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Sample records for acoustic resonance signatures

  1. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures

    Herberg, J; Maxwell, R; Tittmann, B R; Lenahan, P M; Yerkes, S; Jayaraman, S

    2005-10-04

    This report reviews progress made on NA22 project LL251DP to develop a novel technique, Nuclear Acoustic Resonance (NAR), for remote, non-destructive, nonradiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs, including {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. We have met all milestones and deliverables for FY05, as shown in Table 1. In short, we have developed a magnetic shield chamber and magnetic field, develop a digital lock-in amplifier computer to integrate both the ultrasound radiation with the detector, developed strain measurements, and begin to perform initial measurements to obtain a NAR signal from aluminum at room temperature and near the earth's magnetic field. The results obtained in FY05 further support the feasibility of successful demonstration of an NAR experiment for remote, non-destructive, non-radiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs.

  2. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures: Final Report

    Herberg, J; Maxwell, R; Tittmann, B R; Lenahan, P M; Yerkes, S; Jayaraman, S B

    2006-11-02

    This is final report on NA-22 project LL251DP, where the goal was to develop a novel technique, Nuclear Acoustic Resonance (NAR), for remote, non-destructive, nonradiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs, including {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. In short, we have developed a magnetic shield chamber and magnetic field, develop a digital lock-in amplifier computer to integrate both the ultrasound radiation with the detector, developed strain measurements, and begun to perform initial measurements to obtain a NAR signal from aluminum at room temperature and near the earth's magnetic field. Since our funding was cut in FY06, I will discuss where this project can go in the future with this technology.

  3. Acoustic Signature Monitoring and Management of Naval Platforms

    Basten, T.G.H.; Jong, C.A.F. de; Graafland, F.; Hof, J. van 't

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic signatures make naval platforms susceptible to detection by threat sensors. The variable operational conditions and lifespan of a platform cause variations in the acoustic signature. To deal with these variations, a real time signature monitoring capability is being developed, with advisory

  4. Acoustic metasurface with hybrid resonances.

    Ma, Guancong; Yang, Min; Xiao, Songwen; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2014-09-01

    An impedance-matched surface has the property that an incident wave generates no reflection. Here we demonstrate that by using a simple construction, an acoustically reflecting surface can acquire hybrid resonances and becomes impedance-matched to airborne sound at tunable frequencies, such that no reflection is generated. Each resonant cell of the metasurface is deep-subwavelength in all its spatial dimensions, with its thickness less than the peak absorption wavelength by two orders of magnitude. As there can be no transmission, the impedance-matched acoustic wave is hence either completely absorbed at one or multiple frequencies, or converted into other form(s) of energy, such as an electrical current. A high acoustic-electrical energy conversion efficiency of 23% is achieved. PMID:24880731

  5. Acoustic Fano resonators

    Amin, Muhammad

    2014-07-01

    The resonances with asymmetric Fano line-shapes were originally discovered in the context of quantum mechanics (U. Fano, Phys. Rev., 124, 1866-1878, 1961). Quantum Fano resonances were generated from destructive interference of a discrete state with a continuum one. During the last decade this concept has been applied in plasmonics where the interference between a narrowband polariton and a broader one has been used to generate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) (M. Rahmani, et al., Laser Photon. Rev., 7, 329-349, 2013).

  6. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun, E-mail: liuxiaojun@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhou, Chen; Wei, Qi; Wu, DaJian [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2013-11-25

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution.

  7. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution

  8. Modeling ground vehicle acoustic signatures for analysis and synthesis

    Security and weapon systems use acoustic sensor signals to classify and identify moving ground vehicles. Developing robust signal processing algorithms for this is expensive, particularly in presence of acoustic clutter or countermeasures. This paper proposes a parametric ground vehicle acoustic signature model to aid the system designer in understanding which signature features are important, developing corresponding feature extraction algorithms and generating low-cost, high-fidelity synthetic signatures for testing. The authors have proposed computer-generated acoustic signatures of armored, tracked ground vehicles to deceive acoustic-sensored smart munitions. They have developed quantitative measures of how accurately a synthetic acoustic signature matches those produced by actual vehicles. This paper describes parameters of the model used to generate these synthetic signatures and suggests methods for extracting these parameters from signatures of valid vehicle encounters. The model incorporates wide-bandwidth and narrow- bandwidth components that are modulated in a pseudo-random fashion to mimic the time dynamics of valid vehicle signatures. Narrow- bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate frequency, amplitude and phase information contained in a single set of narrow frequency- band harmonics. Wide-bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate parameters of a correlated-noise-floor model. Finally, the authors propose a method of modeling the time dynamics of the harmonic amplitudes as a means adding necessary time-varying features to the narrow-bandwidth signal components. The authors present results of applying this modeling technique to acoustic signatures recorded during encounters with one armored, tracked vehicle. Similar modeling techniques can be applied to security systems

  9. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy intrinsic seals

    We have begun to quantify the ability of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to detect the removal and replacement of the lid of a simulated special nuclear materials drum. Conceptually, the acoustic spectrum of a container establishcs a baseline fingerprint, which we refer to as an intrinsic seal, for the container. Simply removing and replacing the lid changes some of the resonant frequencies because it is impossible to exactly duplicate all of the stress patterns between the lid and container. Preliminary qualitative results suggested that the ARS intrinsic seal could discriminate between cases where a lid has or has not been removed. The present work is directed at quantifying the utility of the ARS intrinsic seal technique, including the technique's sensitivity to ''nuisance'' effects, such as temperature swings, movement of the container, and placement of the transducers. These early quantitative tests support the potential of the ARS intrinsic seal application, but also reveal a possible sensitivity to nuisance effects that could limit environments or conditions under which the technique is effective

  10. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  11. Acoustic transparency and slow sound using detuned acoustic resonators

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the phenomenon of acoustic transparency and slowsound propagation can be realized with detuned acoustic resonators (DAR), mimicking thereby the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in atomic physics. Sound propagation in a pipe with a series of side...

  12. Humanitarian mine detection by acoustic resonance

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-03-01

    The JASON Committee at MITRE Corp. was tasked by DARPA to inquire into suitable technologies for humanitarian mine detection. Acoustic resonance was one of the very few technologies that the JASONs determined might be promising for the task, but was as yet unexplored at the time that they conducted their inquiry. The objective of this Seed Money investigation into acoustic resonance was to determine if it would be feasible to use acoustic resonance to provide an improvement to present methods for humanitarian mine detection. As detailed in this report, acoustic resonance methods do not appear to be feasible for this task. Although acoustic resonant responses are relatively easy to detect when they exist, they are very difficult to excite by the non-contact means that must be used for buried objects. Despite many different attempts, this research did not discover any practical means of using sound to excite resonant responses in objects known to have strong resonances. The shaker table experiments did see an effect that might be attributable to the resonance of the object under test, but the effect was weak, and exploited the a priori knowledge of the resonant frequency of the object under test to distinguish it from the background. If experiments that used objects known to have strong acoustic resonances produced such marginal results, this does not seem to be a practical method to detect objects with weak resonances or non-existent resonances. The results of this work contribute to the ORNL countermine initiative. ORNL is exploring several unconventional mine detection technologies, and is proposed to explore others. Since this research has discovered some major pitfalls in non-metallic mine detection, this experience will add realism to other strategies proposed for mine detection technologies. The experiment provided hands-on experience with inert plastic mines under field conditions, and gives ORNL additional insight into the problems of developing practical

  13. Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate the innovative Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) to provide rapid and reliable in-space impulse...

  14. Resonant acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography

    Qi, Wenjuan; Li, Rui; Ma, Teng; Li, Jiawen; Kirk Shung, K.; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2013-01-01

    We report on a resonant acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography (ARF-OCE) technique that uses mechanical resonant frequency to characterize and identify tissues of different types. The linear dependency of the resonant frequency on the square root of Young's modulus was validated on silicone phantoms. Both the frequency response spectrum and the 3D imaging results from the agar phantoms with hard inclusions confirmed the feasibility of deploying the resonant frequency as a mec...

  15. Multifrequency acoustic resonators with variable nonuniformity

    Alkov, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A new type of acoustic resonator utilizes alterations of the nonuniformity to achieve different resonance frequencies. Each resonator is designed to yield frequencies that correspond to musical notes. The apparatus are remarkably simple, employing piecewise uniform cross sectional areas that can easily and quickly be changed. The resonators are thus useful as educational demonstrations. The phenomenon can be understood physically a...

  16. Acoustic microscopy applied to resonator characterization

    This paper describes the characteristics of acoustic resonators and the techniques used to characterize the standing wave patterns. It is shown that these patterns can be observed by the acoustic microscope in a transmission mode. Results are presented for circular and rectangular transducers showing the effects of supporting mount leads and defects on the vibration characteristics. The development of new more direct techniques for observing the acoustic resonances of piezoelectric transducers is of considerable interest since some of the other methods previously applied are indirect in nature and suffer from different limitations

  17. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    Polzikova, N. I.; Alekseev, S. G.; Pyataikin, I. I.; Kotelyanskii, I. M.; Luzanov, V. A.; Orlov, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonator (HBAR) formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  18. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    N. I. Polzikova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonator (HBAR formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  19. Spin-3/2 Pentaquark Resonance Signature

    We search for the standard lattice resonance signature of attraction between the resonance constituents which leads to a bound state at quark masses near the physical regime. We study a variety of spin-1/2 interpolators and for the first time, interpolators providing access to spin-3/2 pentaquark states. In looking for evidence of binding, a precise determination of the mass splitting between the pentaquark state and its lowest-lying decay channel is performed by constructing the effective mass splitting from the various two-point correlation functions. While the binding of the pentaquark state is not a requirement, the observation of such binding would provide compelling evidence for the existence of the theta+ pentaquark resonance. Evidence of binding is observed in the isoscalar spin-3/2 positive parity channel, making it an interesting state for further research

  20. Acoustic Resonator Optimisation for Airborne Particle Manipulation

    Devendran, Citsabehsan; Billson, Duncan R.; Hutchins, David A.; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    Advances in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and biomedical research necessitate micro-machined manipulators to capture, handle and position delicate micron-sized particles. To this end, a parallel plate acoustic resonator system has been investigated for the purposes of manipulation and entrapment of micron sized particles in air. Numerical and finite element modelling was performed to optimise the design of the layered acoustic resonator. To obtain an optimised resonator design, careful considerations of the effect of thickness and material properties are required. Furthermore, the effect of acoustic attenuation which is dependent on frequency is also considered within this study, leading to an optimum operational frequency range. Finally, experimental results demonstrated good particle levitation and capture of various particle properties and sizes ranging to as small as 14.8 μm.

  1. Multilayer Integrated Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators

    Zhang, Yafei

    2013-01-01

    Multilayer Integrated Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators mainly introduces the theory, design, fabrication technology and application of a recently developed new type of device, multilayer integrated film bulk acoustic resonators, at the micro and nano scale involving microelectronic devices, integrated circuits, optical devices, sensors and actuators, acoustic resonators, micro-nano manufacturing, multilayer integration, device theory and design principles, etc. These devices can work at very high frequencies by using the newly developed theory, design, and fabrication technology of nano and micro devices. Readers in fields of IC, electronic devices, sensors, materials, and films etc. will benefit from this book by learning the detailed fundamentals and potential applications of these advanced devices. Prof. Yafei Zhang is the director of the Ministry of Education’s Key Laboratory for Thin Films and Microfabrication Technology, PRC; Dr. Da Chen was a PhD student in Prof. Yafei Zhang’s research group.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic neuroma

    Kashihara, Kengo; Murata, Hideaki; Ito, Haruhide; Onishi, Hiroaki; Kadoya, Masumi; Suzuki, Masayuki.

    1989-03-01

    Thirteen patients with acoustic neuroma were studied on a 1.5T superconductive magnetic resonance (MR) imager. Acoustic neuromas appeared as lower signal intensity than the surrounding brain stem on T1 weighted image (W.I.), and as higher signal intensity on T2 W.I.. Axial and coronal sections of T1 W.I. were very useful in observing the tumor in the auditory canal and in investigating the anatomical relations of the tumor and the surrounding structures. MR imaging is very excellent examination to make early diagnosis of the acoustic neuroma and preoperative anatomical evaluation.

  3. Prototype acoustic resonance spectroscopy monitor

    This report reports on work performed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) through the Program Office for Technical Assistance (POTAS). In this work, we investigate possible applications of nondestructive acoustics measurements to facilitate IAEA safeguards at bulk processing facilities. Two different acoustic techniques for verifying the internal structure of a processing tank were investigated. During this effort we also examined two acoustic techniques for assessing the fill level within a processing tank. The fill-level measurements could be made highly portable and have an added safeguards advantage that they can also detect stratification of fill material. This later application may be particularly useful in confirming the absence of stratification in plutonium processing tanks before accountability samples are withdrawn

  4. Ionospheric signatures of acoustic waves generated by transient tropospheric forcing

    Zettergren, M. D.; Snively, J. B.

    2013-10-01

    Acoustic waves generated by tropospheric sources may attain significant amplitudes in the thermosphere and overlying ionosphere. Although they are weak precursors to gravity waves in the mesosphere below, acoustic waves may achieve temperature and vertical wind perturbations on the order of approximately tens of Kelvin and m/s throughout the E and F regions. Their perturbations to total electron content are predicted to be detectable by ground-based radar and GPS receivers; they also drive field-aligned currents that may be detectable in situ via magnetometers. Although transient and short lived, ionospheric signatures of acoustic waves may provide new and quantitative insight into the forcing of the upper atmosphere from below.

  5. Wave Phenomena in an Acoustic Resonant Chamber

    Smith, Mary E.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design and operation of a high Q acoustical resonant chamber which can be used to demonstrate wave phenomena such as three-dimensional normal modes, Q values, densities of states, changes in the speed of sound, Fourier decomposition, damped harmonic oscillations, sound-absorbing properties, and perturbation and scattering problems.…

  6. Estimation of acoustic resonances for room transfer function equalization

    Gil-Cacho, Pepe; van Waterschoot, Toon; Moonen, Marc; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2010-01-01

    Strong acoustic resonances create long room impulse responses (RIRs) which may harm the speech transmission in an acoustic space and hence reduce speech intelligibility. Equalization is performed by cancelling the main acoustic resonances common to multiple room transfer functions (RTFs), i...

  7. Conversion acoustic resonances in orthorhombic crystals

    Lyubimov, V. N.; Bessonov, D. A.; Alshits, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    A classification of acoustic-beam reflection resonances in orthorhombic crystals under conditions where a proximity to conversion is implemented in the vicinity of total internal reflection is proposed. In this case, the energy from the incident pump beam falls almost entirely into a narrow intense reflected beam propagating at a small angle with respect to the surface. The crystal boundary is parallel to one of the elastic symmetry planes, and the excited beam propagates near one of axes 2 in this plane. Depending on the relations between the elastic moduli and the chosen propagation geometry, 18 types of resonances may occur, but no more than three in each crystal. The developed theory combines an approximate analytical description and accurate computer analysis. The relations between the elastic moduli providing minimum energy loss over the parasite reflected wave are determined. Some crystals with resonant excitation very close to conversion are revealed.

  8. Parametric resonance in acoustically levitated water drops

    Shen, C.L.; Xie, W.J. [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.c [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2010-05-10

    Liquid drops can be suspended in air with acoustic levitation method. When the sound pressure is periodically modulated, the levitated drop is usually forced into an axisymmetric oscillation. However, a transition from axisymmetric oscillation into sectorial oscillation occurs when the modulation frequency approaches some specific values. The frequency of the sectorial oscillation is almost exactly half of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that this transition is induced by the parametric resonance of levitated drop. The natural frequency of sectorial oscillation is found to decrease with the increase of drop distortion extent.

  9. Algorithm for classifying multiple targets using acoustic signatures

    Damarla, Thyagaraju; Pham, Tien; Lake, Douglas

    2004-08-01

    In this paper we discuss an algorithm for classification and identification of multiple targets using acoustic signatures. We use a Multi-Variate Gaussian (MVG) classifier for classifying individual targets based on the relative amplitudes of the extracted harmonic set of frequencies. The classifier is trained on high signal-to-noise ratio data for individual targets. In order to classify and further identify each target in a multi-target environment (e.g., a convoy), we first perform bearing tracking and data association. Once the bearings of the targets present are established, we next beamform in the direction of each individual target to spatially isolate it from the other targets (or interferers). Then, we further process and extract a harmonic feature set from each beamformed output. Finally, we apply the MVG classifier on each harmonic feature set for vehicle classification and identification. We present classification/identification results for convoys of three to five ground vehicles.

  10. Feature extraction from time domain acoustic signatures of weapons systems fire

    Yang, Christine; Goldman, Geoffrey H.

    2014-06-01

    The U.S. Army is interested in developing algorithms to classify weapons systems fire based on their acoustic signatures. To support this effort, an algorithm was developed to extract features from acoustic signatures of weapons systems fire and applied to over 1300 signatures. The algorithm filtered the data using standard techniques then estimated the amplitude and time of the first five peaks and troughs and the location of the zero crossing in the waveform. The results were stored in Excel spreadsheets. The results are being used to develop and test acoustic classifier algorithms.

  11. Acoustic metamaterials with piezoelectric resonant structures

    A resonant structure of a hard-core coated by piezoelectric composite materials is proposed as an acoustic metamaterial (AM), in which a negative effective mass density and elastic modulus are simultaneously achieved. The double negativity, appearing within a certain range of the filling ratio, is numerically demonstrated by the switch of the electrical boundary from open to closed. The bandwidth of the negative effective elastic modulus is sensitive to the piezoelectric constant e33. The multi-unit AM offers the advantages of broadening the double-negativity domain and of reducing the primary frequency, while the cut-up frequency remains the same as that of the single-unit cell AM. (paper)

  12. Tuneable film bulk acoustic wave resonators

    Gevorgian, Spartak Sh; Vorobiev, Andrei K

    2013-01-01

    To handle many standards and ever increasing bandwidth requirements, large number of filters and switches are used in transceivers of modern wireless communications systems. It makes the cost, performance, form factor, and power consumption of these systems, including cellular phones, critical issues. At present, the fixed frequency filter banks based on Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators (FBAR) are regarded as one of the most promising technologies to address performance -form factor-cost issues. Even though the FBARs improve the overall performances the complexity of these systems remains high.  Attempts are being made to exclude some of the filters by bringing the digital signal processing (including channel selection) as close to the antennas as possible. However handling the increased interference levels is unrealistic for low-cost battery operated radios. Replacing fixed frequency filter banks by one tuneable filter is the most desired and widely considered scenario. As an example, development of the softwa...

  13. Acoustic scattering from a submerged cylindrical shell coated with locally resonant acoustic metamaterials

    Using the multilayered cylinder model, we study acoustic scattering from a submerged cylindrical shell coated with locally resonant acoustic metamaterials, which exhibit locally negative effective mass densities. A spring model is introduced to replace the traditional transfer matrix, which may be singular in the negative mass region. The backscattering form function and the scattering cross section are calculated to discuss the acoustic properties of the coated submerged cylindrical shell. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic neurinomas

    A restrospective review was made on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, preoperative neuro-otological findings, and surgical results for hearing preservation in 20 consecutive patients with histologically verified acoustic neurinomas. The maximum diameter of the tumor, both in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and internal auditory canal (IAC), were measured by MRI scans to classify tumor size. The signal intensity of acoustic neurinoma was equal to or lower than that of the adjacent pons on T1-weighted images and higher on T2-weighted images. After the administration of Gd-DTPA, tumors were markedly enhanced, which appeared homogeneous for small tumors and heterogeneous for large ones. There was no relationship between the degree of preoperative hearing loss and tumor size in either the CPA or the IAC. The larger the tumor in the CPA, however, the more often did the response to a caloric test disappear or decrease greatly. In contrast, there was no apparent correlation between the caloric response and tumor size in the IAC. Twelve patients (60%) had serviceable hearing (pure tone average loss 50%) preoperatively: the average tumor size in this group was similar to that in patients with poor or no hearing. These 12 patients were considered to be candidates for hearing preservation at surgery: 5 (41.7%) retained serviceable hearing postoperatively. A mean tumor size in the CPA was 11.8 mm for patients with postoperative serviceable hearing and 21.3 mm for those without it. Moreover, hearing was preserved postoperatively in all 4 patients with tumor less than 5 mm in the IAC. Thus, hearing preservation after surgery seemed to be closely related to tumor size. This study confirmed the value of MRI, providing information for the evaluation of hearing-preservation surgery. (N.K.)

  15. Active Cancellation of Acoustical Resonances with an FPGA FIR Filter

    Ryou, Albert

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel approach to enhancing the bandwidth of a feedback-controlled mechanical system by digitally canceling acoustical resonances (poles) and anti-resonances (zeros) in the open-loop response via an FPGA FIR filter. By performing a real-time convolution of the feedback error signal with an inverse filter, we can suppress arbitrarily many poles and zeros below 100 kHz, each with a linewidth down to 10 Hz. We demonstrate the efficacy of this technique by canceling the ten largest mechanical resonances and anti-resonances of a high-finesse optical resonator, thereby enhancing the unity gain frequency by more than an order of magnitude. This approach is applicable to a broad array of stabilization problems including optical resonators, external cavity diode lasers, and scanning tunneling microscopes, and points the way to applying modern optimal control techniques to intricate linear acoustical systems.es to intricate linear acoustical systems.

  16. Flow Induced Acoustic Resonance in In-line Tube Banks

    Hiromitsu Hamakawa; Tohru Fukano; Eiichi Nishida; Yoshikazu Satou

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper the attention is focused on the relation between vortex shedding phenomena and acoustic resonance which occurred in the two-dimensional model of boiler. There were tube banks with in-line arrangement for small tube pitch ratio. We measured the sound pressure level, the phase delay of acoustic pressures, the spectrum of velocity fluctuation and the gap velocity. As a result, we found two peak frequencies of sound pressure level with different Strouhal numbers St, mainly about 0.26 and 0.52. The noise of St=0.26 was the resonance of transverse mode and St=0.52 was longitudinal mode. The vortex shedding of St=0.15 was generated inside the tube banks without acoustic resonance. As gap velocity increased, we observed that the peak level of spectrum was weak and broad-banded. The onset velocity of the acoustic resonance of longitudinal mode was lower than that of transverse mode.

  17. Acoustic Resonance Frequency Elimination Device for Safety Relief Valves

    Industry experience has shown that Safety Relief Valves (SRVs) and Steam Dryers installed in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) experience vibration induced degradation and failures caused by acoustic resonance vibration of the main steam lines, resulting in decreased reliability and potential safety issues. The resonance is caused by vortex shedding from the standpipe inlet and acoustic standing waves in the standpipe, occurring when the two frequencies match. (Author)

  18. Experimental realization of extraordinary acoustic transmission using Helmholtz resonators

    The phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic transmission through a solid barrier with an embedded Helmholtz resonator (HR) is demonstrated. The Helmholtz resonator consists of an embedded cavity and two necks that protrude, one on each side of the barrier. Extraordinary transmission occurs for a narrow spectral range encompassing the resonant frequency of the Helmholtz resonator. We show that an amplitude transmission of 97.5% is achieved through a resonator whose neck creates an open area of 6.25% of the total barrier area. In addition to the enhanced transmission, we show that there is a smooth, continuous phase transition in the transmitted sound as a function of frequency. The frequency dependent phase transition is used to experimentally realize slow wave propagation for a narrow-band Gaussian wave packet centered at the maximum transmission frequency. The use of parallel pairs of Helmholtz resonators tuned to different resonant frequencies is experimentally explored as a means of increasing the transmission bandwidth. These experiments show that because of the phase transition, there is always a frequency between the two Helmholtz resonant frequencies at which destructive interference occurs whether the resonances are close or far apart. Finally, we explain how the phase transition associated with Helmholtz-resonator-mediated extraordinary acoustic transmission can be exploited to produce diffractive acoustic components including sub-wavelength thickness acoustic lenses

  19. Optical and acoustic sensing using Fano-like resonances in dual phononic and photonic crystal plate

    Amoudache, Samira; Moiseyenko, Rayisa; Pennec, Yan; Rouhani, Bahram Djafari; Khater, Antoine; Lucklum, Ralf; Tigrine, Rachid

    2016-01-01

    We perform a theoretical study based on the transmissions of optical and acoustic waves normally impinging to a periodic perforated silicon plate when the embedded medium is a liquid and show the existence of Fano-like resonances in both cases. The signature of the resonances appears as well-defi...... standing waves confined inside the cavity coming from the deformation of the water/silicon edges of the cylindrical inclusion. We finally use these features for sensing and show ultra-sensitivity to the light and sound velocities for different concentrations of analytes....

  20. On the acoustic signature of tandem airfoils: The sound of an elastic airfoil in the wake of a vortex generator

    Manela, A.

    2016-07-01

    The acoustic signature of an acoustically compact tandem airfoil setup in uniform high-Reynolds number flow is investigated. The upstream airfoil is considered rigid and is actuated at its leading edge with small-amplitude harmonic pitching motion. The downstream airfoil is taken passive and elastic, with its motion forced by the vortex-street excitation of the upstream airfoil. The non-linear near-field description is obtained via potential thin-airfoil theory. It is then applied as a source term into the Powell-Howe acoustic analogy to yield the far-field dipole radiation of the system. To assess the effect of downstream-airfoil elasticity, results are compared with counterpart calculations for a non-elastic setup, where the downstream airfoil is rigid and stationary. Depending on the separation distance between airfoils, airfoil-motion and airfoil-wake dynamics shift between in-phase (synchronized) and counter-phase behaviors. Consequently, downstream airfoil elasticity may act to amplify or suppress sound through the direct contribution of elastic-airfoil motion to the total signal. Resonance-type motion of the elastic airfoil is found when the upstream airfoil is actuated at the least stable eigenfrequency of the downstream structure. This, again, results in system sound amplification or suppression, depending on the separation distance between airfoils. With increasing actuation frequency, the acoustic signal becomes dominated by the direct contribution of the upstream airfoil motion, whereas the relative contribution of the elastic airfoil to the total signature turns negligible.

  1. Acoustically induced transparency using Fano resonant periodic arrays

    Amin, M.

    2015-10-22

    A three-dimensional acoustic device, which supports Fano resonance and induced transparency in its response to an incident sound wave, is designed and fabricated. These effects are generated from the destructive interference of closely coupled one broad- and one narrow-band acoustic modes. The proposed design ensures excitation and interference of two spectrally close modes by locating a small pipe inside a wider and longer one. Indeed, numerical simulations and experiments demonstrate that this simple-to-fabricate structure can be used to generate Fano resonance as well as acoustically induced transparency with promising applications in sensing, cloaking, and imaging.

  2. Acoustically induced transparency using Fano resonant periodic arrays

    Amin, M.; Elayouch, A.; Farhat, M.; Addouche, M.; Khelif, A.; Baǧcı, H.

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional acoustic device, which supports Fano resonance and induced transparency in its response to an incident sound wave, is designed and fabricated. These effects are generated from the destructive interference of closely coupled one broad- and one narrow-band acoustic modes. The proposed design ensures excitation and interference of two spectrally close modes by locating a small pipe inside a wider and longer one. Indeed, numerical simulations and experiments demonstrate that this simple-to-fabricate structure can be used to generate Fano resonance as well as acoustically induced transparency with promising applications in sensing, cloaking, and imaging.

  3. Acoustic scattering from a submerged cylindrical shell coated with locally resonant acoustic metamaterials

    Li Li; Wen Ji-Hong; Cai Li; Zhao Hong-Gang; Wen Xi-Sen

    2013-01-01

    Using the multilayered cylinder model,we study acoustic scattering from a submerged cylindrical shell coated with locally resonant acoustic metamaterials,which exhibit locally negative effective mass densities.A spring model is introduced to replace the traditional transfer matrix,which may be singular in the negative mass region.The backscattering form function and the scattering cross section are calculated to discuss the acoustic properties of the coated submerged cylindrical shell.

  4. The acoustic signatures of cavitation erosion on grade DH36 steel

    Armakolas, I.; Carlton, J.; Vidakovic, M.; Sun, T.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation can cause considerable erosion to adjacent materials. Erosion is accompanied by acoustic emissions, related to crack formation and propagation inside the material. In this study a piezoelectric acoustic sensor mounted on the back of a grade DH36 steel plate is used to identify the acoustic signatures of cavitation. Cavitation is induced near the plate by means of an ultrasonic transducer (sonotrode). Various ‘non-erosive’ and erosive test rig configurations are examined and an acoustic threshold value for the onset of cavitation erosion is identified and presented. The use of a fibre Bragg grating (FBG)-based acoustic sensor developed at City University London for acoustic monitoring purposes is also examined. Acoustic signals from both sensors are analysed, by means of a fast Fourier transform, showing a very good agreement in terms of captured frequencies.

  5. Numerical study on the valve acoustic resonance behaviors

    Background: In recent years some reactors have experienced significant steam dryer cracking. Studies indicate that the fatigue is due to flow-induced acoustic vibration. Purpose: In this study, sound source behaviors of a single valve on the main steam line are investigated. Methods: Mode and CFD analysis were carried to investigate the acoustic mode and resonance behaviors. Results: The following results can be concluded from this study: various categories of acoustic modes exist in the structure; geometries directly influence acoustic mode; peak excitation occurs around St of some specifically range. Conclusions: The results match theory and experimental studies well, and provide reference for the related researches. (authors)

  6. Acoustic control in enclosures using optimally designed Helmholtz resonators

    Driesch, Patricia Lynne

    A virtual design methodology is developed to minimize the noise in enclosures with optimally designed, passive, acoustic absorbers (Helmholtz resonators). A series expansion of eigen functions is used to represent the acoustic absorbers as external volume velocities, eliminating the need for a solution of large matrix eigen value problems. A determination of this type (efficient model/reevaluation approach) significantly increases the design possibilities when optimization techniques are implemented. As a benchmarking exercise, this novel methodology was experimentally validated for a narrowband acoustic assessment of two optimally designed Helmholtz resonators coupled to a 2D enclosure. The resonators were tuned to the two lowest resonance frequencies of a 30.5 by 40.6 by 2.5 cm (12 x 16 x 1 inch) cavity with the resonator volume occupying only 2% of the enclosure volume. A maximum potential energy reduction of 12.4 dB was obtained at the second resonance of the cavity. As a full-scale demonstration of the efficacy of the proposed design method, the acoustic response from 90--190 Hz of a John Deere 7000 Ten series tractor cabin was investigated. The lowest cabin mode, referred to as a "boom" mode, proposes a significant challenge to a noise control engineer since its anti-node is located near the head of the operator and often generates unacceptable sound pressure levels. Exploiting the low frequency capability of Helmholtz resonators, lumped parameter models of these resonators were coupled to the enclosure via an experimentally determined acoustic model of the tractor cabin. The virtual design methodology uses gradient optimization techniques as a post processor for the modeling and analysis of the unmodified acoustic interior to determine optimal resonator characteristics. Using two optimally designed Helmholtz resonators; potential energy was experimentally reduced by 3.4 and 10.3 dB at 117 and 167 Hz, respectively.

  7. Active electroacoustic resonators with negative acoustic properties

    Lissek, Hervé; Boulandet, Romain

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials constitute a new class of acoustic structures, composed of periodic arrangements of engineered unit-cells, that exhibit macroscopic acoustic properties not readily available in nature. These properties can either be a negative mass density or a negative bulk modulus. However, these artificial behaviours derive from the engineered arrangement of the unit-cells, which do not present individual ''meta-properties'', rather than from their intrinsic nature. It is although po...

  8. Acoustic metamaterials: From local resonances to broad horizons

    Ma, Guancong; Sheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Within a time span of 15 years, acoustic metamaterials have emerged from academic curiosity to become an active field driven by scientific discoveries and diverse application potentials. This review traces the development of acoustic metamaterials from the initial findings of mass density and bulk modulus frequency dispersions in locally resonant structures to the diverse functionalities afforded by the perspective of negative constitutive parameter values, and their implications for acoustic wave behaviors. We survey the more recent developments, which include compact phase manipulation structures, superabsorption, and actively controllable metamaterials as well as the new directions on acoustic wave transport in moving fluid, elastic, and mechanical metamaterials, graphene-inspired metamaterials, and structures whose characteristics are best delineated by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. Many of the novel acoustic metamaterial structures have transcended the original definition of metamaterials as arising from the collective manifestations of constituent resonating units, but they continue to extend wave manipulation functionalities beyond those found in nature. PMID:26933692

  9. Acoustic metamaterials: From local resonances to broad horizons.

    Ma, Guancong; Sheng, Ping

    2016-02-01

    Within a time span of 15 years, acoustic metamaterials have emerged from academic curiosity to become an active field driven by scientific discoveries and diverse application potentials. This review traces the development of acoustic metamaterials from the initial findings of mass density and bulk modulus frequency dispersions in locally resonant structures to the diverse functionalities afforded by the perspective of negative constitutive parameter values, and their implications for acoustic wave behaviors. We survey the more recent developments, which include compact phase manipulation structures, superabsorption, and actively controllable metamaterials as well as the new directions on acoustic wave transport in moving fluid, elastic, and mechanical metamaterials, graphene-inspired metamaterials, and structures whose characteristics are best delineated by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. Many of the novel acoustic metamaterial structures have transcended the original definition of metamaterials as arising from the collective manifestations of constituent resonating units, but they continue to extend wave manipulation functionalities beyond those found in nature. PMID:26933692

  10. Surface resonant states and superlensing in acoustic metamaterials

    Ambati, Muralidhar; Fang, Nicholas; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Xiang

    2007-05-01

    We report that the negative material responses of acoustic metamaterials can lead to a plethora of surface resonant states. We determine that negative effective-mass density is the necessary condition for the existence of surface states on acoustic metamaterials. We offer the microscopic picture of these unique surface states; in addition, we find that these surface excitations enhance the transmission of evanescent pressure fields across the metamaterial. The evanescent pressure fields scattered from an object can be resonantly coupled and enhanced at the surface of the acoustic metamaterial, resulting in an image with resolution below the diffraction limit. This concept of acoustic superlens opens exciting opportunities to design acoustic metamaterials for ultrasonic imaging.

  11. Soft resonator of omnidirectional resonance for acoustic metamaterials with a negative bulk modulus

    Xiaodong Jing; Yang Meng; Xiaofeng Sun

    2015-01-01

    Monopolar resonance is of fundamental importance in the acoustic field. Here, we present the realization of a monopolar resonance that goes beyond the concept of Helmholtz resonators. The balloon-like soft resonator (SR) oscillates omnidirectionally and radiates from all parts of its spherical surface, eliminating the need for a hard wall for the cavity and baffle effects. For airborne sound, such a low-modulus resonator can be made extremely lightweight. Deep subwavelength resonance is achie...

  12. Spin-(3/2) pentaquark resonance signature in lattice QCD

    The possible discovery of the Θ+ pentaquark has motivated a number of studies of its nature using lattice QCD. While all the analyses thus far have focused on spin-(1/2) states, here we report the results of the first exploratory study in quenched lattice QCD of pentaquarks with spin (3/2). For the spin-(3/2) interpolating field we use a product of the standard N and K* operators. We do not find any evidence for the standard lattice resonance signature of attraction (i.e., binding at quark masses near the physical regime) in the JP=(3/2)- channel. Some evidence of binding is inferred in the isoscalar (3/2)+ channel at several quark masses, in accord with the standard lattice resonance signature. This suggests that this is a good candidate for the further study of pentaquarks on the lattice

  13. Spin-3/2 pentaquark resonance signature in lattice QCD

    The possible discovery of the Θ+ pentaquark has motivated a number of studies of its nature using lattice QCD. While all the analyses thus far have focussed on spin-1/2 states, here we report the results of the first exploratory study in quenched lattice QCD of pentaquarks with spin 3/2. For the spin-3/2 interpolating field we use a product of the standard N and K* operators. We do not find any evidence for the standard lattice resonance signature of attraction (i.e., binding at quark masses near the physical regime) in the JP=(3-)/(2) channel. Some evidence of binding is inferred in the isoscalar (3+)/(2) channel at several quark masses, in accord with the standard lattice resonance signature. This suggests that this is a good candidate for the further study of pentaquarks on the lattice. (orig.)

  14. Acoustic detection of electron spin resonance

    Coufal, H.

    1981-07-01

    The ESR-signal of DPPH was recorded by detecting the modulation of the absorbed microwave power with a gas-coupled microphone. This photo-acoustic detection scheme is compared with conventional ESR-detection. Applications of the acoustical detection method to other modulation spectroscopic techniques, particularly NMR, are discussed.

  15. Effective zero index in locally resonant acoustic material

    Zhu, Xue-Feng, E-mail: ernestzhu.nju@gmail.com

    2013-10-30

    Here in locally resonant acoustic material, it is shown that effective zero refractive index can be constructed by the resonant unit-cells with coherent degenerate monopole–dipole momenta. Due to strong local resonances, the material layers with effective zero refractive index can function as a resonant cavity of high Q factor, where a subtle deviation from the resonant frequency may result in distinct increase of reflection. Full-wave simulations are performed to demonstrate some unusual wave transport properties such as invisibility cloaking, super-reflection, local field enhancement, and wavefronts rotation.

  16. Lateral acoustic wave resonator comprising a suspended membrane of low damping resonator material

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady; , Ihab F.; Ziaei-Moayyed, Maryam; Branch; , Darren W.; Su; Mehmet F.,; Reinke; Charles M.,

    2013-09-03

    A very high-Q, low insertion loss resonator can be achieved by storing many overtone cycles of a lateral acoustic wave (i.e., Lamb wave) in a lithographically defined suspended membrane comprising a low damping resonator material, such as silicon carbide. The high-Q resonator can sets up a Fabry-Perot cavity in a low-damping resonator material using high-reflectivity acoustic end mirrors, which can comprise phononic crystals. The lateral overtone acoustic wave resonator can be electrically transduced by piezoelectric couplers. The resonator Q can be increased without increasing the impedance or insertion loss by storing many cycles or wavelengths in the high-Q resonator material, with much lower damping than the piezoelectric transducer material.

  17. Study on resonance frequency distribution of high-overtone bulk acoustic resonators

    ZHANG Hui; WANG Zuoqing; ZHANG Shuyi

    2005-01-01

    Based on the method of characterizing piezo-films by the resonance frequency distributions, the factors influencing the resonance frequency distribution of a High-overtone Bulk Acoustic Resonator (HBAR) consisting of a piezoelectric thin film with twoelectrodes and a substrate are studied. Some HBARs are simulated. The results manifest that changing the acoustic impedance ratio of the substrate to piezo-film the distribution of the space of the parallel resonance frequency and the effective electromechanical coupling factor are changed. When the fundamental mode of the piezo-film is at high frequency, changing the acoustic impedance ratio of the electrode to piezo-film and the thickness of the electrodes make the resonance frequency distribution of HBARs change. These results manifest that the HBARs can be resonant at specified frequencies by means of adjusting the factors affecting the resonance frequency distribution.

  18. Mesospheric hydroxyl airglow signatures of acoustic and gravity waves generated by transient tropospheric forcing

    Snively, J. B.

    2013-09-01

    Numerical model results demonstrate that acoustic waves generated by tropospheric sources may produce cylindrical "concentric ring" signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer. They may arrive as precursors to upward propagating gravity waves, generated simultaneously by the same sources, and produce strong temperature perturbations in the thermosphere above. Transient and short-lived, the acoustic wave airglow intensity and temperature signatures are predicted to be detectable by ground-based airglow imaging systems and may provide new insight into the forcing of the upper atmosphere from below.

  19. Extremely Low-Loss Acoustic Phonons in a Quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonator

    Goryachev, Maxim; Ivanov, Eugene N; Galliou, Serge; Bourquin, Roger; Tobar, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Low-loss, high frequency acoustic resonators cooled to millikelvin temperatures are a topic of great interest for application to hybrid quantum systems. When cooled to 20 mK, we show that resonant acoustic phonon modes in a Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) quartz resonator demonstrate exceptionally low loss (with $Q$-factors of order billions) at frequencies of 15.6 and 65.4 MHz, with a maximum $f.Q$ product of 7.8$\\times10^{16}$ Hz. Given this result, we show that the $Q$-factor in such devices near the quantum ground state can be four orders of magnitude better than previously attained. Such resonators possess the low losses crucial for electromagnetic cooling to the phonon ground state, and the possibility of long coherence and interaction times of a few seconds, allowing multiple quantum gate operations.

  20. High coupling materials for thin film bulk acoustic wave resonators

    Conde, Janine

    2009-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) filters based on bulk acoustic wave resonances in piezoelectric thin films have become indispensable components in mobile communications. The currently used material, AlN, exhibits many excellent properties for this purpose. However, its bandwidth is often a limiting factor. In addition, no tuning is possible with AlN. Ferroelectrics would offer both larger coupling to achieve larger bandwidths, and tunability. However, their acoustic properties are not well known, especi...

  1. Ir/thz Double Resonance Signatures at Atmospheric Pressure

    Phillips, Dane J.; Tanner, Elizabeth A.; Everitt, Henry O.; Medvedev, Ivan R.; Neese, Christopher F.; Holt, Jennifer; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2010-06-01

    IR/THz double resonance (DR) spectroscopy, historically used to investigate molecular collision dynamics and THz molecular lasers at low pressures (remote sensing at atmospheric pressure. Molecular specificity is obtained through the rare coincidence(s) between molecule-specific ro-vibrational energy levels and CO2 laser lines. The resulting molecule-specific, DR-induced, THz spectroscopic signatures strongly depend on the type of ro-vibrational transition involved (P, Q, or R), the type of vibrational level excited (stretching or bending), and the molecular mass. To illustrate these sensitivities, calculated DR spectra of prototypical molecules such as methyl fluoride, methyl chloride, and methyl cyanide will be discussed. Although atmospheric pressure broadening obfuscates pure rotational spectra, we show how it can enhance the DR signature in two ways: by relaxing the pump coincidence requirement and by adding the DR signatures of multiple nearby transitions. We will present estimates of this enhancement, including cases where the coincidences that produce the strongest DR signatures at atmospheric pressure do not exist at low pressures.

  2. Particle manipulation by a non-resonant acoustic levitator

    We present the analysis of a non-resonant acoustic levitator, formed by an ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. In contrast to traditional levitators, the geometry presented herein does not require the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be a multiple of half wavelength. The levitator behavior is numerically predicted by applying a numerical model to calculate the acoustic pressure distribution and the Gor'kov theory to obtain the potential of the acoustic radiation force that acts on a levitated particle. We also demonstrate that levitating particles can be manipulated by controlling the reflector position while maintaining the transducer in a fixed position

  3. Particle manipulation by a non-resonant acoustic levitator

    Andrade, Marco A. B., E-mail: marcobrizzotti@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, CP 66318, 05314-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Pérez, Nicolás [Centro Universitario de Paysandú, Universidad de la República, Ruta 3 km 363, 60000 Paysandú (Uruguay); Adamowski, Julio C. [Department of Mechatronics and Mechanical Systems Engineering, Escola Politécnica, University of São Paulo, Av. Mello Moraes, 2231, 05508-030 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-01-05

    We present the analysis of a non-resonant acoustic levitator, formed by an ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. In contrast to traditional levitators, the geometry presented herein does not require the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be a multiple of half wavelength. The levitator behavior is numerically predicted by applying a numerical model to calculate the acoustic pressure distribution and the Gor'kov theory to obtain the potential of the acoustic radiation force that acts on a levitated particle. We also demonstrate that levitating particles can be manipulated by controlling the reflector position while maintaining the transducer in a fixed position.

  4. Particle manipulation by a non-resonant acoustic levitator

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2015-01-01

    We present the analysis of a non-resonant acoustic levitator, formed by an ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. In contrast to traditional levitators, the geometry presented herein does not require the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be a multiple of half wavelength. The levitator behavior is numerically predicted by applying a numerical model to calculate the acoustic pressure distribution and the Gor'kov theory to obtain the potential of the acoustic radiation force that acts on a levitated particle. We also demonstrate that levitating particles can be manipulated by controlling the reflector position while maintaining the transducer in a fixed position.

  5. SILICON COMPATIBLE ACOUSTIC WAVE RESONATORS: DESIGN, FABRICATION AND PERFORMANCE

    Aliza Aini Md Ralib

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Continuous advancement in wireless technology and silicon microfabrication has fueled exciting growth in wireless products. The bulky size of discrete vibrating mechanical devices such as quartz crystals and surface acoustic wave resonators impedes the ultimate miniaturization of single-chip transceivers. Fabrication of acoustic wave resonators on silicon allows complete integration of a resonator with its accompanying circuitry.  Integration leads to enhanced performance, better functionality with reduced cost at large volume production. This paper compiles the state-of-the-art technology of silicon compatible acoustic resonators, which can be integrated with interface circuitry. Typical acoustic wave resonators are surface acoustic wave (SAW and bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonators.  Performance of the resonator is measured in terms of quality factor, resonance frequency and insertion loss. Selection of appropriate piezoelectric material is significant to ensure sufficient electromechanical coupling coefficient is produced to reduce the insertion loss. The insulating passive SiO2 layer acts as a low loss material and aims to increase the quality factor and temperature stability of the design. The integration technique also is influenced by the fabrication process and packaging.  Packageless structure using AlN as the additional isolation layer is proposed to protect the SAW device from the environment for high reliability. Advancement in miniaturization technology of silicon compatible acoustic wave resonators to realize a single chip transceiver system is still needed. ABSTRAK: Kemajuan yang berterusan dalam teknologi tanpa wayar dan silikon telah menguatkan pertumbuhan yang menarik dalam produk tanpa wayar. Saiz yang besar bagi peralatan mekanikal bergetar seperti kristal kuarza menghalang pengecilan untuk merealisasikan peranti cip. Silikon serasi  gelombang akustik resonator mempunyai potensi yang besar untuk menggantikan unsur

  6. Triad Resonance in the Gravity-Acoustic Family

    Kadri, U.

    2015-12-01

    Resonance interactions of waves play a prominent role in energy share among the different wave types involved. Such interactions may significantly contribute, among others, to the evolution of the ocean energy spectrum by exchanging energy between surface-gravity waves; surface and internal gravity waves; or even surface and compression-type waves, that can transfer energy from the upper ocean through the whole water column reaching down to the seafloor. A resonant triad occurs among a triplet of waves, usually involving interaction of nonlinear terms of second order perturbed equations. Until recently, it has been believed that in a homogeneous fluid a resonant triad is possible only when tension forces are included, or at the limit of a shallow water, and that when the compressibility of water is considered, no resonant triads can occur within the family of gravity-acoustic waves. However, more recently it has been proved that, under some circumstances, resonant triads comprising two opposing surface-gravity waves of similar periods (though not identical) and a much longer acoustic-gravity wave, of almost double the frequency, exist [Kadri and Stiassnie 2013, J. Fluid Mech.735 R6]. Here, I report on a new resonant triad involving a gravity wave and two acoustic waves of almost double the length. Interestingly, the two acoustic waves propagate in the same direction with similar wavelengths, that are almost double of that of the gravity wave. The evolution of the wave triad amplitudes is periodic and it is derived analytically, in terms of Jacobian elliptic functions and elliptic integrals. The physical importance of this type of triad interactions is the modulation of pertinent acoustic signals, leading to inaccurate signal perceptions. Enclosed figure: presents an example spatio-temporal evolution of the wave triad amplitudes. The gravity wave (top) remains almost unaltered, while the envelope slowly displaces to the left. However, the prescribed acoustic

  7. Acoustic superlens using Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterials

    Yang, Xishan; Yin, Jing; Yu, Gaokun; Peng, Linhui; Wang, Ning

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic superlens provides a way to overcome the diffraction limit with respect to the wavelength of the bulk wave in air. However, the operating frequency range of subwavelength imaging is quite narrow. Here, an acoustic superlens is designed using Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterials to broaden the bandwidth of super-resolution. An experiment is carried out to verify subwavelength imaging of double slits, the imaging of which can be well resolved in the frequency range from 570 to 650 Hz. Different from previous works based on the Fabry-Pérot resonance, the corresponding mechanism of subwavelength imaging is the Fano resonance, and the strong coupling between the neighbouring Helmholtz resonators separated at the subwavelength interval leads to the enhanced sound transmission over a relatively wide frequency range.

  8. Acoustic superlens using Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterials

    Acoustic superlens provides a way to overcome the diffraction limit with respect to the wavelength of the bulk wave in air. However, the operating frequency range of subwavelength imaging is quite narrow. Here, an acoustic superlens is designed using Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterials to broaden the bandwidth of super-resolution. An experiment is carried out to verify subwavelength imaging of double slits, the imaging of which can be well resolved in the frequency range from 570 to 650 Hz. Different from previous works based on the Fabry-Pérot resonance, the corresponding mechanism of subwavelength imaging is the Fano resonance, and the strong coupling between the neighbouring Helmholtz resonators separated at the subwavelength interval leads to the enhanced sound transmission over a relatively wide frequency range

  9. Acoustic superlens using Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterials

    Yang, Xishan; Yin, Jing; Yu, Gaokun, E-mail: gkyu@ouc.edu.cn; Peng, Linhui; Wang, Ning [Department of Marine Technology, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2015-11-09

    Acoustic superlens provides a way to overcome the diffraction limit with respect to the wavelength of the bulk wave in air. However, the operating frequency range of subwavelength imaging is quite narrow. Here, an acoustic superlens is designed using Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterials to broaden the bandwidth of super-resolution. An experiment is carried out to verify subwavelength imaging of double slits, the imaging of which can be well resolved in the frequency range from 570 to 650 Hz. Different from previous works based on the Fabry-Pérot resonance, the corresponding mechanism of subwavelength imaging is the Fano resonance, and the strong coupling between the neighbouring Helmholtz resonators separated at the subwavelength interval leads to the enhanced sound transmission over a relatively wide frequency range.

  10. Effect of a cracked surface of porous silicon on the behaviour of the acoustic signature

    Bouhedja Samia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We study in this work the effect of a crack, located on the porous silicon, Psi, surface on the propagation of Rayleigh waves. We simulate and analyse the acoustic signature V(z according porosity at 142 MHz, to study the microstructure of PSi around the crack.

  11. Resonance and Nonlinear Seismo-Acoustic Land Mine Detection

    Donskoy, Dimitri M.

    2008-01-01

    We have presented an overview of our team’s (at Stevens Institute of Technology) contribution in development of resonance and nonlinear Seismo-Acoustic Mine Detection (SAMD) techniques. Among our major accomplishments are the discovery and quantitative characterization of mine resonances; the discovery of a very strong nonlinear dynamics of the buried mines manifesting itself through the combination and intermodulation frequencies; the development of a physical model describing the linear a...

  12. Resonance Shift of Single-Axis Acoustic Levitation

    XIE Wen-Jun; WEI Bing-Bo

    2007-01-01

    @@ The resonance shift due to the presence and movement of a rigid spherical sample in a single-axis acoustic levitator is studied with the boundary element method on the basis of a two-cylinder model of the levitator.The introduction of a sample into the sound pressure nodes, where it is usually levitated, reduces the resonant interval Hn (n is the mode number) between the reflector and emitter.

  13. Quantitative Determination of Lateral Mode Dispersion in Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators through Laser Acoustic Imaging

    Ken Telschow; John D. Larson III

    2006-10-01

    Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators are useful for many signal processing applications. Detailed knowledge of their operation properties are needed to optimize their design for specific applications. The finite size of these resonators precludes their use in single acoustic modes; rather, multiple wave modes, such as, lateral wave modes are always excited concurrently. In order to determine the contributions of these modes, we have been using a newly developed full-field laser acoustic imaging approach to directly measure their amplitude and phase throughout the resonator. This paper describes new results comparing modeling of both elastic and piezoelectric effects in the active material with imaging measurement of all excited modes. Fourier transformation of the acoustic amplitude and phase displacement images provides a quantitative determination of excited mode amplitude and wavenumber at any frequency. Images combined at several frequencies form a direct visualization of lateral mode excitation and dispersion for the device under test allowing mode identification and comparison with predicted operational properties. Discussion and analysis are presented for modes near the first longitudinal thickness resonance (~900 MHz) in an AlN thin film resonator. Plate wave modeling, taking account of material crystalline orientation, elastic and piezoelectric properties and overlayer metallic films, will be discussed in relation to direct image measurements.

  14. Modeling the acoustic excitation of a resonator

    Mandre, Shreyas; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan

    2007-11-01

    The sounding of a beverage bottle when blown on is a familiar but very little understood phenomenon. A very similar mechanism is used by musical wind instruments, like organ pipes and flutes, for sound production. This phenomenon falls under the general umbrella of flow induced oscillations and is representative of a more generic mechanism. The modeling of this phenomenon essentially involves two components. The first is the resonator, which bears the oscillations and this component is very well understood. The resonator, however, needs an external energy input to sustain the oscillations, which is provided by the jet of air blown. The dynamics of the jet and its interaction with the resonator is the primary focus of this talk. In particular, we provide a linearized model based on first principles to explain the feedback of energy from the jet to the resonator and compare the predictions with experimental results.

  15. Harnessing buckling to design tunable locally resonant acoustic metamaterials.

    Wang, Pai; Casadei, Filippo; Shan, Sicong; Weaver, James C; Bertoldi, Katia

    2014-07-01

    We report a new class of tunable and switchable acoustic metamaterials comprising resonating units dispersed into an elastic matrix. Each resonator consists of a metallic core connected to the elastomeric matrix through elastic beams, whose buckling is intentionally exploited as a novel and effective approach to control the propagation of elastic waves. We first use numerical analysis to show the evolution of the locally resonant band gap, fully accounting for the effect of nonlinear pre-deformation. Then, we experimentally measure the transmission of vibrations as a function of the applied loading in a finite-size sample and find excellent agreement with our numerical predictions. The proposed concept expands the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials by enabling tunability over a wide range of frequencies. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in our system the deformation can be exploited to turn on or off the band gap, opening avenues for the design of adaptive switches. PMID:25032927

  16. Bound states in the continuum in open acoustic resonators

    Lyapina, A A; Pilipchuk, A S; Sadreev, A F

    2015-01-01

    We consider bound states in the continuum (BSC) or embedded trapped modes in two- and three-dimensional acoustic axisymmetric duct-cavity structures. We demonstrate numerically that under variation of the length of the cavity multiple BSCs occur due to the Friedrich-Wintgen two-mode full destructive interference mechanism. The BSCs are detected by tracing the resonant widths to the points of the collapse of Fano resonances where one of the two resonant modes acquires infinite life-time. It is shown that the approach of the acoustic coupled mode theory cast in the truncated form of a two-mode approximation allows us to analytically predict the BSC frequencies and shape functions to a good accuracy in both two and three dimensions.

  17. Laser Acoustic Imaging of Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator (FBAR) Lateral Mode Dispersion

    Ken L. Telschow

    2004-07-01

    A laser acoustic imaging microscope has been developed that measures acoustic motion with high spatial resolution without scanning. Images are recorded at normal video frame rates and heterodyne principles are used to allow operation at any frequency from Hz to GHz. Fourier transformation of the acoustic amplitude and phase displacement images provides a direct quantitative determination of excited mode wavenumbers at any frequency. Results are presented at frequencies near the first longitudinal thickness mode (~ 900 MHz) demonstrating simultaneous excitation of lateral modes with nonzero wavenumbers in an electrically driven AlN thin film acoustic resonator. Images combined at several frequencies form a direct visualization of lateral mode dispersion relations for the device under test allowing mode identification and a direct measure of specific lateral mode properties. Discussion and analysis of the results are presented in comparison with plate wave modeling of these devices taking account for material anisotropy and multilayer films.

  18. Acoustic noise in magnetic resonance imaging: An ongoing issue

    Purpose: Acoustic noise creates a problem for both patients and staff within the magnetic resonance (MR) environment. This study qualitatively and quantitatively investigates the acoustic noise levels from two MR systems in one clinical department and demonstrates the adverse effects that the acoustic noise generated in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has on a patient's experience of an MRI examination. Methods: A questionnaire was distributed to consenting patients undergoing one of two specific MR examinations on two MR systems (System A and System B) of varying age and technology in one clinical department. These evaluated the patient's experience during the MRI examination. Physical measurements of the maximum acoustic noise levels produced by each system for various pulse sequences were also recorded using a sound level meter. Results: The results of the questionnaire survey demonstrated significantly greater tolerance of the acoustic noise levels of System B (mean noise level rating of 2.45 on LIKERT scale) in comparison to System A (mean noise level rating of 3.71 on LIKERT scale) (P = 0.001). Significantly lower noise level descriptions were also demonstrated (P = 0.01). The maximum recorded sound levels also confirmed that System B was quieter than the System A. Conclusion: It is has been demonstrated that the acoustic noise generated during an MRI examinations has an adverse effect on the patient experience during the examination. However, new technology has significantly reduced these effects and is improving patient comfort in MRI. It was shown quantitatively that the newer system's advanced gradient technology was quieter than the older system, in terms of the acoustic noise levels associated with a range of common pulse sequences.

  19. Acoustic resonance in heat exchanger tube bundles - Part II: Prediction and suppression of resonance

    In the first part of this series, experimental data were presented which suggest that the acoustic resonance in heat exchanger tube bundles is tied to periodic vortex shedding from the tubes. In this paper, a semiempirical model for predicting the onset of resonance is developed. This model is compared with experimental data and other models from the literature. Methods of suppressing the resonance are developed and experimental data on their effectiveness are presented

  20. Identification of cavitation signatures using both optical and PZT acoustic sensors

    Vidakovic, M.; Armakolas, I.; Sun, T.; Carlton, J.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the results obtained from monitoring a simulated material cavitation process using both a fibre Bragg grating (FBG)-based acoustic sensor system developed at City University London and a commercial PZT (Piezoelectric Transducer) acoustic sensor, with an aim to identify the cavitation signatures. In the experiment, a sample metal plate with its back surface being instrumented with both sensors is positioned very close to an excitation sonotrode with a standard frequency of 19.5kHz. The data obtained from both sensors are recorded and analyzed, showing a very good agreement.

  1. Spontaneous pattern formation in an acoustical resonator

    Sanchez-Morcillo, Victor J.

    2003-01-01

    A dynamical system of equations describing parametric sound generation (PSG) in a dispersive large aspect ratio resonator is derived. The model generalizes previously proposed descriptions of PSG by including diffraction effects, and is analogous to the model used in theoretical studies of optical parametric oscillation. A linear stability analysis of the solution below the threshold of subharmonic generation reveals the existence of a pattern forming instability, which is confirmed by numeri...

  2. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of a Helmholtz resonator: Discrete vortex model compared to experiments

    The acoustic resonance in a Helmholtz resonator excited by a low Mach number grazing flow is studied theoretically. The nonlinear numerical model is established by coupling the vortical motion at the cavity opening with the cavity acoustic mode through an explicit force balancing relation between the two sides of the opening. The vortical motion is modeled in the potential flow framework, in which the oscillating motion of the thin shear layer is described by an array of convected point vortices, and the unsteady vortex shedding is determined by the Kutta condition. The cavity acoustic mode is obtained from the one-dimensional acoustic propagation model, the time-domain equivalent of which is given by means of a broadband time-domain impedance model. The acoustic resistances due to radiation and viscous loss at the opening are also taken into account. The physical processes of the self-excited oscillations, at both resonance and off-resonance states, are simulated directly in the time domain. Results show that the shear layer exhibits a weak flapping motion at the off-resonance state, whereas it rolls up into large-scale vortex cores when resonances occur. Single and dual-vortex patterns are observed corresponding to the first and second hydrodynamic modes. The simulation also reveals different trajectories of the two vortices across the opening when the first and second hydrodynamic modes co-exist. The strong modulation of the shed vorticity by the acoustic feedback at the resonance state is demonstrated. The model overestimates the pressure pulsation amplitude by a factor 2, which is expected to be due to the turbulence of the flow which is not taken into account. The model neglects vortex shedding at the downstream and side edges of the cavity. This will also result in an overestimation of the pulsation amplitude

  3. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of a Helmholtz resonator: Discrete vortex model compared to experiments

    Dai, Xiwen; Jing, Xiaodong, E-mail: jingxd@buaa.edu.cn; Sun, Xiaofeng [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-05-15

    The acoustic resonance in a Helmholtz resonator excited by a low Mach number grazing flow is studied theoretically. The nonlinear numerical model is established by coupling the vortical motion at the cavity opening with the cavity acoustic mode through an explicit force balancing relation between the two sides of the opening. The vortical motion is modeled in the potential flow framework, in which the oscillating motion of the thin shear layer is described by an array of convected point vortices, and the unsteady vortex shedding is determined by the Kutta condition. The cavity acoustic mode is obtained from the one-dimensional acoustic propagation model, the time-domain equivalent of which is given by means of a broadband time-domain impedance model. The acoustic resistances due to radiation and viscous loss at the opening are also taken into account. The physical processes of the self-excited oscillations, at both resonance and off-resonance states, are simulated directly in the time domain. Results show that the shear layer exhibits a weak flapping motion at the off-resonance state, whereas it rolls up into large-scale vortex cores when resonances occur. Single and dual-vortex patterns are observed corresponding to the first and second hydrodynamic modes. The simulation also reveals different trajectories of the two vortices across the opening when the first and second hydrodynamic modes co-exist. The strong modulation of the shed vorticity by the acoustic feedback at the resonance state is demonstrated. The model overestimates the pressure pulsation amplitude by a factor 2, which is expected to be due to the turbulence of the flow which is not taken into account. The model neglects vortex shedding at the downstream and side edges of the cavity. This will also result in an overestimation of the pulsation amplitude.

  4. Scaling of membrane-type locally resonant acoustic metamaterial arrays.

    Naify, Christina J; Chang, Chia-Ming; McKnight, Geoffrey; Nutt, Steven R

    2012-10-01

    Metamaterials have emerged as promising solutions for manipulation of sound waves in a variety of applications. Locally resonant acoustic materials (LRAM) decrease sound transmission by 500% over acoustic mass law predictions at peak transmission loss (TL) frequencies with minimal added mass, making them appealing for weight-critical applications such as aerospace structures. In this study, potential issues associated with scale-up of the structure are addressed. TL of single-celled and multi-celled LRAM was measured using an impedance tube setup with systematic variation in geometric parameters to understand the effects of each parameter on acoustic response. Finite element analysis was performed to predict TL as a function of frequency for structures with varying complexity, including stacked structures and multi-celled arrays. Dynamic response of the array structures under discrete frequency excitation was investigated using laser vibrometry to verify negative dynamic mass behavior. PMID:23039544

  5. Blend uniformity analysis of pharmaceutical products by Broadband Acoustic Resonance Dissolution Spectroscopy (BARDS).

    Fitzpatrick, Dara; Scanlon, Eoin; Krüse, Jacob; Vos, Bastiaan; Evans-Hurson, Rachel; Fitzpatrick, Eileen; McSweeney, Seán

    2012-11-15

    Blend uniformity analysis (BUA) is a routine and highly regulated aspect of pharmaceutical production. In most instances, it involves quantitative determination of individual components of a blend in order to ascertain the mixture ratio. This approach often entails the use of costly and sophisticated instrumentation and complex statistical methods. In this study, a new and simple qualitative blend confirmatory test is introduced based on a well known acoustic phenomenon. Several over the counter (OTC) product powder blends are analysed and it is shown that each product has a unique and highly reproducible acoustic signature. The acoustic frequency responses generated during the dissolution of the product are measured and recorded in real time. It is shown that intra-batch and inter-batch variation for each product is either insignificant or non-existent when measured in triplicate. This study demonstrates that Broadband Acoustic Resonance Dissolution Spectroscopy or BARDS can be used successfully to determine inter-batch variability, stability and uniformity of powder blends. This is just one application of a wide range of BARDS applications which are more cost effective and time efficient than current methods. PMID:22884840

  6. Homogenation of acoustic metamaterials of Helmholtz resonators in fluid

    Hu, X.; Ho, K. M.; Chan, C. T.; Zi, J.

    2008-05-01

    By using a two-step homogenization approach, we derive analytical formulas of effective mass density {rho}{sub e} and effective bulk modulus B{sub e} for two- and three-dimensional acoustic metamaterials of Helmholtz resonators (HRs) in fluid. A negative B{sub e} is found at certain frequencies due to the monopolar resonance, leading to a low-frequency acoustic band gap. A unified picture is presented for metamaterials of HRs and three-component metamaterials of negative {rho}{sub e}. Our work supports recent observations in a one-dimensional array of HRs [N. Fang et al., Nat. Mater. 5, 452 (2006)] and presents important high-dimensional extensions for exploring more fascinating phenomena.

  7. Acoustic resonance in MEMS scale cylindrical tubes with side branches

    Schill, John F.; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Marcus, Logan S.

    2014-05-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful monitoring technique that is well suited for trace gas detection. This method routinely exhibits detection limits at the parts-per-million (ppm) or parts-per-billion (ppb) level for gaseous samples. PAS also possesses favorable detection characteristics when the system dimensions are scaled to a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) design. One of the central issues related to sensor miniaturization is optimization of the photoacoustic cell geometry, especially in relationship to high acoustical amplification and reduced system noise. Previous work relied on a multiphysics approach to analyze the resonance structures of the MEMS scale photo acoustic cell. This technique was unable to provide an accurate model of the acoustic structure. In this paper we describe a method that relies on techniques developed from musical instrument theory and electronic transmission line matrix methods to describe cylindrical acoustic resonant cells with side branches of various configurations. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the ease and accuracy of this method. All experimental results were within 2% of those predicted by this theory.

  8. Active Cancellation of Acoustical Resonances with an FPGA FIR Filter

    Ryou, Albert; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach to enhancing the closed-loop bandwidth of a feedback-controlled mechanical system by digitally cancelling its acoustical resonances and antiresonances with an FPGA FIR filter. By performing a real-time convolution of the feedback error signal with an arbitrary filter, we can suppress arbitrarily many poles and zeros below 100 kHz, each with a linewidth as small as 10 Hz. We demonstrate the efficacy of this technique by cancelling the six largest resonances and antiresonances of a high-finesse optical resonator piezomechanical transfer function, thereby enhancing the unity gain frequency by more than an order of magnitude. More broadly, this approach is applicable to stabilization of optical resonators, external cavity diode lasers, and scanning tunneling microscopes.

  9. Subwavelength acoustic focusing by surface-wave-resonance enhanced transmission in doubly negative acoustic metamaterials

    We present analytical and numerical analyses of a yet unseen lensing paradigm that is based on a solid metamaterial slab in which the wave excitation source is attached. We propose and demonstrate sub-diffraction-limited acoustic focusing induced by surface resonant states in doubly negative metamaterials. The enhancement of evanescent waves across the metamaterial slab produced by their resonant coupling to surface waves is evidenced and quantitatively determined. The effect of metamaterial parameters on surface states, transmission, and wavenumber bandwidth is clearly identified. Based on this concept consisting of a wave source attached on the metamaterial, a high resolution of λ/28.4 is obtained with the optimum effective physical parameters, opening then an exciting way to design acoustic metamaterials for ultrasonic focused imaging

  10. Subwavelength acoustic focusing by surface-wave-resonance enhanced transmission in doubly negative acoustic metamaterials

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Badreddine Assouar, M., E-mail: Badreddine.Assouar@univ-lorraine.fr; Oudich, Mourad [CNRS, Institut Jean Lamour, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy F-54506 (France); Institut Jean Lamour, University of Lorraine, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP: 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France)

    2014-11-21

    We present analytical and numerical analyses of a yet unseen lensing paradigm that is based on a solid metamaterial slab in which the wave excitation source is attached. We propose and demonstrate sub-diffraction-limited acoustic focusing induced by surface resonant states in doubly negative metamaterials. The enhancement of evanescent waves across the metamaterial slab produced by their resonant coupling to surface waves is evidenced and quantitatively determined. The effect of metamaterial parameters on surface states, transmission, and wavenumber bandwidth is clearly identified. Based on this concept consisting of a wave source attached on the metamaterial, a high resolution of λ/28.4 is obtained with the optimum effective physical parameters, opening then an exciting way to design acoustic metamaterials for ultrasonic focused imaging.

  11. Surface acoustic waves in piezoelectrics with HTSC resonance film structure

    Analysis of surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a periodic film structure of granulated high-temperature superconductor formed on the piezoelectric surface, is conducted. A number of notable features in the SAW characteristics is revealed. SAW parameter dependences on frequency and temperature can be of a resonance character in the region of N-S transition, in a zone, where Josephson currents on intergranular contacts of a superconductor prevail. Evaluations have shown that the resonance peak of attenuation can achieve the value of 100 decibel/cm, and SAW velocity difference in the region of resonance ΔV/V can exceed 10-2. A sharp temperature dependence of these parameters allows one to use the effects to construct bolometric acoustoelectron photoreceivers and other sensors. 9 refs.; 5 figs

  12. Acoustic agglomeration of fine particles based on a high intensity acoustical resonator

    Zhao, Yun; Zeng, Xinwu; Tian, Zhangfu

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic agglomeration (AA) is considered to be a promising method for reducing the air pollution caused by fine aerosol particles. Removal efficiency and energy consuming are primary parameters and generally have a conflict with each other for the industry applications. It was proved that removal efficiency is increased with sound intensity and optimal frequency is presented for certain polydisperse aerosol. As a result, a high efficiency and low energy cost removal system was constructed using acoustical resonance. High intensity standing wave is generated by a tube system with abrupt section driven by four loudspeakers. Numerical model of the tube system was built base on the finite element method, and the resonance condition and SPL increase were confirmd. Extensive tests were carried out to investigate the acoustic field in the agglomeration chamber. Removal efficiency of fine particles was tested by the comparison of filter paper mass and particle size distribution at different operating conditions including sound pressure level (SPL), and frequency. The experimental study has demonstrated that agglomeration increases with sound pressure level. Sound pressure level in the agglomeration chamber is between 145 dB and 165 dB from 500 Hz to 2 kHz. The resonance frequency can be predicted with the quarter tube theory. Sound pressure level gain of more than 10 dB is gained at resonance frequency. With the help of high intensity sound waves, fine particles are reduced greatly, and the AA effect is enhanced at high SPL condition. The optimal frequency is 1.1kHz for aerosol generated by coal ash. In the resonace tube, higher resonance frequencies are not the integral multiplies of the first one. As a result, Strong nonlinearity is avoided by the dissonant characteristic and shock wave is not found in the testing results. The mechanism and testing system can be used effectively in industrial processes in the future.

  13. Acoustic resonances in two dimensional radial sonic crystals shells

    Torrent, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Radial sonic crystals (RSC) are fluidlike structures infinitely periodic along the radial direction. They have been recently introduced and are only possible thanks to the anisotropy of specially designed acoustic metamaterials [see Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 103} 064301 (2009)]. We present here a comprehensive analysis of two-dimensional RSC shells, which consist of a cavity defect centered at the origin of the crystal and a finite thickness crystal shell surrounded by a fluidlike background. We develop analytic expressions demonstrating that, like for other type of crystals (photonic or phononic) with defects, these shells contain Fabry-Perot like resonances and strongly localized modes. The results are completely general and can be extended to three dimensional acoustic structures and to their photonic counterparts, the radial photonic crystals.

  14. Resonance scattering of radio waves in the acoustically disturbed ionosphere

    It is known that acoustic waves are excited in the atmosphere for a variety of reasons, including seismic oscillations of the earth's surface as a result of earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, explosions, and in the operation of other powerful sources of natural or artificial origin. When sound waves are sufficiently intense, they can create disturbances in the electron density at ionospheric heights. In this paper, we consider the properties of radio wave scattering off such disturbances created by infrasound waves, i.e., we consider Mandel'shtam-Brillouin scattering in the ionosphere. The authors discuss the possibility of a radiophysical enhancement of the effect connected with the phenomenon of resonance scattering of the radiowaves off the disturbances created in the medium by the acoustic wave

  15. Acoustic signature recognition technique for Human-Object Interactions (HOI) in persistent surveillance systems

    Alkilani, Amjad; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2013-05-01

    Handling, manipulation, and placement of objects, hereon called Human-Object Interaction (HOI), in the environment generate sounds. Such sounds are readily identifiable by the human hearing. However, in the presence of background environment noises, recognition of minute HOI sounds is challenging, though vital for improvement of multi-modality sensor data fusion in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS). Identification of HOI sound signatures can be used as precursors to detection of pertinent threats that otherwise other sensor modalities may miss to detect. In this paper, we present a robust method for detection and classification of HOI events via clustering of extracted features from training of HOI acoustic sound waves. In this approach, salient sound events are preliminary identified and segmented from background via a sound energy tracking method. Upon this segmentation, frequency spectral pattern of each sound event is modeled and its features are extracted to form a feature vector for training. To reduce dimensionality of training feature space, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique is employed to expedite fast classification of test feature vectors, a kd-tree and Random Forest classifiers are trained for rapid classification of training sound waves. Each classifiers employs different similarity distance matching technique for classification. Performance evaluations of classifiers are compared for classification of a batch of training HOI acoustic signatures. Furthermore, to facilitate semantic annotation of acoustic sound events, a scheme based on Transducer Mockup Language (TML) is proposed. The results demonstrate the proposed approach is both reliable and effective, and can be extended to future PSS applications.

  16. Soft resonator of omnidirectional resonance for acoustic metamaterials with a negative bulk modulus

    Jing, Xiaodong; Meng, Yang; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-11-01

    Monopolar resonance is of fundamental importance in the acoustic field. Here, we present the realization of a monopolar resonance that goes beyond the concept of Helmholtz resonators. The balloon-like soft resonator (SR) oscillates omnidirectionally and radiates from all parts of its spherical surface, eliminating the need for a hard wall for the cavity and baffle effects. For airborne sound, such a low-modulus resonator can be made extremely lightweight. Deep subwavelength resonance is achieved when the SR is tuned by adjusting the shell thickness, benefiting from the large density contrast between the shell material and the encapsulated gas. The SR resonates with near-perfect monopole symmetry, as demonstrated by the theoretical and experimental results, which are in excellent agreement. For a lattice of SRs, a band gap occurs and blocks near-total transmission, and the effective bulk modulus exhibits a prominent negative band, while the effective mass density remains unchanged. Our study shows that the SR is suitable for building 3D acoustic metamaterials and provides a basis for constructing left-handed materials as a new means of creating a negative bulk modulus.

  17. Micro acoustic resonant chambers for heating/agitating/mixing (MARCHAM)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Noell, Aaron C.; Fisher, Anita M.; Takano, Nobuyuki; Grunthaner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A variety of applications require the mixing and/or heating of a slurry made from a powder/fluid mixture. One of these applications, Sub Critical Water Extraction (SCWE), is a process where water and an environmental powder sample (sieved soil, drill cuttings, etc.) are heated in a sealed chamber to temperatures greater than 200 degrees Celsius by allowing the pressure to increase, but without reaching the critical point of water. At these temperatures, the ability of water to extract organics from solid particulate increases drastically. This paper describes the modeling and experimentation on the use of an acoustic resonant chamber which is part of an amino acid detection instrument called Astrobionibbler [Noell et al. 2014, 2015]. In this instrument we use acoustics to excite a fluid- solid fines mixture in different frequency/amplitude regimes to accomplish a variety of sample processing tasks. Driving the acoustic resonant chamber at lower frequencies can create circulation patterns in the fluid and mixes the liquid and fines, while driving the chamber at higher frequencies one can agitate the fluid and powder and create a suspension. If one then drives the chamber at high amplitude at resonance heating of the slurry occurs. In the mixing and agitating cell the particle levitation force depends on the relative densities and compressibility's of the particulate and fluid and on the kinetic and potential energy densities associated with the velocity and pressure fields [Glynne-Jones, Boltryk and Hill 2012] in the cell. When heating, the piezoelectric transducer and chamber is driven at high power in resonance where the solid/fines region is modelled as an acoustic transmission line with a large loss component. In this regime, heat is pumped into the solution/fines mixture and rapidly heats the sample. We have modeled the piezoelectric transducer/chamber/ sample using Mason's equivalent circuit. In order to assess the validity of the model we have built and

  18. Acoustic resonances in two-dimensional radial sonic crystal shells

    Radial sonic crystals (RSC) are fluidlike structures infinitely periodic along the radial direction that verify the Bloch theorem and are possible only if certain specially designed acoustic metamaterials with mass density anisotropy can be engineered (see Torrent and Sanchez-Dehesa 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 064301). A comprehensive analysis of two-dimensional (2D) RSC shells is reported here. A given shell is in fact a circular slab with a central cavity. These finite crystal structures contain Fabry-Perot-like resonances and modes strongly localized at the central cavity. Semi-analytical expressions are developed to obtain the quality factors of the different resonances, their symmetry features and their excitation properties. The results reported here are completely general and can be extended to equivalent 3D spherical shells and to their photonic counterparts.

  19. Acoustic resonances in two-dimensional radial sonic crystal shells

    Torrent, Daniel; Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose, E-mail: jsdehesa@upvnet.upv.e [Wave Phenomena Group, Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, C/Camino de Vera s.n., E-46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Radial sonic crystals (RSC) are fluidlike structures infinitely periodic along the radial direction that verify the Bloch theorem and are possible only if certain specially designed acoustic metamaterials with mass density anisotropy can be engineered (see Torrent and Sanchez-Dehesa 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 064301). A comprehensive analysis of two-dimensional (2D) RSC shells is reported here. A given shell is in fact a circular slab with a central cavity. These finite crystal structures contain Fabry-Perot-like resonances and modes strongly localized at the central cavity. Semi-analytical expressions are developed to obtain the quality factors of the different resonances, their symmetry features and their excitation properties. The results reported here are completely general and can be extended to equivalent 3D spherical shells and to their photonic counterparts.

  20. The thermophysical properties of gases determined using an annular acoustic resonator

    Buxton, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    A novel annular acoustic resonator was constructed for measurements of the speed of sound in gases at pressures below 1 MPa. The resonator was designed to allow measurements of the speed and absorption of sound at low pressure in gases with large bulk viscosities. Measurements in propene, for which the speed of sound is known, served to characterise the geometry of the resonator and provide a test of the acoustic model for the system. A detailed description of the resonator whi...

  1. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation

    Siegfried Hohmann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application.

  2. Film bulk acoustic resonator pressure sensor with self temperature reference

    A novel film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) with two resonant frequencies which have opposite reactions to temperature changes has been designed. The two resonant modes respond differently to changes in temperature and pressure, with the frequency shift being linearly correlated with temperature and pressure changes. By utilizing the FBAR's sealed back trench as a cavity, an on-chip single FBAR sensor suitable for measuring pressure and temperature simultaneously is proposed and demonstrated. The experimental results show that the pressure coefficient of frequency for the lower frequency peak of the FBAR sensors is approximately −17.4 ppm kPa−1, while that for the second peak is approximately −6.1 ppm kPa−1, both of them being much more sensitive than other existing pressure sensors. This dual mode on-chip pressure sensor is simple in structure and operation, can be fabricated at very low cost, and yet requires no specific package, therefore has great potential for applications. (paper)

  3. Implementation of electromagnetic acoustic resonance in pipe inspection

    Electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR) provides accurate and stable evaluation. Its capability has been demonstrated through online monitoring using a large-scale corrosion test loop operating at high temperature. This study uses EMAR to evaluate the thickness of pipes in a nuclear power plant during its shutdown through signal processing based on superposition of nth compression. Sections of piping evaluated with EMAR include those in long-term service, where thinning may produce scale-like surfaces, and those having complicated geometry. Moreover, we compare measurement results obtained with EMAR and with ultrasonic testing (UT). The accuracy of EMAR depends on the pipe geometry, such as the pipe diameter and whether the pipe is straight or an elbow, the presence of welding, and complicated wall thinning. We consider the causes of the difference in thickness values between EMAR measurements and UT. Finally, we discuss how to implement EMAR in pipe inspection. (author)

  4. Implementation applicability of piping inspection using electromagnetic acoustic resonance

    The electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR) method provides accurate and stable evaluation and its capability has been demonstrated through online monitoring using a large-scale corrosion test loop in operation at high temperature. This study applies EMAR with the signal processing method of the superposition of nth compression to the thickness evaluation of piping in a nuclear power plant during shutdown. Sections of piping evaluated by EMAR include those having long-term service, where thinning may produce scale-like surfaces, and those having complicated geometry. Moreover, measurement results obtained with EMAR and in ultrasonic testing are compared. The accuracy of the EMAR method depends on the pipe geometry, such as the pipe diameter and whether the pipe is straight or an elbow, the presence of welding, and complicated wall thinning. (author)

  5. RAP: acoustic detection of particles in ultracryogenic resonant antenna

    Bertolucci, S.; Coccia, E.; D' Antonio, S.; Waard, A. de; Delle Monache, G.; Di Gioacchino, D.; Fafone, V.; Fauth, A.; Frossati, G.; Ligi, C. E-mail: carlo.ligi@inf.infn.it; Marini, A.; Mazzitelli, G.; Modestino, G.; Pizzella, G.; Quintieri, L.; Raffone, G.; Ronga, F.; Tripodi, P.; Valente, P

    2004-03-11

    The resonant-mass gravitational wave detector NAUTILUS has recently recorded signals due to cosmic rays crossing. Very large signals have been observed in the superconductive state of the antenna. In order to investigate this anomalous response at low temperatures, the Rivelazione Acustica di Particelle experiment has been approved. Its purpose is the measurement of the mechanical vibrations in a superconducting (T{approx}100 mK) cylindrical aluminium bar when hit by 10{sup 5} electrons at 510 MeV from the DAPHINE Beam Test Facility, corresponding to the energies released by extensive air showers in the NAUTILUS antenna. The results of this measurement are crucial to understand the interaction of ionizing particles with bulk superconductors and to confirm the results on the thermo-acoustic model of the past experiments.

  6. CMOS-Integrated Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators for Label-Free Biosensing

    Matthias Schreiter

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The throughput is an important parameter for label-free biosensors. Acoustic resonators like the quartz crystal microbalance have a low throughput because the number of sensors which can be used at the same time is limited. Here we present an array of 64 CMOS-integrated film bulk acoustic resonators. We compare the performance with surface plasmon resonance and the quartz crystal microbalance and demonstrate the performance of the sensor for multiplexed detection of DNA.

  7. Search for new resonances with boosted signatures at CMS

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The LHC and its experiments are ideally suited to search for these new resonances in order to validate or constrain the corresponding theories. At resonance masses well above 1 TeV, these searches face specific challenges. The decay products have large Lorentz boosts, resulting in very collimated final state topologies. Jet substructure methods and the use of non-isolate...

  8. The underwater acoustic signature of a nuclear explosion at the ocean surface. Interim technical report

    Bache, T.C.; Barker, T.G.; Brown, M.G.; Pyatt, K.D.; Swanger, H.J.

    1980-07-01

    The gross spectral character and duration of the acoustic wave signature of a nuclear explosion near the ocean surface is estimated by constructing theoretical pressure-time histories, using models for the explosion and wave propagation. The explosion is assumed to have a yield of 1 KT and the nominal range is 6600 km. The frequencies of interest are rather low, 50 Hz and less, so absorption is small and the estimates of spectral character and duration essentially decouple. The spectrum depends almost entirely on the source characteristics and the duration is controlled by characteristics of the travel path. The airblast-induced pressure loading on the ocean surface dominates the source, with the acoustic waves from direct coupling into the water being relatively small. At large distances, the spectrum for 1 KT peaks near 20 Hz and is band-limited between 5 and 50 Hz. For different energy yields these frequencies scale with the cube-root of the yield. Different assumptions about the (laterally homogeneous) oceanic sound profile lead to differing estimates for the signal duration. Values of 20 to 60 seconds seem most reasonable.

  9. Analysis of acoustic resonator with shape deformation using finite element method

    G M Kalmse; Ajay Chaudhari; P B Patil

    2000-10-01

    An acoustic resonator with shape deformation has been analysed using the finite element method. The shape deformation issuch that the volume of the resonator remains constant. The effect of deformation on the resonant frequencies is studied. Deformation splits the degenerate frequencies.

  10. Quantum signatures of nonlinear resonances in mesoscopic systems: Efficient extension of localized wave functions

    We investigate the quantum signatures of classical nonlinear resonances by making the analytic connection between the quantum wave functions and the classical periodic orbits for the uncoupled systems. It is found that the highly efficient extension of the localized coherent states within the classical caustics is an intriguing phenomenon in mesoscopic systems with nonlinear resonances. With the theoretical analysis, we experimentally demonstrate that the laser resonator with an intracavity saturable absorber can be employed to visualize the wave patterns analogous to the quantum wave functions associated with Fermi resonance

  11. Search for the pentaquark resonance signature in lattice QCD

    B. G. Lasscock; J. Hedditch; D. B. Leinweber; W. Melnitchouk; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams; R. D. Young; J. M. Zanotti

    2005-03-01

    Claims concerning the possible discovery of the $\\Theta^+$ pentaquark, with minimal quark content $uudd\\bar{s}$, have motivated our comprehensive study into possible pentaquark states using lattice QCD. We review various pentaquark interpolating fields in the literature and create a new candidate ideal for lattice QCD simulations. Using these interpolating fields we attempt to isolate a signal for a five-quark resonance. Calculations are performed using improved actions on a large $20^{3} \\times 40$ lattice in the quenched approximation. The standard lattice resonance signal of increasing attraction between baryon constituents for increasing quark mass is not observed for spin-1/2 pentaquark states. We conclude that evidence supporting the existence of a spin-1/2 pentaquark resonance does not exist in quenched QCD.

  12. Characterization of Acoustic Resonance in a High-Pressure Sodium Lamp

    Chhun, Labo; Maussion, Pascal; Bhosle, Sounil; Zissis, Georges

    2011-01-01

    International audience With the last decades, the high pressure sodium (HPS) lamp has been supplied in high frequency in order to increase the efficacy of the lamp/ballast system. However, at some given frequencies, standing acoustic waves, namely acoustic resonance (AR), might develop in the burner and cause lamp luminous fluctuation, extinction and destruction in the most serious case. As we seek for a control method to detect and avoid the lamp AR some main characteristics of the acoust...

  13. Implementation of algorithms to discriminate chemical/biological airbursts from high explosive airbursts utilizing acoustic signatures

    Hohil, Myron E.; Desai, Sachi; Morcos, Amir

    2006-05-01

    The Army is currently developing acoustic sensor systems that will provide extended range surveillance, detection, and identification for force protection and tactical security. A network of such sensors remotely deployed in conjunction with a central processing node (or gateway) will provide early warning and assessment of enemy threats, near real-time situational awareness to commanders, and may reduce potential hazards to the soldier. In contrast, the current detection of chemical/biological (CB) agents expelled into a battlefield environment is limited to the response of chemical sensors that must be located within close proximity to the CB agent. Since chemical sensors detect hazardous agents through contact, the sensor range to an airburst is the key-limiting factor in identifying a potential CB weapon attack. The associated sensor reporting latencies must be minimized to give sufficient preparation time to field commanders, who must assess if an attack is about to occur, has occurred, or if occurred, the type of agent that soldiers might be exposed to. The long-range propagation of acoustic blast waves from heavy artillery blasts, which are typical in a battlefield environment, introduces a feature for using acoustics and other sensor suite technologies for the early detection and identification of CB threats. Employing disparate sensor technologies implies that warning of a potential CB attack can be provided to the solider more rapidly and from a safer distance when compared to current conventional methods. Distinct characteristics arise within the different airburst signatures because High Explosive (HE) warheads emphasize concussive and shrapnel effects, while chemical/biological warheads are designed to disperse their contents over immense areas, therefore utilizing a slower burning, less intensive explosion to mix and distribute their contents. Highly reliable discrimination (100%) has been demonstrated at the Portable Area Warning Surveillance System

  14. Signatures of resonant terrestrial planets in long-period systems

    Kennedy, Gareth F

    2009-01-01

    The majority of extrasolar planets discovered to date have significantly eccentric orbits, some if not all of which may have been produced through planetary migration. During this process, any planets interior to such an orbit would therefore have been susceptible to resonance capture, and hence may exhibit measurable orbital period variations. Here we summarize the results of our investigation into the possibility of detecting low-mass planets which have been captured into the strong 2:1 resonance. Using analytical expressions together with simulated data we showed that it is possible to identify the existence of a low-mass companion in the internal 2:1 resonance by estimating the time-dependant orbital period for piecewise sections of radial velocity data. This works as long as the amplitude of modulation of the orbital period is greater than its uncertainty, which in practice means that the system should not be too close to exact resonance. Here we provide simple expressions for the libration period and th...

  15. Coupling of Acoustic Vibrations to Plasmon Resonances in Metal Nanoparticles

    Ahmed, Aftab; Pelton, Matthew; Guest, Jeffrey

    Measurements of acoustic vibrations in nanoparticles provide a unique opportunity to study mechanical phenomena at nanometer length scales and picosecond time scales. Phonon vibrations of plasmonic nanoparticles are of particular interest, due to their large extinction efficiencies, and high sensitivity to surrounding medium. There are two mechanisms that transduce the mechanical oscillations into plasmon resonance shift: (1) changes in polarizability; and (2) changes in electron density. These mechanisms have been used to explain qualitatively the origin of the transient-absorption signals, however, a quantitative connection has not yet been made except for simple geometries. Here, we present a method to quantitatively determine the coupling between vibrational modes and plasmon modes in noble-metal nanoparticles including spheres, shells, rods and cubes. We separately determine the parts of the optical response that are due to shape changes and to changes in electron density, and we relate the optical signals to the symmetries of the vibrational and plasmon modes. These results clarify reported experimental results, and should help guide the optimization of future experiments.

  16. How can acoustic resonance reduce the average velocity in a falling body?

    V. Torres-Zúñiga

    2011-01-01

    In this article, a simple experiment is described to overcome the misconception that acoustic pressure and levitation effects are difficult to observe in school laboratories. Analysis of the free fall velocity of a toy parachute inside a vertical tube, driven by sound in a range of frequencies around the resonant condition, exhibits the resonance frequency, the node pressure zones, and the optimal conditions to obtain acoustical levitation of a light body.

  17. Acoustic resonant states on the interface between density-negative and modulus-negative metamaterial

    Lee, M. H. [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, M. K.; Lee, S. H. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nikitov, S. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-15

    We observed resonant states on the interface between the acoustic metamaterials of negative effective mass density and negative effective modulus, which were based on membranes and side holes, respectively. All resonances excited by placing the driving pressure at different places have the same spatial pressure distribution and resonance frequency. The amplitude decayed exponentially on both sides of the interface. We present experimental results on the spatial and the spectral characteristics of the resonant states.

  18. Acoustic resonant states on the interface between density-negative and modulus-negative metamaterial

    We observed resonant states on the interface between the acoustic metamaterials of negative effective mass density and negative effective modulus, which were based on membranes and side holes, respectively. All resonances excited by placing the driving pressure at different places have the same spatial pressure distribution and resonance frequency. The amplitude decayed exponentially on both sides of the interface. We present experimental results on the spatial and the spectral characteristics of the resonant states.

  19. Cyclotron resonant scattering in gamma-ray bursts - Line strengths and signature of neutron star rotation

    Lamb, D. Q.; Wang, J. C. L.; Wasserman, I.

    1992-01-01

    We explain the relative line strengths in gamma-ray bursts in terms of cyclotron resonant scattering. We describe the line signature of neutron star rotation and discuss the possibility that variations seen in the strengths and widths of the lines in GB780325 and GB870303 are due to rotation.

  20. Experimental study on flow-induced acoustic resonance in square closed side branch

    Flow-induced acoustic resonance is a phenomenon caused by the interaction of flow and acoustic fields in special structure. Acoustic resonance characteristic experiments were carried out on square closed side branch. The influences of the velocity in main pipe and the length of the side branch on acoustic resonance were studied. The range of occurrence and characteristics of pressure pulsation were analyzed. Three lengths of side branches (L/d=5.6 and 7) were experimentally studied and the Reynolds number in the experiment was 2.74 X 104-2.429 X 105 while the Mach number was 0.025-0.218. The results show that the resonance frequency shows a lock-in phenomenon with the increase of velocity. As the length of the side branch increasing, the amplitude of the acoustic pressure and the resonance frequency decrease. In the considered structure, the acoustic resonance occurs when Strouhal number is 0.3-0.6 and 0.7-1.0. (authors)

  1. In-plane acoustic reflectors for reducing effective anchor loss in lateral–extensional MEMS resonators

    In this paper, novel in-plane acoustic reflectors are proposed to enhance the quality factor (Q) in lateral-mode micromachined resonators. Finite element coupled-domain simulation is used to model anchor loss and to estimate the relative change in the resonator's performance without and with the inclusion of acoustic reflectors. Several 27 and 110 MHz AlN-on-silicon resonators are fabricated and measured to validate the theoretical and simulated data. An average Q enhancement of up to 560% is reported for specific designs with reflectors over the same resonators without reflectors. The measured results trend well with the simulated data and support that the acoustic reflectors can reduce the overall anchor loss with minimum modification in the resonator design

  2. Numerical derivation of forces on particles and agglomerates in a resonant acoustic field

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2013-10-01

    Particles and agglomerates are investigated in gaseous acoustic flow fields. Acoustic fields exert forces on solid objects, which can influence the shape of the exposed bodies, even to the point of breakage of the structures. Motivated by experimentally observed breakage of agglomerates in an acoustic levitator (f = 20 kHz), a numerical study is presented that derives the acoustic forces on a complex model agglomerate from the pressure and velocity fields of a resonant standing ultrasound wave, calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is distinguished between the drag and lift/lateral forces on the overall agglomerate and on the different primary particles of the model.

  3. Grazing incidence modeling of a metamaterial-inspired dual-resonance acoustic liner

    Beck, Benjamin S.

    2014-03-01

    To reduce the noise emitted by commercial aircraft turbofan engines, the inlet and aft nacelle ducts are lined with acoustic absorbing structures called acoustic liners. Traditionally, these structures consist of a perforated facesheet bonded on top of a honeycomb core. These traditional perforate over honeycomb core (POHC) liners create an absorption spectra where the maximum absorption occurs at a frequency that is dictated by the depth of the honeycomb core; which acts as a quarter-wave resonator. Recent advances in turbofan engine design have increased the need for thin acoustic liners that are effective at low frequencies. One design that has been developed uses an acoustic metamaterial architecture to improve the low frequency absorption. Specifically, the liner consists of an array of Helmholtz resonators separated by quarter-wave volumes to create a dual-resonance acoustic liner. While previous work investigated the acoustic behavior under normal incidence, this paper outlines the modeling and predicted transmission loss and absorption of a dual-resonance acoustic metamaterial when subjected to grazing incidence sound.

  4. Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) Munition Classification System enhancements. Final report

    Vela, O.A.; Huggard, J.C.

    1997-09-18

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a non-destructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technology has resulted in three generations of instrumentation, funded by the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), specifically designed for field identification of chemical weapon (CW) munitions. Each generation of ARS instrumentation was developed with a specific user in mind. The ARS1OO was built for use by the U.N. Inspection Teams going into Iraq immediately after the Persian Gulf War. The ARS200 was built for use in the US-Russia Bilateral Chemical Weapons Treaty (the primary users for this system are the US Onsite Inspection Agency (OSIA) and their Russian counterparts). The ARS300 was built with the requirements of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in mind. Each successive system is an improved version of the previous system based on learning the weaknesses of each and, coincidentally, on the fact that more time was available to do a requirements analysis and the necessary engineering development. The ARS300 is at a level of development that warrants transferring the technology to a commercial vendor. Since LANL will supply the computer software to the selected vendor, it is possible for LANL to continue to improve the decision algorithms, add features where necessary, and adjust the user interface before the final transfer occurs. This paper describes the current system, ARS system enhancements, and software enhancements. Appendices contain the Operations Manual (software Version 3.01), and two earlier reports on enhancements.

  5. Random matrix theory and acoustic resonances in plates with an approximate symmetry

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Ellegaard, C.; Jackson, A.D.;

    2001-01-01

    the widths for acoustic resonances in thin aluminum plates, cut in the shape of the so-called three-leaf clover. Due to the mirror symmetry through the middle plane of the plate, each resonance of the plate belongs to one of two mode classes and we show how to separate the modes into these two classes...

  6. Study of the onset of the acoustic streaming in parallel plate resonators with pulse ultrasound.

    Castro, Angelica; Hoyos, Mauricio

    2016-03-01

    In a previous study, we introduced pulse mode ultrasound as a new method for reducing and controlling the acoustic streaming in parallel plate resonators (Hoyos and Castro, 2013). Here, by modifying other parameters such as the resonator geometry and the particle size, we have found a threshold for particle manipulation with ultrasonic standing waves in confined resonators without the influence of the acoustic streaming. We demonstrate that pulse mode ultrasound open the possibility of manipulating particles smaller than 1 μm size. PMID:26705604

  7. A Novel Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonator for Filters and Sensors Applications

    Zhixin Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonators are widely applied in filters and gravimetric sensors for physical or biochemical sensing. In this work, a new architecture of BAW resonator is demonstrated, which introduces a pair of reflection layers onto the top of a thin film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR device. The new device can be transformed between type I and type II dispersions by varying the thicknesses of the reflection layers. A computational modeling is developed to fully investigate the acoustic waves and the dispersion types of the device theoretically. The novel structure makes it feasible to fabricate both type resonators in one filter, which offers an effective alternative to improve the pass band flatness in the filter. Additionally, this new device exhibits a high quality factor (Q in the liquid, which opens a possibility for real time measurement in solutions with a superior limitation of detection (LOD in sensor applications.

  8. Intrinsically tunable bulk acoustic wave resonators based on sol-gel grown PMN-PT films

    Vorobiev, A.; Spreitzer, M.; Veber, A.; Suvorov, D.; Gevorgian, S.

    2014-08-01

    Intrinsically tunable bulk acoustic wave resonators, based on sol-gel 0.70Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.30PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) thin films, with high effective electromechanical coupling coefficient of 13% and tunability of the series resonance frequency up to 4.0% are fabricated and characterized. The enhanced electroacoustic properties of the PMN-PT resonators are attributed to the mechanism of polarization rotation occurring in the region of the morphotropic phase boundary. Electroacoustic performance of the PMN-PT resonators is analyzed using the theory of dc field-induced piezoelectric effect in ferroelectrics. Extrinsic acoustic loss in the PMN-PT resonators is analyzed using the model of the wave scattering at reflections from rough interfaces. Mechanical Q-factor of the resonators is up to 70 at 4.1 GHz and limited mainly by losses in the PMN-PT film.

  9. Resonant signatures of heavy scalar fields in the cosmic microwave background

    We investigate the possibility that a heavy scalar field, whose mass exceeds the Hubble scale during inflation, could leave non-negligible signatures in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropy power spectrum through the parametric resonance between its background oscillations and the inflaton fluctuations. By assuming the heavy scalar field couples with the inflaton derivatively, we show that the resonance can be efficient without spoiling the slow-roll inflation. The primordial power spectrum modulated by the resonance has a sharp peak at a specific scale and could be an origin of the anomalies observed in the angular power spectrum of the CMB. In some values of parameters, the modulated spectrum can fit the observed data better than the simple power-law power spectrum, though the resultant improvement of the fit is not large enough and hence other observations such as non-Gaussianity are necessary to confirm that the CMB anomalies are originated from the resonant effect of the heavy scalar field. The resonant signatures can provide an opportunity to observe heavy degrees of freedom during inflation and improve our understanding of physics behind inflation

  10. Giant suppression of shot noise as signature of coherent transport in double barrier resonant diodes

    Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Reggiani, L.; Alkeev, N. V.; Lyubchenko, V.E.; Ironside, C. N.; Figueiredo, J.M.L.; Stanley, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    Shot noise suppression in double barrier resonant tunnelling diodes with a Fano factor well below the value of 0.5 is theoretically predicted. This giant suppression is found to be a signature of the coherent transport regime and can occur near zero temperature as a consequence of the Pauli principle or above about 77 K as a consequence of long range Coulomb interaction. These predictions are validated by experimental data.

  11. A numerically efficient damping model for acoustic resonances in microfluidic cavities

    Bulk acoustic wave devices are typically operated in a resonant state to achieve enhanced acoustic amplitudes and high acoustofluidic forces for the manipulation of microparticles. Among other loss mechanisms related to the structural parts of acoustofluidic devices, damping in the fluidic cavity is a crucial factor that limits the attainable acoustic amplitudes. In the analytical part of this study, we quantify all relevant loss mechanisms related to the fluid inside acoustofluidic micro-devices. Subsequently, a numerical analysis of the time-harmonic visco-acoustic and thermo-visco-acoustic equations is carried out to verify the analytical results for 2D and 3D examples. The damping results are fitted into the framework of classical linear acoustics to set up a numerically efficient device model. For this purpose, all damping effects are combined into an acoustofluidic loss factor. Since some components of the acoustofluidic loss factor depend on the acoustic mode shape in the fluid cavity, we propose a two-step simulation procedure. In the first step, the loss factors are deduced from the simulated mode shape. Subsequently, a second simulation is invoked, taking all losses into account. Owing to its computational efficiency, the presented numerical device model is of great relevance for the simulation of acoustofluidic particle manipulation by means of acoustic radiation forces or acoustic streaming. For the first time, accurate 3D simulations of realistic micro-devices for the quantitative prediction of pressure amplitudes and the related acoustofluidic forces become feasible

  12. A numerically efficient damping model for acoustic resonances in microfluidic cavities

    Hahn, P., E-mail: hahnp@ethz.ch; Dual, J. [Institute of Mechanical Systems (IMES), Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 3, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    Bulk acoustic wave devices are typically operated in a resonant state to achieve enhanced acoustic amplitudes and high acoustofluidic forces for the manipulation of microparticles. Among other loss mechanisms related to the structural parts of acoustofluidic devices, damping in the fluidic cavity is a crucial factor that limits the attainable acoustic amplitudes. In the analytical part of this study, we quantify all relevant loss mechanisms related to the fluid inside acoustofluidic micro-devices. Subsequently, a numerical analysis of the time-harmonic visco-acoustic and thermo-visco-acoustic equations is carried out to verify the analytical results for 2D and 3D examples. The damping results are fitted into the framework of classical linear acoustics to set up a numerically efficient device model. For this purpose, all damping effects are combined into an acoustofluidic loss factor. Since some components of the acoustofluidic loss factor depend on the acoustic mode shape in the fluid cavity, we propose a two-step simulation procedure. In the first step, the loss factors are deduced from the simulated mode shape. Subsequently, a second simulation is invoked, taking all losses into account. Owing to its computational efficiency, the presented numerical device model is of great relevance for the simulation of acoustofluidic particle manipulation by means of acoustic radiation forces or acoustic streaming. For the first time, accurate 3D simulations of realistic micro-devices for the quantitative prediction of pressure amplitudes and the related acoustofluidic forces become feasible.

  13. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    Rubaiyet Iftekharul Haque; Erick Ogam; Christophe Loussert; Patrick Benaben; Xavier Boddaert

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive ...

  14. Effects of relevant parameters on the bandgaps of acoustic metamaterials with multi-resonators

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Rongqi; Lin, Jieqiong

    2016-04-01

    Locally resonant acoustic metamaterials with multi-resonators are generally regarded as a fine trend for managing the bandgaps, the different effects of relevant structural parameters on the bandgaps, which will be numerically investigated in this paper. A two-step homogenization method is extended to achieve the effective mass of multi-resonators metamaterial in the lattice system. As comparison, the dispersive wave propagation in lattice system and continuum model is studied. Then, the different effects of relevant parameters on the center frequencies and bandwidth of bandgaps are perfectly revealed, and the steady-state responses in the continuum models with purposed relevant parameters are additionally clarified. The related results can well confirm that the bandgaps exist around the undamped natural frequencies of internal resonators, and also their bandwidth can be efficiently controlled with the ensured center frequencies. Moreover, the design of purposed multi-resonators acoustic metamaterial in vibration control is presented and discussed by an example.

  15. Optimization of the Acoustic Pressure Distribution in a Resonant Photoacoustic Cell

    陈柏; 陈兰荣; 范薇; 林尊琪

    2001-01-01

    The size of a cylindrical photoacoustic cell with suitable size was selected so that the resonant frequency of the first radial mode was equal to that of a longitudinal higher mode. By maintaining two thin coaxial tubes at each end, a enhanced photoacoustic cell was constructed with two tubes of 1/2 and 1/4 of the wavelength. In this enhanced photoacoustie cell, both the first radial resonance and the higher longitudinal resonance were excited adequately. Coupling of two acoustic modes makes the acoustic energy concentrating in the middle of the cell. The surface loss was decreased, the acoustic quality factor and pressure amplitude increased obviously as compared with conventional cylindrical cell.

  16. Resonant attenuation of surface acoustic waves by a disordered monolayer of microspheres

    Eliason, J. K.; Vega-Flick, A.; Hiraiwa, M.; Khanolkar, A.; Gan, T.; Boechler, N.; Fang, N.; Nelson, K. A.; Maznev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Attenuation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by a disordered monolayer of polystyrene microspheres is investigated. Surface acoustic wave packets are generated by a pair of crossed laser pulses in a glass substrate coated with a thin aluminum film and detected via the diffraction of a probe laser beam. When a 170 μm-wide strip of micron-sized spheres is placed on the substrate between the excitation and detection spots, strong resonant attenuation of SAWs near 240 MHz is observed. The attenuation is caused by the interaction of SAWs with a contact resonance of the microspheres, as confirmed by acoustic dispersion measurements on the microsphere-coated area. Frequency-selective attenuation of SAWs by such a locally resonant metamaterial may lead to reconfigurable SAW devices and sensors, which can be easily manufactured via self-assembly techniques.

  17. Wide-band underwater acoustic absorption based on locally resonant unit and interpenetrating network structure

    The interpenetrating network structure provides an interesting avenue to novel materials. Locally resonant phononic crystal (LRPC) exhibits excellent sound attenuation performance based on the periodical arrangement of sound wave scatters. Combining the LRPC concept and interpenetrating network glassy structure, this paper has developed a new material which can achieve a wide band underwater strong acoustic absorption. Underwater absorption coefficients of different samples were measured by the pulse tube. Measurement results show that the new material possesses excellent underwater acoustic effects in a wide frequency range. Moreover, in order to investigate impacts of locally resonant units, some defects are introduced into the sample. The experimental result and the theoretical calculation both show that locally resonant units being connected to a network structure play an important role in achieving a wide band strong acoustic absorption. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  18. Extremely high Q-factor mechanical modes in quartz bulk acoustic wave resonators at millikelvin temperature

    Goryachev, M.; Creedon, D. L.; Ivanov, E. N.; Tobar, M. E. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Galliou, S.; Bourquin, R. [Department of Time and Frequency, FEMTO-ST Institute, ENSMM, 26 Chemin de l' Épitaphe, 25000, Besançon (France)

    2014-12-04

    We demonstrate that Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) quartz resonator cooled down to millikelvin temperatures are excellent building blocks for hybrid quantum systems with extremely long coherence times. Two overtones of the longitudinal mode at frequencies of 15.6 and 65.4 MHz demonstrate a maximum f.Q product of 7.8×10{sup 16} Hz. With this result, the Q-factor in such devices near the quantum ground state can be four orders of magnitude better than previously attained in other mechanical systems. Tested quartz resonators possess the ultra low acoustic losses crucial for electromagnetic cooling to the phonon ground state.

  19. Multi-band and broadband acoustic metamaterial with resonant structures

    We design an acoustic metamaterial (AM) with multi-band of negative modulus composed of different sized split hollow spheres (SHSs). From acoustic transmitted experiment, the AM exhibits simultaneously negative modulus at frequencies 914, 1298 and 1514 Hz. Based on the multi-band designed concept, broadband AM is fabricated by arraying gradually sized SHS. The transmission results indicate that this medium can achieve negative modulus at the frequency range from 900 to 1500 Hz. This kind of broadband AM is very convenient to couple with other structures to gain the double-negative AM.

  20. Enlargement of locally resonant sonic band gap by using composite plate-type acoustic metamaterial

    We numerically investigate the propagation characteristics of Lamb waves in composite plate-type acoustic metamaterial constituted of one-side cylindrical stubs deposited on a two-dimensional binary locally resonant phononic plate. Numerical results show that, with the introduction of composite plate-type acoustic metamaterial, locally resonant band gap shifts to lower frequency, and a significant enlargement of the relative bandwidth by a factor of 3 can be obtained, compared to one-side locally resonant stubbed plates. We show that the band gap enlargement is attributed to the coupling between the local resonant Lamb modes of two-dimensional phononic plate and the resonant modes of the stubs. - Highlights: • An original composite plate-type locally resonant acoustic metamaterial is proposed. • A significant enlargement of the relative bandwidth by a factor of 3 can be obtained. • The band gap enlargement is attributed to the locally resonant complex effect. • The band gap is significantly dependent upon the geometrical parameters

  1. Analysis of underwater decoupling properties of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial coating

    Ling-Zhi, Huang; Yong, Xiao; Ji-Hong, Wen; Hai-Bin, Yang; Xi-Sen, Wen

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical solution for the vibration and sound radiation of a semi-infinite plate covered by a decoupling layer consisting of locally resonant acoustic metamaterial. Formulations are derived based on a combination use of effective medium theory and the theory of elasticity for the decoupling material. Theoretical results show good agreements between the method developed in this paper and the conventional finite element method (FEM), but the method of this paper is more efficient than FEM. Numerical results also show that system with acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer exhibits significant noise reduction performance at the local resonance frequency of the acoustic metamaterial, and such performance can be ascribed to the vibration suppression of the base plate. It is demonstrated that the effective density of acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer has a great influence on the mechanical impedance of the system. Furthermore, the resonance frequency of locally resonant structure can be effectively predicted by a simple model, and it can be significantly affected by the material properties of the locally resonant structure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51305448 and 51275519).

  2. Resonance Effects of Bilayered Piezoelectric Films Used for Bulk Acoustic Wave Sensors

    ZHANG Hui; ZHANG Shu-Yi; FAN Li

    2011-01-01

    The resonance vibrations of acoustic sensors with two layers of (1120) textured hexagonal piezoelectric films are studied.When the acoustic and electric fields satisfy a special match condition,i.e.the phase variation of thickness shear mode (TSM) at each film equals π,both piezoelectric layers with opposite polarization directions reduce the first TSM and generate the second TSM with higher frequency and a higher quality factor.The excited second TSM can increase the product of the operating frequency and the quality factor,which is useful for improving the mass sensitivity and resolution of acoustic sensors.Additionally,both of the piezoelectric films have larger thickness and decrease the risk of mechanical damage in device production processes.Thin film bulk acoustic sensors have attracted great attention due to their small sizes,low power consumption and high sensitivity,etc.[1] The thickness shear mode (TSM) is more suitable for liquid sensing applications since much less acoustic energy is transferred into the liquid medium than that of longitudinal acoustic waves,due to the fact that ideal liquids cannot support propagations of shear waves.By using a TSM with a high resonance frequency,sensorsbased on thin film bulk acoustic resonator structures can be fabricated by the fixing of a sensitive coating on the surface of the device.[2] The binding events at the sensitive coating can cause a shift of the resonance frequency.[3]%The resonance vibrations of acoustic sensors with two layers of (1120) textured hexagonal piezoelectric films are studied. When the acoustic and electric fields satisfy a special match condition, I.e. The phase variation of thickness shear mode (TSM) at each film equals it, both piezoelectric layers with opposite polarization directions reduce the first TSM and generate the second TSM with higher frequency and a higher quality factor. The excited second TSM can increase the product of the operating frequency and the quality factor, which

  3. Dispersion and damping of multi-quantum well polaritons from resonant Brillouin scattering by folded acoustic modes

    Jusserand, B.; Fainstein, A.; Ferreira, R.; Majrab, S.; Lemaitre, A.

    2011-01-01

    We report on confined exciton resonances of acoustic and folded acoustic phonon light scattering in a GaAs/AlAs multi-quantum-well. Significant variations of the line shifts and widths are observed across the resonance and quantitatively reproduced in terms of the polariton dispersion. This high resolution Brillouin study brings new unexpectedly detailed informations on the polariton dynamics in confined systems.

  4. Development of Energy Efficiency Design Map based on acoustic resonance frequency of suction muffler in compressor

    Highlights: • Development of Energy Efficiency Design Map. • Experimental validation of Energy Efficiency Design Map. • Suggestion regarding the Acoustically Supercharged Energy Efficiency. • Sensitivity analysis of the Energy Efficiency Ratio with respect to acoustic pressure. • Suggestion regarding the hybrid coupling method for acoustic analysis in compressor. - Abstract: The volumetric efficiency of the Internal Combustion (IC) engine and compressor can be increased by properly adjusting the acoustic resonance frequency of the suction muffler or the suction valve timing without any additional equipment or power source. This effect is known as acoustic supercharging. However, the energy efficiency has become more important than the volumetric efficiency because of the energy shortage issue and factors influencing consumers’ purchasing decisions. Therefore, methods for increasing the energy efficiency using the acoustic effect in the suction part of IC engine and compressor should be considered. In this study, a systematic method for improving the energy efficiency using the acoustic effect in the suction part of the compressor used in refrigerators and air conditioners was developed for the first time. This effect is named as the Acoustically Supercharged Energy Efficiency (ASEE). For the ASEE, first, a hybrid coupling method was suggested for the acoustical analysis in the suction part of the compressor. Next, an Energy Efficiency Design Map (EEDM) was proposed. This can serve as a design guide for suction mufflers in terms of the energy efficiency. Finally, sensitivity analyses of the Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER) and total massflow rate with respect to the acoustic pressure were conducted to identify the relationship between the acoustic pressure and the suction valve motion. This provides the physical background for the EEDM

  5. Opto-acoustic phenomena in whispering gallery mode resonators

    Lin, Guoping; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Optical whispering gallery mode resonators are important platforms to enhance and study various nonlinear frequency conversion processes. Stimulated Brillouin scattering is one of the strongest nonlinear effects, and can be successfully investigated using these platforms. In this article, we study the phenomenon of stimulated Brillouin scattering using a crystalline disk resonator. A fast scanning ringdown spectroscopy technique is used to characterize the optical modes featuring quality factors of the order of one billion at telecom wavelengths. The mW scale threshold power in a centimeter disk resonator is observed and found to be strongly dependent on the gap between the resonator and the prism coupler.

  6. Signature of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ resonance in neutron spectra from the $K^-+d$ reaction

    Révai, János

    2012-01-01

    Neutron spectra from the reaction $K^-+d\\rightarrow \\pi+\\Sigma+n$ were calculated in the energy range $E^{cm}_{K^-}= 0-50\\ MeV$ using coupled channel Faddeev equations for the description of the $\\bar KNN-\\pi\\Sigma N$ three-body system. The aim was to trace the signature of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ resonance in the spectra. We found, that while in the direct spectra kinematic effects mask completely the peak corresponding to the resonance, the deviation spectrum method \\cite{AY} is able to eliminate kinematics and produce clear evidence of the resonance. The dependence of the obtained spectra on the incident kaon energy is discussed.

  7. Surface resonant states in acoustic and elastic metamaterials

    Ambati, Muralidhar; Wu, Dongmin; Zhang, Xiang

    2007-03-01

    We discuss a new type of surface acoustic wave at an interface between two media, one of which is a metamaterial. In contrast to the familiar case where the surface acoustic waves exist at solid-fluid and solid-solid interfaces, these unique waves exist because of the negative material responses in metamaterials. We explore the existence of a surface wave a) at the interface of a fluid and an acoustic metamaterial modeled as a fluid and b) at the interface of a solid and an elastic metamaterial modeled as a solid. The latter case is for shear waves with horizontal polarization (SH). In each of these two cases, first, we discuss the necessary and sufficient conditions on the material properties of metamaterials for the existence of surface modes. Second, we offer the microscopic picture of these surface modes in terms of particle trajectories at the interfaces. Next, we examine the unique characteristics of these surface states; as a result, we propose and numerically demonstrate an acoustic superlens for sub-diffraction limited imaging. Finally, we provide a design for metamaterials that can lead to the surface states and make a significant impact in ultrasonic imaging.

  8. Tunable band gaps in acoustic metamaterials with periodic arrays of resonant shunted piezos

    Periodic arrays of resonant shunted piezoelectric patches are employed to control the wave propagation in a two-dimensional (2D) acoustic metamaterial. The performance is characterized by the finite element method. More importantly, we propose an approach to solving the conventional issue of the nonlinear eigenvalue problem, and give a convenient solution to the dispersion properties of 2D metamaterials with periodic arrays of resonant shunts in this article. Based on this modeling method, the dispersion relations of a 2D metamaterial with periodic arrays of resonant shunted piezos are calculated. The results show that the internal resonances of the shunting system split the dispersion curves, thereby forming a locally resonant band gap. However, unlike the conventional locally resonant gap, the vibrations in this locally resonant gap are unable to be completely localized in oscillators consisting of shunting inductors and piezo-patches

  9. Tunable band gaps in acoustic metamaterials with periodic arrays of resonant shunted piezos

    Chen Sheng-Bing; Wen Ji-Hong; Wang Gang; Wen Xi-Sen

    2013-01-01

    Periodic arrays of resonant shunted piezoelectric patches are employed to control the wave propagation in a twodimensional (2D) acoustic metamaterial.The performance is characterized by the finite element method.More importantly,we propose an approach to solving the conventional issue of the nonlinear eigenvalue problem,and give a convenient solution to the dispersion properties of 2D metamaterials with periodic arrays of resonant shunts in this article.Based on this modeling method,the dispersion relations of a 2D metamaterial with periodic arrays of resonant shunted piezos are calculated.The results show that the internal resonances of the shunting system split the dispersion curves,thereby forming a locally resonant band gap.However,unlike the conventional locally resonant gap,the vibrations in this locally resonant gap are unable to be completely localized in oscillators consisting of shunting inductors and piezo-patches.

  10. Flow-induced acoustic resonance at the mouth of one or two side branches

    Highlights: ► We investigated the effect of the geometrical and flow parameters on the flow-induced acoustic resonance. ► In the case of a single branch, the dimensionless acoustic pressure amplitude at resonance increases as the cross-sectional ratio of the main and branch pipes is decreased. ► In the case of coaxial branches, the pressure amplitude shows a counter tendency to that in the case of a single branch. ► In the case of tandem branches, peak pressure and frequency change cyclically as the distance between tandem branches changes. - Abstract: In the case of flow-induced acoustic resonance with multiple side branches, the pulsation amplitude may be significantly enhanced compared to the case of a single branch. However, few studies have been presented on the effects of the distance between tandem branches or side branches on fluctuating pressure amplitude. In this study, we carried out several air flow experiments at ordinary temperatures and pressures to investigate the effect of the geometrical and flow parameters on the general acoustic resonance. In the case of a single branch, the dimensionless acoustic pressure amplitude at resonance increases as the cross-sectional ratio of the main and branch pipes is decreased. This is attributed to the acoustic radiation loss from the branch pipe to the main pipe increasing at higher values of the cross-sectional ratio. In the case of coaxial branches, the pressure amplitude shows a counter tendency to that in the case of a single branch. This is because the two branches strongly couple and form a standing wave with negligible radiation losses. In the case of tandem branches, peak pressure and frequency change cyclically as the distance between tandem branches changes.

  11. Detection of Ionospheric Alfven Resonator Signatures Onboard C/NOFS: Implications for IRI Modeling

    Simoes, F.; Klenzing, J.; Ivanov, S.; Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Bilitza, D.

    2011-01-01

    The 2008-2009 long-lasting solar minimum activity has been the one of its kind since the dawn of space age, offering exceptional conditions for investigating space weather in the near-Earth environment. First ever detection of Ionospheric Alfven Resonator (IAR) signatures in orbit offers new means for investigating ionospheric electrodynamics, namely MHD (MagnetoHydroDynamics) wave propagation, aeronomy processes, ionospheric dynamics, and Sun-Earth connection mechanisms at a local scale. Local and global plasma density heterogeneities in the ionosphere and magnetosphere allow for formation of waveguides and resonators where magnetosonic and shear Alfven waves propagate. The ionospheric magnetosonic waveguide results from complete magnetosonic wave reflection about the ionospheric F-region peak, where the Alfven index of refraction presents a maximum. MHD waves can also be partially trapped in the vertical direction between the lower boundary of the ionosphere and the magnetosphere, a resonance mechanism known as IAR. In this work we present C/NOFS (Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System) Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) electric field measurements related to IAR signatures, discuss the resonance and wave propagation mechanisms in the ionosphere, and address the electromagnetic inverse problem from which electron/ion distributions can be derived. These peculiar IAR electric field measurements provide new, complementary methodologies for inferring ionospheric electron and ion density profiles, and also contribute for the investigation of ionosphere dynamics and space weather monitoring. Specifically, IAR spectral signatures measured by C/NOFS contribute for improving the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model, namely electron density and ion composition.

  12. Acoustical “transparency” induced by local resonance in Bragg bandgaps

    We show that sound waves can resonantly transmit through Bragg bandgaps in an acoustical duct periodically attached with an array of Helmholtz resonators, forming within the normally forbidden band a transparency window with group velocity smaller than the normal speed of sound. The transparency occurs for the locally resonant frequency so much close to the Bragg one that both the local-resonance-induced bandgap and the Bragg one heavily overlap with each other. The phenomenon seems an acoustical analog of the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency by quantum interference. Different from the Fano-like interference explanation, we also provide a mechanism for the transparency window phenomenon which makes it possible to extend the phenomenon in general

  13. Acoustical “transparency” induced by local resonance in Bragg bandgaps

    Yu, Gaokun; Wang, Xinlong, E-mail: xlwang@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics and Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-01-28

    We show that sound waves can resonantly transmit through Bragg bandgaps in an acoustical duct periodically attached with an array of Helmholtz resonators, forming within the normally forbidden band a transparency window with group velocity smaller than the normal speed of sound. The transparency occurs for the locally resonant frequency so much close to the Bragg one that both the local-resonance-induced bandgap and the Bragg one heavily overlap with each other. The phenomenon seems an acoustical analog of the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency by quantum interference. Different from the Fano-like interference explanation, we also provide a mechanism for the transparency window phenomenon which makes it possible to extend the phenomenon in general.

  14. Kiwi fruit (Actinidia chinensis) quality determination based on surface acoustic wave resonator combined with electronic nose

    Wei, Liu; Guohua, Hui

    2015-01-01

    In this study, electronic nose (EN) combined with a 433 MHz surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR) was used to determine Kiwi fruit quality under 12-day storage. EN responses to Kiwi samples were measured and analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and stochastic resonance (SR) methods. SAWR frequency eigen values were also measured to predict freshness. Kiwi fruit sample's weight loss index and human sensory evaluation were examined to characteristic its quality and freshness. Kiwi fr...

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF ACOUSTIC MODELS FOR HIGH FREQUENCY RESONATORS FOR TURBOCHARGED IC-ENGINES

    Wang, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Automotive turbo compressors generate high frequency noise in the air intake system. This sound generation is of importance for the perceived sound quality of luxury cars and may need to be controlled by the use of silencers. The silencers usually contain resonators with slits, perforates and cavities. The purpose of the work reported is to develop acoustic models for these resonators where relevant effects such as the effect of realistic mean flow on losses and possibly 3D effects are consid...

  16. Demonstration of slow sound propagation and acoustic transparency with a series of detuned resonators

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental results demonstrating the phenomenon of acoustic transparency with a significant slowdown of sound propagation realized with a series of paired detuned acoustic resonators (DAR) side-attached to a waveguide. The phenomenon mimics the electromagnetically induced transparency...... of more than 20 dB on both sides of the transparency window, and we quantify directly (using a pulse propagation) the acoustic slowdown effect, resulting in the sound group velocity of 9.8 m/s (i.e. in the group refractive index of 35). We find very similar values of the group refractive index by...... using measurements of the phase of the transmitted wave. It is also shown that a direct coupling exists between the DAR in each pair, which cannot be explained by the interference of waves radiated from those resonators. This detrimental coupling becomes noticeable for small values of detuning and also...

  17. Acoustic resonances in two dimensional radial sonic crystals shells

    Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2010-01-01

    Radial sonic crystals (RSC) are fluidlike structures infinitely periodic along the radial direction. They have been recently introduced and are only possible thanks to the anisotropy of specially designed acoustic metamaterials [see Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 103} 064301 (2009)]. We present here a comprehensive analysis of two-dimensional RSC shells, which consist of a cavity defect centered at the origin of the crystal and a finite thickness crystal shell surrounded by a fluidlike background. We ...

  18. Detection of acoustic resonance effects on the ground and in the ionosphere at the total eclipses

    Complete text of publication follows. The ground - lower atmosphere - thermosphere (ionosphere) coupling effects through acoustic resonance have been observed, for example, for the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in 1991 (Kanamori and Mori, 1992) and the great 2004 Sumatra earthquake (Iyemori et al., 2005). In the Mt. Pinatubo case, it was assumed that the acoustic wave (i.e., pressure variation) caused a very low frequency oscillation of the ground observed worldwide. However, a volcanic eruption or earthquake can also cause the ground oscillation directly. The ground oscillation may cause atmospheric oscillations but with a complicated causality. In the case of typhoons when the resonance effects have been detected, the ocean waves also make the situation complicated. When a total eclipse occurs, the rapid pressure variations, caused by the rapid decrease of temperature may also generate the acoustic resonance, however, in this case, the situation is expected to be simpler than for volcanic eruptions. This situation provides better conditions for quantitative modeling of the acoustic resonance effects. On July 22, 2009, a total eclipse will be observed along a band from China, Iwo Island, and through the Tokara Islands, south of Japan. We plan to make barometric, geomagnetic, GPS-TEC and HF Doppler observations at several points along the eclipse path. In this paper, we show some results of analysis of the data obtained from the total eclipses in the past and preliminary results of the observations from the July 22, 2009 event.

  19. Subterahertz acoustical pumping of electronic charge in a resonant tunneling device.

    Young, E S K; Akimov, A V; Henini, M; Eaves, L; Kent, A J

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that controlled subnanosecond bursts of electronic charge can be transferred through a resonant tunneling diode by successive picosecond acoustic pulses. The effect exploits the nonlinear current-voltage characteristics of the device and its asymmetric response to the compressive and tensile components of the strain pulse. This acoustoelectronic pump opens new possibilities for the control of quantum phenomena in nanostructures. PMID:23003634

  20. The acoustic signatures of ground acceleration, gas expansion, and spall fallback in experimental volcanic explosions

    Bowman, Daniel C.; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Kim, Keehoon; Anderson, Jacob F.; Lees, Jonathan M.; Graettinger, Alison H.; Sonder, Ingo; Valentine, Greg A.

    2014-03-01

    Infrasound and high-speed imaging during a series of field-scale buried explosions suggest new details about the generation and radiation patterns of acoustic waves from volcanic eruptions. We recorded infrasound and high-speed video from a series of subsurface explosions with differing burial depths and charge sizes. Joint observations and modeling allow the extraction of acoustic energy related to the magnitude of initial ground deformation, the contribution of gas breakout, and the timing of the fallback of displaced material. The existence and relative acoustic amplitudes of these three phases depended on the size and depth of the explosion. The results motivate a conceptual model that relates successive contributions from ground acceleration, gas breakout, and spall fallback to the acoustic amplitude and waveform characteristics of buried explosions. We place the literature on infrasound signals at Santiaguito Volcano, Guatemala, and Sakurajima and Suwonosejima Volcanoes, Japan, in the context of this model.

  1. Coherent Control of Ultra-High Frequency Acoustic Resonances in Photonic Crystal Fibers

    Wiederhecker, G S; Fragnito, H L; Russell, P St J

    2007-01-01

    UHF (ultra-high frequency) acoustic resonances (~2 GHz) trapped within the glass core (1 micron diameter) of a photonic crystal fibre are excited electrostrictively using laser pulses of duration 100 ps and energy 500 pJ. Using precisely timed sequences of such driving pulses, we achieve coherent control of the acoustic resonances by constructive or destructive interference, demonstrating both enhancement and suppression of the vibrations. A sequence of resonantly-timed pulses (limited to 25 by the capacity of the erbium-doped fibre amplifier used) provides a 100-fold increase in the amplitude of the vibrational mode. The results are explained and interpreted using a semi-analytical theory, and supported by precise numerical simulations of the complex light-matter interaction.

  2. Film bulk acoustic resonators integrated on arbitrary substrates using a polymer support layer

    Chen, Guohao; Zhao, Xinru; Wang, Xiaozhi; Jin, Hao; Li, Shijian; Dong, Shurong; Flewitt, A. J.; Milne, W. I.; Luo, J. K.

    2015-03-01

    The film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) is a widely-used MEMS device which can be used as a filter, or as a gravimetric sensor for biochemical or physical sensing. Current device architectures require the use of an acoustic mirror or a freestanding membrane and are fabricated as discrete components. A new architecture is demonstrated which permits fabrication and integration of FBARs on arbitrary substrates. Wave confinement is achieved by fabricating the resonator on a polyimide support layer. Results show when the polymer thickness is greater than a critical value, d, the FBARs have similar performance to devices using alternative architectures. For ZnO FBARs operating at 1.3-2.2 GHz, d is ~9 μm, and the devices have a Q-factor of 470, comparable to 493 for the membrane architecture devices. The polymer support makes the resonators insensitive to the underlying substrate. Yields over 95% have been achieved on roughened silicon, copper and glass.

  3. Sound Transmission Loss Through a Corrugated-Core Sandwich Panel with Integrated Acoustic Resonators

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.; Zalewski, Bart F; Beck, Benjamin S.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study is to better understand the effect of structurally integrated resonators on the transmission loss of a sandwich panel. The sandwich panel has facesheets over a corrugated core, which creates long aligned chambers that run parallel to the facesheets. When ports are introduced through the facesheet, the long chambers within the core can be used as low-frequency acoustic resonators. By integrating the resonators within the structure they contribute to the static load bearing capability of the panel while also attenuating noise. An analytical model of a panel with embedded resonators is derived and compared with numerical simulations. Predictions show that acoustic resonators can significantly improve the transmission loss of the sandwich panel around the natural frequency of the resonators. In one configuration with 0.813 m long internal chambers, the diffuse field transmission loss is improved by more than 22 dB around 104 Hz. The benefit is achieved with no added mass or volume relative to the baseline structure. The embedded resonators are effective because they radiate sound out-of-phase with the structure. This results in destructive interference, which leads to less transmitted sound power.

  4. Electro-thermo-mechanical model for bulk acoustic wave resonators.

    Rocas, Eduard; Collado, Carlos; Mateu, Jordi; Orloff, Nathan D; Aigner, Robert; Booth, James C

    2013-11-01

    We present the electro-thermo-mechanical constitutive relations, expanded up to the third order, for a BAW resonator. The relations obtained are implemented into a circuit model, which is validated with extensive linear and nonlinear measurements. The mathematical analysis, along with the modeling, allows us to identify the dominant terms, which are the material temperature derivatives and two intrinsic nonlinear terms, and explain, for the first time, all observable effects in a BAW resonator by use of a unified physical description. Moreover, the terms that are responsible for the second-harmonic generation and the frequency shift with dc voltage are shown to be the same. PMID:24158294

  5. Selective magnetic resonance imaging of magnetic nanoparticles by Acoustically Induced Rotary Saturation (AIRS)

    Zhu, Bo; Witzel, Thomas; Jiang, Shan; Huang, Susie Y.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We introduce a new method to selectively detect iron oxide contrast agents using an acoustic wave to perturb the spin-locked water signal in the vicinity of the magnetic particles. The acoustic drive can be externally modulated to turn the effect on and off, allowing sensitive and quantitative statistical comparison and removal of confounding image background variations. Methods We demonstrate the effect in spin-locking experiments using piezoelectric actuators to generate vibrational displacements of iron oxide samples. We observe a resonant behavior of the signal changes with respect to the acoustic frequency where iron oxide is present. We characterize the effect as a function of actuator displacement and contrast agent concentration. Results The resonant effect allows us to generate block-design “modulation response maps” indicating the contrast agent’s location, as well as positive contrast images with suppressed background signal. We show the AIRS effect stays approximately constant across acoustic frequency, and behaves monotonically over actuator displacement and contrast agent concentration. Conclusion AIRS is a promising method capable of using acoustic vibrations to modulate the contrast from iron oxide nanoparticles and thus perform selective detection of the contrast agents, potentially enabling more accurate visualization of contrast agents in clinical and research settings. PMID:25537578

  6. Raman albedo and deep-UV resonance Raman signatures of explosives

    Yellampalle, Balakishore; Lemoff, Brian E.

    2013-05-01

    Deep-ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy (DUVRRS) is a promising approach to stand-off detection of explosive traces due to large Raman cross-section and background free signatures. In order to design an effective sensor, one must be able to estimate the signal level of the DUVRRS signature for solid-phase explosive residues. The conventional approach to signal estimation uses scattering cross-sections and molar absorptivity, measured on solutions of explosives dissolved in an optically-transparent solvent. Only recently have researchers started to measure solid-state cross-sections. For most solid-phase explosives and explosive mixtures, neither the DUV Raman scattering cross sections nor the optical absorption coefficient are known, and they are very difficult to separately measure. Therefore, for a typical solid explosive mixture, it is difficult to accurately estimate Raman signal strength using conventional approaches. To address this issue, we have developed a technique to measure the Raman scattering strength of optically-thick (opaque) materials, or "Raman Albedo", defined as the total power of Raman-scattered light per unit frequency per unit solid angle divided by the incident power of the excitation source. We have measured Raman Albedo signatures for a wide range of solid explosives at four different DUV excitation wavelengths. These results will be presented, and we will describe the use of Raman Albedo measurements in the design and current construction of a novel stand-off explosive sensor, based on dual-excitation-wavelength DUVRRS.

  7. Numerical and experimental investigation of a low-frequency measurement technique: differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    Yin, Hanjun; Zhao, Jianguo; Tang, Genyang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Wang, Shangxu

    2016-06-01

    Differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy (DARS) has been developed to determine the elastic properties of saturated rocks within the kHz frequency range. This laboratory technique is based on considerations from perturbation theory, wherein the resonance frequencies of the resonant cavity with and without a perturbation sample are used to estimate the acoustic properties of the test sample. In order to better understand the operating mechanism of DARS and therefore optimize the procedure, it is important to develop an accurate and efficient numerical model. Accordingly, this study presents a new multiphysics model by coupling together considerations from acoustics, solid mechanics, and electrostatics. The numerical results reveal that the newly developed model can successfully simulate the acoustic pressure field at different resonance modes, and that it can accurately reflect the measurement process. Based on the understanding of the DARS system afforded by the numerical simulation, we refine the system configuration by utilizing cavities of different lengths and appropriate radii to broaden the frequency bandwidth and ensure testing accuracy. Four synthetic samples are measured to test the performance of the optimized DARS system, in conjunction with ultrasonic and static measurements. For nonporous samples, the estimated bulk moduli are shown to be independent of the different measurement methods (i.e. DARS or ultrasonic techniques). In contrast, for sealed porous samples, the differences in bulk moduli between the low- and high-frequency techniques can be clearly observed; this discrepancy is attributed to frequency dispersion. In summary, the optimized DARS system with an extended frequency range of 500–2000 Hz demonstrates considerable utility in investigating the frequency dependence of the acoustic properties of reservoir rocks.

  8. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) Acoustical Resonance Technical Assessment Report

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Kehoe, Michael W.; Gupta, Kajal K.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Ginsberg, Jerry H.; Kolar, Ramesh

    2009-01-01

    A request was submitted on September 2, 2004 concerning the uncertainties regarding the acoustic environment within the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) cavity, and the potential for structural damage from acoustical resonance or tones, especially if they occur at or near a structural mode. The requestor asked for an independent expert opinion on the approach taken by the SOFIA project to determine if the project's analysis, structural design and proposed approach to flight test were sound and conservative. The findings from this assessment are recorded in this document.

  9. Interaction of reed and acoustic resonator in clarinetlike systems

    Silva, Fabrice; Vergez, Christophe; Gilbert, Joël

    2008-01-01

    Sound emergence in clarinetlike instruments is investigated in terms of instability of the static regime. Various models of reed-bore coupling are considered, from the pioneering work of Wilson and Beavers ["Operating modes of the clarinet", J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 56, 653--658 (1974)] to more recent modeling including viscothermal bore losses and vena contracta at the reed inlet. The pressure threshold above which these models may oscillate as well as the frequency of oscillation at threshold are calculated. In addition to Wilson and Beavers' previous conclusions concerning the role of the reed damping in the selection of the register the instrument will play on, the influence of the reed motion induced flow is also emphasized, particularly its effect on playing frequencies, contributing to reduce discrepancies between Wilson and Beavers' experimental results and theory, despite discrepancies still remain concerning the pressure threshold. Finally, analytical approximations of the oscillating solution based on F...

  10. Linear and Nonlinear Acoustic Measurements of Buried Landmines: Detection Schemes Near Resonance

    Sabatier, James M.

    2003-03-01

    Measurements of the acoustic impedance of an anti-personnel and anti-tank plastic, blast-hardened landmines reveal resonances in the frequency range between 100 and 1000 Hz. The top surface resonances are due to its complicated mechanical structure vibrating in air. The lowest mode results from the blast hardened design of the landmine. Typically, a portion or cavity of the landmine is designed to absorb the shock from an explosion that is intended to detonate the landmine but still allow the landmine to trigger its explosive device when a slow steady pressure is applied. The mechanical design of the blast hardened aspects results in a high Q simple harmonic oscillator resonance of the top surface. At higher frequencies the top surface behaves like thin circular plate acoustic modes. When these landmines are buried in soils, the modes are mass loaded. Resonances from measurements of the normal component of the acoustically induced soil surface particle velocity are used for detection schemes. Since the interface between the top plate and the soil responds to pressure fluctuations nonlinearly, characteristics of landmines, the soil, and the interface are rich in nonlinear physics and allow for new methods of landmine detection not previously exploited.

  11. Air/steam flow and steam wetness dependence on acoustic resonance in safety relief valves

    Many experimental studies related to the flow-induced acoustic resonance closed side branches have been reported. However, few studies have reported on the effects of air/steam flow and steam wetness dependence on fluctuating pressure amplitude. Therefore, we investigated the effect of air/steam flow and steam wetness dependence on fluctuating pressure amplitude by conducting a high temperature and high pressure tests at the Hitachi Utility Steam Test Leading Facility (HUSTLE). The test section consisted of a main pipe and a side branch. The side branch was mounted on the long straight main pipe. Fluctuating pressures at the end face of the side branches were measured. The following two results were obtained; the first is that the air/steam flow had little effect on the fluctuating pressure amplitude normalized by dynamic pressure and frequency normalized by the resonance frequency; the second is that under the acoustic resonance (St = 0.41) and non-resonance (St = 0.55) conditions, fluctuating pressure and frequency changed little with steam wetness. The steam wetness during the boiling water reactor operation was less than 0.1%; thus, there was no effect of steam wetness on the acoustic pressure amplitude and the frequency under this operating condition. (author)

  12. Selective focusing through target identification and experimental acoustic signature extraction: Numerical experiments.

    Rodriguez, S; Jacob, X; Gibiat, V

    2016-05-01

    Using transducer arrays and appropriate emission delays allow to focus acoustic waves at a chosen location in a medium. The focusing spatial accuracy depends on the accurate knowledge of its acoustic properties. When those properties are unknown, methods based on the Time-Reversal principle allow accurate focusing. Still, these methods are either intrusive (an active source has to be introduced at the target location first), either blind (the target cannot be selected in the presence of several objects.) The purpose of the present work is to achieve non-invasive accurate focusing on a selected target using inaccurate acoustic properties for the investigated medium. Potential applications are for instance noninvasive surgery based on High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Numerical experiments are presented and demonstrate accurate focusing on a previously designated target located in an unknown heterogeneous medium. PMID:26890791

  13. R&D studies for the development of a compact transmitter able to mimic the acoustic signature of a UHE neutrino interaction

    Ardid, M; Bou-Cabo, M; Larosa, G; Mart\\inez-Mora, J A; Espinosa, V; Camarena, F; Ferri, M

    2011-01-01

    Calibration of acoustic neutrino telescopes with neutrino-like signals is an essential aspect to evaluate the feasibility of the technique and to know the efficiency of the detectors. However, it is not straightforward to have acoustic transmitters that, on one hand, are able to mimic the signature of a UHE neutrino interaction, that is, a bipolar acoustic pulse with the 'pancake' directivity, and, on the other hand, fulfill practical issues such as ease of deployment and operation. This is a non-trivial problem since it requires directive transducer with cylindrical symmetry for a broadband frequency range. Classical solutions using linear arrays of acoustic transducers result in long arrays with many elements, which increase the cost and the complexity for deployment and operation. In this paper we present the extension of our previous R&D studies using the parametric acoustic source technique by dealing with the cylindrical symmetry, and demonstrating that it is possible to use this technique for havin...

  14. Acoustic nuclear magnetic resonance in easy-axis antiferromagnets

    Obtained and investigated is the dispersion equation which shows that in the rouge of the tipping field at low temperatures the study of effects conditioned by the bond between the oscillations of electron and nuclear spins depends upon the fact, whethe the interaction of the sound with a nuclear spin subsystem is taken into account. The same concerns the effects conditioned by a strong bond between the oscillations of the lattice and electron spins. Shown is the effect of anisotropy of magnitostriction relative part on the nature of orientation phase transitions and the value of the coefficient of strengthening nuclear magnetic resonance

  15. Interaction of reed and acoustic resonator in clarinetlike systems.

    Silva, Fabrice; Kergomard, Jean; Vergez, Christophe; Gilbert, Joël

    2008-11-01

    Sound emergence in clarinetlike instruments is investigated in terms of instability of the static regime. Various models of reed-bore coupling are considered, from the pioneering work of Wilson and Beavers ["Operating modes of the clarinet," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 56, 653-658 (1974)] to more recent modeling including viscothermal bore losses and vena contracta at the reed inlet. The pressure threshold above which these models may oscillate as well as the frequency of oscillation at threshold are calculated. In addition to Wilson and Beavers' previous conclusions concerning the role of the reed damping in the selection of the register the instrument will play on, the influence of the reed motion induced flow is also emphasized, particularly its effect on playing frequencies, contributing to reduce discrepancies between Wilson and Beavers' experimental results and theory, despite discrepancies still remain concerning the pressure threshold. Finally, analytical approximations of the oscillating solution based on Fourier series expansion are obtained in the vicinity of the threshold of oscillation. This allows to emphasize the conditions which determine the nature of the bifurcation (direct or inverse) through which the note may emerge, with therefore important consequences on the musical playing performances. PMID:19045811

  16. Energy storage and dispersion of surface acoustic waves trapped in a periodic array of mechanical resonators

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2009-01-01

    resonators storing mechanical energy. These resonators are evanescently coupled by the surface. The dispersion diagram is presented and shows very low group velocities as the wave vector approaches the limit of the first Brillouin zone. ©2009 American Institute of Physics......It has been shown previously that surface acoustic waves can be efficiently trapped and slowed by steep ridges on a piezoelectric substrate, giving rise to two families of shear-horizontal and vertically polarized surface waves. The mechanisms of energy storage and dispersion are explored by using...... the finite element method to model surface acoustic waves generated by high aspect ratio electrodes. A periodic model is proposed including a perfectly matched layer to simulate radiation conditions away from the sources, from which the modal distributions are found. The ratio of the mechanical energy...

  17. Non-contact liquid level measurement with electromagnetic–acoustic resonator sensors

    Electromagnetic–acoustic transduction represents an alternative to piezoelectric transduction with unique properties and advantages for resonator sensors. We have shown that such devices are suitable as mass microbalances similar to quartz crystal resonators, and as liquid density and viscosity sensors by exciting a suitable in-plane mode featuring dominant shear vibration. Generating out-of-plane vibrations we have applied these devices also as liquid level sensors. In contrast to classic time-of-flight ultrasonic liquid level sensors, the resolution is not limited by the wavelength, since small frequency changes due to interference effects with a standing acoustic wave are evaluated. For this contribution we have extensively evaluated this liquid level sensing and will present and compare new measurement and modeling results. The model comprises electromagnetic–acoustic interaction with a lossy transmission line representing the acoustic wave in the liquid. In impedance measurements with standard lab equipment a resolution as low as 3 µm at a liquid level of 10 mm and an operating frequency of 275 kHz has been achieved

  18. Sub-optical wavelength acoustic wave modulation of integrated photonic resonators at microwave frequencies.

    Tadesse, Semere Ayalew; Li, Mo

    2014-01-01

    Light-sound interactions have long been exploited in various acousto-optic devices based on bulk crystalline materials. Conventionally, these devices operate in megahertz frequency range where the acoustic wavelength is much longer than the optical wavelength and a long interaction length is required to attain significant coupling. With nanoscale transducers, acoustic waves with sub-optical wavelengths can now be excited to induce strong acousto-optic coupling in nanophotonic devices. Here we demonstrate microwave frequency surface acoustic wave transducers co-integrated with nanophotonic resonators on piezoelectric aluminum nitride substrates. Acousto-optic modulation of the resonance modes at above 10 GHz with the acoustic wavelength significantly below the optical wavelength is achieved. The phase and modal matching conditions in this scheme are investigated for efficient modulation. The new acousto-optic platform can lead to novel optical devices based on nonlinear Brillouin processes and provides a direct, wideband link between optical and microwave photons for microwave photonics and quantum optomechanics. PMID:25400144

  19. Test of a virtual cylindrical acoustic resonator for determining the Boltzmann constant

    Feng, X. J.; Lin, H.; Gillis, K. A.; Moldover, M. R.; Zhang, J. T.

    2015-10-01

    We report progress toward determining the Boltzmann constant kB using the concept of a virtual acoustic resonator, a hypothetical resonator that is mathematically equivalent to a cylindrical cavity with periodic boundary conditions. We derived the virtual resonator by combining the measured frequencies of the longitudinal acoustic modes of two argon-filled, cylindrical cavity resonators in such a way to minimize the effects of the cavities’ ends, including transducers and ducts attached to the ends. The cavities had lengths of 80 mm and 160 mm and were operated in their longitudinal (ℓ,0,0) modes. We explored virtual resonators that combine modes of the two resonators that have nearly the same frequencies. The virtual resonator formed from the (2,0,0) mode of the 80 mm resonator combined with the (4,0,0) mode of the 160 mm resonator yielded a value for kB that is, fractionally, only (0.2  ±  1.5)  ×  10-6 larger than the 2010 CODATA-recommended value of kB. (The estimated uncertainty is one standard uncertainty corresponding to a 68% confidence level.) The same virtual resonator yielded values of the pressure derivatives of the speed of sound c in argon, (∂c2/∂p)T and (∂c2/∂p2)T, that differed from literature values by 1% and 2%, respectively. By comparison, when each cavity was considered separately, the values of kB, (∂c2/∂p)T, and (∂c2/∂p2)T differed from literature values by up to 7 ppm, 10%, and 5%, respectively. However, combining the results from the (3,0,0) or (4,0,0) modes of shorter resonator with the results from the (6,0,0) or (8,0,0) modes of the longer resonator yielded incorrect values of kB that varied from run-to-run. We speculate that these puzzling results originated in an unmodeled coupling, either between the two cavities (that resonated at nearly identical resonance frequencies in the same pressure vessel) or between the cavities and modes of the pressure vessel.

  20. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS): ARS300 operations manual, software version 2.01

    NONE

    1996-07-25

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a nondestructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The ARS technique is a fast, safe, and nonintrusive technique that is particularly useful when a large number of objects need to be tested. Any physical object, whether solid, hollow, or fluid filled, has many modes of vibration. These modes of vibration, commonly referred to as the natural resonant modes or resonant frequencies, are determined by the object`s shape, size, and physical properties, such as elastic moduli, speed of sound, and density. If the object is mechanically excited at frequencies corresponding to its characteristic natural vibrational modes, a resonance effect can be observed when small excitation energies produce large amplitude vibrations in the object. At other excitation frequencies, i.e., vibrational response of the object is minimal.

  1. Vibration optimization of ZnO thin film bulk acoustic resonator with ring electrodes

    Zhao, Zinan; Qian, Zhenghua; Wang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    A rectangular ZnO thin film bulk acoustic resonator with ring electrodes is presented in this paper to demonstrate the existence of a nearly uniform displacement distribution at the central part of this typical resonator. The variational formulation based on two-dimensional scalar differential equations provides a theoretical foundation for the Ritz method adopted in our analysis. The resonant frequencies and vibration distributions for the thickness-extensional modes of this ring electrode resonator are obtained. The structural parameters are optimized to achieve a more uniform displacement distribution and therefore a uniform mass sensitivity, which guarantee the high accuracy and repeatable measurement for sensor detection in an air or a liquid environment. These results provide a fundamental reference for the design and optimization of the high quality sensor.

  2. A new model for nonlinear acoustic waves in a non-uniform lattice of Helmholtz resonators

    Mercier, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of high amplitude acoustic pulses is studied in a 1D waveguide, connected to a lattice of Helmholtz resonators. An homogenized model has been proposed by Sugimoto (J. Fluid. Mech., 244 (1992)), taking into account both the nonlinear wave propagation and various mechanisms of dissipation. This model is extended to take into account two important features: resonators of different strengths and back-scattering effects. The new model is derived and is proved to satisfy an energy balance principle. A numerical method is developed and a better agreement between numerical and experimental results is obtained.

  3. Orientation fluctuation trend of Pt and ZnO layers in film bulk acoustic resonator

    ZnO-based film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) was fabricated with many ZnO/Pt layers by magnetron sputtering. All the layers are good crystallized and highly textured. By crystallographic test, the orientation fluctuation of Pt layer increases with increasing film thickness or stack layers, whereas that of ZnO layer decreases slightly. It is consistent with ZnO grain c-axis tilting observed using transmission electron microscopy. Due to these good quality layers, the device has a high resonate frequency of 3.94 GHz

  4. Flexible structured high-frequency film bulk acoustic resonator for flexible wireless electronics

    Flexible electronics have inspired many novel and very important applications in recent years and various flexible electronic devices such as diodes, transistors, circuits, sensors, and radiofrequency (RF) passive devices including antennas and inductors have been reported. However, the lack of a high-performance RF resonator is one of the key bottlenecks to implement flexible wireless electronics. In this study, for the first time, a novel ultra-flexible structured film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) is proposed. The flexible FBAR is fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate using piezoelectric thin film aluminum nitride (AlN) for acoustic wave excitation. Both the shear wave and longitudinal wave can be excited under the surface interdigital electrodes configuration we proposed. In the case of the thickness extension mode, a flexible resonator with a working frequency as high as of 5.2325 GHz has been realized. The resonators stay fully functional under bending status and after repeated bending and re-flattening operations. This flexible high-frequency resonator will serve as a key building block for the future flexible wireless electronics, greatly expanding the application scope of flexible electronics. (paper)

  5. Varying the agglomeration position of particles in a micro-channel using Acoustic Radiation Force beyond the resonance condition.

    Dron, Olivier; Aider, Jean-Luc

    2013-09-01

    It is well-known that particles can be focused at mid-height of a micro-channel using Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) tuned at the resonance frequency (h=λ/2). The resonance condition is a strong limitation to the use of acoustophoresis (particles manipulation using acoustic force) in many applications. In this study we show that it is possible to focus the particles anywhere along the height of a micro-channel just by varying the acoustic frequency, in contradiction with the resonance condition. This result has been thoroughly checked experimentally. The different physical properties as well as wall materials have been changed. The wall materials is finally the only critical parameters. One of the specificity of the micro-channel is the thickness of the carrier and reflector layer. A preliminary analysis of the experimental results suggests that the acoustic focusing beyond the classic resonance condition can be explained in the framework of the multilayered resonator proposed by Hill [1]. Nevertheless, further numerical studies are needed in order to confirm and fully understand how the acoustic pressure node can be moved over the entire height of the micro channel by varying the acoustic frequency. Despite some uncertainties about the origin of the phenomenon, it is robust and can be used for improved acoustic sorting or manipulation of particles or biological cells in confined set-ups. PMID:23628114

  6. Phonon-magnon resonant processes with relevance to acoustic spin pumping

    Deymier, P. A.

    2014-12-23

    The recently described phenomenon of resonant acoustic spin pumping is due to resonant coupling between an incident elastic wave and spin waves in a ferromagnetic medium. A classical one-dimensional discrete model of a ferromagnet with two forms of magnetoelastic coupling is treated to shed light on the conditions for resonance between phonons and magnons. Nonlinear phonon-magnon interactions in the case of a coupling restricted to diagonal terms in the components of the spin degrees of freedom are analyzed within the framework of the multiple timescale perturbation theory. In that case, one-phonon-two-magnon resonances are the dominant mechanism for pumping. The effect of coupling on the dispersion relations depends on the square of the amplitude of the phonon and magnon excitations. A straightforward analysis of a linear phonon-magnon interaction in the case of a magnetoelastic coupling restricted to off-diagonal terms in the components of the spins shows a one-phonon to one-magnon resonance as the pumping mechanism. The resonant dispersion relations are independent of the amplitude of the waves. In both cases, when an elastic wave with a fixed frequency is used to stimulate magnons, application of an external magnetic field can be used to approach resonant conditions. Both resonance conditions exhibit the same type of dependency on the strength of an applied magnetic field.

  7. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    Rubaiyet Iftekharul Haque

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D printing and two-dimensional (2D printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency.

  8. Fabrication of capacitive acoustic resonators combining 3D printing and 2D inkjet printing techniques.

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency. PMID:26473878

  9. Enhancing nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signature detection leveraging interference suppression algorithms

    DeBardelaben, James A.; Miller, Jeremy K.; Myrick, Wilbur L.; Miller, Joel B.; Gilbreath, G. Charmaine; Bajramaj, Blerta

    2012-06-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a radio frequency (RF) magnetic spectroscopic technique that has been shown to detect and identify a wide range of explosive materials containing quadrupolar nuclei. The NQR response signal provides a unique signature of the material of interest. The signal is, however, very weak and can be masked by non-stationary RF interference (RFI) and thermal noise, limiting detection distance. In this paper, we investigate the bounds on the NQR detection range for ammonium nitrate. We leverage a low-cost RFI data acquisition system composed of inexpensive B-field sensing and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software-defined radios (SDR). Using collected data as RFI reference signals, we apply adaptive filtering algorithms to mitigate RFI and enable NQR detection techniques to approach theoretical range bounds in tactical environments.

  10. Acoustic communication and sound degradation: how do the individual signatures of male and female zebra finch calls transmit over distance?

    Solveig C Mouterde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Assessing the active space of the various types of information encoded by songbirds' vocalizations is important to address questions related to species ecology (e.g. spacing of individuals, as well as social behavior (e.g. territorial and/or mating strategies. Up to now, most of the previous studies have investigated the degradation of species-specific related information (species identity, and there is a gap of knowledge of how finer-grained information (e.g. individual identity can transmit through the environment. Here we studied how the individual signature coded in the zebra finch long distance contact call degrades with propagation. METHODOLOGY: We performed sound transmission experiments of zebra finches' distance calls at various propagation distances. The propagated calls were analyzed using discriminant function analyses on a set of analytical parameters describing separately the spectral and temporal envelopes, as well as on a complete spectrographic representation of the signals. RESULTS/CONCLUSION: We found that individual signature is remarkably resistant to propagation as caller identity can be recovered even at distances greater than a hundred meters. Male calls show stronger discriminability at long distances than female calls, and this difference can be explained by the more pronounced frequency modulation found in their calls. In both sexes, individual information is carried redundantly using multiple acoustical features. Interestingly, features providing the highest discrimination at short distances are not the same ones that provide the highest discrimination at long distances.

  11. Acoustic signatures of the phases and phase transitions in Yb2Ti2O7

    Bhattacharjee, Subhro; Erfanifam, S.; Green, E. L.; Naumann, M.; Wang, Zhaosheng; Granovsky, S.; Doerr, M.; Wosnitza, J.; Zvyagin, A. A.; Moessner, R.; Maljuk, A.; Wurmehl, S.; Büchner, B.; Zherlitsyn, S.

    2016-04-01

    We report on measurements of the sound velocity and attenuation in a single crystal of the candidate quantum-spin-ice material Yb2Ti2O7 as a function of temperature and magnetic field. The acoustic modes couple to the spins magnetoelastically and, hence, carry information about the spin correlations that sheds light on the intricate magnetic phase diagram of Yb2Ti2O7 and the nature of spin dynamics in the material. Particularly, we find a pronounced thermal hysteresis in the acoustic data with a concomitant peak in the specific heat indicating a possible first-order phase transition at about 0.17 K. At low temperatures, the acoustic response to magnetic field saturates hinting at the development of magnetic order. The experimental data are consistent with a first-order phase transition from a cooperative paramagnet to a ferromagnet below T ≈0.17 K, as shown by fitting the data with a phenomenological mean-field theory.

  12. Low Mach number prediction of the acoustic signature of fractal-generated turbulence

    Laizet, Sylvain, E-mail: s.laizet@imperial.ac.uk [Turbulence, Mixing and Flow Control Group, Department of Aeronautics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Fortune, Veronique, E-mail: veronique.fortune@lea.univ-poitiers.fr [Department of Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer and Combustion, Institute PPRIME, Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, CNRS, Teleport 2 - Bd. Marie et Pierre Curie, B.P. 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Lamballais, Eric, E-mail: lamballais@univ-poitiers.fr [Department of Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer and Combustion, Institute PPRIME, Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, CNRS, Teleport 2 - Bd. Marie et Pierre Curie, B.P. 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Vassilicos, John Christos, E-mail: j.c.vassilicos@imperial.ac.uk [Turbulence, Mixing and Flow Control Group, Department of Aeronautics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acoustic properties of a fractal square grid and regular grid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid approach based on Lighthill's analogy and Direct Numerical Simulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noise reduction for the fractal square grid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Well-defined peak at a Strouhal number between 0.2 and 0.3 for the fractal square grid, absent for the regular grid. - Abstract: In this work, we compare the acoustic properties of a fractal square grid with those of a regular grid by means of a hybrid approach based on Lighthill's analogy and Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). Our results show that the sound levels corresponding to our fractal square grid of three fractal iterations are significantly reduced by comparison to a regular grid of same porosity and mesh-based Reynolds number. We also find a well-defined peak at a Strouhal number between 0.2 and 0.3 in the acoustic spectrum of our fractal square grid which is absent in the case of our regular grid. We explain this effect in terms of a new criterion for quasi-periodic vortex shedding from a regular or fractal grid.

  13. Surface acoustic load sensing using a face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonator.

    Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2012-11-01

    Pb(In(0.5)Nb(0.5))O(3)-Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-PbTiO(3) (PIN-PMN-PT) resonators for surface acoustic load sensing are presented in this paper. Different acoustic loads are applied to thickness mode, thickness-shear mode, and face-shear mode resonators, and the electrical impedances at resonance and anti-resonance frequencies are recorded. More than one order of magnitude higher sensitivity (ratio of electrical impedance change to surface acoustic impedance change) at the resonance is achieved for the face-shear-mode resonator compared with other resonators with the same dimensions. The Krimholtz, Leedom, and Matthaei (KLM) model is used to verify the surface acoustic loading effect on the electrical impedance spectrum of face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonators. The demonstrated high sensitivity of face-shear mode resonators to surface loads is promising for a broad range of applications, including artificial skin, biological and chemical sensors, touch screens, and other touch-based sensors. PMID:23192819

  14. A portable blood plasma clot micro-elastometry device based on resonant acoustic spectroscopy

    Krebs, C. R.; Li, Ling; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal blood clot stiffness is an important indicator of coagulation disorders arising from a variety of cardiovascular diseases and drug treatments. Here, we present a portable instrument for elastometry of microliter volume blood samples based upon the principle of resonant acoustic spectroscopy, where a sample of well-defined dimensions exhibits a fundamental longitudinal resonance mode proportional to the square root of the Young's modulus. In contrast to commercial thromboelastography, the resonant acoustic method offers improved repeatability and accuracy due to the high signal-to-noise ratio of the resonant vibration. We review the measurement principles and the design of a magnetically actuated microbead force transducer applying between 23 pN and 6.7 nN, providing a wide dynamic range of elastic moduli (3 Pa-27 kPa) appropriate for measurement of clot elastic modulus (CEM). An automated and portable device, the CEMport, is introduced and implemented using a 2 nm resolution displacement sensor with demonstrated accuracy and precision of 3% and 2%, respectively, of CEM in biogels. Importantly, the small strains (disorders, potentially leading to improved diagnostics and therapeutic monitoring.

  15. Homogenization of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials towards an emergent enriched continuum

    Sridhar, A.; Kouznetsova, V. G.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2016-03-01

    This contribution presents a novel homogenization technique for modeling heterogeneous materials with micro-inertia effects such as locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. Linear elastodynamics is used to model the micro and macro scale problems and an extended first order Computational Homogenization framework is used to establish the coupling. Craig Bampton Mode Synthesis is then applied to solve and eliminate the microscale problem, resulting in a compact closed form description of the microdynamics that accurately captures the Local Resonance phenomena. The resulting equations represent an enriched continuum in which additional kinematic degrees of freedom emerge to account for Local Resonance effects which would otherwise be absent in a classical continuum. Such an approach retains the accuracy and robustness offered by a standard Computational Homogenization implementation, whereby the problem and the computational time are reduced to the on-line solution of one scale only.

  16. Efficient Structure Resonance Energy Transfer from Microwaves to Confined Acoustic Vibrations in Viruses

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Lin, Huan-Chun; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Lu, Jen-Tang; Hung, Wan-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ru; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-12-01

    Virus is known to resonate in the confined-acoustic dipolar mode with microwave of the same frequency. However this effect was not considered in previous virus-microwave interaction studies and microwave-based virus epidemic prevention. Here we show that this structure-resonant energy transfer effect from microwaves to virus can be efficient enough so that airborne virus was inactivated with reasonable microwave power density safe for the open public. We demonstrate this effect by measuring the residual viral infectivity of influenza A virus after illuminating microwaves with different frequencies and powers. We also established a theoretical model to estimate the microwaves power threshold for virus inactivation and good agreement with experiments was obtained. Such structure-resonant energy transfer induced inactivation is mainly through physically fracturing the virus structure, which was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These results provide a pathway toward establishing a new epidemic prevention strategy in open public for airborne virus.

  17. Development of numerical analysis method of flow-acoustic resonance in stub pipes of safety relief valves

    The boiling water reactors (BWRs) have steam dryer in the upper part of the pressure vessel to remove moisture from the steam. The steam dryer in the Quad Cities Unit 2 nuclear power plant was damaged by high-cycle fatigue due to acoustic-induced vibration during extended power uprate operation. The principal source of the acoustic-induced vibration was flow-acoustic resonance at the stub pipes of the safety relief valves (SRVs) in the main steam lines (MSLs). The acoustic wave generated at the SRV stub pipes propagates throughout the MSLs and eventually reaches and damages the steam dryer. Therefore, for power uprate operation of the BWRs, it has been required to predict the flow-acoustic resonance at the SRV stub pipes. The purpose of this article was to propose a numerical analysis method for evaluating the flow-acoustic resonance in the SRV stub pipes. The proposed method is based on the finite difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM). So far, the FDLBM has been applied to flow-acoustic simulations of laminar flows around simple geometries at low Reynolds number. In order to apply the FDLBM to the flow-acoustic resonance simulations of turbulent flows around complicated geometries at the high Reynolds number, we developed computationally efficient model by introducing new function into the governing equation. The proposed method was compared with the conventional FDLBM in the cavity-driven flow simulation. The proposed method was validated by comparisons with the experimental data in the 1/10-scale test of BWR-5 under atmosphere condition. The following three results were obtained; the first is that the proposed method can reduce the computing time by 30% compared with the conventional FDLBM; the second is that the proposed method successfully simulated the flow-acoustic resonance in the SRV stub pipes of the BWR-5, and the pressure fluctuations of the simulation results agreed well with those of the experimental data; and the third is the mechanism of the

  18. A comparison of methods for 3D target localization from seismic and acoustic signatures

    ELBRING,GREGORY J.; GARBIN,H. DOUGLAS; LADD,MARK D.

    2000-04-03

    An important application of seismic and acoustic unattended ground sensors (UGS) is the estimation of the three dimensional position of an emitting target. Seismic and acoustic data derived from UGS systems provide the taw information to determine these locations, but can be processed and analyzed in a number of ways using varying amounts of auxiliary information. Processing methods to improve arrival time picking for continuous wave sources and methods for determining and defining the seismic velocity model are the primary variables affecting the localization accuracy. Results using field data collected from an underground facility have shown that using an iterative time picking technique significantly improves the accuracy of the resulting derived target location. Other processing techniques show little advantage over simple crosscorrelation along in terms of accuracy, but may improve the ease with which time picks can be made. An average velocity model found through passive listening or a velocity model determined from a calibration source near the target source both result in similar location accuracies, although the use of station correction severely increases the location error.

  19. A flow visualization study of flow-acoustic coupling at the mouth of a resonant side-branch

    Flow-excited acoustic resonances of piping systems containing closed side-branches are often encountered in power stations, gas transport pipelines, chemical plants, compressor installations, and other industrial applications. The coupling of a shear layer with the sound field of a resonant side-branch has been investigated by means of an extensive flow visualization study under controlled excitation level and frequency. The interaction mechanism is visualized at several Strouhal numbers corresponding to: (a) before the onset of resonance; (b) within the lock-in range; (c) in the hysteresis region; and (d) after the subsidence of resonance. It is shown that the instantaneous position and phase speed of the shear layer vortices are strongly dependent on the Strouhal number and the amplitude of the acoustic particle velocity. Moreover, the phase speed has been found to be not constant over the oscillation cycle. These findings have important implications when modeling flow-acoustic interaction at large amplitude acoustic pulsations. The study has shed more light also on the phenomenon of hysteresis as well as on the mechanism of vortex damping which limits the amplitude of pulsation when the system losses become negligibly small. The flow visualization results give support to the argument made by other researchers that the mechanism of acoustic resonance is different from that which causes the non-resonant oscillations of impinging shear flows

  20. Investigation of the ocean acoustic signatures from strong explosions at a long distance in the ocean sound channel by computer simulation

    The identification and location of ocean acoustic signatures are the principal objectives of a program to discourage clandestine testing of nuclear explosives. Difficulties arise primarily from variations in the water column. In turn, these variations affect acoustic propagation in the SOFAR channel. In this study, the path effects on the signals generated by strong explosions (1 and 10 kn) are investigated. The goal is to make a quantitative correlation between the initial source description and the final acoustical signatures received at a great distance under various conditions. The study is performed entirely by computer simulations applying two computer programs in succession. First, the explosions are simulated by a 2-D hydrodynamic computer program, CALE, which was originally developed to calculate astrophysical problems. The computed signals have reached more than 700 m deep approaching the SOFAR channel. At this point, the CALE output is linked to a hydro-acoustic computer program, the NPE code, by which wave propagation in the SOFAR channel is modeled. The NPE code was developed at the Naval Research Laboratory to study ocean acoustics. [Work supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  1. A passively tunable non-resonant acoustic metamaterial lens for selective ultrasonic excitation

    Zhu, Hongfei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present an approach to ultrasonic beam-forming and beam-steering in structures based on the concept of embedded non-resonant acoustic metamaterial lenses. The lens design exploits the principle of acoustic drop-channel which enables the dynamic coupling of multiple ultrasonic waveguides at selected frequencies. In contrast with currently available technology, the embedded lens allows generating directional excitation by means of a single ultrasonic transducer. The lens design and performance are numerically investigated by using Plane Wave Expansion and Finite Difference Time Domain techniques applied to bulk structures. Then, the design is experimentally validated on a thin aluminum plate where the lens is implemented by through-holes. The dynamic response of the embedded lens is estimated by reconstructing, via Laser Vibrometry, the velocity field induced by a piezoelectric shaker source.

  2. Non destructive testing by acoustic signature of damage level in 304L steel samples submitted to rolling, tensile test and thermal annealing treatments

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate the ability of acoustic signature technique to detect in a non-destructive way mechanical property variations due to damage of the internal material structure for 304L steel samples, provided by EDF company. For this purpose, the velocity and the attenuation of Rayleigh acoustic waves have been measured for rolled, drawn and thermally treated samples. Complementary information provided by echography have also been used to calculate the corresponding variations of the dynamic Young's modulus E

  3. Electrostatic Generation of Bulk Acoustic Waves and Electrical Parameters of Si-MEMS Resonators.

    Dulmet, Bernard; Ivan, Mihaela Eugenia; Ballandras, Sylvain

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an analytical approach to model the generation of bulk acoustic waves in an electrostatically excited silicon MEMS structure, as well as its electromechanical response in terms of static and dynamic displacements, electromechanical coupling, and motional current. The analysis pertains to the single-port electrostatic drive of trapped-energy thickness-extensional (TE) modes in thin plates. Both asymmetric single-side and symmetric double-side electrostatic gap configurations are modeled. Green's function is used to describe the characteristic of the static displacement of the driven surface of the structure versus the dc bias voltage, which allows us to determine the electrical response of the resonator. Optical and electrical characterizations have been performed on resonator samples operating at 10.3 MHz on the fundamental of TE mode under single-side electrostatic excitation. The various figures of merit depend on the dc bias voltage. Typical values of 9000 for the Q-factor, and of 10(-5) for the electromechanical coupling factor k(2) have been obtained with [Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text]-thick gaps. Here-considered modes have a typical temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF) close to -30 ppm/(°)C. We conclude that the practical usability of such electrostatically excited bulk acoustic waves (BAW) resonators essentially depends on the efficiency of the compensation of feed-through capacitance. PMID:26642450

  4. A wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement

    Friedt, J.-M [SENSeOR, 32 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 25044 Besancon (France); Droit, C.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S. [Department of Time and Frequency, FEMTO-ST, 32 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 25044 Besancon (France)

    2010-01-15

    Monitoring physical quantities using acoustic wave devices can be advantageously achieved using the wave characteristic dependence to various parametric perturbations (temperature, stress, and pressure). Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators are particularly well suited to such applications as their resonance frequency is directly influenced by these perturbations, modifying both the phase velocity and resonance conditions. Moreover, the intrinsic radio frequency (rf) nature of these devices makes them ideal for wireless applications, mainly exploiting antennas reciprocity and piezoelectric reversibility. In this paper, we present a wireless SAW sensor interrogation unit operating in the 434 MHz centered ISM band--selected as a tradeoff between antenna dimensions and electromagnetic wave penetration in dielectric media--based on the principles of a frequency sweep network analyzer. We particularly focus on the compliance with the ISM standard which reveals complicated by the need for switching from emission to reception modes similarly to radar operation. In this matter, we propose a fully digital rf synthesis chain to develop various interrogation strategies to overcome the corresponding difficulties and comply with the above-mentioned standard. We finally assess the reader interrogation range, accuracy, and dynamics.

  5. Negative refraction realized by band folding effect in resonator-based acoustic metamaterials

    Liu, Jiao; Hou, Zhilin; Fu, Xiujun

    2015-09-01

    We show in the paper that a two-dimensional acoustic metamaterial with isotropic negative refraction band at subwavelength scale can be constructed simply by arranging only one kind of Helmholtz resonators into honeycomb-like lattice. To understand the phenomenon, the mechanism for double negative metamaterial is investigated. We point out that double negative metamaterials can be obtained only when the phase accumulating over their constructive unit cell becomes greater than π but smaller than 2π. Based on the understanding, we attribute the negative refraction phenomenon in our suggested structure as a result of the band folding effect.

  6. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject. PMID:26520354

  7. Resonant modal group theory of membrane-type acoustical metamaterials for low-frequency sound attenuation

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng

    2015-09-01

    In order to overcome the influence of the structural resonance on the continuous structures and obtain a lightweight thin-layer structure which can effectively isolate the low-frequency noises, an elastic membrane structure was proposed. In the low-frequency range below 500 Hz, the sound transmission loss (STL) of this membrane type structure is greatly higher than that of the current sound insulation material EVA (ethylene-vinyl acetate copo) of vehicle, so it is possible to replace the EVA by the membrane-type metamaterial structure in practice engineering. Based on the band structure, modal shapes, as well as the sound transmission simulation, the sound insulation mechanism of the designed membrane-type acoustic metamaterials was analyzed from a new perspective, which had been validated experimentally. It is suggested that in the frequency range above 200 Hz for this membrane-mass type structure, the sound insulation effect was principally not due to the low-level locally resonant mode of the mass block, but the continuous vertical resonant modes of the localized membrane. So based on such a physical property, a resonant modal group theory is initially proposed in this paper. In addition, the sound insulation mechanism of the membrane-type structure and thin plate structure were combined by the membrane/plate resonant theory.

  8. Acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic signature analysis of failure mechanisms in carbon fiber reinforced polymer materials

    Carey, Shawn Allen

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials, particularly carbon (CFRPs), are being used for primary structural applications, particularly in the aerospace and naval industries. Advantages of CFRP materials, compared to traditional materials such as steel and aluminum, include: light weight, high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and long life expectancy. A concern with CFRPs is that despite quality control during fabrication, the material can contain many hidden internal flaws. These flaws in combination with unseen damage due to fatigue and low velocity impact have led to catastrophic failure of structures and components. Therefore a large amount of research has been conducted regarding nondestructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of CFRP materials. The principal objective of this research program was to develop methods to characterize failure mechanisms in CFRP materials used by the U.S. Army using acoustic emission (AE) and/or acousto-ultrasonic (AU) data. Failure mechanisms addressed include fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination due to shear between layers. CFRP specimens were fabricated and tested in uniaxial tension to obtain AE and AU data. The specimens were designed with carbon fibers in different orientations to produce the different failure mechanisms. Some specimens were impacted with a blunt indenter prior to testing to simulate low-velocity impact. A signature analysis program was developed to characterize the AE data based on data examination using visual pattern recognition techniques. It was determined that it was important to characterize the AE event , using the location of the event as a parameter, rather than just the AE hit (signal recorded by an AE sensor). A back propagation neural network was also trained based on the results of the signature analysis program. Damage observed on the specimens visually with the aid of a scanning electron microscope agreed with the damage type assigned by the

  9. Resonant acoustic frequencies of a tandem cascade. Part 1. Zero relative motion

    Woodley, B. M.; Peake, N.

    1999-08-01

    In this paper we study the acoustic scattering between two flat-plate cascades, with the aim of investigating the possible existence of trapped modes. In practical terms this question is related to the phenomenon of acoustic resonance in turbomachinery, whereby such resonant modes are excited to large amplitude by unsteady processes such as vortex shedding. We use the Wiener Hopf technique to analyse the scattering of the various wave fields by the cascade blades, and by considering the fields between adjacent blades, as well as between the cascades, we are able to take full account of the genuinely finite blade chords. Analytic expressions for the various scattering matrices are derived, and an infinite-dimensional matrix equation is formed, which is then investigated numerically for singularity. One advantage of this formulation is that it allows the constituent parts of the system to be analysed individually, so that for instance the behaviour of the gap between the blade rows alone can be investigated by omitting the finite-chord terms in the equations. We demonstrate that the system exhibits two types of resonance, at a wide range of parameter values. First, there is a cut-on/cut-off resonance associated with the gap between the rows, and corresponding to modes propagating parallel to the front face of the cascades. Second, there is a resonance of the downstream row, akin to a Parker mode, driven at low frequencies by a vorticity wave produced by trapped duct modes in the upstream row, and at higher frequencies by radiation modes (and the vorticity wave) between the blade rows. The predictions for this second set of resonances are shown to be in excellent agreement with previous experimental data. The resonant frequencies are also seen to be real for this twin cascade system, indicating that the resonances correspond to genuine trapped modes. The analysis in this paper is completed with non-zero axial flow but with zero relative rotation between the cascades

  10. Acoustic emission signature analysis. Technical progress report No. 2, 1 March 1979-29 February 1980

    Acoustic emission in plate glass and steel has been studied as a function of angle. The low frequency AE in glass (< 1 MHz) was studied in detail, and contributions from P, S and Rayleigh waves identified. These results are isotropic, as expected theoretically. Limited high frequency (5-20 MHz) results have been obtained in glass. This is the first time, that AE energy has been measured above 3 MHz. The measurement of AE on transgranular crack growth in steel during fatigue crack growth was accomplished by use of a low noise manual hydraulic loading system and an electronic gate to reject grip noise. The signals are complex, and not yet understood in detail. The concept of the wave momentum of an AE, first introduced during the previous year, was elaboratored and a measurement technique suggested. The theoretical study of this problem led to the discovery of an infinite, previously unknown, family of elastic surface (Rayleigh-like) waves, and to further cylindrical, radially propagating plate waves. It appears these waves may be useful in other areas of ultrasonics

  11. Ultrasonic thermometry simulation in a random fluctuating medium: Evidence of the acoustic signature of a one-percent temperature difference.

    Nagaso, M; Moysan, J; Benjeddou, S; Massacret, N; Ploix, M A; Komatitsch, D; Lhuillier, C

    2016-05-01

    We study the development potential of ultrasonic thermometry in a liquid fluctuating sodium environment similar to that present in a Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor, and thus investigate if and how ultrasonic thermometry could be used to monitor the sodium flow at the outlet of the reactor core. In particular we study if small temperature variations in the sodium flow of e.g. about 1% of the sodium temperature, i.e., about 5°C, can have a reliably-measurable acoustic signature. Since to our knowledge no experimental setups are available for such a study, and considering the practical difficulties of experimentation in sodium, we resort to a numerical technique for full wave propagation called the spectral-element method, which is a highly accurate finite-element method owing to the high-degree basis functions it uses. We obtain clear time-of-flight variations in the case of a small temperature difference of one percent in the case of a static temperature gradient as well as in the presence of a random fluctuation of the temperature field in the turbulent flow. The numerical simulations underline the potential of ultrasonic thermometry in such a context. PMID:26921558

  12. Single- and few-layer WTe2 and their suspended nanostructures: Raman signatures and nanomechanical resonances

    Lee, Jaesung; Ye, Fan; Wang, Zenghui; Yang, Rui; Hu, Jin; Mao, Zhiqiang; Wei, Jiang; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2016-04-01

    Single crystal tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) has recently been discovered to exhibit non-saturating extreme magnetoresistance in bulk; it has also emerged as a new layered material from which atomic layer crystals can be extracted. While atomically thin WTe2 is attractive for its unique properties, little research has been conducted on single- and few-layer WTe2. Here we report the isolation of single- and few-layer WTe2, as well as the fabrication and characterization of the first WTe2 suspended nanostructures. We have observed new Raman signatures of single- and few-layer WTe2 that have been theoretically predicted but have not been reported to date, in both on-substrate and suspended WTe2 flakes. We have further probed the nanomechanical properties of suspended WTe2 structures by measuring their flexural resonances, and obtain a Young's modulus of EY ~ 80 GPa for the suspended WTe2 flakes. This study paves the way for future investigations and utilizations of the multiple new Raman fingerprints of single- and few-layer WTe2, and for explorations of mechanical control of WTe2 atomic layers.

  13. Negative refraction realized by band folding effect in resonator-based acoustic metamaterials

    We show in the paper that a two-dimensional acoustic metamaterial with isotropic negative refraction band at subwavelength scale can be constructed simply by arranging only one kind of Helmholtz resonators into honeycomb-like lattice. To understand the phenomenon, the mechanism for double negative metamaterial is investigated. We point out that double negative metamaterials can be obtained only when the phase accumulating over their constructive unit cell becomes greater than π but smaller than 2π. Based on the understanding, we attribute the negative refraction phenomenon in our suggested structure as a result of the band folding effect. - Highlights: • Negative-refraction structure by only one kind of resonators is suggested. • Directional and isotropic negative band at subwavelength scale are obtained. • The mechanism is understood as the band folding effect. • The influences of the wall friction and thermoviscous diffusive effect are checked

  14. Negative refraction realized by band folding effect in resonator-based acoustic metamaterials

    Liu, Jiao; Hou, Zhilin, E-mail: phzlhou@scut.edu.cn; Fu, Xiujun

    2015-09-25

    We show in the paper that a two-dimensional acoustic metamaterial with isotropic negative refraction band at subwavelength scale can be constructed simply by arranging only one kind of Helmholtz resonators into honeycomb-like lattice. To understand the phenomenon, the mechanism for double negative metamaterial is investigated. We point out that double negative metamaterials can be obtained only when the phase accumulating over their constructive unit cell becomes greater than π but smaller than 2π. Based on the understanding, we attribute the negative refraction phenomenon in our suggested structure as a result of the band folding effect. - Highlights: • Negative-refraction structure by only one kind of resonators is suggested. • Directional and isotropic negative band at subwavelength scale are obtained. • The mechanism is understood as the band folding effect. • The influences of the wall friction and thermoviscous diffusive effect are checked.

  15. General band gap condition in one-dimensional resonator-based acoustic metamaterial

    Liu, Yafei; Hou, Zhilin; Fu, Xiujun

    2016-03-01

    A one-dimensional model for resonator-based acoustic metamaterials is introduced. The condition for band gap in such kind of structure is obtained. According to this condition, the dispersion relation is in general a result of the scattering phase and propagating phase. The phenomenon that the band gap is less dependent on lattice structure appears only in the special system in which the coupling between the resonators and the host medium is weak enough. For strong coupled systems, the dispersion of wave can be significantly adjusted by the propagating phase. Based on the understanding, a general guide for band gap optimization is given and the mechanism for structures with the defect states at subwavelength scale is revealed.

  16. Micromachined silicon and polymer probes integrated with film-bulk-acoustic-resonator mass sensors

    This paper presents a novel micromachined probe with a miniature film-bulk-acoustic-resonator (FBAR) mass sensor integrated at the tip. The detailed fabrication processes for a silicon microprobe and an SU-8 microprobe are described and discussed. The electrical performances of FBARs integrated on both the microprobes were characterized and compared. The semiconducting silicon was found to degrade the FBAR's quality factor (Q) significantly, due to the GHz electromagnetic wave's energy loss in the low-resistivity silicon. Yet, the FBAR on the SU-8 probe was measured to have a higher Q than that on the silicon probe, as the SU-8 polymer material is highly resistive and electrically insulating. As an application demonstration, the fabricated SU-8 probe was successfully used in detecting Hg2+ concentration in liquids. The integration of a resonant mass sensor with a micromachined probe offers easy access to sensing environment with minimal disturbance to the environment

  17. Acoustic resonance scattering by a system of concentrically multilayered shells: the inherent background and resonance coefficients

    Choi, M S; Lee, S H

    1999-01-01

    The inherent background coefficients that exactly describe the background amplitudes in the scattered field have been presented for the scattering of plane acoustic waves by a system of concentrically multilayered solid and/or fluid shells submerged in a fluid. The coefficients have been obtained by replacing the mechanical surface admittance function with the zero-frequency limit of the admittance function for the analogous fluid system, where the shear wave speeds in the solid layers are set to zero. By taking advantage of the concept of incoming and outgoing waves, we find the surface admittance function for the fluid system in such a form that the analytical generalization for any number of layers and the physical interpretation are very easy. The background coefficients obtained are independent of the bulk wave speeds in the system: they depend on the mass densities and the thickness of the shells. With increasing frequency, the inherent background undergoes a transition from the soft to the rigid backgr...

  18. Temperature Frequency Characteristics of Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) Polymer Coated Rayleigh Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Resonators for Gas-Phase Sensor Applications

    Radeva, Ekaterina I.; Esmeryan, Karekin D.; Ivan D. Avramov

    2012-01-01

    Temperature induced frequency shifts may compromise the sensor response of polymer coated acoustic wave gas-phase sensors operating in environments of variable temperature. To correct the sensor data with the temperature response of the sensor the latter must be known. This study presents and discusses temperature frequency characteristics (TFCs) of solid hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) polymer coated sensor resonators using the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (RSAW) mode on ST-cut quartz. Using ...

  19. Combined surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance measurement of collagen and fibrinogen layers

    Friedt, J M; Francis, L; Zhou, C; Campitelli, A; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Denis, Frederic; Francis, Laurent; Zhou, Cheng; Campitelli, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    We use an instrument combining optical (surface plasmon resonance) and acoustic (Love mode acoustic wave device) real-time measurements on a same surface for the identification of water content in collagen and fibrinogen protein layers. After calibration of the surface acoustic wave device sensitivity by copper electrodeposition, the bound mass and its physical properties -- density and optical index -- are extracted from the complementary measurement techniques and lead to thickness and water ratio values compatible with the observed signal shifts. Such results are especially usefully for protein layers with a high water content as shown here for collagen on an hydrophobic surface. We obtain the following results: collagen layers include 70+/-20 % water and are 16+/-3 to 19+/-3 nm thick for bulk concentrations ranging from 30 to 300 ug/ml. Fibrinogen layers include 50+/-10 % water for layer thicknesses in the 6+/-1.5 to 13+/-2 nm range when the bulk concentration is in the 46 to 460 ug/ml range.

  20. Sensitivity of thin-film bulk acoustic resonators (FBAR) to localized mechanical forces

    We report on the sensitivity of thin-film bulk acoustic resonators (FBARs) to localized contact mechanical forces, their design for high sensitivity and the performance under different forcing conditions and mechanisms. Cantilever and membrane structures are the examples chosen for structure and process flow design, finite element modeling and experimental characterization. To leverage on the high sensitivity of FBAR devices at the 2 GHz radio frequency, we carried out electrical bulk acoustic wave excitation and readout of the first longitudinal acoustic mode. Experiments to extract actual sensitivities included atomic force microscopy-driven force excitation, nanoindentation and manual force loading. A force sensitivity function with extracted values S (MHz N−1) from 50 to 270 MHz N−1 shows its dependence on the thin-film stack configuration, the extent of force which determines the linear regime and the spatial location of the force loading source. The discussion provides a force range and sensitivity benchmarking, possible manufacturing and application scenarios, and design guidelines for future integrated devices. (paper)

  1. Monitoring accelerated carbonation on standard Portland cement mortar by nonlinear resonance acoustic test

    Eiras, J. N.; Kundu, T.; Popovics, J. S.; Monzó, J.; Borrachero, M. V.; Payá, J.

    2015-03-01

    Carbonation is an important deleterious process for concrete structures. Carbonation begins when carbon dioxide (CO2) present in the atmosphere reacts with portlandite producing calcium carbonate (CaCO3). In severe carbonation conditions, C-S-H gel is decomposed into silica gel (SiO2.nH2O) and CaCO3. As a result, concrete pore water pH decreases (usually below 10) and eventually steel reinforcing bars become unprotected from corrosion agents. Usually, the carbonation of the cementing matrix reduces the porosity, because CaCO3 crystals (calcite and vaterite) occupy more volume than portlandite. In this study, an accelerated carbonation-ageing process is conducted on Portland cement mortar samples with water to cement ratio of 0.5. The evolution of the carbonation process on mortar is monitored at different levels of ageing until the mortar is almost fully carbonated. A nondestructive technique based on nonlinear acoustic resonance is used to monitor the variation of the constitutive properties upon carbonation. At selected levels of ageing, the compressive strength is obtained. From fractured surfaces the depth of carbonation is determined with phenolphthalein solution. An image analysis of the fractured surfaces is used to quantify the depth of carbonation. The results from resonant acoustic tests revealed a progressive increase of stiffness and a decrease of material nonlinearity.

  2. Super-resolution imaging by resonant tunneling in anisotropic acoustic metamaterials.

    Liu, Aiping; Zhou, Xiaoming; Huang, Guoliang; Hu, Gengkai

    2012-10-01

    The resonant tunneling effects that could result in complete transmission of evanescent waves are examined in acoustic metamaterials of anisotropic effective mass. The tunneling conditions are first derived for the metamaterials composed of classical mass-in-mass structures. It is found that the tunneling transmission occurs when the total length of metamaterials is an integral number of half-wavelengths of the periodic Bloch wave. Due to the local resonance of building units of metamaterials, the Bloch waves are spatially modulated within the periodic structures, leading to the resonant tunneling occurring in the low-frequency region. The metamaterial slab lens with anisotropic effective mass is designed by which the physics of resonant tunneling and the features for evanescent field manipulations are examined. The designed lens interacts with evanescent waves in the way of the propagating wavenumber weakly dependent on the spatial frequency of evanescent waves. Full-wave simulations validate the imaging performance of the proposed lens with the spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit. PMID:23039546

  3. Complex Contact-Based Dynamics of Microsphere Monolayers Revealed by Resonant Attenuation of Surface Acoustic Waves

    Hiraiwa, M.; Abi Ghanem, M.; Wallen, S. P.; Khanolkar, A.; Maznev, A. A.; Boechler, N.

    2016-05-01

    Contact-based vibrations play an essential role in the dynamics of granular materials. Significant insights into vibrational granular dynamics have previously been obtained with reduced-dimensional systems containing macroscale particles. We study contact-based vibrations of a two-dimensional monolayer of micron-sized spheres on a solid substrate that forms a microscale granular crystal. Measurements of the resonant attenuation of laser-generated surface acoustic waves reveal three collective vibrational modes that involve displacements and rotations of the microspheres, as well as interparticle and particle-substrate interactions. To identify the modes, we tune the interparticle stiffness, which shifts the frequency of the horizontal-rotational resonances while leaving the vertical resonance unaffected. From the measured contact resonance frequencies we determine both particle-substrate and interparticle contact stiffnesses and find that the former is an order of magnitude larger than the latter. This study paves the way for investigating complex contact-based dynamics of microscale granular crystals and yields a new approach to studying micro- to nanoscale contact mechanics in multiparticle networks.

  4. Acoustic scattering by elastic cylinders of elliptical cross-section and splitting up of resonances

    The scattering of a plane acoustic wave by an infinite elastic cylinder of elliptical cross section is studied from a modal formalism by emphasizing the role of the symmetries. More precisely, as the symmetry is broken in the transition from the infinite circular cylinder to the elliptical one, the splitting up of resonances is observed both theoretically and experimentally. This phenomenon can be interpreted using group theory. The main difficulty stands in the application of this theory within the framework of the vectorial formalism in elastodynamics. This method significantly simplifies the numerical treatment of the problem, provides a full classification of the resonances, and gives a physical interpretation of the splitting up in terms of symmetry breaking. An experimental part based on ultrasonic spectroscopy complements the theoretical study. A series of tank experiments is carried out in the case of aluminium elliptical cylinders immersed in water, in the frequency range 0 ≤ kr ≤ 50, where kr is the reduced wave number in the fluid. The symmetry is broken by selecting various cylinders of increasing eccentricity. More precisely, the greater the eccentricity, the higher the splitting up of resonances is accentuated. The experimental results provide a very good agreement with the theoretical ones, the splitting up is observed on experimental form functions, and the split resonant modes are identified on angular diagrams

  5. Sub-Poissonian phonon statistics in an acoustical resonator coupled to a pumped two-level emitter

    Ceban, V., E-mail: victor.ceban@phys.asm.md; Macovei, M. A., E-mail: macovei@phys.asm.md [Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Institute of Applied Physics (Moldova, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The concept of an acoustical analog of the optical laser has been developed recently in both theoretical and experimental works. We here discuss a model of a coherent phonon generator with a direct signature of the quantum properties of sound vibrations. The considered setup is made of a laser-driven quantum dot embedded in an acoustical nanocavity. The system dynamics is solved for a single phonon mode in the steady-state and in the strong quantum dot—phonon coupling regime beyond the secular approximation. We demonstrate that the phonon statistics exhibits quantum features, i.e., is sub-Poissonian.

  6. Using Combined X-ray Computed Tomography and Acoustic Resonance to Understand Supercritical CO2 Behavior in Fractured Sandstone

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.

    2015-12-01

    Distribution of supercritical (sc) CO2 has a large impact on its flow behavior as well as on the properties of seismic waves used for monitoring. Simultaneous imaging of scCO2 distribution in a rock core using X-ray computed tomography (CT) and measurements of seismic waves in the laboratory can help understand how the distribution evolves as scCO2 invades through rock, and the resulting seismic signatures. To this end, we performed a series of laboratory scCO2 core-flood experiments in intact and fractured anisotropic Carbon Tan sandstone samples. In these experiments, we monitored changes in the CO2 saturation distribution and sonic-frequency acoustic resonances (yielding both seismic velocity and attenuation) over the course of the floods. A short-core resonant bar test system (Split-Hopkinson Resonant Bar Apparatus) custom fit into a long X-ray transparent pressure vessel was used for the seismic measurements, and a modified General Electric medical CT scanner was used to acquire X-ray CT data from which scCO2 saturation distributions were determined. The focus of the experiments was on the impact of single fractures on the scCO2 distribution and the seismic properties. For this reason, we examined several cases including 1. intact, 2. a closely mated fracture along the core axis, 3. a sheared fracture along the core axis (both vertical and horizontal for examining the buoyancy effect), and 4. a sheared fracture perpendicular to the core axis. For the intact and closely mated fractured cores, Young's modulus declined with increasing CO2 saturation, and attenuation increased up to about 15% CO2 saturation after which attenuation declined. For cores having wide axial fractures, the Young's modulus was lower than for the intact and closely mated cases, however did not change much with CO2 pore saturation. Much lower CO2 pore saturations were achieved in these cases. Attenuation increased more rapidly however than for the intact sample. For the core

  7. The Fugløy Reef at 70°N; acoustic signature, geologic, geomorphologic and oceanographic setting

    Lindberg, Björn; Berndt, Christian; Mienert, Jürgen

    2007-02-01

    This is the first in-depth study of a cluster of cold-water coral reefs, the Fugløy Reefs, found at 70°N on the Norwegian margin. Combining high-resolution seismic reflection data, side-scan sonar, video-images, and oceanographic measurements reveals the geologic, geomorphologic and oceanographic setting in which the reefs occur. The reefs consist mainly of the scleractinian ahermatypic Lophelia pertusa, and exist below the thermocline at water depths between 140 m and 190 m. The reefs appear as cone-shaped, acoustically transparent features on seismic reflection data, consistently located in places characterized by the availability of hard substrate, high relief, and periodical exposure to high tidal currents (>30 cm/s). These currents transport water of the Norwegian Atlantic Current to the reefs from an area with fluid expulsion-related pockmarks. The spatial relationship between reef, pockmark locations, and current directions suggests that seepage of biogenic gas might be a catalyst to reef growth. With a height of more than 40 m some of the Fugløy reefs are among the highest reported from the Norwegian Margin. This indicates highly favourable growth conditions, and conservative estimates indicate a net growth rate for the reefs of ~5 mm/year. We expect that cold-water reefs will be found further north along the Barents Sea margin as general awareness on the geophysical signature and appearance of the reefs increases, because all known factors involved in reef establishment and growth are within the required intervals also further north.

  8. R and D studies for the development of a compact transmitter able to mimic the acoustic signature of a UHE neutrino interaction

    Calibration of acoustic neutrino telescopes with neutrino-like signals is essential to evaluate the feasibility of the technique and to know the efficiency of the detectors. However, it is not straightforward to have acoustic transmitters that, on one hand, are able to mimic the signature of a UHE neutrino interaction, that is, a bipolar acoustic pulse with the ‘pancake’ directivity, and on the other hand, fulfil practical issues such as ease of deployment and operation. This is a non-trivial problem since it requires directive transducer with cylindrical symmetry for a broadband frequency range. Classical solutions using linear arrays of acoustic transducers result in long arrays with many elements, which increase the cost and the complexity for deployment and operation. In this paper we present the extension of our previous R and D studies using the parametric acoustic source technique by dealing with the cylindrical symmetry and demonstrating that it is possible to use this technique for having a compact solution that could be much more easily included in neutrino telescope infrastructures or used in specific sea campaigns for calibration.

  9. A METHODOLOGY TO INTEGRATE MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Jorge O. Parra; Chris L. Hackert; Lorna L. Wilson

    2002-09-20

    The work reported herein represents the third year of development efforts on a methodology to interpret magnetic resonance and acoustic measurements for reservoir characterization. In this last phase of the project we characterize a vuggy carbonate aquifer in the Hillsboro Basin, Palm Beach County, South Florida, using two data sets--the first generated by velocity tomography and the second generated by reflection tomography. First, we integrate optical macroscopic (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, as well as petrography, as a first step in characterizing the aquifer pore system. This pore scale integration provides information with which to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log signatures for NMR well log calibration, interpret ultrasonic data, and characterize flow units at the field scale between two wells in the aquifer. Saturated and desaturated NMR core measurements estimate the irreducible water in the rock and the variable T{sub 2} cut-offs for the NMR well log calibration. These measurements establish empirical equations to extract permeability from NMR well logs. Velocity and NMR-derived permeability and porosity relationships integrated with velocity tomography (based on crosswell seismic measurements recorded between two wells 100 m apart) capture two flow units that are supported with pore scale integration results. Next, we establish a more detailed picture of the complex aquifer pore structures and the critical role they play in water movement, which aids in our ability to characterize not only carbonate aquifers, but reservoirs in general. We analyze petrography and cores to reveal relationships between the rock physical properties that control the compressional and shear wave velocities of the formation. A digital thin section analysis provides the pore size distributions of the rock matrix, which allows us to relate pore structure to permeability and to characterize flow units at the

  10. Acoustic resonance scattering from a multilayered cylindrical shell with imperfect bonding.

    Rajabi, M; Hasheminejad, Seyyed M

    2009-12-01

    The method of wave function expansion is adopted to study the three dimensional scattering of a time-harmonic plane progressive sound field obliquely incident upon a multi-layered hollow cylinder with interlaminar bonding imperfection. For the generality of solution, each layer is assumed to be cylindrically orthotropic. An approximate laminate model in the context of the modal state equations with variable coefficients along with the classical T-matrix solution technique is set up for each layer to solve for the unknown modal scattering and transmission coefficients. A linear spring model is used to describe the interlaminar adhesive bonding whose effects are incorporated into the global transfer matrix by introduction of proper interfacial transfer matrices. Following the classic acoustic resonance scattering theory (RST), the scattered field and response to surface waves are determined by constructing the partial waves and obtaining the non-resonance (backgrounds) and resonance components. The solution is first used to investigate the effect of interlayer imperfection of an air-filled and water submerged bilaminate aluminium cylindrical shell on the resonances associated with various modes of wave propagation (i.e., symmetric/asymmetric Lamb waves, fluid-borne A-type waves, Rayleigh and Whispering Gallery waves) appearing in the backscattered spectrum, according to their polarization and state of stress. An illustrative numerical example is also given for a multi-layered (five-layered) cylindrical shell for which the stiffness of the adhesive interlayers is artificially varied. The sensitivity of resonance frequencies associated with higher mode numbers to the stiffness coefficients is demonstrated to be a good measure of the bonding strength. Limiting cases are considered and fair agreements with solutions available in the literature are established. PMID:19586650

  11. SiDIVS: Simple Detection of Inductive Vehicle Signatures with a Multiplex Resonant Sensor.

    Lamas-Seco, José J; Castro, Paula M; Dapena, Adriana; Vazquez-Araujo, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    This work provides a system capable of obtaining simultaneous inductive signatures of vehicles traveling on a roadway with minimal cost. Based on Time-Division Multiplexing (TDM) with multiple oscillators, one for each inductive loop, the proposed system detects the presence of vehicles by means of a shift in the oscillation period of the selected loop and registers the signature of the detected vehicles by measuring the duration of a fixed number of oscillator pulses. In order to test the system in an actual environment, we implement a prototype that we denote as SiDIVS (Simple Detection of Inductive Vehicle Signatures) and acquire different vehicle inductive signatures under real scenarios. We also test the robustness of the detector by simulating the effect of noise on the signature acquisition. PMID:27548167

  12. SiDIVS: Simple Detection of Inductive Vehicle Signatures with a Multiplex Resonant Sensor

    José J. Lamas-Seco

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work provides a system capable of obtaining simultaneous inductive signatures of vehicles traveling on a roadway with minimal cost. Based on Time-Division Multiplexing (TDM with multiple oscillators, one for each inductive loop, the proposed system detects the presence of vehicles by means of a shift in the oscillation period of the selected loop and registers the signature of the detected vehicles by measuring the duration of a fixed number of oscillator pulses. In order to test the system in an actual environment, we implement a prototype that we denote as SiDIVS (Simple Detection of Inductive Vehicle Signatures and acquire different vehicle inductive signatures under real scenarios. We also test the robustness of the detector by simulating the effect of noise on the signature acquisition.

  13. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration

    Hao, Wenchang; Liu, Jiuling; Liu, Minghua; Liang, Yong; He, Shitang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW) sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM) approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM) parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of an R-SAW resonator by a P-matrix cascading technique. Cascading the P-matrixes of unloaded areas with mass loaded areas, the sensitivity for different sensitive areas was obtained by analyzing the frequency shift. The performance of the sensitivity analysis was confirmed by the measured responses from the silicon dioxide (SiO2) deposited on different sensitive areas of R-SAW resonators. It is shown that the mass sensitivity varies strongly for different sensitive areas, and the optimal sensitive area lies towards the center of the device. PMID:27104540

  14. Acoustics

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  15. Influence of bottom shape in the pipe wall thinning inspection using an electromagnetic acoustic resonance method

    Electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) provides non-contacting measurements and is often applied to monitoring in high temperature environment. Electromagnetic acoustic resonance method (EMAR) is transmits an ultrasonic burst wave, and the driving frequency of bust wave is swept. Then signal amplitude of each frequency is computed by the superheterodyne processing at the interval. Pulse-EMAR method is transmits an ultrasonic pulse wave propagating, but the pulse wave is not swept. Then echo waves received is analyzed by Fast Fourier Transform. Finally, the superposition of the nth compression (SNC) for data processing is applied to evaluate wall thickness for two methods, In this study, the influence of bottom shapes is evaluated using EMAR method and Pulse-EMAR method. And therefore the specimens of three types which are with inclined bottom, R shape and scale-like shape are prepared. Influence of bottom shape appears as an attenuating of peak value of SNC, a widening of the full width at half maximum, and peaks of multiple. (author)

  16. Optimization of Capacitive Acoustic Resonant Sensor Using Numerical Simulation and Design of Experiment

    Rubaiyet Iftekharul Haque

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of the acoustic resonant sensor requires a clear understanding of how the output responses of the sensor are affected by the variation of different factors. During this work, output responses of a capacitive acoustic transducer, such as membrane displacement, quality factor, and capacitance variation, are considered to evaluate the sensor design. The six device parameters taken into consideration are membrane radius, backplate radius, cavity height, air gap, membrane tension, and membrane thickness. The effects of factors on the output responses of the transducer are investigated using an integrated methodology that combines numerical simulation and design of experiments (DOE. A series of numerical experiments are conducted to obtain output responses for different combinations of device parameters using finite element methods (FEM. Response surface method is used to identify the significant factors and to develop the empirical models for the output responses. Finally, these results are utilized to calculate the optimum device parameters using multi-criteria optimization with desirability function. Thereafter, the validating experiments are designed and deployed using the numerical simulation to crosscheck the responses.

  17. Optimization of capacitive acoustic resonant sensor using numerical simulation and design of experiment.

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Loussert, Christophe; Sergent, Michelle; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of the acoustic resonant sensor requires a clear understanding of how the output responses of the sensor are affected by the variation of different factors. During this work, output responses of a capacitive acoustic transducer, such as membrane displacement, quality factor, and capacitance variation, are considered to evaluate the sensor design. The six device parameters taken into consideration are membrane radius, backplate radius, cavity height, air gap, membrane tension, and membrane thickness. The effects of factors on the output responses of the transducer are investigated using an integrated methodology that combines numerical simulation and design of experiments (DOE). A series of numerical experiments are conducted to obtain output responses for different combinations of device parameters using finite element methods (FEM). Response surface method is used to identify the significant factors and to develop the empirical models for the output responses. Finally, these results are utilized to calculate the optimum device parameters using multi-criteria optimization with desirability function. Thereafter, the validating experiments are designed and deployed using the numerical simulation to crosscheck the responses. PMID:25894937

  18. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosis of acoustic neuroma. Comparative study with plain X-ray and CTs

    Nomura, Kimihisa; Sakai, Makoto; Shinkawa, Atsushi; Miyake, Hirosato; Matsukawa, Junichi

    1987-11-01

    In order to find an approach to earlier and more acurate diagnosis of acoustic neuroma, a comparative evaluation of MRI, plain X-ray (Stenvers' projection), high resolution CT with or without Metrizamide enhancement and air-CT has been made in five clinical cases of acoustic neuroma. A paramagnetic contrast agent, Gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), was used to enhance images resolution in two cases of acoustic neuroma. In MRI, the high singnal mass in the posterior fossa was smaller than 10 x 10 mm in 2 cases, 17 x 20 mm in 2 cases and 35 x 40 mm in one case. MRI revealed enlargement of the neurovascular bundle around the VII and VIII cranial nerves compatible with a diagnosis of acoustic neuroma in all 5 cases, and masses within the cerebellopontine angle were also disclosed. In 2 cases the image of equivocal acoustic neuromas was well enhanced, and these lesions were visualized after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA. In one of the cases the acoustic neuroma was satisfactorily differentiated from the surrounding cystic lesion with the aid of a contrast medium. Magnetic resonance which uses no ionizing radiation seems to be innocuous and offers several advantages over other imaging methods and CT, which may produce an adverse reaction when a contrast medium is used in CT-cisternography. Further advancement of MR technology will offer greater assistance in differential diagnosis of lesions such as acoustic tumors or other cerebellopontine angle tumors.

  19. The mass load effect on the resonant acoustic frequencies of colloidal semiconductor nanoplatelets

    Girard, Adrien; Saviot, Lucien; Pedetti, Silvia; Tessier, Mickaël D.; Margueritat, Jérémie; Gehan, Hélène; Mahler, Benoit; Dubertret, Benoit; Mermet, Alain

    2016-07-01

    Resonant acoustic modes of ultrathin CdS and CdSe colloidal nanoplatelets (NPLs) with varying thicknesses were probed using low frequency Raman scattering. The spectra are dominated by an intense band ascribed to the thickness breathing mode of the 2D nanostructures. The measured Raman frequencies show strong deviations with respect to the values expected for simple bare plates, all the more so as the thickness is reduced. The deviation is shown to arise from the additional mass of the organic ligands that are bound to the free surfaces of the nanoplatelets. The calculated eigen frequencies of vibrating platelets weighed down by the mass of the organic ligands are in very good agreement with the observed experimental behaviours. This finding opens up a new possibility of nanomechanical sensing such as nanobalances.Resonant acoustic modes of ultrathin CdS and CdSe colloidal nanoplatelets (NPLs) with varying thicknesses were probed using low frequency Raman scattering. The spectra are dominated by an intense band ascribed to the thickness breathing mode of the 2D nanostructures. The measured Raman frequencies show strong deviations with respect to the values expected for simple bare plates, all the more so as the thickness is reduced. The deviation is shown to arise from the additional mass of the organic ligands that are bound to the free surfaces of the nanoplatelets. The calculated eigen frequencies of vibrating platelets weighed down by the mass of the organic ligands are in very good agreement with the observed experimental behaviours. This finding opens up a new possibility of nanomechanical sensing such as nanobalances. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR07383A

  20. Material and device properties of ZnO-based film bulk acoustic resonator for mass sensing applications

    Zinc oxide based film bulk acoustic resonator as mass sensor was fabricated by multi-target magnetron sputtering under optimized deposition condition. Each layer of the device was well crystallized and highly textural observed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurement. Through piezoelectric test, the device vibrated with significant distance. The influence of top electrode on resonant frequency and the bio-specimen of mass loading effect were investigated. Data show that the device has qualified properties as mass biosensor, with a resonant frequency of 3-4 GHz and a high sensitivity of 8-10 kHz cm2/ng

  1. A poly(vinylidene fluoride)-coated ZnO film bulk acoustic resonator for nerve gas detection

    We apply the film bulk acoustic resonator for the detection of nerve gas. The resonator is consisted of a ZnO piezoelectric stack and a W/SiO2 Bragg reflector. Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) is used as the sensing coating to adsorb the analyte under test. The testing results show that our proposed sensor can yield a sensitive, reversible and reproducible response to nerve gas. The relationship between the frequency shifts and the concentrations of the nerve gas exhibits a perfect linear correlation in the range of 10–50 ppm. The gas sensitivity of the proposed sensor is 718 kHz ppm−1, which is several orders of magnitude higher than that of a quartz crystal microbalance with the same sensitive coating. This study proves that it is feasible to use the PVDF-coated thin film bulk acoustic resonator for the detection of the traced nerve gas

  2. The Glashow resonance at IceCube: signatures, event rates and pp vs. pγ interactions

    We revisit the signatures of the Glashow resonance process ν-bar ee → W in the high-energy astrophysical neutrino observatory IceCube. We note that in addition to the standard hadronic and electromagnetic showers produced by an incoming neutrino at the resonance energy of Eν ≈ 6.3 PeV, there are two clear signals of the process: the 'pure muon' from ν-bar ee → ν-bar μμ and the 'contained lollipop' from ν-bar ee → ν-bar ττ. The event rate and the signal-to-background ratio (the ratio of the resonant to concurrent non-resonant processes) are calculated for each type of interaction, based on current flux limits on the diffuse neutrino flux. Because of the low background in the neighborhood of the resonance, the observation of only one pure muon or contained lollipop event essentially signals discovery of the resonance, even if the expected event numbers are small. We also evaluate the total event rates of the Glashow resonance from the extra-galactic diffuse neutrino flux and emphasize its utility as a discovery tool to enable first observations of such a flux. We find that one can expect 3.6 (0.65) events per year for a pure pp (pγ) source, along with an added contribution of 0.51 (0.21) from non-resonant events. We also give results as a function of the ratio of pp vs pγ sources

  3. Experimental study on acoustic subwavelength imaging of holey-structured metamaterials by resonant tunneling.

    Su, Haijing; Zhou, Xiaoming; Xu, Xianchen; Hu, Gengkai

    2014-04-01

    A holey-structured metamaterial is proposed for near-field acoustic imaging beyond the diffraction limit. The structured lens consists of a rigid slab perforated with an array of cylindrical holes with periodically modulated diameters. Based on the effective medium approach, the structured lens is characterized by multilayered metamaterials with anisotropic dynamic mass, and an analytic model is proposed to evaluate the transmission properties of incident evanescent waves. The condition is derived for the resonant tunneling, by which evanescent waves can completely transmit through the structured lens without decaying. As an advantage of the proposed lens, the imaging frequency can be modified by the diameter modulation of internal holes without the change of the lens thickness in contrast to the lens due to the Fabry-Pérot resonant mechanism. In this experiment, the lens is assembled by aluminum plates drilled with cylindrical holes. The imaging experiment demonstrates that the designed lens can clearly distinguish two sources separated in the distance below the diffraction limit at the tunneling frequency. PMID:25234968

  4. Kiwi fruit (Actinidia chinensis) quality determination based on surface acoustic wave resonator combined with electronic nose.

    Wei, Liu; Guohua, Hui

    2015-01-01

    In this study, electronic nose (EN) combined with a 433 MHz surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR) was used to determine Kiwi fruit quality under 12-day storage. EN responses to Kiwi samples were measured and analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and stochastic resonance (SR) methods. SAWR frequency eigen values were also measured to predict freshness. Kiwi fruit sample's weight loss index and human sensory evaluation were examined to characteristic its quality and freshness. Kiwi fruit's quality predictive models based on EN, SAWR, and EN combined with SAWR were developed, respectively. Weight loss and human sensory evaluation results demonstrated that Kiwi fruit's quality decline and overall acceptance decrease during the storage. Experiment result indicated that the PCA method could qualitatively discriminate all Kiwi fruit samples with different storage time. Both SR and SAWR frequency analysis methods could successfully discriminate samples with high regression coefficients (R = 0.98093 and R = 0.99014, respectively). The validation experiment results showed that the mixed predictive model developed using EN combined with SAWR present higher quality prediction accuracy than the model developed either by EN or by SAWR. This method exhibits some advantages including high accuracy, non-destructive, low cost, etc. It provides an effective way for fruit quality rapid analysis. PMID:25551334

  5. Detecting leaks in gas-filled pressure vessels using acoustic resonances

    Gillis, K. A.; Moldover, M. R.; Mehl, J. B.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that a leak from a large, unthermostatted pressure vessel into ambient air can be detected an order of magnitude more effectively by measuring the time dependence of the ratio p/f2 than by measuring the ratio p/T. Here f is the resonance frequency of an acoustic mode of the gas inside the pressure vessel, p is the pressure of the gas, and T is the kelvin temperature measured at one point in the gas. In general, the resonance frequencies are determined by a mode-dependent, weighted average of the square of the speed-of-sound throughout the volume of the gas. However, the weighting usually has a weak dependence on likely temperature gradients in the gas inside a large pressure vessel. Using the ratio p/f2, we measured a gas leak (dM/dt)/M ≈ - 1.3 × 10-5 h-1 = - 0.11 yr-1 from a 300-liter pressure vessel filled with argon at 450 kPa that was exposed to sunshine-driven temperature and pressure fluctuations as large as (dT/dt)/T ≈ (dp/dt)/p ≈ 5 × 10-2 h-1 using a 24-hour data record. This leak could not be detected in a 72-hour record of p/T. (Here M is the mass of the gas in the vessel and t is the time.)

  6. Resonant instability of the surface dust-acoustic wave in electron–positron–ion dusty plasmas including pair annihilation effects

    The influence of electron–positron pair annihilations on the resonant instability of surface dust-acoustic wave is investigated in semi-bounded electron–positron–ion dusty plasmas. The dispersion relation and the temporal growth rate of the surface dust-acoustic wave including the pair annihilation effect are obtained by the specular reflection boundary condition. It is found that the electron–positron annihilation effect suppresses the temporal growth rate of the surface dust-acoustic instability and, however, increases the domain of the resonant instability. It is also shown that the pair annihilation effect on the growth rate decreases with increasing wave number and dust plasma frequency. The variation of the domain and magnitude of temporal growth rate is also discussed. - Highlights: • The resonant instability of surface dust-acoustic wave is investigated in semi-bounded electron–positron pair dusty plasmas. • The dispersion relation and the temporal growth rate are obtained by the specular reflection boundary condition. • The pair annihilation effects on the domain and magnitude of temporal growth rate are discussed

  7. Perceptual identification and acoustic measures of the resonant voice based on "Lessac's Y-Buzz"--a preliminary study with actors.

    Barrichelo, Viviane M O; Behlau, Mara

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to verify whether the resonant voice based on Lessac's Y-Buzz can be perceived by listeners as resonant and different from habitual voice and to compare them to determine whether this sound exploration improves the vocal production. Nine newly graduated actors, six men and three women without voice complaints, were the subjects. They received a session of Lessac's Y-Buzz training from the primary investigator. Before training, they were asked to sustain the vowel /i/ at comfortable frequency and habitual loudness. After training, they were requested to sustain the Y-Buzz they had learned at a comfortable frequency and habitual loudness. Three speech-language pathologists (SLP) trained in voice developed an auditory-perceptive analysis. The pre- and posttraining voice samples were randomly spliced together, edited, and presented in pairs to perceptual judges who were asked to identify the most resonant of the pair. The voice samples were also acoustically compared through the Hoarseness Diagram and acoustic measures using the VoxMetria Software (CTS, version 2.0s, Brazil). The Y-Buzz trials were identified as resonant voice in 74% of the comparisons. The acoustic measures showed a statistically significant decrease of irregularity (P = 0.002) and shimmer (P = 0.38). The Hoarseness Diagram demonstrated how the resonant voice moved toward the normality for irregularity and noise components. The results showed that the resonant voice based on the Y-Buzz can be identified as resonant and different from normal voicing in the same subject, and it apparently implies a better vocal production demonstrating a significant decrease of shimmer and irregularity through the Hoarseness Diagram evaluation. PMID:16458480

  8. Resonance Type Instabilities in the Gaseous Disks of the Flat Galaxies 1 The Acoustical Resonance Type Instability and the Absence of Vortex Sheet Stabilization on Shallow Water

    Mustsevaya, J V

    1998-01-01

    Linear analysis of vortex sheet stability in the rotating gaseous disk or shallow water layer shows that presence of a central reflecting surface changes system stability significantly. An effect of absence of vortex sheet stabilization has been found as compressibility exceeds Landau criterion. The properties of multimode short-scale instability of acoustical resonance type are investigated and probability of its influence upon experiments on the rotating shallow water is discussed.

  9. Development of a combined surface plasmon resonance/surface acoustic wave device for the characterization of biomolecules

    It is known that acoustic sensor devices, if operated in liquid phase, are sensitive not just to the mass of the analyte but also to various other parameters, such as size, shape, charge and elastic constants of the analyte as well as bound and viscously entrained water. This can be used to extract valuable information about a biomolecule, particularly if the acoustic device is combined with another sensor element which is sensitive to the mass or amount of analyte only. The latter is true in good approximation for various optical sensor techniques. This work reports on the development of a combined surface plasmon resonance/surface acoustic wave sensor system which is designed for the investigation of biomolecules such as proteins or DNA. Results for the deposition of neutravidin and DNA are reported

  10. Particle mesh simulations of the Lyman-alpha forest and the signature of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the intergalactic medium

    White, Martin; Carlson, Jordan; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Fasel, Patricia; Daniel, David; Lukic, Zarija

    2009-01-01

    We present a set of ultra-large particle-mesh simulations of the LyA forest targeted at understanding the imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the inter-galactic medium. We use 9 dark matter only simulations which can, for the first time, simultaneously resolve the Jeans scale of the intergalactic gas while covering the large volumes required to adequately sample the acoustic feature. Mock absorption spectra are generated using the fluctuating Gunn-Peterson approximation which have approximately correct flux probability density functions (PDFs) and small-scale power spectra. On larger scales there is clear evidence in the redshift space correlation function for an acoustic feature, which matches a linear theory template with constant bias. These spectra, which we make publicly available, can be used to test pipelines, plan future experiments and model various physical effects. As an illustration we discuss the basic properties of the acoustic signal in the forest, the scaling of errors with noise ...