnet.upv.es, E-mail: jsdehesa@upvnet.upv.es [Grupo de Fenomenos Ondulatorios, Departamento de IngenierIa Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n (Edificio 7F), ES-46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    A multiple scattering formulation of two-dimensional (2D) acoustic metamaterials is presented. This approach is comprehensive and can lead to frequency-dependent effective parameters (scalar bulk modulus and tensorial mass density), as it is possible to have not only positive or negative ellipsoidal refractive index, but also positive or negative hyperbolic refractive index. The correction due to multiple scattering interactions is included in the theory and it is demonstrated that its contribution is important only for lattices with high filling fractions. Since the surface fields on the scatterers are mainly responsible for the anomalous behavior of the resulting effective medium, complex scatterers can be used to engineer the frequency response. Anisotropic effects are also discussed within this formulation and some numerical examples are reported. A homogenization theory is also extended to electromagnetic wave propagation in 2D lattices of dielectric structures, where Mie resonances are found to be responsible for the metamaterial behavior.

  15. Vertical distribution, composition and migratory patterns of acoustic scattering layers in the Canary Islands

    Ariza, A.; Landeira, J. M.; Escánez, A.; Wienerroither, R.; Aguilar de Soto, N.; Røstad, A.; Kaartvedt, S.; Hernández-León, S.

    2016-05-01

    Diel vertical migration (DVM) facilitates biogeochemical exchanges between shallow waters and the deep ocean. An effective way of monitoring the migrant biota is by acoustic observations although the interpretation of the scattering layers poses challenges. Here we combine results from acoustic observations at 18 and 38 kHz with limited net sampling in order to unveil the origin of acoustic phenomena around the Canary Islands, subtropical northeast Atlantic Ocean. Trawling data revealed a high diversity of fishes, decapods and cephalopods (152 species), although few dominant species likely were responsible for most of the sound scattering in the region. We identified four different acoustic scattering layers in the mesopelagic realm: (1) at 400-500 m depth, a swimbladder resonance phenomenon at 18 kHz produced by gas-bearing migrant fish such as Vinciguerria spp. and Lobianchia dofleini, (2) at 500-600 m depth, a dense 38 kHz layer resulting primarily from the gas-bearing and non-migrant fish Cyclothone braueri, and to a lesser extent, from fluid-like migrant fauna also inhabiting these depths, (3) between 600 and 800 m depth, a weak signal at both 18 and 38 kHz ascribed either to migrant fish or decapods, and (4) below 800 m depth, a weak non-migrant layer at 18 kHz which was not sampled. All the dielly migrating layers reached the epipelagic zone at night, with the shorter-range migrations moving at 4.6 ± 2.6 cm s - 1 and the long-range ones at 11.5 ± 3.8 cm s - 1. This work reduces uncertainties interpreting standard frequencies in mesopelagic studies, while enhances the potential of acoustics for future research and monitoring of the deep pelagic fauna in the Canary Islands.

  16. Vertical distribution, composition and migratory patterns of acoustic scattering layers in the Canary Islands

    Ariza, A.

    2016-01-21

    Diel vertical migration (DVM) facilitates biogeochemical exchanges between shallow waters and the deep ocean. An effective way of monitoring the migrant biota is by acoustic observations although the interpretation of the scattering layers poses challenges. Here we combine results from acoustic observations at 18 and 38 kHz with limited net sampling in order to unveil the origin of acoustic phenomena around the Canary Islands, subtropical northeast Atlantic Ocean. Trawling data revealed a high diversity of fishes, decapods and cephalopods (152 species), although few dominant species likely were responsible for most of the sound scattering in the region. We identified four different acoustic scattering layers in the mesopelagic realm: (1) at 400–500 m depth, a swimbladder resonance phenomenon at 18 kHz produced by gas-bearing migrant fish such as Vinciguerria spp. and Lobianchia dofleini, (2) at 500–600 m depth, a dense 38 kHz layer resulting primarily from the gas-bearing and non-migrant fish Cyclothone braueri, and to a lesser extent, from fluid-like migrant fauna also inhabiting these depths, (3) between 600 and 800 m depth, a weak signal at both 18 and 38 kHz ascribed either to migrant fish or decapods, and (4) below 800 m depth, a weak non-migrant layer at 18 kHz which was not sampled. All the dielly migrating layers reached the epipelagic zone at night, with the shorter-range migrations moving at 4.6 ± 2.6 cm s − 1 and the long-range ones at 11.5 ± 3.8 cm s − 1. This work reduces uncertainties interpreting standard frequencies in mesopelagic studies, while enhances the potential of acoustics for future research and monitoring of the deep pelagic fauna in the Canary Islands.

  17. Axisymmetric scattering of an acoustical Bessel beam by a rigid fixed spheroid

    Mitri, F G

    2015-01-01

    Based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustic scattering of a zeroth-order Bessel acoustic beam centered on a rigid fixed (oblate or prolate) spheroid is provided. The unknown scattering coefficients of the spheroid are determined by solving a system of linear equations derived for the Neumann boundary condition. Numerical results for the modulus of the backscattered pressure (\\theta = \\pi) in the near-field and the backscattering form function in the far-field for both prolate and oblate spheroids are presented and discussed, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid), the half-cone angle of the Bessel beam \\beta, and the dimensionless frequency. The plots display periodic oscillations (versus the dimensionless frequency) due to the interference of specularly reflected waves in the backscattering direction with circumferential Franz' waves circumnavigati...

  18. HP-FASS: A Hybrid Parallel Fast Acoustic Scattering Solver. CMMSE-09

    López Fernández, Jesús A.; López Portugués, Miguel; Taboada Varela, José Manuel; Rice, Henry J.; Obelleiro, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Acoustic scattering problems may be accurately posed in terms of the Boundary Elements Method (BEM). Nevertheless, the solution of the linear system of equations produced by the BEM usually requires huge computational resources which limits its applicability. The use of efficient solvers in combination with parallel programming may considerably increase the scope of application of the BEM. In this work, a hybrid parallel implementation of the Fast Multipole Method (FMM) us...

  19. Stimulated Brillouin scattering for generating an acoustic wave in optical fibers

    Holík, M.; Mikel, Břetislav; Urban, F.

    Bellingham : SPIE, 2012, 86971I:1-6. ISBN 978-0-8194-9481-8. [CPS 2012. Czech-Polish-Slovak Optical Conference on Wave and Quantum Aspects of Contemporary Optics /18./. Ostravice (CZ), 03.09.2012-07.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010995 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : stimulated Brillouin scattering * acoustic wave * optical fiber Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s

  20. Dispersion and damping of multi-quantum well polaritons from resonant Brillouin scattering by folded acoustic modes

    Jusserand, B.; Fainstein, A.; Ferreira, R.; Majrab, S.; Lemaitre, A.

    2011-01-01

    We report on confined exciton resonances of acoustic and folded acoustic phonon light scattering in a GaAs/AlAs multi-quantum-well. Significant variations of the line shifts and widths are observed across the resonance and quantitatively reproduced in terms of the polariton dispersion. This high resolution Brillouin study brings new unexpectedly detailed informations on the polariton dynamics in confined systems.

  1. Acoustic scattering of a Bessel vortex beam by a rigid fixed spheroid

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Partial-wave series representation of the acoustic scattering field of high-order Bessel vortex beams by rigid oblate and prolate spheroids using the modal matching method is developed. The method, which is applicable to slightly elongated objects at low-to-moderate frequencies, requires solving a system of linear equations which depends on the partial-wave index n and the order of the Bessel vortex beam m using truncated partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs), and satisfying the Neumann boundary condition for a rigid immovable surface in the least-squares sense. This original semi-analytical approach developed for Bessel vortex beams is demonstrated for finite oblate and prolate spheroids, where the mathematical functions describing the spheroidal geometry are written in a form involving single angular (polar) integrals that are numerically computed. The transverse (θ = π / 2) and 3D scattering directivity patterns are evaluated in the far-field for both prolate and oblate spheroids, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid) not exceeding 3:1, the half-cone angle β and order m of the Bessel vortex beam, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kr0. Periodic oscillations in the magnitude plots of the far-field scattering form function are observed, which result from the interference of the reflected waves with the circumferential (Franz') waves circumnavigating the surface of the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the 3D directivity patterns illustrate the far-field scattering from the spheroid, that vanishes in the forward (θ = 0) and backward (θ = π) directions. Particular applications in underwater acoustics and scattering, acoustic levitation and the detection of submerged elongated objects using Bessel vortex waves to name a few, would benefit from the results of the present investigation.

  2. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 1: spectral properties of scattering

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Bed-sediment classification using high-frequency hydro-acoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain-scale roughness. Here, a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel,rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from geo-referenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed ‘stochastic geometries’. Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power-law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological- and grain-scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales, or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate, nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed-sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  3. Scattering reduction for an acoustic sensor using a multilayered shell comprising a pair of homogeneous isotropic single-negative media

    Xu, Tao; Zhu, Xue-Feng; Liang, Bin; Li, Yong; Zou, Xin-Ye; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2012-07-01

    We have designed a cylindrical multilayered structure to reduce scattering for an acoustic sensor while allowing it to receive external information. The proposed structure consists of two alternately arranged complementary media with homogeneous isotropic single-negative parameters. Numerical results show that the acoustic scattering from the sensor is suppressed considerably when the number of bilayers is large enough and the thickness of each bilayer is much smaller than the incident wavelength. This may be particularly significant for practical applications where acoustic measurements would otherwise be disturbed by the insertion of sensors.

  4. Specific multiple-scattering process in acoustic cloak with multilayered homogeneous isotropic materials

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun

    2008-11-01

    It was qualitatively demonstrated through finite-element full-wave simulations that acoustic cloak can be constructed by using concentric multilayered structure with alternating homogeneous isotropic materials [Y. Cheng et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 151913 (2008)]. Here we present a sequential in-depth analysis of the proposed cloak by means of the multiple-scattering algorithms. Calculated pressure fields demonstrate that the cloak possesses low-reflection and wavefront-bending properties. The scattering patterns further characterize the directional cloaking performance in the far field, which is consistent with the pressure fields. The mechanism of the cloaking is ascribed to a specific multiple-scattering process determined by the microscopic material distribution and structural details of the cloak. We also discuss the behavior of the multilayered cloak as a function of wavelength.

  5. A Computational Method to Calculate the Exact Solution for Acoustic Scattering by Liquid Spheroids

    González, Juan D; Blanc, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The problem of scattering of harmonic plane acoustic waves by liquid spheroids (prolate and oblate) is addressed from an analytical approach. Mathematically, it consists in solving the Helmholtz equation in an unbounded domain with Sommerfeld radiation condition at infinity. The domain where propagation takes place is characterised by density and sound speed values $\\rho_0$ and $c_0$, respectively, while $\\rho_1$ and $c_1$ are the corresponding density and sound speed values of an inmersed object that is responsible of the scattered field. Since Helmholtz equation is separable in prolate (oblate) spheroidal coordinates, its exact solution for the scattered field can be expressed as an expansion on prolate (oblate) spheroidal functions multiplied by coefficients whose values depend upon the boundary conditions verified at the medium-inmersed fluid obstacle interface. The general case ($c_0 \

  6. Surface acoustic waves and elastic constants of InN epilayers determined by Brillouin scattering

    Jimenez-Rioboo, R.J.; Prieto, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Cusco, R.; Domenech-Amador, N.; Artus, L. [Institut Jaume Almera, Consell Superior d' Investigacions Cientifiques (CSIC), Lluis Sole i Sabaris s.n., Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Yamaguchi, T.; Nanishi, Y. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, Noji-Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    The surface acoustic wave velocity in InN has been experimentally determined by means of Brillouin scattering experiments on c - and m -face epilayers. From simulations based on the Green's function formalism we determine the shear elastic constants c{sub 66} and c{sub 44} and propose a complete set of elastic constants for wurtzite InN. The analysis of the sagittal and azimuthal dependence of the surface acoustic wave velocity indicates a slightly different elastic behavior of the m -face sample that basically affects the c{sub 44} elastic constant. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Longitudinal acoustic waves in layered media: Comparative study of Raman scattering and reflection delay time

    El Boudouti, E H; Zelmat, R; Bailich, R [LDOM, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mohamed I, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Hassouani, Y El [Universite de Bordeaux, Laboratoire de Mecanique Physique, Talence F-33405 (France); Djafari-Rouhani, B, E-mail: elboudouti@yahoo.f [Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie, UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de Physique, Universite de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2010-03-01

    Using a Green's function method, we present a theoretical analysis of the propagation of acoustic waves in multilayer structures. The structure studied consists of a finite superlattice (SL) made of a periodic repetition of N unit cells deposited on a substrate. Such a structure exhibits extended modes constituting the allowed bands separated by forbidden bands where localized modes associated to free surfaces, defect layers, ... may exist. These modes can be observed either by Raman scattering when an incident light is launched from vacuum towards the multilayer, or by the reflection delay time when an incident acoustic wave is launched from the substrate. Specific applications of our results are given for some available experiments in the literature (e.g., Si/Ge{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}, GaSb-AlSb) and a good agreement has been obtained between our theoretical results and the experimental data.

  8. Longitudinal acoustic waves in layered media: Comparative study of Raman scattering and reflection delay time

    Using a Green's function method, we present a theoretical analysis of the propagation of acoustic waves in multilayer structures. The structure studied consists of a finite superlattice (SL) made of a periodic repetition of N unit cells deposited on a substrate. Such a structure exhibits extended modes constituting the allowed bands separated by forbidden bands where localized modes associated to free surfaces, defect layers, ... may exist. These modes can be observed either by Raman scattering when an incident light is launched from vacuum towards the multilayer, or by the reflection delay time when an incident acoustic wave is launched from the substrate. Specific applications of our results are given for some available experiments in the literature (e.g., Si/GexSi1-x, GaSb-AlSb) and a good agreement has been obtained between our theoretical results and the experimental data.

  9. Nonlinear acoustic propagation in bubbly liquids: Multiple scattering, softening and hardening phenomena.

    Doc, Jean-Baptiste; Conoir, Jean-Marc; Marchiano, Régis; Fuster, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The weakly nonlinear propagation of acoustic waves in monodisperse bubbly liquids is investigated numerically. A hydrodynamic model based on the averaged two-phase fluid equations is coupled with the Rayleigh-Plesset equation to model the dynamics of bubbles at the local scale. The present model is validated in the linear regime by comparing with the Foldy approximation. The analysis of the pressure signals in the linear regime highlights two resonance frequencies: the Minnaert frequency and a multiple scattering resonance that strongly depends on the bubble concentration. For weakly nonlinear regimes, the generation of higher harmonics is observed only for the Minnaert frequency. Linear combinations between the Minnaert harmonics and the multiple scattering resonance are also observed. However, the most significant effect observed is the appearance of softening-hardening effects that share some similarities with those observed for sandstones or cracked materials. These effects are related to the multiple scattering resonance. Downward or upward resonance frequency shifts can be observed depending on the characteristic of the incident wave when increasing the excitation amplitude. It is shown that the frequency shift can be explained assuming that the acoustic wave velocity depends on a law different from those usually encountered for sandstones or cracked materials. PMID:27106317

  10. Application of multiple-precision arithmetic to direct numerical computation of inverse acoustic scattering

    The aim of the paper is to show an effective application of multiple-precision arithmetic to numerical computations of ill-posed problems. Multiple-precision arithmetic enables us to realize virtually numerical computations without rounding errors, and we apply it, without any stabilization methods, to an inverse acoustic scattering problem to obtain remarkable results. We also introduce our new multiple-precision arithmetic environment exflib, which is designed and implemented for fast computation of large scale scientific numerical simulations, and it works with the language C++ and FORTRAN90

  11. Efficient Solution of Three-Dimensional Problems of Acoustic and Electromagnetic Scattering by Open Surfaces

    Turc, Catalin; Anand, Akash; Bruno, Oscar; Chaubell, Julian

    2011-01-01

    We present a computational methodology (a novel Nystrom approach based on use of a non-overlapping patch technique and Chebyshev discretizations) for efficient solution of problems of acoustic and electromagnetic scattering by open surfaces. Our integral equation formulations (1) Incorporate, as ansatz, the singular nature of open-surface integral-equation solutions, and (2) For the Electric Field Integral Equation (EFIE), use analytical regularizes that effectively reduce the number of iterations required by iterative linear-algebra solution based on Krylov-subspace iterative solvers.

  12. Elastic properties of boron carbide films via surface acoustic waves measured by Brillouin light scattering

    Salas, E.; Jimenez-Villacorta, F.; Jimenez Rioboo, R.J.; Prieto, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez-Marcos, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Munoz-Martin, A.; Prieto, J.E.; Joco, V. [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-03-15

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity has been determined by high resolution Brillouin light scattering to study the mechano-elastic properties of boron carbide films prepared by radio frequency (RF) sputtering. The comparison of experimentally observed elastic behaviour with simulations made by considering film composition obtained from elastic recoil detection analysis-time of flight (ERDA-ToF) spectroscopy allows establishing that elastic properties are determined by that of crystalline boron carbide with a lessening of the SAW velocity values due to surface oxidation. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Acoustic resonance scattering by a system of concentrically multilayered shells: the inherent background and resonance coefficients

    Choi, M S; Lee, S H

    1999-01-01

    The inherent background coefficients that exactly describe the background amplitudes in the scattered field have been presented for the scattering of plane acoustic waves by a system of concentrically multilayered solid and/or fluid shells submerged in a fluid. The coefficients have been obtained by replacing the mechanical surface admittance function with the zero-frequency limit of the admittance function for the analogous fluid system, where the shear wave speeds in the solid layers are set to zero. By taking advantage of the concept of incoming and outgoing waves, we find the surface admittance function for the fluid system in such a form that the analytical generalization for any number of layers and the physical interpretation are very easy. The background coefficients obtained are independent of the bulk wave speeds in the system: they depend on the mass densities and the thickness of the shells. With increasing frequency, the inherent background undergoes a transition from the soft to the rigid backgr...

  14. Measurements of high-frequency acoustic scattering from glacially-eroded rock outcrops

    Olson, Derek R; Sæbo, Torstein

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of acoustic backscattering from glacially-eroded rock outcrops were made off the coast of Sandefjord, Norway using a high-frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) system. A method by which scattering strength can be estimated from data collected by a SAS system is detailed, as well as a method to estimate an effective calibration parameter for the system. Scattering strength measurements from very smooth areas of the rock outcrops agree with predictions from both the small-slope approximation and perturbation theory, and range between -33 and -26 dB at 20$^\\circ$ grazing angle. Scattering strength measurements from very rough areas of the rock outcrops agree with the sine-squared shape of the empirical Lambertian model and fall between -30 and -20 dB at 20$^\\circ$ grazing angle. Both perturbation theory and the small-slope approximation are expected to be inaccurate for the very rough area, and overestimate scattering strength by 8 dB or more for all measurements of very rough surfaces. Supportin...

  15. Measurements of high-frequency acoustic scattering from glacially eroded rock outcrops.

    Olson, Derek R; Lyons, Anthony P; Sæbø, Torstein O

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of acoustic backscattering from glacially eroded rock outcrops were made off the coast of Sandefjord, Norway using a high-frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) system. A method by which scattering strength can be estimated from data collected by a SAS system is detailed, as well as a method to estimate an effective calibration parameter for the system. Scattering strength measurements from very smooth areas of the rock outcrops agree with predictions from both the small-slope approximation and perturbation theory, and range between -33 and -26 dB at 20° grazing angle. Scattering strength measurements from very rough areas of the rock outcrops agree with the sine-squared shape of the empirical Lambertian model and fall between -30 and -20 dB at 20° grazing angle. Both perturbation theory and the small-slope approximation are expected to be inaccurate for the very rough area, and overestimate scattering strength by 8 dB or more for all measurements of very rough surfaces. Supporting characterization of the environment was performed in the form of geoacoustic and roughness parameter estimates. PMID:27106331

  16. Phase-locked stimulated Brillouin scattering seeded by a transient acoustic wave excited through an optical interference field

    A mathematical description of an experimentally-verified scheme leading to a phase-locked stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is presented. It is shown that this phase-locking of the SBS process may have its origin in a transient acoustic standing wave initiated by an arising optical interference field, eventually leading to a stationary density modulation of the medium. An appropriate solution was obtained by solving the acoustic wave-equation with electrostriction as a driving force. As a consequence of the damping term being included in this equation, the acoustic standing wave becomes gradually attenuated and, contrary to the undamped solution published earlier, thus constitutes a truly transient phenomenon.

  17. Analysis of a Cartesian PML approximation to acoustic scattering problems in and

    Bramble, James H.

    2013-08-01

    We consider the application of a perfectly matched layer (PML) technique applied in Cartesian geometry to approximate solutions of the acoustic scattering problem in the frequency domain. The PML is viewed as a complex coordinate shift ("stretching") and leads to a variable complex coefficient equation for the acoustic wave posed on an infinite domain, the complement of the bounded scatterer. The use of Cartesian geometry leads to a PML operator with simple coefficients, although, still complex symmetric (non-Hermitian). The PML reformulation results in a problem whose solution coincides with the original solution inside the PML layer while decaying exponentially outside. The rapid decay of the PML solution suggests truncation to a bounded domain with a convenient outer boundary condition and subsequent finite element approximation (for the truncated problem). This paper provides new stability estimates for the Cartesian PML approximations both on the infinite and the truncated domain. We first investigate the stability of the infinite PML approximation as a function of the PML strength σ0. This is done for PML methods which involve continuous piecewise smooth stretching as well as piecewise constant stretching functions. We next introduce a truncation parameter M which determines the size of the PML layer. Our analysis shows that the truncated PML problem is stable provided that the product of Mσ0 is sufficiently large, in which case the solution of the problem on the truncated domain converges exponentially to that of the original problem in the domain of interest near the scatterer. This justifies the simple computational strategy of selecting a fixed PML layer and increasing σ0 to obtain the desired accuracy. The results of numerical experiments varying M and σ0 are given which illustrate the theoretically predicted behavior. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Advanced Boundary Element Formulation for Acoustic Radiation and Scattering in Three Dimensions.

    Soenarko, Benjamin

    A computational method is presented for determining acoustic fields produced by arbitrary shaped three-dimensional bodies. The formulation includes both radiation and scattering problems. In particular an isoparametric element formulation is introduced in which both the surface geometry and the acoustic variables on the surface of the body are represented by second order shape functions within the local coordinate system. A general result for the surface velocity potential and the exterior field is derived. This result is applicable to non-smooth bodies, i.e. it includes the case where the surface may have a non-unique normal (e.g. at the edge of a cube). Test cases are shown involving spherical, cylindrical and cubical geometry for both radiation and scattering problems. The present formulation is also extended to include half-space problems in which the effect of the reflected wave from an infinite plane is taken into account. By selecting an appropriate Green's function, the surface integral over the plane is nullified; thus all the computational efforts can be performed only on the radiating or scattering body at issue and thereby greatly simplify the solution. A special formulation involving axisymmetric bodies and boundary conditions is also presented. For this special case, the surface integrals are reduced to line integrals and an integral over the angle of revolution. The integration over the angle is performed partly analytically in terms of elliptic integrals and partly numerically using simple Gaussian quadrature formula. Since the rest of the integrals involve only line integrals along the generator of the body, any discretization scheme can be easily obtained to achieve a desired degree of accuracy in evaluating these integrals.

  19. Modeling of acoustic wave propagation and scattering for telemetry of complex structures

    This study takes place in the framework of tools development for the telemetry simulation. Telemetry is a possible technology applied to monitoring the sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) and consists in positioning in the reactor core a transducer to generate an ultrasonic beam. This beam propagates through an inhomogeneous random medium since temperature fluctuations occur in the liquid sodium and consequently the sound velocity fluctuates as well, which modifies the bream propagation. Then the beam interacts with a reactor structure immersed in sodium. By measuring the time of flight of the backscattered echo received by the same transducer, one can determine the precise location of the structure. The telemetry simulation therefore requires modeling of both the acoustic wave propagation in an inhomogeneous random medium and the interaction of this wave with structures of various shapes; this is the objective of this work. A stochastic model based on a Monte Carlo algorithm is developed in order to take into account the random fluctuations of the acoustic field. The acoustic field through an inhomogeneous random medium is finally modeled from the field calculated in a mean homogeneous medium by modifying the travel times of rays in the homogeneous medium, using a correction provided by the stochastic model. This stochastic propagation model has been validated by comparison with a deterministic model and is much simpler to integrate in the CIVA software platform for non destructive evaluation simulation and less time consuming than the deterministic model. In order to model the interaction between the acoustic wave and the immersed structures, classical diffraction models have been evaluated for rigid structures, including the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) and the Kirchhoff approximation (KA). These two approaches appear to be complementary. Combining them so as to retain only their advantages, we have developed a hybrid model (the so-called refined KA

  20. Analysis of the spectrum of a Cartesian Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) approximation to acoustic scattering problems

    Kim, Seungil

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the spectrum of the operator which results when the Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) is applied in Cartesian geometry to the Laplacian on an unbounded domain. This is often thought of as a complex change of variables or "complex stretching." The reason that such an operator is of interest is that it can be used to provide a very effective domain truncation approach for approximating acoustic scattering problems posed on unbounded domains. Stretching associated with polar or spherical geometry lead to constant coefficient operators outside of a bounded transition layer and so even though they are on unbounded domains, they (and their numerical approximations) can be analyzed by more standard compact perturbation arguments. In contrast, operators associated with Cartesian stretching are non-constant in unbounded regions and hence cannot be analyzed via a compact perturbation approach. Alternatively, to show that the scattering problem PML operator associated with Cartesian geometry is stable for real nonzero wave numbers, we show that the essential spectrum of the higher order part only intersects the real axis at the origin. This enables us to conclude stability of the PML scattering problem from a uniqueness result given in a subsequent publication. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Negative refractive index and acoustic superlens from multiple scattering in single negative metamaterials

    Kaina, Nadège; Lemoult, Fabrice; Fink, Mathias; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2015-09-01

    Metamaterials, man-made composite media structured on a scale much smaller than a wavelength, offer surprising possibilities for engineering the propagation of waves. One of the most interesting of these is the ability to achieve superlensing--that is, to focus or image beyond the diffraction limit. This originates from the left-handed behaviour--the property of refracting waves negatively--that is typical of negative index metamaterials. Yet reaching this goal requires the design of `double negative' metamaterials, which act simultaneously on the permittivity and permeability in electromagnetics, or on the density and compressibility in acoustics; this generally implies the use of two different kinds of building blocks or specific particles presenting multiple overlapping resonances. Such a requirement limits the applicability of double negative metamaterials, and has, for example, hampered any demonstration of subwavelength focusing using left-handed acoustic metamaterials. Here we show that these strict conditions can be largely relaxed by relying on media that consist of only one type of single resonant unit cell. Specifically, we show with a simple yet general semi-analytical model that judiciously breaking the symmetry of a single negative metamaterial is sufficient to turn it into a double negative one. We then demonstrate that this occurs solely because of multiple scattering of waves off the metamaterial resonant elements, a phenomenon often disregarded in these media owing to their subwavelength patterning. We apply our approach to acoustics and verify through numerical simulations that it allows the realization of negative index acoustic metamaterials based on Helmholtz resonators only. Finally, we demonstrate the operation of a negative index acoustic superlens, achieving subwavelength focusing and imaging with spot width and resolution 7 and 3.5 times better than the diffraction limit, respectively. Our findings have profound implications for the

  2. Neutron scattering investigation of the acoustic-mode Grüneisen parameters in RbBr

    Ernst, G.; Krexner, G.; Quittner, G.; Kress, W.; Buras, B.; Lebech, Bente

    1984-01-01

    The microscopic Grüneisen parameters in RbBr have been determined for 44 acoustic modes in the main symmetry directions Δ, Σ, and Λ by inelastic neutron scattering under hydrostatic pressure. The experimental data are well described within the framework of a breathing-shell model, which includes ...

  3. Simulation of acoustic scattering from an aluminum cylinder near a rough interface using the elastodynamic finite integration technique

    Calvo, D.C.; Rudd, K.E.; Zampolli, M.; Sanders, W.M.; Bibee, L.D.

    2010-01-01

    We present calculations of acoustic scattering from an aluminum cylinder near a rough interface computed using the elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT): a time-domain numerical method useful for pulse propagation in inhomogeneous fluid–elastic environments. These calculations are releva

  4. Acoustic resonance scattering from a multilayered cylindrical shell with imperfect bonding.

    Rajabi, M; Hasheminejad, Seyyed M

    2009-12-01

    The method of wave function expansion is adopted to study the three dimensional scattering of a time-harmonic plane progressive sound field obliquely incident upon a multi-layered hollow cylinder with interlaminar bonding imperfection. For the generality of solution, each layer is assumed to be cylindrically orthotropic. An approximate laminate model in the context of the modal state equations with variable coefficients along with the classical T-matrix solution technique is set up for each layer to solve for the unknown modal scattering and transmission coefficients. A linear spring model is used to describe the interlaminar adhesive bonding whose effects are incorporated into the global transfer matrix by introduction of proper interfacial transfer matrices. Following the classic acoustic resonance scattering theory (RST), the scattered field and response to surface waves are determined by constructing the partial waves and obtaining the non-resonance (backgrounds) and resonance components. The solution is first used to investigate the effect of interlayer imperfection of an air-filled and water submerged bilaminate aluminium cylindrical shell on the resonances associated with various modes of wave propagation (i.e., symmetric/asymmetric Lamb waves, fluid-borne A-type waves, Rayleigh and Whispering Gallery waves) appearing in the backscattered spectrum, according to their polarization and state of stress. An illustrative numerical example is also given for a multi-layered (five-layered) cylindrical shell for which the stiffness of the adhesive interlayers is artificially varied. The sensitivity of resonance frequencies associated with higher mode numbers to the stiffness coefficients is demonstrated to be a good measure of the bonding strength. Limiting cases are considered and fair agreements with solutions available in the literature are established. PMID:19586650

  5. Soliton generation via continuous stokes acoustic self-scattering of hypersonic waves in a paramagnetic crystal

    A new mechanism is proposed for continuous frequency down-conversion of acoustic waves propagating in a paramagnetic crystal at a low temperature in an applied magnetic field. A transverse hypersonic pulse generating a carrier-free longitudinal strain pulse via nonlinear effects is scattered by the generated pulse. This leads to a Stokes shift in the transverse hypersonic wave proportional to its intensity, and both pulses continue to propagate in the form of a mode-locked soliton. As the transverse-pulse frequency is Stokes shifted, its spectrum becomes narrower. This process can be effectively implemented only if the linear group velocity of the transverse hypersonic pulse equals the phase velocity of the longitudinal strain wave. These velocities are renormalized by spin-phonon coupling and can be made equal by adjusting the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. The transverse structure of the soliton depends on the sign of the group velocity dispersion of the transverse component. When the dispersion is positive, planar solitons can develop whose transverse component has a topological defect of dark vortex type and longitudinal component has a hole. In the opposite case, the formation of two-component acoustic 'bullets' or vortices localized in all directions is possible

  6. Stimulated trapped electron-acoustic wave scattering and ion-vortices in subcritical plasmas

    Stimulated trapped electron-acoustic wave scattering instability by a linearly-polarized laser interacting with a plasma layer at a subcritical density range is studied by particle simulation. Its early behavior is almost the same whether ion dynamics is taken into account or not. However,when ion dynamics is considered, a large ion acoustic wave is excited, which grows with time and eventually breaks up locally, followed by the generation of a large amplitude electromagnetic soliton. As a new phenomenon, an ion-vortex structure in ion phase-space is formed due to the ion acceleration and trapping by high local electromagnetic and electrostatic fields inside the soliton. As the electromagnetic soliton is accelerated backwards, several ion-vortices are formed in the wake behind. Ion-vortices are also found in inhomogeneous subcritical plasmas. These ion-vortices are recognized as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability patterns, likely to be formed due to a topological defect, i.e., the plasma density cavity in the electromagnetic soliton region, which exhibit the well-known paradigmatic Ying-Yang pattern. (authors)

  7. Generation of an acoustic supercontinuum under conditions of the hypersound intrapulse scattering mode

    Bugai, A. N., E-mail: bugay_aleksandr@mail.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Studies (Russian Federation); Sazonov, S. V., E-mail: sazonov.sergey@gmail.com [Kurchatov Institute Russian Scientific Center (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-15

    The nonlinear generation of an acoustic supercontinuum in a solid doped with impurity paramagnetic ions is studied theoretically. It is shown that generation can be the most efficient at two certain carrier frequencies of input pulses lying above the resonance spin-phonon absorption line and determined by the time and spatial dispersions, respectively. The generated supercontinuum lies well below the resonance absorption line. Generation of the supercontinuum in the single-frequency regime is accompanied by a shift of the input pulse spectrum mainly to the red. In the two-frequency regime, cross scattering is possible when a higher-frequency pulse is scattered by the powerful supercontinuum generated by a pulse with a different, lower carrier frequency. As a result, the spectrum of the high-frequency pulse experiences a strong modulation and broadening both to the red and blue. The efficiency of supercontinuum generation both in the single-frequency and two-frequency regimes can be on the order of 1%.

  8. Effect of high pressure on acoustic properties of several polymers: Use of impulsive stimulated light scattering method

    Dreger, Z. A.; Zhou, J.; Dang, N. C.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2011-04-01

    The acoustic properties of four polymers compressed to high pressures in a diamond anvil cell were determined using the impulsive stimulated light scattering (ISLS) method. Despite the weak scattering efficiency of these polymers, good signal quality was obtained by using a continuous wave probe and an optical heterodyne detection. We provide, for the first time, longitudinal acoustic velocities up to 5 GPa for two thermoplasts: poly(methyl-methacrylate) and poly(styrene), and two elastomers: poly(butadiene) and triblock copolymer of polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene. The longitudinal acoustic velocities for all of these polymers displayed nonlinear pressure dependence. Despite the significant differences in the initial acoustic velocities these velocities converged above 2.5 GPa. This convergence is associated with the ultimate reduction of free volume in the studied polymers. We explored the possibility of measuring shear acoustic waves in these polymers using ISLS in a depolarized geometry. The data obtained here are important for modeling the response of polymers at extreme conditions.

  9. Photoacoustic tomography based on the Green's function retrieval with ultrasound interferometry for sample partially behind an acoustically scattering layer

    Acoustically inhomogeneous mediums with multiple scattering are often the nightmare of photoacoustic tomography. In order to break this limitation, a photoacoustic tomography scheme combining ultrasound interferometry and time reversal is proposed to achieve images in acoustically scattering medium. An ultrasound interferometry is developed to determine the unknown Green's function of strong scattering tissue. Using the determined Greens' function, a time-reversal process is carried out to restore images behind an acoustically inhomogeneous layer from the scattering photoacoustic signals. This method effectively decreases the false contrast, noise, and position deviation of images induced by the multiple scattering. Phantom experiment is carried out to validate the method. Therefore, the proposed method could have potential value in extending the biomedical applications of photoacoustic tomography in acoustically inhomogeneous tissue

  10. Photoacoustic tomography based on the Green's function retrieval with ultrasound interferometry for sample partially behind an acoustically scattering layer

    Yin, Jie [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Automation, Nanjing Polytechnic Institute, 210048 Nanjing (China); Tao, Chao, E-mail: taochao@nju.edu.cn; Cai, Peng; Liu, Xiaojun, E-mail: liuxiaojun@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-06-08

    Acoustically inhomogeneous mediums with multiple scattering are often the nightmare of photoacoustic tomography. In order to break this limitation, a photoacoustic tomography scheme combining ultrasound interferometry and time reversal is proposed to achieve images in acoustically scattering medium. An ultrasound interferometry is developed to determine the unknown Green's function of strong scattering tissue. Using the determined Greens' function, a time-reversal process is carried out to restore images behind an acoustically inhomogeneous layer from the scattering photoacoustic signals. This method effectively decreases the false contrast, noise, and position deviation of images induced by the multiple scattering. Phantom experiment is carried out to validate the method. Therefore, the proposed method could have potential value in extending the biomedical applications of photoacoustic tomography in acoustically inhomogeneous tissue.

  11. Measurements of the Absorption and Scattering Cross Sections for the Interaction of Solar Acoustic Waves with Sunspots

    Zhao, Hui; Chou, Dean-Yi

    2016-05-01

    The solar acoustic waves are modified by the interaction with sunspots. The interaction can be treated as a scattering problem: an incident wave propagating toward a sunspot is scattered by the sunspot into different modes. The absorption cross section and scattering cross section are two important parameters in the scattering problem. In this study, we use the wavefunction of the scattered wave, measured with a deconvolution method, to compute the absorption cross section σ ab and the scattering cross section σ sc for the radial order n = 0-5 for two sunspots, NOAA 11084 and NOAA 11092. In the computation of the cross sections, the random noise and dissipation in the measured acoustic power are corrected. For both σ ab and σ sc, the value of NOAA 11092 is greater than that of NOAA 11084, but their overall n dependence is similar: decreasing with n. The ratio of σ ab of NOAA 11092 to that of NOAA 11084 approximately equals the ratio of sunspot radii for all n, while the ratio of σ sc of the two sunspots is greater than the ratio of sunspot radii and increases with n. This suggests that σ ab is approximately proportional to the sunspot radius, while the dependence of σ sc on radius is faster than the linear increase.

  12. Risk of a second cancer from scattered radiation in acoustic neuroma treatment

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Hyunho; Sung, Jiwon; Shin, Dongoh; Park, Sungho; Chung, Weon Kuu; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Kim, Dong Wook

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to compare the risk of a secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses in patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of a secondary cancer were estimated using the corresponding secondary doses measured at various organs by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, liver, bowel, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were 14.6, 1.7, 0.9, 0.8, 0.6, 0.6, and 0.6 cGy, respectively, for IMRT whereas they were 19.1, 1.8, 2.0, 0.6, 0.4, 0.4, and 0.4 cGy, respectively, for VMAT, and 22.8, 4.6, 1.4, 0.7, 0.5, 0.5, and 0.5 cGy, respectively, for SRS. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A lifetime attributable risk evaluation estimated that more than 0.03% of acoustic neuroma (AN) patients would get radiation-induced cancer within 20 years of receiving radiation therapy. The organ with the highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN was the thyroid. We found that the LAR could be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  13. Risk of a second cancer from scattered radiation in acoustic neuroma treatment

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Hyunho; Sung, Jiwon [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dongoh [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungho [Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Weonkuu; Jahng, Geonho; Kim, Dongwook [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The present study aimed to compare the risk of a secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses in patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of a secondary cancer were estimated using the corresponding secondary doses measured at various organs by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, liver, bowel, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were 14.6, 1.7, 0.9, 0.8, 0.6, 0.6, and 0.6 cGy, respectively, for IMRT whereas they were 19.1, 1.8, 2.0, 0.6, 0.4, 0.4, and 0.4 cGy, respectively, for VMAT, and 22.8, 4.6, 1.4, 0.7, 0.5, 0.5, and 0.5 cGy, respectively, for SRS. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A lifetime attributable risk evaluation estimated that more than 0.03% of acoustic neuroma (AN) patients would get radiation-induced cancer within 20 years of receiving radiation therapy. The organ with the highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN was the thyroid. We found that the LAR could be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  14. Iterative solution of multiple radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics using the BL-QMR algorithm

    Malhotra, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Finite-element discretizations of time-harmonic acoustic wave problems in exterior domains result in large sparse systems of linear equations with complex symmetric coefficient matrices. In many situations, these matrix problems need to be solved repeatedly for different right-hand sides, but with the same coefficient matrix. For instance, multiple right-hand sides arise in radiation problems due to multiple load cases, and also in scattering problems when multiple angles of incidence of an incoming plane wave need to be considered. In this talk, we discuss the iterative solution of multiple linear systems arising in radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics by means of a complex symmetric variant of the BL-QMR method. First, we summarize the governing partial differential equations for time-harmonic structural acoustics, the finite-element discretization of these equations, and the resulting complex symmetric matrix problem. Next, we sketch the special version of BL-QMR method that exploits complex symmetry, and we describe the preconditioners we have used in conjunction with BL-QMR. Finally, we report some typical results of our extensive numerical tests to illustrate the typical convergence behavior of BL-QMR method for multiple radiation and scattering problems in structural acoustics, to identify appropriate preconditioners for these problems, and to demonstrate the importance of deflation in block Krylov-subspace methods. Our numerical results show that the multiple systems arising in structural acoustics can be solved very efficiently with the preconditioned BL-QMR method. In fact, for multiple systems with up to 40 and more different right-hand sides we get consistent and significant speed-ups over solving the systems individually.

  15. The point source method for reconstructing an inclusion from boundary measurements in electrical impedance tomography and acoustic scattering

    Erhard, Klaus; Potthast, Roland

    2003-10-01

    We employ the point source method (PSM) for the reconstruction of some field u on parts of a domain Omega from the Cauchy data for the field on the boundary partialOmega of the domain. Then, the boundary condition for a perfectly conducting inclusion or a sound-soft object in Omega can be used to find the location and shape of the inhomogeneity. The results show that we can detect perfectly conducting inclusions in impedance tomography from the voltages for one injected current. For acoustic scattering a sound-soft object is found from the knowledge of one (total) field and its normal derivative on partialOmega. The work redesigns the PSM, which was first proposed in the framework of inverse scattering, to solve inverse boundary value problems. Numerical examples are provided for impedance tomography and the sound-soft acoustic boundary value problem.

  16. On the Assessment of Acoustic Scattering and Shielding by Time Domain Boundary Integral Equation Solutions

    Hu, Fang Q.; Pizzo, Michelle E.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the time domain boundary integral equation formulation of the linear convective wave equation, a computational tool dubbed Time Domain Fast Acoustic Scattering Toolkit (TD-FAST) has recently been under development. The time domain approach has a distinct advantage that the solutions at all frequencies are obtained in a single computation. In this paper, the formulation of the integral equation, as well as its stabilization by the Burton-Miller type reformulation, is extended to cases of a constant mean flow in an arbitrary direction. In addition, a "Source Surface" is also introduced in the formulation that can be employed to encapsulate regions of noise sources and to facilitate coupling with CFD simulations. This is particularly useful for applications where the noise sources are not easily described by analytical source terms. Numerical examples are presented to assess the accuracy of the formulation, including a computation of noise shielding by a thin barrier motivated by recent Historical Baseline F31A31 open rotor noise shielding experiments. Furthermore, spatial resolution requirements of the time domain boundary element method are also assessed using point per wavelength metrics. It is found that, using only constant basis functions and high-order quadrature for surface integration, relative errors of less than 2% may be obtained when the surface spatial resolution is 5 points-per-wavelength (PPW) or 25 points-per-wavelength squared (PPW2).

  17. Acoustic scattering by elastic cylinders of elliptical cross-section and splitting up of resonances

    The scattering of a plane acoustic wave by an infinite elastic cylinder of elliptical cross section is studied from a modal formalism by emphasizing the role of the symmetries. More precisely, as the symmetry is broken in the transition from the infinite circular cylinder to the elliptical one, the splitting up of resonances is observed both theoretically and experimentally. This phenomenon can be interpreted using group theory. The main difficulty stands in the application of this theory within the framework of the vectorial formalism in elastodynamics. This method significantly simplifies the numerical treatment of the problem, provides a full classification of the resonances, and gives a physical interpretation of the splitting up in terms of symmetry breaking. An experimental part based on ultrasonic spectroscopy complements the theoretical study. A series of tank experiments is carried out in the case of aluminium elliptical cylinders immersed in water, in the frequency range 0 ≤ kr ≤ 50, where kr is the reduced wave number in the fluid. The symmetry is broken by selecting various cylinders of increasing eccentricity. More precisely, the greater the eccentricity, the higher the splitting up of resonances is accentuated. The experimental results provide a very good agreement with the theoretical ones, the splitting up is observed on experimental form functions, and the split resonant modes are identified on angular diagrams

  18. Concurrent identification of aero-acoustic scattering and noise sources at a flow duct singularity in low Mach number flow

    Sovardi, Carlo; Jaensch, Stefan; Polifke, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    A numerical method to concurrently characterize both aeroacoustic scattering and noise sources at a duct singularity is presented. This approach combines Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with techniques of System Identification (SI): In a first step, a highly resolved LES with external broadband acoustic excitation is carried out. Subsequently, time series data extracted from the LES are post-processed by means of SI to model both acoustic propagation and noise generation. The present work studies the aero-acoustic characteristics of an orifice placed in a duct at low flow Mach numbers with the "LES-SI" method. Parametric SI based on the Box-Jenkins mathematical structure is employed, with a prediction error approach that utilizes correlation analysis of the output residuals to avoid overfitting. Uncertainties of model parameters due to the finite length of times series are quantified in terms of confidence intervals. Numerical results for acoustic scattering matrices and power spectral densities of broad-band noise are validated against experimental measurements over a wide range of frequencies below the cut-off frequency of the duct.

  19. Optimization of Oil-in-Water Emulsion Stability: Experimental Design, Multiple Light Scattering, and Acoustic Attenuation Spectroscopy

    Bendjaballah, Malek; Canselier, Jean-Paul; Oumeddour, Rabah

    2010-01-01

    To find an optimal formulation of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions (o = 0.05), the effect of emulsifier nature and concentration, agitation speed, emulsifying time, storage temperature and their mutual interactions on the properties and behavior of these dispersions is evaluated by means of an experimental design (Nemrodw software). Long-term emulsion stability is monitored by multiple light scattering (Turbiscan ags) and acoustic attenuation spectroscopy (Ultrasizer). After matching surfactant H...

  20. Acoustics

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  1. Blind source separation based on time-frequency morphological characteristics for rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects

    Yang, Yang; Li, Xiukun

    2016-06-01

    Separation of the components of rigid acoustic scattering by underwater objects is essential in obtaining the structural characteristics of such objects. To overcome the problem of rigid structures appearing to have the same spectral structure in the time domain, time-frequency Blind Source Separation (BSS) can be used in combination with image morphology to separate the rigid scattering components of different objects. Based on a highlight model, the separation of the rigid scattering structure of objects with time-frequency distribution is deduced. Using a morphological filter, different characteristics in a Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD) observed for single auto term and cross terms can be simplified to remove any cross-term interference. By selecting time and frequency points of the auto terms signal, the accuracy of BSS can be improved. An experimental simulation has been used, with changes in the pulse width of the transmitted signal, the relative amplitude and the time delay parameter, in order to analyzing the feasibility of this new method. Simulation results show that the new method is not only able to separate rigid scattering components, but can also separate the components when elastic scattering and rigid scattering exist at the same time. Experimental results confirm that the new method can be used in separating the rigid scattering structure of underwater objects.

  2. Controlled and in situ target strengths of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas and identification of potential acoustic scattering sources.

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Gilly, William F; Au, Whitlow W L; Mate, Bruce

    2008-03-01

    This study presents the first target strength measurements of Dosidicus gigas, a large squid that is a key predator, a significant prey, and the target of an important fishery. Target strength of live, tethered squid was related to mantle length with values standardized to the length squared of -62.0, -67.4, -67.9, and -67.6 dB at 38, 70, 120, and 200 kHz, respectively. There were relatively small differences in target strength between dorsal and anterior aspects and none between live and freshly dead squid. Potential scattering mechanisms in squid have been long debated. Here, the reproductive organs had little effect on squid target strength. These data support the hypothesis that the pen may be an important source of squid acoustic scattering. The beak, eyes, and arms, probably via the sucker rings, also play a role in acoustic scattering though their effects were small and frequency specific. An unexpected source of scattering was the cranium of the squid which provided a target strength nearly as high as that of the entire squid though the mechanism remains unclear. Our in situ measurements of the target strength of free-swimming squid support the use of the values presented here in D. gigas assessment studies. PMID:18345820

  3. Reverse Doppler effect in backward spin waves scattered on acoustic waves

    A. V. Chumak; Dhagat, P.; Jander, A.; Serga, A. A.; Hillebrands, B

    2009-01-01

    We report on the observation of reverse Doppler effect in backward spin waves reflected off of surface acoustic waves. The spin waves are excited in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film. Simultaneously, acoustic waves are also generated. The strain induced by the acoustic waves in the magnetostrictive YIG film results in the periodic modulation of the magnetic anisotropy in the film. Thus, in effect, a travelling Bragg grating for the spin waves is produced. The backward spin waves reflecting off...

  4. Monte Carlo Simulation of Scattered Light with Shear Waves Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force for Acousto-Optic Imaging

    A Monte Carlo method of multiple scattered coherent light with the information of shear wave propagation in scattering media is presented. The established Monte-Carlo algorithm is mainly relative to optical phase variations due to the acoustic-radiation-force shear-wave-induced displacements of light scatterers. Both the distributions and temporal behaviors of optical phase increments in probe locations are obtained. Consequently, shear wave speed is evaluated quantitatively. It is noted that the phase increments exactly track the propagations of shear waves induced by focus-ultrasound radiation force. In addition, attenuations of shear waves are demonstrated in simulation results. By using linear regression processing, the shear wave speed, which is set to 2.1 m/s in simulation, is estimated to be 2.18 m/s and 2.35 m/s at time sampling intervals of 0.2 ms and 0.5 ms, respectively

  5. Stimulated Brillouin scattering phase-locking using a transient acoustic standing wave excited through an optical interference field

    Complete text of publication follows. Analytical description of an experimentally verified scheme leading to a phase-locked stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), used in a laser beam combination systems, is presented. The essential condition for the phase-locking effect for SBS is the fixation of the starting position and time of the acoustic Brillouin wave. It is shown that the starting position fixation of this acoustic wave may have its origin in a transient acoustic standing wave initiated by an arising optical interference field produced by the back-seeding concave mirror. This interference field leads to a stationary density modulation of the medium. However, the way to the formation of this density modulation leads via the acoustic standing wave. An appropriate solution, in the form of the standing wave, was obtained from solving the acoustic wave-equation using the electrostriction as a driving force. As a consequence of the damping term included in this equation the acoustic standing wave becomes gradually attenuated and contrary to the undamped solution published earlier, thus constitutes a truly transient phenomenon. Using a mathematical formalism similar to that which is used for the SBS description in the case of a random phase, the coupled equations describing the phase-locked SBS were derived. Contrary to the case without the back-seeding mirror, where the wave chosen from the thermal noise background subsequently plays the role of a trigger of the stimulated process, in this case it is replaced by the transient standing wave produced as a consequence of the presence of an optical interference field arisen in the focal region of the back-seeding concave mirror.

  6. Multiple scattering of an acoustic wave from a network of cylindrical rods encased in a solid viscoelastic medium.

    Taheri, Ali; Honarvar, Farhang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the multiple scattering of normally and obliquely incident acoustic waves from a network of cylindrical rods embedded in a viscoelastic medium is investigated. The cylinders can be either isotropic or transversely isotropic. This problem has applications in studying the interaction of ultrasonic waves with composite materials in ultrasonic nondestructive testing. By extending the classical theory of scattering from a single cylinder, the multiple scattering equations are derived incorporating all three kinds of longitudinal, horizontally polarized shear and vertically polarized shear waves in a viscoelastic matrix. The spatial angle of the incident wave is arbitrarily chosen and the backscattered waves can be found in any point of the space. In the proposed method, there are no restrictions on the number of cylinders and/or on the order of scattering. Therefore, the method is capable of handling any order of scattering from any number of cylinders. To experimentally validate the numerical results, a number of experiments are conducted on steel cylinders embedded in a polymeric matrix. The scattered waves from the cylinders are received and their corresponding form functions are obtained. By comparing the numerical and experimental results, a good agreement is observed. PMID:26250601

  7. A thorough look at the nonuniqueness of the electromagnetic scattering integral equation solutions as compared to the scalar acoustic ones

    Langenberg, Karl J.

    2003-04-01

    It is well-known that solutions of electromagnetic scattering integral equations of the first or second kind (EFIE and MFIE) for perfectly electric or perfectly magnetic conducting scatterers are nonunique for those frequencies which correspond to interior Maxwell resonances of the scatterer; hence, the null spaces of the respective interior problem operators are under concern. In principle, all mathematical facts and proofs regarding this problem and cited in this paper are available from the book by [1983], yet, these authors mainly concentrate on single and double layer potentials for the scalar acoustic (Dirichlet and Neumann) as well as the magnetic dipole layer ansatz for the perfectly electric conducting (Maxwell) problem and treat the Huygens-type representation, which is more common in the electrical engineering community, not in the same detail. This might be the reason that part of the electrical engineering literature suffers from some confusion regarding the proper null spaces and their physical relevance, in particular, if the electromagnetic problem is considered in 2-D, where it reduces to scalar TM/TE-problems. The present contribution comments on these issues emphasizing that the null spaces of 2-D electromagnetics are the nonphysical null spaces originating from the Huygens-type representation of scalar acoustics.

  8. Acoustic scattering of a cylindrical quasi-Gaussian beam with arbitrary incidence focused on a rigid elliptical cylinder

    Using the partial-wave series expansion method in cylindrical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustical scattering of a 2D cylindrical quasi-Gaussian beam with an arbitrary angle of incidence θi, focused on a rigid elliptical cylinder in a non-viscous fluid, is developed. The cylindrical focused beam expression is an exact solution of the Helmholtz equation. The scattering coefficients for the elliptical cylinder are determined by forcing the expression of the total (incident + scattered) field to satisfy the Neumann boundary condition for a rigid immovable surface, and performing the product of matrices involving an inversion procedure. Computations for the matrices elements require a single numerical integration procedure for each partial-wave mode. Numerical results are performed with particular emphasis on the focusing properties of the incident beam and its angle of incidence with respect to the major axis a of the ellipse as well as the aspect ratio a/b where b is the minor axis (assuming a > b). The method is validated and verified against previous results obtained via the T-matrix for plane waves. The present analysis is the first to consider an acoustical beam on an elliptic cylinder of variable cross-section as opposed to plane waves of infinite extent. Other 2D non-spherical and Chebyshev surfaces are mentioned that may be examined throughout this analytical formalism assuming a small deformation parameter ε

  9. Interaction of an acoustical quasi-Gaussian beam with a rigid sphere: linear axial scattering, instantaneous and time-averaged radiation force

    Mitri, F. G.

    2012-01-01

    This work focuses on the interaction of an acoustical quasi-Gaussian beam centered on a rigid immovable sphere, during which at least three physical phenomena arise, namely, the (axial) acoustic scattering, the instantaneous force, and the time-average radiation force which are investigated here. The quasi-Gaussian beam is an exact solution of the source free Helmholtz wave equation and is characterized by an arbitrary waist w0 and a diffraction convergence length known as the Rayleigh range ...

  10. Measurement of the Dispersion of Thermal Ion-Acoustic Fluctuations in High-Temperature Laser Plasmas Using Multiple-Wavelength Thomson Scattering

    The dispersion of ion-acoustic fluctuations has been measured using a novel technique that employs multiple color Thomson-scattering diagnostics to measure the frequency spectrum for two separate thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations with significantly different wave vectors. The plasma fluctuations are shown to become dispersive with increasing electron temperature. We demonstrate that this technique allows a time resolved local measurement of electron density and temperature in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

  11. Measurement of the dispersion of thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations in high-temperature laser plasmas using multiple wavelength Thomson-scattering

    The dispersion of ion-acoustic fluctuations has been measured using a novel technique that employed multiple color Thomson scattering to measure the frequency spectrum for two separate thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations with significantly different wave vectors. The plasma fluctuations are shown to become dispersive with increasing electron temperature. They demonstrate that this technique allows a time resolved local measurement of electron density and temperature in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

  12. Measurement of the dispersion of thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations in high-temperature laser plasmas using multiple-wavelength Thomson scattering.

    Froula, D H; Davis, P; Divol, L; Ross, J S; Meezan, N; Price, D; Glenzer, S H; Rousseaux, C

    2005-11-01

    The dispersion of ion-acoustic fluctuations has been measured using a novel technique that employs multiple color Thomson-scattering diagnostics to measure the frequency spectrum for two separate thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations with significantly different wave vectors. The plasma fluctuations are shown to become dispersive with increasing electron temperature. We demonstrate that this technique allows a time resolved local measurement of electron density and temperature in inertial confinement fusion plasmas. PMID:16383991

  13. Acoustic scattering from an infinitely long cylindrical shell with an internal mass attached by multiple axisymmetrically distributed stiffeners

    Titovich, Alexey S

    2014-01-01

    A thin infinitely long elastic shell is stiffened by $J$ in number identical lengthwise ribs distributed uniformly around the circumference and joined to a rod in the center. The 2D model of the substructure is a rigid central mass supported by $J$ axisymmetrically placed linear springs. The response of the shell-spring-mass system is quite different from a fluid filled shell or that of a solid cylinder due to the discrete number of contact points which couple the displacement of the shell at different locations. Exterior acoustic scattering due to normal plane wave incidence is solved in closed form for arbitrary $J$. The scattering matrix associated with the normal mode solution displays a simple structure, composed of distinct sub-matrices which decouple the incident and scattered fields into $J$ families. The presence of a springs-mass substructure causes resonances which are shown to be related to the subsonic shell flexural waves, and an approximate analytic expression is derived for the quasi-flexural ...

  14. Sound scattering from rough bubbly ocean surface based on modified sea surface acoustic simulator and consideration of various incident angles and sub-surface bubbles' radii

    Bolghasi, Alireza; Ghadimi, Parviz; Chekab, Mohammad A. Feizi

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the capabilities and precision of a recently introduced Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator (SSAS) developed based on optimization of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Fresnel (HKF) method. The improved acoustic simulator, hereby known as the Modified SSAS (MSSAS), is capable of determining sound scattering from the sea surface and includes an extended Hall-Novarini model and optimized HKF method. The extended Hall-Novarini model is used for considering the effects of sub-surface bubbles over a wider range of radii of sub-surface bubbles compared to the previous SSAS version. Furthermore, MSSAS has the capability of making a three-dimensional simulation of scattered sound from the rough bubbly sea surface with less error than that of the Critical Sea Tests (CST) experiments. Also, it presents scattered pressure levels from the rough bubbly sea surface based on various incident angles of sound. Wind speed, frequency, incident angle, and pressure level of the sound source are considered as input data, and scattered pressure levels and scattering coefficients are provided. Finally, different parametric studies were conducted on wind speeds, frequencies, and incident angles to indicate that MSSAS is quite capable of simulating sound scattering from the rough bubbly sea surface, according to the scattering mechanisms determined by Ogden and Erskine. Therefore, it is concluded that MSSAS is valid for both scattering mechanisms and the transition region between them that are defined by Ogden and Erskine.

  15. Development of a new plasma diagnostic of the critical surface and studies of the ion acoustic decay instability using collective Thomson scattering. Final report

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Seka, W. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics]l Drake, R.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    We have developed 5-channel collective Thomson scattering system to measure the ion acoustic wave excited by the ion acoustic wave decay instabilities. The multichannel collective Thomson scattering technique was established with 4{omega} probe laser beam using GDL laser system at LLE, Univ. of Rochester. We have obtained the ionic charge state Z by measuring the second harmonic emission from the ion acoustic decay instability. The LASNEX computer simulation calculations have been carried out. The experimental results agree very well with the LASNEX computer simulation results with the flux number f=0.1. In high power laser regime, the spectrum become broad, and the {alpha}{gamma} decreases indicating that the turbulent like spectrum is observed. In order to understand the experimental results, we have developed a theory to study absorption of laser and heat transport. This new theory includes the temporal evolution of the heat conduction region. The results agree with flux-limited hydrodynamic simulations. 20 refs.

  16. Development of a new plasma diagnostic of the critical surface and studies of the ion acoustic decay instability using collective Thomson scattering

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S. (California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)); Seka, W. (Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics)l Drake, R.P. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    We have developed 5-channel collective Thomson scattering system to measure the ion acoustic wave excited by the ion acoustic wave decay instabilities. The multichannel collective Thomson scattering technique was established with 4{omega} probe laser beam using GDL laser system at LLE, Univ. of Rochester. We have obtained the ionic charge state Z by measuring the second harmonic emission from the ion acoustic decay instability. The LASNEX computer simulation calculations have been carried out. The experimental results agree very well with the LASNEX computer simulation results with the flux number f=0.1. In high power laser regime, the spectrum become broad, and the {alpha}{gamma} decreases indicating that the turbulent like spectrum is observed. In order to understand the experimental results, we have developed a theory to study absorption of laser and heat transport. This new theory includes the temporal evolution of the heat conduction region. The results agree with flux-limited hydrodynamic simulations. 20 refs.

  17. Collective acoustic modes as renormalized damped oscillators: Unified description of neutron and x-ray scattering data from classical fluids

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Guarini, Eleonora; Barocchi, Fabrizio

    2006-06-01

    In the Q range where inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering are applied to the study of acoustic collective excitations in fluids, various models of the dynamic structure factor S(Q,ω) generalize in different ways the results obtained from linearized-hydrodynamics theory in the Q→0 limit. Here we show that the models most commonly fitted to experimental S(Q,ω) spectra can be given a unified formulation. In this way, direct comparisons among the results obtained by fitting different models become now possible to a much larger extent than ever. We also show that a consistent determination of the dispersion curve and of the propagation Q range of the excitations is possible, whichever model is used. We derive an exact formula which describes in all cases the dispersion curve and allows for the first quantitative understanding of its shape, by assigning specific and distinct roles to the various structural, thermal, and damping effects that determine the Q dependence of the mode frequencies. The emerging picture describes the acoustic modes as Q -dependent harmonic oscillators whose characteristic frequency is explicitly renormalized in an exact way by the relaxation processes, which also determine, through the widths of both the inelastic and the elastic lines, the whole shape of collective-excitation spectra.

  18. On the application of wavelet transform to the solution of integral equations for acoustic radiation and scattering

    WEN Lihua; ZAHNG Jingmei; SUN Jincai

    2002-01-01

    The application of wavelets is explored to solve acoustic radiation and scattering problems. A new wavelet approach is presented for solving two-dimensional and axisymmetric acoustic problems. It is different from the previous methods in which Galerkin formulation or wavelet matrix transform approach is used. The boundary quantities are expended in terms of a basis of the periodic, orthogonal wavelets on the interval. Using wavelet transform leads a highly sparse matrix system. It can avoid an additional integration in Galerkin formulation,which may be very computationally expensive. The techniques of the singular integrals in two-dimensional and axisymmetric wavelet formulation are proposed. The new method can solve the boundary value problems with Dirichlet, Neumann and mixed conditions and treat axisymmetric bodies with arbitrary boundary conditions. It can be suitable for the solution at large wave numbers. A series of numerical examples are given. The comparisons of the results from new approach with those from boundary element method and analytical solutions demonstrate that the new technique has a fast convergence and high accuracy.

  19. Modelling of the acoustic field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs

    The efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the treatment of a range of different cancers, including those of the liver, prostate and breast, has been demonstrated. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection in terms of reduced risk of harmful side effects. Despite this, there are a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the rib cage to induce tissue necrosis in the required volume whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes. Multi-element random-phased arrays are currently showing great promise in overcoming the limitations of single-element transducers. Nevertheless, successful treatment of a patient with liver tumours requires a thorough understanding of the way in which the ultrasonic pressure field from a HIFU array is scattered by the rib cage. In order to address this, a boundary element approach based on a generalized minimal residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was used in conjunction with phase conjugation techniques to focus the field of a 256-element random HIFU array behind human ribs at locations requiring intercostal and transcostal treatment. Simulations were carried out on a 3D mesh of quadratic pressure patches generated using CT scan anatomical data for adult ribs 9-12 on the right side. The methodology was validated on spherical and cylindrical scatterers. Field calculations were also carried out for idealized ribs, consisting of arrays of strip-like scatterers, demonstrating effects of splitting at the focus. This method has the advantage of fully accounting for the effect of scattering and diffraction in 3D under continuous wave excitation.

  20. Modelling of the acoustic field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs

    Gélat, Pierre; ter Haar, Gail; Saffari, Nader

    2011-09-01

    The efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the treatment of a range of different cancers, including those of the liver, prostate and breast, has been demonstrated. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection in terms of reduced risk of harmful side effects. Despite this, there are a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the rib cage to induce tissue necrosis in the required volume whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes. Multi-element random-phased arrays are currently showing great promise in overcoming the limitations of single-element transducers. Nevertheless, successful treatment of a patient with liver tumours requires a thorough understanding of the way in which the ultrasonic pressure field from a HIFU array is scattered by the rib cage. In order to address this, a boundary element approach based on a generalized minimal residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was used in conjunction with phase conjugation techniques to focus the field of a 256-element random HIFU array behind human ribs at locations requiring intercostal and transcostal treatment. Simulations were carried out on a 3D mesh of quadratic pressure patches generated using CT scan anatomical data for adult ribs 9-12 on the right side. The methodology was validated on spherical and cylindrical scatterers. Field calculations were also carried out for idealized ribs, consisting of arrays of strip-like scatterers, demonstrating effects of splitting at the focus. This method has the advantage of fully accounting for the effect of scattering and diffraction in 3D under continuous wave excitation.

  1. Modelling of the acoustic field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs

    Gelat, Pierre [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Ter Haar, Gail [Therapeutic Ultrasound Group, Physics Department, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Saffari, Nader, E-mail: Pierre.Gelat@npl.co.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-07

    The efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the treatment of a range of different cancers, including those of the liver, prostate and breast, has been demonstrated. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection in terms of reduced risk of harmful side effects. Despite this, there are a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the rib cage to induce tissue necrosis in the required volume whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes. Multi-element random-phased arrays are currently showing great promise in overcoming the limitations of single-element transducers. Nevertheless, successful treatment of a patient with liver tumours requires a thorough understanding of the way in which the ultrasonic pressure field from a HIFU array is scattered by the rib cage. In order to address this, a boundary element approach based on a generalized minimal residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was used in conjunction with phase conjugation techniques to focus the field of a 256-element random HIFU array behind human ribs at locations requiring intercostal and transcostal treatment. Simulations were carried out on a 3D mesh of quadratic pressure patches generated using CT scan anatomical data for adult ribs 9-12 on the right side. The methodology was validated on spherical and cylindrical scatterers. Field calculations were also carried out for idealized ribs, consisting of arrays of strip-like scatterers, demonstrating effects of splitting at the focus. This method has the advantage of fully accounting for the effect of scattering and diffraction in 3D under continuous wave excitation.

  2. Acoustic backscatter and effective scatterer size estimates using a 2D CMUT transducer

    Liu, W.; Zagzebski, J A; Hall, T.J.; Madsen, E L; Varghese, T.; Kliewer, M.A.; Panda, S.; Lowery, C; Barnes, S.

    2008-01-01

    Compared to conventional piezoelectric transducers, new capacitive microfabricated ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) technology is expected to offer a broader bandwidth, higher resolution and advanced 3D/4D imaging inherent in a 2D array. For ultrasound scatterer size imaging, a broader frequency range provides more information on frequency-dependent backscatter, and therefore, generally more accurate size estimates. Elevational compounding, which can significantly reduce the large statistical flu...

  3. Use of X-ray computed tomography for the estimation of parameters relevant to the modeling of acoustic scattering from the seafloor

    Underwater sonar systems are increasingly being used at frequencies greater than 100 kHz for bathymetry measurement, seabed characterization and object detection [Proceedings of the 5th European Conference on Underwater Acoustics, Vol. 2, p. 1283]. In general, there are two main contributions to the backscattered acoustic wave due to seafloor properties: scattering from interface roughness (interface scattering) and from volume heterogeneities (e.g. due to sediment layering or bioturbation) in the first few decimeters of the seabed (volume scattering) [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95 (1994) 2441]. Until recently, modeling and validated measurements at these very high frequencies have been limited by the difficulty of accurately characterizing seabed properties at centimeter and sub-centimeter scales. This paper examines how X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans of seafloor cores have been used to obtain data sets that not only allow computation of both the statistical and the spatial distribution of density-related parameters relevant to volume scattering modeling, but also represent a valuable tool for selective, nondestructive visual analysis of inner features of cores. The main advantages of X-ray CT are the excellent spatial resolution and the ready availability of digital data sets that naturally lend themselves to computer processing. The methodology of the whole process, from core collection to advanced instruis described here, with special emphasis on image processing and density quantification issues

  4. Low and high frequency asymptotics acoustic, electromagnetic and elastic wave scattering

    Varadan, VK

    2013-01-01

    This volume focuses on asymptotic methods in the low and high frequency limits for the solution of scattering and propagation problems. Each chapter is pedagogical in nature, starting with the basic foundations and ending with practical applications. For example, using the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction, the canonical problem of edge diffraction is first solved and then used in solving the problem of diffraction by a finite crack. In recent times, the crack problem has been of much interest for its applications to Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of flaws in structural materials.

  5. Light comfort zones of mesopelagic acoustic scattering layers in two contrasting optical environments

    Røstad, Anders

    2016-03-31

    We make a comparison of the mesopelagic sound scattering layers (SLs) in two contrasting optical environments; the clear Red Sea and in murkier coastal waters of Norway (Masfjorden). The depth distributions of the SL in Masfjorden are shallower and narrower than those of the Red Sea. This difference in depth distribution is consistent with the hypothesis that the organisms of the SL distribute according to similar light comfort zones (LCZ) in the two environments. Our study suggest that surface and underwater light measurements ranging more than10 orders of magnitude is required to assess the controlling effects of light on SL structure and dynamics.

  6. A theoretical and numerical resolution of an acoustic multiple scattering problem in three-dimensional case

    Amamou, Manel L.

    2016-05-01

    This paper develops an analytical solution for sound, electromagnetic or any other wave propagation described by the Helmholtz equation in three-dimensional case. First, a theoretical investigation based on multipole expansion method and spherical wave functions was established, through which we show that the resolution of the problem is reduced to solving an infinite, complex and large linear system. Second, we explain how to suitably truncate the last infinite dimensional system to get an accurate stable and fast numerical solution of the problem. Then, we evaluate numerically the theoretical solution of scattering problem by multiple ideal rigid spheres. Finally, we made a numerical study to present the "Head related transfer function" with respect to different physical and geometrical parameters of the problem.

  7. Fast and Accurate Computation of Time-Domain Acoustic Scattering Problems with Exact Nonreflecting Boundary Conditions

    Wang, Li-Lian; Zhao, Xiaodan

    2011-01-01

    This paper is concerned with fast and accurate computation of exterior wave equations truncated via exact circular or spherical nonreflecting boundary conditions (NRBCs, which are known to be nonlocal in both time and space). We first derive analytic expressions for the underlying convolution kernels, which allow for a rapid and accurate evaluation of the convolution with $O(N_t)$ operations over $N_t$ successive time steps. To handle the onlocality in space, we introduce the notion of boundary perturbation, which enables us to handle general bounded scatters by solving a sequence of wave equations in a regular domain. We propose an efficient spectral-Galerkin solver with Newmark's time integration for the truncated wave equation in the regular domain. We also provide ample numerical results to show high-order accuracy of NRBCs and efficiency of the proposed scheme.

  8. Raman scattering from ZnO incorporating Fe nanoparticles: Vibrational modes and low-frequency acoustic modes

    Romcevic, N., E-mail: romcevi@ipb.ac.r [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Kostic, R.; Hadzic, B.; Romcevic, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Kuryliszyn-Kudelska, I.; Dobrowolski, W.D. [Institute of Physics PAS, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02/668 Warsaw (Poland); Narkiewicz, U.; Sibera, D. [Szcecin University of Tehnology, Institute of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Puleskiego 10, 70-322 Szczecin, Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: Nanocrystaline samples of ZnO(Fe) were synthesized by wet chemical method. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction to determine composition of the samples (ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and the mean crystalline size (8-52 nm). Small amount (5 wt.%) of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the beginning of the synthesis results in forming of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. Large amount (90 wt.%) of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the beginning of the synthesis results in forming Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Both samples contain ZnO phase which is not registered by XRD, but is clearly seen in the Raman spectra. Main characteristics of experimental Raman spectrum in 200-1600 cm{sup -1} spectral region are: sharp peak at 436 cm{sup -1} and broad two-phonon structure at {approx}1150 cm{sup -1}, typical for ZnO; broad structure below 700 cm{sup -1} that has different position and shape in case of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} or Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. In low-frequency Raman spectra of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles registered peaks agree well with the calculated frequencies of acoustic phonons. As a result we identified (0,2), (0,0), (2,2) and (1,0) modes. - Abstract: Nanocrystaline samples of ZnO(Fe) were synthesized by wet chemical method. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction to determine composition of the samples (ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and the mean crystalline size (8-52 nm). In this paper we report the experimental spectra of Raman scattering. Main characteristics of experimental Raman spectrum in 200-1600 cm{sup -1} spectral region are: sharp peak at 436 cm{sup -1} and broad two-phonon structure at {approx}1150 cm{sup -1}, typical for ZnO; broad structure below 700 cm{sup -1} that has different position and shape in case of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} or Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Low-frequency Raman modes were measured and assigned according to confined acoustic vibrations of spherical nanoparticles

  9. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  10. Development of hydroacoustical techniques for the monitoring and classification of benthic habitats in Puck Bay: Modeling of acoustic waves scattering by seagrass

    Raczkowska, A.; Gorska, N.

    2012-12-01

    Puck Bay is an area of high species biodiversity belonging to the Coastal Landscape Park of Baltic Sea Protected Areas (BSPA) and is also included in the list of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and covered by the protection program "Natura 2000". The underwater meadows of the Puck Bay are important for Europe's natural habitats due to their role in enhancing the productivity of marine ecosystems and providing shelter and optimal feeding conditions for many marine organisms. One of the dominant species comprising the underwater meadows of the Southern Baltic Sea is the seagrass Zostera marina. The spatial extent of underwater seagrass meadows is altered by pollution and eutrophication; therefore, to properly manage the area one must monitor its ecological state. Remote acoustic methods are useful tools for the monitoring of benthic habitats in many marine areas because they are non-invasive and allow researchers to obtain data from a large area in a short period of time. Currently there is a need to apply these methods in the Baltic Sea. Here we present an analysis of the mechanism of scattering of acoustic waves on seagrass in the Southern Baltic Sea based on the numerical modeling of acoustic wave scattering by the biological tissues of plants. The study was conducted by adapting a model developed on the basis of DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation) developed by Stanton and Chu (2005) for fluid-like objects, including the characteristics of the Southern Baltic seagrass. Input data for the model, including the morphometry of seagrass leaves, their angle of inclination and the density plant cover, was obtained through the analysis of biological materials collected in the Puck Bay in the framework of a research project financed by the Polish Government (Development of hydroacoustic methods for studies of underwater meadows of Puck Bay, 6P04E 051 20). On the basis of the developed model, we have analyzed the dependence of the target strength of a single

  11. Evolution of elastic and thermal properties during TMOS-gel formation determined by ringing bottle acoustic resonance spectroscopy, impulsive stimulated scattering, photopyroelectric spectroscopy and the hot ball method

    The evolution of the elastic and thermal properties of a tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS)-based gel that exhibits an extraordinary ringing effect when enclosed in a bottle is investigated during the sol–gel transition. The results demonstrate the feasibility of three proposed experimental methods for monitoring of gels during their formation. The shear stiffening evolution during gelation is monitored by ringing bottle, resonant acoustic spectroscopy and by an ultrasonic technique using piezo electric excitation and detection. The evolution of the longitudinal modulus and the thermal diffusivity of the gel during stiffening are simultaneously determined by a combined photoacoustic and photothermal method based on heterodyne diffraction detection of impulsive stimulated scattering by, respectively, a propagating acoustic wave grating and a decaying thermal expansion grating that were both thermo elastically generated using a pulsed laser. Also, the feasibility of an inverse photopyroelectric method and a hot ball technique to monitor the thermal transport efficiency and thermal impedance of a forming gel by tracking the thermal conductivity, the thermal diffusivity, and the thermal effusivity is demonstrated. The network polymerization and stiffening during the sol–gel transition in TMOS-gel corresponds with substantial changes in the shear acoustic velocity and in all thermal properties, while the longitudinal acoustic velocity is only weakly affected. (paper)

  12. Acoustic integrated extinction

    Norris, Andrew N

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross-section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. [1] derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency.

  13. Mechanical spectra of glass-forming liquids. II. Gigahertz-frequency longitudinal and shear acoustic dynamics in glycerol and DC704 studied by time-domain Brillouin scattering.

    Klieber, Christoph; Hecksher, Tina; Pezeril, Thomas; Torchinsky, Darius H; Dyre, Jeppe C; Nelson, Keith A

    2013-03-28

    This paper presents and discusses the temperature and frequency dependence of the longitudinal and shear viscoelastic response at MHz and GHz frequencies of the intermediate glass former glycerol and the fragile glass former tetramethyl-tetraphenyl-trisiloxane (DC704). Measurements were performed using the recently developed time-domain Brillouin scattering technique, in which acoustic waves are generated optically, propagated through nm thin liquid layers of different thicknesses, and detected optically after transmission into a transparent detection substrate. This allows for a determination of the frequency dependence of the speed of sound and the sound-wave attenuation. When the data are converted into mechanical moduli, a linear relationship between longitudinal and shear acoustic moduli is revealed, which is consistent with the generalized Cauchy relation. In glycerol, the temperature dependence of the shear acoustic relaxation time agrees well with literature data for dielectric measurements. In DC704, combining the new data with data from measurements obtained previously by piezo-ceramic transducers yields figures showing the longitudinal and shear sound velocities at frequencies from mHz to GHz over an extended range of temperatures. The shoving model's prediction for the relaxation time's temperature dependence is fairly well obeyed for both liquids as demonstrated from a plot with no adjustable parameters. Finally, we show that for both liquids the instantaneous shear modulus follows an exponential temperature dependence to a good approximation, as predicted by Granato's interstitialcy model. PMID:23556795

  14. Effect of the ultrasonic frequency on the multiple X-ray scattering from a LiNbO3 crystal modulated by a surface acoustic wave

    The effect of multiple scattering on the formation of the θ-2θ scan curves for a crystal modulated by a surface acoustic wave (SAW), depending on the ultrasonic frequency, has been investigated in the frame-work of the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction. A model of a Rayleigh surface wave has been analyzed as applied to X-ray diffraction with allowance for the transverse and longitudinal elastic lattice strains. Using the example of the 127° Y′ cut of the LiNbO3 crystal, it is established that the effects of multiple scattering can be neglected for ultrasonic frequencies above 650 MHz; this finding significantly simplifies the numerical calculations of X-ray diffraction from a crystal modulated by a short-wavelength SAW. A comparative quantitative analysis of the experimental data on synchrotron scattering from the 127° Y′ cut of a LiNbO3 crystal modulated by a 952-MHz SAW have been performed, both taking into account and neglecting the effects of multiple scattering. It is shown that the computation time can be reduced by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude.

  15. Interaction of an acoustical quasi-Gaussian beam with a rigid sphere: linear axial scattering, instantaneous and time-averaged radiation force

    Mitri, F G

    2012-01-01

    This work focuses on the interaction of an acoustical quasi-Gaussian beam centered on a rigid immovable sphere, during which at least three physical phenomena arise, namely, the (axial) acoustic scattering, the instantaneous force, and the time-average radiation force which are investigated here. The quasi-Gaussian beam is an exact solution of the source free Helmholtz wave equation and is characterized by an arbitrary waist w0 and a diffraction convergence length known as the Rayleigh range z_R. Specialized formulations for the scattering and the instantaneous force function as well as the (time-averaged) radiation force function are provided. Numerical computations illustrate the variations of the backscattering form-function, the instantaneous force function and the (time-averaged) radiation force function versus the dimensionless frequency ka (where k is the wave number and a is the radius of the sphere), and the results show significant differences from the plane wave limit when the dimensionless beam wa...

  16. Seismic inversion with generalized Radon transform based on local second-order approximation of scattered field in acoustic media

    Ouyang, Wei; Mao, Weijian; Li, Xuelei; Li, Wuqun

    2014-08-01

    Sound velocity inversion problem based on scattering theory is formulated in terms of a nonlinear integral equation associated with scattered field. Because of its nonlinearity, in practice, linearization algorisms (Born/single scattering approximation) are widely used to obtain an approximate inversion solution. However, the linearized strategy is not congruent with seismic wave propagation mechanics in strong perturbation (heterogeneous) medium. In order to partially dispense with the weak perturbation assumption of the Born approximation, we present a new approach from the following two steps: firstly, to handle the forward scattering by taking into account the second-order Born approximation, which is related to generalized Radon transform (GRT) about quadratic scattering potential; then to derive a nonlinear quadratic inversion formula by resorting to inverse GRT. In our formulation, there is a significant quadratic term regarding scattering potential, and it can provide an amplitude correction for inversion results beyond standard linear inversion. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the linear single scattering inversion is only good in amplitude for relative velocity perturbation () of background media up to 10 %, and its inversion errors are unacceptable for the perturbation beyond 10 %. In contrast, the quadratic inversion can give more accurate amplitude-preserved recovery for the perturbation up to 40 %. Our inversion scheme is able to manage double scattering effects by estimating a transmission factor from an integral over a small area, and therefore, only a small portion of computational time is added to the original linear migration/inversion process.

  17. A single-sided homogeneous Green's function representation for holographic imaging, inverse scattering, time-reversal acoustics and interferometric Green's function retrieval

    Wapenaar, Kees; Thorbecke, Jan; van der Neut, Joost

    2016-04-01

    Green's theorem plays a fundamental role in a diverse range of wavefield imaging applications, such as holographic imaging, inverse scattering, time-reversal acoustics and interferometric Green's function retrieval. In many of those applications, the homogeneous Green's function (i.e. the Green's function of the wave equation without a singularity on the right-hand side) is represented by a closed boundary integral. In practical applications, sources and/or receivers are usually present only on an open surface, which implies that a significant part of the closed boundary integral is by necessity ignored. Here we derive a homogeneous Green's function representation for the common situation that sources and/or receivers are present on an open surface only. We modify the integrand in such a way that it vanishes on the part of the boundary where no sources and receivers are present. As a consequence, the remaining integral along the open surface is an accurate single-sided representation of the homogeneous Green's function. This single-sided representation accounts for all orders of multiple scattering. The new representation significantly improves the aforementioned wavefield imaging applications, particularly in situations where the first-order scattering approximation breaks down.

  18. The diel vertical migration of sound scatterers observed by an acoustic Doppler current profiler in the Luzon Strait from July 2009 to April 2011

    YANG Chenghao; LIAO Guanghong; YUAN Yaochu; CHEN Hong; ZHU Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) receives echoes from sound scatterers, then their speed is calcu-lated by the Doppler effect. In the open ocean, most of these backscatterers are from the plankton. The sound scatterers descend down to depth at around dawn, their mean speed is 2.9 cm/s, then they ascend up to the surface layer at around dusk with a mean speed of 2.1 cm/s, in the Luzon Strait. The descending speed is faster, which suggests that this zooplankton population may accelerate its downward migration under the action of the gravity. The vertical distribution of a mean volume backscattering strength (MVB-S) in the nighttime has two peaks, which locate near the upper and lower boundary layers of halocline, respectively. However, the backscatterers only aggregate near the surface layer in the daytime. The diel ver-tical migration (DVM) of sound scatterers has several characteristic patterns, it is stronger in summer, but weaker in winter, and the maximum peak occurs in September. The DVM occurrence is synchronous with the seawater temperature increasing at around dawn and dusk, it may affect the ocean mixing and water stratification.

  19. Systematic investigation of effects of exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering on photoluminescence rise times of free excitons in GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As single quantum wells

    We have systematically investigated the photoluminescence (PL) dynamics of free excitons in GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As single quantum wells, focusing on the energy relaxation process due to exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering under non-resonant and weak excitation conditions as a function of GaAs-layer thickness from 3.6 to 12.0 nm and temperature from 30 to 50 K. The free exciton characteristics were confirmed by observation that the PL decay time has a linear dependence with temperature. We found that the free exciton PL rise rate, which is the reciprocal of the rise time, is inversely linear with the GaAs-layer thickness and linear with temperature. This is consistent with a reported theoretical study of the exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering rate in the energy relaxation process in quantum wells. Consequently, it is conclusively verified that the PL rise rate is dominated by the exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering rate. In addition, from quantitative analysis of the GaAs-layer thickness and temperature dependences, we suggest that the PL rise rate reflects the number of exciton–acoustic-phonon scattering events

  20. Multi-dimensional dynamics of stimulated Brillouin scattering in a laser speckle: Ion acoustic wave bowing, breakup, and laser-seeded two-ion-wave decay

    Albright, B. J.; Yin, L.; Bowers, K. J.; Bergen, B.

    2016-03-01

    Two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in laser speckle geometry have been analyzed to evaluate the relative importance of competing nonlinear processes in the evolution and saturation of SBS. It is found that ion-trapping-induced wavefront bowing and breakup of ion acoustic waves (IAW) and the associated side-loss of trapped ions dominate electron-trapping-induced IAW wavefront bowing and breakup, as well as the two-ion-wave decay instability over a range of Z Te/Ti conditions and incident laser intensities. In the simulations, the latter instability does not govern the nonlinear saturation of SBS; however, evidence of two-ion-wave decay is seen, appearing as a modulation of the ion acoustic wavefronts. This modulation is periodic in the laser polarization plane, anti-symmetric across the speckle axis, and of a wavenumber matching that of the incident laser pulse. A simple analytic model is provided for how spatial "imprinting" from a high frequency inhomogeneity (in this case, the density modulation from the laser) in an unstable system with continuum eigenmodes can selectively amplify modes with wavenumbers that match that of the inhomogeneity.

  1. Localized Acoustic Surface Modes

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-08-04

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes (ASMs). We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  2. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 2: scattering signatures of Colorado River bed sediment in Marble and Grand Canyons

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    In this, the second of a pair of papers on the statistical signatures of riverbed sediment in high-frequency acoustic backscatter, spatially explicit maps of the stochastic geometries (length- and amplitude-scales) of backscatter are related to patches of riverbed surfaces composed of known sediment types, as determined by geo-referenced underwater video observations. Statistics of backscatter magnitudes alone are found to be poor discriminators between sediment types. However, the variance of the power spectrum, and the intercept and slope from a power-law spectral form (termed the spectral strength and exponent, respectively) successfully discriminate between sediment types. A decision-tree approach was able to classify spatially heterogeneous patches of homogeneous sands, gravels (and sand-gravel mixtures), and cobbles/boulders with 95, 88, and 91% accuracy, respectively. Application to sites outside the calibration, and surveys made at calibration sites at different times, were plausible based on observations from underwater video. Analysis of decision trees built with different training data sets suggested that the spectral exponent was consistently the most important variable in the classification. In the absence of theory concerning how spatially variable sediment surfaces scatter high-frequency sound, the primary advantage of this data-driven approach to classify bed sediment over alternatives is that spectral methods have well understood properties and make no assumptions about the distributional form of the fluctuating component of backscatter over small spatial scales.

  3. Effects of core position of locally resonant scatterers on low-frequency acoustic absorption in viscoelastic panel

    Zhong, Jie; Wen, Ji-Hong; Zhao, Hong-Gang; Yin, Jian-Fei; Yang, Hai-Bin

    2015-08-01

    Locally resonant sonic materials, due to their ability to control the propagation of low-frequency elastic waves, have become a promising option for underwater sound absorption materials. In this paper, the finite element method is used to investigate the absorption characteristics of a viscoelastic panel periodically embedded with a type of infinite-long non-coaxially cylindrical locally resonant scatterers (LRSs). The effect of the core position in the coating layer of the LRS on the low-frequency (500 Hz-3000 Hz) sound absorption property is investigated. With increasing the longitudinal core eccentricity e, there occur few changes in the absorptance at the frequencies below 1500 Hz, however, the absorptance above 1500 Hz becomes gradually better and the valid absorption (with absorptance above 0.8) frequency band (VAFB) of the viscoelastic panel becomes accordingly broader. The absorption mechanism is revealed by using the displacement field maps of the viscoelastic panel and the steel slab. The results show two typical resonance modes. One is the overall resonance mode (ORM) caused by steel backing, and the other is the core resonance mode (CRM) caused by LRS. The absorptance of the viscoelastic panel by ORM is induced mainly by the vibration of the steel slab and affected little by core position. On the contrary, with increasing the core eccentricity, the CRM shifts toward high frequency band and decouples with the ORM, leading to two separate absorption peaks and the broadened VAFB of the panel. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51275519).

  4. High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics

    Jackson, Darrell R

    2007-01-01

    High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics is the first book in a new series sponsored by the Office of Naval Research on the latest research in underwater acoustics. This exciting new title provides ready access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics. The physical characteristics of the seafloor affecting acoustic propagation and scattering are covered, including physical and geoacoustic properties and surface roughness. Current theories for acoustic propagation in sediments are presented along with corresponding models for reflection, scattering, and seafloor penetration. The main text is backed up by an extensive bibliography and technical appendices.

  5. Fundamentals of Shallow Water Acoustics

    Katsnelson, Boris; Lynch, James

    2012-01-01

    Shallow water acoustics (SWA), the study of how low and medium frequency sound propagates and scatters on the continental shelves of the world's oceans, has both technical interest and a large number of practical applications. Technically, shallow water poses an interesting medium for the study of acoustic scattering, inverse theory, and propagation physics in a complicated oceanic waveguide. Practically, shallow water acoustics has interest for geophysical exploration, marine mammal studies, and naval applications. Additionally, one notes the very interdisciplinary nature of shallow water acoustics, including acoustical physics, physical oceanography, marine geology, and marine biology. In this specialized volume, the authors, all of whom have extensive at-sea experience in U.S. and Russian research efforts, have tried to summarize the main experimental, theoretical, and computational results in shallow water acoustics, with an emphasis on providing physical insight into the topics presented.

  6. Acoustic Metamaterials and Phononic Crystals

    2013-01-01

    This comprehensive book presents all aspects of acoustic metamaterials and phononic crystals. The emphasis is on acoustic wave propagation phenomena at interfaces such as refraction, especially unusual refractive properties and negative refraction. A thorough discussion of the mechanisms leading to such refractive phenomena includes local resonances in metamaterials and scattering in phononic crystals.

  7. Acoustic Invisibility in Turbulent Fluids

    Huang, Xun; Zhong, Siyang

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic invisibility of a cloaking system in turbulent uids has been poorly understood. Here we show that evident scattering would appear in turbulent wakes owing to the submergence of a classical cloaking device. The inherent mechanism is explained using our theoretical model, which eventually inspires us to develop an optimized cloaking approach. Both the near- and far-?eld scatted ?elds are examined using high order computational acoustic methods. The remarkably low scattering demonstrate...

  8. Modelling Hyperboloid Sound Scattering

    Burry, Jane; Davis, Daniel; Peters, Brady; Ayres, Phil; Klein, John; Pena de Leon, Alexander; Burry, Mark

    The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...... both physical and digital models at three distinct scales. The results suggest hyperboloid geometry, while difficult to fabricate, facilitates sound scattering....

  9. Communication Acoustics

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  10. Acoustic Neuroma

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

  11. Acoustic Neuroma

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  12. Mechanical spectra of glass-forming liquids. II. Gigahertz-frequency longitudinal and shear acoustic dynamics in glycerol and DC704 studied by time-domain Brillouin scattering

    Klieber, Christoph; Hecksher, Tina; Pezeril, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    of the frequency dependence of the speed of sound and the sound-wave attenuation. When the data are converted into mechanical moduli, a linear relationship between longitudinal and shear acoustic moduli is revealed, which is consistent with the generalized Cauchy relation. In glycerol, the temperature dependence......This paper presents and discusses the temperature and frequency dependence of the longitudinal and shear viscoelastic response at MHz and GHz frequencies of the intermediate glass former glycerol and the fragile glass former tetramethyl-tetraphenyl-trisiloxane (DC704). Measurements were performed...... of the shear acoustic relaxation time agrees well with literature data for dielectric measurements. In DC704, combining the new data with data from measurements obtained previously by piezo-ceramic transducers yields figures showing the longitudinal and shear sound velocities at frequencies from mHz to GHz...

  13. Simultaneous triple-modality imaging of diffuse reflectance, optoacoustic pressure and ultrasonic scattering using an acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscope: feasibility study

    Subochev, Pavel; Fiks, Ilya; Frenz, Martin; Turchin, llya

    2016-02-01

    The letter discusses the opportunity for cost-effective use of conventional optoacoustic hardware to realize additional imaging modalities such as ultrasonic microscopy and diffuse optical reflectometry within the same laser pulse. Optoacoustic methods for deep biomedical visualization are based on pulsed laser illumination of the internal tissue layers with scattered photons, however some of the back-scattered photons can be absorbed by the optoacoustic detector. Thermoelastic extension of the detector’s surface provides a probing pulse for an ultrasonic modality while the measurement of the amplitude of the probing ultrasonic pulse allows estimation of the diffuse reflectance from the object under investigation.

  14. Scattering from black holes

    Futterman, J.A.H.; Handler, F.A.; Matzner, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive treatment of the propagation of waves in the presence of black holes. While emphasizing intuitive physical thinking in their treatment of the techniques of analysis of scattering, the authors also include chapters on the rigorous mathematical development of the subject. Introducing the concepts of scattering by considering the simplest, scalar wave case of scattering by a spherical (Schwarzschild) black hole, the book then develops the formalism of spin weighted spheroidal harmonics and of plane wave representations for neutrino, electromagnetic, and gravitational scattering. Details and results of numerical computations are given. The techniques involved have important applications (references are given) in acoustical and radar imaging.

  15. Scattering from black holes

    This book provides a comprehensive treatment of the propagation of waves in the presence of black holes. While emphasizing intuitive physical thinking in their treatment of the techniques of analysis of scattering, the authors also include chapters on the rigorous mathematical development of the subject. Introducing the concepts of scattering by considering the simplest, scalar wave case of scattering by a spherical (Schwarzschild) black hole, the book then develops the formalism of spin weighted spheroidal harmonics and of plane wave representations for neutrino, electromagnetic, and gravitational scattering. Details and results of numerical computations are given. The techniques involved have important applications (references are given) in acoustical and radar imaging

  16. Theoretical acoustics of underwater structures

    Skelton, EA

    1997-01-01

    This important book provides an account of the linear acoustics of basic isotropic/anisotropic structures excited by time-harmonic and transient mechanical forces and acoustic sources. Many numerical examples are given to aid physical insight and to provide benchmark computations of sound radiation and sound scattering. The theoretical methods, developed originally for naval noise control problems, should find civil application in the acoustic modelling of structures fabricated from both fibre-reinforced and isotropic materials. Such an endeavour is increasingly desirable and necessary in this

  17. Noise Shielding Using Acoustic Metamaterials

    We exploit theoretically a class of rectangular cylindrical devices for noise shielding by using acoustic metamaterials. The function of noise shielding is justified by both the far-field and near-field full-wave simulations based on the finite element method. The enlargement of equivalent acoustic scattering cross sections is revealed to be the physical mechanism for this function. This work makes it possible to design a window with both noise shielding and air flow. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  18. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    Chen Huanyang [School of Physical Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215006 (China); Chan, C T, E-mail: kenyon@ust.h, E-mail: phchan@ust.h [Department of Physics and the William Mong Institute of NanoScience and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong)

    2010-03-24

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  19. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  20. Acoustical Imaging

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  1. Active elastic metamaterials with applications in acoustics

    POPE, Simon; Laalej, Hatim; Daley, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Elastic metamaterials provide a new approach to solving existing problems in acoustics. They have also been associated with novel concepts such as acoustic invisibility and subwavelength imaging. To be applied to many of the proposed applications a metamaterial would need to have the desired mass density and elastic moduli over a wide frequency band. To minimise scatter in acoustics applications the impedance of solid elastic metamaterials also need to be matched to the impedance of the surro...

  2. Optical Mixing Controlled Stimulated Scattering instabilities: Suppression of SRS by the Controlled Introduction of Ion Acoustic and Electron Plasma Wave Turbulence

    Afeyan, Bedros; Won, K; Montgomery, D S; Hammer, J; Kirkwood, R K; Schmitt, A J

    2012-01-01

    In a series of experiments on the Omega laser facility at LLE, we have demonstrated the suppression of SRS in prescribed spectral windows due to the presence of externally controlled levels of ion acoustic waves (IAW, by crossing two blue beams at the Mach -1 surface) and electron plasma waves (EPW, by crossing a blue and a green beam around a tenth critical density plasma) generated via optical mixing. We have further observed SRS backscattering of a green beam when crossed with a blue pump beam, in whose absence, that (green beam) backscattering signature was five times smaller. This is direct evidence for green beam amplification when crossed with the blue. Additional proof comes from transmitted green beam measurements. A combination of these techniques may allow the suppression of unacceptable levels of SRS near the light entrance hole of large-scale hohlraums on the NIF or LMJ.

  3. Strongly driven ion acoustic waves in laser produced plasmas

    This paper present an experimental study of ion acoustic waves with wavenumbers corresponding to stimulated Brillouin scattering. Time resolved Thomson scattering in frequency and wavenumber space, has permitted to observe the dispersion relation of the waves as a function of the laser intensity. Apart from observing ion acoustic waves associated with a strong second component is observed at laser intensities above 1013Wcm-2

  4. Radiation acoustics

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  5. Inversion assuming weak scattering

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The study of weak scattering from inhomogeneous media or interface roughness has long been of interest in sonar applications. In an acoustic backscattering model of a stationary field of volume inhomogeneities, a stochastic description of the field is more useful than a deterministic description...

  6. Effects of electric field on acoustic properties of 0.83Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3) -0.17PbTiO3 single crystals studied by Brillouin light scattering

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kojima, Seiji

    2013-03-01

    Relaxor-based ferroelectric Pb[(Mg1/3Nb2/3)1-x Tix]O3 (PMN-xPT) single crystals have attracted great attention because of their exceptionally strong piezoelectric properties. This peculiar characteristic was attributed to the rotation of polarization directions and structural complexity. In this study, the phase transition behaviors of PMN-17PT single crystals have been investigated under an electric field applied along [001] by micro-Brillouin scattering. PMN-17PT single crystals were grown by the modified Bridgeman method. The two (001) surfaces were Au-coated to apply the electric field, and the coating was thin enough to allow the incident beam to transmit without much loss. The electric field of different values was applied to the sample along the [001] direction, and the Brillouin scattering spectrum was measured under both field-heating (FH) and field-cooling (FC) conditions. The electric field of 1kV/cm induced a new longitudinal acoustic (LA) mode component along with a broad Brillouin peak evolving continuously from the paraelectric phase during both FC and FH processes. This was attributed to the remnant polar nanoregions that were not aligned under the electric field due to quenched random fields. However, the splitting of the LA mode did not appear when the electric field was over 2kV/cm indicating a clear structural phase transition. This research was supported in part by the Marubun Research Promotion Foundation and Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2010-0010497).

  7. Acoustic signal analysis of underwater elastic cylinder

    LI Xiukun; YANG Shi'e

    2001-01-01

    The echoes of underwater elastic cylinder comprise two types of acoustic components: Geometrical scattering waves and elastic scattering waves. The transfer function is appropriate to characterize the echo of targets. And the discrete wavelet transform of amplitude spectrum is presented and used to identify the resonant components of underwater targets.PACS numbers: 43.30, 43.60

  8. Battlefield acoustics

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  9. Acoustical Imaging

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  10. Acoustic telemetry

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To determine movements of green turtles in the nearshore foraging areas, we deployed acoustic tags and determined their movements through active and passive...

  11. Acoustics Research

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  12. Acoustic transparency in two-dimensional sonic crystals

    Acoustic transparency is studied in two-dimensional sonic crystals consisting of hexagonal distributions of cylinders with continuously varying properties. The transparency condition is achieved by selectively closing the acoustic bandgaps, which are governed by the structure factor of the cylindrical scatterers. It is shown here that cylindrical scatterers with the proposed continuously varying properties are physically realizable by using metafluids based on sonic crystals. The feasibility of this proposal is analyzed by a numerical experiment based on multiple scattering theory.

  13. Acoustic transparency in two-dimensional sonic crystals

    Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose; Torrent, Daniel [Wave Phenomena Group, Department of Electronic Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, C/ Camino de Vera s/n, E-46022 Valencia (Spain); Cai Liangwu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)], E-mail: jsdehesa@upvnet.upv.es

    2009-01-15

    Acoustic transparency is studied in two-dimensional sonic crystals consisting of hexagonal distributions of cylinders with continuously varying properties. The transparency condition is achieved by selectively closing the acoustic bandgaps, which are governed by the structure factor of the cylindrical scatterers. It is shown here that cylindrical scatterers with the proposed continuously varying properties are physically realizable by using metafluids based on sonic crystals. The feasibility of this proposal is analyzed by a numerical experiment based on multiple scattering theory.

  14. Lecture Notes On Acoustics

    This book mentions string vibration and wave, one-dimension wave and wave equation, characteristic impedance, governing equation of string, and wave energy from string, wave equation of wave and basic physical quantity like one-dimension wave equation, sound unit, sound intensity and energy, sound movement in a surface of discontinuity with transmission loss of sound by partition, and Snell's law, radiation, scatter and diffraction and sound in closed space with Sabine's theory, sound characteristic of closed space and duct acoustics.

  15. Tunable acoustic waveguide based on vibro-acoustic metamaterials with shunted piezoelectric unit cells

    Kwon, Byung-Jin; Jung, Jin-Young; Lee, Dooho; Park, Kwang-Chun; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2015-10-01

    We propose a new class of acoustic waveguides with tunable bandgaps (TBs) by using vibro-acoustic metamaterials with shunted periodic piezoelectric unit cells. The unit metamaterial cells that consist of a single crystal piezoelectric transducer and an electrical shunt circuit are designed to induce a strong vibro-acousto-electrical coupling, resulting in a tunable acoustic bandgap as well as local structural resonance and Bragg scattering bandgaps. The present results show that the TB frequency can be actively controlled and the transmission loss of the acoustic wave can be greatly improved by simply changing the inductance values in the shunt circuit.

  16. Acoustic emission

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  17. The acoustics of snoring.

    Pevernagie, Dirk; Aarts, Ronald M; De Meyer, Micheline

    2010-04-01

    Snoring is a prevalent disorder affecting 20-40% of the general population. The mechanism of snoring is vibration of anatomical structures in the pharyngeal airway. Flutter of the soft palate accounts for the harsh aspect of the snoring sound. Natural or drug-induced sleep is required for its appearance. Snoring is subject to many influences such as body position, sleep stage, route of breathing and the presence or absence of sleep-disordered breathing. Its presentation may be variable within or between nights. While snoring is generally perceived as a social nuisance, rating of its noisiness is subjective and, therefore, inconsistent. Objective assessment of snoring is important to evaluate the effect of treatment interventions. Moreover, snoring carries information relating to the site and degree of obstruction of the upper airway. If evidence for monolevel snoring at the site of the soft palate is provided, the patient may benefit from palatal surgery. These considerations have inspired researchers to scrutinize the acoustic characteristics of snoring events. Similarly to speech, snoring is produced in the vocal tract. Because of this analogy, existing techniques for speech analysis have been applied to evaluate snoring sounds. It appears that the pitch of the snoring sound is in the low-frequency range (noise-like', and has scattered energy content in the higher spectral sub-bands (>500 Hz). To evaluate acoustic properties of snoring, sleep nasendoscopy is often performed. Recent evidence suggests that the acoustic quality of snoring is markedly different in drug-induced sleep as compared with natural sleep. Most often, palatal surgery alters sound characteristics of snoring, but is no cure for this disorder. It is uncertain whether the perceived improvement after palatal surgery, as judged by the bed partner, is due to an altered sound spectrum. Whether some acoustic aspects of snoring, such as changes in pitch, have predictive value for the presence of

  18. Acoustic lenses

    Acoustic lenses focus ultrasound to produce pencil-like beams with reduced near fields. When fitted to conventional (flat-faced) transducers, such lenses greatly improve the ability to detect and size defects. This paper describes a program developed to design acoustic lenses for use in immersion or contact inspection, using normal or angle beam mode with flat or curved targets. Lens surfaces are circular in geometry to facilitate machining. For normal beam inspection of flat plate, spherical or cylindrical lenses are used. For angle beam or curved surface inspections, a compound lens is required to correct for the extra induced aberration. Such a lens is aspherical with one radius of curvature in the plane of incidence, and a different radius of curvature in the plane perpendicular to the incident plane. The resultant beam profile (i.e., location of the acoustic focus, beam diameter, 6 dB working range) depends on the degree of focusing and the transducer used. The operating frequency and bandwidth can be affected by the instrumentation used. Theoretical and measured beam profiles are in good agreement. Various applications, from zone focusing used for defect sizing in thick plate, to line focusing for pipe weld inspection, are discussed

  19. Time reversal transfer: Exploring the robustness of time reversed acoustics in media with geometry perturbations

    Kober, Jan; Dvořáková, Zuzana; Převorovský, Zdeněk; Krofta, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 138, č. 1 (2015), EL49-EL53. ISSN 0001-4966 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : acoustic waves * boundary value problems * elastic waves * green's function methods * acoustic scattering Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.503, year: 2014 http://scitation.aip.org/content/asa/journal/jasa/138/1/10.1121/1.4922623

  20. Acoustic interaction forces between small particles in an ideal fluid

    Silva, Glauber T

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical expression for the acoustic interaction force between small spherical particles suspended in an ideal fluid exposed to an external acoustic wave. The acoustic interaction force is the part of the acoustic radiation force on one given particle involving the scattered waves from the other particles. The particles, either compressible liquid droplets or elastic microspheres, are considered to be much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. In this so-called Rayleigh limit, the acoustic interaction forces between the particles are well approximated by gradients of pair-interaction potentials with no restriction on the inter-particle distance. The theory is applied to studies of the acoustic interaction force on a particle suspension in either standing or traveling plane waves. The results show aggregation regions along the wave propagation direction, while particles may attract or repel each other in the transverse direction. In addition, a mean-field approximation is developed to describe ...

  1. Wave Phenomena in an Acoustic Resonant Chamber

    Smith, Mary E.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design and operation of a high Q acoustical resonant chamber which can be used to demonstrate wave phenomena such as three-dimensional normal modes, Q values, densities of states, changes in the speed of sound, Fourier decomposition, damped harmonic oscillations, sound-absorbing properties, and perturbation and scattering problems.…

  2. Constructing acoustic timefronts using random matrix theory

    Hegewisch, Katherine C

    2012-01-01

    In a recent letter [Europhys. Lett. {\\bf 97}, 34002 (2012)], random matrix theory is introduced for long-range acoustic propagation in the ocean. The theory is expressed in terms of unitary propagation matrices that represent the scattering between acoustic modes due to sound speed fluctuations induced by the ocean's internal waves. The scattering exhibits a power-law decay as a function of the differences in mode numbers thereby generating a power-law, banded, random unitary matrix ensemble. This work gives a more complete account of that approach and extends the methods to the construction of an ensemble of acoustic timefronts. The result is a very efficient method for studying the statistical properties of timefronts at various propagation ranges that agrees well with propagation based on the parabolic equation. It helps identify which information about the ocean environment survives in the timefronts and how to connect features of the data to the surviving environmental information. It also makes direct c...

  3. Acoustic hemostasis

    Crum, L.; Andrew, M.; Bailey, M.; Beach, K.; Brayman, A.; Curra, F.; Kaczkowski, P.; Kargl, S.; Martin, R.; Vaezy, S.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past several years, the Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound (CIMU) at the Applied Physics Laboratory in the University of Washington has undertaken a broad research program in the general area of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Our principal emphasis has been on the use of HIFU to induce hemostasis; in particular, CIMU has sought to develop a small, lightweight, portable device that would use ultrasound for both imaging and therapy. Such a technology is needed because nearly 50% of combat casualty mortality results from exsanguinations, or uncontrolled bleeding. A similar percentage occurs for civilian death due to trauma. In this general review, a presentation of the general problem will be given, as well as our recent approaches to the development of an image-guided, transcutaneous, acoustic hemostasis device. [Work supported in part by the USAMRMC, ONR and the NIH.

  4. Combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method

    Koutsouris, Georgios I; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho;

    2013-01-01

    A combined model for room acoustic predictions is developed, aiming to treat both diffuse and specular reflections in a unified way. Two established methods are incorporated: acoustical radiosity, accounting for the diffuse part, and the image source method, accounting for the specular part. The...... model is based on conservation of acoustical energy. Losses are taken into account by the energy absorption coefficient, and the diffuse reflections are controlled via the scattering coefficient, which defines the portion of energy that has been diffusely reflected. The way the model is formulated...... studio hall. The proposed model turns out to be promising for acoustic predictions providing a high level of detail and accuracy....

  5. Acoustic telemetry.

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  6. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available Educational Video Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video ... for pre- and post-treatment acoustic neuroma patients. Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic ...

  7. Theoretical and experimental verification of acoustic focusing in metal cylinder structure

    Xia, Jian-ping; Sun, Hong-xiang; Cheng, Qian; Xu, Zheng; Chen, Hao; Yuan, Shou-qi; Zhang, Shu-yi; Ge, Yong; Guan, Yi-jun

    2016-05-01

    We report the realization of a multifocal acoustic focusing lens using a simple metal cylinder structure immersed in water, as determined both experimentally and theoretically. The acoustic waves can be focused on one or more points, because the Mie-resonance modes are excited in the cylinder structure. The acoustic pressure fields measured in the Schlieren imaging system agree with the results calculated using the acoustic scattering theory. Interesting applications of multifocal focusing in the acoustic encryption communication are further discussed. Our work should be helpful in understanding the focusing mechanism and experimentally measuring the acoustic phenomena in cylinder structures.

  8. Potential of acoustic emissions from three point bending tests as rock failure precursors

    Agioutantis Z.; Kaklis K.; Mavrigiannakis S.; Verigakis M.; Vallianatos F.; Saltas V.

    2016-01-01

    Development of failure in brittle materials is associated with microcracks, which release energy in the form of elastic waves called acoustic emissions. This paper presents results from acoustic emission mea-surements obtained during three point bending tests on Nestos marble under laboratory conditions. Acoustic emission activity was monitored using piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors, and the potential for accurate prediction of rock damage based on acoustic emission data was investigated. Damage local-ization was determined based on acoustic emissions generated from the critically stressed region as scat-tered events at stresses below and close to the strength of the material.

  9. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...

  10. Acoustic dispersive prism

    Hussein Esfahlani; Sami Karkar; Herve Lissek; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic ...

  11. Time-Reversal Acoustics and Maximum-Entropy Imaging

    Berryman, J G

    2001-08-22

    Target location is a common problem in acoustical imaging using either passive or active data inversion. Time-reversal methods in acoustics have the important characteristic that they provide a means of determining the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the scattering operator for either of these problems. Each eigenfunction may often be approximately associated with an individual scatterer. The resulting decoupling of the scattered field from a collection of targets is a very useful aid to localizing the targets, and suggests a number of imaging and localization algorithms. Two of these are linear subspace methods and maximum-entropy imaging.

  12. Time-Reversal Analysis for Scatterer Characterization

    Chambers, D H; Berryman, J G

    2003-11-05

    Only the simplest monopole scattering behavior has usually been treated in previous time-reversal analyses. A new application of time-reversal processing of wave scattering data permits characterization of scatterers by analyzing the number and nature of the singular functions (or eigenfunctions) associated with individual scatterers when they have multiple contributions from monopole, dipole and/or quadrupole scattering terms. We discuss acoustic, elastic, and electromagnetic scattering problems for low frequencies (ka < 1, k being the wavenumber and a the radius of the scatterer). Specific examples for electromagnetic scattering from one of a number of small conducting spheres show that each sphere can have up to six distinct time-reversal eigenfunctions associated with it.

  13. Double-negative acoustic metamaterials based on quasi-two-dimensional fluid-like shells

    Gracia Salgado, Rogelio; Torrent Martí, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa Moreno-Cid, José

    2012-01-01

    A structured cylindrical scatterer with low-frequency resonances in both the effective bulk modulus and the dynamical mass density is designed and characterized. The proposed scattering unit is made of a rigid cylinder surrounded by a fluid-like shell embedded in a two-dimensional waveguide of height less than the length of the cylindrical scatterer. It is demonstrated that the acoustic metamaterials based on this building unit have negative acoustic parameters in a broad range of frequencies...

  14. Acoustic Neurinomas

    Mohammad Faraji Rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuromas (AN are schwann cell-derived tumors that commonly arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve also known as vestibular schwannoma(VS causes unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and unsteadiness. In many cases, the tumor size may remain unchanged for many years following diagnosis, which is typically made by MRI. In the majority of cases the tumor is small, leaving the clinician and patient with the options of either serial scanning or active treatment by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR or microneurosurgery. Despite the vast number of published treatment reports, comparative studies are few. The predominant clinical endpoints of AN treatment include tumor control, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Less focus has been put on symptom relief and health-related quality of life (QOL. It is uncertain if treating a small tumor leaves the patient with a better chance of obtaining relief from future hearing loss, vertigo or tinnitus than by observing it without treatment.   In this paper we review the literature for the natural course, the treatment alternatives and the results of AN. Finally, we present our experience with a management strategy applied for more than 30 years.

  15. Acoustic Spatiality

    Brandon LaBelle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of listening can be appreciated as intensely relational, bringing us into contact with surrounding events, bodies and things. Given that sound propagates and expands outwardly, as a set of oscillations from a particular source, listening carries with it a sensual intensity, whereby auditory phenomena deliver intrusive and disruptive as well as soothing and assuring experiences. The physicality characteristic of sound suggests a deeply impressionistic, locational "knowledge structure" – that is, the ways in which listening affords processes of exchange, of being in the world, and from which we extend ourselves. Sound, as physical energy reflecting and absorbing into the materiality around us, and even one's self, provides a rich platform for understanding place and emplacement. Sound is always already a trace of location.Such features of auditory experience give suggestion for what I may call an acoustical paradigm – how sound sets in motion not only the material world but also the flows of the imagination, lending to forces of signification and social structure, and figuring us in relation to each other. The relationality of sound brings us into a steady web of interferences, each of which announces the promise or problematic of being somewhere.

  16. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  17. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton;

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design for the...... acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design was...... simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  18. Radiative correction in approximate treatments of electromagnetic scattering by point and body scatterers

    Ru, Eric C. Le; Somerville, Walter R. C.; Auguié, Baptiste

    2012-01-01

    The transition-matrix ($T$-matrix) approach provides a general formalism to study scattering problems in various areas of physics, including acoustics (scalar fields) and electromagnetics (vector fields), and is related to the theory of the scattering matrix ($S$-matrix) used in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. Focusing on electromagnetic scattering, we highlight an alternative formulation of the $T$-matrix approach, based on the use of the reactance matrix or $K$-matrix, which is ...

  19. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  20. Nanowave devices for terahertz acoustic phonons

    Lanzillotti-Kimura, N. D.; Fainstein, A.; Lemaître, A.; Jusserand, B.

    2006-02-01

    The emergence of the area of nanophononics requires the development of terahertz (THz) acoustic devices with tailored properties. We describe nonperiodic planar nanostructures with specific THz phononic response and superior performance. We show that improved devices based on GaAs and AlAs layers can be designed using an optimization Nelder-Mead simplex method, and grown with state-of-the-art molecular beam epitaxy. We also demonstrate that high-resolution Raman scattering provides a powerful tool to characterize these devices. We illustrate the concept with results on acoustic THz edge and color filters.

  1. Scattering by two spheres: Theory and experiment

    Bjørnø, Irina; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1998-01-01

    three issues: (1) to develop a simplified theory for scattering by two elastical spheres; (2) to measure the scattering by two spheres in a water tank, and (3) to compare the theoretical/numerical results with the measured data. A number of factors influencing multiple scattering, including the......Extensive studies of scattering of acoustical signals by targets of different regular shapes have formed a useful background for attempts to develop procedures for remote monitoring of suspended materials in marine environments as, for instance, measurements of characteristic parameters of...

  2. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and...

  3. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  4. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... is ANA? Mission Statement Board of Directors ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic ... is ANA? Mission Statement Board of Directors ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic ...

  5. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Join/Renew Ways to Give ANA Discussion Forum ... ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Search ANAUSA.org Connect with us! Educational Video ...

  6. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... Resources Patient Surveys Related Links Clinical Trials.gov Health Care Insurance Toolkit Additional Resources ANA Public Webinars © 2016 Acoustic Neuroma Association Acoustic Neuroma Association ® • ...

  7. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask ... Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask ...

  8. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Join/Renew ... ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Search ANAUSA. ...

  9. Cystic acoustic neuromas

    Chitkara, Naveen; Chanda, Rakesh; Yadav, S. P. S.; N.K. Sharma

    2002-01-01

    Predominantly cystic acoustic neuromas are rare and they usually present with clinical and radiological features different from their more common solid counterparts. Two cases of cystic acoustic neuromas are reported here.

  10. Brillouin scattering self-cancellation

    Florez, O.; Jarschel, P. F.; Espinel, Y. A. V.; Cordeiro, C. M. B.; Mayer Alegre, T. P.; Wiederhecker, G. S.; Dainese, P.

    2016-06-01

    The interaction between light and acoustic phonons is strongly modified in sub-wavelength confinement, and has led to the demonstration and control of Brillouin scattering in photonic structures such as nano-scale optical waveguides and cavities. Besides the small optical mode volume, two physical mechanisms come into play simultaneously: a volume effect caused by the strain-induced refractive index perturbation (known as photo-elasticity), and a surface effect caused by the shift of the optical boundaries due to mechanical vibrations. As a result, proper material and structure engineering allows one to control each contribution individually. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the perfect cancellation of Brillouin scattering arising from Rayleigh acoustic waves by engineering a silica nanowire with exactly opposing photo-elastic and moving-boundary effects. This demonstration provides clear experimental evidence that the interplay between the two mechanisms is a promising tool to precisely control the photon-phonon interaction, enhancing or suppressing it.

  11. Diffuse scattering

    Kostorz, G. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Angewandte Physik, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    While Bragg scattering is characteristic for the average structure of crystals, static local deviations from the average lattice lead to diffuse elastic scattering around and between Bragg peaks. This scattering thus contains information on the occupation of lattice sites by different atomic species and on static local displacements, even in a macroscopically homogeneous crystalline sample. The various diffuse scattering effects, including those around the incident beam (small-angle scattering), are introduced and illustrated by typical results obtained for some Ni alloys. (author) 7 figs., 41 refs.

  12. Diffuse scattering

    While Bragg scattering is characteristic for the average structure of crystals, static local deviations from the average lattice lead to diffuse elastic scattering around and between Bragg peaks. This scattering thus contains information on the occupation of lattice sites by different atomic species and on static local displacements, even in a macroscopically homogeneous crystalline sample. The various diffuse scattering effects, including those around the incident beam (small-angle scattering), are introduced and illustrated by typical results obtained for some Ni alloys. (author) 7 figs., 41 refs

  13. Acoustic Attraction

    Oviatt, Eric; Patsiaouris, Konstantinos; Denardo, Bruce

    2009-11-01

    A sound source of finite size produces a diverging traveling wave in an unbounded fluid. A rigid body that is small compared to the wavelength experiences an attractive radiation force (toward the source). An attractive force is also exerted on the fluid itself. The effect can be demonstrated with a styrofoam ball suspended near a loudspeaker that is producing sound of high amplitude and low frequency (for example, 100 Hz). The behavior can be understood and roughly calculated as a time-averaged Bernoulli effect. A rigorous scattering calculation yields a radiation force that is within a factor of two of the Bernoulli result. For a spherical wave, the force decreases as the inverse fifth power of the distance from the source. Applications of the phenomenon include ultrasonic filtration of liquids and the growth of supermassive black holes that emit sound waves in a surrounding plasma. An experiment is being conducted in an anechoic chamber with a 1-inch diameter aluminum ball that is suspended from an analytical balance. Directly below the ball is a baffled loudspeaker that exerts an attractive force that is measured by the balance.

  14. Acoustic cloaking transformations from attainable material properties

    We propose a general methodology and a set of practical recipes for the construction of ultra-broadband acoustic cloaks-structures that can render themselves and a concealed object undetectable by means of acoustic scattering. The acoustic cloaks presented here are designed and function analogously to electromagnetic cloaks. However, acoustic cloaks in a fluid medium do not suffer the bandwidth limitations imposed on their electromagnetic counterparts by the finite speed of light in vacuum. In the absence of specific metamaterials having arbitrary combinations of quasi-static speed of sound and mass density, we explore the flexibility of continuum transformations that produce approximate cloaking solutions. We show that an imperfect, eikonal acoustic cloak (that is, one which is not impedance matched but is valid in the geometrical optics regime) with negligible dispersion can be designed using a simple layered geometry. Since a practical cloaking device will probably be composed of combinations of solid materials rather than fluids, it is necessary to consider the full elastic properties of such media, which support shear waves in addition to the compression waves associated with the acoustic regime. We perform a systematic theoretical and numerical investigation of the role of shear waves in elastic cloaking devices. We find that for elastic metamaterials with Poisson's ratio ν>0.49, shear waves do not alter the cloaking effect. Such metamaterials can be built from nearly incompressible rubbers (with ν∼0.499) and fluids. We expect this finding to have applications in other acoustic devices based on the form-invariance of the scalar acoustic wave equation.

  15. Acoustic cloaking transformations from attainable material properties

    Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Ghezzo, Fabrizia; Hunt, John; Smith, David R, E-mail: yaroslav.urzhumov@duke.ed [Center for Metamaterials and Integrated Plasmonics, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    We propose a general methodology and a set of practical recipes for the construction of ultra-broadband acoustic cloaks-structures that can render themselves and a concealed object undetectable by means of acoustic scattering. The acoustic cloaks presented here are designed and function analogously to electromagnetic cloaks. However, acoustic cloaks in a fluid medium do not suffer the bandwidth limitations imposed on their electromagnetic counterparts by the finite speed of light in vacuum. In the absence of specific metamaterials having arbitrary combinations of quasi-static speed of sound and mass density, we explore the flexibility of continuum transformations that produce approximate cloaking solutions. We show that an imperfect, eikonal acoustic cloak (that is, one which is not impedance matched but is valid in the geometrical optics regime) with negligible dispersion can be designed using a simple layered geometry. Since a practical cloaking device will probably be composed of combinations of solid materials rather than fluids, it is necessary to consider the full elastic properties of such media, which support shear waves in addition to the compression waves associated with the acoustic regime. We perform a systematic theoretical and numerical investigation of the role of shear waves in elastic cloaking devices. We find that for elastic metamaterials with Poisson's ratio {nu}>0.49, shear waves do not alter the cloaking effect. Such metamaterials can be built from nearly incompressible rubbers (with {nu}{approx}0.499) and fluids. We expect this finding to have applications in other acoustic devices based on the form-invariance of the scalar acoustic wave equation.

  16. An overview of acoustic telemetry

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry has been a dream of the drilling industry for the past 50 years. It offers the promise of data rates which are one-hundred times greater than existing technology. Such a system would open the door to true logging-while-drilling technology and bring enormous profits to its developers. The basic idea is to produce an encoded sound wave at the bottom of the well, let it propagate up the steel drillpipe, and extract the data from the signal at the surface. Unfortunately, substantial difficulties arise. The first difficult problem is to produce the sound wave. Since the most promising transmission wavelengths are about 20 feet, normal transducer efficiencies are quire low. Compounding this problem is the structural complexity of the bottomhole assembly and drillstring. For example, the acoustic impedance of the drillstring changes every 30 feet and produces an unusual scattering pattern in the acoustic transmission. This scattering pattern causes distortion of the signal and is often confused with signal attenuation. These problems are not intractable. Recent work has demonstrated that broad frequency bands exist which are capable of transmitting data at rates up to 100 bits per second. Our work has also identified the mechanism which is responsible for the observed anomalies in the patterns of signal attenuation. Furthermore in the past few years a body of experience has been developed in designing more efficient transducers for application to metal waveguides. The direction of future work is clear. New transducer designs which are more efficient and compatible with existing downhole power supplies need to be built and tested; existing field test data need to be analyzed for transmission bandwidth and attenuation; and the new and less expensive methods of collecting data on transmission path quality need to be incorporated into this effort. 11 refs.

  17. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    Blaeser, Susan B; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Susan B. Blaeser.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:27036268

  18. Virtual reshaping and invisibility in obstacle scattering

    We consider reshaping an obstacle virtually by using transformation optics in acoustic and electromagnetic scattering. Among the general virtual reshaping results, the virtual minification and virtual magnification in particular are studied. Stability estimates are derived for scattering amplitude in terms of the diameter of a small obstacle, which implies that the limiting case for minification corresponds to a perfect cloaking, i.e., the obstacle is invisible to detection

  19. Surface resonant states and superlensing in acoustic metamaterials

    Ambati, Muralidhar; Fang, Nicholas; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Xiang

    2007-05-01

    We report that the negative material responses of acoustic metamaterials can lead to a plethora of surface resonant states. We determine that negative effective-mass density is the necessary condition for the existence of surface states on acoustic metamaterials. We offer the microscopic picture of these unique surface states; in addition, we find that these surface excitations enhance the transmission of evanescent pressure fields across the metamaterial. The evanescent pressure fields scattered from an object can be resonantly coupled and enhanced at the surface of the acoustic metamaterial, resulting in an image with resolution below the diffraction limit. This concept of acoustic superlens opens exciting opportunities to design acoustic metamaterials for ultrasonic imaging.

  20. Soft 3D acoustic metamaterial with negative index.

    Brunet, Thomas; Merlin, Aurore; Mascaro, Benoit; Zimny, Kevin; Leng, Jacques; Poncelet, Olivier; Aristégui, Christophe; Mondain-Monval, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to the design and achievement of negative-refractive-index metamaterials since the 2000s. One of the challenges at present is to extend that field beyond electromagnetism by realizing three-dimensional (3D) media with negative acoustic indices. We report a new class of locally resonant ultrasonic metafluids consisting of a concentrated suspension of macroporous microbeads engineered using soft-matter techniques. The propagation of Gaussian pulses within these random distributions of 'ultra-slow' Mie resonators is investigated through in situ ultrasonic experiments. The real part of the acoustic index is shown to be negative (up to almost - 1) over broad frequency bandwidths, depending on the volume fraction of the microbeads as predicted by multiple-scattering calculations. These soft 3D acoustic metamaterials open the way for key applications such as sub-wavelength imaging and transformation acoustics, which require the production of acoustic devices with negative or zero-valued indices. PMID:25502100

  1. Soft 3D acoustic metamaterial with negative index

    Brunet, Thomas; Merlin, Aurore; Mascaro, Benoit; Zimny, Kevin; Leng, Jacques; Poncelet, Olivier; Aristégui, Christophe; Mondain-Monval, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to the design and achievement of negative-refractive-index metamaterials since the 2000s. One of the challenges at present is to extend that field beyond electromagnetism by realizing three-dimensional (3D) media with negative acoustic indices. We report a new class of locally resonant ultrasonic metafluids consisting of a concentrated suspension of macroporous microbeads engineered using soft-matter techniques. The propagation of Gaussian pulses within these random distributions of ‘ultra-slow’ Mie resonators is investigated through in situ ultrasonic experiments. The real part of the acoustic index is shown to be negative (up to almost - 1) over broad frequency bandwidths, depending on the volume fraction of the microbeads as predicted by multiple-scattering calculations. These soft 3D acoustic metamaterials open the way for key applications such as sub-wavelength imaging and transformation acoustics, which require the production of acoustic devices with negative or zero-valued indices.

  2. Evaluation of Adhesive Bonding Quality by Acoustic Emission

    Prediction of fatigue life and monitoring of fracture process for adhesively bonded CFRP composites joint have been investigated by analysis of acoustic emission signals during the fatigue and tension tests. During fatigue test, generated acoustic emission is related to stored elastic strain energy. By results of monitoring of AE event rate, fatigue process could be divided into two regions, and boundaries of two regions, fatigue cycles of the initiation of fast crack growth, were 70-80% of fatigue life even though the fatigue life were highly scattered from specimen to specimen. The result shows the possibility of predicting catastrophic failure by acoustic emission monitoring

  3. Acoustic cloak with duplex communication ability constructed by multilayered homogeneous isotropic materials

    Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiaojun

    2012-12-01

    Based on the effective medium theory, we propose a practical implementation of a cylindrical acoustic cloak with a concentric alternating multilayered structure of homogeneous isotropic materials, which can perfectly mimic the ideal radius-dependent and anisotropic ordinary lens cloak. The proposal exhibits near-ideal cloaking performance such as low-scattering and shadow-reducing in a wide frequency range, thus it can hide an object from the detection of acoustic waves. The acoustic wave can pass through the cloaking shell with an unchanged wavefront shape, which endues the cloaked object with duplex communication ability. More simulations on the acoustic far-field scattering patterns and the total scattering cross-section are performed to investigate the layer number and the frequency dependence of the cloaking effect, and the results show that the thinner layers exhibit a better cloaking effect. The proposal may significantly facilitate the experimental demonstration of the acoustic cloak.

  4. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  5. NEUTRON-SCATTERING STUDY OF DCN

    Mackenzie, Gordon A.; Pawley, G. S.

    1979-01-01

    Phonons in deuterium cyanide have been measured by neutron coherent inelastic scattering. The main subject of study was the transverse acoustic mode in the (110) direction polarised along (110) which is associated with the first-order structural phase transition at 160K. Measurements have shown...

  6. Homogenization scheme for acoustic metamaterials

    Yang, Min

    2014-02-26

    We present a homogenization scheme for acoustic metamaterials that is based on reproducing the lowest orders of scattering amplitudes from a finite volume of metamaterials. This approach is noted to differ significantly from that of coherent potential approximation, which is based on adjusting the effective-medium parameters to minimize scatterings in the long-wavelength limit. With the aid of metamaterials’ eigenstates, the effective parameters, such as mass density and elastic modulus can be obtained by matching the surface responses of a metamaterial\\'s structural unit cell with a piece of homogenized material. From the Green\\'s theorem applied to the exterior domain problem, matching the surface responses is noted to be the same as reproducing the scattering amplitudes. We verify our scheme by applying it to three different examples: a layered lattice, a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, and a decorated-membrane system. It is shown that the predicted characteristics and wave fields agree almost exactly with numerical simulations and experiments and the scheme\\'s validity is constrained by the number of dominant surface multipoles instead of the usual long-wavelength assumption. In particular, the validity extends to the full band in one dimension and to regimes near the boundaries of the Brillouin zone in two dimensions.

  7. Long-Wavelength Phonon Scattering in Nonpolar Semiconductors

    Lawætz, Peter

    1969-01-01

    The long-wavelength acoustic- and optical-phonon scattering of carriers in nonpolar semiconductors is considered from a general point of view. The deformation-potential approximation is defined and it is shown that long-range electrostatic forces give a nontrivial correction to the scattering. For...... the very-short-range nature of interactions in a covalent semiconductor....

  8. Acoustic streaming in microchannels

    Tribler, Peter Muller

    , and experimental results for the streaming-induced drag force dominated motion of particles suspended in a water-filled microchannel supporting a transverse half-wavelength resonance. The experimental and theoretical results agree within a mean relative dierence of approximately 20%, a low deviation given state......This thesis presents studies of boundary-driven acoustic streaming in microfluidic channels, which is a steady flow of the fluid initiated by the interactions of an oscillating acoustic standing wave and the rigid walls of the microchannel. The studies present analysis of the acoustic resonance......, the acoustic streaming flow, and the forces on suspended microparticles. The work is motivated by the application of particle focusing by acoustic radiation forces in medical, environmental and food sciences. Here acoustic streaming is most often unwanted, because it limits the focusability of particles...

  9. Vibro-acoustics

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume book gives a thorough and comprehensive presentation of vibration and acoustic theories. Different from traditional textbooks which typically deal with some aspects of either acoustic or vibration problems, it is unique of this book to combine those two correlated subjects together. Moreover, it provides fundamental analysis and mathematical descriptions for several crucial phenomena of Vibro-Acoustics which are quite useful in noise reduction, including how structures are excited, energy flows from an excitation point to a sound radiating surface, and finally how a structure radiates noise to a surrounding fluid. Many measurement results included in the text make the reading interesting and informative. Problems/questions are listed at the end of each chapter and the solutions are provided. This will help the readers to understand the topics of Vibro-Acoustics more deeply. The book should be of interest to anyone interested in sound and vibration, vehicle acoustics, ship acoustics and inter...

  10. Springer handbook of acoustics

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and electronics. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is also in his 2nd edition an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents. This new edition of the Handbook features over 11 revised and expanded chapters, new illustrations, and 2 new chapters covering microphone arrays  and acoustic emission.  Updated chapters contain the latest research and applications in, e.g. sound propagation in the atmosphere, nonlinear acoustics in fluids, building and concert hall acoustics, signal processing, psychoacoustics, computer music, animal bioacousics, sound intensity, modal acoustics as well as new chapters on microphone arrays an...

  11. Acoustic metamaterial design and applications

    Zhang, Shu

    make the experimental studies remain challenging. We present here the first practical realization of a low-loss and broadband acoustic cloak for underwater ultrasound. This metamaterial cloak is constructed with a network of acoustic circuit elements, namely serial inductors and shunt capacitors. Our experiment clearly shows that the acoustic cloak can effectively bend the ultrasound waves around the hidden object, with reduced scattering and shadow. Due to the non-resonant nature of the building elements, this low loss (˜6dB/m) cylindrical cloak exhibits excellent invisibility over a broad frequency range from 52 to 64 kHz in the measurements. The low visibility of the cloaked object for underwater ultrasound shed a light on the fundamental understanding of manipulation, storage and control of acoustic waves. Furthermore, our experimental study indicates that this design approach should be scalable to different acoustic frequencies and offers the possibility for a variety of devices based on coordinate transformation.

  12. Double-negative acoustic metamaterials based on quasi-two-dimensional fluid-like shells

    A structured cylindrical scatterer with low-frequency resonances in both the effective bulk modulus and the dynamical mass density is designed and characterized. The proposed scattering unit is made of a rigid cylinder surrounded by a fluid-like shell embedded in a two-dimensional waveguide of height less than the length of the cylindrical scatterer. It is demonstrated that the acoustic metamaterials based on this building unit have negative acoustic parameters in a broad range of frequencies. It is also shown that double-negative behavior can be tailored by adjusting the dimensions and properties of the materials forming the structured scattering unit. (paper)

  13. Handbook of Engineering Acoustics

    Möser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the physical background of engineering acoustics, focusing on empirically obtained engineering experience as well as on measurement techniques and engineering methods for prognostics. Its goal is not only to describe the state of art of engineering acoustics but also to give practical help to engineers in order to solve acoustic problems. It deals with the origin, the transmission and the methods of the abating different kinds of air-borne and structure-borne sounds caused by various mechanisms – from traffic to machinery and flow-induced sound. In addition the modern aspects of room and building acoustics, as well as psychoacoustics and active noise control, are covered.

  14. Acoustic dispersive prism

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  15. Shear-mediated contributions to the effective properties of soft acoustic metamaterials including negative index

    Derek Michael Forrester; Valerie J. Pinfield

    2015-01-01

    Here we show that, for sub-wavelength particles in a fluid, viscous losses due to shear waves and their influence on neighbouring particles significantly modify the effective acoustic properties, and thereby the conditions at which negative acoustic refraction occurs. Building upon earlier single particle scattering work, we adopt a multiple scattering approach to derive the effective properties (density, bulk modulus, wavenumber). We show,through theoretical prediction, the implications for ...

  16. Translation Representations and Scattering By Two Intervals

    Jorgensen, Palle; Tian, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Studying unitary one-parameter groups in Hilbert space (U(t),H), we show that a model for obstacle scattering can be built, up to unitary equivalence, with the use of translation representations for L2-functions in the complement of two finite and disjoint intervals. The model encompasses a family of systems (U (t), H). For each, we obtain a detailed spectral representation, and we compute the scattering operator, and scattering matrix. We illustrate our results in the Lax-Phillips model where (U (t), H) represents an acoustic wave equation in an exterior domain; and in quantum tunneling for dynamics of quantum states.

  17. The Fast Scattering Code (FSC): Validation Studies and Program Guidelines

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Dunn, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    The Fast Scattering Code (FSC) is a frequency domain noise prediction program developed at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to simulate the acoustic field produced by the interaction of known, time harmonic incident sound with bodies of arbitrary shape and surface impedance immersed in a potential flow. The code uses the equivalent source method (ESM) to solve an exterior 3-D Helmholtz boundary value problem (BVP) by expanding the scattered acoustic pressure field into a series of point sources distributed on a fictitious surface placed inside the actual scatterer. This work provides additional code validation studies and illustrates the range of code parameters that produce accurate results with minimal computational costs. Systematic noise prediction studies are presented in which monopole generated incident sound is scattered by simple geometric shapes - spheres (acoustically hard and soft surfaces), oblate spheroids, flat disk, and flat plates with various edge topologies. Comparisons between FSC simulations and analytical results and experimental data are presented.

  18. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    ... org Connect with us! What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Each heading slides to reveal information. Important Points ... Neuroma Important Points To Know About an Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular schwannoma, ...

  19. NEUTRON-SCATTERING STUDY OF DCN

    Mackenzie, Gordon A.; Pawley, G. S.

    1979-01-01

    Phonons in deuterium cyanide have been measured by neutron coherent inelastic scattering. The main subject of study was the transverse acoustic mode in the (110) direction polarised along (110) which is associated with the first-order structural phase transition at 160K. Measurements have shown...... that the frequency decreases by about 25% between about 225 and 160K as the transition temperature is approached. The other acoustic modes observable in the a*b* scattering plane have been measured and show no anomalous temperature dependence. Optic modes were unobservable because of the small size of...... the single-crystal sample which gave insufficient scattered intensity. Apart from the 'soft' mode, the measured frequencies are in good agreement with lattice dynamics calculations....

  20. Critical scattering

    We outline the theoretical and experimental background to neutron scattering studies of critical phenomena at magnetic and structural phase transitions. The displacive phase transition of SrTiO3 is discussed, along with examples from recent work on magnetic materials from the rare-earth (Ho, Dy) and actinide (NpAs, NpSb, USb) classes. The impact of synchrotron X-ray scattering is discussed in conclusion. (author) 13 figs., 18 refs

  1. Critical scattering

    Stirling, W.G. [Liverpool Univ., Dep. of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Perry, S.C. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    We outline the theoretical and experimental background to neutron scattering studies of critical phenomena at magnetic and structural phase transitions. The displacive phase transition of SrTiO{sub 3} is discussed, along with examples from recent work on magnetic materials from the rare-earth (Ho, Dy) and actinide (NpAs, NpSb, USb) classes. The impact of synchrotron X-ray scattering is discussed in conclusion. (author) 13 figs., 18 refs.

  2. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Hora, Petr; Červená, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2010), s. 25-36. ISSN 1802-680X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1630 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission source * wave propagation * FEM Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  3. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself Post-treatment Post-treatment ... Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself Post-treatment Post-treatment ...

  4. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  5. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  6. Computational Ocean Acoustics

    Jensen, Finn B; Porter, Michael B; Schmidt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the computer has played an increasingly pivotal role in the field of ocean acoustics. Faster and less expensive than actual ocean experiments, and capable of accommodating the full complexity of the acoustic problem, numerical models are now standard research tools in ocean laboratories. The progress made in computational ocean acoustics over the last thirty years is summed up in this authoritative and innovatively illustrated new text. Written by some of the field's pioneers, all Fellows of the Acoustical Society of America, Computational Ocean Acoustics presents the latest numerical techniques for solving the wave equation in heterogeneous fluid–solid media. The authors discuss various computational schemes in detail, emphasizing the importance of theoretical foundations that lead directly to numerical implementations for real ocean environments. To further clarify the presentation, the fundamental propagation features of the techniques are illustrated in color. Computational Ocean A...

  7. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook will...... present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...... from different areas, will find the self-contained chapters accessible and will be interested in the similarities and differences between the approaches and techniques used in different areas of acoustics....

  8. An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-03-24

    Acoustic telemetry has been a dream of the drilling industry for the past 50 years. It offers the promise of data rates which are one-hundred times greater than existing technology. Such a system would open the door to true logging-while-drilling technology and bring enormous profits to its developers. The oil and gas industry has led in most of the attempts to develop this type of telemetry system; however, very substantial efforts have also been made through government sponsored work in the geothermal industry. None of these previous attempts have lead to a commercial telemetry system. Conceptually, the problem looks easy. The basic idea is to produce an encoded sound wave at the bottom of the well, let it propagate up the steel drillpipe, and extract the data from the signal at the surface. Unfortunately, substantial difficulties arise. The first difficult problem is to produce the sound wave. Since the most promising transmission wavelengths are about 20 feet, normal transducer efficiencies are quite low. Compounding this problem is the structural complexity of the bottomhole assembly and drillstring. For example, the acoustic impedance of the drillstring changes every 30 feet and produces an unusual scattering pattern in the acoustic transmission. This scattering pattern causes distortion of the signal and is often confused with signal attenuation. These problems are not intractable. Recent work has demonstrated that broad frequency bands exist which are capable of transmitting data at rates up to 100 bits per second. Our work has also identified the mechanism which is responsible for the observed anomalies in the patterns of signal attenuation. Furthermore in the past few years a body of experience has been developed in designing more efficient transducers for application to metal Waveguides. The direction of future work is clear. New transducer designs which are more efficient and compatible with existing downhole power supplies need to be built and tested

  9. Acoustic cloaking and mirages with flying carpets

    Diatta, Andre; Guenneau, Sebastien; Enoch, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Carpets under consideration here, in the context of pressure acoustic waves propagating in a compressible fluid, do not touch the ground: they levitate in mid-air (or float in mid-water), which leads to approximate cloaking for an object hidden underneath, or touching either sides of a square cylinder on, or over, the ground. The tentlike carpets attached to the sides of a square cylinder illustrate how the notion of a carpet on a wall naturally generalizes to sides of other small compact objects. We then extend the concept of flying carpets to circular cylinders. However, instead of reducing its scattering cross-section like in acoustic cloaks, we rather mimic that of another obstacle, say a square rigid cylinder. For instance, show that one can hide any type of defects under such circular carpets, and yet they still scatter waves just like a smaller cylinder on its own. Interestingly, all these carpets are described by non-singular acoustic parameters. To exemplify this important aspect, we propose a multi-...

  10. Acoustic cloaking using layered pentamode materials.

    Scandrett, Clyde L; Boisvert, Jeffrey E; Howarth, Thomas R

    2010-05-01

    While receiving less attention in the literature than electromagnetic cloaking, theoretical efforts to define and create acoustic cloaks based upon mimicking coordinate transformations through use of metamaterials is of interest. The present work extends recent analysis of Norris [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 464, 2411-2434 (2008)] by considering a range of cloaks, from those comprised of fluid layers which are isotropic in bulk moduli with anisotropic density to those having anisotropic bulk moduli and isotropic density. In all but pure inertial varieties, fluid layers comprising the cloaks are pentamode materials governed by a special scalar acoustic equation for pseudopressure derived by Norris. In most cases presented, material properties of the fluid/pentamode layers are based upon target values specified by continuously varying properties resulting from theoretical coordinate transformations geared to minimize scattered pressure limited by realistic goals. The present work analyzes such cloaks for the specific case of plane wave scattering from an acoustically hard sphere. An initial exploration of the parameter space defining such cloaks (for example, material properties of its constituent layers, and operating frequency) is undertaken with a view toward "optimal" design. PMID:21117736

  11. Naturally enhanced ion-acoustic spectra and their interpretation

    Sedgemore-Schulthess, K.J.F.; St. Maurice, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Incoherent scatter radars are designed to detect scatter from thermal fluctuations in the ionosphere. These fluctuations contain, among other things, features associated with ion-acoustic waves driven by random motions within the plasma. The resulting spectra are generally broad and noisy, but...... years there has been much interest in naturally occurring (as opposed to artificially stimulated) enhanced ion-acoustic spectra seen in the auroral zone and cusp/cleft region. A study of the plasma instability processes that lead to such spectra will help us to better understand auroral particle...... acceleration, wave-particle and wave-wave interactions in the ionosphere, and their association with magnetospheric processes. There is now a substantial body of literature documenting observations of enhanced ion-acoustic spectra, but there remains controversy over generation mechanisms. We present a review...

  12. Theoretical analysis and simulation prediction of torpedo self-noise based on acoustic scattering model%基于双基地模型的鱼雷自噪声仿真预报

    徐园园; 王明洲; 蒋继军; 李斌

    2012-01-01

    鱼雷自噪声直接影响了自导系统的有效探测距离和定向精度,而在水下航行时螺旋桨辐射噪声是其自噪声的主要声源.本文针对螺旋桨噪声在海洋中经散射产生的自噪声,提出了一种基于声散射模型的理论研究方法,推导自噪声平均强度.仿真分析体积、海面散射及鱼雷散射自噪声强度随螺旋桨噪声形成的辐射噪声、声吸收系数、散射系数、航深等参数的变化关系.考虑雷长,分析其影响,建立精确的理论模型.仿真结果表明,变化规律与客观事实和经验数据吻合,表明了该模型的正确性和有效性,为鱼雷自噪声预报提供了新的途径.%Torpedo self-noise affects the detection range and localization accuracy of its homing system. While propeller noise occupies the dominating position in the condition of high frequency and high speed,it is essential to study on propeller noise. So this paper proposes a method focused on it. It is based on bistatic scattering model comparatively. And it analyses variational rules of parameters for torpedo self-noise by using Matlab, such as the radiated noise, the sound absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient and the depth. It also analyses the effect of torpedo length. Simulation results show that the effects obtained by analyzing the computing results conform to the objective law. It indicates the validity of this theoretical model. Also it finds a new way to predict torpedo self-noise exactly and effectively.

  13. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry–Perot resonance. - Highlights: • Expression of transmission coefficient of an acoustic grating with curled slits. • Non-dispersive and tunable effective medium parameters for the acoustic grating. • A flat acoustic focusing lens with gradient index by using the acoustic grating

  14. Acoustics as a tool to enhance physics education

    Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Gee, Kent L.

    2016-03-01

    The use of acoustics in physics pedagogy, whether in stand-alone courses, or as examples, analogies, or demonstrations in other contexts, can enhance student learning. At most, a typical physics student receives only a few weeks of instruction in acoustics, despite its potential ability to enhance class discussions of source, resonance, and traveling-wave phenomena in both introductory and advanced settings. A recent annotated bibliography, includes specific resources for incorporating acoustics-based demonstrations into physics courses. Acoustics analogies can be used to illustrate wave phenomena in advanced contexts, such as diffraction, scattering, refraction, reflection, method of images, resonance, dispersion, tunneling. This presentation will review the Resource Letter, highlighting specific demonstration ideas, as well as offer additional perspectives gained since its publication.

  15. From Architectural Acoustics to Acoustical Architecture Using Computer Simulation

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; KIRKEGAARD, Poul Henning

    2005-01-01

    Architectural acoustics design has in the past been based on simple design rules. However, with a growing complexity in architectural acoustics and the emergence of room acoustic simulation programmes with considerable potential, it is now possible to subjectively analyse and evaluate acoustic properties prior to the actual construction of a building. With the right tools applied, acoustic design can become an integral part of the architectural design process. The aim of this paper is to inve...

  16. Underwater Applications of Acoustical Holography

    P. C. Mehta

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the basic technique of acoustical holography. Requirements for recording the acoustical hologram are discussed with its ability for underwater imaging in view. Some practical systems for short-range and medium-range imaging are described. The advantages of acoustical holography over optical imaging, acoustical imaging and sonars are outlined.

  17. Predicting Acoustics in Class Rooms

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    Typical class rooms have fairly simple geometries, even so room acoustics in this type of room is difficult to predict using today's room acoustic computer modeling software. The reasons why acoustics of class rooms are harder to predict than acoustics of complicated concert halls might be...

  18. Tunable acoustic metamaterials

    Babaee, Sahab; Viard, Nicolas; Fang, Nicholas; Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-03-01

    We report a new class of active and switchable acoustic metamaterials composed of three-dimensional stretchable chiral helices arranged on a two-dimensional square lattice. We investigate the propagation of sounds through the proposed structure both numerically and experimentally and find that the deformation of the helices can be exploited as a novel and effective approach to control the propagation of acoustic waves. The proposed concept expands the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials since we demonstrate that the deformation can be exploited to turn on or off the band gap, opening avenues for the design of adaptive noise-cancelling devices.

  19. Cascaded forward Brillouin scattering to all Stokes orders

    Wolff, Christian; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Steel, Michael J; Poulton, Christopher G

    2016-01-01

    Inelastic scattering processes such as Brillouin scattering can often function in cascaded regimes and this is likely to occur in certain integrated opto-acoustic devices. We develop a Hamiltonian formalism for cascaded Brillouin scattering valid for both quantum and classical regimes. By regarding Brillouin scattering as the interaction of a single acoustic envelope and a single optical envelope that covers all Stokes and anti-Stokes orders, we obtain a compact model that is well suited for numerical implementation, extension to include other optical nonlinearities or short pulses, and application in the quantum-optics domain. We then theoretically analyze intra-mode forward Brillouin scattering (FBS) for arbitrary waveguides with and without optical dispersion. In the absence of optical dispersion, we find an exact analytical solution. With a perturbative approach, we furthermore solve the case of weak optical dispersion. Our work leads to several key results on intra-mode FBS. For negligible dispersion, we...

  20. Phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials

    Ming-Hui Lu; Liang Feng; Yan-Feng Chen

    2009-01-01

    Phononic crystals have been proposed about two decades ago and some important characteristics such as acoustic band structure and negative refraction have stimulated fundamental and practical studies in acoustic materials and devices since then. To carefully engineer a phononic crystal in an acoustic “atom” scale, acoustic metamaterials with their inherent deep subwavelength nature have triggered more exciting investigations on negative bulk modulus and/or negative mass density. Acoustic surf...

  1. Acoustic effects analysis utilizing speckle pattern with fixed-particle Monte Carlo

    Vakili, Ali; Hollmann, Joseph A.; Holt, R. Glynn; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging in a turbid medium is limited because of multiple scattering a photon undergoes while traveling through the medium. Therefore, optical imaging is unable to provide high resolution information deep in the medium. In the case of soft tissue, acoustic waves unlike light, can travel through the medium with negligible scattering. However, acoustic waves cannot provide medically relevant contrast as good as light. Hybrid solutions have been applied to use the benefits of both imaging methods. A focused acoustic wave generates a force inside an acoustically absorbing medium known as acoustic radiation force (ARF). ARF induces particle displacement within the medium. The amount of displacement is a function of mechanical properties of the medium and the applied force. To monitor the displacement induced by the ARF, speckle pattern analysis can be used. The speckle pattern is the result of interfering optical waves with different phases. As light travels through the medium, it undergoes several scattering events. Hence, it generates different scattering paths which depends on the location of the particles. Light waves that travel along these paths have different phases (different optical path lengths). ARF induces displacement to scatterers within the acoustic focal volume, and changes the optical path length. In addition, temperature rise due to conversion of absorbed acoustic energy to heat, changes the index of refraction and therefore, changes the optical path length of the scattering paths. The result is a change in the speckle pattern. Results suggest that the average change in the speckle pattern measures the displacement of particles and temperature rise within the acoustic wave focal area, hence can provide mechanical and thermal properties of the medium.

  2. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  3. Principles of musical acoustics

    Hartmann, William M

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Musical Acoustics focuses on the basic principles in the science and technology of music. Musical examples and specific musical instruments demonstrate the principles. The book begins with a study of vibrations and waves, in that order. These topics constitute the basic physical properties of sound, one of two pillars supporting the science of musical acoustics. The second pillar is the human element, the physiological and psychological aspects of acoustical science. The perceptual topics include loudness, pitch, tone color, and localization of sound. With these two pillars in place, it is possible to go in a variety of directions. The book treats in turn, the topics of room acoustics, audio both analog and digital, broadcasting, and speech. It ends with chapters on the traditional musical instruments, organized by family. The mathematical level of this book assumes that the reader is familiar with elementary algebra. Trigonometric functions, logarithms and powers also appear in the book, but co...

  4. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  5. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  6. Acoustic Igniter Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  7. Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) is a progressive wave tube test facility that is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to...

  8. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... treatment Summary Types Of Post-treatment Issues Resources Medical Resources Considerations When Selecting a Healthcare Professional Healthcare ... ANA? Mission Statement Board of Directors ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma ...

  9. Acoustic coherent perfect absorbers

    In this paper, we explore the possibility of achieving acoustic coherent perfect absorbers. Through numerical simulations in two dimensions, we demonstrate that the energy of coherent acoustic waves can be totally absorbed by a fluid absorber with specific complex mass density or bulk modulus. The robustness of such absorbing systems is investigated under small perturbations of the absorber parameters. We find that when the resonance order is the lowest and the size of the absorber is comparable to the wavelength in the background, the phenomenon of perfect absorption is most stable. When the wavelength inside both the background and the absorber is much larger than the size of the absorber, perfect absorption is possible when the mass density of the absorber approaches the negative value of the background mass density. Finally, we show that by using suitable dispersive acoustic metamaterials, broadband acoustic perfect absorption may be achieved. (papers)

  10. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  11. Autonomous Acoustic Receiver System

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Collects underwater acoustic data and oceanographic data. Data are recorded onboard an ocean buoy and can be telemetered to a remote ship or shore station...

  12. Shear Brillouin light scattering microscope.

    Kim, Moonseok; Besner, Sebastien; Ramier, Antoine; Kwok, Sheldon J J; An, Jeesoo; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-11

    Brillouin spectroscopy has been used to characterize shear acoustic phonons in materials. However, conventional instruments had slow acquisition times over 10 min per 1 mW of input optical power, and they required two objective lenses to form a 90° scattering geometry necessary for polarization coupling by shear phonons. Here, we demonstrate a confocal Brillouin microscope capable of detecting both shear and longitudinal phonons with improved speeds and with a single objective lens. Brillouin scattering spectra were measured from polycarbonate, fused quartz, and borosilicate in 1-10 s at an optical power level of 10 mW. The elastic constants, phonon mean free path and the ratio of the Pockels coefficients were determined at microscopic resolution. PMID:26832263

  13. Brillouin Scattering Self-Cancellation

    Florez, Omar; Espinel, Yovanny A V; Cordeiro, Cristiano M B; Alegre, Thiago P Mayer; Wiederhecker, Gustavo S; Dainese, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between light and acoustic phonons is strongly modified in sub-wavelength confinement, and has led to the demonstration and control of Brillouin scattering in photonic structures such as nano-scale optical waveguides and cavities. Besides the small optical mode volume, two physical mechanisms come into play simultaneously: a volume effect caused by the strain induced refractive index perturbation (known as photo-elasticity), and a surface effect caused by the shift of the optical boundaries due to mechanical vibrations. As a result proper material and structure engineering allows one to control each contribution individually. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate the perfect cancellation of Brillouin scattering by engineering a silica nanowire with exactly opposing photo-elastic and moving-boundary effects. This demonstration provides clear experimental evidence that the interplay between the two mechanisms is a promising tool to precisely control the photon-phonon interaction, enhancin...

  14. Stimulated Brillouin scattering enhancement in silicon inverse opal waveguides

    Smith, M. J. A.; Wolff, C; Sterke, C. Martijn de; Lapine, M.; Kuhlmey, B. T.; Poulton, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon is an ideal material for on-chip applications, however its poor acoustic properties limit its performance for important optoacoustic applications, particularly for Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). We theoretically show that silicon inverse opals exhibit a strongly improved acoustic performance that enhances the bulk SBS gain coefficient by more than two orders of magnitude. We also design a waveguide that incorporates silicon inverse opals and which has SBS gain values that are ...

  15. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Hora, Petr; Červená, Olga

    Plzeň : University of West Bohemia, 2009 - (Adámek, V.; Zajíček, M.). s. 1-2 ISBN 978-80-7043-824-4. [Výpočtová mechanika 2009. 09.11.2009-11.11.2009, Nečtiny] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1630 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission source * wave propagation * FEM Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  16. The autonomous acoustic buoy

    Pellicer, Francisco; Reitsma, Robert; Agüera, Joaquín; Marinas, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The Acoustic Buoy is a project between the Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics (LAB) and the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC). In areas that the human activities produce high noise levels, such as oil exploration or construction, there is a need to monitor the environment for the presence of cetaceans. Another need is for fishing, to prevent endangered species from being killed. This can be done with an Autonomous Acoustic Buoy (AAB). Mooring or anchoring at to the seaflo...

  17. Anal acoustic reflectometry

    Mitchell, Peter J; Klarskov, Niels; Telford, Karen J; Hosker, Gordon L; Lose, Gunnar; Kiff, Edward S

    2011-01-01

    Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis.......Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis....

  18. Elastic wave scattering to characterize heterogeneities in the borehole environment

    Tang, Xiao-Ming; Li, Zhen; Hei, Chuang; Su, Yuan-Da

    2016-04-01

    Scattering due to small-scale heterogeneities in the rock formation surrounding a wellbore can significantly change the acoustic waveform from a logging measurement which in turn can be used to characterize the formation heterogeneities. This study simulates the elastic heterogeneity scattering in monopole and dipole acoustic logging and analyse the resulting effects on the waveforms. The results show that significant coda waves are generated in both monopole and dipole waveforms and the dipole coda is dominated by S-to-S scattering, which can be effectively utilized to diagnose the heterogeneity in the rock formation. The coda wave modelling and analysis were used to characterize dipole acoustic data logged before and after fracturing a reservoir interval, with significant coda wave in the after-fracturing data indicating fracturing-induced heterogeneous property change in the rock volume surrounding the borehole.

  19. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications. PMID:25418084

  20. Suppression of Raman gain by finite level ion acoustic waves in inhomogeneous plasma

    We have examined a complex five-wave Raman scattering event in an inhomogeneous plasma in the presence of a finite level of ion acoustic waves. The first phase involves conventional three-wave stimulated Raman scattering, followed by the decay of the Raman Langmuir wave into either a second Langmuir wave (LDI) or a second scattered light wave (EDI) and an ion acoustic wave, assumed present at a non-thermal level. These decays take place locally so that matching conditions for Raman scattering and the subsidiary decay are coincident. We have shown that the complex Raman gain is sensitive to the source levels for the amplifying waves. For LDI the gain may be suppressed or enhanced depending on the relative intensities of the two Langmuir waves while for EDI the gain is invariably suppressed. Only a very modest level of ion acoustic waves is necessary for this to occur. (authors)

  1. Physical Acoustics in the Solid State

    Lüthi, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Suitable for researchers and graduate students in physics and material science, "Physical Acoustics in the Solid State" reviews the modern aspects in the field, including many experimental results, especially those involving ultrasonics. Practically all fields of solid-state physics are covered: metals, semiconductors, magnetism, superconductivity, different kinds of phase transitions, low-dimensional systems, and the quantum Hall effect. After a review of the relevant experimental techniques and an introduction to the theory of elasticity, emphasizing the symmetry aspects, applications in the various fields of condensed matter physics are presented. Also treated are Brillouin-scattering results and results from thermodynamic investigations, such as thermal expansion and specific heat.

  2. Physical Acoustics in the Solid State

    Lüthi, B

    2006-01-01

    Suitable for researchers and graduate students in physics and material science, "Physical Acoustics in the Solid State" reviews the modern aspects in the field, including many experimental results, especially those involving ultrasonics. Practically all fields of solid-state physics are covered: metals, semiconductors, magnetism, superconductivity, different kinds of phase transitions, low-dimensional systems, and the quantum Hall effect. After a review of the relevant experimental techniques and an introduction to the theory of elasticity, emphasizing the symmetry aspects, applications in the various fields of condensed matter physics are presented. Also treated are Brillouin-scattering results and results from thermodynamic investigations, such as thermal expansion and specific heat.

  3. Formation of high-order acoustic Bessel beams by spiral diffraction gratings

    Jiménez, Noé; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor; Romero-García, Vicent; García-Raffi, Lluis M; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-01-01

    The formation of high-order Bessel beams by a passive acoustic device consisting of an Archimedes' spiral diffraction grating is theoretically, numerically and experimentally reported in this work. These beams are propagation-invariant solutions of the Helmholtz equation and are characterized by an azimuthal variation of the phase along its annular spectrum producing an acoustic vortex in the near field. In our system, the scattering of plane acoustic waves by the spiral grating leads to the formation of the acoustic vortex with zero pressure on-axis and the angular phase dislocations characterized by the spiral geometry. The order of the generated Bessel beam and, as a consequence, the size of the generated vortex can be fixed by the number of arms in the spiral diffraction grating. The obtained results allow to obtain Bessel beams with controllable vorticity by a passive device, which has potential applications in low-cost acoustic tweezers and acoustic radiation force devices.

  4. Stimulated Brillouin scattering enhancement in silicon inverse opal waveguides

    Smith, M J A; de Sterke, C Martijn; Lapine, M; Kuhlmey, B T; Poulton, C G

    2016-01-01

    Silicon is an ideal material for on-chip applications, however its poor acoustic properties limit its performance for important optoacoustic applications, particularly for Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). We theoretically show that silicon inverse opals exhibit a strongly improved acoustic performance that enhances the bulk SBS gain coefficient by more than two orders of magnitude. We also design a waveguide that incorporates silicon inverse opals and which has SBS gain values that are comparable with chalcogenide glass waveguides. This research opens new directions for opto-acoustic applications in on-chip material systems.

  5. Acoustic vector sensor signal processing

    SUN Guiqing; LI Qihu; ZHANG Bin

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic vector sensor simultaneously, colocately and directly measures orthogonal components of particle velocity as well as pressure at single point in acoustic field so that is possible to improve performance of traditional underwater acoustic measurement devices or detection systems and extends new ideas for solving practical underwater acoustic engineering problems. Although acoustic vector sensor history of appearing in underwater acoustic area is no long, but with huge and potential military demands, acoustic vector sensor has strong development trend in last decade, it is evolving into a one of important underwater acoustic technology. Under this background, we try to review recent progress in study on acoustic vector sensor signal processing, such as signal detection, DOA estimation, beamforming, and so on.

  6. Guided-wave Brillouin scattering in air

    Renninger, William H; Rakich, Peter T

    2016-01-01

    Here we identify a new form of optomechanical coupling in gas-filled hollow-core fibers. Stimulated forward Brillouin scattering is observed in air in the core of a photonic bandgap fiber. A single resonance is observed at 35 MHz, which corresponds to the first excited axial-radial acoustic mode in the air-filled core. The linewidth and coupling strengths are determined by the acoustic loss and electrostrictive coupling in air, respectively. A simple analytical model, refined by numerical simulations, is developed that accurately predicts the Brillouin coupling strength and frequency from the gas and fiber parameters. Since this form of Brillouin coupling depends strongly on both the acoustic and dispersive optical properties of the gas within the fiber, this new type of optomechanical interaction is highly tailorable. These results allow for forward Brillouin spectroscopy in dilute gases, could be useful for sensing and will present a power and noise limitation for certain applications.

  7. Research on micro-sized acoustic bandgap structures.

    Fleming, James Grant; McCormick, Frederick Bossert; Su, Mehmet F.; El-Kady, Ihab Fathy; Olsson, Roy H., III; Tuck, Melanie R.

    2010-01-01

    Phononic crystals (or acoustic crystals) are the acoustic wave analogue of photonic crystals. Here a periodic array of scattering inclusions located in a homogeneous host material forbids certain ranges of acoustic frequencies from existence within the crystal, thus creating what are known as acoustic (or phononic) bandgaps. The vast majority of phononic crystal devices reported prior to this LDRD were constructed by hand assembling scattering inclusions in a lossy viscoelastic medium, predominantly air, water or epoxy, resulting in large structures limited to frequencies below 1 MHz. Under this LDRD, phononic crystals and devices were scaled to very (VHF: 30-300 MHz) and ultra (UHF: 300-3000 MHz) high frequencies utilizing finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling, microfabrication and micromachining technologies. This LDRD developed key breakthroughs in the areas of micro-phononic crystals including physical origins of phononic crystals, advanced FDTD modeling and design techniques, material considerations, microfabrication processes, characterization methods and device structures. Micro-phononic crystal devices realized in low-loss solid materials were emphasized in this work due to their potential applications in radio frequency communications and acoustic imaging for medical ultrasound and nondestructive testing. The results of the advanced modeling, fabrication and integrated transducer designs were that this LDRD produced the 1st measured phononic crystals and phononic crystal devices (waveguides) operating in the VHF (67 MHz) and UHF (937 MHz) frequency bands and established Sandia as a world leader in the area of micro-phononic crystals.

  8. Scattering theory

    Friedrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    This corrected and updated second edition of "Scattering Theory" presents a concise and modern coverage of the subject. In the present treatment, special attention is given to the role played by the long-range behaviour of the projectile-target interaction, and a theory is developed, which is well suited to describe near-threshold bound and continuum states in realistic binary systems such as diatomic molecules or molecular ions. It is motivated by the fact that experimental advances have shifted and broadened the scope of applications where concepts from scattering theory are used, e.g. to the field of ultracold atoms and molecules, which has been experiencing enormous growth in recent years, largely triggered by the successful realization of Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute atomic gases in 1995. The book contains sections on special topics such as near-threshold quantization, quantum reflection, Feshbach resonances and the quantum description of scattering in two dimensions. The level of abstraction is k...

  9. Scattering theory

    Written by the author of the widely acclaimed textbook. Theoretical Atomic Physics Includes sections on quantum reflection, tunable Feshbach resonances and Efimov states. Useful for advanced students and researchers. This book presents a concise and modern coverage of scattering theory. It is motivated by the fact that experimental advances have shifted and broadened the scope of applications where concepts from scattering theory are used, e.g. to the field of ultracold atoms and molecules, which has been experiencing enormous growth in recent years, largely triggered by the successful realization of Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute atomic gases in 1995. In the present treatment, special attention is given to the role played by the long-range behaviour of the projectile-target interaction, and a theory is developed, which is well suited to describe near-threshold bound and continuum states in realistic binary systems such as diatomic molecules or molecular ions. The level of abstraction is kept as low as at all possible, and deeper questions related to mathematical foundations of scattering theory are passed by. The book should be understandable for anyone with a basic knowledge of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. It is intended for advanced students and researchers, and it is hoped that it will be useful for theorists and experimentalists alike.

  10. Neutron scattering

    The annual report on hand gives an overview of the research work carried out in the Laboratory for Neutron Scattering (LNS) of the ETH Zuerich in 1990. Using the method of neutron scattering, it is possible to examine in detail the static and dynamic properties of the condensed material. In accordance with the multidisciplined character of the method, the LNS has for years maintained a system of intensive co-operation with numerous institutes in the areas of biology, chemistry, solid-state physics, crystallography and materials research. In 1990 over 100 scientists from more than 40 research groups both at home and abroad took part in the experiments. It was again a pleasure to see the number of graduate students present, who were studying for a doctorate and who could be introduced into the neutron scattering during their stay at the LNS and thus were in the position to touch on central ways of looking at a problem in their dissertation using this modern experimental method of solid-state research. In addition to the numerous and interesting ways of formulating the questions to explain the structure, nowadays the scientific programme increasingly includes particularly topical studies in connection with high temperature-supraconductors and materials research

  11. SAW reflection and scattering by electrodes

    WANG Wei-biao; HAN Tao; ZHANG Xiao-dong; WU Hao-dong; SHUI Yong-an

    2005-01-01

    A rigorous analysis of surface acoustic wave (SAW) reflection and scattering by electrodes is of paramount importance in the design of SAW identification tags and sensors. In this paper, a new method based on Green's function concept is used to study reflection and scattering coefficients. By this method the reflection coefficient with its phase angle, transmission coefficient, and bulk wave scattering coefficient, can be obtained rapidly and accurately. To get precise result, the influence of static charge must be taken into account. In the work, we successfully cancelled out the effect of static charge and the validity of the results was checked. As an example, the reflection, transmission and scattering coefficients ora single grounded electrode on 128°YX LiNbO3 is shown.

  12. Impact of polydispersity on multipolar resonant scattering in emulsions.

    Mascaro, Benoit; Brunet, Thomas; Poncelet, Olivier; Aristégui, Christophe; Raffy, Simon; Mondain-Monval, Olivier; Leng, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    The influence of size polydispersity on the resonant acoustic properties of dilute emulsions, made of fluorinated-oil droplets, is quantitatively investigated. Ultrasound attenuation and dispersion measurements on various samples with controlled size polydispersities, ranging from 1% to 13%, are found to be in excellent agreement with predictions based on the independent scattering approximation. By relating the particle-size distribution of the synthesized emulsions to the quality factor of the predicted multipolar resonances, the number of observable acoustic resonances is shown to be imposed by the sample polydispersity. These results are briefly discussed into the context of metamaterials for which scattering resonances are central to their effective properties. PMID:23556570

  13. Acoustic comfort in eating establishments

    Svensson, David; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The subjective concept of acoustic comfort in eating establishments has been investigated in this study. The goal was to develop a predictive model for the acoustic comfort, by means of simple objective parameters, while also examining which other subjective acoustic parameters could help explain...... the feeling of acoustic comfort. Through several layers of anal ysis, acoustic comfort was found to be rather complex, and could not be explained entirely by common subjective parameters such as annoyance, intelligibility or privacy. A predictive model for the mean acoustic comfort for an eating...

  14. Phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials

    Ming-Hui Lu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Phononic crystals have been proposed about two decades ago and some important characteristics such as acoustic band structure and negative refraction have stimulated fundamental and practical studies in acoustic materials and devices since then. To carefully engineer a phononic crystal in an acoustic “atom” scale, acoustic metamaterials with their inherent deep subwavelength nature have triggered more exciting investigations on negative bulk modulus and/or negative mass density. Acoustic surface evanescent waves have also been recognized to play key roles to reach acoustic subwavelength imaging and enhanced transmission.

  15. Acoustic and thermal properties of strontium pyroniobate single crystals

    Shabbir, G.; Kojima, S.

    2003-04-01

    High resolution Brillouin scattering and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) experiments were performed to study the acoustic and thermal properties of strontium pyroniobate (Sr2Nb2O7) single crystals. The anomalous temperature dependence of the longitudinal acoustic phonon mode frequency corresponding to c22 elastic stiffness coefficient was observed in the neighbourhood of the normal-incommensurate phase transition temperature Ti (491 K). The specific heat measured by MDSC showed an anomaly around 487+/-2 K. The changes in enthalpy and entropy of the phase transition were estimated as 147 J mol-1 and 0.71 J mol-1 K-1, respectively.

  16. Acoustic and thermal properties of strontium pyroniobate single crystals

    High resolution Brillouin scattering and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) experiments were performed to study the acoustic and thermal properties of strontium pyroniobate (Sr2Nb2O7) single crystals. The anomalous temperature dependence of the longitudinal acoustic phonon mode frequency corresponding to c22 elastic stiffness coefficient was observed in the neighbourhood of the normal-incommensurate phase transition temperature Ti (491 K). The specific heat measured by MDSC showed an anomaly around 487±2 K. The changes in enthalpy and entropy of the phase transition were estimated as 147 J mol-1 and 0.71 J mol-1 K-1, respectively

  17. From Architectural Acoustics to Acoustical Architecture Using Computer Simulation

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2005-01-01

    Architectural acoustics design has in the past been based on simple design rules. However, with a growing complexity in architectural acoustics and the emergence of room acoustic simulation programmes with considerable potential, it is now possible to subjectively analyse and evaluate acoustic...... properties prior to the actual construction of a building. With the right tools applied, acoustic design can become an integral part of the architectural design process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the field of application that an acoustic simulation programme can have during an architectural...... the first phases in the architectural process and set out a reverse strategy for simulation programmes to do so - from developing acoustics from given spaces to developing spaces from given acoustics...

  18. Modifying the acoustic impedance of polyurea-based composites

    Nantasetphong, Wiroj; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Jia, Zhanzhan; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2013-04-01

    Acoustic impedance is a material property that depends on mass density and acoustic wave speed. An impedance mismatch between two media leads to the partial reflection of an acoustic wave sent from one medium to another. Active sonar is one example of a useful application of this phenomenon, where reflected and scattered acoustic waves enable the detection of objects. If the impedance of an object is matched to that of the surrounding medium, however, the object may be hidden from observation (at least directly) by sonar. In this study, polyurea composites are developed to facilitate such impedance matching. Polyurea is used due to its excellent blast-mitigating properties, easy casting, corrosion protection, abrasion resistance, and various uses in current military technology. Since pure polyurea has impedance higher than that of water (the current medium of interest), low mass density phenolic microballoon particles are added to create composite materials with reduced effective impedances. The volume fraction of particles is varied to study the effect of filler quantity on the acoustic impedance of the resulting composite. The composites are experimentally characterized via ultrasonic measurements. Computational models based on the method of dilute-randomly-distributed inclusions are developed and compared with the experimental results. These experiments and models will facilitate the design of new elastomeric composites with desirable acoustic impedances.

  19. Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography with intense acoustic bursts

    Zemp, Roger J.; Kim, Chulhong; Wang, Lihong V.

    2007-04-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography (UOT) detects ultrasonically modulated light to spatially localize multiply scattered photons in turbid media with the ultimate goal of imaging the optical properties in living subjects. A principal challenge of the technique is weak modulated signal strength. We discuss ways to push the limits of signal enhancement with intense acoustic bursts while conforming to optical and ultrasonic safety standards. A CCD-based speckle-contrast detection scheme is used to detect acoustically modulated light by measuring changes in speckle statistics between ultrasound-on and ultrasound-off states. The CCD image capture is synchronized with the ultrasound burst pulse sequence. Transient acoustic radiation force, a consequence of bursts, is seen to produce slight signal enhancement over pure ultrasonic-modulation mechanisms for bursts and CCD exposure times of the order of milliseconds. However, acoustic radiation-force-induced shear waves are launched away from the acoustic sample volume, which degrade UOT spatial resolution. By time gating the CCD camera to capture modulated light before radiation force has an opportunity to accumulate significant tissue displacement, we reduce the effects of shear-wave image degradation, while enabling very high signal-to-noise ratios. Additionally, we maintain high-resolution images representative of optical and not mechanical contrast. Signal-to-noise levels are sufficiently high so as to enable acquisition of 2D images of phantoms with one acoustic burst per pixel.

  20. Wavefront Modulation and Subwavelength Diffractive Acoustics with an Acoustic Metasurface

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality as their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a desig...

  1. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  2. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (ppneumothorax states (pPneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (pPneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  3. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  4. Practical acoustic emission testing

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  5. The Prediction of Noise Scattered by a Wing/Ducted Fan Configuration

    Tweed, John; Dunn, Mark H.

    1999-01-01

    In this proof of concept research, a computational method was developed for predicting the sound field created by the scattering of ducted fan engine noise by a blended wing-body (BWB). It was assumed that all acoustic processes were linear and time harmonic with excitation frequency co. Inflow effects were neglected and no penetration boundary conditions were applied to the engine nacelle and BWB surfaces. A scattering approach was adopted in which the total acoustic field is written as the sum of known incident (from the engine duct) and unknown scattered parts. We further assume that the incident field is independent of the scattered field. Application of the above conditions to the equations of linearized acoustics yields the Helmholtz equation (reduced wave equation) for the scattered pressure with Neumann boundary conditions.

  6. Vlasov Simulations of Trapping and Inhomogeneity in Raman Scattering

    Strozzi, D J; Langdon, A B; Shoucri, M M; Williams, E A

    2005-01-01

    We study stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in laser-fusion conditions with the Eulerian Vlasov code ELVIS. Back SRS from homogeneous plasmas occurs in sub-picosecond bursts and far exceeds linear theory. Forward SRS and re-scatter of back SRS are also observed. The plasma wave frequency downshifts from the linear dispersion curve, and the electron distribution shows flattening. This is consistent with trapping and reduces the Landau damping. There is some acoustic ($\\omega\\propto k$) activity and possibly electron acoustic scatter. Kinetic ions do not affect SRS for early times but suppress it later on. SRS from inhomogeneous plasmas exhibits a kinetic enhancement for long density scale lengths. More scattering results when the pump propagates to higher as opposed to lower density.

  7. Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL) is a state-of-the-art Undersea Warfare (USW) acoustic data analysis facility capable of both active and passive underwater...

  8. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  9. A Century of Acoustic Metrology

    Rasmussen, Knud

    The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect.......The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect....

  10. Dynamics of acoustically levitated disk samples.

    Xie, W J; Wei, B

    2004-10-01

    The acoustic levitation force on disk samples and the dynamics of large water drops in a planar standing wave are studied by solving the acoustic scattering problem through incorporating the boundary element method. The dependence of levitation force amplitude on the equivalent radius R of disks deviates seriously from the R3 law predicted by King's theory, and a larger force can be obtained for thin disks. When the disk aspect ratio gamma is larger than a critical value gamma(*) ( approximately 1.9 ) and the disk radius a is smaller than the critical value a(*) (gamma) , the levitation force per unit volume of the sample will increase with the enlargement of the disk. The acoustic levitation force on thin-disk samples ( gammaacoustic field for stable levitation of a large water drop is to adjust the reflector-emitter interval H slightly above the resonant interval H(n) . The simulation shows that the drop is flattened and the central parts of its top and bottom surface become concave with the increase of sound pressure level, which agrees with the experimental observation. The main frequencies of the shape oscillation under different sound pressures are slightly larger than the Rayleigh frequency because of the large shape deformation. The simulated translational frequencies of the vertical vibration under normal gravity condition agree with the theoretical analysis. PMID:15600551

  11. Airborne chemistry: acoustic levitation in chemical analysis.

    Santesson, Sabina; Nilsson, Staffan

    2004-04-01

    This review with 60 references describes a unique path to miniaturisation, that is, the use of acoustic levitation in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry applications. Levitation of small volumes of sample by means of a levitation technique can be used as a way to avoid solid walls around the sample, thus circumventing the main problem of miniaturisation, the unfavourable surface-to-volume ratio. Different techniques for sample levitation have been developed and improved. Of the levitation techniques described, acoustic or ultrasonic levitation fulfils all requirements for analytical chemistry applications. This technique has previously been used to study properties of molten materials and the equilibrium shape()and stability of liquid drops. Temperature and mass transfer in levitated drops have also been described, as have crystallisation and microgravity applications. The airborne analytical system described here is equipped with different and exchangeable remote detection systems. The levitated drops are normally in the 100 nL-2 microL volume range and additions to the levitated drop can be made in the pL-volume range. The use of levitated drops in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry offers several benefits. Several remote detection systems are compatible with acoustic levitation, including fluorescence imaging detection, right angle light scattering, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Applications include liquid/liquid extractions, solvent exchange, analyte enrichment, single-cell analysis, cell-cell communication studies, precipitation screening of proteins to establish nucleation conditions, and crystallisation of proteins and pharmaceuticals. PMID:14762640

  12. Broadband Acoustic Cloak for Ultrasound Waves

    Zhang, Shu; Fang, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Invisibility devices based on coordinate transformation have opened up a new field of considerable interest. Such a device is proposed to render the hidden object undetectable under the flow of light or sound, by guiding and controlling the wave path through an engineered space surrounding the object. We present here the first practical realization of a low-loss and broadband acoustic cloak for underwater ultrasound. This metamaterial cloak is constructed with a network of acoustic circuit elements, namely serial inductors and shunt capacitors. Our experiment clearly shows that the acoustic cloak can effectively bend the ultrasound waves around the hidden object, with reduced scattering and shadow. Due to the non-resonant nature of the building elements, this low loss (~6dB/m) cylindrical cloak exhibits excellent invisibility over a broad frequency range from 52 to 64 kHz in the measurements. The low visibility of the cloaked object for underwater ultrasound shed a light on the fundamental understanding of ma...

  13. Strong acoustic wave action

    Gokhberg, M. B.

    1983-07-01

    Experiments devoted to acoustic action on the atmosphere-magnetosphere-ionosphere system using ground based strong explosions are reviewed. The propagation of acoustic waves was observed by ground observations over 2000 km in horizontal direction and to an altitude of 200 km. Magnetic variations up to 100 nT were detected by ARIEL-3 satellite near the epicenter of the explosion connected with the formation of strong field aligned currents in the magnetosphere. The enhancement of VLF emission at 800 km altitude is observed.

  14. Acoustic black holes

    Visser, M

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in a moving fluid provides a conceptually clean and powerful analogy for understanding black hole physics. As a teaching tool, the analogy is useful for introducing students to both General Relativity and fluid mechanics. As a research tool, the analogy helps clarify what aspects of the physics are kinematics and what aspects are dynamics. In particular, Hawking radiation is a purely kinematical effect, whereas black hole entropy is intrinsically dynamical. Finally, I discuss the fact that with present technology acoustic Hawking radiation is almost experimentally testable.

  15. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  16. Densitometry By Acoustic Levitation

    Trinh, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    "Static" and "dynamic" methods developed for measuring mass density of acoustically levitated solid particle or liquid drop. "Static" method, unknown density of sample found by comparison with another sample of known density. "Dynamic" method practiced with or without gravitational field. Advantages over conventional density-measuring techniques: sample does not have to make contact with container or other solid surface, size and shape of samples do not affect measurement significantly, sound field does not have to be know in detail, and sample can be smaller than microliter. Detailed knowledge of acoustic field not necessary.

  17. Quantum stochastic theory of phonon scattering between polaritons

    Kinsler, P.

    2001-01-01

    Quantum stochastic operator equations are derived for inter-branch exciton and polariton processes caused by acoustic phonon scattering. The use of a fully quantum model combined with these recently developed techniques predicts the presence of ``stimulated scattering'' terms, and provides a sound basis for understanding the basis of the approximations used in generating the equations. The theory is applied to a model motivated by recent experiments where a stronger photoluminescence signal f...

  18. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun, E-mail: liuxiaojun@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhou, Chen; Wei, Qi; Wu, DaJian [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2013-11-25

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution.

  19. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution

  20. Underwater Acoustic Networking Techniques

    Otnes, Roald; Casari, Paolo; Goetz, Michael; Husøy, Thor; Nissen, Ivor; Rimstad, Knut; van Walree, Paul; Zorzi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This literature study presents an overview of underwater acoustic networking. It provides a background and describes the state of the art of all networking facets that are relevant for underwater applications. This report serves both as an introduction to the subject and as a summary of existing protocols, providing support and inspiration for the development of network architectures.

  1. COMBUSTION ACOUSTICS DIAGNOSTICS

    This is an Exploratory Research Project that was awarded by APPCD for research on developing an acoustic flame condition monitor. It will involve a bench scale experiment of 4-6 weeks duration to record adjacent audible energy of a Bunsen burner. The experiment will require a d...

  2. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...

  3. Tunable cylindrical shell as an element in acoustic metamaterial

    Titovich, Alexey S

    2014-01-01

    Elastic cylindrical shells are fitted with an internal mechanism which is optimized so that, in the quasi-static regime, the combined system exhibits prescribed effective acoustic properties. The mechanism consists of a central mass supported by an axisymmetric distribution of elastic stiffeners. By appropriate selection of the mass and stiffness of the internal mechanism, the shell's effective acoustic properties (bulk modulus and density) can be tuned as desired. Subsonic flexural waves excited in the shell by the attachment of stiffeners are suppressed by including a sufficiently large number of such stiffeners. Effectiveness of the proposed metamaterial is demonstrated by matching the properties of a thin aluminum shell with a polymer insert to those of water. The scattering cross section in water is nearly zero over a broad range of frequencies at the lower end of the spectrum. By arranging the tuned shells in an array the resulting acoustic metamaterial is capable of steering waves. As an example, a cyl...

  4. Cloaking an acoustic sensor with single-negative materials

    Cai, Chen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhu, Xue-Feng [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xu, Tao [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zou, Xin-Ye, E-mail: xyzou@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-07-15

    In this review, a brief introduction is given to the development of acoustic superlens cloaks that allow the cloaked object to receive signals while its presence is not sensed by the surrounding, which can be regarded as “cloaking an acoustic sensor”. Remarkably, the designed cloak consists of single-negative materials with parameters independent of the background medium or the sensor system, which is proven to be a magnifying superlens. This has facilitated significantly the design and fabrication of acoustic cloaks that generally require double-negative materials with customized parameters. Such innovative design has then been simplified further as a multi-layered structure comprising of two alternately arranged complementary media with homogeneous isotropic single-negative materials. Based on this, a scattering analyses method is developed for the numerical simulation of such multi-layered cloak structures, which may serve as an efficient approach for the investigation on such devices.

  5. Achieving acoustic cloak by using compressible background flow

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-01-01

    We propose a scheme of acoustic spherical cloaking by means of background irrotational flow in compressible fluid. The background flow forms a virtual curved spacetime and guides the sound waves bypass the cloaked objects. To satisfy the laws of real fluid, we show that spatially distributed mass source and momentum source are necessary to supply. The propagation of sound waves in this system is studied via both geometric acoustics approximation and full wave approach. The analytic solution of sound fields is obtained for plane wave incidence. The results reveal the effect of phase retardation (or lead) in comparison with the ordinary transformation-acoustic cloak. In addition, the ability of cloaking is also evaluated for unideal background flows by analyzing the scattering cross section.

  6. Cloaking an acoustic sensor with single-negative materials

    In this review, a brief introduction is given to the development of acoustic superlens cloaks that allow the cloaked object to receive signals while its presence is not sensed by the surrounding, which can be regarded as “cloaking an acoustic sensor”. Remarkably, the designed cloak consists of single-negative materials with parameters independent of the background medium or the sensor system, which is proven to be a magnifying superlens. This has facilitated significantly the design and fabrication of acoustic cloaks that generally require double-negative materials with customized parameters. Such innovative design has then been simplified further as a multi-layered structure comprising of two alternately arranged complementary media with homogeneous isotropic single-negative materials. Based on this, a scattering analyses method is developed for the numerical simulation of such multi-layered cloak structures, which may serve as an efficient approach for the investigation on such devices

  7. Achieving acoustic cloak by using compressible background flow

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Zhao, Qing; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a scheme of acoustic spherical cloaking by means of background irrotational flow in compressible fluid. The background flow forms a virtual curved spacetime and directs the sound waves to bypass the cloaked objects. To satisfy the laws of real fluid, we show that spatially distributed mass source and momentum source are necessary to supply. The propagation of sound waves in this system is studied via both geometric acoustics approximation and full wave approach. The analytic solution of sound fields is obtained for plane wave incidence. The results reveal the effect of phase retardation (or lead) in comparison with the ordinary transformation-acoustic cloak. In addition, the ability of cloaking is also evaluated for unideal background flows by analyzing the scattering cross section. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475088 and 11275024) and the Fund from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2013YQ030595-3).

  8. An invisible acoustic sensor based on parity-time symmetry.

    Fleury, Romain; Sounas, Dimitrios; Alù, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Sensing an incoming signal is typically associated with absorbing a portion of its energy, inherently perturbing the measurement and creating reflections and shadows. Here, in contrast, we demonstrate a non-invasive, shadow-free, invisible sensor for airborne sound waves at audible frequencies, which fully absorbs the impinging signal, without at the same time perturbing its own measurement or creating a shadow. This unique sensing device is based on the unusual scattering properties of a parity-time (PT) symmetric metamaterial device formed by a pair of electro-acoustic resonators loaded with suitably tailored non-Foster electrical circuits, constituting the acoustic equivalent of a coherent perfect absorber coupled to a coherent laser. Beyond the specific application to non-invasive sensing, our work broadly demonstrates the unique relevance of PT-symmetric metamaterials for acoustics, loss compensation and extraordinary wave manipulation. PMID:25562746

  9. Characterizing Tissue with Acoustic Parameters Derived from Ultrasound Data

    Littrup, P; Duric, N; Leach, R R; Azevedo, S G; Candy, J V; Moore, T; Chambers, D H; Mast, J E; Johnson, S A; Holsapple, E

    2002-01-23

    In contrast to standard reflection ultrasound (US), transmission US holds the promise of more thorough tissue characterization by generating quantitative acoustic parameters. We compare results from a conventional US scanner with data acquired using an experimental circular scanner operating at frequencies of 0.3 - 1.5 MHz. Data were obtained on phantoms and a normal, formalin-fixed, excised breast. Both reflection and transmission-based algorithms were used to generate images of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation.. Images of the phantoms demonstrate the ability to detect sub-mm features and quantify acoustic properties such as sound speed and attenuation. The human breast specimen showed full field evaluation, improved penetration and tissue definition. Comparison with conventional US indicates the potential for better margin definition and acoustic characterization of masses, particularly in the complex scattering environments of human breast tissue. The use of morphology, in the context of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation, for characterizing tissue, is discussed.

  10. Acoustic inversion by a RMS born approximation space - time domain

    A new approximate method to calculate the space-time acoustic wave motion generated by an impulsive point source in a horizontally layered configuration is presented. The configuration consists of a stack op fluid layers between two acoustic half-spaces where the source and the receiver are located in the upper half-space. A distorted-wave Born approximation is introduced; the important feature of the present method is the assumption of the presence of a background medium with vertical varying root-mean-square acoustic wave speed. A closed-form expression for the scattered field in space and time as a function of the contract parameters is arrived at. The result is in close agreement with synthetic seismograms calculated in a rigorous way. In the inverse scheme the wave speed and mass density can be reconstructed within a single trace. Results of the inversion scheme applied to synthetic data have been shown. (author)

  11. Acoustic-like dynamics of amorphous drugs in the THz regime

    Pogna, E. A. A.; Rodríguez-Tinoco, C.; Krisch, M.; Rodríguez-Viejo, J.; Scopigno, T.

    2013-08-01

    The high frequency dynamics of Indomethacin and Celecoxib glasses has been investigated by inelastic x-ray scattering, accessing a momentum-energy region still unexplored in amorphous pharmaceuticals. We find evidence of phonon-like acoustic dynamics, and determine the THz behavior of sound velocity and acoustic attenuation. Connections with ordinary sound propagation are discussed, along with the relation between fast and slow degrees of freedom as represented by non-ergodicity factor and kinetic fragility, respectively.

  12. Experimental analysis of the relationship between reverberant acoustic intensity and energy density inside long rooms

    Visentin, Chiara; Prodi, Nicola; Valeau, Vincent; Picaut, Judicaël

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the validity of the Fick's law of diffusion in room acoustics is experimentally investigated inside long rooms. The room-acoustics diffusion model relies on Fick's law stating a proportionality relationship between sound intensity and energy density gradient inside a room through a constant diffusion coefficient. This relationship is investigated in the stationary state for the particular case of long rooms with different amounts of boundary scattering. Measurements were perfor...

  13. A numerical investigation of the Fick's law of diffusion in room acoustics

    Visentin, Chiara; PRODI, Nicolas; Valeau, Vincent; Picaut, Judicaël

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the validity of the Fick's law of diffusion in room acoustics is investigated in the stationary state. The Fick's law, underlying the room-acoustics diffusion model, assumes a proportionality relationship between the local sound intensity and the energy density gradient, the proportionality constant being the so-called diffusion coefficient. This relationship, based on an analogy with the behavior of real particles in a scattering medium, is assessed by using a numerical tool si...

  14. The acoustic spectroscopy of asphaltene aggregation in petroleum

    A sphaltenes are well known to be important in causing blockages during production, transportation and refining. They are also responsible for the formation of tar mats in petroleum reservoirs, which can impede crude oil recovery. Acoustic spectroscopy in the frequency range 2 – 120 MHz was used to detect the aggregation of asphaltenes in a North Sea crude oil (UK continental shelf). In the absence of aggregation, both the toluene solvent and the maltenes isolated from the oil exhibit a power law dependence which is a function of the continuous phase. In contrast the crude oil itself showed clear signs of a changing size of the scattering entities. With sufficient information, it may in future be possible to determine the size of the scattering particles from the acoustic spectrum including the changing size of the asphaltene particles during aggregation.

  15. Naturally enhanced ion-acoustic spectra and their interpretation

    Sedgemore-Schulthess, K.J.F.; St. Maurice, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Incoherent scatter radars are designed to detect scatter from thermal fluctuations in the ionosphere. These fluctuations contain, among other things, features associated with ion-acoustic waves driven by random motions within the plasma. The resulting spectra are generally broad and noisy, but...... nevertheless the technique can, through a detailed analysis of spectra, be used to measure a range of physical parameters in the Earth's upper atmosphere, and provides a powerful diagnostic in studies of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, thermosphere dynamics and the geospace environment in general. In recent...... acceleration, wave-particle and wave-wave interactions in the ionosphere, and their association with magnetospheric processes. There is now a substantial body of literature documenting observations of enhanced ion-acoustic spectra, but there remains controversy over generation mechanisms. We present a review...

  16. Point sources and multipoles in inverse scattering theory

    Potthast, Roland

    2001-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, the growing availability of computing power has had an enormous impact on the classical fields of direct and inverse scattering. The study of inverse scattering, in particular, has developed rapidly with the ability to perform computational simulations of scattering processes and led to remarkable advances in a range of applications, from medical imaging and radar to remote sensing and seismic exploration. Point Sources and Multipoles in Inverse Scattering Theory provides a survey of recent developments in inverse acoustic and electromagnetic scattering theory. Focusing on methods developed over the last six years by Colton, Kirsch, and the author, this treatment uses point sources combined with several far-reaching techniques to obtain qualitative reconstruction methods. The author addresses questions of uniqueness, stability, and reconstructions for both two-and three-dimensional problems.With interest in extracting information about an object through scattered waves at an all-ti...

  17. INTERFERENCE FRINGES OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES AROUND SUNSPOTS

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Zhao Hui; Yang, Ming-Hsu; Liang, Zhi-Chao, E-mail: chou@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Physics Department, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-20

    Solar acoustic waves are scattered by a sunspot due to the interaction between the acoustic waves and the sunspot. The sunspot, excited by the incident wave, generates the scattered wave. The scattered wave is added to the incident wave to form the total wave around the sunspot. The interference fringes between the scattered wave and the incident wave are visible in the intensity of the total wave because the coherent time of the incident wave is of the order of a wave period. The strength of the interference fringes anti-correlates with the width of temporal spectra of the incident wave. The separation between neighboring fringes increases with the incident wavelength and the sunspot size. The strength of the fringes increases with the radial order n of the incident wave from n = 0 to n = 2, and then decreases from n = 2 to n = 5. The interference fringes play a role analogous to holograms in optics. This study suggests the feasibility of using the interference fringes to reconstruct the scattered wavefields of the sunspot, although the quality of the reconstructed wavefields is sensitive to the noise and errors in the interference fringes.

  18. Axisymmetric Scattering of p Modes by Thin Magnetic Tubes

    Hindman, Bradley W

    2011-01-01

    We examine the scattering of acoustic p-mode waves from a thin magnetic fibril embedded in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. The scattering is mediated through the excitation of slow sausage waves on the magnetic tube, and only the scattering of the monopole component of the wavefield is considered. Since such tube waves are not confined by the acoustic cavity and may freely propagate along the field lines removing energy from the acoustic wavefield, the excitation of fibril oscillations is a source of acoustic wave absorption as well as scattering. We compute the mode mixing that is achieved and the absorption coefficients and phase shifts that would be measured in a Fourier-Hankel decomposition. We find that for thin tubes the mode mixing is weak and the absorption coefficient is small and is a smooth function of frequency over the physically relevant band of observed frequencies. The prominent absorption resonances seen in previous studies of unstratified tubes are absent. Despite the relatively sma...

  19. Stimulated Brillouin scatter in a magnetized ionospheric plasma.

    Bernhardt, P A; Selcher, C A; Lehmberg, R H; Rodriguez, S P; Thomason, J F; Groves, K M; McCarrick, M J; Frazer, G J

    2010-04-23

    High power electromagnetic waves transmitted from the HAARP facility in Alaska can excite low-frequency electrostatic waves by magnetized stimulated Brillouin scatter. Either an ion-acoustic wave with a frequency less than the ion cyclotron frequency (f(CI)) or an electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) wave just above f(CI) can be produced. The coupled equations describing the magnetized stimulated Brillouin scatter instability show that the production of both ion-acoustic and EIC waves is strongly influenced by the wave propagation relative to the background magnetic field. Experimental observations of stimulated electromagnetic emissions using the HAARP transmitter have confirmed that only ion-acoustic waves are excited for propagation along the magnetic zenith and that EIC waves can only be detected with oblique propagation angles. The ion composition can be obtained from the measured EIC frequency. PMID:20482059

  20. Stimulated Brillouin Scatter in a Magnetized Ionospheric Plasma

    High power electromagnetic waves transmitted from the HAARP facility in Alaska can excite low-frequency electrostatic waves by magnetized stimulated Brillouin scatter. Either an ion-acoustic wave with a frequency less than the ion cyclotron frequency (fCI) or an electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) wave just above fCI can be produced. The coupled equations describing the magnetized stimulated Brillouin scatter instability show that the production of both ion-acoustic and EIC waves is strongly influenced by the wave propagation relative to the background magnetic field. Experimental observations of stimulated electromagnetic emissions using the HAARP transmitter have confirmed that only ion-acoustic waves are excited for propagation along the magnetic zenith and that EIC waves can only be detected with oblique propagation angles. The ion composition can be obtained from the measured EIC frequency.

  1. Brillouin scattering induced transparency and non-reciprocal light storage

    Dong, Chun-Hua; Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Yan-Lei; Fu, Wei; Guo, Guang-Can

    2014-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is a very fundamental interaction between light and travelling acoustic waves, which is mainly attributed to the electrostriction and photoelastic effects with the interaction strength being orders of magnitude larger than other nonlinearities. Although various photonic applications for all-optical light controlling based on SBS have been achieved in optical fiber and waveguides, the coherent light-acoustic interaction remains a challenge. Here, we experimentally demonstrated the Brillouin scattering induced transparency (BSIT) in a high quality optical microresonantor. Benefited from the triple-resonance in the whispering gallery cavity, the photon-phonon interaction is enhanced, and enables the light storage to the phonon, which has lifetime up to 10us. In addition, due to the phase matching condition, the stored circulating acoustic phonon can only interact with certain direction light, which leads to non-reciprocal light storage and retrieval. Our work paves the way t...

  2. Computer simulations in room acoustics: concepts and uncertainties.

    Vorländer, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Geometrical acoustics are used as a standard model for room acoustic design and consulting. Research on room acoustic simulation focuses on a more accurate modeling of propagation effects such as diffraction and other wave effects in rooms, and on scattering. Much progress was made in this field so that wave models also (for example, the boundary element method and the finite differences in time domain) can now be used for higher frequencies. The concepts and implementations of room simulation methods are briefly reviewed. After all, simulations in architectural acoustics are indeed powerful tools, but their reliability depends on the skills of the operator who has to create an adequate polygon model and has to choose the correct input data of boundary conditions such as absorption and scattering. Very little is known about the uncertainty of this input data. With the theory of error propagation of uncertainties it can be shown that prediction of reverberation times with accuracy better than the just noticeable difference requires input data in a quality which is not available from reverberation room measurements. PMID:23463991

  3. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron scattering in contemporary research, neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  4. The geometrical acoustic method for calculating the echo of targets submerged in a shallow water waveguide

    CHEN Yan; TANG Weilin; FAN Wei; FAN Jun

    2012-01-01

    A geometrical acoustic method based on image-source method and physicM acoustic method was developed to calculate the echo of targets submerged in the shallow water waveguide. The incident rays and the scattering rays are reflected by two boundaries for many times, and then the back rays become countless. The total backscattering field is obtained through summing up the scattering field produced by each combination of incident rays and back rays. The echo of the 10m-radius pressure release sphere in Pekeris waveguide with the range is calculated by the geometrical acoustic method. Compared with the results calculated by the wave acoustic method in the available literature, it shows that both are in accordance on average value and descend trend. The following results indicate that the difference between Effective Target Strength (ETS) in shallow water and the Target Strength (TS) in free space for spheres and certain other rounded objects is small. However, the ETS of some targets such as cone-shaped is quite different from TS in free space, which can lead to large errors in estimating a target's scattering property using traditional sonar equation. Compared with the method of wave acoustics, the geometrical acoustic method not only has the definite physical meaning but also can calculate the echo of complex objects in shallow water waveguide.

  5. Transmission Characteristics in Tubular Acoustic Metamaterials Studied with Fluid Impedance Theory

    Tubular acoustic metamaterials with negative densities composed of periodical membranes set up along pipes are studied with the fluid impedance theory. In addition to the conventional forbidden bands induced by the Bragg-scattering due to the periodic distributions of different acoustic impedances, the low-frequency forbidden band (LFB) with the low-frequency limit of zero Hertz is studied, in which the LFB is explained with acoustic impedance matching and the Bloch theory. Furthermore, the influences of the structural parameters of the tubular acoustic metamaterials on the transmission characteristics, such as the transmission coefficients, dispersion curves, widths of forbidden and pass bands, fluctuations in pass bands, etc., are evaluated, which can be used in the optimization of the acoustic insulation ability of the metamaterials. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  6. Precipitate Contribution to the Acoustic Nonlinearity in Nickel-Based Superalloy

    Chung-Seok KIM; Cliff J.LISSENDEN

    2009-01-01

    The influence of γ' precipitate on the acoustic nonlinearity is investigated for a nickel-based superalloy,which is subjected to creep deformation.During creep deformation,the cuboidal γ' precipitate is preferentially coarsened in a direction perpendicular to the applied stress axis.The length and shape factor of the γ' precipitate increase with creep time.The increase of relative acoustic nonlinearity with increasing fraction of creep life is discussed in relation to the rafting of γ' precipitate,which is closely related to the scattering and distortion of the acoustic wave.

  7. On scattered subword complexity

    Kása, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    Special scattered subwords, in which the gaps are of length from a given set, are defined. The scattered subword complexity, which is the number of such scattered subwords, is computed for rainbow words.

  8. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    Peng, Pai

    2014-10-01

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry-Perot resonance.

  9. Acoustics Discipline Overview

    Envia, Edmane; Thomas, Russell

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Annual Review, a summary of the progress made in 2007 in acoustics research under the Subsonic Fixed Wing project is given. The presentation describes highlights from in-house and external activities including partnerships and NRA-funded research with industry and academia. Brief progress reports from all acoustics Phase 1 NRAs are also included as are outlines of the planned activities for 2008 and all Phase 2 NRAs. N+1 and N+2 technology paths outlined for Subsonic Fixed Wing noise targets. NRA Round 1 progressing with focus on prediction method advancement. NRA Round 2 initiating work focused on N+2 technology, prediction methods, and validation. Excellent partnerships in progress supporting N+1 technology targets and providing key data sets.

  10. Acoustic methodology review

    Schlegel, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    It is important for industry and NASA to assess the status of acoustic design technology for predicting and controlling helicopter external noise in order for a meaningful research program to be formulated which will address this problem. The prediction methodologies available to the designer and the acoustic engineer are three-fold. First is what has been described as a first principle analysis. This analysis approach attempts to remove any empiricism from the analysis process and deals with a theoretical mechanism approach to predicting the noise. The second approach attempts to combine first principle methodology (when available) with empirical data to formulate source predictors which can be combined to predict vehicle levels. The third is an empirical analysis, which attempts to generalize measured trends into a vehicle noise prediction method. This paper will briefly address each.

  11. Acoustic Tractor Beam

    Démoré, Christine E. M.; Dahl, Patrick M.; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P.; Spalding, Gabriel C.

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  12. Acoustic classification of dwellings

    Berardi, Umberto; Rasmussen, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Schemes for the classification of dwellings according to different building performances have been proposed in the last years worldwide. The general idea behind these schemes relates to the positive impact a higher label, and thus a better performance, should have. In particular, focusing on sound...... insulation performance, national schemes for sound classification of dwellings have been developed in several European countries. These schemes define acoustic classes according to different levels of sound insulation. Due to the lack of coordination among countries, a significant diversity in terms of...... descriptors, number of classes, and class intervals occurred between national schemes. However, a proposal “acoustic classification scheme for dwellings” has been developed recently in the European COST Action TU0901 with 32 member countries. This proposal has been accepted as an ISO work item. This paper...

  13. Imaging with Scattered Neutrons

    Ballhausen, H; Gähler, R; Trapp, M; Van Overberghe, A

    2006-01-01

    We describe a novel experimental technique for neutron imaging with scattered neutrons. These scattered neutrons are of interest for condensed matter physics, because they permit to reveal the local distribution of incoherent and coherent scattering within a sample. In contrast to standard attenuation based imaging, scattered neutron imaging distinguishes between the scattering cross section and the total attenuation cross section including absorption. First successful low-noise millimeter-resolution images by scattered neutron radiography and tomography are presented.

  14. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Hora P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the acoustic emission (AE source modeling by means of FEM system COMSOL Multiphysics. The following types of sources are used: the spatially concentrated force and the double forces (dipole. The pulse excitation is studied in both cases. As a material is used steel. The computed displacements are compared with the exact analytical solution of point sources under consideration.

  15. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Yeo, Leslie Y. [Micro/Nanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  16. Bidirectional optical scattering facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Goniometric optical scatter instrument (GOSI) The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) quantifies the angular distribution of light scattered from...

  17. Latest Trends in Acoustic Sensing

    Cinzia Caliendo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustics-based methods offer a powerful tool for sensing applications. Acoustic sensors can be applied in many fields ranging from materials characterization, structural health monitoring, acoustic imaging, defect characterization, etc., to name just a few. A proper selection of the acoustic wave frequency over a wide spectrum that extends from infrasound (<20 Hz up to ultrasound (in the GHz–band, together with a number of different propagating modes, including bulk longitudinal and shear waves, surface waves, plate modes, etc., allow acoustic tools to be successfully applied to the characterization of gaseous, solid and liquid environments. The purpose of this special issue is to provide an overview of the research trends in acoustic wave sensing through some cases that are representative of specific applications in different sensing fields.

  18. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  19. Effect of collisions on amplification of laser beams by Brillouin scattering in plasmas

    Humphrey, K. A.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Fiuza, F.; Speirs, D. C.; Norreys, P.; Cairns, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; R. Bingham

    2013-01-01

    We report on particle in cell simulations of energy transfer between a laser pump beam and a counter-propagating seed beam using the Brillouin scattering process in uniform plasma including collisions. The results presented show that the ion acoustic waves excited through naturally occurring Brillouin scattering of the pump field are preferentially damped without affecting the driven Brillouin scattering process resulting from the beating of the pump and seed fields together. We find that col...

  20. Localization of a small change in a multiple scattering environment without modeling of the actual medium

    Rakotonarivo, Sandrine; Walker, S.C.; Kuperman, W. A.; ROUX, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    A method to actively localize a small perturbation in a multiple scattering medium using a collection of remote acoustic sensors is presented. The approach requires only minimal modeling and no knowledge of the scatterer distribution and properties of the scattering medium and the perturbation. The medium is ensonified before and after a perturbation is introduced. The coherent difference between the measured signals then reveals all field components that have interacted with the perturbation...

  1. Magneto-photo-acoustic imaging

    Qu, Min; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Truby, Ryan; Homan, Kimberly; Joshi, Pratixa; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Sokolov, Konstantin; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Magneto-photo-acoustic imaging, a technique based on the synergy of magneto-motive ultrasound, photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging, is introduced. Hybrid nanoconstructs, liposomes encapsulating gold nanorods and iron oxide nanoparticles, were used as a dual-contrast agent for magneto-photo-acoustic imaging. Tissue-mimicking phantom and macrophage cells embedded in ex vivo porcine tissue were used to demonstrate that magneto-photo-acoustic imaging is capable of visualizing the location of cel...

  2. Room acoustic auralization with Ambisonics

    Polack, Jean-Dominique; Leão Figueiredo, Fábio

    2012-01-01

    International audience During the year of 2009, the room acoustics group of the LAM (Équipe Lutheries, Acoustique, Musique de l’Institut Jean Le Rond d’Alembert - Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris) performed a series of acoustical measurements in music halls in Paris. The halls were chosen in regarding their importance to the historic, architectural or acoustic domains. The measured ensemble of fourteen rooms includes quite different architectural designs. The measurements were carri...

  3. Combined Environment Acoustic Chamber (CEAC)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The CEAC imposes combined acoustic, thermal and mechanical loads on aerospace structures. The CEAC is employed to measure structural response and determine...

  4. Truck acoustic data analyzer system

    Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2006-07-04

    A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

  5. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic neutron scattering, strongly correlated electrons, polymer dynamics, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  6. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  7. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  8. A Wave Scattering Theory of Solar Seismic Power Haloes

    Hanasoge, Shravan M

    2009-01-01

    Spatial maps of the high-pass frequency filtered time-averaged root-mean-squared (RMS) Doppler velocities tend to show substantial decrements within regions of strong field and curiously, randomly distributed patches of enhancement in the vicinity. We propose that these haloes or enhancements are a consequence of magnetic-field-induced mode mixing (scattering), resulting in the preferential powering of waves that possess strong surface velocity signatures (i.e. scattering from low to high wavenumbers). Evidently, this process can occur in the reverse, and therefore in order to determine if the haloes are indeed caused by mode mixing, we must answer the question: {\\it how are acoustic waves scattered by magnetic fields?} Through simulations of the interactions between waves and sunspots and models of plage, we demonstrate that the high to low modal order scattering channels are favoured. With increasing frequency and consequently, decreasing wavelength, a growing number of modes are scattered by the sunspot, t...

  9. Acoustic transparency and slow sound using detuned acoustic resonators

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the phenomenon of acoustic transparency and slowsound propagation can be realized with detuned acoustic resonators (DAR), mimicking thereby the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in atomic physics. Sound propagation in a pipe with a series of side...

  10. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Lift-Off Acoustics

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janie D.

    2011-01-01

    The lift-off acoustic (LOA) environment is an important design factor for any launch vehicle. For the Ares I vehicle, the LOA environments were derived by scaling flight data from other launch vehicles. The Ares I LOA predicted environments are compared to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) preliminary results.

  11. Modelling of diffuse sound field in architectural acoustic using transport theory

    LE POLLES, T; Picaut, J.; BERENGIER, M

    2001-01-01

    A general formalism to predict the repartition of diffuse sound field energy, in rooms and urban areas including scattering effects, is presented. We propose an exact analytical description of the spatial and temporal evolution of the diffuse sound field energy by the use of a transport equation. Boundary conditions are described in a probabilistic way and are expressed in terms of façade or wall reflection laws including absorption and scattering effects. Applications to room acoustics are t...

  12. Cosmic Microwave Background Acoustic Peak Locations

    Pan, Zhen; Mulroe, Brigid; Narimani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The Planck collaboration has measured the temperature and polarization of the cosmic microwave background well enough to determine the locations of eight peaks in the temperature (TT) power spectrum, five peaks in the polarization (EE) power spectrum and twelve extrema in the cross (TE) power spectrum. The relative locations of these extrema give a striking, and beautiful, demonstration of what we expect from acoustic oscillations in the plasma; e.g., that EE peaks fall half way between TT peaks. We expect this because the temperature map is predominantly sourced by temperature variations in the last scattering surface, while the polarization map is predominantly sourced by gradients in the velocity field, and the harmonic oscillations have temperature and velocity 90 degrees out of phase. However, there are large differences in expectations for extrema locations from simple analytic models vs. numerical calculations. Here we quantitatively explore the origin of these differences in gravitational potential tr...

  13. Non-Liner Dynamics of Underwater Acoustics

    Wiercigroch, M.; Badiey, M.; Simmen, J.; Cheng, A. H.-D.

    1999-03-01

    The non-linear dynamic behavior of acoustic wave propagation in an underwater sound channel, described by the Munk's classical sound speed profile perturbed by a single-mode internal wave, is studied using a parabolic ray theory. The amplitude and wavelength of this single-mode wave are used as the branching parameters in bifurcation analysis. The phase plane trajectory of the ray-based system can be periodic, quasi-periodic, and unstable. The regions of instability, located numerically via the bifurcation diagrams, are examined through a sequence of phase diagrams and Poincaré maps. Charts showing the maximum uninterrupted propagation distance reveal instances of anomalous vertical scattering of sound energy. Floquet multipliers were used to investigate instability of periodic orbits.

  14. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  15. Taming Acoustic Cavitation

    Rivas, David Fernandez; Enriquez, Oscar R; Versluis, Michel; Prosperetti, Andrea; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we show acoustic cavitation occurring from pits etched on a silicon surface. By immersing the surface in a liquid, gas pockets are entrapped in the pits which upon ultrasonic insonation, are observed to shed cavitation bubbles. Modulating the driving pressure it is possible to induce different behaviours based on the force balance that determines the interaction among bubbles and the silicon surface. This system can be used for several applications like sonochemical water treatment, cleaning of surfaces with deposited materials such as biofilms.

  16. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-03-01

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  17. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    Mitri, F. G., E-mail: F.G.Mitri@ieee.org [Chevron, Area 52 Technology – ETC, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87508 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  18. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  19. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  20. Imaging with Scattered Neutrons

    Ballhausen, H.; Abele, H.; Gaehler, R.; Trapp, M; Van Overberghe, A.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a novel experimental technique for neutron imaging with scattered neutrons. These scattered neutrons are of interest for condensed matter physics, because they permit to reveal the local distribution of incoherent and coherent scattering within a sample. In contrast to standard attenuation based imaging, scattered neutron imaging distinguishes between the scattering cross section and the total attenuation cross section including absorption. First successful low-noise millimeter-re...

  1. Phonon scattering and transmission at silicon-helium interfaces

    Using a 2D thermal conductivity technique, the phonon scattering and transmission probabilities have been measured from 0.05K to 2.5K for silicon in contact with liquid 4He. For polished surfaces at low temperature, the diffuse scattering probability is less than 0.5%, and the classical Acoustic Mismatch Model of Khalatnikov correctly describes the observed transmission probability. At higher temperatures, the residual roughness of the surface causes additional diffuse phonon scattering which leads to enhanced transmission across the interface. Samples with thermal oxide films on the surfaces have additional diffuse scattering, which can be adequately described by assuming the films scatter phonons with the same probability as bulk a-SiO2. Samples with either 60 angstrom or 300 angstrom Au films have diffuse scattering probabilities and transmission probabilities that are practically identical, confirming the hypothesis of Klitsner that thin Au films scatter phonons because of the open-quotes mud-flatclose quotes film morphology, a form of scattering that will not depend strongly on film thickness. The transmission probability is only 25-30% of that predicted by Diffuse Mismatch Model however, and this discrepancy has not been adequately explained. Samples with 2D Au diffraction gratings on them exhibited coherent resonant scattering of the phonons, but little phonon transmission. Samples which had been roughened by sandblasting or chemical etching had very high diffuse scattering probabilities, but the transmission probability for the sandblasted sample was much smaller than for the etched sample because of the subsurface damage caused the physical sandblasting process. Of the samples measured, only the etched sample showed a large transmission probability at low temperatures. Summarizing, the author has confirmed the veracity of the Acoustic Mismatch Model for the thermal boundary resistance at an ideal solid surface in contact with liquid helium

  2. Thomson scattering from inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    Thomson scattering has been developed at the Nova laser facility as a direct and accurate diagnostic to characterize inertial confinement fusion plasmas. Flat disks coated with thin multilayers of gold and beryllium were irradiated with one laser beam to produce a two ion species plasma with a controlled amount of both species. Thomson scattering spectra from these plasmas showed two ion acoustic waves belonging to gold and beryllium. The phase velocities of the ion acoustic waves are shown to be a sensitive function of the relative concentrations of the two ion species and are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. These open geometry experiments further show that an accurate measurement of the ion temperature can be derived from the relative damping of the two ion acoustic waves. Subsequent Thomson scattering measurements from methane-filled, ignition-relevant hohlraums apply the theory for two ion species plasmas to obtain the electron and ion temperatures with high accuracy. The experimental data provide a benchmark for two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using LASNEX, which is presently in use to predict the performance of future megajoule laser-driven hohlraums of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The data are consistent with modeling using significantly inhibited heat transport at the peak of the drive. Applied to NIF targets, this flux limitation has little effect on x-ray production. The spatial distribution of x-rays is slightly modified but optimal symmetry can be re-established by small changes in power balance or pointing. Furthermore, we find that stagnating plasma regions on the hohlraum axis are well described by the calculations. This result implies that stagnation in gas-filled hohlraums occurs too late to directly affect the capsule implosion in ignition experiments. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  3. Thomson scattering from inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    Glenzer, S.H.; Back, C.A.; Suter, L.J. [and others

    1997-07-08

    Thomson scattering has been developed at the Nova laser facility as a direct and accurate diagnostic to characterize inertial confinement fusion plasmas. Flat disks coated with thin multilayers of gold and beryllium were with one laser beam to produce a two ion species plasma with a controlled amount of both species. Thomson scattering spectra from these plasmas showed two ion acoustic waves belonging to gold and beryllium. The phase velocities of the ion acoustic waves are shown to be a sensitive function of the relative concentrations of the two ion species and are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. These open geometry experiments further show that an accurate measurement of the ion temperature can be derived from the relative damping of the two ion acoustic waves. Subsequent Thomson scattering measurements from methane-filled, ignition-relevant hohlraums apply the theory for two ion species plasmas to obtain the electron and ion temperatures with high accuracy. The experimental data provide a benchmark for two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using LASNEX, which is presently in use to predict the performance of future megajoule laser driven hohlraums of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The data are consistent with modeling using significantly inhibited heat transport at the peak of the drive. Applied to NIF targets, this flux limitation has little effect on x- ray production. The spatial distribution of x-rays is slightly modified but optimal symmetry can be re-established by small changes in power balance or pointing. Furthermore, we find that stagnating plasma regions on the hohlraum axis are well described by the calculations. This result implies that stagnation in gas-filled hohlraums occurs too late to directly affect the capsule implosion in ignition experiments.

  4. Acoustic Center or Time Origin?

    Staffeldt, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses the acoustic center in relation to measurements of loudspeaker polar data. Also, it presents the related concept time origin and discusses the deviation that appears between positions of the acoustic center found by wavefront based and time based measuring methods....

  5. Propagation of Ion Acoustic Perturbations

    Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered.......Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered....

  6. Acoustic engineering and technology '90

    Acoustic monitoring, testing and diagnosis in machines, production processes and products enhance the uptimes and profitability of machinery and plants. 18 papers discuss the current state of the art of acoustic monitoring systems including integrated factory planning as well as industrial health, and noise protection. (DG)

  7. Digital Controller For Acoustic Levitation

    Tarver, D. Kent

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic driver digitally controls sound fields along three axes. Allows computerized acoustic levitation and manipulation of small objects for such purposes as containerless processing and nuclear-fusion power experiments. Also used for controlling motion of vibration-testing tables in three dimensions.

  8. Radiative correction in approximate treatments of electromagnetic scattering by point and body scatterers

    Ru, Eric C Le; Auguié, Baptiste

    2012-01-01

    The transition-matrix ($T$-matrix) approach provides a general formalism to study scattering problems in various areas of physics, including acoustics (scalar fields) and electromagnetics (vector fields), and is to some extent related to the scattering matrix ($S$-matrix) used in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. Focusing on electromagnetic scattering, we highlight an alternative formulation of the $T$-matrix approach, based on the use of the reactance matrix or $K$-matrix, which is more suited to formal studies of energy conservation constraints (such as the optical theorem). We show in particular that electrostatics or quasi-static approximations can be corrected within this framework to satisfy the energy conservation constraints associated with radiation. A general formula for such a radiative correction is explicitly obtained and empirical expressions proposed in earlier studies are shown to be special cases of this general formula. This work therefore provides a justification of the empirical ...

  9. MEMS Based Acoustic Array

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikaza (Inventor); Humphreys, William M. (Inventor); Arnold, David P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention described and shown in the specification aid drawings include a combination responsive to an acoustic wave that can be utilized as a dynamic pressure sensor. In one embodiment of the present invention, the combination has a substrate having a first surface and an opposite second surface, a microphone positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having an input and a first output and a second output, wherein the input receives a biased voltage, and the microphone generates an output signal responsive to the acoustic wave between the first output and the second output. The combination further has an amplifier positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having a first input and a second input and an output, wherein the first input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the first output of the microphone and the second input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the second output of the microphone for receiving the output sinual from the microphone. The amplifier is spaced from the microphone with a separation smaller than 0.5 mm.

  10. Acoustics and Hearing

    Damaske, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When one listens to music at home, one would like to have an acoustic impression close to that of being in the concert hall. Until recently this meant elaborate multi-channelled sound systems with 5 or more speakers. But head-related stereophony achieves the surround-sound effect in living rooms with only two loudspeakers. By virtue of their slight directivity as well as an electronic filter the limitations previously common to two-speaker systems can be overcome and this holds for any arbitrary two-channel recording. The book also investigates the question of how a wide and diffuse sound image can arise in concert halls and shows that the quality of concert halls decisively depends on diffuse sound images arising in the onset of reverberation. For this purpose a strong onset of reverberation is modified in an anechoic chamber by electroacoustic means. Acoustics and Hearing proposes ideas concerning signal processing in the auditory system that explain the measured results and the resultant sound effects plea...

  11. Musical acoustics demonstrations

    Hoekje, P. L.

    2003-10-01

    The ASA Musical Acoustics Demonstrations website (trial version at http://www.bw.edu/~phoekje) includes sound files, video clips, program code listings, and other material for demonstrations related to musical acoustics. Many of the sound demonstrations may be experienced either as expositions, in which the phenomena are explained before they are presented, or as experiments, in which the explanation comes after listeners have had the opportunity to draw their own conclusions. Suggestions are provided for apparatus construction and classroom experiments, as well as for building simple musical instruments. Software is recommended if it is available free and compatible with multiple personal computer operating systems. For example, Audacity (http://audacity.sourceforce.net) is a sound file editor and analyzer that can be used to visually represent sounds and manipulate them. Source files are included for the synthesized sound examples, which were created in Csound (http://csounds.com), so that interested users may create their own variations. Source code is also included for visual demonstrations created in Visual Python and Python (http://www.python.org), an efficient, high level programming language. Suggestions, criticisms, and contributions are always welcome! [Work supported by ASA and Baldwin-Wallace College.

  12. Time-reversal acoustics

    Fink, Mathias [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, Ecole Superieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielle de la Ville de Paris, Universite Denis Diderot, UMR CNRS 7587, 10 Rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)], E-mail: mathias.fink@espci.fr

    2008-10-15

    Time-reversal mirrors (TRMs) refocus an incident acoustic field to the position of the original source regardless of the complexity of the propagation medium. TRM's have now been implemented in a variety of physical scenarios from MHz ultrasonics with order centimeter aperture size to hundreds/thousands of Hz in ocean acoustics with order hundred meter aperture size. Common to this broad range of scales is a remarkable robustness exemplified by observations at all scales that the more complex the medium between the probe source and the TRM, the sharper the focus. The relation between the medium complexity and the size of the focal spot is studied in this paper. It is certainly the most exciting property of TRM compared to standard focusing devices. A TRM acts as an antenna that uses complex environments to appears wider than it is, resulting for a broadband pulse in a refocusing quality that does not depend of the TRM aperture. In this paper, we investigate the time-reversal approach in various media of increasing complexity and we discuss the link existing between time-reversal approach and local helioseismology where Green's functions can be extracted from diffusive noise.

  13. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  14. Acoustic monitoring method and device

    The present invention provides a method of eliminating resonance noises upon acoustically monitoring the operation state of power plants and plant equipments whether they are normal or not, to improve sensitivity for detecting abnormalities. Namely, a microphone detects acoustic signals including leaking sounds and converts them into electric signals. An amplifier amplifies the electric signals to an appropriate level. A noise eliminating section eliminates resonance noises other than the leaking sounds. An abnormality judging section judges presence of abnormality based on the level of the acoustic signals of the leaking sounds. With such a constitution, a plurality of resonance noises generated also during normal plant operation are automatically eliminated. Since resonance noises as a factor of lowering the sensitivity for abnormal sound detection are not included in the acoustic signals, the sensitivity for the abnormal sound detection is improved. Accordingly, the performance of the acoustic monitoring device is improved. (I.S.)

  15. Aero-acoustics of Drag Generating Swirling Exhaust Flows

    Shah, P. N.; Mobed, D.; Spakovszky, Z. S.; Brooks, T. F.; Humphreys, W. M. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft on approach in high-drag and high-lift configuration create unsteady flow structures which inherently generate noise. For devices such as flaps, spoilers and the undercarriage there is a strong correlation between overall noise and drag such that, in the quest for quieter aircraft, one challenge is to generate drag at low noise levels. This paper presents a rigorous aero-acoustic assessment of a novel drag concept. The idea is that a swirling exhaust flow can yield a steady, and thus relatively quiet, streamwise vortex which is supported by a radial pressure gradient responsible for pressure drag. Flows with swirl are naturally limited by instabilities such as vortex breakdown. The paper presents a first aero-acoustic assessment of ram pressure driven swirling exhaust flows and their associated instabilities. The technical approach combines an in-depth aerodynamic analysis, plausibility arguments to qualitatively describe the nature of acoustic sources, and detailed, quantitative acoustic measurements using a medium aperture directional microphone array in combination with a previously established Deconvolution Approach for Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS). A model scale engine nacelle with stationary swirl vanes was designed and tested in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility at a full-scale approach Mach number of 0.17. The analysis shows that the acoustic signature is comprised of quadrupole-type turbulent mixing noise of the swirling core flow and scattering noise from vane boundary layers and turbulent eddies of the burst vortex structure near sharp edges. The exposed edges are the nacelle and pylon trailing edge and the centerbody supporting the vanes. For the highest stable swirl angle setting a nacelle area based drag coefficient of 0.8 was achieved with a full-scale Overall Sound Pressure Level (OASPL) of about 40dBA at the ICAO approach certification point.

  16. Separation of viscothermal losses and scattering in ultrasonic characterization of porous media.

    Ayrault, Christophe; Griffiths, Stéphane

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents a method for separating viscothermal and scattering losses in ultrasonic characterization of porous media. This method is based on variations of the static pressure of the saturating fluid. Experimental results were already presented in previous papers and the losses separation was verified experimentally. The aim of this paper is to present an analytic justification of this losses separation in the case of this experimental method and to show that it is possible to estimate acoustic parameters without the knowledge of scattering characteristics. The standard scattering length is used to renormalize speed and transmission through the porous medium, described as an equivalent fluid. Under certain assumptions corresponding to a weak scattering regime, it is shown how viscothermal and scattering losses can be separated easily without knowing scattering characteristics. Application of this model is presented in the case of weak scattering in a polyurethane foam and in the limit case of stronger scattering in a glass beads sample. PMID:16859724

  17. Modal analysis of the scattering coefficients of an open cavity in a waveguide

    Tong, Yuhui

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of an acoustic scatterer are often described by scattering coefficients. The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the frequency dependent features of the coefficients has been a challenge task, owing to the complicated coupling between the waves in open space and the modes inside the finite scatterer. In this paper, a frequency-dependent modal description of the scattering coefficient is utilized to study the modal properties of the scatterer. The important role that eigenmodes play in defining the features of the scattering coefficients is revealed via an expansion of the coefficients by the eigenmodes. The results show the local extrema of the scattering coefficients can be attributed to the constructive/destructive interference of resonant and non-resonant modes. In particular, an approximated equation, which is equivalent to the standard Fano formula, is obtained to describe the sharp anti-symmetric Fano characteristics of the scattering coefficients. The special cases where sca...

  18. Wave scattering from statistically rough surfaces

    Bass, F G; ter Haar, D

    2013-01-01

    Wave Scattering from Statistically Rough Surfaces discusses the complications in radio physics and hydro-acoustics in relation to wave transmission under settings seen in nature. Some of the topics that are covered include radar and sonar, the effect of variations in topographic relief or ocean waves on the transmission of radio and sound waves, the reproduction of radio waves from the lower layers of the ionosphere, and the oscillations of signals within the earth-ionosphere waveguide. The book begins with some fundamental idea of wave transmission theory and the theory of random processes a

  19. The significance of multiple scattering in bubble measurements near the sea surface

    Jensen, Leif Bjørnø; Bjørnø, Irina K.

    1996-01-01

    of the theory for isotropic scattering by randomly distributed scatterers. This theory, modified later by others [K. W. Commander and A. Prosperetti, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 85, 732–746 (1989)] fails in the vicinity of individual bubble resonances and for high concentrations of bubbles in the population. A recent...... improvement of the scattering theory [C. Feuillade, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 98, 1178–1190 (1995)], predicts a downward frequency shift and a suppression of the attenuation peak. His results emphasize the importance of the still unsolved problem on proximity thresholds for influence of multiple scattering in terms...... of bubble plume qualities. Available, but still unconfirmed, experimental data show the significance of multiple scattering in bubble plumes having void fractions >~0.22%. This paper forms an attempt to illuminate and solve the proximity threshold question, forming the basis for the significance...

  20. Evaluation of performance of Son Tek Argonaut acoustic doppler velocity log in tow tank and sea

    Joseph, A.; Madhan, R.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Desai, R.G.P.; VijayKumar, K.; Dias, M.; Tengali, S.; Methar, A.

    Performance of a 500-kHz, 3-beam downward-looking Sontex Argonaut acoustic Doppler velocity log (DVL) based on measurements at tow-tank and sea is addressed. Its accuracy and linearity under tow-tank measurements were largely scattered...

  1. Acoustic interaction forces and torques acting on suspended spheres in an ideal fluid

    Lopes, J Henrique; Silva, G T

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the acoustic interaction forces and torques exerted by an arbitrary time-harmonic wave on a set of N spheres suspended in an inviscid fluid are theoretically analyzed. In so doing, we utilize the partial-wave expansion method to solve the related multiple scattering problem. The acoustic interaction force and torque are computed for a sphere using the farfield radiation force and torque formulas. To exemplify the method, we calculate the interaction forces exerted by an external traveling and standing plane wave on an arrangement of two and three olive-oil droplets in water. The droplets radii are comparable to the wavelength (i.e. Mie scattering regime). The results show that the radiation force may considerably deviates from that exerted solely by the external incident wave. In addition, we find that acoustic interaction torques arise on the droplets when a nonsymmetric effective incident wave interacts with the droplets.

  2. The Frequency and Damping of Ion Acoustic Waves in Collisional and Collisionless Two-species Plasma

    R.L. Berger; E.J. Valeo

    2004-08-18

    The dispersion properties of ion acoustic waves (IAW) are sensitive to the strength of ion-ion collisions in multi-species plasma in which the different species usually have differing charge-to-mass ratios. The modification of the frequency and damping of the fast and slow acoustic modes in a plasma composed of light (low Z) and heavy (high Z) ions is considered. In the fluid limit where the light ion scattering mean free path, {lambda}{sub th} is smaller than the acoustic wavelength, {lambda} = 2{pi}/k, the interspecies friction and heat flow carried by the light ions scattering from the heavy ions causes the damping. In the collisionless limit, k{lambda}{sub th} >> 1, Landau damping by the light ions provides the dissipation. In the intermediate regime when k{lambda}{sub th} {approx} 1, the damping is at least as large as the sum of the collisional and Landau damping.

  3. Acoustical radiation torque and force for spheres and Bessel beam extinction efficiency

    Marston, Philip L.; Zhang, Likun

    2014-11-01

    The scattering of optical and acoustical beams is relevant to the levitation and manipulation of drops. Here we examine theoretical developments in the acoustical case. We previously showed how the optical theorem for extinction can be extended to invariant beams. The example of a sphere in a Bessel beam facilitates the direct comparison with a circular disc computed using Babinet's principle and the Kirchhoff approximation. In related work, by considering traveling or standing wave first-order vortex beams we previously showed that the radiation torque is the ratio of the absorbed power and the radian acoustic frequency. By modifying the scattering to account for the viscosity of the surrounding fluid in the analysis of the absorbed power, approximations for radiation torque and force are obtained at long wavelengths in special cases and these can be compared with results published elsewhere.

  4. Quantum scattering theory

    Kouri, Donald J

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a detailed exposition of quantum scattering theory as applied to chemical physics. It includes the fundamental mathematics of scattering, details of how it applies to atom-molecule, molecule-molecule collisions, as well as collisions with surfaces. A variety of computational methods for solving scattering problems are presented. In addition, some discussion of fully quantal approximations is included. Both inelastic and reactive scattering are treated in detail. Both time-dependent and time-independent approaches to scattering theory and scattering computation are included. The book will reflect the research done over approximately 50 years by the author.

  5. Status of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup

    Due to the low flux of ultra-high energetic neutrinos induced in interactions of cosmic rays with the cosmic microwave background, very large instrumented volumes and new registration techniques are necessary for their detection. The south polar ice offers the unique opportunity to implement existing Cherenkov techniques as well as registration of radio and acoustic waves from the neutrino interaction. A simulation of a ∼ 120 km3 hybrid optical/radio/acoustic detector showed that event rates of ∼ 10 per year can be achieved. In this simulation the ultrasonic parameters of antarctic ice regarding absorption, scattering and environmental noise pose the key uncertainty. To evaluate the acoustic properties in-situ, the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been created. An array of custom-made ultrasonic sensors and transmitters will be deployed on three strings in the upper 400 m of the holes of the IceCube experiment. The status of the experiment and a first evaluation of its performance are presented here

  6. Low frequency acoustic pulse propagation in temperate forests.

    Albert, Donald G; Swearingen, Michelle E; Perron, Frank E; Carbee, David L

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of acoustic pulse propagation for a 30-m path were conducted in an open field and in seven different forest stands in the northeastern United States consisting of deciduous, evergreen, or mixed tree species. The waveforms recorded in forest generally show the pulse elongation characteristic of propagation over a highly porous ground surface, with high frequency scattered arrivals superimposed on the basic waveform shape. Waveform analysis conducted to determine ground properties resulted in acoustically determined layer thicknesses of 4-8 cm in summer, within 2 cm of the directly measured thickness of the litter layers. In winter the acoustic thicknesses correlated with the site-specific snow cover depths. Effective flow resistivity values of 50-88 kN s m(-4) were derived for the forest sites in summer, while lower values typical for snow were found in winter. Reverberation times (T60) were typically around 2 s, but two stands (deciduous and pruned spruce planted on a square grid) had lower values of about 1.2 s. One site with a very rough ground surface had very low summer flow resistivity value and also had the longest reverberation time of about 3 s. These measurements can provide parameters useful for theoretical predictions of acoustic propagation within forests. PMID:26328690

  7. Extended optical theorem for scalar monochromatic acoustical beams of arbitrary wavefront in cylindrical coordinates.

    Mitri, F G

    2016-04-01

    One of the fundamental theorems in (optical, acoustical, quantum, gravitational) wave scattering is the optical theorem for plane waves, which relates the extinction cross-section to the forward scattering complex amplitude function. In this analysis, the optical theorem is extended for the case of 3D-beams of arbitrary character in a cylindrical coordinates system for any angle of incidence and any scattering angle. Generalized analytical expressions for the extinction, absorption, scattering cross-sections and efficiency factors are derived in the framework of the scalar resonance scattering theory for an object of arbitrary shape. The analysis reveals the presence of an interference scattering cross-section term, which describes interference between the diffracted or specularly reflected inelastic (Franz) waves with the resonance elastic waves. Moreover, an alternate expression for the extinction cross-section, which relates the resonance cross-section with the scattering cross-section for an impenetrable object, is obtained, suggesting an improved method for particle characterization. Cross-section expressions are also derived for known acoustical wavefronts centered on the object, defined as the on-axis case. The extended optical theorem in cylindrical coordinates can be applied to evaluate the extinction efficiency from any object of arbitrary geometry placed on or off the axis of the incident beam. Applications in acoustics, optics, and quantum mechanics should benefit from this analysis in the context of wave scattering theory and other phenomena closely connected to it, such as the multiple scattering by many particles, as well as the radiation force and torque. PMID:26836290

  8. Localized and stationary dynamic gratings via stimulated Brillouin scattering with phase modulated pumps

    Antman, Yair; Primerov, Nikolay; Sancho Dura, Juan; Thévenaz, Luc; Zadok, Avinoam

    2012-01-01

    A novel technique for the localization of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) interaction is proposed, analyzed and demonstrated experimentally. The method relies on the phase modulation of two counter-propagating optical waves by a common pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS), these waves being spectrally detuned by the Brillouin frequency shift. The PRBS symbol duration is much shorter than the acoustic lifetime. The interference between the two modulated waves gives rise to an acoustic grati...

  9. Structure analysis using acoustically levitated droplets.

    Leiterer, J; Delissen, F; Emmerling, F; Thünemann, A F; Panne, U

    2008-06-01

    Synchrotron diffraction with a micrometer-sized X-ray beam permits the efficient characterization of micrometer-sized samples, even in time-resolved experiments, which is important because often the amount of sample available is small and/or the sample is expensive. In this context, we will present acoustic levitation as a useful sample handling method for small solid and liquid samples, which are suspended in a gaseous environment (air) by means of a stationary ultrasonic field. A study of agglomeration and crystallization processes in situ was performed by continuously increasing the concentration of the samples by evaporating the solvent. Absorption and contamination processes on the sample container walls were suppressed strongly by this procedure, and parasitic scattering such as that observed when using glass capillaries was also absent. The samples investigated were either dissolved or dispersed in water droplets with diameters in the range of 1 micrometer to 2 millimeters. Initial results from time-resolved synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements of ascorbic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, apoferritin, and colloidal gold are presented. PMID:18373085

  10. Cosmic microwave background acoustic peak locations

    Pan, Z.; Knox, L.; Mulroe, B.; Narimani, A.

    2016-07-01

    The Planck collaboration has measured the temperature and polarization of the cosmic microwave background well enough to determine the locations of eight peaks in the temperature (TT) power spectrum, five peaks in the polarization (EE) power spectrum and 12 extrema in the cross (TE) power spectrum. The relative locations of these extrema give a striking, and beautiful, demonstration of what we expect from acoustic oscillations in the plasma; e.g. that EE peaks fall half way between TT peaks. We expect this because the temperature map is predominantly sourced by temperature variations in the last scattering surface, while the polarization map is predominantly sourced by gradients in the velocity field, and the harmonic oscillations have temperature and velocity 90 deg out of phase. However, there are large differences in expectations for extrema locations from simple analytic models versus numerical calculations. Here, we quantitatively explore the origin of these differences in gravitational potential transients, neutrino free-streaming, the breakdown of tight coupling, the shape of the primordial power spectrum, details of the geometric projection from three to two dimensions, and the thickness of the last scattering surface. We also compare the peak locations determined from Planck measurements to expectations under the Λ cold dark matter model. Taking into account how the peak locations were determined, we find them to be in agreement.

  11. Acoustic-structure interaction problems. Final report

    Love, E.; Taylor, R.L.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to compare and evaluate different numerical methods for solving problems of interaction between elastic solids and acoustic fluids. In particular, we concentrate our efforts on solution techniques involving the finite element method. To that end, in Chapter 2 we discuss different options for analysis of infinite fluids. In particular, the method of mesh trunction and the use of radiation elements and the use of infinite elements are discussed. Also discussed is the analysis of scattering from rigid boundaries. Chapter 3 is a brief discussion of finite element formulations for elastic solids. We review the development, of two dimensional plane strain elements and one dimensional plate and shell elements. In Chapter 4, there is a discussion of the method used to couple the solid and the fluid. We give examples for solution of scattering of pressure waves from thin elastic shell structures. Chapter 5 is a brief conclusion of results and includes recommendations for the best methods of solution and additional research.

  12. Direct aeroacoustic simulation of acoustic feedback phenomena on a side-view mirror

    Frank, Hannes M.; Munz, Claus-Dieter

    2016-06-01

    The flow around a side-view mirror and its noise generation are investigated using large eddy simulation and direct acoustic simulation. To this end, we use the high order discontinuous Galerkin spectral element method on non-conforming curved elements. Tonal noise is observed, which originates at the trailing edge downstream of laminar separation, coinciding with experimental results. In order to determine the nature of the tonal noise generation mechanism, we perform a linear stability analysis and employ a global perturbation approach in combination with dynamic mode decomposition. The perturbation analysis based on the whole flow field demonstrates the existence of a global instability involving convective disturbance growth, acoustic scattering at the trailing edge and acoustic receptivity at a rounded edge slightly upstream of separation. The results clearly show the tonal noise to be caused by the so-called acoustic feedback loop known from airfoil aeroacoustics. This phenomenon has been simulated here for the first time for a complex geometry.

  13. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-07-20

    The Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) has been designed to record and monitor the acoustic signal in natural gas transmission lines. In particular the three acoustic signals associated with a line leak. The system is portable ({approx}30 lbs) and is designed for line pressures up to 1000 psi. It has become apparent that cataloging of the various background acoustic signals in natural gas transmission line is very important if a system to identify leak signals is to be developed. The low-pressure (0-200 psig) laboratory test phase has been completed and a number of field trials have been conducted. Before the cataloging phase could begin, a few problems identified in field trials identified had to be corrected such as: (1) Decreased microphone sensitivity at line pressures above 250 psig. (2) The inability to deal with large data sets collected when cataloging the variety of signals in a transmission line. (3) The lack of an available online acoustic calibration system. These problems have been solved and the WVU PAMP is now fully functional over the entire pressure range found in the Natural Gas transmission lines in this region. Field portability and reliability have been greatly improved. Data collection and storage have also improved to the point were the full acoustic spectrum of acoustic signals can be accurately cataloged, recorded and described.

  14. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  15. Integrating Sound Scattering Measurements in the Design of Complex Architectural Surfaces

    Peters, Brady

    2010-01-01

    Digital tools present the opportunity for incorporating performance analysis into the architectural design process. Acoustic performance is an important criterion for architectural design. There is much known about sound absorption but little about sound scattering, even though scattering is...... recognized to be one of the most important factors in predicting the computational prediction of acoustic performance. This paper proposes a workflow for the design of complex architectural surfaces and the prediction of their sound scattering properties. This workflow includes the development of...... computational design tools, geometry generation, fabrication of test surfaces, measurement of acoustic performance, and the incorporation of this data into the generative tool. The Hexagon Wall is included and discussed as an illustrative design study....

  16. Local Measurement of Electron Density and Temperature in High Temperature Laser Plasma Using the Ion-Acoustic Dispersion

    The dispersion of ion-acoustic fluctuations has been measured using a novel technique that employs multiple color Thomson-scattering diagnostics to measure the frequency spectrum for two separate thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations with significantly different wave vectors. The plasma fluctuations are shown to become dispersive with increasing electron temperature. We demonstrate that this technique allows a time resolved local measurement of electron density and temperature in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

  17. Acoustic phonons in the hexagonal perovskite CsNiCl3 around the Gamma-point

    Visser, D.; Monteith, A.R.; Rønnow, H.M.;

    2000-01-01

    The acoustic phonon dispersion curves of the hexagonal perovskite CsNiCl3 were measured at room temperature in the vicinity of the Gamma-point along the [0 0 1] and [1 1 0] directions. The derived velocity of sound values for the longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons are compared...... with the velocity of sound values from ultrasound and Brillouin scattering measurements as well as model calculations using the GULP code. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  18. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    The work of this project is concerned with the simulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and topology optimization of SAW devices. SAWs are elastic vibrations that propagate along a material surface and are extensively used in electromechanical filters and resonators in telecommunication. A new...... application is modulation of optical waves in waveguides. This presentation elaborates on how a SAW is generated by interdigital transducers using a 2D model of a piezoelectric, inhomogeneous material implemented in the high-level programming language Comsol Multiphysics. The SAW is send through a model of a...... output waveguide and the MZI can thus be used as an optical switch. It is explained how the mechanical model of the SAW is coupled to a model of the optical waves such that the change in effective refractive index introduced in the MZI arms by the SAW can be calculated. Results of a parameter study of...

  19. Evoked acoustic emission

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...... a minor effect on the power spectra, i.e. the maximum jumps from one spectral peak to another. Experiments with deconvolution demonstrate that the emission generating system at least at a fixed intensity can be regarded as being linear and characterized by its impulse response which is similar to...... the emission evoked by click stimuli. It is concluded that significant information is obtained by the click rather than by the tonal stimuli. The click-evoked emissions were also recorded from both ears in a consecutive series of 100 full-term and otherwise normal babies 2-4 days after birth. The...

  20. Acoustic emission testing

    Grosse, Christian U

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) techniques have been studied in civil engineering for a long time. The techniques are recently going to be more and more applied to practical applications and to be standardized in the codes. This is because the increase of aging structures and disastrous damages due to recent earthquakes urgently demand for maintenance and retrofit of civil structures in service for example. It results in the need for the development of advanced and effective inspection techniques. Thus, AE techniques draw a great attention to diagnostic applications and in material testing. The book covers all levels from the description of AE basics for AE beginners (level of a student) to sophisticated AE algorithms and applications to real large-scale structures as well as the observation of the cracking process in laboratory specimen to study fracture processes.

  1. Acoustic fault injection tool (AFIT)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1999-05-01

    On September 18, 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. The program was funded as part of the U.S. Navy's Air Vehicle Diagnostic Systems (AVDS) program. Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. The application of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults has proven the feasibility of the technology. The flight-test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. During the RAMS flight test, 12 test flights were flown from which 25 Gbyte of digital acoustic data and about 15 hours of analog flight data recorder (FDR) data were collected from the eight on-rotor acoustic sensors. The focus of this paper is to describe the CH-46 flight-test configuration and present design details about a new innovative machinery diagnostic technology called acoustic fault injection. This technology involves the injection of acoustic sound into machinery to assess health and characterize operational status. The paper will also address the development of the Acoustic Fault Injection Tool (AFIT), which was successfully demonstrated during the CH-46 flight tests.

  2. Bubble nonlinear dynamics and stimulated scattering process

    Jie, Shi; De-Sen, Yang; Sheng-Guo, Shi; Bo, Hu; Hao-Yang, Zhang; Shi-Yong, Hu

    2016-02-01

    A complete understanding of the bubble dynamics is deemed necessary in order to achieve their full potential applications in industry and medicine. For this purpose it is first needed to expand our knowledge of a single bubble behavior under different possible conditions including the frequency and pressure variations of the sound field. In addition, stimulated scattering of sound on a bubble is a special effect in sound field, and its characteristics are associated with bubble oscillation mode. A bubble in liquid can be considered as a representative example of nonlinear dynamical system theory with its resonance, and its dynamics characteristics can be described by the Keller-Miksis equation. The nonlinear dynamics of an acoustically excited gas bubble in water is investigated by using theoretical and numerical analysis methods. Our results show its strongly nonlinear behavior with respect to the pressure amplitude and excitation frequency as the control parameters, and give an intuitive insight into stimulated sound scattering on a bubble. It is seen that the stimulated sound scattering is different from common dynamical behaviors, such as bifurcation and chaos, which is the result of the nonlinear resonance of a bubble under the excitation of a high amplitude acoustic sound wave essentially. The numerical analysis results show that the threshold of stimulated sound scattering is smaller than those of bifurcation and chaos in the common condition. Project supported by the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University, China (Grant No. IRT1228) and the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204050 and 11204049).

  3. An asymptotic model in acoustics:acoustic drift equations

    Vladimirov, Vladimir; Ilin, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    A rigorous asymptotic procedure with the Mach number as a small parameter is used to derive the equations of mean flows which coexist and are affected by the background acoustic waves in the limit of very high Reynolds number.

  4. Anisotropic spectra of acoustic turbulence

    We found universal anizopropic spectra of acoustic turbulence with the linear dispersion law ω(k)=ck within the framework of generalized kinetic equation which takes into account the finite time of three-wave interactions. This anisotropic spectra can assume both scale-invariant and non-scale-invariant form. The implications for the evolution of the acoustic turbulence with nonisotropic pumping are discussed. The main result of the article is that the spectra of acoustic turbulence tend to become more isotropic. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  5. Acoustic metamaterial with negative density

    We fabricated a one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial with negative effective density using an array of very thin elastic membranes. We observed acoustic equivalence of the plasma oscillation at ωc=735 Hz. The metamaterial was opaque in the frequency range from 0 to 735 Hz, and was transparent above 735 Hz. We report direct observation of negative acceleration in this acoustic medium below 735 Hz. The frequency characteristics of the metamaterial have the same form as that of metals with negative permittivity. We also provide a simple theory to explain the experimental results.

  6. Acoustic metamaterial with negative modulus

    We present experimental and theoretical results on an acoustic metamaterial that exhibits a negative effective modulus in a frequency range from 0 to 450 Hz. A one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial with an array of side holes on a tube was fabricated. We observed that acoustic waves above 450 Hz propagated well in this structure, but no sound below 450 Hz passed through. The frequency characteristics of the metamaterial has the same form as that of the permittivity in metals due to the plasma oscillation. We also provide a theory to explain the experimental results.

  7. Acoustic-optic investigations of acoustic gyrotropy in crystals

    For the experimental investigation of the acoustic activity the Bragg light diffraction method on transverse acoustic waves was used in the frequency range 0.4-1.8 GHz. It is shown that the oscillation period of the intensity of the diffracted light is defined by the specific rotator power of the crystal. On the basis of experimental data the specific rotation of the polarization plane in a number of gyrotropic crystals was determined. (authors)

  8. Acoustic metamaterials for new two-dimensional sonic devices

    It has been shown that two-dimensional arrays of rigid or fluidlike cylinders in a fluid or a gas define, in the limit of large wavelengths, a class of acoustic metamaterials whose effective parameters (sound velocity and density) can be tailored up to a certain limit. This work goes a step further by considering arrays of solid cylinders in which the elastic properties of cylinders are taken into account. We have also treated mixtures of two different elastic cylinders. It is shown that both effects broaden the range of acoustic parameters available for designing metamaterials. For example, it is predicted that metamaterials with perfect matching of impedance with air are now possible by using aerogel and rigid cylinders equally distributed in a square lattice. As a potential application of the proposed metamaterial, we present a gradient index lens for airborne sound (i.e. a sonic Wood lens) whose functionality is demonstrated by multiple scattering simulations

  9. Acoustic and thermal properties of strontium pyroniobate single crystals

    Shabbir, G; Kojima, S [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

    2003-04-21

    High resolution Brillouin scattering and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) experiments were performed to study the acoustic and thermal properties of strontium pyroniobate (Sr{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 7}) single crystals. The anomalous temperature dependence of the longitudinal acoustic phonon mode frequency corresponding to c{sub 22} elastic stiffness coefficient was observed in the neighbourhood of the normal-incommensurate phase transition temperature T{sub i} (491 K). The specific heat measured by MDSC showed an anomaly around 487{+-}2 K. The changes in enthalpy and entropy of the phase transition were estimated as 147 J mol{sup -1} and 0.71 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}, respectively.

  10. Acoustic metamaterials for new two-dimensional sonic devices

    Torrent, Daniel; Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose [Wave Phenomena Group, Department of Electronic Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, C/Camino de Vera sn, E-46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    It has been shown that two-dimensional arrays of rigid or fluidlike cylinders in a fluid or a gas define, in the limit of large wavelengths, a class of acoustic metamaterials whose effective parameters (sound velocity and density) can be tailored up to a certain limit. This work goes a step further by considering arrays of solid cylinders in which the elastic properties of cylinders are taken into account. We have also treated mixtures of two different elastic cylinders. It is shown that both effects broaden the range of acoustic parameters available for designing metamaterials. For example, it is predicted that metamaterials with perfect matching of impedance with air are now possible by using aerogel and rigid cylinders equally distributed in a square lattice. As a potential application of the proposed metamaterial, we present a gradient index lens for airborne sound (i.e. a sonic Wood lens) whose functionality is demonstrated by multiple scattering simulations.

  11. Effects of subsampling of passive acoustic recordings on acoustic metrics.

    Thomisch, Karolin; Boebel, Olaf; Zitterbart, Daniel P; Samaran, Flore; Van Parijs, Sofie; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2015-07-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring is an important tool in marine mammal studies. However, logistics and finances frequently constrain the number and servicing schedules of acoustic recorders, requiring a trade-off between deployment periods and sampling continuity, i.e., the implementation of a subsampling scheme. Optimizing such schemes to each project's specific research questions is desirable. This study investigates the impact of subsampling on the accuracy of two common metrics, acoustic presence and call rate, for different vocalization patterns (regimes) of baleen whales: (1) variable vocal activity, (2) vocalizations organized in song bouts, and (3) vocal activity with diel patterns. To this end, above metrics are compared for continuous and subsampled data subject to different sampling strategies, covering duty cycles between 50% and 2%. The results show that a reduction of the duty cycle impacts negatively on the accuracy of both acoustic presence and call rate estimates. For a given duty cycle, frequent short listening periods improve accuracy of daily acoustic presence estimates over few long listening periods. Overall, subsampling effects are most pronounced for low and/or temporally clustered vocal activity. These findings illustrate the importance of informed decisions when applying subsampling strategies to passive acoustic recordings or analyses for a given target species. PMID:26233026

  12. Scattering by Black Holes

    Andersson, N

    2000-01-01

    This is a chapter on Black-hole Scattering that was commissioned for an Encyclopaedia on Scattering edited by Pike and Sabatier, to be published by Academic Press. The chapter surveys wave propagation in black-hole spacetimes, diffraction effects in wave scattering, resonances, quasinormal modes and related topics.

  13. Polarized Neutron Scattering

    Roessli, B.; Böni, P.

    2000-01-01

    The technique of polarized neutron scattering is reviewed with emphasis on applications. Many examples of the usefulness of the method in various fields of physics are given like the determination of spin density maps, measurement of complex magnetic structures with spherical neutron polarimetry, inelastic neutron scattering and separation of coherent and incoherent scattering with help of the generalized XYZ method.

  14. Magnetic photon scattering

    The report reviews, at an introductory level, the theory of photon scattering from condensed matter. Magnetic scattering, which arises from first-order relativistic corrections to the Thomson scattering amplitude, is treated in detail and related to the corresponding interaction in the magnetic neutron diffraction amplitude. (author)

  15. Hybrid optical and acoustic force based sorting

    O'Mahoney, Paul; Brodie, Graham W.; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E. M.; Cochran, Sandy; Spalding, Gabriel C.; MacDonald, Michael P.

    2014-09-01

    We report the combined use of optical sorting and acoustic levitation to give particle sorting. Differing sizes of microparticles are sorted optically both with and without the aid of acoustic levitation, and the results compared to show that the use of acoustic trapping can increase sorting efficiency. The use of a transparent ultrasonic transducer is also shown to streamline the integration of optics and acoustics. We also demonstrate the balance of optical radiation pressure and acoustic levitation to achieve vertical sorting.

  16. Particle-like wave packets in complex scattering systems

    Gérardin, Benoît; Ambichl, Philipp; Prada, Claire; Rotter, Stefan; Aubry, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    A wave packet undergoes a strong spatial and temporal dispersion while propagating through a complex medium. This wave scattering is often seen as a nightmare in wave physics whether it be for focusing, imaging or communication purposes. Controlling wave propagation through complex systems is thus of fundamental interest in many areas, ranging from optics or acoustics to medical imaging or telecommunications. Here, we study the propagation of elastic waves in a cavity and a disordered waveguide by means of laser interferometry. We demonstrate how the direct experimental access to the information stored in the scattering matrix of these systems allows us to selectively excite scattering states and wave packets that travel along individual classical trajectories. Due to their limited dispersion, these particle-like scattering states will be crucially relevant for all applications involving selective wave focusing and efficient information transfer through complex media.

  17. Frequency Steered Acoustic Transducer Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is to develop, fabricate, and characterize a novel frequency steered acoustic transducer (FSAT) for the...

  18. Frequency Steered Acoustic Transducer Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project is to fabricate, characterize, and verify performance of a new type of frequency steered acoustic...

  19. Airborne synthetic aperture acoustic imaging.

    Soumekh, M

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a system model and inversion for airborne synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) imaging. The system model accurately represents the intercation of the acoustic source and the target region at near range values. Moreover, the model incorporates the fact that the relative speed of the vehicle's (transmitter/receiver) with respect to the target region is comparable to the acoustic wave propagation speed. The inversion utilizes the principle of spectral decomposition of spherical phase functions to develop a wavefront reconstruction method from SAA data. Processing issues and selection of appropriate acoustic FM-CW sources are discussed. Results are provided that exhibit the superior accuracy of the proposed SAA system model and inversion over their synthetic aperture radar (SAR) counterpart in which the vehicle's speed is assumed to be much smaller than the wave propagation speed. PMID:18282912

  20. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will explore and test the feasibility and effectiveness of using a cryogenic fluid (liquid nitrogen) to facilitate acoustic suppression in a...

  1. Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The very large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, is currently under construction and is due to...

  2. In-situ optical and acoustical measurements of the buoyant cyanobacterium p. Rubescens: spatial and temporal distribution patterns.

    Hofmann, Hilmar; Peeters, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Optical (fluorescence) and acoustic in-situ techniques were tested in their ability to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of plankton in freshwater ecosystems with special emphasis on the harmful and buoyant cyanobacterium P. rubescens. Fluorescence was measured with the multi-spectral FluoroProbe (Moldaenke FluoroProbe, MFP) and a Seapoint Chlorophyll Fluorometer (SCF). In-situ measurements of the acoustic backscatter strength (ABS) were conducted with three different acoustic devices covering multiple acoustic frequencies (614 kHz ADCP, 2 MHz ADP, and 6 MHz ADV). The MFP provides a fast and reliable technique to measure fluorescence at different wavelengths in situ, which allows discriminating between P. rubescens and other phytoplankton species. All three acoustic devices are sensitive to P. rubescens even if other scatterers, e.g., zooplankton or suspended sediment, are present in the water column, because P. rubescens containing gas vesicles has a strong density difference and hence acoustic contrast to the ambient water and other scatterers. After calibration, the combination of optical and acoustical measurements not only allows qualitative and quantitative observation of P. rubescens, but also distinction between P. rubescens, other phytoplankton, and zooplankton. As the measuring devices can sample in situ at high rates they enable assessment of plankton distributions at high temporal (minutes) and spatial (decimeters) resolution or covering large temporal (seasonal) and spatial (basin scale) scales. PMID:24303028

  3. In-situ optical and acoustical measurements of the buoyant cyanobacterium p. Rubescens: spatial and temporal distribution patterns.

    Hilmar Hofmann

    Full Text Available Optical (fluorescence and acoustic in-situ techniques were tested in their ability to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of plankton in freshwater ecosystems with special emphasis on the harmful and buoyant cyanobacterium P. rubescens. Fluorescence was measured with the multi-spectral FluoroProbe (Moldaenke FluoroProbe, MFP and a Seapoint Chlorophyll Fluorometer (SCF. In-situ measurements of the acoustic backscatter strength (ABS were conducted with three different acoustic devices covering multiple acoustic frequencies (614 kHz ADCP, 2 MHz ADP, and 6 MHz ADV. The MFP provides a fast and reliable technique to measure fluorescence at different wavelengths in situ, which allows discriminating between P. rubescens and other phytoplankton species. All three acoustic devices are sensitive to P. rubescens even if other scatterers, e.g., zooplankton or suspended sediment, are present in the water column, because P. rubescens containing gas vesicles has a strong density difference and hence acoustic contrast to the ambient water and other scatterers. After calibration, the combination of optical and acoustical measurements not only allows qualitative and quantitative observation of P. rubescens, but also distinction between P. rubescens, other phytoplankton, and zooplankton. As the measuring devices can sample in situ at high rates they enable assessment of plankton distributions at high temporal (minutes and spatial (decimeters resolution or covering large temporal (seasonal and spatial (basin scale scales.

  4. Wave scattering theory a series approach based on the Fourier transformation

    Eom, Hyo J

    2001-01-01

    The book provides a unified technique of Fourier transform to solve the wave scattering, diffraction, penetration, and radiation problems where the technique of separation of variables is applicable. The book discusses wave scattering from waveguide discontinuities, various apertures, and coupling structures, often encountered in electromagnetic, electrostatic, magnetostatic, and acoustic problems. A system of simultaneous equations for the modal coefficients is formulated and the rapidly-convergent series solutions amenable to numerical computation are presented. The series solutions find practical applications in the design of microwave/acoustic transmission lines, waveguide filters, antennas, and electromagnetic interference/compatibilty-related problems.

  5. Imaging Nonequilibrium Atomic Vibrations with X-ray Diffuse Scattering

    Trigo, M.; Chen, J.; Vishwanath, V.H.; /SLAC; Sheu, Y.M.; /Michigan U.; Graber, T.; Henning, R.; /U. Chicago; Reis, D; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-03-03

    We use picosecond x-ray diffuse scattering to image the nonequilibrium vibrations of the lattice following ultrafast laser excitation. We present images of nonequilibrium phonons in InP and InSb throughout the Brillouin-zone which remain out of equilibrium up to nanoseconds. The results are analyzed using a Born model that helps identify the phonon branches contributing to the observed features in the time-resolved diffuse scattering. In InP this analysis shows a delayed increase in the transverse acoustic (TA) phonon population along high-symmetry directions accompanied by a decrease in the longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons. In InSb the increase in TA phonon population is less directional.

  6. Passive/Active Acoustic metamaterials

    Lissek, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    Within the last years, an increasing number of studies have been carried out in the field of acoustic metamaterials. These artificial composite materials aim at achieving new macroscopic properties, like negative refraction, that are not readily present in nature. In analogy to electromagnetics, where such concepts are already more mature, a novel concept of artificial acoustic transmission line has recently been reported, which presents such artificial behavior. In this presentation, the des...

  7. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  8. Simplified Rotation In Acoustic Levitation

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.; Trinh, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    New technique based on old discovery used to control orientation of object levitated acoustically in axisymmetric chamber. Method does not require expensive equipment like additional acoustic drivers of precisely adjustable amplitude, phase, and frequency. Reflecting object acts as second source of sound. If reflecting object large enough, close enough to levitated object, or focuses reflected sound sufficiently, Rayleigh torque exerted on levitated object by reflected sound controls orientation of object.

  9. Computational Modeling of Airway Acoustic

    Horáček, Jaromír

    Salt Lake City: National Center for Voice and Speech, University of Utah, 2014. s. 14-14. [International Conference on Voice Physiology and Biomechanics /9./. 10.04.2014-12.04.2014, Salt Lake City] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/12/1306 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : biomechanics of voice * finite element method * acoustic waves propagation Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  10. Incorporating tissue absorption and scattering in rapid ultrasound beam modeling

    Christensen, Douglas; Almquist, Scott

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a new approach for modeling the propagation of an ultrasound beam in inhomogeneous tissues such as encountered with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for treatment of various diseases. This method, called the hybrid angular spectrum (HAS) approach, alternates propagation steps between the space and the spatial frequency domains throughout the inhomogeneous regions of the body; the use of spatial Fourier transforms makes this technique considerably faster than other modeling approaches (about 10 sec for a 141 x 141 x 121 model). In HIFU thermal treatments, the acoustic absorption property of the tissues is of prime importance since it leads to temperature rise and the achievement of desired thermal dose at the treatment site. We have recently added to the HAS method the capability of independently modeling tissue absorption and scattering, the two components of acoustic attenuation. These additions improve the predictive value of the beam modeling and more accurately describes the thermal conditions expected during a therapeutic ultrasound exposure. Two approaches to explicitly model scattering were developed: one for scattering sizes smaller than a voxel, and one when the scattering scale is several voxels wide. Some anatomically realistic examples that demonstrate the importance of independently modeling absorption and scattering are given, including propagation through the human skull for noninvasive brain therapy and in the human breast for treatment of breast lesions.

  11. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  12. Prediction of acoustic comfort and acoustic silence in Goan Catholic churches

    Menino A. S. M. P. Tavares; S. Rajagopalan; Satish J. Sharma; António P. O. Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic Comfort and Acoustic Silence are determinants of tranquility in a worship space. The results presented here are part of a study that investigates the behaviour of acoustically constituted worship parameters in six Catholic churches (Goa, India). Acoustic comfort is quantified through an Acoustic Comfort Impression Index which measures the net comfort induced through the optimization of the desired subjective acoustic impressions for different types of music and different music source...

  13. Measurements of acoustic pressure at high amplitudes and intensities

    Crum, L A [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th Street, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); Bailey, M R [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th Street, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); Kaczkowski, P [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th Street, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); McAteer, J A [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Indiana University, 635 Barnhill Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Pishchalnikov, Y A [Department of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, M V Lomosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Sapozhnikov, O A [Department of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, M V Lomosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2004-01-01

    In our research group, we desire measurements of the large pressure amplitudes generated by the shock waves used in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and the large acoustic intensities used in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Conventional piezoelectric or PVDF hydrophones can not be used for such measurements as they are damaged either by cavitation, in SWL applications, or heat, in HIFU applications. In order to circumvent these difficulties, we have utilized optical fiber hydrophones in SWL that do not cavitate, and small glass probes and a scattering technique for measurements of large HIFU intensities. Descriptions of these techniques will be given as well as some typical data.

  14. Anisotropic mass density by two-dimensional acoustic metamaterials

    We show that specially designed two-dimensional arrangements of full elastic cylinders embedded in a nonviscous fluid or gas define (in the homogenization limit) a new class of acoustic metamaterials characterized by a dynamical effective mass density that is anisotropic. Here, analytic expressions for the dynamical mass density and the effective sound velocity tensors are derived in the long wavelength limit. Both show an explicit dependence on the lattice filling fraction, the elastic properties of cylinders relative to the background, their positions in the unit cell, and their multiple scattering interactions. Several examples of these metamaterials are reported and discussed

  15. Anisotropic mass density by two-dimensional acoustic metamaterials

    Torrent, Daniel; Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose [Wave Phenomena Group, Department of Electronic Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, C/Camino de Vera s/n, E-46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: jsdehesa@upvnet.upv.es

    2008-02-15

    We show that specially designed two-dimensional arrangements of full elastic cylinders embedded in a nonviscous fluid or gas define (in the homogenization limit) a new class of acoustic metamaterials characterized by a dynamical effective mass density that is anisotropic. Here, analytic expressions for the dynamical mass density and the effective sound velocity tensors are derived in the long wavelength limit. Both show an explicit dependence on the lattice filling fraction, the elastic properties of cylinders relative to the background, their positions in the unit cell, and their multiple scattering interactions. Several examples of these metamaterials are reported and discussed.

  16. Optimized multisectioned acoustic liners

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    A critical examination is presented of the use of optimized axially segmented acoustic liners to increase the attenuation of a liner. New calculations show that segmenting is most efficient at high frequencies with relatively long duct lengths where the attenuation is low for both uniform and segmented liners. Statistical considerations indicate little advantage in using optimized liners with more than two segments while the bandwidth of an optimized two-segment liner is shown to be nearly equal to that of a uniform liner. Multielement liner calculations show a large degradation in performance due to changes in assumed input modal structure. Finally, in order to substantiate previous and future analytical results, in-house (finite difference) and contractor (mode matching) programs are used to generate theoretical attenuations for a number of liner configurations for liners in a rectangular duct with no mean flow. Overall, the use of optimized multisectioned liners (sometimes called phased liners) fails to offer sufficient advantage over a uniform liner to warrant their use except in low frequency single mode application.

  17. Focusing of Acoustic Waves through Acoustic Materials with Subwavelength Structures

    Xiao, Bingmu

    2013-05-01

    In this thesis, wave propagation through acoustic materials with subwavelength slits structures is studied. Guided by the findings, acoustic wave focusing is achieved with a specific material design. By using a parameter retrieving method, an effective medium theory for a slab with periodic subwavelength cut-through slits is successfully derived. The theory is based on eigenfunction solutions to the acoustic wave equation. Numerical simulations are implemented by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for the two-dimensional acoustic wave equation. The theory provides the effective impedance and refractive index functions for the equivalent medium, which can reproduce the transmission and reflection spectral responses of the original structure. I analytically and numerically investigate both the validity and limitations of the theory, and the influences of material and geometry on the effective spectral responses are studied. Results show that large contrasts in impedance and density are conditions that validate the effective medium theory, and this approximation displays a better accuracy for a thick slab with narrow slits in it. Based on the effective medium theory developed, a design of a at slab with a snake shaped" subwavelength structure is proposed as a means of achieving acoustic focusing. The property of focusing is demonstrated by FDTD simulations. Good agreement is observed between the proposed structure and the equivalent lens pre- dicted by the theory, which leads to robust broadband focusing by a thin at slab.

  18. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    John l. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-07-01

    The 1st generation acoustic monitoring package was designed to detect and analyze weak acoustic signals inside natural gas transmission lines. Besides a microphone it housed a three-inch diameter aerodynamic acoustic signal amplifier to maximize sensitivity to leak induced {Delta}p type signals. The theory and test results of this aerodynamic signal amplifier was described in the master's degree thesis of our Research Assistant Deepak Mehra who is about to graduate. To house such a large three-inch diameter sensor required the use of a steel 300-psi rated 4 inch weld neck flange, which itself weighed already 29 pounds. The completed 1st generation Acoustic Monitoring Package weighed almost 100 pounds. This was too cumbersome to mount in the field, on an access port at a pipeline shut-off valve. Therefore a 2nd generation and truly Portable Acoustic Monitor was built. It incorporated a fully self-contained {Delta}p type signal sensor, rated for line pressures up to 1000 psi with a base weight of only 6 pounds. This is the Rosemont Inc. Model 3051CD-Range 0, software driven sensor, which is believed to have industries best total performance. Its most sensitive unit was purchased with a {Delta}p range from 0 to 3 inch water. This resulted in the herein described 2nd generation: Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) for pipelines up to 1000 psi. Its 32-pound total weight includes an 18-volt battery. Together with a 3 pound laptop with its 4-channel data acquisition card, completes the equipment needed for field acoustic monitoring of natural gas transmission pipelines.

  19. Reflective echo tomographic imaging using acoustic beams

    Kisner, Roger; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2014-11-25

    An inspection system includes a plurality of acoustic beamformers, where each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers including a plurality of acoustic transmitter elements. The system also includes at least one controller configured for causing each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers to generate an acoustic beam directed to a point in a volume of interest during a first time. Based on a reflected wave intensity detected at a plurality of acoustic receiver elements, an image of the volume of interest can be generated.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Target Range Estimation Using Ambient Noise Imaging with Acoustic Lens

    Mori, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Hanako; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2010-07-01

    In ambient noise imaging (ANI), each pixel of a target image is mapped by either monochrome or pseudo color to represent its acoustic intensity in each direction. This intensity is obtained by measuring the target object's reflecting or scattering wave, with ocean background noise serving as the sound source. In the case of using an acoustic lens, the ANI system creates a C-mode-like image, where receivers are arranged on a focal plane and each pixel's color corresponds to the intensity of each receiver output. There is no consideration for estimating a target range by this method, because it is impossible to measure the traveling time between a transducer and a target by a method like an active imaging sonar. In this study, we tried to estimate a target range using the ANI system with an acoustic lens. Here, we conducted a numerical simulation of sound propagation based on the principle of the time reversal mirror. First, instead of actual ocean measurements in the forward propagation, we calculated the scattering wave from a rigid target object in an acoustic noise field generated by a large number of point sources using the two-dimensional (2D) finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The time series of the scattering wave converged by the lens was then recorded on each receiver. The sound pressure distribution assuming that the time-reversed wave of the scattering wave was reradiated from each receiver position was also calculated using the 2D FDTD method in the backward propagation. It was possible to estimate a target range using the ANI system with an acoustic lens, because the maximum position of the reradiated sound pressure field was close to the target position.

  1. Acoustic and thermal anomalies in a liquid-glass transition of racemic S(+)-R(-) ketoprofen

    Shibata, Tomohiko; Takayama, Haruki; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kojima, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic and thermal properties of pharmaceutical racemic S(+)-R(-) ketoprofen were investigated in wide temperature range including glassy, supercooled liquid and liquid states by Brillouin scattering and temperature modulated DSC. Sound velocity and acoustic attenuation exhibited clear changes at 265 K indicating a liquid-glass transition and showed the typical structural relaxation above Tg. The high value of the fragility index m = 71 was determined by the dispersion of the complex heat capacity. New relaxation map was suggested in combination with previous study of dielectric measurement.

  2. Simulation of an Underwater Acoustic Communication Channel Characterized by Wind-Generated Surface Waves and Bubbles

    Dol, H.S.; Colin, M.E.G.D.; Ainslie, M.A.; Walree, P.A. van; Janmaat, J.

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface scattering by wind-generated waves and bubbles is regarded to be the main non-platform related cause of the time variability of shallow acoustic communication channels. Simulations for predicting the quality of acoustic communication links in such channels thus require adequate modeling of these dynamic sea-surface effects. It is known that, for frequencies in the range 1-4 kHz, the main effect of bubbles on sea surface reflection loss is due to refraction, which can be modeled wi...

  3. Riemann–Hilbert problem approach for two-dimensional flow inverse scattering

    Agaltsov, A. D., E-mail: agalets@gmail.com [Faculty of Computational Mathematics and Cybernetics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Novikov, R. G., E-mail: novikov@cmap.polytechnique.fr [CNRS (UMR 7641), Centre de Mathématiques Appliquées, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); IEPT RAS, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-15

    We consider inverse scattering for the time-harmonic wave equation with first-order perturbation in two dimensions. This problem arises in particular in the acoustic tomography of moving fluid. We consider linearized and nonlinearized reconstruction algorithms for this problem of inverse scattering. Our nonlinearized reconstruction algorithm is based on the non-local Riemann–Hilbert problem approach. Comparisons with preceding results are given.

  4. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  5. Stimulated Brillouin scatter and stimulated ion Bernstein scatter during electron gyroharmonic heating experiments

    Fu, H.; Scales, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Samimi, A.; Mahmoudian, A.; Briczinski, S. J.; McCarrick, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    Results of secondary radiation, Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE), produced during ionospheric modification experiments using ground-based high-power radio waves are reported. These results obtained at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility specifically considered the generation of Magnetized Stimulated Brillouin Scatter (MSBS) and Stimulated Ion Bernstein Scatter (SIBS) lines in the SEE spectrum when the transmitter frequency is near harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency. The heater antenna beam angle effect was investigated on MSBS in detail and shows a new spectral line postulated to be generated near the upper hybrid resonance region due to ion acoustic wave interaction. Frequency sweeping experiments near the electron gyroharmonics show for the first time the transition from MSBS to SIBS lines as the heater pump frequency approaches the gyroharmonic. Significantly far from the gyroharmonic, MSBS lines dominate, while close to the gyroharmonic, SIBS lines strengthen while MSBS lines weaken. New possibilities for diagnostic information are discussed in light of these new observations.

  6. CALCULATION OF ACOUSTIC EFFICIENCY OF PORTABLE ACOUSTIC SCREEN

    Aleksandr Skvortsov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The research of influence of life environment adverse factors on physical development and health of population is an actual problem of ecology. The aspects of the most actual problems of the modern world, namely environmental industrial noise pollution are considered in the article. Industrial facilities everywhere have noisy equipment. Noise is a significant factors of negative influenceon people and environment. Combined effects of noise and of other physical pollutions on people may cause amplification of their negative impact. If the noise pollution level from the object in a residential area exceeds the permissible levels (MPL, noise protection measures can be initiated. Today, the most common design decisions for noise protection are sound absorbing construction, noise screens and barriers, acousting housings, soundproff cabins. Many of them are popular, others are less known. The article deals with one of the most wide spread means of noise protection – a portable acoustic screen. The aim of the research is to determine the efficiency of portable acoustic screens. It is shown that the installation of such structures can reduce the average value of the sound level. The authors analyzed acoustic screens as device to reduce noise pollution. The authors offer a potable acoustic screen differing from the used easyness, mobility, minimum price and good sound protective properties. Effectiveness, a sound absorption coefficient and sound conductivity coefficient of a portable acoustic screen are evaluated. The descriptions of the algorithm calculations and the combination of technical solutions have practical originality. The results of the research demonstrate the advantages of the proposed solutions for reducing noise levels in the agro-industrial complex.

  7. My 65 years in acoustics

    Beranek, Leo L.

    2001-05-01

    My entry into acoustics began as research assistant to Professor F. V. Hunt at Harvard University. I received my doctorate in 1940 and directed the Electro-Acoustic Laboratory at Harvard from October 1940 until September 1945. In 1947, I became a tenured associate professor at MIT, and, with Richard H. Bolt, formed the consulting firm Bolt and Beranek, that later included Robert B. Newman, becoming BBN. My most significant contributions before 1970 were design of wedge-lined anechoic chambers, systemization of noise reduction in ventilation systems, design of the world's largest muffler for the testing of supersonic jet engines at NASA's Lewis Laboratory in Cleveland, speech interference level, NC noise criterion curves, heading New York Port Authority's noise study that resulted in mufflers on jet aircraft, and steep aircraft climb procedures, and publishing books titled, Acoustical Measurements, Acoustics, Noise Reduction, Noise and Vibration Control, and Music, Acoustics and Architecture. As President of BBN, I supervised the formation of the group that built and operated the ARPANET (1969), which, when split in two (using TCP/IP protocol) became the INTERNET (1984). Since then, I have written two books on Concert Halls and Opera Houses and have consulted on four concert halls and an opera house.

  8. Muon-proton Scattering

    Borie, E.

    2012-01-01

    A recent proposal to measure the proton form factor by means of muon-proton scattering will use muons which are not ultrarelativistic (and also not nonrelativistic). The usual equations describing the scattering cross section use the approximation that the scattered lepton (usually an electron) is ultrarelativistic, with v/c approximately equal to 1. Here the cross section is calculated for all values of the energy. It agrees with the standard result in the appropriate limit.

  9. Introduction to neutron scattering

    Fischer, W.E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    We give here an introduction to the theoretical principles of neutron scattering. The relationship between scattering- and correlation-functions is particularly emphasized. Within the framework of linear response theory (justified by the weakness of the basic interaction) the relation between fluctuation and dissipation is discussed. This general framework explains the particular power of neutron scattering as an experimental method. (author) 4 figs., 4 refs.

  10. Direct measurements of the ion acoustic decay instability in a laser-produced, large-scale, hot plasma

    The ion acoustic decay instability has been investigated using UV collective Thomson scattering (CTS) in a large scale (∼1 mm) and hot (∼1 keV) plasma relevant to laser fusion. The instability was found to be easily excited. The spectrum of the electron plasma wave is consistent with simple theory. Collective Thomson scattering is shown to be a good tool for diagnosing the local electron temperature

  11. Partially strong WW scattering

    What if only a light Higgs boson is discovered at the CERN LHC? Conventional wisdom tells us that the scattering of longitudinal weak gauge bosons would not grow strong at high energies. However, this is generally not true. In some composite models or general two-Higgs-doublet models, the presence of a light Higgs boson does not guarantee complete unitarization of the WW scattering. After partial unitarization by the light Higgs boson, the WW scattering becomes strongly interacting until it hits one or more heavier Higgs bosons or other strong dynamics. We analyze how LHC experiments can reveal this interesting possibility of partially strong WW scattering.

  12. Multiple scattering tomography.

    Modregger, Peter; Kagias, Matias; Peter, Silvia; Abis, Matteo; Guzenko, Vitaliy A; David, Christian; Stampanoni, Marco

    2014-07-11

    Multiple scattering represents a challenge for numerous modern tomographic imaging techniques. In this Letter, we derive an appropriate line integral that allows for the tomographic reconstruction of angular resolved scattering distributions, even in the presence of multiple scattering. The line integral is applicable to a wide range of imaging techniques utilizing various kinds of probes. Here, we use x-ray grating interferometry to experimentally validate the framework and to demonstrate additional structural sensitivity, which exemplifies the impact of multiple scattering tomography. PMID:25062159

  13. Precise tailoring of acoustic velocity in optical fibers by hydrogenation and UV exposure.

    Kong, Fanting; Dong, Liang

    2012-12-01

    Tailoring of acoustic properties in solids has many potential applications in both acoustics, i.e. acoustic gratings and waveguides, and photon-phonon interactions, i.e. stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). One immediate application is in the area of SBS suppression in optical fibers. We demonstrate, for the first time, a post-processing technique where hydrogen is diffused in to a fiber core and then locally and permanently bonded to core glass by a subsequent UV exposure. It is discovered that local acoustic velocity can be altered by as much as ~2% this way, with strong potential for much further improvements with an increased hydrogen pressure. It is also found that the large change in acoustic velocity is primarily due to a reduction in bulk modulus, possibly as a result of network bonds being broken up by the addition of OH bonds. It is possible to use this technique to precisely tailor acoustic velocity along a fiber for more optimized SBS suppression in a fiber amplifier. Change in Brillouin Stokes frequency of ~320MHz at 1.064μm was observed. PMID:23262726

  14. Density and Shape Effects in the Acoustic Propulsion of Bimetallic Nanorod Motors.

    Ahmed, Suzanne; Wang, Wei; Bai, Lanjun; Gentekos, Dillon T; Hoyos, Mauricio; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2016-04-26

    Bimetallic nanorods are propelled without chemical fuels in megahertz (MHz) acoustic fields, and exhibit similar behaviors to single-metal rods, including autonomous axial propulsion and organization into spinning chains. Shape asymmetry determines the direction of axial movement of bimetallic rods when there is a small difference in density between the two metals. Movement toward the concave end of these rods is inconsistent with a scattering mechanism that we proposed earlier for acoustic propulsion, but is consistent with an acoustic streaming model developed more recently by Nadal and Lauga ( Phys. Fluids 2014 , 26 , 082001 ). Longer rods were slower at constant power, and their speed was proportional to the square of the power density, in agreement with the acoustic streaming model. The streaming model was further supported by a correlation between the disassembly of spinning chains of rods and a sharp decrease in the axial speed of autonomously moving motors within the levitation plane of the cylindrical acoustic cell. However, with bimetallic rods containing metals of different densities, a consistent polarity of motion was observed with the lighter metal end leading. Speed comparisons between single-metal rods of different densities showed that those of lower density are propelled faster. So far, these density effects are not explained in the streaming model. The directionality of bimetallic rods in acoustic fields is intriguing and offers some new possibilities for designing motors in which shape, material, and chemical asymmetry might be combined for enhanced functionality. PMID:26991933

  15. Acoustic metasurface with hybrid resonances.

    Ma, Guancong; Yang, Min; Xiao, Songwen; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2014-09-01

    An impedance-matched surface has the property that an incident wave generates no reflection. Here we demonstrate that by using a simple construction, an acoustically reflecting surface can acquire hybrid resonances and becomes impedance-matched to airborne sound at tunable frequencies, such that no reflection is generated. Each resonant cell of the metasurface is deep-subwavelength in all its spatial dimensions, with its thickness less than the peak absorption wavelength by two orders of magnitude. As there can be no transmission, the impedance-matched acoustic wave is hence either completely absorbed at one or multiple frequencies, or converted into other form(s) of energy, such as an electrical current. A high acoustic-electrical energy conversion efficiency of 23% is achieved. PMID:24880731

  16. Prototype acoustic resonance spectroscopy monitor

    This report reports on work performed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) through the Program Office for Technical Assistance (POTAS). In this work, we investigate possible applications of nondestructive acoustics measurements to facilitate IAEA safeguards at bulk processing facilities. Two different acoustic techniques for verifying the internal structure of a processing tank were investigated. During this effort we also examined two acoustic techniques for assessing the fill level within a processing tank. The fill-level measurements could be made highly portable and have an added safeguards advantage that they can also detect stratification of fill material. This later application may be particularly useful in confirming the absence of stratification in plutonium processing tanks before accountability samples are withdrawn

  17. Acoustic Communication for Medical Nanorobots

    Hogg, Tad

    2012-01-01

    Communication among microscopic robots (nanorobots) can coordinate their activities for biomedical tasks. The feasibility of in vivo ultrasonic communication is evaluated for micron-size robots broadcasting into various types of tissues. Frequencies between 10MHz and 300MHz give the best tradeoff between efficient acoustic generation and attenuation for communication over distances of about 100 microns. Based on these results, we find power available from ambient oxygen and glucose in the bloodstream can readily support communication rates up to 10,000 bits/second between micron-sized robots. We discuss techniques, such as directional acoustic beams, that can increase this rate. The acoustic pressure fields enabling this communication are unlikely to damage nearby tissue, and short bursts at considerably higher power could be of therapeutic use.

  18. Acoustic multivariate condition monitoring - AMCM

    Rosenhave, P.E. [Vestfold College, Maritime Dept., Toensberg (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    In Norway, Vestfold College, Maritime Department presents new opportunities for non-invasive, on- or off-line acoustic monitoring of rotating machinery such as off-shore pumps and diesel engines. New developments within acoustic sensor technology coupled with chemometric data analysis of complex signals now allow condition monitoring of hitherto unavailable flexibility and diagnostic specificity. Chemometrics paired with existing knowledge yields a new and powerful tool for condition monitoring. By the use of multivariate techniques and acoustics it is possible to quantify wear and tear as well as predict the performance of working components in complex machinery. This presentation describes the AMCM method and one result of a feasibility study conducted onboard the LPG/C `Norgas Mariner` owned by Norwegian Gas Carriers as (NGC), Oslo. (orig.) 6 refs.

  19. Acoustics of a broadcast center

    Beristain, Sergio

    2003-04-01

    A broadcast system in Mexico City had to change facilities in order to concentrate in a single site all related broadcast stations and production studios in order to facilitate its normal operation. This led to a design which included the acoustic noise isolation and the interior acoustics of every studio and control room, together with the audio interconection, the electricity layout, the air conditioning system, the office building, etc. This paper presents the acoustics profile of the center, including final results of the construction as they were measured on completion of the installation. The complex has seven AM and FM broadcast stations, plus seven production studios for news, commercials and radio-novels plus an audio master control room, and everything was completed within four months.

  20. Classroom acoustics: Three pilot studies

    Smaldino, Joseph J.

    2005-04-01

    This paper summarizes three related pilot projects designed to focus on the possible effects of classroom acoustics on fine auditory discrimination as it relates to language acquisition, especially English as a second language. The first study investigated the influence of improving the signal-to-noise ratio on the differentiation of English phonemes. The results showed better differentiation with better signal-to-noise ratio. The second studied speech perception in noise by young adults for whom English was a second language. The outcome indicated that the second language learners required a better signal-to-noise ratio to perform equally to the native language participants. The last study surveyed the acoustic conditions of preschool and day care classrooms, wherein first and second language learning occurs. The survey suggested an unfavorable acoustic environment for language learning.

  1. Acoustic metamaterials for sound mitigation

    Assouar, Badreddine; Oudich, Mourad; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    We provide theoretical and numerical analyses of the behavior of a plate-type acoustic metamaterial considered in an air-borne sound environment in view of sound mitigation application. Two configurations of plate are studied, a spring-mass one and a pillar system-based one. The acoustic performances of the considered systems are investigated with different approaches and show that a high sound transmission loss (STL) up to 82 dB is reached with a metamaterial plate with a thickness of 0.5 mm. The physical understanding of the acoustic behavior of the metamaterial partition is discussed based on both air-borne and structure-borne approaches. Confrontation between the STL, the band structure, the displacement fields and the effective mass density of the plate metamaterial is made to have a complete physical understanding of the different mechanisms involved. xml:lang="fr"

  2. Phoneme Recognition Using Acoustic Events

    Huebener, K; Huebener, Kai; Carson-Berndsen, Julie

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to phoneme recognition using nonsequential sub--phoneme units. These units are called acoustic events and are phonologically meaningful as well as recognizable from speech signals. Acoustic events form a phonologically incomplete representation as compared to distinctive features. This problem may partly be overcome by incorporating phonological constraints. Currently, 24 binary events describing manner and place of articulation, vowel quality and voicing are used to recognize all German phonemes. Phoneme recognition in this paradigm consists of two steps: After the acoustic events have been determined from the speech signal, a phonological parser is used to generate syllable and phoneme hypotheses from the event lattice. Results obtained on a speaker--dependent corpus are presented.

  3. Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis

    ... Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis On this page: ... more information about vestibular schwannomas? What is a vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma)? Inner ear with vestibular schwannoma ( ...

  4. On the Synchronization of Acoustic Gravity Waves

    Lonngren, Karl E.; Bai, Er-Wei

    Using the model proposed by Stenflo, we demonstrate that acoustic gravity waves found in one region of space can be synchronized with acoustic gravity waves found in another region of space using techniques from modern control theory.

  5. Acoustojet: acoustic analogue of photonic jet phenomenon

    Minin, Igor V

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated for the first time that an existence of acoustic analogue of photonic jet phenomenon, called acoustojet, providing for subwavelength localization of acoustic field in the shadow area of arbitrary 3D penetrable mesoscale particle, is possible.

  6. Golden Gate and Pt. Reyes Acoustic Detections

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains detections of acoustic tagged fish from two general locations: Golden Gate (east and west line) and Pt. Reyes. Several Vemco 69khz acoustic...

  7. Acoustic remote sensing of ocean flows

    Joseph, A.; Desa, E.

    Acoustic techniques have become powerful tools for measurement of ocean circulation mainly because of the ability of acoustic signals to travel long distances in water, and the inherently non-invasive nature of measurement. The satellite remote...

  8. CT findings of acoustic neuroma

    Sim, Do Choul; Lee, Jae Mun; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Computed Tomography (CT) is very accurate in evaluating the location, size, shape and extension of acoustic neuroma. We analysed CT findings of 23 acoustic neuromas seen at Department of Radiology, Kangnam St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University Medical College during the period of from January 1981 to June 1987. 1. Five (22%) were men and 18 (78%) were women with the high incidence occurring in the 4th and 5th decades. 2. Twenty two cases were diagnosed satisfactorily by CT examinations which included axial, coronal and reconstruction images. One with the smallest dimension of 8 mm in diameter could not be detected by the conventional CT scan. But is could be seen after metrizamide cisternography. mean size of the tumor masses was estimated 3.6 cm in diameter. 3. The shape of the tumor was oval in 50%, round in 27% and lobulated in 23%. The masses were presented as hypodense in 50%, isodense in 32% and hyperdense in 18%. All tumors were extended from the internal acoustic and toward the cerebellopontine angle. The internal acoustic canal was widened in 77%. Hydrocephalus was associated in 45%. Widening of cerebellopontine angle cistern was noted in 50%. 4. After contrast infusion the tumors were enhanced markedly in 45%, moderately in 32% and mildly in 23%. The enhanced pattern was homogeneous in 41%, mixed in 41% and rim in 18%. The margin of the tumors was sharply defined in 82%. The tumors were attached to the petrous bone with acute angle in 73%. Cystic change within the tumor was found in 27%. The peritumoral edema was noted in 45%. In conclusion, CT is of most effective modalities to evaluate size, shape, extent and internal architecture of acoustic neuroma as well as relationship with adjacent anatomic structures including the internal acoustic canal.

  9. Acoustically-Induced Electrical Signals

    Brown, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have observed electrical signals excited by and moving along with an acoustic pulse propagating in a sandstone sample. Using resonance we are now studying the characteristics of this acousto-electric signal and determining its origin and the controlling physical parameters. Four rock samples with a range of porosities, permeabilities, and mineralogies were chosen: Berea, Boise, and Colton sandstones and Austin Chalk. Pore water salinity was varied from deionized water to sea water. Ag-AgCl electrodes were attached to the sample and were interfaced to a 4-wire electrical resistivity system. Under computer control, the acoustic signals were excited and the electrical response was recorded. We see strong acoustically-induced electrical signals in all samples, with the magnitude of the effect for each rock getting stronger as we move from the 1st to the 3rd harmonics in resonance. Given a particular fluid salinity, each rock has its own distinct sensitivity in the induced electrical effect. For example at the 2nd harmonic, Berea Sandstone produces the largest electrical signal per acoustic power input even though Austin Chalk and Boise Sandstone tend to resonate with much larger amplitudes at the same harmonic. Two effects are potentially responsible for this acoustically-induced electrical response: one the co-seismic seismo-electric effect and the other a strain-induced resistivity change known as the acousto-electric effect. We have designed experimental tests to separate these mechanisms. The tests show that the seismo-electric effect is dominant in our studies. We note that these experiments are in a fluid viscosity dominated seismo-electric regime, leading to a simple interpretation of the signals where the electric potential developed is proportional to the local acceleration of the rock. Toward a test of this theory we have measured the local time-varying acoustic strain in our samples using a laser vibrometer.

  10. Acoustic characterization of rehabilitated cloisters

    A. P. O. Carvalho; S. R. C. Vilela

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results of field measurements in eight rehabilitated cloisters of old monasteries in Portugal (length: 20 to 35 m and height: 3.3 to 6.3 m) regarding their acoustic behavior to two objective parameters: RT and RASTI. The goal is to characterize the acoustic effect of the rehabilitation done on theses spaces to adapt them to new uses. All these cloisters had recently their galleries#8217; openings to the central yard closed with glass panels. Simple formulas were obtain...

  11. Physical foundations of technical acoustics

    Malecki, I

    1969-01-01

    Physical Foundations of Technical Acoustics discusses theoretical foundations of acoustical engineering. It is not so much a technical compendium as a systematic statement of physical laws so conceived that technologists might find in it all the information they need to become acquainted with the physical meaning and mathematical expression of phenomena they encounter in their work. To facilitate the acquirement of notions, which lie beyond a layman's grasp, the plan of narration adopted consists in beginning with the simplest idealized cases and then gradually moving on to the truest possibl

  12. Acoustic concerns related to multi cultural societies

    Gade, Anders Christian

    2001-01-01

    Immigration has increased cultural diversity in western societies. The process of integrating immigrants into their host countries can be smoothed if acousticians learn to recognize (1) the acoustic traditions of immigrant cultures and (2) the specific acoustic needs of the new society members. Two related projects are discussed. The ``Cahrisma'' project (Conservation of Acoustical Heritage by the Revival and Identification of the Sinan's Mosque Acoustics) is sponsored by the European Commiss...

  13. Absorption boundary conditions for geomertical acoustics

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Defining accurate acoustical boundary conditions is of crucial importance for room acoustic simulations. In predicting sound fields using phased geometrical acoustics methods, the absorption coefficients or surface impedances of the boundary surfaces can be used, but no guideline has been developed...... solutions. Two rectangular rooms with uniform and non-uniform absorption distributions are tested. It is concluded that the impedance and random incidence absorption boundary conditions produce reasonable results with some exceptions at low frequencies for acoustically soft materials....

  14. Modeling parametric scattering instabilities in large-scale expanding plasmas

    Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Hüller, S.; Pesme, D.; Casanova, M.; Loiseau, P.; Labaune, Ch.

    2006-06-01

    We present results from two-dimensional simulations of long scale-length laser-plasma interaction experiments performed at LULI. With the goal of predictive modeling of such experiments with our code Harmony2D, we take into account realistic plasma density and velocity profiles, the propagation of the laser light beam and the scattered light, as well as the coupling with the ion acoustic waves in order to describe Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). Laser pulse shaping is taken into account to follow the evolution ofthe SBS reflectivity as close as possible to the experiment. The light reflectivity is analyzed by distinguishing the backscattered light confined in the solid angle defined by the aperture of the incident light beam and the scattered light outside this cone. As in the experiment, it is observed that the aperture of the scattered light tends to increase with the mean intensity of the RPP-smoothed laser beam. A further common feature between simulations and experiments is the observed localization of the SBS-driven ion acoustic waves (IAW) in the front part of the target (with respect to the incoming laser beam).

  15. Influence of a forest edge on acoustical propagation: experimental results.

    Swearingen, Michelle E; White, Michael J; Guertin, Patrick J; Albert, Donald G; Tunick, Arnold

    2013-05-01

    Acoustic propagation through a forest edge can produce complicated pressure time histories because of scattering from the trees and changes in the microclimate and ground parameters of the two regions. To better understand these effects, a field experiment was conducted to measure low-frequency acoustic pulses propagating in an open field, a forest, and passing through a forest edge in both directions. Waveforms measured in the open field were simple impulses with very low scattering, whereas waveforms at the edge and within the forest had stronger reverberations after the direct arrival. The direct wave pulse shapes increased in duration in accordance with the path length in the forest, which had an effective flow resistivity 12 to 13 that of the grassy open field. The measurements exhibit different rates of attenuation in the two regions, with relatively lower attenuation in the open field than higher rates in the forest. Decay of SEL transmitted into the forest was 4 dB more per tenfold distance than for outbound transmission. Stronger attenuation in the 1-2 kHz range occurs when propagating into the forest. While the measured meteorological profiles revealed three distinct microclimates, meteorological effects are not sufficient to explain the apparent non-reciprocal propagation. PMID:23654365

  16. A purely flexible lightweight membrane-type acoustic metamaterial

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Zhang, Weiquan; Zhang, Siwen

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a purely flexible lightweight membrane-type acoustic structure, wherein one kind of flexible lightweight rubber material takes the roles of mass and stiffness and another type of lightweight flexible EVA (ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer) or plastic material functions as the localized stiffness for each unit. Because both the scatterers and base are constituted by the same material, this type of structure breaks the limitation that the metamaterials and phononic crystals need different materials with relatively large density and elasticity modulus ratios to play the roles of the scatterers and base respectively. Based on the band structures with different units, mass block shapes and size parameters, it is suggested that the shapes of the mass block can significantly affect the band structure. In addition, this type of structure could not only open a full band gap in the low-frequency range below 500 Hz, but also obtain an ultra-low-frequency bending wave band gap in the range below 100 Hz. Finally, we take into account the semi-infinite medium as a component, and calculate the sound transmission loss (STL) to evaluate the interaction between the structure and air. An experimental validation employing the cylindrical mass structure was developed to directly support the simulation results. Since the structures proposed in this study have achieved a purely flexible lightweight design, there exists an important promotion effect to realize the engineering applications of the acoustic metamaterials in practice.

  17. Scattering and propagation of terahertz pulses in random soot aggregate systems

    Scattering and propagation of terahertz pulses in random soot aggregate systems are studied by using the generalized multi-particle Mie-solution (GMM) and the pulse propagation theory. Soot aggregates are obtained by the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model. For a soot aggregate in soot aggregate systems, scattering characteristics are analyzed by using the GMM. Scattering intensities versus scattering angles are given. The effects of different positions of the aggregate on the scattering intensities, scattering cross sections, extinction cross sections, and absorption cross sections are computed and compared. Based on pulse propagation in random media, the transmission of terahertz pulses in random soot aggregate systems is determined by the two-frequency mutual coherence function. Numerical simulations and analysis are given for terahertz pulses (0.7956 THz). (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  18. Calculating room acoustic parameters from pseudo-impulsive acoustic sources

    San Martin, Maria L.; Vela, Antonio; San Martin, Ricardo; Arana, Miguel A.

    2002-11-01

    The impulse response function provides complete information to predict the acoustic response of a room to an acoustic input of arbitrary characteristics. At this job study, small explosions of firecrackers are proposed to be used as pseudo-impulsive acoustics sources to determine some acoustic parameters of a room such as reverberation time, definition, and clarity, comparing these results to those obtained with other techniques. A previous characterization of these sources allows us to state that they can be used for this purpose because they are, in practice, omnidirectional, their temporary pattern is highly repetitive and their spectral power is, as well, repetitive and with enough power in octave bands from 125 Hz to 8 kHz. If the linear time-invariant system impulse response h(t) is known, output signal s(t) regarding any arbitrary signal s(t) can be obtained. For our pseudo-impulsive sources, the output signal s(t) has been taken as impulse response h(t). Using the integrated impulse response method suggested by Schroeder, it has been stated that both the mean values and standard deviations for some parameters are practically identical to results obtained with other usual techniques. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  19. Acoustic Test Characterization of Melamine Foam for Usage in NASA's Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The external acoustic liftoff levels predicted for NASA's future heavy lift launch vehicles are expected to be significantly higher than the environment created by today's commercial launch vehicles. This creates a need to develop an improved acoustic attenuation system for future NASA payload fairings. NASA Glenn Research Center initiated an acoustic test series to characterize the acoustic performance of melamine foam, with and without various acoustic enhancements. This testing was denoted as NEMFAT, which stands for NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test, and is the subject of this paper. Both absorption and transmission loss testing of numerous foam configurations were performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory in July 2013. The NEMFAT test data provides an initial acoustic characterization and database of melamine foam for NASA. Because of its acoustic performance and lighter mass relative to fiberglass blankets, melamine foam is being strongly considered for use in the acoustic attenuation systems of NASA's future launch vehicles.

  20. Comment on "Anomalous wave propagation in a one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial having simultaneously negative mass density and Young's modulus" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2887-2895 (2012)].

    Marston, Philip L

    2014-03-01

    The phase and group velocities of elastic guided waves are important in the physical interpretation of high frequency scattering by fluid-loaded elastic shells. Outside the context of scattering, those properties are also important for understanding the energy flow in acoustic metamaterials. In a recent investigation of acoustic metamaterials exhibiting anomalous wave propagation [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2887-2895 (2012)] criticism of negative group velocity terminology was generalized to elastic waves guided on ordinary materials. Some context and justification for retaining the identification of negative group velocities associated with a type of backscattering enhancement for shells are explained here. The phase evolution direction is determined by the boundary conditions. PMID:24606246