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Sample records for acoustic insulation

  1. Acoustic quality and sound insulation between dwellings

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    1998-01-01

    During the years there have been several large field investigations in different countries with the aim to find a relationship between sound insulation between dwellings and the subjective degree of annoyance. This paper presents an overview of the results, and the difficulties in comparing the d...... to another, however, several of the results show a slope around 4 % per dB. The results may be used to evaluate the acoustic quality level of a certain set of sound insulation requirements, or they may be used as a basis for specifying the desired acoustic quality of future buildings...

  2. Acoustic quality and sound insulation between dwellings

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    1999-01-01

    During the years there have been several large field investigations in different countries with the aim to find a relationship between sound insulation between dwellings and the subjective degree of annoyance. This paper presents an overview of the results, and the dif-ficulties in comparing the ...... to another, however, several of the results show a slope around 4 % per dB. The results may be used to evaluate the acoustic quality level of a certain set of sound insulation requirements, or they may be used as a basis for specifying the desired acoustic quality of future buildings....

  3. An energy model for the acoustic insulation of absorbing materials

    Díaz Cereceda, Cristina; Poblet-Puig, Jordi; Rodríguez Ferran, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In this work an energy model for the acoustic insulation of absorbing ma- terials is shown. This model is an extension of Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) [1] in order to account for the effect of non-conservative connections [2, 3]. The energy-based approach allows to solve sound insulation problems in large domains (such as those in building acoustics) in an efficient way for the whole frequency range required by regulations (50-5000 Hz). In particular, this approach is appl...

  4. The relationship between sound insulation and acoustic quality in dwellings

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    1998-01-01

    During the years there have been several large field investigations in different countries with the aim to find a relationship between sound insulation between dwellings and the subjective degree of annoyance. This paper presents an overview of the results, and the difficulties in comparing the d...... to another, however, several of the results show a slope around 4 % per dB. The results may be used to evaluate the acoustic quality level of a certain set of sound insulation requirements, or they may be used as a basis for specifying the desired acoustic quality of future buildings....

  5. Parametric fuselage design: Integration of mechanics and acoustic & thermal insulation

    Krakers, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    Designing a fuselage is a very complex process, which involves many different aspects like strength and stability, fatigue, damage tolerance, fire resistance, thermal and acoustic insulation but also inspection, maintenance, production and repair aspects. It is difficult to include all design aspect

  6. Acoustic metamaterials capable of both sound insulation and energy harvesting

    Li, Junfei; Zhou, Xiaoming; Huang, Guoliang; Hu, Gengkai

    2016-04-01

    Membrane-type acoustic metamaterials are well known for low-frequency sound insulation. In this work, by introducing a flexible piezoelectric patch, we propose sound-insulation metamaterials with the ability of energy harvesting from sound waves. The dual functionality of the metamaterial device has been verified by experimental results, which show an over 20 dB sound transmission loss and a maximum energy conversion efficiency up to 15.3% simultaneously. This novel property makes the metamaterial device more suitable for noise control applications.

  7. Sound insulation and energy harvesting based on acoustic metamaterial plate

    Assouar, Badreddine; Oudich, Mourad; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2015-03-01

    The emergence of artificially designed sub-wavelength acoustic materials, denoted acoustic metamaterials (AMM), has significantly broadened the range of materials responses found in nature. These engineered materials can indeed manipulate sound/vibration in surprising ways, which include vibration/sound insulation, focusing, cloaking, acoustic energy harvesting …. In this work, we report both on the analysis of the airborne sound transmission loss (STL) through a thin metamaterial plate and on the possibility of acoustic energy harvesting. We first provide a theoretical study of the airborne STL and confronted them to the structure-borne dispersion of a metamaterial plate. Second, we propose to investigate the acoustic energy harvesting capability of the plate-type AMM. We have developed semi-analytical and numerical methods to investigate the STL performances of a plate-type AMM with an airborne sound excitation having different incident angles. The AMM is made of silicone rubber stubs squarely arranged in a thin aluminum plate, and the STL is calculated at low-frequency range [100Hz to 3kHz] for an incoming incident sound pressure wave. The obtained analytical and numerical STL present a very good agreement confirming the reliability of developed approaches. A comparison between computed STL and the band structure of the considered AMM shows an excellent agreement and gives a physical understanding of the observed behavior. On another hand, the acoustic energy confinement in AMM with created defects with suitable geometry was investigated. The first results give a general view for assessing the acoustic energy harvesting performances making use of AMM.

  8. Sound insulation of dwellings - Legal requirements in Europe and subjective evaluation of acoustical comfort

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2003-01-01

    , the impact sound insulation and the noise level from traffic and building services. For road traffic noise it is well established that an outdoor noise level LAeq, 24 h below 55 dB in a housing area means that approximately 15-20% of the occupants are annoyed by the noise. However, for sound......Acoustical comfort is a concept that can be characterised by absence of unwanted sound and by opportunities for acoustic activities without annoying other people. In order to achieve acoustical comfort in dwellings certain requirements have to be fulfilled concerning the airborne sound insulation...... insulation against noise from neighbours the relationship is not so well understood. A comparison of sound insulation requirements in different countries shows that the sound insulation requirements differ considerably in terms of the concepts used, the frequency range considered and the level of requirement...

  9. Teaching Acoustic Properties of Materials in Secondary School: Testing Sound Insulators

    Hernandez, M. I.; Couso, D.; Pinto, R.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching the acoustic properties of materials is a good way to teach physics concepts, extending them into the technological arena related to materials science. This article describes an innovative approach for teaching sound and acoustics in combination with sound insulating materials in secondary school (15-16-year-old students). Concerning the…

  10. Foam/Aerogel Composite Materials for Thermal and Acoustic Insulation and Cryogen Storage

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); Sass, Jared P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The invention involves composite materials containing a polymer foam and an aerogel. The composite materials have improved thermal insulation ability, good acoustic insulation, and excellent physical mechanical properties. The composite materials can be used, for instance, for heat and acoustic insulation on aircraft, spacecraft, and maritime ships in place of currently used foam panels and other foam products. The materials of the invention can also be used in building construction with their combination of light weight, strength, elasticity, ability to be formed into desired shapes, and superior thermal and acoustic insulation power. The materials have also been found to have utility for storage of cryogens. A cryogenic liquid or gas, such as N.sub.2 or H.sub.2, adsorbs to the surfaces in aerogel particles. Thus, another embodiment of the invention provides a storage vessel for a cryogen.

  11. Dry sand as a specialized layer to improve the acoustic insulation between rooms one above another

    Díaz, C.; Caballol, D.; Díaz, A.; A. Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    This work presents and analyses the experimental field results of the sound insulation from airborne and impact noise of the horizontal separating elements commonly used in the past, in which a uniform layer of sand was placed on top of the floor construction to serve as a base for the ceramic tiling. The results of the acoustic measurements show that when there is an intermediate layer of sand in the horizontal separating element between rooms, the sound insulation is greater than would...

  12. Ultra-thin smart acoustic metasurface for low-frequency sound insulation

    Zhang, Hao; Xiao, Yong; Wen, Jihong; Yu, Dianlong; Wen, Xisen

    2016-04-01

    Insulating low-frequency sound is a conventional challenge due to the high areal mass required by mass law. In this letter, we propose a smart acoustic metasurface consisting of an ultra-thin aluminum foil bonded with piezoelectric resonators. Numerical and experimental results show that the metasurface can break the conventional mass law of sound insulation by 30 dB in the low frequency regime (<1000 Hz), with an ultra-light areal mass density (<1.6 kg/m2) and an ultra-thin thickness (1000 times smaller than the operating wavelength). The underlying physical mechanism of such extraordinary sound insulation performance is attributed to the infinite effective dynamic mass density produced by the smart resonators. It is also demonstrated that the excellent sound insulation property can be conveniently tuned by simply adjusting the external circuits instead of modifying the structure of the metasurface.

  13. Acoustic and Thermal Testing of an Integrated Multilayer Insulation and Broad Area Cooling Shield System

    Wood, Jessica J.; Foster, Lee W.

    2013-01-01

    A Multilayer Insulation (MLI) and Broad Area Cooling (BAC) shield thermal control system shows promise for long-duration storage of cryogenic propellant. The NASA Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) project is investigating the thermal and structural performance of this tank-applied integrated system. The MLI/BAC Shield Acoustic and Thermal Test was performed to evaluate the MLI/BAC shield's structural performance by subjecting it to worst-case launch acoustic loads. Identical thermal tests using Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) were performed before and after the acoustic test. The data from these tests was compared to determine if any degradation occurred in the thermal performance of the system as a result of exposure to the acoustic loads. The thermal test series consisted of two primary components: a passive boil-off test to evaluate the MLI performance and an active cooling test to evaluate the integrated MLI/BAC shield system with chilled vapor circulating through the BAC shield tubes. The acoustic test used loads closely matching the worst-case envelope of all launch vehicles currently under consideration for CPST. Acoustic test results yielded reasonable responses for the given load. The thermal test matrix was completed prior to the acoustic test and successfully repeated after the acoustic test. Data was compared and yielded near identical results, indicating that the MLI/BAC shield configuration tested in this series is an option for structurally implementing this thermal control system concept.

  14. Membrane-constrained acoustic metamaterials for low frequency sound insulation

    Wang, Xiaole; Zhao, Hui; Luo, Xudong; Huang, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    We present a constrained membrane-type acoustic metamaterial (CMAM) that employs constraint sticks to add out-of-plane dimensions in the design space of MAM. A CMAM sample, which adopts constraint sticks to suppress vibrations at the membrane center, was fabricated to achieve a sound transmission loss (STL) peak of 26 dB at 140 Hz, with the static areal density of 6.0 kg/m2. The working mechanism of the CMAM as an acoustic metamaterial is elucidated by calculating the averaged normal displacement, the equivalent areal density, and the effective dynamic mass of a unit cell through finite element simulations. Furthermore, the vibration modes of the CMAM indicate that the eigenmodes related to STL dips are shifted into high frequencies, thus broadening its effective bandwidth significantly. Three samples possessing the same geometry and material but different constraint areas were fabricated to illustrate the tunability of STL peaks at low frequencies.

  15. Guided acoustic and optical waves in silicon-on-insulator for Brillouin scattering and optomechanics

    Sarabalis, Christopher J; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study silicon waveguides on silica showing that it is possible to simultaneously guide optical and acoustic waves in the technologically important silicon on insulator (SOI) material system. Thin waveguides, or fins, exhibit geometrically softened mechanical modes at gigahertz frequencies with phase velocities below the Rayleigh velocity in glass, eliminating acoustic radiation losses. We propose slot waveguides on glass with telecom optical frequencies and strong radiation pressure forces resulting in Brillouin gains on the order of 500 and 50,000 1/(Wm) for backward and forward Brillouin scattering, respectively.

  16. Acoustic phonon dynamics in thin-films of the topological insulator Bi2Se3

    Transient reflectivity traces measured for nanometer-sized films (6–40 nm) of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 revealed GHz-range oscillations driven within the relaxation of hot carriers photoexcited with ultrashort (∼100 fs) laser pulses of 1.51 eV photon energy. These oscillations have been suggested to result from acoustic phonon dynamics, including coherent longitudinal acoustic phonons in the form of standing acoustic waves. An increase of oscillation frequency from ∼35 to ∼70 GHz with decreasing film thickness from 40 to 15 nm was attributed to the interplay between two different regimes employing traveling-acoustic-waves for films thicker than 40 nm and the film bulk acoustic wave resonator (FBAWR) modes for films thinner than 40 nm. The amplitude of oscillations decays rapidly for films below 15 nm thick when the indirect intersurface coupling in Bi2Se3 films switches the FBAWR regime to that of the Lamb wave excitation. The frequency range of coherent longitudinal acoustic phonons is in good agreement with elastic properties of Bi2Se3

  17. Acoustic susceptibility of an insulating spin-glass in an applied magnetic field

    Doussineau, P.; Levelut, A.; Schön, W.

    1991-01-01

    The propagation of longitudinal acoustic waves of frequency between 30 MHz and 800 MHz has been studied in the insulating spin-glass (CoF2)0.5(BaF2)0.2(NaPO3)0.3. This was achieved in the temperature range 1.2 to 4.2 K which includes the critical temperature Tc=1.8 K, with an applied magnetic field up to 9 Teslas. The results are the following. i) The velocity shows an anisotropic bahaviour. It depends on the angle between the field and the acoustic wavevector. ii) The initial slope of the ve...

  18. Dry sand as a specialized layer to improve the acoustic insulation between rooms one above another

    Díaz, C.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents and analyses the experimental field results of the sound insulation from airborne and impact noise of the horizontal separating elements commonly used in the past, in which a uniform layer of sand was placed on top of the floor construction to serve as a base for the ceramic tiling. The results of the acoustic measurements show that when there is an intermediate layer of sand in the horizontal separating element between rooms, the sound insulation is greater than would be obtained with other construction systems with equal mass per unit area, where the floor is joined rigidly to the floor construction. The effect on the sound insulation between the rooms produced by this layer of sand placed between the floor construction and the tiling is that of a cushioning layer, and demonstrates that this type of structure acts as a floating floor.En este trabajo se exponen y se analizan los resultados experimentales in situ del aislamiento acústico a ruido aéreo y a ruido de impactos de elementos de separación horizontales, habituales hace años, en los que sobre el forjado se coloca una capa uniforme de arena que sirve de asiento al suelo cerámico. Los resultados de las mediciones acústicas muestran que, cuando en el elemento de separación horizontal entre los recintos hay una capa intermedia de arena, el aislamiento acústico es mejor que el que se obtendría con otros sistemas constructivos de igual masa por unidad de superficie, con el suelo unido rígidamente al forjado. El efecto de la capa de arena colocada entre el forjado y el suelo, en el aislamiento acústico entre los recintos, es el de una capa amortiguadora, que hace que este tipo de suelo pueda considerarse como flotante.

  19. Vibro-acoustic analysis procedures for the evaluation of the sound insulation characteristics of agricultural machinery cabins

    Desmet, W.; Pluymers, B.; Sas, P.

    2003-09-01

    Over the last few years, customer demands regarding acoustic performance, along with the tightening of legal regulations on noise emission levels and human exposure to noise, have made the noise and vibration properties into important design criteria for agricultural machinery cabins. In this framework, both experimental analysis procedures for prototype testing as well as reliable numerical prediction tools for early design assessment are compulsory for an efficient optimization of the cabin noise and vibration comfort. This paper discusses several numerical approaches, which are based on the finite element and boundary element method, in terms of their practical use for airborne sound insulation predictions. To illustrate the efficiency and reliability of the various vibro-acoustic analysis procedures, the numerical procedures are applied for the case of a harvester driver's cabin and validated with experimental results.

  20. Fiber Optic Sensor for Acoustic Detection of Partial Discharges in Oil-Paper Insulated Electrical Systems

    Julio Posada-Roman; Garcia-Souto, Jose A.; Jesus Rubio-Serrano

    2012-01-01

    A fiber optic interferometric sensor with an intrinsic transducer along a length of the fiber is presented for ultrasound measurements of the acoustic emission from partial discharges inside oil-filled power apparatus. The sensor is designed for high sensitivity measurements in a harsh electromagnetic field environment, with wide temperature changes and immersion in oil. It allows enough sensitivity for the application, for which the acoustic pressure is in the range of units of Pa at a frequ...

  1. Acoustics

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  2. Floquet topological insulators for sound.

    Fleury, Romain; Khanikaev, Alexander B; Alù, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The unique conduction properties of condensed matter systems with topological order have recently inspired a quest for the similar effects in classical wave phenomena. Acoustic topological insulators, in particular, hold the promise to revolutionize our ability to control sound, allowing for large isolation in the bulk and broadband one-way transport along their edges, with topological immunity against structural defects and disorder. So far, these fascinating properties have been obtained relying on moving media, which may introduce noise and absorption losses, hindering the practical potential of topological acoustics. Here we overcome these limitations by modulating in time the acoustic properties of a lattice of resonators, introducing the concept of acoustic Floquet topological insulators. We show that acoustic waves provide a fertile ground to apply the anomalous physics of Floquet topological insulators, and demonstrate their relevance for a wide range of acoustic applications, including broadband acoustic isolation and topologically protected, nonreciprocal acoustic emitters. PMID:27312175

  3. Liner insulation for gas cooled reactors - a personal history

    The paper describes briefly the development work leading to the foil and mesh insulation used at Oldbury and the fibre insulation used in the Hinkley and Hunterston reactors. The subject is covered under the headings: cooling system; insulation specification; thermal problems; Oldbury (choice of insulant; conductivity tests; commissioning); Hinkley (choice of insulant; thermal performance; mechanical details; acoustic testing; thermal cycling tests); commissioning tests; Torness and Heysham. (U.K.)

  4. Beyond Insulation and Isolation

    Højlund, Marie Koldkjær

    2016-01-01

    insulation and isolation strategies to reduce measurable and perceptual noise levels. However, these strategies are unsuited to support the need to feel as an integral part of the shared hospital environment. This article suggests that the gap is intimately linked to a reductionist framework underlying the......Most research on the acoustic environment in the Western modern hospital identifies raised noise levels as the main causal explanation for the ranking of noise as critical stressors for patients, relatives and staffs. Therefore the most widely used strategies to tackle the problem in practice are...

  5. Thermal insulation

    Thermal insulation for vessels and piping within the reactor containment area of nuclear power plants is disclosed. The thermal insulation of this invention can be readily removed and replaced from the vessels and piping for inservice inspection, can withstand repeated wettings and dryings, and can resist high temperatures for long periods of time. 4 claims, 3 figures

  6. Automotive Insulation

    1997-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement between Boeing North America and BSR Products, Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials are now used to insulate race cars. BSR has created special TPS blanket insulation kits for use on autos that take part in NASCAR events, and other race cars through its nationwide catalog distribution system. Temperatures inside a race car's cockpit can soar to a sweltering 140 to 160 degrees, with the extreme heat coming through the engine firewall, transmission tunnel, and floor. It is common for NASCAR drivers to endure blisters and burns due to the excessive heat. Tests on a car insulated with the TPS material showed a temperature drop of some 50 degrees in the driver's cockpit. BSR-TPS Products, Inc. now manufactures insulation kits for distribution to race car teams around the world.

  7. Acoustic classification of dwellings

    Berardi, Umberto; Rasmussen, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Schemes for the classification of dwellings according to different building performances have been proposed in the last years worldwide. The general idea behind these schemes relates to the positive impact a higher label, and thus a better performance, should have. In particular, focusing on sound...... insulation performance, national schemes for sound classification of dwellings have been developed in several European countries. These schemes define acoustic classes according to different levels of sound insulation. Due to the lack of coordination among countries, a significant diversity in terms of...... descriptors, number of classes, and class intervals occurred between national schemes. However, a proposal “acoustic classification scheme for dwellings” has been developed recently in the European COST Action TU0901 with 32 member countries. This proposal has been accepted as an ISO work item. This paper...

  8. Transparent insulations

    Kouhia, I.; Nieminen, J.; Rautiainen, L. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland). Building Materials Lab.); Ojanen, T.; Salonvaara, M. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland). Lab. of Heating and Ventilation)

    1992-01-01

    The study was carried out to determine the properties of various transparent insulation materials and the performance of wall structures comprising transparent insulation materials and to investigate the performance of a number of experimental walls in full-scale tests in actual service conditions. The thermal stability range of currently available transparent insulation materials made of plastic is 80-125 deg C. It is necessary to have sufficient thermal mass and thermal conductivity of the wall in order to be able to maintain the temperature of the insulation within this range. Another option is an active application, there excessive thermal energy is removed from the wall by means of the air in the air gap or liquid in a liquid absorber. The need for heating energy in buildings reaches its peak in midwinter when solar radiation is at its lowest. Passive structures perform best in the spring and autumn and can lead to overheating problems in summer, which, however, can be controlled by the means of shading. At best, passive structures account for 10 % of the annual energy consumption at a building. Another potential application is the use of transparent thermal insulation for preheating of domestic hot water. Water consumption remains more or less constant around the year. Such a design would yield about 50 % of energy required for heating of domestic water.

  9. Topological insulators

    Franz, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Topological Insulators, volume six in the Contemporary Concepts of Condensed Matter Series, describes the recent revolution in condensed matter physics that occurred in our understanding of crystalline solids. The book chronicles the work done worldwide that led to these discoveries and provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the field. Starting in 2004, theorists began to explore the effect of topology on the physics of band insulators, a field previously considered well understood. However, the inclusion of topology brings key new elements into this old field. Whereas it was

  10. Microsphere insulation systems

    Allen, Mark S. (Inventor); Willen, Gary S. (Inventor); Mohling, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A new insulation system is provided that contains microspheres. This insulation system can be used to provide insulated panels and clamshells, and to insulate annular spaces around objects used to transfer, store, or transport cryogens and other temperature-sensitive materials. This insulation system provides better performance with reduced maintenance than current insulation systems.

  11. Communication Acoustics

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  12. Tank Insulation

    1979-01-01

    For NASA's Apollo program, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, Huntington Beach, California, developed and built the S-IVB, uppermost stage of the three-stage Saturn V moonbooster. An important part of the development task was fabrication of a tank to contain liquid hydrogen fuel for the stage's rocket engine. The liquid hydrogen had to be contained at the supercold temperature of 423 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The tank had to be perfectly insulated to keep engine or solar heat from reaching the fuel; if the hydrogen were permitted to warm up, it would have boiled off, or converted to gaseous form, reducing the amount of fuel available to the engine. McDonnell Douglas' answer was a supereffective insulation called 3D, which consisted of a one-inch thickness of polyurethane foam reinforced in three dimensions with fiberglass threads. Over a 13-year development and construction period, the company built 30 tanks and never experienced a failure. Now, after years of additional development, an advanced version of 3D is finding application as part of a containment system for transporting Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) by ship.

  13. Acoustic Neuroma

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

  14. Acoustic Neuroma

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  15. Mechanical and vibro-acoustic aspects of composite sandwich cylinders

    Yuan, C.

    2013-01-01

    Designing a fuselage involves many considerations such as strength and stability, fatigue, damage tolerance, fire and lightning resistance, thermal and acoustic insulation, production, inspection, maintenance and repair. In the background of the application of composite sandwich structures on the ai

  16. Acoustic emission pickup essentially for waveguide

    Lambda wave length acoustic emission pickup comprising two juxtaposed piezoelectric capsules of equal lambda/2 thickness and with opposite polarization, separated by an electrically insulating foil, the two opposite sides of the capsules being earthed. The electric signal resulting from the acoustic emission is picked up on the two sides facing both sides of the insulating foil and the assembly of the two piezoelectric capsules is mounted on a base insulating it from the structure on which the acoustic emission is being listened to. Application of this pickup to the surveillance of defects in the steel vessels of nuclear reactors, characterized in that it is placed at the end of a metal ultrasonic wave guide the other end of which is welded directly to the vessel

  17. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    Chen Huanyang [School of Physical Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215006 (China); Chan, C T, E-mail: kenyon@ust.h, E-mail: phchan@ust.h [Department of Physics and the William Mong Institute of NanoScience and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong)

    2010-03-24

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  18. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  19. Virtual Reality for Architectural Acoustics

    Vorländer, Michael; Schröder, Dirk; PELZER, Sönke; Wefers, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, powerful prediction models have been developed in architectural acoustics, which are used for the calculation of sound propagation in indoor and/or outdoor scenarios. Sound insulation is predicted rather precisely by using direct and flanking transmission models of sound and vibration propagation. These prediction tools are already in use in architectural design and consulting. For the extension towards virtual reality (VR) systems, it is required to accelerate the pred...

  20. Acoustical Imaging

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  1. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors.

    Browning, Diana L; Collins, Casey P; Hocum, Jonah D; Leap, David J; Rae, Dustin T; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-03-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. PMID:26715244

  2. Insulating Foams Save Money, Increase Safety

    2009-01-01

    Scientists at Langley Research Center created polyimide foam insulation for reusable cryogenic propellant tanks on the space shuttle. Meanwhile, a small Hialeah, Florida-based business, PolyuMAC Inc., was looking for advanced foams to use in the customized manufacturing of acoustical and thermal insulation. The company contacted NASA, licensed the material, and then the original inventors worked with the company's engineers to make a new material that was better for both parties. The new version, a high performance, flame retardant, flexible polyimide foam, is used for insulating NASA cryogenic propellant tanks and shows promise for use on watercraft, aircraft, spacecraft, electronics and electrical products, automobiles and automotive products, recreation equipment, and building and construction materials.

  3. Radiation acoustics

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  4. Cellular slabs with and without insulation submitted to fire conditions

    Haddad, Djaafer; Lamri, Belkacem; Fonseca, E.M.M.

    2016-01-01

    The wooden cellular slabs are lightweight structures, easy to assemble, and with excellent architectural features, as good thermal and acoustic conditions. The wooden cellular slabs with perforations are typical and very common engineering solutions, used in the ceiling or flooring to improve the acoustic absorption of compartments, and also have a good insulation and relevant architectonic characteristics. However, the high vulnerability of wooden elements submitted to fire conditions requir...

  5. INSULATION SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

    Becker, H; Marston, P.

    1984-01-01

    With careful attention to engineering detail design, it is possible to take advantage of high strength organic insulators to design more efficient fusion magnet insulation systems. By optimizing insulator / magnet design through maximum use of thin sheet mechanical properties, it may also be possible to operate at a higher radiation fluence level with additional economic payoff in reduced magnet size and cost.

  6. Battlefield acoustics

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  7. Acoustical Imaging

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  8. Acoustic telemetry

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To determine movements of green turtles in the nearshore foraging areas, we deployed acoustic tags and determined their movements through active and passive...

  9. Acoustics Research

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  10. Constructions complying with tightened Danish sound insulation requirements for new housing

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Hoffmeyer, Dan

    New sound insulation requirements in Denmark in 2008 New Danish Building Regulations with tightened sound insulation requirements were introduced in 2008 (and in 2010 with unchanged acoustic requirements). Compared to the Building Regulations from 1995, the airborne sound insulation requirements...... were 2 –3 dB stricter and the impact sound insulation requirements 5 dB stricter. The limit values are given using the descriptors R’w and L’n,w as before. For the first time, acoustic requirements for dwellings are not found as figures in the Building Regulations. Instead, it is stated that the...... requirements are considered to be met, if the acoustic indoor climate in housing complies with sound class C in the Danish classification scheme DS 490:2007 [1]. The Danish Building Research Institute is preparing a guideline [2] with examples of construction solutions to meet the tightened requirements. The...

  11. Vibro-acoustics of lightweight sandwich structures

    Lu, Tianjian

    2014-01-01

    Vibro-Acoustics of Lightweight Sandwich Structures introduces the study of the coupled vibration and acoustic behavior of lightweight sandwich structures in response to harmonic force and sound pressure. This book focuses on the theoretical modeling and experimental investigation of lightweight sandwich structures in order to provide a predictive framework for vibro-acoustic characteristics of typical engineering structures. Furthermore, by developing solution tools, it concentrates on the influence of key systematic parameters leading to effective guidance for optimal structure design toward lightweight, high-stiffness and superior sound insulation capability. This book is intended for researchers, scientists, engineers and graduate students in mechanical engineering especially in structural mechanics, mechanics and acoustics. Fengxian Xin and Tianjian Lu both work at the School of Aerospace, Xi’an Jiaotong University.

  12. Acoustic emission

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  13. Topological insulators and superconductors

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter which can not be adiabatically connected to conventional insulators and semiconductors. They are characterized by a full insulating gap in the bulk and gapless edge or surface states which are protected by time-reversal symmetry. These topological materials have been theoretically predicted and experimentally observed in a variety of systems, including HgTe quantum wells, BiSb alloys, and Bi$_2$Te$_3$ and Bi$_2$Se$_3$ crystals. We review...

  14. Plasmonics in Topological Insulators

    Yi-Ping Lai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With strong spin-orbit coupling, topological insulators have an insulating bulk state, characterized by a band gap, and a conducting surface state, characterized by a Dirac cone. Plasmons in topological insulators show high frequency-tunability in the mid-infrared and terahertz spectral regions with transverse spin oscillations, also called “spin-plasmons”. This paper presents a discussion and review of the developments in this field from the fundamental theory of plasmons in bulk, thin-film, and surface-magnetized topological insulators to the techniques of plasmon excitation and future applications.

  15. Gas insulated transmission line with insulators having field controlling recesses

    Cookson, Alan H.; Pederson, Bjorn O.

    1984-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line having a novel insulator for supporting an inner conductor concentrically within an outer sheath. The insulator has a recess contiguous with the periphery of one of the outer and inner conductors. The recess is disposed to a depth equal to an optimum gap for the dielectric insulating fluid used for the high voltage insulation or alternately disposed to a large depth so as to reduce the field at the critical conductor/insulator interface.

  16. Acoustic evaluation of beam and pot slabs with lightweight regularization layers : a case study

    Bragança, L.; Almeida, Manuela Guedes de; Mateus, Ricardo; Silva, Sandra Monteiro

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the acoustic performance of beam and pot slabs with regularization layers made of lightweight concrete. The study consists on the analysis of the acoustic behaviour of three types of solutions, through the execution of "in situ" measurements for the determination of the airborne sound insulation index and of the impact sound insulation index. The studied elements have the same support element (concrete slab), but regularization layers made of...

  17. Sound Insulation between Dwellings

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory sound insulation requirements for dwellings exist in more than 30 countries in Europe. In some countries, requirements have existed since the 1950s. Findings from comparative studies show that sound insulation descriptors and requirements represent a high degree of diversity. Unfortuna...

  18. Mineral Wool Insulation Binders

    Kowatsch, Stefan

    Mineral wool is considered the best known insulation type among the wide variety of insulation materials. There are three types of mineral wool, and these consist of glass, stone (rock), and slag wool. The overall manufacturing processes, along with features such as specifications and characteristics for each of these types, as well as the role of the binder within the process are described.

  19. Mott-insulator dynamics

    The hydrodynamics of a lattice Bose gas in a time-dependent external potential is studied in a mean-field approximation. The conditions under which a Mott insulating region can melt, and the local density can adjust to the new potential, are determined. In the case of a suddenly switched potential, it is found that the Mott insulator stays insulating and the density will not adjust if the switch is too abrupt. This comes about because too rapid currents result in Bloch oscillation-type current reversals. For a stirrer moved through a Mott insulating cloud, it is seen that only if the stirrer starts in a superfluid region and the velocity is comparable to the time scale set by the tunneling will the Mott insulator be affected.

  20. Sound insulation between dwellings

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    and initiate – where needed – improvement of sound insulation of new and existing dwellings in Europe to the benefit of the inhabitants and the society. A European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established......Regulatory sound insulation requirements for dwellings exist in more than 30 countries in Europe. In some countries, requirements have existed since the 1950s. Findings from comparative studies show that sound insulation descriptors and requirements represent a high degree of diversity...... and runs 2009-2013. The main objectives of TU0901 are to prepare proposals for harmonized sound insulation descriptors and for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality classes for dwellings. Findings from the studies provide input for the discussions in COST TU0901. Data...

  1. Mechanical and vibro-acoustic aspects of composite sandwich cylinders

    Yuan, C.

    2013-01-01

    Designing a fuselage involves many considerations such as strength and stability, fatigue, damage tolerance, fire and lightning resistance, thermal and acoustic insulation, production, inspection, maintenance and repair. In the background of the application of composite sandwich structures on the aircraft fuselage, the focus of the thesis is to investigate the vibration and acoustic behaviours of sandwich structures. As a preliminary design of aircraft fuselages, a sizing work of sandwich cyl...

  2. Market Brief : The insulation and waterproofing products market in Italy

    The use of thermal insulation in buildings in Italy is among the lowest in Western Europe. Soon, operational regulations will be in place, creating considerable opportunity for Canadian companies interested in gaining access to the Italian market through materials that provide better insulation and waterproofing for existing buildings. Approximately three fifths of the Italian insulation demand is for foamed plastics. Areas with strong commercial potential include products such as lightweight acoustic insulation materials, polymer bitumen membranes, fire-retardant foam plastic insulation, water-based waterproofing products as well as advanced waterproofing products. In 1999, the demand for insulation in Italy reached 352 million square metres of R-1 value. Currently, the most active exporters to Italy are neighbouring European countries. Italy's leading domestic insulation manufacturers are Saint-Gobin-Isover Italia, Dow, BASF and Sirap Gema. Italian industry experts recognize that in addition to heat savings, thermal insulation in buildings can contribute to reducing carbon dioxide emissions through energy efficiency. Demand for insulation products in Italy is expected to grow by 2.6 per cent per year through 2004. Demand is expected to reach $814 million in 2004. Approximately 3500 apartment buildings are in need of major renovations due to their age and because of poor construction systems used in the 1960s. Canadian imports of insulation and waterproofing products to Europe are recognized for their high quality and innovation. However, transportation costs are generally prohibitive. In January 2001, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Italian government to promote and extend exchange of information on building standards and practices, increasing Canada-Italy collaboration within the building sector. 1 tab

  3. Acoustic lenses

    Acoustic lenses focus ultrasound to produce pencil-like beams with reduced near fields. When fitted to conventional (flat-faced) transducers, such lenses greatly improve the ability to detect and size defects. This paper describes a program developed to design acoustic lenses for use in immersion or contact inspection, using normal or angle beam mode with flat or curved targets. Lens surfaces are circular in geometry to facilitate machining. For normal beam inspection of flat plate, spherical or cylindrical lenses are used. For angle beam or curved surface inspections, a compound lens is required to correct for the extra induced aberration. Such a lens is aspherical with one radius of curvature in the plane of incidence, and a different radius of curvature in the plane perpendicular to the incident plane. The resultant beam profile (i.e., location of the acoustic focus, beam diameter, 6 dB working range) depends on the degree of focusing and the transducer used. The operating frequency and bandwidth can be affected by the instrumentation used. Theoretical and measured beam profiles are in good agreement. Various applications, from zone focusing used for defect sizing in thick plate, to line focusing for pipe weld inspection, are discussed

  4. Acoustical behavior of hybrid composite sandwich panels

    Patinha, Sérgio; Cunha, Fernando Eduardo Macedo; Fangueiro, Raúl; Rana, Sohel; Prego, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the characterization of acoustic insulation behaviour of hybrid sandwich composite panels for application in modular house construction. These sandwich panels are a sustainable, light-weight and durable solution, since are based on natural fibers structure impregnated with a thermosetting polymer. In this way, three different types of hybrid composite panels containing polyurethane core and laminated composite skins were produced and analyzed, varying the ...

  5. Mott insulator dynamics

    Lundh, Emil

    2011-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of a lattice Bose gas in a time-dependent external potential is studied in a mean-field approximation. The conditions under which a Mott insulating region can melt, and the local density adjust to the new potential, are determined. In the case of a suddenly switched potential, it is found that the Mott insulator stays insulating and the density will not adjust if the switch is too abrupt. This comes about because too rapid currents result in Bloch oscillation-type current re...

  6. Microsphere Insulation Panels

    Mohling, R.; Allen, M.; Baumgartner, R.

    2006-01-01

    Microsphere insulation panels (MIPs) have been developed as lightweight, longlasting replacements for the foam and vacuum-jacketed systems heretofore used for thermally insulating cryogenic vessels and transfer ducts. The microsphere core material of a typical MIP consists of hollow glass bubbles, which have a combination of advantageous mechanical, chemical, and thermal-insulation properties heretofore available only separately in different materials. In particular, a core filling of glass microspheres has high crush strength and low density, is noncombustible, and performs well in soft vacuum.

  7. Insulation fact sheet

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    Electricity bills, oil bills, gas bills - all homeowners pay for one or more of these utilities, and wish they paid less. Often many of us do not really know how to control or reduce our utility bills. We resign ourselves to high bills because we think that is the price we have to pay for a comfortable home. We encourage our children to turn off the lights and appliances, but may not recognize the benefits of insulating the attic. This publication provides facts relative to home insulation. It discusses where to insulate, what products to use, the decision making process, installation options, and sources of additional information.

  8. Gas insulated substations

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an overview on the particular development steps of gas insulated high-voltage switchgear, and is based on the information given with the editor's tutorial. The theory is kept low only as much as it is needed to understand gas insulated technology, with the main focus of the book being on delivering practical application knowledge. It discusses some introductory and advanced aspects in the meaning of applications. The start of the book presents the theory of Gas Insulated Technology, and outlines reliability, design, safety, grounding and bonding, and factors for choosing GIS. The third chapter presents the technology, covering the following in detail: manufacturing, specification, instrument transformers, Gas Insulated Bus, and the assembly process. Next, the book goes into control and monitoring, which covers local control cabinet, bay controller, control schemes, and digital communication. Testing is explained in the middle of the book before installation and energization. Importantly, ...

  9. Antiferromagnetic crystalline topological insulators

    LIU, CHAO-XING

    2013-01-01

    The gapless surface Dirac cone of time reversal invariant topological insulators is protected by time reversal symmetry due to the Kramers' theorem. Spin degree of freedom is usually required since Kramers' theorem only guarantees double degeneracy for spinful fermions, but not for spinless fermions. In this paper, we present an antiferromagnetic spinless model, which breaks time reversal symmetry. Similar to time reversal invariant topological insulators, this model possesses a topologically...

  10. Sustainable Acoustic Metasurfaces for Sound Control

    Paola Gori

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sound attenuation with conventional acoustic materials is subject to the mass law and requires massive and bulky structures at low frequencies. A possible alternative solution is provided by the use of metamaterials, which are artificial materials properly engineered to obtain properties and characteristics that it is not possible to find in natural materials. Theory and applications of metamaterials, already consolidated in electromagnetism, can be extended to acoustics; in particular, they can be applied to improve the properties of acoustical panels. The design of acoustic metasurfaces that could effectively control transmitted sound in unconventional ways appears a significant subject to be investigated, given its wide-ranging possible applications. In this contribution, we investigate the application of a metasurface-inspired technique to achieve the acoustical insulation of an environment. The designed surface has subwavelength thickness and structuring and could be realized with cheap, lightweight and sustainable materials. We present a few examples of such structures and analyze their acoustical behavior by means of full-wave simulations.

  11. Wrapped Multilayer Insulation

    Dye, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    New NASA vehicles, such as Earth Departure Stage (EDS), Orion, landers, and orbiting fuel depots, need improved cryogenic propellant transfer and storage for long-duration missions. Current cryogen feed line multilayer insulation (MLI) performance is 10 times worse per area than tank MLI insulation. During each launch, cryogenic piping loses approximately 150,000 gallons (equivalent to $300,000) in boil-off during transfer, chill down, and ground hold. Quest Product Development Corp., teaming with Ball Aerospace, developed an innovative advanced insulation system, Wrapped MLI (wMLI), to provide improved thermal insulation for cryogenic feed lines. wMLI is high-performance multilayer insulation designed for cryogenic piping. It uses Quest's innovative discrete-spacer technology to control layer spacing/ density and reduce heat leak. The Phase I project successfully designed, built, and tested a wMLI prototype with a measured heat leak 3.6X lower than spiral-wrapped conventional MLI widely used for piping insulation. A wMLI prototype had a heat leak of 7.3 W/m2, or 27 percent of the heat leak of conventional MLI (26.7 W/m2). The Phase II project is further developing wMLI technology with custom, molded polymer spacers and advancing the product toward commercialization via a rigorous testing program, including developing advanced vacuuminsulated pipe for ground support equipment.

  12. Spin waves in ferromagnetic insulators coupled via a normal metal

    Skarsvâg, Hans; Kapelrud, André; Brataas, Arne

    2014-09-01

    Herein, we study spin-wave dispersion and dissipation in a ferromagnetic insulator-normal metal-ferromagnetic insulator system. Long-range dynamic coupling because of spin pumping and spin transfer lead to collective magnetic excitations in the two thin-film ferromagnets. In addition, the dynamic dipolar field contributes to the interlayer coupling. By solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski equation for macrospin excitations and the exchange-dipole volume as well as surface spin waves, we compute the effect of the dynamic coupling on the resonance frequencies and linewidths of the various modes. The long-wavelength modes may couple acoustically or optically. In the absence of spin-memory loss in the normal metal, the spin-pumping-induced Gilbert damping enhancement of the acoustic mode vanishes, whereas the optical mode acquires a significant Gilbert damping enhancement, comparable to that of a system attached to a perfect spin sink. The dynamic coupling is reduced for short-wavelength spin waves, and there is no synchronization. For intermediate wavelengths, the coupling can be increased by the dipolar field such that the modes in the two ferromagnetic insulators can couple despite possible small frequency asymmetries. The surface waves induced by an easy-axis surface anisotropy exhibit much greater Gilbert damping enhancement. These modes also may acoustically or optically couple, but they are unaffected by thickness asymmetries.

  13. Acoustic hemostasis

    Crum, L.; Andrew, M.; Bailey, M.; Beach, K.; Brayman, A.; Curra, F.; Kaczkowski, P.; Kargl, S.; Martin, R.; Vaezy, S.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past several years, the Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound (CIMU) at the Applied Physics Laboratory in the University of Washington has undertaken a broad research program in the general area of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Our principal emphasis has been on the use of HIFU to induce hemostasis; in particular, CIMU has sought to develop a small, lightweight, portable device that would use ultrasound for both imaging and therapy. Such a technology is needed because nearly 50% of combat casualty mortality results from exsanguinations, or uncontrolled bleeding. A similar percentage occurs for civilian death due to trauma. In this general review, a presentation of the general problem will be given, as well as our recent approaches to the development of an image-guided, transcutaneous, acoustic hemostasis device. [Work supported in part by the USAMRMC, ONR and the NIH.

  14. International proposal for an acoustic classification scheme for dwellings

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic classification schemes specify different quality levels for acoustic conditions. Regulations and classification schemes for dwellings typically include criteria for airborne and impact sound insulation, façade sound insulation and service equipment noise. However, although important for...... European countries have introduced classification schemes. The schemes typically include four classes. Comparative studies have shown significant discrepancies between countries due to national development of schemes. The diversity is an obstacle for exchange of construction experience for different...... classes, implying also trade barriers. Thus, a harmonized classification scheme would be useful, and the European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", running 2009-2013 with members from 32 countries, including three overseas...

  15. Acoustic telemetry.

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  16. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available Educational Video Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video ... for pre- and post-treatment acoustic neuroma patients. Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic ...

  17. COMFORT PROVIDING SYSTEMS IN SPACES WITH ACOUTIC INSULATION

    Grzegorz KLEKOT

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High capacities of currently available devices for sound registering and processing have generated a need for sound insulated spaces dedicated to exchange of confidential information. In such spaces, preventing propagation of vibroacoustic signals both by the way of air and construction elements entails complete insulation of the room. In order to meet this requirement, proper chemical composition of air and stabilized temperature conditions have to be guaranteed. The paper discusses questions related to the process of solving the task of providing thermal comfort and satisfying air quality in a room for confidential discussions. It presents prototype solutions of installations dedicated to stabilize human-friendly conditions inside a modular chamber provided with acoustic insulation.

  18. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...

  19. Embedded ultrasound sensor in a silicon-on-insulator photonic platform

    A miniaturized ultrasound sensor is demonstrated in a silicon-on-insulator platform. The sensor is based on a π-phase-shifted Bragg grating formed by waveguide corrugation. Ultrasound detection is performed by monitoring shifts in the resonance frequency of the grating using pulse interferometry. The device is characterized by measuring its response to a wideband acoustic point source generated using the optoacoustic effect. Experimental results show that the sensor's response is dominated by the formation of surface acoustic waves

  20. Wooden cellular slabs with and without insulation submitted to fire conditions

    Haddad, Djaafer; Lamri, Belkacem; Fonseca, E.M.M.

    2016-01-01

    The wooden cellular slabs are lightweight structures, easy to assemble, and with excellent architectural features, as thermal and acoustic conditions. The wooden cellular slabs with perforations are typical and very common engineering solutions, used in the ceiling or flooring plates to improve the acoustic absorption of compartments, and also have a good insulation and relevant architectonic characteristics. However, the high vulnerability of wooden elements submitted to fire conditions requ...

  1. Insulation bonding test system

    Beggs, J. M.; Johnston, G. D.; Coleman, A. D.; Portwood, J. N.; Saunders, J. M.; Redmon, J. W.; Porter, A. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and a system for testing the bonding of foam insulation attached to metal is described. The system involves the use of an impacter which has a calibrated load cell mounted on a plunger and a hammer head mounted on the end of the plunger. When the impacter strikes the insulation at a point to be tested, the load cell measures the force of the impact and the precise time interval during which the hammer head is in contact with the insulation. This information is transmitted as an electrical signal to a load cell amplifier where the signal is conditioned and then transmitted to a fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzer. The FFT analyzer produces energy spectral density curves which are displayed on a video screen. The termination frequency of the energy spectral density curve may be compared with a predetermined empirical scale to determine whether a igh quality bond, good bond, or debond is present at the point of impact.

  2. Insulators for fusion applications

    Design studies for fusion devices and reactors have become more detailed in recent years and with this has come a better understanding of requirements and operating conditions for insulators in these machines. Ceramic and organic insulators are widely used for many components of fusion devices and reactors namely: radio frequency (RF) energy injection systems (BeO, Al2O3, Mg Al2O4, Si3N4); electrical insulation for the torus structure (SiC, Al2O3, MgO, Mg Al2O4, Si4Al2O2N6, Si3N4, Y2O3); lightly-shielded magnetic coils (MgO, MgAl2O4); the toroidal field coil (epoxies, polyimides), neutron shield (B4C, TiH2); high efficiency electrical generation; as well as the generation of very high temperatures for high efficiency hydrogen production processes (ZrO2 and Al2O3 - mat, graphite and carbon - felt). Timely development of insulators for fusion applications is clearly necessary. Those materials to be used in fusion machines should show high resistance to radiation damage and maintain their structural integrity. Now the need is urgent for a variety of radiation resistant materials, but much effort in these areas is required for insulators to be considered seriously by the design community. This document contains 14 papers from an IAEA meeting. It was the objective of this meeting to identify existing problems in analysing various situations of applications and requirements of electrical insulators and ceramics in fusion and to recommend strategies and different stages of implementation. This meeting was endorsed by the International Fusion Research Council

  3. Acoustic dispersive prism

    Hussein Esfahlani; Sami Karkar; Herve Lissek; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic ...

  4. Condensation in insulated homes

    Wiley, R A

    1978-05-28

    A research proposal on condensation in insulated homes is presented. Information is provided on: justification for condensation control; previous work and present outlook (good vapor barrier, condensation and retrofit insulation, vapor barrier decreases condensation, brick-veneer walls, condensation in stress-skin panels, air-conditioned buildings, retrofitting for conservation, study on mobile homes, high indoor relative humidity, report on various homes); and procedure (after funding has been secured). Measures are briefly described on opening walls, testing measures, and retrofitting procedures. An extensive bibliography and additional informative citations are included. (MCW)

  5. Self-Healing Wire Insulation

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A self-healing system for an insulation material initiates a self-repair process by rupturing a plurality of microcapsules disposed on the insulation material. When the plurality of microcapsules are ruptured, reactants within the plurality of microcapsules react to form a replacement polymer in a break of the insulation material. This self-healing system has the ability to repair multiple breaks in a length of insulation material without exhausting the repair properties of the material.

  6. Acoustic Neurinomas

    Mohammad Faraji Rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuromas (AN are schwann cell-derived tumors that commonly arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve also known as vestibular schwannoma(VS causes unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and unsteadiness. In many cases, the tumor size may remain unchanged for many years following diagnosis, which is typically made by MRI. In the majority of cases the tumor is small, leaving the clinician and patient with the options of either serial scanning or active treatment by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR or microneurosurgery. Despite the vast number of published treatment reports, comparative studies are few. The predominant clinical endpoints of AN treatment include tumor control, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Less focus has been put on symptom relief and health-related quality of life (QOL. It is uncertain if treating a small tumor leaves the patient with a better chance of obtaining relief from future hearing loss, vertigo or tinnitus than by observing it without treatment.   In this paper we review the literature for the natural course, the treatment alternatives and the results of AN. Finally, we present our experience with a management strategy applied for more than 30 years.

  7. Acoustic Spatiality

    Brandon LaBelle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of listening can be appreciated as intensely relational, bringing us into contact with surrounding events, bodies and things. Given that sound propagates and expands outwardly, as a set of oscillations from a particular source, listening carries with it a sensual intensity, whereby auditory phenomena deliver intrusive and disruptive as well as soothing and assuring experiences. The physicality characteristic of sound suggests a deeply impressionistic, locational "knowledge structure" – that is, the ways in which listening affords processes of exchange, of being in the world, and from which we extend ourselves. Sound, as physical energy reflecting and absorbing into the materiality around us, and even one's self, provides a rich platform for understanding place and emplacement. Sound is always already a trace of location.Such features of auditory experience give suggestion for what I may call an acoustical paradigm – how sound sets in motion not only the material world but also the flows of the imagination, lending to forces of signification and social structure, and figuring us in relation to each other. The relationality of sound brings us into a steady web of interferences, each of which announces the promise or problematic of being somewhere.

  8. Insulated ECG electrodes

    Portnoy, W. M.; David, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Insulated, capacitively coupled electrode does not require electrolyte paste for attachment. Other features of electrode include wide range of nontoxic material that may be employed for dielectric because of sputtering technique used. Also, electrode size is reduced because there is no need for external compensating networks with FET operational amplifier.

  9. Holographic fractional topological insulators

    We give a holographic realization of the recently proposed low-energy effective action describing a fractional topological insulator. In particular we verify that the surface of this hypothetical material supports a fractional quantum Hall current corresponding to half that of a Laughlin state.

  10. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  11. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton;

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design for the...... acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design was...... simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  12. One-dimensional rigid film acoustic metamaterials

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng

    2015-11-01

    We have designed a 1D film-type acoustic metamaterial structure consisting of several polymer films directly stacked on each other. It is experimentally revealed that the mass density law can be broken by such structures in the low frequency range. By comparing the sound transmission loss (STL) curves of structures with different numbers of cycles, materials and incident sound directions, several physical properties of the 1D film-type acoustic metamaterial are revealed, which consist of cyclical effects, surface effects and orientation effects. It is suggested that the excellent low frequency sound insulation capacity is influenced by both the cycle number and the stiffness of the film surface. Meanwhile, the surface effect plays a dominant role among these physical properties. Due to the surface acoustic property, for structures with a particular combination form, the STL dominated by the cyclical effects may reach saturation with increasing number of construction periods. Moreover, in some cases, the sound insulation ability is diverse for different sound incidence directions. This kind of 1D film-type periodic structure with these special physical properties provides a new concept for the regulation of sound waves.

  13. Integrated Multilayer Insulation

    Dye, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Integrated multilayer insulation (IMLI) is being developed as an improved alternative to conventional multilayer insulation (MLI), which is more than 50 years old. A typical conventional MLI blanket comprises between 10 and 120 metallized polymer films separated by polyester nets. MLI is the best thermal- insulation material for use in a vacuum, and is the insulation material of choice for spacecraft and cryogenic systems. However, conventional MLI has several disadvantages: It is difficult or impossible to maintain the desired value of gap distance between the film layers (and consequently, it is difficult or impossible to ensure consistent performance), and fabrication and installation are labor-intensive and difficult. The development of IMLI is intended to overcome these disadvantages to some extent and to offer some additional advantages over conventional MLI. The main difference between IMLI and conventional MLI lies in the method of maintaining the gaps between the film layers. In IMLI, the film layers are separated by what its developers call a micro-molded discrete matrix, which can be loosely characterized as consisting of arrays of highly engineered, small, lightweight, polymer (typically, thermoplastic) frames attached to, and placed between, the film layers. The term "micro-molded" refers to both the smallness of the frames and the fact that they are fabricated in a process that forms precise small features, described below, that are essential to attainment of the desired properties. The term "discrete" refers to the nature of the matrix as consisting of separate frames, in contradistinction to a unitary frame spanning entire volume of an insulation blanket.

  14. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  15. Thin Aerogel as a Spacer in Multilayer Insulation

    Moroz, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic fluid management is a critical technical area that is needed for future space exploration. A key challenge is the storability of liquid hydrogen (LH2), liquid methane (LCH4), and liquid oxygen (LOX) propellants for long-duration missions. The storage tanks must be well-insulated to prevent over-pressurization and venting, which can lead to unacceptable propellant losses for long-duration missions to Mars and beyond. Aspen Aerogels had validated the key process step to enable the fabrication of thin, low-density aerogel materials. The multilayer aerogel insulation (MLAI) system prototypes were prepared using sheets of aerogel materials with superior thermal performance exceeding current state-of-the-art insulation for space applications. The exceptional properties of this system include a new breakthrough in high-vacuum cryogenic thermal insulation, providing a durable material with excellent thermal performance at a reduced cost when compared to longstanding state-of-the-art multilayer insulation systems. During the Phase II project, further refinement and qualification/system-level testing of the MLAI system will be performed for use in cryogenic storage applications. Aspen has been in discussions with United Launch Alliance, LLC; NASA's Kennedy Space Center; and Yetispace, Inc., to test the MLAI system on rea-lworld tanks such as Vibro-Acoustic Test Article (VATA) or the Cryogenic Orbital Testbed (CRYOTE).

  16. Industrial thermal insulation: an assessment

    Donnelly, R.G.; Tennery, V.J.; McElroy, D.L.; Godfrey, T.G.; Kolb, J.O.

    1976-03-01

    A large variety of thermal insulation materials is manufactured for application in various temperature ranges and environments. Additional and improved thermal insulation for steam systems is a key area with immediate energy conservation potential in several of the larger energy-consuming industries. Industrial thermal insulation technology was assessed by obtaining input from a variety of sources including insulation manufacturers, system designers, installers, users, consultants, measurement laboratories, open literature, and in-house knowledge. The assessment identified a number of factors relevant to insulation materials and usage that could contribute significantly to improved energy conservation.

  17. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and...

  18. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  19. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... is ANA? Mission Statement Board of Directors ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic ... is ANA? Mission Statement Board of Directors ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic ...

  20. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Join/Renew Ways to Give ANA Discussion Forum ... ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Search ANAUSA.org Connect with us! Educational Video ...

  1. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... Resources Patient Surveys Related Links Clinical Trials.gov Health Care Insurance Toolkit Additional Resources ANA Public Webinars © 2016 Acoustic Neuroma Association Acoustic Neuroma Association ® • ...

  2. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask ... Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask ...

  3. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Join/Renew ... ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Search ANAUSA. ...

  4. Cystic acoustic neuromas

    Chitkara, Naveen; Chanda, Rakesh; Yadav, S. P. S.; N.K. Sharma

    2002-01-01

    Predominantly cystic acoustic neuromas are rare and they usually present with clinical and radiological features different from their more common solid counterparts. Two cases of cystic acoustic neuromas are reported here.

  5. Green insulation: hemp fibers

    Anon

    2011-09-15

    Indian hemp (Cannabis indica) is known for its psychotropic values and it is banned in most countries. However, industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa) is known for its tough fibers. Several manufactures in Europe including, small niche players, have been marketing hemp insulation products for several years. Hemp is a low environmental impact material. Neither herbicide nor pesticide is used during the growth of hemp. The fibers are extracted in a waste-free and chemical-free mechanical process. Hemp can consume CO2 during its growth. In addition, hemp fiber can be disposed of harmlessly by composting or incineration at the end of its life. Hemp fibers are processed and treated only minimally to resist rot and fungal activity. There is little health risk when producing and installing the insulation, thanks to the absence of toxic additive. Its thermal resistance is comparable to mineral wool. But the development and marketing of hemp fibers may be restricted in North America.

  6. Super insulating aerogel glazing

    Schultz, Jørgen Munthe; Jensen, Karsten Ingerslev; Kristiansen, Finn Harken

    2004-01-01

    Monolithic silica aerogel offers the possibility of combining super insulation and high solar energy transmittance, which has been the background for a previous and a current EU project on research and development of monolithic silica aerogel as transparent insulation in windows. Generally, windows...... form the weakest part of the thermal envelope with respect to heat loss coefficient, but on the other hand also play an important role for passive solar energy utilisation. For window orientations other than south, the net energy balance will be close to or below zero. However, the properties of...... aerogel glazing will allow for a positive net energy gain even for north facing vertical windows in a Danish climate during the heating season. This means that high quality daylight can be obtained even with additional energy gain. On behalf of the partners of the two EU projects, results related to the...

  7. Insulated pipe clamp design

    Thin wall large diameter piping for breeder reactor plants can be subjected to significant thermal shocks during reactor scrams and other upset events. On the Fast Flux Test Facility, the addition of thick clamps directly on the piping was undesired because the differential metal temperatures between the pipe wall and the clamp could have significantly reduced the pipe thermal fatigue life cycle capabilities. Accordingly, an insulated pipe clamp design concept was developed. The design considerations and methods along with the development tests are presented. Special considerations to guard against adverse cracking of the insulation material, to maintain the clamp-pipe stiffness desired during a seismic event, to minimize clamp restraint on the pipe during normal pipe heatup, and to resist clamp rotation or spinning on the pipe are emphasized

  8. Consider insulation reliability

    This paper reports that when calcium silicate and two brands of mineral wool were compared in a series of laboratory tests, calcium silicate was more reliable. And in-service experience with mineral wool at a Canadian heavy crude refinery provided examples of many of the lab's findings. Lab tests, conducted under controlled conditions following industry accepted practices, showed calcium silicate insulation was stronger, tougher and more durable than the mineral wools to which it was compared. For instance, the calcium silicate insulation exhibited only some minor surface cracking when heated to 1,200 degrees F (649 degrees C), while the mineral wools suffered binder burnout resulting in sagging, delamination and a general loss of dimensional stability

  9. Photonic Floquet Topological Insulators

    Rechtsman, Mikael C; Plotnik, Yonatan; Lumer, Yaakov; Nolte, Stefan; Segev, Mordechai; Szameit, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The topological insulator is a fundamentally new phase of matter, with the striking property that the conduction of electrons occurs only on its surface, not within the bulk, and that conduction is topologically protected. Topological protection, the total lack of scattering of electron waves by disorder, is perhaps the most fascinating and technologically important aspect of this material: it provides robustness that is otherwise known only for superconductors. However, unlike superconductivity and the quantum Hall effect, which necessitate low temperatures or magnetic fields, the immunity to disorder of topological insulators occurs at room temperature and without any external magnetic field. For this reason, topological protection is predicted to have wide-ranging applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing and spintronics. Recently, a large theoretical effort has been directed towards bringing the concept into the domain of photonics: achieving topological protection of light at optical frequencies. ...

  10. Topological Mott Insulators

    Raghu, S.; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Honerkamp, C.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    We consider extended Hubbard models with repulsive interactions on a Honeycomb lattice and the transitions from the semi-metal phase at half-filling to Mott insulating phases. In particular, due to the frustrating nature of the second-neighbor repulsive interactions, topological Mott phases displaying the quantum Hall and the quantum spin Hall effects are found for spinless and spinful fermion models, respectively. We present the mean-field phase diagram and consider the effects of fluctuatio...

  11. Weyl Mott Insulator

    Morimoto, Takahiro; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic Weyl fermion (WF) often appears in the band structure of three dimensional magnetic materials and acts as a source or sink of the Berry curvature, i.e., the (anti-)monopole. It has been believed that the WFs are stable due to their topological indices except when two Weyl fermions of opposite chiralities annihilate pairwise. Here, we theoretically show for a model including the electron-electron interaction that the Mott gap opens for each WF without violating the topological stability, leading to a topological Mott insulator dubbed Weyl Mott insulator (WMI). This WMI is characterized by several novel features such as (i) energy gaps in the angle-resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES) and the optical conductivity, (ii) the nonvanishing Hall conductance, and (iii) the Fermi arc on the surface with the penetration depth diverging as approaching to the momentum at which the Weyl point is projected. Experimental detection of the WMI by distinguishing from conventional Mott insulators is discussed with possible relevance to pyrochlore iridates.

  12. Repetitively pulsed vacuum insulator flashover

    Experiments were performed to determine the flashover strength of various vacuum insulators under conditions of repetitive pulsing. The pulse duration was 30 ns, and the thickness of a typical insulator sample was 1.8 cm. Data were taken for 450 insulators from five different materials. An insulator was subjected to an extended series of pulses at a given repetition rate and field. If flashover was not detected, the field level was increased and the sequence repeated. At rates up to 50 pulses per second, there was no apparent dependence of flashover field on rate. In addition, some ''single shot'' data were taken, including various modifications of the geometries and surface textures of the insulators. Only two to the modifications increased the flashover strength significantly over that of a 450 sample: (1) annealing some plastics (roughly a 35% increase), and (2) extending the insulator to cover the surfaces of both electrodes (an increase of nearly a factor of two)

  13. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    Blaeser, Susan B; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Susan B. Blaeser.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:27036268

  14. Lightweight acoustic treatments for aerospace applications

    Naify, Christina Jeanne

    2011-12-01

    Increase in the use of composites for aerospace applications has the benefit of decreased structural weight, but at the cost of decreased acoustic performance. Stiff, lightweight structures (such as composites) are traditionally not ideal for acoustic insulation applications because of high transmission loss at low frequencies. A need has thus arisen for effective sound insulation materials for aerospace and automotive applications with low weight addition. Current approaches, such as the addition of mass law dominated materials (foams) also perform poorly when scaled to small thickness and low density. In this dissertation, methods which reduce sound transmission without adding significant weight are investigated. The methods presented are intended to be integrated into currently used lightweight structures such as honeycomb sandwich panels and to cover a wide range of frequencies. Layering gasses of differing acoustic impedances on a panel substantially reduced the amount of sound energy transmitted through the panel with respect to the panel alone or an equivalent-thickness single species gas layer. The additional transmission loss derives from successive impedance mismatches at the interfaces between gas layers and the resulting inefficient energy transfer. Attachment of additional gas layers increased the transmission loss (TL) by as much as 17 dB at high (>1 kHz) frequencies. The location and ordering of the gasses with respect to the panel were important factors in determining the magnitude of the total TL. Theoretical analysis using a transfer matrix method was used to calculate the frequency dependence of sound transmission for the different configurations tested. The method accurately predicted the relative increases in TL observed with the addition of different gas layer configurations. To address low-frequency sound insulation, membrane-type locally resonant acoustic materials (LRAM) were fabricated, characterized, and analyzed to understand their

  15. The need for good acoustic design of schools

    Shield, Bridget

    2005-04-01

    This paper gives an overview of research into classroom acoustics, highlighting the importance of a good acoustic environment in schools to enhance teaching and learning. The paper is aimed at a general audience of people interested in education and school design. In the past 30 years there has been a great deal of research into the effects of noise and poor acoustics in schools on children and teachers. It has been shown in many studies that children have difficulty hearing and understanding their teachers in noise, and both external environmental noise and noise within a school affect children's academic performance. Furthermore many teachers suffer from voice and throat problems which may be attributable to a poor acoustic environment in the classroom. The acoustic design of a classroom has a direct influence upon noise levels and the intelligibility of speech. Poor sound insulation and excessive reverberation have the potential to increase noise levels and reduce speech intelligibility. However, despite the introduction in many countries of legislation or guidelines for acoustic design of schools, in general acoustics still has a low priority in school design and many schools, old and new, fail to meet the current standards.

  16. [INVITED] Laser generation and detection of ultrafast shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids

    Pezeril, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the up-to-date findings related to ultrafast shear acoustic waves. Recent progress obtained for the laser generation and detection of picosecond shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids is reviewed. Examples in which the transverse isotropic symmetry of the sample structure is broken in order to permit shear acoustic wave generation through sudden laser heating are described in detail. Alternative photo-induced mechanisms for ultrafast shear acoustic generation in metals, semiconductors, insulators, magnetostrictive, piezoelectric and electrostrictive materials are reviewed as well. With reference to key experiments, an all-optical technique employed to probe longitudinal and shear structural dynamics in the GHz frequency range in ultra-thin liquid films is described. This technique, based on specific ultrafast shear acoustic transducers, has opened new perspectives that will be discussed for ultrafast shear acoustic probing of viscoelastic liquids at the nanometer scale.

  17. Low Permeability Polyimide Insulation Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Resodyn Technologies proposes a new technology that enables the application of polyimide based cryogenic insulation with low hydrogen permeability. This effort...

  18. Super insulating aerogel glazing

    Schultz, Jørgen Munthe; Jensen, Karsten Ingerslev; Kristiansen, Finn Harken

    This paper describes the application results of a previous and current EU-project on super insulating glazing based on monolithic silica aerogel. Prototypes measuring approx. 55´55 cm2 have been made with 15 mm evacuated aerogel between two layers of low-iron glass. Anti-reflective treatment of the...... glass and a heat-treatment of the aerogel increases the visible quality and the solar energy transmittance. A low-conductive rim seal solution with the required vacuum barrier properties has been developed along with a reliable assembly and evacuation process. The prototypes have a centre heat loss...

  19. Passive Collecting of Solar Radiation Energy using Transparent Thermal Insulators, Energetic Efficiency of Transparent Thermal Insulators

    Smajo Sulejmanovic; Suad Kunosic; Ema Hankic

    2014-01-01

    This paper explains passive collection of solar radiation energy using transparent thermal insulators. Transparent thermal insulators are transparent for sunlight, at the same time those are very good thermal insulators. Transparent thermal insulators can be placed instead of standard conventional thermal insulators and additionally transparent insulators can capture solar radiation, transform it into heat and save heat just as standard insulators. Using transparent insulators would lead to r...

  20. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  1. Research progress on space charge characteristics in polymeric insulation

    Zhang, Yibo; Christen, Thomas; Meng, Xing; Chen, Jiansheng; Rocks, Jens

    2016-03-01

    Due to their excellent electrical insulation properties and processability, polymer materials are used in many electrical products. It is widely believed that space charge plays an important role for the electric field distribution, conduction, ageing, and electric breakdown of polymeric insulation. This paper reviews measurements and characteristics of space charge behavior which mainly determined by the pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) measurement technique. Particular interests are the effects of the applied voltage, the electrodes, temperature, humidity, microstructure, additives, and filler materials on accumulation, distribution, transport, and the decay of space charge in polymeric materials. This review paper is to provide an overview on various space charge effects under different conditions, and also to summarize the information for polymeric materials with suppressed space charge and improved electrical behavior.

  2. Carrier transport in Bi2Se3 topological insulator slab

    Gupta, Gaurav; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun; Jalil, Mansoor Bin Abdul; Liang, Gengchiau

    2015-11-01

    Electron transport in Bi2Se3 topological insulator slabs is investigated in the thermal activation regime (>50 K) both in the absence (ballistic) and presence of weak and strong acoustic phonon scattering using the non-equilibrium Green function approach. Resistance of the slab is simulated as a function of temperature for a range of slab thicknesses and effective doping in order to gain a handle on how various factors interact and compete to determine the overall resistance of the slab. If the Bi2Se3 slab is biased at the Dirac point, resistance is found to display an insulating trend even for strong electron-phonon coupling strength. However, when the Fermi-level lies close to the bulk conduction band (heavy electron doping), phonon scattering can dominate and result in a metallic behavior, although the insulating trend is retained in the limit of ballistic transport. Depending on values of the operating parameters, the temperature dependence of the slab is found to exhibit a remarkably complex behavior, which ranges from insulating to metallic, and includes cases where the resistance exhibits a local maximum, much like the contradictory behaviors seen experimentally in various experiments.

  3. Magnetically insulated H- diodes

    At the Univ. of California, Irvine, the authors have been studying the production of intense H- beams using pulse power techniques for the past 7 years. Previously, current densities of H- ions for various diode designs at UCI have been a few A/cm2. Recently, they have developed diodes similar to the coaxial design of the Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow, USSR, where current densities of up to 200 A/cm2 were reported using nuclear activation of a carbon target. In experiments at UCI employing the coaxial diode, current densities of up to 35 A/cm2 from a passive polyethylene cathode loaded with TiH2 have been measured using a pinhole camera and CR-39 track recording plastic. The authors have also been working on a self-insulating, annular diode which can generate a directed beam of H- ions. In the annular diode experiments a plasma opening switch was used to provide a prepulse and a current path which self-insulated the diode. These experiments were done on the machine APEX, a 1 MV, 50 ns, 7 Ω pulseline with a unipolar negative prepulse of ∼ 100 kV and 400 ns duration. Currently, the authors are modifying the pulseline to include an external LC circuit which can generate a bipolar, 150 kV, 1 μs duration prepulse (similar prepulse characteristic as in the Lebedev Institute experiments cited above)

  4. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units

    Diana S Pope; Miller-Klein, Erik T.

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation) and reduce reverberation ...

  5. Acoustic streaming in microchannels

    Tribler, Peter Muller

    , and experimental results for the streaming-induced drag force dominated motion of particles suspended in a water-filled microchannel supporting a transverse half-wavelength resonance. The experimental and theoretical results agree within a mean relative dierence of approximately 20%, a low deviation given state......This thesis presents studies of boundary-driven acoustic streaming in microfluidic channels, which is a steady flow of the fluid initiated by the interactions of an oscillating acoustic standing wave and the rigid walls of the microchannel. The studies present analysis of the acoustic resonance......, the acoustic streaming flow, and the forces on suspended microparticles. The work is motivated by the application of particle focusing by acoustic radiation forces in medical, environmental and food sciences. Here acoustic streaming is most often unwanted, because it limits the focusability of particles...

  6. Vibro-acoustics

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume book gives a thorough and comprehensive presentation of vibration and acoustic theories. Different from traditional textbooks which typically deal with some aspects of either acoustic or vibration problems, it is unique of this book to combine those two correlated subjects together. Moreover, it provides fundamental analysis and mathematical descriptions for several crucial phenomena of Vibro-Acoustics which are quite useful in noise reduction, including how structures are excited, energy flows from an excitation point to a sound radiating surface, and finally how a structure radiates noise to a surrounding fluid. Many measurement results included in the text make the reading interesting and informative. Problems/questions are listed at the end of each chapter and the solutions are provided. This will help the readers to understand the topics of Vibro-Acoustics more deeply. The book should be of interest to anyone interested in sound and vibration, vehicle acoustics, ship acoustics and inter...

  7. Springer handbook of acoustics

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and electronics. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is also in his 2nd edition an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents. This new edition of the Handbook features over 11 revised and expanded chapters, new illustrations, and 2 new chapters covering microphone arrays  and acoustic emission.  Updated chapters contain the latest research and applications in, e.g. sound propagation in the atmosphere, nonlinear acoustics in fluids, building and concert hall acoustics, signal processing, psychoacoustics, computer music, animal bioacousics, sound intensity, modal acoustics as well as new chapters on microphone arrays an...

  8. Tailorable Advanced Blanket Insulation (TABI)

    Sawko, Paul M.; Goldstein, Howard E.

    1987-01-01

    Single layer and multilayer insulating blankets for high-temperature service fabricated without sewing. TABI woven fabric made of aluminoborosilicate. Triangular-cross-section flutes of core filled with silica batting. Flexible blanket formed into curved shapes, providing high-temperature and high-heat-flux insulation.

  9. Research on vacuum insulation for cryocables

    Vacuum insulation, as compared with solid insulation, simplifies the construction of both resistive or superconducting cryogenic cables. The common vacuum space in the cable can furnish thermal insulation between the environment and the cryogenic coolant, provide electrical insulation between conductors, and establish thermal isolation between go- and return-coolant streams. The differences between solid and vacuum high voltage insulation are discussed, and research on the design, materials selection, and testing of vacuum insulated cryogenic cables is described

  10. Magnetically self-insulated transformers

    Magnetic insulation is the only practicable form of insulation for much equipment used in ultrahigh pulsed-power work, including transmission lines and plasma opening switches. It has not however so far been successfully exploited in the transformers that are necessarily involved, and the first proposed design that appeared more than 30 years ago raised apparently insuperable problems. The two novel arrangements for a magnetically insulated transformer described in this paper overcome the problems faced by the earlier designs and also offer considerable scope for development in a number of important areas. Theoretical justification is given for their insulating properties, and this is confirmed by proof-of-principle results obtained from a small-scale experimental prototype in which magnetic insulation was demonstrated at up to 100 kV. (author)

  11. Hybrid Multifoil Aerogel Thermal Insulation

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Paik, Jong-Ah; Jones, Steven; Nesmith, Bill

    2008-01-01

    This innovation blends the merits of multifoil insulation (MFI) with aerogel-based insulation to develop a highly versatile, ultra-low thermally conductive material called hybrid multifoil aerogel thermal insulation (HyMATI). The density of the opacified aerogel is 240 mg/cm3 and has thermal conductivity in the 20 mW/mK range in high vacuum and 25 mW/mK in 1 atmosphere of gas (such as argon) up to 800 C. It is stable up to 1,000 C. This is equal to commercially available high-temperature thermal insulation. The thermal conductivity of the aerogel is 36 percent lower compared to several commercially available insulations when tested in 1 atmosphere of argon gas up to 800 C.

  12. Hydrogenerator insulation: maintaining the system

    Dang, G.; McCrae, G.

    Changes in hydrogenerator insulation systems have occurred in the last 20 years because of the development of large projects and the resulting requirements for high capacity hydrogenerators. Insulation systems, which originally consisted of mica tapes and asphalt or shellac binders, have been replaced with hard insulation systems using mica and polyester or epoxy resin. However, the new insulation systems have created some new problems. As a result, many hydro plant operators have had to update maintenance practices and develop new preventive maintenance techniques. Insulation system maintenance practices necessary to detect, identify and correct defects and problems so that further deterioration can be arrested, abnormal conditions remedied, and in-service equipment failures prevented are discussed.

  13. Localized Acoustic Surface Modes

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-08-04

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes (ASMs). We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  14. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  15. Handbook of Engineering Acoustics

    Möser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the physical background of engineering acoustics, focusing on empirically obtained engineering experience as well as on measurement techniques and engineering methods for prognostics. Its goal is not only to describe the state of art of engineering acoustics but also to give practical help to engineers in order to solve acoustic problems. It deals with the origin, the transmission and the methods of the abating different kinds of air-borne and structure-borne sounds caused by various mechanisms – from traffic to machinery and flow-induced sound. In addition the modern aspects of room and building acoustics, as well as psychoacoustics and active noise control, are covered.

  16. Acoustic dispersive prism

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  17. Technology Solutions Case Study: Insulating Concrete Forms

    none,

    2012-10-01

    This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory project investigated insulating concrete forms—rigid foam, hollow walls that are filled with concrete for highly insulated, hurricane-resistant construction.

  18. Thermal Insulating Concrete Tiles

    Sarkawt.A. Saeed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This Paper studies the shape of high-thermal insulating concrete tiles used for roof tiling. The theoretical part consists of a comparison between this invented tiles and ordinary terrazzo tiles. The analysis depends on the values of thermal conductivity of the material used. The results showed that when these tiles are used for roof tiling, the temperature difference between the outside of roof surface and the inside room can be reduced about six times compared with the use of ordinary terrazzo tiles. In addition, these specimens were fabricated and tested for rupture and absorption tests. The test results showed that, they had a good resistance to the applied test loads, and high resistance to water absorption. The authors believe that, the results are remarkable, highly applicable and should be taken into consideration in building constructions.

  19. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    ... org Connect with us! What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Each heading slides to reveal information. Important Points ... Neuroma Important Points To Know About an Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular schwannoma, ...

  20. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Hora, Petr; Červená, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2010), s. 25-36. ISSN 1802-680X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1630 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission source * wave propagation * FEM Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  1. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself Post-treatment Post-treatment ... Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself Post-treatment Post-treatment ...

  2. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  3. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  4. Computational Ocean Acoustics

    Jensen, Finn B; Porter, Michael B; Schmidt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the computer has played an increasingly pivotal role in the field of ocean acoustics. Faster and less expensive than actual ocean experiments, and capable of accommodating the full complexity of the acoustic problem, numerical models are now standard research tools in ocean laboratories. The progress made in computational ocean acoustics over the last thirty years is summed up in this authoritative and innovatively illustrated new text. Written by some of the field's pioneers, all Fellows of the Acoustical Society of America, Computational Ocean Acoustics presents the latest numerical techniques for solving the wave equation in heterogeneous fluid–solid media. The authors discuss various computational schemes in detail, emphasizing the importance of theoretical foundations that lead directly to numerical implementations for real ocean environments. To further clarify the presentation, the fundamental propagation features of the techniques are illustrated in color. Computational Ocean A...

  5. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook will...... present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...... from different areas, will find the self-contained chapters accessible and will be interested in the similarities and differences between the approaches and techniques used in different areas of acoustics....

  6. Transmission Characteristics in Tubular Acoustic Metamaterials Studied with Fluid Impedance Theory

    Tubular acoustic metamaterials with negative densities composed of periodical membranes set up along pipes are studied with the fluid impedance theory. In addition to the conventional forbidden bands induced by the Bragg-scattering due to the periodic distributions of different acoustic impedances, the low-frequency forbidden band (LFB) with the low-frequency limit of zero Hertz is studied, in which the LFB is explained with acoustic impedance matching and the Bloch theory. Furthermore, the influences of the structural parameters of the tubular acoustic metamaterials on the transmission characteristics, such as the transmission coefficients, dispersion curves, widths of forbidden and pass bands, fluctuations in pass bands, etc., are evaluated, which can be used in the optimization of the acoustic insulation ability of the metamaterials. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  7. Field insulation materials and problems

    Vogt, G. H.

    1981-12-01

    In a turbine generator the rotating field requires insulation materials and design considerations much different from the high voltage insulation used for armature windings. The principal properties to be looked for are mechanical strength, resistance to abrasion and resistance to thermal degradation. Electrical strength is also important because field windings are required to withstand a high potential test of ten times rated voltage. Some of the materials used over the years ranged from various kinds of fibers and flake mica composites, to asbestos, fiberglass epoxy or polyester laminates, Nomex and combinations of fiberglass, Nomex and insulating films. New materials have been applied to satisfy demands for better properties as generators grew in size and output, and it is the new materials that have made it possible to obtain more power from smaller machines. Field insulation materials and problems are discussed further.

  8. Measure Guideline: Basement Insulation Basics

    Aldrich, R.; Mantha, P.; Puttagunta, S.

    2012-10-01

    This guideline is intended to describe good practices for insulating basements in new and existing homes, and is intended to be a practical resources for building contractors, designers, and also to homeowners.

  9. On Effective Holographic Mott Insulators

    Baggioli, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    We present a class of holographic models that behave effectively as prototypes of Mott insulators, materials where electron-electron interactions dominate transport phenomena. The main ingredient in the gravity dual is that the gauge-field dynamics contains self-interactions by way of a particular type of non-linear electrodynamics. The electrical response in these models exhibits typical features of Mott-like states: i) the low-temperature DC conductivity is unboundedly low; ii) metal-insulator transitions appear by varying various parameters; iii) for large enough self-interaction strength, the conductivity can even decrease with increasing doping (density of carriers), which appears as a sharp manifestation of `traffic-jam'-like behaviour; iv) the insulating state becomes very unstable towards superconductivity at large enough doping. We exhibit some of the properties of the resulting insulator-superconductor transition, which is sensitive to the amount of disorder in a specific way. These models imply a c...

  10. Transparent thermal insulations (TIM)

    Rautiainen, L.

    1992-01-01

    Materials properties of four different TIM types of various thicknesses were measured partly as such and partly with facing(s). A small pilot research was also carried out in VTTs test house. The results achieved show great tailoring possibilities of TIM systems with materials selection. The thermal conductivities varies from aerogels 0.02 W/mK to 0.107 W/mK of capillary TIM with big capillaries. The temperature dependence of thermal conductivity is small with aerogel products and can be held as insignificant in solutions where maximum and average temperatures are generally < 100 deg C. The thermal conductivities of capillar and cellular products depend clearly on temperature. The radiation transmission properties have also a great scale from transmittance of aerogel granulates 0.4 to 0.82 of capillary TIM with big capillaries. Variations of thicknesses and facings can be used to adjust transmittance. The influence of TIM on air sound insulation of windows was positive. Especially traffic noise reduction index was about 10 dB better with TIM filled windows compared to ordinary air filled ones. The achieved results indicate that in window or glazed roof or wall solutions TI-materials can be exploited efficiently. In wall solutions, the properties of TI-material and facings together with heat capacity/transmission properties of wall structure, determines the performance of the system.

  11. A gas-insulated railgun

    Tidman, D.A.; Witherspoon, F.D. [GT-Devices, Alexandria, VA (United States); Parker, J.V. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A railgun concept is discussed in which a high pressure prefill of hydrogen serves as the close-in insulator between the rails. The Gas-Insulated Railgun (GIRG) may reduce or eliminate the velocity-limiting problem of growth and separation of the current-carrying armature region behind the projectile, and thus a low higher launch velocities to be achieved. A hybrid armature appears appropriate for this launcher.

  12. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry–Perot resonance. - Highlights: • Expression of transmission coefficient of an acoustic grating with curled slits. • Non-dispersive and tunable effective medium parameters for the acoustic grating. • A flat acoustic focusing lens with gradient index by using the acoustic grating

  13. From Architectural Acoustics to Acoustical Architecture Using Computer Simulation

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; KIRKEGAARD, Poul Henning

    2005-01-01

    Architectural acoustics design has in the past been based on simple design rules. However, with a growing complexity in architectural acoustics and the emergence of room acoustic simulation programmes with considerable potential, it is now possible to subjectively analyse and evaluate acoustic properties prior to the actual construction of a building. With the right tools applied, acoustic design can become an integral part of the architectural design process. The aim of this paper is to inve...

  14. Underwater Applications of Acoustical Holography

    P. C. Mehta

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the basic technique of acoustical holography. Requirements for recording the acoustical hologram are discussed with its ability for underwater imaging in view. Some practical systems for short-range and medium-range imaging are described. The advantages of acoustical holography over optical imaging, acoustical imaging and sonars are outlined.

  15. Predicting Acoustics in Class Rooms

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    Typical class rooms have fairly simple geometries, even so room acoustics in this type of room is difficult to predict using today's room acoustic computer modeling software. The reasons why acoustics of class rooms are harder to predict than acoustics of complicated concert halls might be...

  16. Tunable acoustic metamaterials

    Babaee, Sahab; Viard, Nicolas; Fang, Nicholas; Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-03-01

    We report a new class of active and switchable acoustic metamaterials composed of three-dimensional stretchable chiral helices arranged on a two-dimensional square lattice. We investigate the propagation of sounds through the proposed structure both numerically and experimentally and find that the deformation of the helices can be exploited as a novel and effective approach to control the propagation of acoustic waves. The proposed concept expands the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials since we demonstrate that the deformation can be exploited to turn on or off the band gap, opening avenues for the design of adaptive noise-cancelling devices.

  17. Image analysis of insulation mineral fibres.

    Talbot, H; Lee, T; Jeulin, D; Hanton, D; Hobbs, L W

    2000-12-01

    We present two methods for measuring the diameter and length of man-made vitreous fibres based on the automated image analysis of scanning electron microscopy images. The fibres we want to measure are used in materials such as glass wool, which in turn are used for thermal and acoustic insulation. The measurement of the diameters and lengths of these fibres is used by the glass wool industry for quality control purposes. To obtain reliable quality estimators, the measurement of several hundred images is necessary. These measurements are usually obtained manually by operators. Manual measurements, although reliable when performed by skilled operators, are slow due to the need for the operators to rest often to retain their ability to spot faint fibres on noisy backgrounds. Moreover, the task of measuring thousands of fibres every day, even with the help of semi-automated image analysis systems, is dull and repetitive. The need for an automated procedure which could replace manual measurements is quite real. For each of the two methods that we propose to accomplish this task, we present the sample preparation, the microscope setting and the image analysis algorithms used for the segmentation of the fibres and for their measurement. We also show how a statistical analysis of the results can alleviate most measurement biases, and how we can estimate the true distribution of fibre lengths by diameter class by measuring only the lengths of the fibres visible in the field of view. PMID:11106965

  18. Phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials

    Ming-Hui Lu; Liang Feng; Yan-Feng Chen

    2009-01-01

    Phononic crystals have been proposed about two decades ago and some important characteristics such as acoustic band structure and negative refraction have stimulated fundamental and practical studies in acoustic materials and devices since then. To carefully engineer a phononic crystal in an acoustic “atom” scale, acoustic metamaterials with their inherent deep subwavelength nature have triggered more exciting investigations on negative bulk modulus and/or negative mass density. Acoustic surf...

  19. Acoustic integrated extinction

    Norris, Andrew N

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross-section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. [1] derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency.

  20. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  1. Principles of musical acoustics

    Hartmann, William M

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Musical Acoustics focuses on the basic principles in the science and technology of music. Musical examples and specific musical instruments demonstrate the principles. The book begins with a study of vibrations and waves, in that order. These topics constitute the basic physical properties of sound, one of two pillars supporting the science of musical acoustics. The second pillar is the human element, the physiological and psychological aspects of acoustical science. The perceptual topics include loudness, pitch, tone color, and localization of sound. With these two pillars in place, it is possible to go in a variety of directions. The book treats in turn, the topics of room acoustics, audio both analog and digital, broadcasting, and speech. It ends with chapters on the traditional musical instruments, organized by family. The mathematical level of this book assumes that the reader is familiar with elementary algebra. Trigonometric functions, logarithms and powers also appear in the book, but co...

  2. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  3. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  4. Acoustic Igniter Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  5. Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) is a progressive wave tube test facility that is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to...

  6. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... treatment Summary Types Of Post-treatment Issues Resources Medical Resources Considerations When Selecting a Healthcare Professional Healthcare ... ANA? Mission Statement Board of Directors ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma ...

  7. Acoustic coherent perfect absorbers

    In this paper, we explore the possibility of achieving acoustic coherent perfect absorbers. Through numerical simulations in two dimensions, we demonstrate that the energy of coherent acoustic waves can be totally absorbed by a fluid absorber with specific complex mass density or bulk modulus. The robustness of such absorbing systems is investigated under small perturbations of the absorber parameters. We find that when the resonance order is the lowest and the size of the absorber is comparable to the wavelength in the background, the phenomenon of perfect absorption is most stable. When the wavelength inside both the background and the absorber is much larger than the size of the absorber, perfect absorption is possible when the mass density of the absorber approaches the negative value of the background mass density. Finally, we show that by using suitable dispersive acoustic metamaterials, broadband acoustic perfect absorption may be achieved. (papers)

  8. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  9. Autonomous Acoustic Receiver System

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Collects underwater acoustic data and oceanographic data. Data are recorded onboard an ocean buoy and can be telemetered to a remote ship or shore station...

  10. A Parametric Study of Thermal Performance of an Exterior Wall Insulated with Vacuum Insulation Panels

    Ciobanu, Adrian-Alexandru; Iacob, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    The requirements regarding thermal insulation of the new buildings and thermal rehabilitation of the existing buildings tend to reach a threshold of insulation which allows to fulfill the necessary requirements for a low-energy building. To achieve this level of thermal insulation involves using either thick layers of conventional insulation (polystyrene, mineral wool, etc.) or high thermal performance materials. Vacuum insulation panels are high performance thermal insulation characteri...

  11. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Hora, Petr; Červená, Olga

    Plzeň : University of West Bohemia, 2009 - (Adámek, V.; Zajíček, M.). s. 1-2 ISBN 978-80-7043-824-4. [Výpočtová mechanika 2009. 09.11.2009-11.11.2009, Nečtiny] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1630 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission source * wave propagation * FEM Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  12. The autonomous acoustic buoy

    Pellicer, Francisco; Reitsma, Robert; Agüera, Joaquín; Marinas, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The Acoustic Buoy is a project between the Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics (LAB) and the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC). In areas that the human activities produce high noise levels, such as oil exploration or construction, there is a need to monitor the environment for the presence of cetaceans. Another need is for fishing, to prevent endangered species from being killed. This can be done with an Autonomous Acoustic Buoy (AAB). Mooring or anchoring at to the seaflo...

  13. Anal acoustic reflectometry

    Mitchell, Peter J; Klarskov, Niels; Telford, Karen J; Hosker, Gordon L; Lose, Gunnar; Kiff, Edward S

    2011-01-01

    Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis.......Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis....

  14. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications. PMID:25418084

  15. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units.

    Pope, Diana S; Miller-Klein, Erik T

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation) and reduce reverberation rates. Enhanced privacy curtains are now available and offer potential for a relatively simple way to improve speech privacy and speech intelligibility by absorbing sound at the hospital patient's bedside. Acoustic assessments were performed over 2 days on two nursing units with a similar design in the same hospital. One unit was built with the 1970s' standard hospital construction and the other was newly refurbished (2013) with sound-absorbing features. In addition, we determined the effect of an enhanced privacy curtain versus standard privacy curtains using acoustic measures of speech privacy and speech intelligibility indexes. Privacy curtains provided auditory protection for the patients. In general, that protection was increased by the use of enhanced privacy curtains. On an average, the enhanced curtain improved sound absorption from 20% to 30%; however, there was considerable variability, depending on the configuration of the rooms tested. Enhanced privacy curtains provide measureable improvement to the acoustics of patient rooms but cannot overcome larger acoustic design issues. To shorten reverberation time, additional absorption, and compact and more fragmented nursing unit floor plate shapes should be considered. PMID:26780959

  16. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units

    Diana S Pope

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation and reduce reverberation rates. Enhanced privacy curtains are now available and offer potential for a relatively simple way to improve speech privacy and speech intelligibility by absorbing sound at the hospital patient′s bedside. Acoustic assessments were performed over 2 days on two nursing units with a similar design in the same hospital. One unit was built with the 1970s′ standard hospital construction and the other was newly refurbished (2013 with sound-absorbing features. In addition, we determined the effect of an enhanced privacy curtain versus standard privacy curtains using acoustic measures of speech privacy and speech intelligibility indexes. Privacy curtains provided auditory protection for the patients. In general, that protection was increased by the use of enhanced privacy curtains. On an average, the enhanced curtain improved sound absorption from 20% to 30%; however, there was considerable variability, depending on the configuration of the rooms tested. Enhanced privacy curtains provide measureable improvement to the acoustics of patient rooms but cannot overcome larger acoustic design issues. To shorten reverberation time, additional absorption, and compact and more fragmented nursing unit floor plate shapes should be considered.

  17. Passive Collecting of Solar Radiation Energy using Transparent Thermal Insulators, Energetic Efficiency of Transparent Thermal Insulators

    Smajo Sulejmanovic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains passive collection of solar radiation energy using transparent thermal insulators. Transparent thermal insulators are transparent for sunlight, at the same time those are very good thermal insulators. Transparent thermal insulators can be placed instead of standard conventional thermal insulators and additionally transparent insulators can capture solar radiation, transform it into heat and save heat just as standard insulators. Using transparent insulators would lead to reduce in usage of fossil fuels and would help protection of an environment and reduce effects of global warming, etc.

  18. Electric Insulation Detection Method for High-voltage Insulators

    Wang Jiajun; Hong Bin; Wang Hongmei

    2013-01-01

    The principle of partial discharge detection is that through partial bridged discharge under high voltage electric field, it detects the inner air-filled cavity of high-voltage insulators. And it is a nondestructive detection method based on discharge magnitude to judge the insulation quality. The detecting system that adopts the partial discharge detection is more rigorous than testing system for electricity products, which must have small discharge capacity and higher sensitivity. This pape...

  19. Aerogels: transparent and super-insulating materials; Les aerogels: isolants transparent-super isolants

    Melka, S.; Rigacci, A.; Achard, P.; Bezian, J.J. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, 06 - Sophia-Antipolis (France); Sallee, H.; Chevalier, B. [Centre des Sciences et Techniques du Batiment, 38 - Saint-Martin-d`Heres (France)

    1996-12-31

    Recent studies have demonstrated the super-insulating properties of silica aerogel in its monolithic or finely divided state. In its monolithic state, this material conciliates excellent thermal insulation performances, a good transmission of visible light and interesting acoustic properties. Also its amazing structural characteristics (lightness, high global porosity, small diameter of pores) are particularly interesting for its use in double glazing windows as transparent insulating spacer. The aim of the work carried out by the Energetic Centre of the Ecole des Mines of Paris is to understand the thermal transfer phenomena in all forms of silica aerogel. In this paper, the main steps of the synthesis process of monolithic silica aerogel is presented with the thermal conductivities obtained. Then, a model is built to describe the thermal transfer mechanisms in finely divided aerogel beds. Finally, the hot wire thermal characterization method is presented and the results obtained on silica aerogels are discussed. (J.S.) 16 refs.

  20. Comparasion of prediction and measurement methods for sound insulation of lightweight partitions

    Praščević Momir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to know the sound insulation of partitions in order to be able to compare different constructions, calculate acoustic comfort in apartments or noise levels from outdoor sources such as road traffic, and find engineer optimum solutions to noise problems. The use of lightweight partitions as party walls between dwellings has become common because sound insulation requirements can be achieved with low overall surface weights. However, they need greater skill to design and construct, because the overall design is much more complex. It is also more difficult to predict and measure of sound transmission loss of lightweight partitions. There are various methods for predicting and measuring sound insulation of partitions and some of them will be described in this paper. Also, this paper presents a comparison of experimental results of the sound insulation of lightweight partitions with results obtained using different theoretical models for single homogenous panels and double panels with and without acoustic absorption in the cavity between the panels. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-37020: Development of methodology and means for noise protection from urban areas i br. III-43014: Improvement of the monitoring system and the assessment of a long-term population exposure to pollutant substances in the environment using neural networks

  1. Acoustic vector sensor signal processing

    SUN Guiqing; LI Qihu; ZHANG Bin

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic vector sensor simultaneously, colocately and directly measures orthogonal components of particle velocity as well as pressure at single point in acoustic field so that is possible to improve performance of traditional underwater acoustic measurement devices or detection systems and extends new ideas for solving practical underwater acoustic engineering problems. Although acoustic vector sensor history of appearing in underwater acoustic area is no long, but with huge and potential military demands, acoustic vector sensor has strong development trend in last decade, it is evolving into a one of important underwater acoustic technology. Under this background, we try to review recent progress in study on acoustic vector sensor signal processing, such as signal detection, DOA estimation, beamforming, and so on.

  2. Theoretical vibro-acoustic modeling of acoustic noise transmission through aircraft windows

    Aloufi, Badr; Behdinan, Kamran; Zu, Jean

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a fully vibro-acoustic model for sound transmission across a multi-pane aircraft window is developed. The proposed model is efficiently applied for a set of window models to perform extensive theoretical parametric studies. The studied window configurations generally simulate the passenger window designs of modern aircraft classes which have an exterior multi-Plexiglas pane, an interior single acrylic glass pane and a dimmable glass ("smart" glass), all separated by thin air cavities. The sound transmission loss (STL) characteristics of three different models, triple-, quadruple- and quintuple-paned windows identical in size and surface density, are analyzed for improving the acoustic insulation performances. Typical results describing the influence of several system parameters, such as the thicknesses, number and spacing of the window panes, on the transmission loss are then investigated. In addition, a comparison study is carried out to evaluate the acoustic reduction capability of each window model. The STL results show that the higher frequencies sound transmission loss performance can be improved by increasing the number of window panels, however, the low frequency performance is decreased, particularly at the mass-spring resonances.

  3. Topological Insulators at Room Temperature

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for $Sb_2Te_3$, $Sb_2Se_3$, $Bi_2Te_3$ and $Bi_2Se_3$ crystals. Our calculations predict that $Sb_2Te_3$, $Bi_2Te_3$ and $Bi_2Se_3$ are topological insulators, while $Sb_2Se_3$ is not. In particular, $Bi_2Se_3$ has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of $0.3 eV$, suitable for room temperature applicat...

  4. Topological insulators fundamentals and perspectives

    Ortmann, Frank; Valenzuela, Sergio O

    2015-01-01

    There are only few discoveries and new technologies in physical sciences that have the potential to dramatically alter and revolutionize our electronic world. Topological insulators are one of them. The present book for the first time provides a full overview and in-depth knowledge about this hot topic in materials science and condensed matter physics. Techniques such as angle-resolved photoemission spectrometry (ARPES), advanced solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) or scanning-tunnel microscopy (STM) together with key principles of topological insulators such as spin-locked electronic

  5. Better and cheaper extra insulation

    Rudbeck, Claus Christian

    of buildings. The thermal performance of the systems is compared to an ideal situation, showing that there is still a potential of further savings by improving the design of the insulation systems.To improve the thermal performance of the systems a number of product developments are proposed.......In the current energy plan, focus in placed on further savings of heat in buildings. If the target of the energy plan should be achieved, there is a need for saving heat both in new and existing buildings.The article investigate and compare the properties of several systems for external insulation...

  6. Electric fields and electrical insulation

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    2002-01-01

    The adoption of a field-theoretical approach to problems arising in the framework of electrical insulation is discussed with reference to six main topics, which have been addressed over the last 30 years. These include uniform field electrodes, Green's differential equation, electrode surface...... roughness, induced charge, electrostatic probes, and partial discharge transients, together with several follow-on aspects. Each topic is introduced and thereafter the progress achieved through the use of a field-theoretical approach is reviewed. Because the topics cover a wide spectrum of conditions......, it is amply demonstrated that such an approach can lead to significant progress in many areas of electrical insulation....

  7. Excitation spectra in Kondo insulators

    It is shown that the exotic strong local characters in the Kondo insulator are difficult to understand based on the band model and the localized Kondo electron model based on the local picture can explain the essential characteristics, in particular characteristic excitation spectra with two peak structure, which is caused through the transition of the localized Kondo electron. Excitation spectra in SmB6, YbB12 and Ce3Bi4Pt3 are shown to be explained by the above model. On the other hand, that of the pseudo gap Kondo insulator CeNiSn is shown to be substantially different. (orig.)

  8. Aerogels Insulate Against Extreme Temperatures

    2010-01-01

    In 1992, NASA started to pursue the development of aerogel for cryogenic insulation. Kennedy Space Center awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to Aspen Systems Inc., of Marlborough, Massachusetts, that resulted in a new manufacturing process and a new flexible, durable, easy-to-use form of aerogel. Aspen Systems formed Aspen Aerogels Inc., in Northborough, Massachusetts, to market the product, and by 2009, the company had become the leading provider of aerogel in the United States, producing nearly 20 million square feet per year. With an array of commercial applications, the NASA-derived aerogel has most recently been applied to protect and insulate people s hands and feet.

  9. Acoustic comfort in eating establishments

    Svensson, David; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The subjective concept of acoustic comfort in eating establishments has been investigated in this study. The goal was to develop a predictive model for the acoustic comfort, by means of simple objective parameters, while also examining which other subjective acoustic parameters could help explain...... the feeling of acoustic comfort. Through several layers of anal ysis, acoustic comfort was found to be rather complex, and could not be explained entirely by common subjective parameters such as annoyance, intelligibility or privacy. A predictive model for the mean acoustic comfort for an eating...

  10. Phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials

    Ming-Hui Lu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Phononic crystals have been proposed about two decades ago and some important characteristics such as acoustic band structure and negative refraction have stimulated fundamental and practical studies in acoustic materials and devices since then. To carefully engineer a phononic crystal in an acoustic “atom” scale, acoustic metamaterials with their inherent deep subwavelength nature have triggered more exciting investigations on negative bulk modulus and/or negative mass density. Acoustic surface evanescent waves have also been recognized to play key roles to reach acoustic subwavelength imaging and enhanced transmission.

  11. EDITORIAL: Progress in topological insulators Progress in topological insulators

    Morpurgo, Alberto; Trauzettel, Björn

    2012-12-01

    One of the most remarkable discoveries of the last few years in condensed matter physics is that the established distinction of crystalline solids in metals and insulators—which relies on the material band-structure—is incomplete. During the last several decades, the band structure of an uncountable variety of compounds of increasing complexity have been computed, and yet it has been overlooked that in the presence of sufficiently strong spin-orbit interaction, a new class of materials can be realized, that intrinsically behaves as insulators in their bulk and as metals at their surface. The discovery of this new class of materials was made only recently by Kane and Mele, during their theoretical studies of graphene in the presence of a sufficiently strong intrinsic spin-orbit interaction. Although the strength of the spin-orbit interaction in graphene is not sufficient to make the topological insulating state visible experimentally under currently reachable conditions, the validity and the originality of the concept were fully appreciated. Predictions for the occurrence of a two-dimensional topological insulating state in HgTe/CdTe heterostructures were made by Bernevig, Hughes and Zhang, and were followed by the experimental verification at Würzburg, in the Molenkamp group. Within a couple of years, this work brought the concept of topological insulator from an abstract theoretical discovery to an experimental reality, which stimulated further work. The concept of topological insulators was extended to the case of three-dimensional systems, for which an ideal experimental probe is angle-resolved photo-emission spectroscopy. Using this technique, specific theoretical predictions that had been made regarding the topological insulating character of different materials (e.g., for Bi-based compounds such as BiSb, Bi2Se3 or Bi2Te3), were verified experimentally through the direct observation of the Dirac surface fermions. This research was sufficient to put on

  12. From Architectural Acoustics to Acoustical Architecture Using Computer Simulation

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2005-01-01

    Architectural acoustics design has in the past been based on simple design rules. However, with a growing complexity in architectural acoustics and the emergence of room acoustic simulation programmes with considerable potential, it is now possible to subjectively analyse and evaluate acoustic...... properties prior to the actual construction of a building. With the right tools applied, acoustic design can become an integral part of the architectural design process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the field of application that an acoustic simulation programme can have during an architectural...... the first phases in the architectural process and set out a reverse strategy for simulation programmes to do so - from developing acoustics from given spaces to developing spaces from given acoustics...

  13. Propagation Characteristics of Multilayer Hybrid Insulator-Metal-Insulator and Metal-Insulator-Metal Plasmonic Waveguides

    Mahmoud Talafi Noghani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Propagation characteristics of symmetrical and asymmetrical multilayer hybrid insulator-metal-insulator (HIMI and metal-insulator-metal (HMIM plasmonic slab waveguides are investigated using the transfer matrix method. Propagation length (Lp and spatial length (Ls are used as two figures of merit to qualitate the plasmonic waveguides. Symmetrical structures are shown to be more performant (having higher Lp and lower Ls, nevertheless it is shown that usage of asymmetrical geometry could compensate for the performance degradation in practically realized HIMI waveguides with different substrate materials. It is found that HMIM slab waveguide could support almost long-range subdiffraction plasmonic modes at dimensions lower than the spatial length of the HIMI slab waveguide.

  14. The air permeability of gypsum insulating structures

    Krikunenko, V.K.; Denisova, G.F.; Omelchenko, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    The air permeability of materials made from gypsum binders used to build insulation and blast-resistant crosspieces is studied, and it is established that the materials tested provided reliable insulation due to the low air permeability factor.

  15. Theoretical study of magnetic topological insulators

    Zhao, An; 赵安

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the discovery of topological insulators brought a topological classification of materials and opened a new field in condensed matter physics. Due to the nontrivial topological properties, the topological insulators have insulating bulk and metallic edge/surface relating to some exotic physics such as quantum anomalous Hall effect, quantum spin Hall effect, and magneto-electric effect. Followed realizations of the Z2 topological insulators in two and three dimensions, the quan...

  16. Wavefront Modulation and Subwavelength Diffractive Acoustics with an Acoustic Metasurface

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality as their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a desig...

  17. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  18. Correlations in a band insulator

    Sentef, M.; Kuneš, Jan; Werner, P.; Kampf, A. P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 15 (2009), 155116/1-155116/7. ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : electronic correlations * dynamical mean-field theory * band insulator Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.475, year: 2009

  19. Insulated Engine, 100-Pound Thrust

    Roth, N. R.

    1966-01-01

    The design and test results of an insulated, 100-pound thrust engine capable of delivering high performance, providing long, steady state and pulse mode endurance, and maintaining a low outside surface temperature of 4000 F, are presented. Included are descriptions of the injector designs and insulation materials investigated, plus a discussion of the thermal analysis and test results. Continuous operation in excess of 29 minutes, and start capability in excess of 4900 pulses, have been demonstrated. To allow the use of available chamber materials and coating systems under insulated conditions, the major challenge to the designer was to define an injector design that would provide gas temperatures and performance of a predetermined value. The solution was the development of an unbalanced, 8-element triplet injector having an unequal fuel distribution within each element, capable of providing a specific impulse in excess of 290 pounds at reduced wall temperatures. The design consists of a columbium chamber and nozzle utilizing a silicide coating, a columbium injector, a composite insulation system of aluminum oxide

  20. A Holographic Fractional Topological Insulator

    Hoyos-Badajoz, Carlos; Karch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    We give a holographic realization of the recently proposed low energy effective action describing a fractional topological insulator. In particular we verify that the surface of this hypothetical material supports a fractional quantum Hall current corresponding to half that of a Laughlin state.

  1. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  2. Thermal Insulation from Hardwood Residues

    Sable, I.; Grinfelds, U.; Vikele, L.; Rozenberga, L.; Zeps, M.; Luguza, S.

    2015-11-01

    Adequate heat is one of the prerequisites for human wellbeing; therefore, building insulation is required in places where the outside temperature is not suitable for living. The climate change, with its rising temperatures and longer dry periods, promotes enlargement of the regions with conditions more convenient for hardwood species than for softwood species. Birch (Betula pendula) is the most common hardwood species in Latvia. The aim of this work was to obtain birch fibres from wood residues of plywood production and to form low-density thermal insulation boards. Board formation and production was done in the presence of water; natural binder, fire retardant and fungicide were added in different concentrations. Board properties such as density, transportability or resistance to particulate loss, thermal conductivity and reaction to fire were investigated. This study included thermal insulation boards with the density of 102-120 kg/m3; a strong correlation between density and the binder amount was found. Transportability also improved with the addition of a binder, and 0.1-0.5% of the binder was the most appropriate amount for this purpose. The measured thermal conductivity was in the range of 0.040-0.043 W/(m·K). Fire resistance increased with adding the fire retardant. We concluded that birch fibres are applicable for thermal insulation board production, and it is possible to diversify board properties, changing the amount of different additives.

  3. Topological Insulators from Group Cohomology

    Alexandradinata, A.; Wang, Zhijun; Bernevig, B. Andrei

    2016-04-01

    We classify insulators by generalized symmetries that combine space-time transformations with quasimomentum translations. Our group-cohomological classification generalizes the nonsymmorphic space groups, which extend point groups by real-space translations; i.e., nonsymmorphic symmetries unavoidably translate the spatial origin by a fraction of the lattice period. Here, we further extend nonsymmorphic groups by reciprocal translations, thus placing real and quasimomentum space on equal footing. We propose that group cohomology provides a symmetry-based classification of quasimomentum manifolds, which in turn determines the band topology. In this sense, cohomology underlies band topology. Our claim is exemplified by the first theory of time-reversal-invariant insulators with nonsymmorphic spatial symmetries. These insulators may be described as "piecewise topological," in the sense that subtopologies describe the different high-symmetry submanifolds of the Brillouin zone, and the various subtopologies must be pieced together to form a globally consistent topology. The subtopologies that we discover include a glide-symmetric analog of the quantum spin Hall effect, an hourglass-flow topology (exemplified by our recently proposed KHgSb material class), and quantized non-Abelian polarizations. Our cohomological classification results in an atypical bulk-boundary correspondence for our topological insulators.

  4. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (ppneumothorax states (pPneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (pPneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  5. Seamount acoustic scattering

    Boehlert, George W.

    The cover of the March 1 issue of Eos showed a time series of acoustic scattering above Southeast Hancock Seamount (29°48‧N, 178°05‧E) on July 17-18, 1984. In a comment on that cover Martin Hovland (Eos, August 2, p. 760) argued that gas or “other far reaching causes” may be involved in the observed acoustic signals. He favors a hypothesis that acoustic scattering observed above a seeping pockmark in the North Sea is a combination of bubbles, stable microbubbles, and pelagic organisms and infers that this may be a more general phenomenon and indeed plays a role in the attraction of organisms to seamounts

  6. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  7. Practical acoustic emission testing

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  8. Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL) is a state-of-the-art Undersea Warfare (USW) acoustic data analysis facility capable of both active and passive underwater...

  9. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  10. A Century of Acoustic Metrology

    Rasmussen, Knud

    The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect.......The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect....

  11. Tunable broadband unidirectional acoustic transmission based on a waveguide with phononic crystal

    Song, Ailing; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Wan, Lele

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a tunable broadband unidirectional acoustic transmission (UAT) device composed of a bended tube and a superlattice with square columns is proposed and numerically investigated by using finite element method. The UAT is realized in the proposed UAT device within two wide frequency ranges. And the effectiveness of the UAT device is demonstrated by analyzing the sound pressure distributions when the acoustic waves are incident from different directions. The unidirectional band gaps can be effectively tuned by mechanically rotating the square columns, which is a highlight of this paper. Besides, a bidirectional acoustic isolation (BAI) device is obtained by placing two superlattices in the bended tube, in which the acoustic waves cannot propagate along any directions. The physical mechanisms of the proposed UAT device and BAI device are simply discussed. The proposed models show potential applications in some areas, such as unidirectional sonic barrier or noise insulation.

  12. Polyimide Foams Offer Superior Insulation

    2012-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, Erik Weiser and his colleagues in the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch were working with a new substance for fabricating composites for use in supersonic aircraft. The team, however, was experiencing some frustration. Every time they tried to create a solid composite from the polyimide (an advanced polymer) material, it bubbled and foamed. It seemed like the team had reached a dead end in their research - until they had another idea. "We said, This isn t going to work for composites, but maybe we could make a foam out of it," Weiser says. "That was kind of our eureka moment, to see if we could go in a whole other direction. And it worked." Weiser and his colleagues invented a new kind of polyimide foam insulation they named TEEK. The innovation displayed a host of advantages over existing insulation options. Compared to other commercial foams, Weiser explains, polyimide foams perform well across a broad range of temperatures, noting that the NASA TEEK foams provide effective structural insulation up to 600 F and down to cryogenic temperatures. The foam does not burn or off-gas toxic fumes, and even at -423 F - the temperature of liquid hydrogen - the material stays flexible. The inventors could produce the TEEK foam at a range of densities, from 0.5 pounds per cubic foot up to 20 pounds per cubic foot, making the foam ideal for a range of applications, including as insulation for reusable launch vehicles and for cryogenic tanks and lines. They also developed a unique, friable balloon format for manufacturing the foam, producing it as hollow microspheres that allowed the foam to be molded and then cured into any desired shape - perfect for insulating pipes of different sizes and configurations. The team s originally unplanned invention won an "R&D 100" award, and a later form of the foam, called LaRC FPF-44 (Spinoff 2009), was named "NASA Invention of the Year" in 2007.

  13. Strong acoustic wave action

    Gokhberg, M. B.

    1983-07-01

    Experiments devoted to acoustic action on the atmosphere-magnetosphere-ionosphere system using ground based strong explosions are reviewed. The propagation of acoustic waves was observed by ground observations over 2000 km in horizontal direction and to an altitude of 200 km. Magnetic variations up to 100 nT were detected by ARIEL-3 satellite near the epicenter of the explosion connected with the formation of strong field aligned currents in the magnetosphere. The enhancement of VLF emission at 800 km altitude is observed.

  14. Acoustic black holes

    Visser, M

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in a moving fluid provides a conceptually clean and powerful analogy for understanding black hole physics. As a teaching tool, the analogy is useful for introducing students to both General Relativity and fluid mechanics. As a research tool, the analogy helps clarify what aspects of the physics are kinematics and what aspects are dynamics. In particular, Hawking radiation is a purely kinematical effect, whereas black hole entropy is intrinsically dynamical. Finally, I discuss the fact that with present technology acoustic Hawking radiation is almost experimentally testable.

  15. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  16. Densitometry By Acoustic Levitation

    Trinh, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    "Static" and "dynamic" methods developed for measuring mass density of acoustically levitated solid particle or liquid drop. "Static" method, unknown density of sample found by comparison with another sample of known density. "Dynamic" method practiced with or without gravitational field. Advantages over conventional density-measuring techniques: sample does not have to make contact with container or other solid surface, size and shape of samples do not affect measurement significantly, sound field does not have to be know in detail, and sample can be smaller than microliter. Detailed knowledge of acoustic field not necessary.

  17. Non-conventional insulators : metal-insulator transition and topological protection

    Mottaghizadeh, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript presents an experimental study of unconventional insulating phases, which are the Anderson insulator, induced by disorder, the Mott insulator, induced by Coulomb interactions, and topological insulators.In a first part of the manuscript, I will describe the development of a method to study the charge response of nanoparticles through Electrostatic Force Microscopy (EFM). This method has been applied to magnetite Fe3O4 nanoparticles, a material that presents a metal-insulator t...

  18. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun, E-mail: liuxiaojun@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhou, Chen; Wei, Qi; Wu, DaJian [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2013-11-25

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution.

  19. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution

  20. A wall-free climate unit for acoustic levitators

    Schlegel, M. C.; Wenzel, K.-J.; Sarfraz, A.; Panne, U.; Emmerling, F.

    2012-05-01

    Acoustic levitation represents the physical background of trapping a sample in a standing acoustic wave with no contact to the wave generating device. For the last three decades, sample holders based on this effect have been commonly used for contact free handling of samples coupled with a number of analytical techniques. In this study, a wall-free climate unit is presented, which allows the control of the environmental conditions of suspended samples. The insulation is based on a continuous cold/hot gas flow around the sample and thus does not require any additional isolation material. This provides a direct access to the levitated sample and circumvents any influence of the climate unit material to the running analyses.

  1. Synthetic gauge flux and Weyl points in acoustic systems

    Xiao, Meng; Chen, Wen-Jie; He, Wen-Yu; Chan, C. T.

    2015-11-01

    Following the discovery of the quantum Hall effect and topological insulators, the topological properties of classical waves began to draw attention. Topologically non-trivial bands characterized by non-zero Chern numbers are realized through either the breaking of time-reversal symmetry using an external magnetic field or dynamic modulation. Owing to the absence of a Faraday-like effect, the breaking of time-reversal symmetry in an acoustic system is commonly realized with moving background fluids, which drastically increases the engineering complexity. Here we show that we can realize effective inversion symmetry breaking and create an effective gauge flux in a reduced two-dimensional system by engineering interlayer couplings, achieving an acoustic analogue of the topological Haldane model. We show that the synthetic gauge flux is closely related to Weyl points in the three-dimensional band structure and the system supports chiral edge states for fixed values of kz.

  2. Evaluation of acoustical parameters of a Brazilian popular housing model

    Ferreira, Jos A. C.; Diniz, Fabiano B.; Ferreira, Andressa M. C.; Zannin, Paulo T.

    2003-10-01

    This article presents the results obtained from the evaluation of the acoustical insulation parameters determined in situ in a popular residence projected to offer an option to combat the housing deficit of the low income Brazilian population. This evaluation has been carried out according to the statements of the standards ISO 140-4 and 140-5, which state about this type of measurement. The results have shown that the surveyed house presents a satisfactory performance if compared to the standard of the Brazilian civil construction, but it is not adequate if compared to the demands of the international standards.

  3. Converting normal insulators into topological insulators via tuning orbital levels

    Shi, Wu-Jun; Liu, Junwei; Xu, Yong; Xiong, Shi-Jie; Wu, Jian; Duan, Wenhui

    2015-11-01

    Tuning the spin-orbit coupling strength via foreign element doping and modifying bonding strength via strain engineering are the major routes to convert normal insulators to topological insulators. We here propose an alternative strategy to realize topological phase transition by tuning the orbital level. Following this strategy, our first-principles calculations demonstrate that a topological phase transition in the cubic perovskite-type compounds CsGeBr3 and CsSnBr3 could be facilitated by carbon substitutional doping. Such a unique topological phase transition predominantly results from the lower orbital energy of the carbon dopant, which can pull down the conduction bands and even induce band inversion. Beyond conventional approaches, our finding of tuning the orbital level may greatly expand the range of topologically nontrivial materials.

  4. Underwater Acoustic Networking Techniques

    Otnes, Roald; Casari, Paolo; Goetz, Michael; Husøy, Thor; Nissen, Ivor; Rimstad, Knut; van Walree, Paul; Zorzi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This literature study presents an overview of underwater acoustic networking. It provides a background and describes the state of the art of all networking facets that are relevant for underwater applications. This report serves both as an introduction to the subject and as a summary of existing protocols, providing support and inspiration for the development of network architectures.

  5. COMBUSTION ACOUSTICS DIAGNOSTICS

    This is an Exploratory Research Project that was awarded by APPCD for research on developing an acoustic flame condition monitor. It will involve a bench scale experiment of 4-6 weeks duration to record adjacent audible energy of a Bunsen burner. The experiment will require a d...

  6. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...

  7. Vibration damage testing of thermal barrier fibrous blanket insulation

    GA Technologies is engaged in a long-term, multiphase program to determine the vibration characteristics of thermal barrier components leading to qualification of assemblies for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) service. The phase of primary emphasis described herein is the third in a series of acoustic tests and uses as background the more elemental tests preceding it. Two sizes of thermal barrier coverplates with one fibrous blanket insulation type were tested in an acoustic environment at sound pressure levels up to 160 dB. Three tests were conducted using sinusoidal and random noise for up to 200 h duration at room temperature. Frequent inspections were made to determine the progression of degradation using definition of stages from a prior test program. Initially the insulation surface adjacent to the metallic seal sheets (noise side) assumed a chafed or polished appearance. This was followed by flattening of the as-received pillowed surface. This stage was followed by a depression being formed in the vicinity of the free edge of the coverplate. Next, loose powder from within the blanket and from fiber erosion accumulated in the depression. Prior experience showed that the next stage of deterioration exhibited a consolidation of the powder to form a local crust. In this test series, this last stage generally failed to materialize. Instead, surface holes generated by solid ceramic particulates (commonly referred to as 'shot') constituted the stage following powdering. With the exception of some manufacturing-induced anomalies, the final stage, namely, gross fiber breakup, did not occur. It is this last stage that must be prevented for the thermal barrier to maintain its integrity. (orig./GL)

  8. ASTM insulation standards and energy conservation

    McAllister, J.D.

    1982-12-01

    Traces the history of thermal insulation technology and standards since the commercialization of the steam engine in the late 18th century. Reveals that the development of magnesium carbonate as an insulation, and use of asbestos fiber as a heat resistant reinforcing material marked the transition of the insulation industry from small entrepreneurs to large corporate organizations. Points out that many of the world's current insulation manufacturers marked their genesis in the 1890-1910 period. Emphasizes that when the energy crisis occurred, C-16 standards for residential, commercial, and industrial insulation materials, application methods, and performance evaluation were either already available or, in the case of cellulosic and foam-in-place insulations, quickly prepared. Reports that a subcommittee has been formed to translate government specifications for commercial grade insulations to ASTM format, as in accordance with OMB Circular A119 which promotes the use of voluntary consensus standards by government agencies.

  9. A review of magnetic insulation

    Zósimo Arévalo Velosa

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available High energy devices are designed to work with extremely high electric and magnetic fields. As a consequence, these devices show non-linear phenomena and behaviour, such as magnetic insulation which alters electron trajectory. A mathematical analysis and review of magnetic insulation were carried out as a consequence of non-linearity to find frontier conditions and solutions to the problem. This paper was aimed at presenting the topic in a way which is easier for that part of the academic community which is unfamiliar with it to understand it. The paper gives a description of the phenomena developed by high electric and magnetic fields in a vacuum plane diode, some equations modelling the phenomenon, proves its existence and finds positive solutions based on upper and lower solutions for boundary limit problems and gives some practical applications.

  10. Positron and positronium in insulators

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy has been widely applied to study the microstructure in various insulators: polymers, oxides, ceramics, molecular substances, zeolites and so on. The most important experimental observation is that the positronium (Ps) can be formed in those materials and then localized in the regions with lower electron density. The Ps annihilation parameter is used to characterize the microstructure in nanometer scale, and related to physical and chemical properties of insulators. In this paper the Ps formation and localization, the Ps interaction with dopants and gases, the recent results in studying the free volume in polymers and micro-voids in porous materials will be briefly reviewed. The unique information explored by Ps probe and its fundamental importance and potential industrial application will be presented. (orig.)

  11. Approximating metal-insulator transitions

    Danieli, Carlo; Rayanov, Kristian; Pavlov, Boris; Martin, Gaven; Flach, Sergej

    2015-12-01

    We consider quantum wave propagation in one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We propose an iterative construction of quasiperiodic potentials from sequences of potentials with increasing spatial period. At each finite iteration step, the eigenstates reflect the properties of the limiting quasiperiodic potential properties up to a controlled maximum system size. We then observe approximate Metal-Insulator Transitions (MIT) at the finite iteration steps. We also report evidence on mobility edges, which are at variance to the celebrated Aubry-André model. The dynamics near the MIT shows a critical slowing down of the ballistic group velocity in the metallic phase, similar to the divergence of the localization length in the insulating phase.

  12. Response of a thermal barrier system to acoustic excitation in a gas turbine nuclear reactor

    A gas turbine located within a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) induces high acoustic sound pressure levels into the primary coolant (helium). This acoustic loading induces high cycle fatigue stresses which may control the design of the thermal barrier system. This study examines the dynamic response of a thermal barrier configuration consisting of a fibrous insulation compressed against the reactor vessel by a coverplate which is held in position by a central attachment fixture. The results of dynamic vibration analyses indicate the effect of the plate size and curvature and the attachment size on the response of the thermal barrier

  13. Approximating Metal-Insulator Transitions

    Danieli, C.; Rayanov, K.; Pavlov, B.; Martin, G.; Flach, S

    2014-01-01

    We consider quantum wave propagation in one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We propose an iterative construction of quasiperiodic potentials from sequences of potentials with increasing spatial period. At each finite iteration step the eigenstates reflect the properties of the limiting quasiperiodic potential properties up to a controlled maximum system size. We then observe approximate metal-insulator transitions (MIT) at the finite iteration steps. We also report evidence on mobility ed...

  14. Corrosion Protection under Thermal Insulation

    Sigbjørnsen, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) is an extensive and costly problem for the petrochemical and chemical industry. Both good coatings to mitigate the problem and test methods to ensure the quality of these coatings are needed. In this thesis, four coatings; standard epoxy coating, epoxy phenolic coating, titanium modified inorganic copolymer (TMIC) and thermally sprayed aluminium (TSA), were tested for their ability to mitigate the problem. To simulate the CUI conditions, several test methods m...

  15. Magnetically insulated helium ion diode

    A gas-puff magnetically insulated ion diode is under development as a pulsed source of high-energy alpha particles for magnetic fusion experiments. The diode is patterned after the Cornell gas-puff diode [J. B. Greenly, M. Ueda, G. D. Rondeau, and D. A. Hammer, J. Appl. Phys. 63, 1872 (1988)], but with modifications to accomodate higher voltages (2 one meter downstream from the source; in our first test of the new source, a helium beam was obtained

  16. Improved Aerogel Vacuum Thermal Insulation

    Ruemmele, Warren P.; Bue, Grant C.

    2009-01-01

    An improved design concept for aerogel vacuum thermal-insulation panels calls for multiple layers of aerogel sandwiched between layers of aluminized Mylar (or equivalent) poly(ethylene terephthalate), as depicted in the figure. This concept is applicable to both the rigid (brick) form and the flexible (blanket) form of aerogel vacuum thermal-insulation panels. Heretofore, the fabrication of a typical aerogel vacuum insulating panel has involved encapsulation of a single layer of aerogel in poly(ethylene terephthalate) and pumping of gases out of the aerogel-filled volume. A multilayer panel according to the improved design concept is fabricated in basically the same way: Multiple alternating layers of aerogel and aluminized poly(ethylene terephthalate) are assembled, then encapsulated in an outer layer of poly(ethylene terephthalate), and then the volume containing the multilayer structure is evacuated as in the single-layer case. The multilayer concept makes it possible to reduce effective thermal conductivity of a panel below that of a comparable single-layer panel, without adding weight or incurring other performance penalties. Implementation of the multilayer concept is simple and relatively inexpensive, involving only a few additional fabrication steps to assemble the multiple layers prior to evacuation. For a panel of the blanket type, the multilayer concept, affords the additional advantage of reduced stiffness.

  17. Effects of insulation on potted superconducting coils

    Test coils using identical wire but with either Formvar or Polyesterimid insulation were fabricated to determine the effects of insulation on training behavior. It was found that the type of insulation did not affect the training behavior. While considerable attention has been paid to epoxy formulations used for superconducting coils, little study has been devoted to the effects of the wire insulation on training behavior. If the insulation does not bind well with the epoxy, the wires will not be held securely in place, and training will be required to make the coil operate at its design limit. In fact, the coil may never reach its design current, showing considerable degredation. Conversely, if the epoxy-insulation reaction is to soften or weaken the insulation, then shorts and/or training may result. The authors have undertaken a study of the effects of the insulation on potted coils wet wound with Stycast 2850 FT epoxy. The wire was insulated with one of two insulting varnishes: Formvar (a polyvinyl formal resin) or Polyesterimid (a phenolic resin). Formvar is the standard insulation in the United States while Polyesterimid the European standard

  18. Tank Applied Testing of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Valenzuela, Juan G.; Feller, Jerr; Plachta, Dave

    2014-01-01

    The development of long duration orbital cryogenic storage systems will require the reduction of heat loads into the storage tank. In the case of liquid hydrogen, complete elimination of the heat load at 20 K is currently impractical due to the limitations in lift available on flight cryocoolers. In order to reduce the heat load, without having to remove heat at 20 K, the concept of Reduced Boil-Off uses cooled shields within the insulation system at approximately 90 K. The development of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI) allowed the 90 K shield with tubing and cryocooler attachments to be suspended within the MLI and still be structurally stable. Coupon testing both thermally and structurally were performed to verify that the LB-MLI should work at the tank applied level. Then tank applied thermal and structural (acoustic) testing was performed to demonstrate the functionality of the LB-MLI as a structural insulation system. The LB-MLI showed no degradation of thermal performance due to the acoustic testing and showed excellent thermal performance when integrated with a 90 K class cryocooler on a liquid hydrogen tank.

  19. Insulator-insulator and insulator-conductor transitions in the phase diagram of aluminium trichloride

    Romina Ruberto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a classical computer-simulation study of the phase diagram of AlCl3 in the pressure-temperature (p, T plane, showing (i that melting from a layered crystal structure occurs into a molecular liquid at low (p, T and into a dissociated ionic liquid at high (p, T, and (ii that a broad transition from a molecular insulator to an ionic conductor takes place in the liquid state.

  20. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    Peng, Pai

    2014-10-01

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry-Perot resonance.

  1. Acoustics Discipline Overview

    Envia, Edmane; Thomas, Russell

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Annual Review, a summary of the progress made in 2007 in acoustics research under the Subsonic Fixed Wing project is given. The presentation describes highlights from in-house and external activities including partnerships and NRA-funded research with industry and academia. Brief progress reports from all acoustics Phase 1 NRAs are also included as are outlines of the planned activities for 2008 and all Phase 2 NRAs. N+1 and N+2 technology paths outlined for Subsonic Fixed Wing noise targets. NRA Round 1 progressing with focus on prediction method advancement. NRA Round 2 initiating work focused on N+2 technology, prediction methods, and validation. Excellent partnerships in progress supporting N+1 technology targets and providing key data sets.

  2. Acoustic methodology review

    Schlegel, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    It is important for industry and NASA to assess the status of acoustic design technology for predicting and controlling helicopter external noise in order for a meaningful research program to be formulated which will address this problem. The prediction methodologies available to the designer and the acoustic engineer are three-fold. First is what has been described as a first principle analysis. This analysis approach attempts to remove any empiricism from the analysis process and deals with a theoretical mechanism approach to predicting the noise. The second approach attempts to combine first principle methodology (when available) with empirical data to formulate source predictors which can be combined to predict vehicle levels. The third is an empirical analysis, which attempts to generalize measured trends into a vehicle noise prediction method. This paper will briefly address each.

  3. Acoustic Tractor Beam

    Démoré, Christine E. M.; Dahl, Patrick M.; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P.; Spalding, Gabriel C.

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  4. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Hora P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the acoustic emission (AE source modeling by means of FEM system COMSOL Multiphysics. The following types of sources are used: the spatially concentrated force and the double forces (dipole. The pulse excitation is studied in both cases. As a material is used steel. The computed displacements are compared with the exact analytical solution of point sources under consideration.

  5. The acoustics of snoring.

    Pevernagie, Dirk; Aarts, Ronald M; De Meyer, Micheline

    2010-04-01

    Snoring is a prevalent disorder affecting 20-40% of the general population. The mechanism of snoring is vibration of anatomical structures in the pharyngeal airway. Flutter of the soft palate accounts for the harsh aspect of the snoring sound. Natural or drug-induced sleep is required for its appearance. Snoring is subject to many influences such as body position, sleep stage, route of breathing and the presence or absence of sleep-disordered breathing. Its presentation may be variable within or between nights. While snoring is generally perceived as a social nuisance, rating of its noisiness is subjective and, therefore, inconsistent. Objective assessment of snoring is important to evaluate the effect of treatment interventions. Moreover, snoring carries information relating to the site and degree of obstruction of the upper airway. If evidence for monolevel snoring at the site of the soft palate is provided, the patient may benefit from palatal surgery. These considerations have inspired researchers to scrutinize the acoustic characteristics of snoring events. Similarly to speech, snoring is produced in the vocal tract. Because of this analogy, existing techniques for speech analysis have been applied to evaluate snoring sounds. It appears that the pitch of the snoring sound is in the low-frequency range (noise-like', and has scattered energy content in the higher spectral sub-bands (>500 Hz). To evaluate acoustic properties of snoring, sleep nasendoscopy is often performed. Recent evidence suggests that the acoustic quality of snoring is markedly different in drug-induced sleep as compared with natural sleep. Most often, palatal surgery alters sound characteristics of snoring, but is no cure for this disorder. It is uncertain whether the perceived improvement after palatal surgery, as judged by the bed partner, is due to an altered sound spectrum. Whether some acoustic aspects of snoring, such as changes in pitch, have predictive value for the presence of

  6. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Yeo, Leslie Y. [Micro/Nanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  7. Interior insulation in existing; Innendaemmung im Bestand

    Geburtig, Gerd (ed.)

    2010-07-01

    Within the third expert meeting of the regional German group of the International Association for Science and Technology of Building and Maintenance and Monuments Preservation (WTA, Pfaffenhofen, Federal Republic of Germany) in November 2009 in Weimar (Federal Republic of Germany) the following lectures were held: (a) Interior insulation according to WTA - The leaflet 6-4 (Anatol Worch); (b) Dimensioning of interior insulation (Hartwig M. Kuenzel); (c) Interior insulation in the field of monument conservation (Roswitha Kaiser); (d) Possibilities of interior insulation (Frank Essmann); (e) Interior insulation - everything considered? (Uwe Gronau); (f) Interior insulation - considered under another view (Georg Dittie); (g) Built practice - this is it (Manuela Kramp); (h) Some practical considerations (Klaus Graupner).

  8. Unconventional Fermi surface in an insulating state

    Harrison, Neil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tan, B. S. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hsu, Y. -T. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Zeng, B. [National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Hatnean, M. Ciomaga [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Zhu, Z. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hartstein, M. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kiourlappou, M. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Srivastava, A. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Johannes, M. D. [Center for Computational Materials Science, Washington, DC (United States); Murphy, T. P. [National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Park, J. -H. [National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Balicas, L. [National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Lonzarich, G. G. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Balakrishnan, G. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Sebastian, Suchitra E. [Cambridge Univ., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-17

    Insulators occur in more than one guise; a recent finding was a class of topological insulators, which host a conducting surface juxtaposed with an insulating bulk. Here, we report the observation of an unusual insulating state with an electrically insulating bulk that simultaneously yields bulk quantum oscillations with characteristics of an unconventional Fermi liquid. We present quantum oscillation measurements of magnetic torque in high-purity single crystals of the Kondo insulator SmB6, which reveal quantum oscillation frequencies characteristic of a large three-dimensional conduction electron Fermi surface similar to the metallic rare earth hexaborides such as PrB6 and LaB6. As a result, the quantum oscillation amplitude strongly increases at low temperatures, appearing strikingly at variance with conventional metallic behavior.

  9. Hydrogen storage in insulated pressure vessels

    Aceves, S.M.; Garcia-Villazana, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH{sub 2}). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). This paper shows an evaluation of the applicability of the insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles. The paper shows an evaluation of evaporative losses and insulation requirements and a description of the current analysis and experimental plans for testing insulated pressure vessels. The results show significant advantages to the use of insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles.

  10. Foam insulated transfer line test report

    Squier, D.M.

    1994-06-01

    Miles of underground insulated piping will be installed at the Hanford site to transfer liquid waste. Significant cost savings may be realized by using pre-fabricated polyurethane foam insulated piping. Measurements were made on sections of insulated pipe to determine the insulation`s resistance to axial expansion of the pipe, the force required to compress the foam in the leg of an expansion loop and the time required for heat up and cool down of a buried piping loop. These measurements demonstrated that the peak axial force increases with the amount of adhesion between the encasement pipe and the insulation. The compressive strength of the foam is too great to accommodate the thermal growth of long straight pipe sections into the expansion loops. Mathematical models of the piping system`s thermal behavior can be refined by data from the heated piping loop.

  11. Topological Magnetic Insulators with Corundum Structure

    Jing WANG; Li, Rundong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Qi, Xiao-Liang

    2010-01-01

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter in which surface states residing in the bulk insulating gap are protected by time-reversal symmetry. When a proper kind of antiferromagnetic long range order is established in a topological insulator, the system supports axionic excitations. In this paper, we study theoretically the electronic states in a transition metal oxide of corundum structure, in which both spin-orbit interaction and electron-electron interaction play crucial role...

  12. Aerogels Insulate Missions and Consumer Products

    2008-01-01

    Aspen Aerogels, of Northborough, Massachusetts, worked with NASA through an SBIR contract with Kennedy Space Center to develop a robust, flexible form of aerogel for cryogenic insulation for space shuttle launch applications. The company has since used the same manufacturing process developed under the SBIR award to expand its product offerings into the more commercial realms, making the naturally fragile aerogel available for the first time as a standard insulation that can be handled and installed just like standard insulation.

  13. Study of High Temperature Insulation Materials

    Pavel Sebik; Vaclav Bocek; Eva Kucerova; Vaclav Mentlik

    2004-01-01

    One of current objectives of the electro insulating technology is the development of the material for extreme conditions. There is a need to operate some devices in extreme temperatures, for example the propulsion of the nuclear fuel bars. In these cases there is necessary to provide not just insulating property, but also the thermal endurance with the required durability of the insulating materials. Critical is the determination of the limit stress for the irreversible structure modification...

  14. Insulating policies for large and small countries

    W. Michael Cox; Douglas McTaggart

    1984-01-01

    In this paper we investigate policies for the large and small country that provide complete insulation from foreign real and monetary disturbances. We find that when there exists two channels of transmission, the integrated commodity and capital markets, using only exchange rate policies does not provide complete insulation. However, floating the exchange rate and pursuing a specific interest rate target does. In terms of output variability however, insulating policies may be undesirable.

  15. Observation of photonic anomalous Floquet Topological Insulators

    Maczewsky, Lukas J; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Commonly, a two-dimensional topological insulator is characterized by non-zero Chern numbers associated with its band structure. In our work, we present the experimental demonstration of an anomalous topological insulator, for which the Chern numbers are always zero, and the winding number is the appropriate quantity describing the topological character of the system. We probe the robustness of the chiral edge states in such anomalous topological insulators and analyze the phase transition between topological and trivial phase.

  16. Classification theory of topological insulators and superconductors and its application to topological crystalline insulators

    We review the classification theory of topological insulators and superconductors based on the K-theory and the Clifford algebras. We also review an application of the classification theory to the topological crystalline insulators with reflection symmetry. (author)

  17. High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics

    Jackson, Darrell R

    2007-01-01

    High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics is the first book in a new series sponsored by the Office of Naval Research on the latest research in underwater acoustics. This exciting new title provides ready access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics. The physical characteristics of the seafloor affecting acoustic propagation and scattering are covered, including physical and geoacoustic properties and surface roughness. Current theories for acoustic propagation in sediments are presented along with corresponding models for reflection, scattering, and seafloor penetration. The main text is backed up by an extensive bibliography and technical appendices.

  18. Fundamentals of Shallow Water Acoustics

    Katsnelson, Boris; Lynch, James

    2012-01-01

    Shallow water acoustics (SWA), the study of how low and medium frequency sound propagates and scatters on the continental shelves of the world's oceans, has both technical interest and a large number of practical applications. Technically, shallow water poses an interesting medium for the study of acoustic scattering, inverse theory, and propagation physics in a complicated oceanic waveguide. Practically, shallow water acoustics has interest for geophysical exploration, marine mammal studies, and naval applications. Additionally, one notes the very interdisciplinary nature of shallow water acoustics, including acoustical physics, physical oceanography, marine geology, and marine biology. In this specialized volume, the authors, all of whom have extensive at-sea experience in U.S. and Russian research efforts, have tried to summarize the main experimental, theoretical, and computational results in shallow water acoustics, with an emphasis on providing physical insight into the topics presented.

  19. Latest Trends in Acoustic Sensing

    Cinzia Caliendo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustics-based methods offer a powerful tool for sensing applications. Acoustic sensors can be applied in many fields ranging from materials characterization, structural health monitoring, acoustic imaging, defect characterization, etc., to name just a few. A proper selection of the acoustic wave frequency over a wide spectrum that extends from infrasound (<20 Hz up to ultrasound (in the GHz–band, together with a number of different propagating modes, including bulk longitudinal and shear waves, surface waves, plate modes, etc., allow acoustic tools to be successfully applied to the characterization of gaseous, solid and liquid environments. The purpose of this special issue is to provide an overview of the research trends in acoustic wave sensing through some cases that are representative of specific applications in different sensing fields.

  20. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  1. Thermal Insulation Strips Conserve Energy

    2009-01-01

    Launching the space shuttle involves an interesting paradox: While the temperatures inside the shuttle s main engines climb higher than 6,000 F hot enough to boil iron for fuel, the engines use liquid hydrogen, the second coldest liquid on Earth after liquid helium. Maintained below 20 K (-423 F), the liquid hydrogen is contained in the shuttle s rust-colored external tank. The external tank also contains liquid oxygen (kept below a somewhat less chilly 90 K or -297 F) that combines with the hydrogen to create an explosive mixture that along with the shuttle s two, powdered aluminum-fueled solid rocket boosters allows the shuttle to escape Earth s gravity. The cryogenic temperatures of the main engines liquid fuel can cause ice, frost, or liquefied air to build up on the external tank and other parts of the numerous launch fueling systems, posing a possible debris risk when the ice breaks off during launch and causing difficulties in the transfer and control of these cryogenic liquid propellants. Keeping the fuel at the necessary ultra-cold temperatures while minimizing ice buildup and other safety hazards, as well as reducing the operational maintenance costs, has required NASA to explore innovative ways for providing superior thermal insulation systems. To address the challenge, the Agency turned to an insulating technology so effective that, even though it is mostly air, a thin sheet can prevent a blowtorch from igniting a match. Aerogels were invented in 1931 and demonstrate properties that make them the most extraordinary insulating materials known; a 1-inch-thick piece of aerogel provides the same insulation as layering 15 panes of glass with air pockets in between. Derived from silica, aluminum oxide, or carbon gels using a supercritical drying process - resulting in a composition of almost 99-percent air - aerogels are the world s lightest solid (among 15 other titles they hold in the Guinness World Records), can float indefinitely on water if treated to be

  2. Aerogel Insulation to Support Cryogenic Technologies Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is seeking a high performance thermal insulation material for cryogenic applications in space launch development. Many of the components in cryogenic...

  3. Magneto-photo-acoustic imaging

    Qu, Min; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Truby, Ryan; Homan, Kimberly; Joshi, Pratixa; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Sokolov, Konstantin; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Magneto-photo-acoustic imaging, a technique based on the synergy of magneto-motive ultrasound, photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging, is introduced. Hybrid nanoconstructs, liposomes encapsulating gold nanorods and iron oxide nanoparticles, were used as a dual-contrast agent for magneto-photo-acoustic imaging. Tissue-mimicking phantom and macrophage cells embedded in ex vivo porcine tissue were used to demonstrate that magneto-photo-acoustic imaging is capable of visualizing the location of cel...

  4. Room acoustic auralization with Ambisonics

    Polack, Jean-Dominique; Leão Figueiredo, Fábio

    2012-01-01

    International audience During the year of 2009, the room acoustics group of the LAM (Équipe Lutheries, Acoustique, Musique de l’Institut Jean Le Rond d’Alembert - Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris) performed a series of acoustical measurements in music halls in Paris. The halls were chosen in regarding their importance to the historic, architectural or acoustic domains. The measured ensemble of fourteen rooms includes quite different architectural designs. The measurements were carri...

  5. Model Hamiltonian for Topological Insulators

    Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Haijun; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we give the full microscopic derivation of the model Hamiltonian for the three dimensional topological insulators in the $Bi_2Se_3$ family of materials ($Bi_2Se_3$, $Bi_2Te_3$ and $Sb_2Te_3$). We first give a physical picture to understand the electronic structure by analyzing atomic orbitals and applying symmetry principles. Subsequently, we give the full microscopic derivation of the model Hamiltonian introduced by Zhang {\\it et al} [\\onlinecite{zhang2009}] based both on symme...

  6. Magnetically insulated helium ion diode

    Wessel, F.J.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Drum, S.; Hoang, K.; Layton, P. (Physics Department, University of California, Irvine, California 92717 (US))

    1990-01-01

    A gas-puff magnetically insulated ion diode is under development as a pulsed source of high-energy alpha particles for magnetic fusion experiments. The diode is patterned after the Cornell gas-puff diode (J. B. Greenly, M. Ueda, G. D. Rondeau, and D. A. Hammer, J. Appl. Phys. {bold 63}, 1872 (1988)), but with modifications to accomodate higher voltages ({lt}1 MeV) and operation in helium. The diode is designed to yield current densities approaching 200 A/cm{sup 2} one meter downstream from the source; in our first test of the new source, a helium beam was obtained.

  7. Micromachined fiber optic Fabry-Perot underwater acoustic probe

    Wang, Fuyin; Shao, Zhengzheng; Hu, Zhengliang; Luo, Hong; Xie, Jiehui; Hu, Yongming

    2014-08-01

    One of the most important branches in the development trend of the traditional fiber optic physical sensor is the miniaturization of sensor structure. Miniature fiber optic sensor can realize point measurement, and then to develop sensor networks to achieve quasi-distributed or distributed sensing as well as line measurement to area monitoring, which will greatly extend the application area of fiber optic sensors. The development of MEMS technology brings a light path to address the problems brought by the procedure of sensor miniaturization. Sensors manufactured by MEMS technology possess the advantages of small volume, light weight, easy fabricated and low cost. In this paper, a fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric underwater acoustic probe utilizing micromachined diaphragm collaborated with fiber optic technology and MEMS technology has been designed and implemented to actualize underwater acoustic sensing. Diaphragm with central embossment, where the embossment is used to anti-hydrostatic pressure which would largely deflect the diaphragm that induce interferometric fringe fading, has been made by double-sided etching of silicon on insulator. By bonding the acoustic-sensitive diaphragm as well as a cleaved fiber end in ferrule with an outer sleeve, an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer has been constructed. The sensor has been interrogated by quadrature-point control method and tested in field-stable acoustic standing wave tube. Results have been shown that the recovered signal detected by the sensor coincided well with the corresponding transmitted signal and the sensitivity response was flat in frequency range from 10 Hz to 2kHz with the value about -154.6 dB re. 1/μPa. It has been manifest that the designed sensor could be used as an underwater acoustic probe.

  8. Combined Environment Acoustic Chamber (CEAC)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The CEAC imposes combined acoustic, thermal and mechanical loads on aerospace structures. The CEAC is employed to measure structural response and determine...

  9. Truck acoustic data analyzer system

    Haynes, Howard D.; Akerman, Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2006-07-04

    A passive vehicle acoustic data analyzer system having at least one microphone disposed in the acoustic field of a moving vehicle and a computer in electronic communication the microphone(s). The computer detects and measures the frequency shift in the acoustic signature emitted by the vehicle as it approaches and passes the microphone(s). The acoustic signature of a truck driving by a microphone can provide enough information to estimate the truck speed in miles-per-hour (mph), engine speed in rotations-per-minute (RPM), turbocharger speed in RPM, and vehicle weight.

  10. Measurement of pipe wall thinning by ultra acoustic resonance technique using optical fiber

    This is the novel system for Pipe Wall Thickness measurement which is combined EAMT(Electro Magnetic Acoustic Transducer) and Optical Fiber Sensor. The conventional ultrasonic thickness meter is using in pipe wall thickness measurement. However, it is necessary to remove a heat insulator from pipe line. A characteristic of this novel system is that it is possible to measure without removing a heat insulator and on-line monitoring, because of measurement probe is attached between pipe surface and heat insulator. As a result of measured with this system, we could measure 30 mm thickness of carbon and stainless steel at the maximum and pipe specimen of elbow shape. Heat-resistant characteristic confirmed at 200 degrees C until about 7000 hours. (author)

  11. Thermal insulation properties of walls

    Zhukov Aleksey Dmitrievich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat-protective qualities of building structures are determined by the qualities of the used materials, adequate design solutions and construction and installation work of high quality. This rule refers both to the structures made of materials similar in their structure and nature and mixed, combined by a construction system. The necessity to ecaluate thermal conductivity is important for a product and for a construction. Methods for evaluating the thermal protection of walls are based on the methods of calculation, on full-scale tests in a laboratory or on objects. At the same time there is a reason to believe that even deep and detailed calculation may cause deviation of the values from real data. Using finite difference method can improve accuracy of the results, but it doesn’t solve all problems. The article discusses new approaches to evaluating thermal insulation properties of walls. The authors propose technique of accurate measurement of thermal insulation properties in single blocks and fragments of walls and structures.

  12. Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons

    Kong, Desheng

    2010-01-13

    Recent theoretical calculations and photoemission spectroscopy measurements on the bulk Bi2Se3 material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states with nondegenerate spins, attractive for dissipationless electronics and spintronics applications. Nanoscale topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface states and are promising candidates for devices. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of high quality single crystalline Bi2Se5 nanomaterials with a variety of morphologies. The synthesis of Bi 2Se5 nanowires and nanoribbons employs Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Nanowires, which exhibit rough surfaces, are formed by stacking nanoplatelets along the axial direction of the wires. Nanoribbons are grown along [1120] direction with a rectangular cross-section and have diverse morphologies, including quasi-one-dimensional, sheetlike, zigzag and sawtooth shapes. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on nanoribbons show atomically smooth surfaces with ∼ 1 nm step edges, indicating single Se-Bi-Se-Bi-Se quintuple layers. STM measurements reveal a honeycomb atomic lattice, suggesting that the STM tip couples not only to the top Se atomic layer, but also to the Bi atomic layer underneath, which opens up the possibility to investigate the contribution of different atomic orbitais to the topological surface states. Transport measurements of a single nanoribbon device (four terminal resistance and Hall resistance) show great promise for nanoribbons as candidates to study topological surface states. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  13. Thermal shock resistant ceramic insulator

    A specification is given for thermal shock resistant cermet insulators which contain 0.1 to 20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase. They are prepared by (a) providing a first solid phase mixture of a ceramic powder and a metal precursor; (b) heating the first solid phase mixture above the minimum decomposition temperature of the metal precursor for no longer than 30 minutes and to a temperature sufficiently above the decomposition temperature to cause the selective decomposition of the metal precursor to the metal to provide a second solid phase mixture comprising particles of ceramic having discrete metal particles adhering to their surfaces, the metal particles having a mean diameter no more than 1/2 the mean diameter of the ceramic particles, and (c) densifying the second solid phase mixture to provide the desired cermet insulator. Examples of the ceramics include BN, B4C, ZrO2, WO3, BeO, Y2O3, TaO, the lanthanide oxides, the oxides of uranium, the oxides of thorium, the oxides of niobium. Examples of the metal precursor include TaHsub(0.5), UH3, ZrH2, ThH2, W(CO)6, ReCl3, WO3 MoO3. (author)

  14. Acoustic transparency and slow sound using detuned acoustic resonators

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the phenomenon of acoustic transparency and slowsound propagation can be realized with detuned acoustic resonators (DAR), mimicking thereby the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in atomic physics. Sound propagation in a pipe with a series of side...

  15. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Lift-Off Acoustics

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janie D.

    2011-01-01

    The lift-off acoustic (LOA) environment is an important design factor for any launch vehicle. For the Ares I vehicle, the LOA environments were derived by scaling flight data from other launch vehicles. The Ares I LOA predicted environments are compared to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) preliminary results.

  16. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  17. Taming Acoustic Cavitation

    Rivas, David Fernandez; Enriquez, Oscar R; Versluis, Michel; Prosperetti, Andrea; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we show acoustic cavitation occurring from pits etched on a silicon surface. By immersing the surface in a liquid, gas pockets are entrapped in the pits which upon ultrasonic insonation, are observed to shed cavitation bubbles. Modulating the driving pressure it is possible to induce different behaviours based on the force balance that determines the interaction among bubbles and the silicon surface. This system can be used for several applications like sonochemical water treatment, cleaning of surfaces with deposited materials such as biofilms.

  18. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-03-01

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  19. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    Mitri, F. G., E-mail: F.G.Mitri@ieee.org [Chevron, Area 52 Technology – ETC, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87508 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  20. Lecture Notes On Acoustics

    This book mentions string vibration and wave, one-dimension wave and wave equation, characteristic impedance, governing equation of string, and wave energy from string, wave equation of wave and basic physical quantity like one-dimension wave equation, sound unit, sound intensity and energy, sound movement in a surface of discontinuity with transmission loss of sound by partition, and Snell's law, radiation, scatter and diffraction and sound in closed space with Sabine's theory, sound characteristic of closed space and duct acoustics.

  1. Triple-glazed insulating unit with improved edge insulation

    Goodwin, George B.; Buchanan, Michael J.

    2016-06-07

    An insulating unit includes a first spacer frame between first and second sheets, e.g. glass sheets, and a second spacer frame between the second sheet and a third sheet. A first surface of the first spacer frame is adhered to inner surface of the first sheet, and an opposite second surface of the first spacer frame is adhered to a first surface of the second sheet, by a moisture impervious adhesive layer. A first outer surface of the second spacer frame is adhered to a second surface of the second sheet, and an opposite second outer surface of the second spacer frame is adhered to an inner surface of the third sheet, by the adhesive layer. The first spacer frame and the second spacer frame have an offset of greater than zero.

  2. A sustainable building product: advanced insulation panels obtained by recycling regional sheep’s wool

    Daniela Bosia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deal with an ongoing research aimed at developing an advanced self-bearing panel, fitted for thermal and acoustic insulation of buildings, derived from the reuse and recycling of local sheep wool. The development of a supply chain of environmentally friendly products (a self bearing panel made of 100% wool encourages, on the one hand, the use of a material so far classified in Italy as special waste and, on the one other, provides new opportunities for a sheepfarming that it is now going through an economic recession, with positive effects on the mountain and the hill landscape.

  3. A large bandwidth photonic delay line using passive cascaded silicon-on-insulator microring resonators

    This paper investigated the design and the characterization of a photonic delay line based on passive cascaded silicon-on-insulator (SOI) microrings. We considered the compromise of group delay, bandwidth and insertion loss. A 3-stage double channel side-coupled integrated spaced sequence of resonator (SCISSOR) device was optimized by shifting the resonance of each microring and fabricated with electron beam lithography and dry etching. The group delay was measured to be 17 ps for non-return-to-zero signals at different bit rates and the bandwidth of 78 GHz was achieved. The experiment result agreed well with our simulation. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  4. Topological insulators. Dirac equation in condensed matters

    Describes the hot newly discovered materials. Presents a unified description of topological insulators from one to three dimensions based on the modified Dirac equation. A starting point to enter the new research field-topological insulators. Topological insulators are insulating in the bulk, but process metallic states around its boundary owing to the topological origin of the band structure. The metallic edge or surface states are immune to weak disorder or impurities, and robust against the deformation of the system geometry. This book, Topological insulators, presents a unified description of topological insulators from one to three dimensions based on the modified Dirac equation. A series of solutions of the bound states near the boundary are derived, and the existing conditions of these solutions are described. Topological invariants and their applications to a variety of systems from one-dimensional polyacetylene, to two-dimensional quantum spin Hall effect and p-wave superconductors, and three-dimensional topological insulators and superconductors or superfluids are introduced, helping readers to better understand this fascinating new field. This book is intended for researchers and graduate students working in the field of topological insulators and related areas.

  5. Insulation materials for advanced water storages

    Schultz, Jørgen Munthe

    2005-01-01

    sections different insulation materials are described with respect to material characteristics and some comments on the easiness of application for tank insulation. The material properties listed in this paper are typical values, which gives an idea of the possibilities but in case of a specific design a...

  6. Quantitative analysis of thermal insulation coatings

    Kiil, Søren

    2014-01-01

    This work concerns the development of simulation tools for mapping of insulation properties of thermal insulation coatings based on selected functional filler materials. A mathematical model, which includes the underlying physics (i.e. thermal conductivity of a heterogeneous two-component coating...

  7. Improved insulator layer for MIS devices

    Miller, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    Insulating layer of supersonic conductor such as LaF sub 3 has been shown able to impart improved electrical properties to photoconductive detectors and promises to improve other metal/insulator/semiconductor (MIS) devices, e.g., MOSFET and integrated circuits.

  8. Acoustic Center or Time Origin?

    Staffeldt, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses the acoustic center in relation to measurements of loudspeaker polar data. Also, it presents the related concept time origin and discusses the deviation that appears between positions of the acoustic center found by wavefront based and time based measuring methods....

  9. Propagation of Ion Acoustic Perturbations

    Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered.......Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered....

  10. Acoustic engineering and technology '90

    Acoustic monitoring, testing and diagnosis in machines, production processes and products enhance the uptimes and profitability of machinery and plants. 18 papers discuss the current state of the art of acoustic monitoring systems including integrated factory planning as well as industrial health, and noise protection. (DG)

  11. Acoustic Metamaterials and Phononic Crystals

    2013-01-01

    This comprehensive book presents all aspects of acoustic metamaterials and phononic crystals. The emphasis is on acoustic wave propagation phenomena at interfaces such as refraction, especially unusual refractive properties and negative refraction. A thorough discussion of the mechanisms leading to such refractive phenomena includes local resonances in metamaterials and scattering in phononic crystals.

  12. Digital Controller For Acoustic Levitation

    Tarver, D. Kent

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic driver digitally controls sound fields along three axes. Allows computerized acoustic levitation and manipulation of small objects for such purposes as containerless processing and nuclear-fusion power experiments. Also used for controlling motion of vibration-testing tables in three dimensions.

  13. ITER CENTRAL SOLENOID COIL INSULATION QUALIFICATION

    Martovetsky, N N; Mann, T L; Miller, J R; Freudenberg, K D; Reed, R P; Walsh, R P; McColskey, J D; Evans, D

    2009-06-11

    An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4 x 4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

  14. Topological Insulators Dirac Equation in Condensed Matters

    Shen, Shun-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Topological insulators are insulating in the bulk, but process metallic states around its boundary owing to the topological origin of the band structure. The metallic edge or surface states are immune to weak disorder or impurities, and robust against the deformation of the system geometry. This book, Topological insulators, presents a unified description of topological insulators from one to three dimensions based on the modified Dirac equation. A series of solutions of the bound states near the boundary are derived, and the existing conditions of these solutions are described. Topological invariants and their applications to a variety of systems from one-dimensional polyacetalene, to two-dimensional quantum spin Hall effect and p-wave superconductors, and three-dimensional topological insulators and superconductors or superfluids are introduced, helping readers to better understand this fascinating new field. This book is intended for researchers and graduate students working in the field of topological in...

  15. Foam insulated transfer line test report

    Miles of underground insulated piping will be installed at the Hanford site to transfer liquid waste. Significant cost savings may be realized by using pre-fabricated polyurethane foam insulated piping. Measurements were made on sections of insulated pipe to determine the insulation's resistance to axial expansion of the pipe, the force required to compress the foam in the leg of an expansion loop and the time required for heat up and cool down of a buried piping loop. These measurements demonstrated that the peak axial force increases with the amount of adhesion between the encasement pipe and the insulation. The compressive strength of the foam is too great to accommodate the thermal growth of long straight pipe sections into the expansion loops. Mathematical models of the piping system's thermal behavior can be refined by data from the heated piping loop

  16. Optical properties for topological insulators with metamaterials

    Zuo, Zheng-Wei, E-mail: zuozw@163.com; Ling, Dong-Bo; Sheng, L.; Xing, D.Y.

    2013-11-29

    The two fields of topological insulators and metamaterials are independent. In this Letter, we firstly investigate the Fresnel coefficients for the reflected and refracted electromagnetic waves across the interface between topological insulators and left-handed metamaterials. Then, we derive the exact analytic expressions for Kerr and Faraday rotations. By way of multiple reflections method, we demonstrate that perfect lens with left-handed metamaterials slab and topological insulators can be designed. On the other hand, the processes of reflection and refraction are investigated in the case of topological insulator and chiral metamaterial. Then, we give the reflection and transmission coefficients of topological insulator with a chiral medium slab. Lastly, the potential applications of these results are discussed.

  17. MEMS Based Acoustic Array

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikaza (Inventor); Humphreys, William M. (Inventor); Arnold, David P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention described and shown in the specification aid drawings include a combination responsive to an acoustic wave that can be utilized as a dynamic pressure sensor. In one embodiment of the present invention, the combination has a substrate having a first surface and an opposite second surface, a microphone positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having an input and a first output and a second output, wherein the input receives a biased voltage, and the microphone generates an output signal responsive to the acoustic wave between the first output and the second output. The combination further has an amplifier positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having a first input and a second input and an output, wherein the first input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the first output of the microphone and the second input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the second output of the microphone for receiving the output sinual from the microphone. The amplifier is spaced from the microphone with a separation smaller than 0.5 mm.

  18. Acoustics and Hearing

    Damaske, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When one listens to music at home, one would like to have an acoustic impression close to that of being in the concert hall. Until recently this meant elaborate multi-channelled sound systems with 5 or more speakers. But head-related stereophony achieves the surround-sound effect in living rooms with only two loudspeakers. By virtue of their slight directivity as well as an electronic filter the limitations previously common to two-speaker systems can be overcome and this holds for any arbitrary two-channel recording. The book also investigates the question of how a wide and diffuse sound image can arise in concert halls and shows that the quality of concert halls decisively depends on diffuse sound images arising in the onset of reverberation. For this purpose a strong onset of reverberation is modified in an anechoic chamber by electroacoustic means. Acoustics and Hearing proposes ideas concerning signal processing in the auditory system that explain the measured results and the resultant sound effects plea...

  19. Musical acoustics demonstrations

    Hoekje, P. L.

    2003-10-01

    The ASA Musical Acoustics Demonstrations website (trial version at http://www.bw.edu/~phoekje) includes sound files, video clips, program code listings, and other material for demonstrations related to musical acoustics. Many of the sound demonstrations may be experienced either as expositions, in which the phenomena are explained before they are presented, or as experiments, in which the explanation comes after listeners have had the opportunity to draw their own conclusions. Suggestions are provided for apparatus construction and classroom experiments, as well as for building simple musical instruments. Software is recommended if it is available free and compatible with multiple personal computer operating systems. For example, Audacity (http://audacity.sourceforce.net) is a sound file editor and analyzer that can be used to visually represent sounds and manipulate them. Source files are included for the synthesized sound examples, which were created in Csound (http://csounds.com), so that interested users may create their own variations. Source code is also included for visual demonstrations created in Visual Python and Python (http://www.python.org), an efficient, high level programming language. Suggestions, criticisms, and contributions are always welcome! [Work supported by ASA and Baldwin-Wallace College.

  20. Time-reversal acoustics

    Fink, Mathias [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, Ecole Superieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielle de la Ville de Paris, Universite Denis Diderot, UMR CNRS 7587, 10 Rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)], E-mail: mathias.fink@espci.fr

    2008-10-15

    Time-reversal mirrors (TRMs) refocus an incident acoustic field to the position of the original source regardless of the complexity of the propagation medium. TRM's have now been implemented in a variety of physical scenarios from MHz ultrasonics with order centimeter aperture size to hundreds/thousands of Hz in ocean acoustics with order hundred meter aperture size. Common to this broad range of scales is a remarkable robustness exemplified by observations at all scales that the more complex the medium between the probe source and the TRM, the sharper the focus. The relation between the medium complexity and the size of the focal spot is studied in this paper. It is certainly the most exciting property of TRM compared to standard focusing devices. A TRM acts as an antenna that uses complex environments to appears wider than it is, resulting for a broadband pulse in a refocusing quality that does not depend of the TRM aperture. In this paper, we investigate the time-reversal approach in various media of increasing complexity and we discuss the link existing between time-reversal approach and local helioseismology where Green's functions can be extracted from diffusive noise.

  1. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  2. Acoustic monitoring method and device

    The present invention provides a method of eliminating resonance noises upon acoustically monitoring the operation state of power plants and plant equipments whether they are normal or not, to improve sensitivity for detecting abnormalities. Namely, a microphone detects acoustic signals including leaking sounds and converts them into electric signals. An amplifier amplifies the electric signals to an appropriate level. A noise eliminating section eliminates resonance noises other than the leaking sounds. An abnormality judging section judges presence of abnormality based on the level of the acoustic signals of the leaking sounds. With such a constitution, a plurality of resonance noises generated also during normal plant operation are automatically eliminated. Since resonance noises as a factor of lowering the sensitivity for abnormal sound detection are not included in the acoustic signals, the sensitivity for the abnormal sound detection is improved. Accordingly, the performance of the acoustic monitoring device is improved. (I.S.)

  3. [Insulitis in type 1 diabetes].

    In't Veld, P; Klöppel, G

    2016-05-01

    Insulitis is considered to be the key morphological lesion of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) for which the diagnostic criteria were recently defined. From the immunophenotype of the lymphocytic infiltration, its frequency and extent during the course of T1DM and the presence of autoantibodies against beta cell proteins, it has been deduced that T1DM is a chronic autoimmune disease leading to gradual destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas, profound insulin deficiency and chronic hyperglycemia. This review article presents the morphological findings that support this hypothesis and addresses questions that need to be answered in order to further clarify the pathogenesis and to develop specific treatment options. PMID:27126249

  4. Neutron shielding heat insulation material

    Purpose: To improve decceleration and absorption of neutrons by incorporating neutron moderators and neutron absorbers in asbestos to thereby increase hydrogen concentration. Constitution: A mixture consisting of crysotile asbestos, surface active agent and water is well stirred and compounded to open the crysotile asbestos filaments and prepare a high viscosity slurry. After adding hydroxides such as magnesium hydroxide, hydrated salts such as magnesium borate hydrate or water containing minerals such as alumina cement hydrate, or boron compound to the slurry, the slurry is charged in a predetermined die, and dried and compressed to prepare shielding heat insulation products. The crysotile asbestos has 18 - 15 wt.% of water of crystallinity in the structure and contains a considerably high hydrogen concentration that acts as neutron moderators. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. Reconfigurable Microwave Photonic Topological Insulator

    Goryachev, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate reconfigurable photonic analogues of topological insulators on a regular lattice of tunable posts in a re-entrant 3D lumped element type system. The tunability allows dynamical {\\it in-situ} change of media chirality and other properties via change of a single post parameter, and as a result, great flexibility in choice of bulk/edge configurations. Additionally, one way photon transport without external magnetic field is demonstrated. The ideas are illustrated by using both full finite element simulation as well as simplified harmonic oscillator models. Reconfigurability of the proposed systems paves the wave to a new class of systems that can be employed for random access, topological signal processing and sensing.

  6. Luminescence from metals and insulators

    The term luminescence is normally applied to light emission that is not explainable by the mechanisms discussed by the other speakers in this meeting. Specifically, it is not transition radiation, surface plasmon radiation, or bremsstrahlung. One normally thinks of luminescence as arising from one-electron transitions within a medium. This talk consists of an overview of luminescence from condensed matter under irradiation by either energetic particles or photons. The author begins with organic molecules, where luminescence is best understood, and then discusses inorganic insulators and metals. Finally, the dependence of yield upon projectile species and velocity is discussed, and predictions are made concerning the relative effectiveness of electrons, protons, and hydrogen atoms in exciting luminescence

  7. Emissions from thermal insulations - part 2: evaluation of emissions from organic and inorganic insulations

    Koivula, M.; Kymaelaeinen, H.-R. [University of Helsinki (Finland). Department of Agricultural Engineering and Household Technology; Virta, J. [Helsinki University of Technology, Hut (FI). Laboratory of Structural Engineering and Building Physics] (and others)

    2005-06-15

    The aim of this study was to examine microbial, chemical and physical (particle) emissions from organic and inorganic thermal insulations with a multifunctional apparatus developed for this purpose. In addition, basic quality parameters of the insulation materials, including microbial content, ignition residue and density, were determined. The particular focus of the study was on bast fibrous insulations made of bast fibres of flax, linseed and hemp. The amounts of microbes in the dry insulations varied greatly, up to 10{sup 7} cfu/g. Several taxa of fungi were detected from the bast fibrous insulations, some of which may produce toxins in suitable conditions. The lowest microbial contents were found in the commercial products. However, emissions of moulds from all insulations made from bast fibres were significant at 90% RH, whereas at lower RHs they were negligible. Only a minor amount of emissions was detected from the reference materials at any RH. Emissions of bacteria were negligible for all materials and conditions. The emission levels of VOCs were negligible for all materials except recycled wood. However, several components of the VOC emissions were identified. No significant emissions of particles were detected from thermal insulations made of bast fibres of flax and hemp. In the case of insulations, particularly those made of organic fibres, it is essential to follow good manufacturing practices and to keep the insulation in a dry place throughout the manufacturing and building process in order to minimize hygienic risks in insulations. (author)

  8. Slab edge insulating form system and methods

    Lee, Brain E.; Barsun, Stephan K.; Bourne, Richard C.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Springer, David A.

    2009-10-06

    A method of forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising constructing a foundation frame, the frame comprising an insulating form having an opening, inserting a pocket former into the opening; placing concrete inside the foundation frame; and removing the pocket former after the placed concrete has set, wherein the concrete forms a pocket in the placed concrete that is accessible through the opening. The method may further comprise sealing the opening by placing a sealing plug or sealing material in the opening. A system for forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising a plurality of interconnected insulating forms, the insulating forms having a rigid outer member protecting and encasing an insulating material, and at least one gripping lip extending outwardly from the outer member to provide a pest barrier. At least one insulating form has an opening into which a removable pocket former is inserted. The system may also provide a tension anchor positioned in the pocket former and a tendon connected to the tension anchor.

  9. Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Field Study

    Schirber, T. [NorthernSTAR, Minneaplolis, MN (United States); Mosiman, G. [NorthernSTAR, Minneaplolis, MN (United States); Ojczyk, C. [NorthernSTAR, Minneaplolis, MN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4 inches wide by 4 feet to 5 feet deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  10. Electrical insulator requirements for mirror fusion reactors

    The requirements for mirror fusion electrical insulators are discussed. Insulators will be required at the neutral beam injectors, injector power supplies, direct converters, and superconducting magnets. Insulators placed at the neutral beam injectors will receive the greatest radiation exposure, 1014 to 1016 neutrons/m2.s and 0.3 to 3 Gy/s (105 to 106 R/h) of gamma rays, with shielding. Direct converter insulators may receive the highest temperature (up to 13000K), but low voltage holding requirements. Insulators made from organic materials (e.g., plastics) for the magnet coils may be satisfactory. Immediate conductivity increases of all insulators result from gamma irradiation. With an upper limit to gamma flux exposures of 300 Gy/s in a minimally shielded region, the conductivity could reach 10-6 S/m. Damage from neutron irradiation may not be serious during several years' exposure. Surface changes in ceramics at the neutral beam injector may be serious. The interior of the injector will contain atomic hydrogen, and sputtering may transfer material away from or onto the ceramic insulators. Unknown and potentially damaging interactions between irradiation, electric fields, temperature gradients, cycling of temperature, surface and joint reactions, sputtering, polarization, and electrotransport in the dielectrics are of concern. Materials research to deal with these problems is needed

  11. Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Field Study

    Schirber, T.; Mosiman, G.; Ojczyk, C.

    2014-10-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with a liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4" wide by 4' to 5' deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  12. Development of a 3D finite element acoustic model to predict the sound reduction index of stud based double-leaf walls

    Arjunan, A.; Wang, C. J.; Yahiaoui, K.; Mynors, D. J.; Morgan, T.; Nguyen, V. B.; English, M.

    2014-11-01

    Building standards incorporating quantitative acoustical criteria to ensure adequate sound insulation are now being implemented. Engineers are making great efforts to design acoustically efficient double-wall structures. Accordingly, efficient simulation models to predict the acoustic insulation of double-leaf wall structures are needed. This paper presents the development of a numerical tool that can predict the frequency dependent sound reduction index R of stud based double-leaf walls at one-third-octave band frequency range. A fully vibro-acoustic 3D model consisting of two rooms partitioned using a double-leaf wall, considering the structure and acoustic fluid coupling incorporating the existing fluid and structural solvers are presented. The validity of the finite element (FE) model is assessed by comparison with experimental test results carried out in a certified laboratory. Accurate representation of the structural damping matrix to effectively predict the R values are studied. The possibilities of minimising the simulation time using a frequency dependent mesh model was also investigated. The FEA model presented in this work is capable of predicting the weighted sound reduction index Rw along with A-weighted pink noise C and A-weighted urban noise Ctr within an error of 1 dB. The model developed can also be used to analyse the acoustically induced frequency dependent geometrical behaviour of the double-leaf wall components to optimise them for best acoustic performance. The FE modelling procedure reported in this paper can be extended to other building components undergoing fluid-structure interaction (FSI) to evaluate their acoustic insulation.

  13. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-07-20

    The Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) has been designed to record and monitor the acoustic signal in natural gas transmission lines. In particular the three acoustic signals associated with a line leak. The system is portable ({approx}30 lbs) and is designed for line pressures up to 1000 psi. It has become apparent that cataloging of the various background acoustic signals in natural gas transmission line is very important if a system to identify leak signals is to be developed. The low-pressure (0-200 psig) laboratory test phase has been completed and a number of field trials have been conducted. Before the cataloging phase could begin, a few problems identified in field trials identified had to be corrected such as: (1) Decreased microphone sensitivity at line pressures above 250 psig. (2) The inability to deal with large data sets collected when cataloging the variety of signals in a transmission line. (3) The lack of an available online acoustic calibration system. These problems have been solved and the WVU PAMP is now fully functional over the entire pressure range found in the Natural Gas transmission lines in this region. Field portability and reliability have been greatly improved. Data collection and storage have also improved to the point were the full acoustic spectrum of acoustic signals can be accurately cataloged, recorded and described.

  14. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  15. Ultra-Violet Induced Insulator Flashover

    Javedani, J B; Houck, T L; Kelly, B T; Lahowe, D A; Shirk, M D; Goerz, D A

    2008-05-21

    Insulators are critical components in high-energy, pulsed power systems. It is known that the vacuum surface of the insulator will flashover when illuminated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation depending on the insulator material, insulator cone angle, applied voltage and insulator shot-history. A testbed comprised of an excimer laser (KrF, 248 nm, {approx} 2 MW/cm{sup 2}, 30 ns FWHM,), a vacuum chamber (low 1.0E-6 torr), and dc high voltage power supply (<60 kV) was assembled for insulator testing to measure the UV dose during a flashover event. Five in-house developed and calibrated fast D-Dot probes (>12 GHz, bandwidth) were embedded in the anode electrode underneath the insulator to determine the time of flashover with respect to UV arrival. A commercial energy meter were used to measure the UV fluence for each pulse. Four insulator materials High Density Polyethylene, Rexolite{reg_sign} 1400, Macor{trademark} and Mycalex with side-angles of 0, {+-}30, and {+-}45 degrees, 1.0 cm thick samples, were tested with a maximum UV fluence of 75 mJ/cm{sup 2} and at varying electrode charge (10 kV to 60 kV). This information clarified/corrected earlier published studies. A new phenomenon was observed related to the UV power level on flashover that as the UV pulse intensity was increased, the UV fluence on the insulator prior to flashover was also increased. This effect would bias the data towards higher minimum flashover fluence.

  16. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    The work of this project is concerned with the simulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and topology optimization of SAW devices. SAWs are elastic vibrations that propagate along a material surface and are extensively used in electromechanical filters and resonators in telecommunication. A new...... application is modulation of optical waves in waveguides. This presentation elaborates on how a SAW is generated by interdigital transducers using a 2D model of a piezoelectric, inhomogeneous material implemented in the high-level programming language Comsol Multiphysics. The SAW is send through a model of a...... output waveguide and the MZI can thus be used as an optical switch. It is explained how the mechanical model of the SAW is coupled to a model of the optical waves such that the change in effective refractive index introduced in the MZI arms by the SAW can be calculated. Results of a parameter study of...

  17. Evoked acoustic emission

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...... a minor effect on the power spectra, i.e. the maximum jumps from one spectral peak to another. Experiments with deconvolution demonstrate that the emission generating system at least at a fixed intensity can be regarded as being linear and characterized by its impulse response which is similar to...... the emission evoked by click stimuli. It is concluded that significant information is obtained by the click rather than by the tonal stimuli. The click-evoked emissions were also recorded from both ears in a consecutive series of 100 full-term and otherwise normal babies 2-4 days after birth. The...

  18. Acoustic emission testing

    Grosse, Christian U

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) techniques have been studied in civil engineering for a long time. The techniques are recently going to be more and more applied to practical applications and to be standardized in the codes. This is because the increase of aging structures and disastrous damages due to recent earthquakes urgently demand for maintenance and retrofit of civil structures in service for example. It results in the need for the development of advanced and effective inspection techniques. Thus, AE techniques draw a great attention to diagnostic applications and in material testing. The book covers all levels from the description of AE basics for AE beginners (level of a student) to sophisticated AE algorithms and applications to real large-scale structures as well as the observation of the cracking process in laboratory specimen to study fracture processes.

  19. Acoustic fault injection tool (AFIT)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1999-05-01

    On September 18, 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. The program was funded as part of the U.S. Navy's Air Vehicle Diagnostic Systems (AVDS) program. Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. The application of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults has proven the feasibility of the technology. The flight-test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. During the RAMS flight test, 12 test flights were flown from which 25 Gbyte of digital acoustic data and about 15 hours of analog flight data recorder (FDR) data were collected from the eight on-rotor acoustic sensors. The focus of this paper is to describe the CH-46 flight-test configuration and present design details about a new innovative machinery diagnostic technology called acoustic fault injection. This technology involves the injection of acoustic sound into machinery to assess health and characterize operational status. The paper will also address the development of the Acoustic Fault Injection Tool (AFIT), which was successfully demonstrated during the CH-46 flight tests.

  20. Development of Innovative Aerogel Based Plasters: Preliminary Thermal and Acoustic Performance Evaluation

    Cinzia Buratti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The thermal and acoustic properties of innovative insulating systems used as building coatings were investigated: Granular silica aerogel was mixed with natural plaster in different percentages. This coating solution is transpiring and insulating, thanks to the use of a natural lime coat and aerogel, a highly porous light material with very low thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of the proposed solution was evaluated by means of a Heat Flow meter apparatus (EN ISO 12667, considering different percentages of aerogel. The natural plaster without aerogel has a thermal conductivity of about 0.50 W/m K; considering a percentage of granular aerogel of about 90% in volume, the thermal conductivity of the insulating natural coating falls to 0.050 W/m K. Increasing the percentage of granular aerogel, a value of about 0.018–0.020 W/m K can be reached. The acoustic properties were also evaluated in terms of the acoustic absorption coefficient, measured by means of a Kundt’s Tube (ISO 10534-2. Two samples composed by a plasterboard support, an insulation plaster with aerogel (thicknesses 10 mm and 30 mm respectively and a final coat were assembled. The results showed that the absorption coefficient strongly depends on the final coat, so the aerogel-based plaster layer moderately influences the final value. The application of this innovative solution can be a useful tool for new buildings, but also for the refurbishment of existing ones. This material is in development: until now, the best value of the thermal conductivity obtained from manufacturers is about 0.015 W/m K.

  1. Little-Parks Oscillations in an Insulator

    Kopnov, G.; Cohen, O.; Ovadia, M.; Lee, K. Hong; Wong, C. C.; Shahar, D.

    2012-10-01

    We present the results of a magnetoresistance study of the disorder-induced superconductor-insulator transition in an amorphous indium-oxide thin film patterned by a nanoscale periodic array of holes. We observed Little-Parks-like oscillations over our entire range of disorder spanning the transition. The period of oscillations was unchanged and corresponded to the superconducting flux quantum in the superconducting as well as in the insulating phases. Our results provide direct evidence for electron pairing in the insulator bordering with superconductivity.

  2. Measure Guideline: Hybrid Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.

    2012-05-01

    This measure guideline provides recommendations for designs and variations for retrofit hybrid assemblies in improving interior foundation insulation and water management of basements. Variations include closed cell spray foam (ccSPF) with membrane waterproofing or air gap membrane drainage layers, rigid board foam insulation at flat walls (cast concrete or CMU block), a 'partial drainage' detail making use of the bulk water drainage that occurs through the field of a rubble stone wall, and non-drained spray foam assemblies (including slab insulation).

  3. Measure Guideline. Hybrid Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This measure guideline provides recommendations for designs and variations for retrofit hybrid assemblies in improving interior foundation insulation and water management of basements. Variations include closed cell spray foam (ccSPF) with membrane waterproofing or air gap membrane drainage layers, rigid board foam insulation at flat walls (cast concrete or CMU block), a “partial drainage” detail making use of the bulk water drainage that occurs through the field of a rubble stone wall, and non-drained spray foam assemblies (including slab insulation).

  4. Silicon on insulator self-aligned transistors

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    2003-11-18

    A method for fabricating thin-film single-crystal silicon-on-insulator (SOI) self-aligned transistors. Standard processing of silicon substrates is used to fabricate the transistors. Physical spaces, between the source and gate, and the drain and gate, introduced by etching the polysilicon gate material, are used to provide connecting implants (bridges) which allow the transistor to perform normally. After completion of the silicon substrate processing, the silicon wafer is bonded to an insulator (glass) substrate, and the silicon substrate is removed leaving the transistors on the insulator (glass) substrate. Transistors fabricated by this method may be utilized, for example, in flat panel displays, etc.

  5. External insulation with cellular plastic materials

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Nielsen, Anker

    2014-01-01

    External thermal insulation composite systems (ETICS) can be used as extra insulation of existing buildings. The system can be made of cellular plastic materials or mineral wool. There is a European Technical guideline, ETAG 004, that describe the tests that shall be conducted on such systems....... This paper gives a comparison of systems with mineral wool and cellular plastic, based on experience from practice and literature. It is important to look at the details in the system and at long time stability of the properties such as thermal insulation, moisture and fire. Investigation of fire properties...

  6. An asymptotic model in acoustics:acoustic drift equations

    Vladimirov, Vladimir; Ilin, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    A rigorous asymptotic procedure with the Mach number as a small parameter is used to derive the equations of mean flows which coexist and are affected by the background acoustic waves in the limit of very high Reynolds number.

  7. Anisotropic spectra of acoustic turbulence

    We found universal anizopropic spectra of acoustic turbulence with the linear dispersion law ω(k)=ck within the framework of generalized kinetic equation which takes into account the finite time of three-wave interactions. This anisotropic spectra can assume both scale-invariant and non-scale-invariant form. The implications for the evolution of the acoustic turbulence with nonisotropic pumping are discussed. The main result of the article is that the spectra of acoustic turbulence tend to become more isotropic. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  8. Theoretical acoustics of underwater structures

    Skelton, EA

    1997-01-01

    This important book provides an account of the linear acoustics of basic isotropic/anisotropic structures excited by time-harmonic and transient mechanical forces and acoustic sources. Many numerical examples are given to aid physical insight and to provide benchmark computations of sound radiation and sound scattering. The theoretical methods, developed originally for naval noise control problems, should find civil application in the acoustic modelling of structures fabricated from both fibre-reinforced and isotropic materials. Such an endeavour is increasingly desirable and necessary in this

  9. Acoustic metamaterial with negative density

    We fabricated a one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial with negative effective density using an array of very thin elastic membranes. We observed acoustic equivalence of the plasma oscillation at ωc=735 Hz. The metamaterial was opaque in the frequency range from 0 to 735 Hz, and was transparent above 735 Hz. We report direct observation of negative acceleration in this acoustic medium below 735 Hz. The frequency characteristics of the metamaterial have the same form as that of metals with negative permittivity. We also provide a simple theory to explain the experimental results.

  10. Noise Shielding Using Acoustic Metamaterials

    We exploit theoretically a class of rectangular cylindrical devices for noise shielding by using acoustic metamaterials. The function of noise shielding is justified by both the far-field and near-field full-wave simulations based on the finite element method. The enlargement of equivalent acoustic scattering cross sections is revealed to be the physical mechanism for this function. This work makes it possible to design a window with both noise shielding and air flow. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  11. Acoustic metamaterial with negative modulus

    We present experimental and theoretical results on an acoustic metamaterial that exhibits a negative effective modulus in a frequency range from 0 to 450 Hz. A one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial with an array of side holes on a tube was fabricated. We observed that acoustic waves above 450 Hz propagated well in this structure, but no sound below 450 Hz passed through. The frequency characteristics of the metamaterial has the same form as that of the permittivity in metals due to the plasma oscillation. We also provide a theory to explain the experimental results.

  12. Polyimide-Foam/Aerogel Composites for Thermal Insulation

    Williams, Martha; Fesmire, James; Sass, Jared; Smith, Trent; Weoser. Erol

    2009-01-01

    Composites of specific types of polymer foams and aerogel particles or blankets have been proposed to obtain thermal insulation performance superior to those of the neat polyimide foams. These composites have potential to also provide enhanced properties for vibration dampening or acoustic attenuation. The specific type of polymer foam is denoted "TEEK-H", signifying a series, denoted H, within a family of polyimide foams that were developed at NASA s Langley Research Center and are collectively denoted TEEK (an acronym of the inventors names). The specific types of aerogels include Nanogel aerogel particles from Cabot Corporation in Billerica, MA. and of Spaceloft aerogel blanket from Aspen Aerogels in Northborough, MA. The composites are inherently flame-retardant and exceptionally thermally stable. There are numerous potential uses for these composites, at temperatures from cryogenic to high temperatures, in diverse applications that include aerospace vehicles, aircraft, ocean vessels, buildings, and industrial process equipment. Some low-temperature applications, for example, include cryogenic storage and transfer or the transport of foods, medicines, and chemicals. Because of thermal cycling, aging, and weathering most polymer foams do not perform well at cryogenic temperatures and will undergo further cracking over time. The TEEK polyimides are among the few exceptions to this pattern, and the proposed composites are intended to have all the desirable properties of TEEK-H foams, plus improved thermal performance along with enhanced vibration or acoustic-attenuation performance. A composite panel as proposed would be fabricated by adding an appropriate amount of TEEK friable balloons into a mold to form a bottom layer. A piece of flexible aerogel blanket material, cut to the desired size and shape, would then be placed on the bottom TEEK layer and sandwiched between another top layer of polyimide friable balloons so that the aerogel blanket would become

  13. Acoustic-optic investigations of acoustic gyrotropy in crystals

    For the experimental investigation of the acoustic activity the Bragg light diffraction method on transverse acoustic waves was used in the frequency range 0.4-1.8 GHz. It is shown that the oscillation period of the intensity of the diffracted light is defined by the specific rotator power of the crystal. On the basis of experimental data the specific rotation of the polarization plane in a number of gyrotropic crystals was determined. (authors)

  14. Electromagnetic Nondestructive Evaluation of Wire Insulation and Models of Insulation Material Properties

    Bowler, Nicola; Kessler, Michael R.; Li, Li; Hondred, Peter R.; Chen, Tianming

    2012-01-01

    Polymers have been widely used as wiring electrical insulation materials in space/air-craft. The dielectric properties of insulation polymers can change over time, however, due to various aging processes such as exposure to heat, humidity and mechanical stress. Therefore, the study of polymers used in electrical insulation of wiring is important to the aerospace industry due to potential loss of life and aircraft in the event of an electrical fire caused by breakdown of wiring insulation. Part of this research is focused on studying the mechanisms of various environmental aging process of the polymers used in electrical wiring insulation and the ways in which their dielectric properties change as the material is subject to the aging processes. The other part of the project is to determine the feasibility of a new capacitive nondestructive testing method to indicate degradation in the wiring insulation, by measuring its permittivity.

  15. Effects of subsampling of passive acoustic recordings on acoustic metrics.

    Thomisch, Karolin; Boebel, Olaf; Zitterbart, Daniel P; Samaran, Flore; Van Parijs, Sofie; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2015-07-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring is an important tool in marine mammal studies. However, logistics and finances frequently constrain the number and servicing schedules of acoustic recorders, requiring a trade-off between deployment periods and sampling continuity, i.e., the implementation of a subsampling scheme. Optimizing such schemes to each project's specific research questions is desirable. This study investigates the impact of subsampling on the accuracy of two common metrics, acoustic presence and call rate, for different vocalization patterns (regimes) of baleen whales: (1) variable vocal activity, (2) vocalizations organized in song bouts, and (3) vocal activity with diel patterns. To this end, above metrics are compared for continuous and subsampled data subject to different sampling strategies, covering duty cycles between 50% and 2%. The results show that a reduction of the duty cycle impacts negatively on the accuracy of both acoustic presence and call rate estimates. For a given duty cycle, frequent short listening periods improve accuracy of daily acoustic presence estimates over few long listening periods. Overall, subsampling effects are most pronounced for low and/or temporally clustered vocal activity. These findings illustrate the importance of informed decisions when applying subsampling strategies to passive acoustic recordings or analyses for a given target species. PMID:26233026

  16. Hybrid optical and acoustic force based sorting

    O'Mahoney, Paul; Brodie, Graham W.; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E. M.; Cochran, Sandy; Spalding, Gabriel C.; MacDonald, Michael P.

    2014-09-01

    We report the combined use of optical sorting and acoustic levitation to give particle sorting. Differing sizes of microparticles are sorted optically both with and without the aid of acoustic levitation, and the results compared to show that the use of acoustic trapping can increase sorting efficiency. The use of a transparent ultrasonic transducer is also shown to streamline the integration of optics and acoustics. We also demonstrate the balance of optical radiation pressure and acoustic levitation to achieve vertical sorting.

  17. Dual vortex theory of doped Mott insulators

    Balents, Leon; Sachdev, Subir

    2007-11-01

    We present a general framework for describing the quantum phases obtained by doping paramagnetic Mott insulators on the square lattice. The undoped insulators are efficiently characterized by the projective transformations of various fields under the square lattice space group (the PSG). We show that the PSG also imposes powerful constraints on the doped system, and on the effective action for the vortex and Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations of superconducting states. This action can also be extended across transitions to supersolid or insulating states at non-zero doping. For the case of a valence bond solid (VBS) insulator, we show that the doped system has the same PSG as that of elementary bosons with density equal to the density of electron Cooper pairs. We also discuss aspects of the action for a d-wave superconductor obtained by doping a "staggered-flux" spin liquid state.

  18. Dual vortex theory of doped Mott insulators

    We present a general framework for describing the quantum phases obtained by doping paramagnetic Mott insulators on the square lattice. The undoped insulators are efficiently characterized by the projective transformations of various fields under the square lattice space group (the PSG). We show that the PSG also imposes powerful constraints on the doped system, and on the effective action for the vortex and Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations of superconducting states. This action can also be extended across transitions to supersolid or insulating states at non-zero doping. For the case of a valence bond solid (VBS) insulator, we show that the doped system has the same PSG as that of elementary bosons with density equal to the density of electron Cooper pairs. We also discuss aspects of the action for a d-wave superconductor obtained by doping a 'staggered-flux' spin liquid state

  19. KSI's Cross Insulated Core Transformer Technology

    Cross Insulated Core Transformer (CCT) technology improves on Insulated Core Transformer (ICT) implementations. ICT systems are widely used in very high voltage, high power, power supply systems. In an ICT transformer ferrite core sections are insulated from their neighboring ferrite cores. Flux leakage is present at each of these insulated gaps. The flux loss is raised to the power of stages in the ICT design causing output voltage efficiency to taper off with increasing stages. KSI's CCT technology utilizes a patented technique to compensate the flux loss at each stage of an ICT system. Design equations to calculate the flux compensation capacitor value are presented. CCT provides corona free operation of the HV stack. KSI's CCT based High Voltage power supply systems offer high efficiency operation, high frequency switching, low stored energy and smaller size over comparable ICT systems.

  20. Bombarding insulating foils with highly energetic ions

    Lanzanò, G.; de Filippo, E.; Hagmann, S.; Rothard, H.; Volant, C.

    Insulating (MYLAR), semi-insulating (MYLAR-Au) and conducting foils have been bombarded by very energetic 64 MeV u-1 78Kr32+ ions. The velocity spectra of fast electrons emitted in the backward and forward directions have been measured and analyzed as a function of the elapsed time in the run. A shift of binary encounter and convoy electrons emitted in the forward direction toward lower velocities has been observed with insulating targets. No such shift occurs with metallic targets. The surface potential evolves with time (i.e. ion fluence) both at forward and backward emission angle. It is shown that strong bulk charging of insulating targets leads to a positive potential as high as 9 kV before charge breakdown.

  1. Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation addressed in this proposal is Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks, or STICT. This novel system could be applied in either an automated...

  2. Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks (STICT) is a thermal management system applied by either an automated or manual spraying process with less...

  3. Dielectric films improve life of polymeric insulators

    Hudis, M.; Wydeven, T.

    1975-01-01

    Degradation of polymeric insulators may be significantly reduced when polymer surfaces are coated with film having gradation of dielectric constants, larger where it is in contact with polymer and smaller at its exposed surface.

  4. Corrosion fatigue properties of thermally insulated pipeline

    The corrosion fatigue properties of thermally insulated pipeline were investigated in synthetic groundwater by electrochemical test, corrosion fatigue test and SEM analysis. Since the potential difference between the weldment and the base metal was small, the pipeline steel was not susceptible to galvanic corrosion. No fatigue limit was apparent for corrosion fatigue testing with remarkable reduction of fatigue lifetime. The effects of insulation and stress on the corrosion fatigue resistance of pipeline steel were studied through Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) during corrosion fatigue testing. The result of LPR measurement indicated that the corrosion rate was determined not by the water content of PUR foam but by the magnitude of applied stress. The better corrosion fatigue property of the insulated steel was attributable to the formation of a protective rust layer under the insulation, which reduced the acceleration of corrosion process and the propagation of fatigue crack. This was confirmed by the results of EIS measurements and SEM observation

  5. Thin Nanoporous Metal-Insulator-Metal Membranes.

    Aramesh, Morteza; Djalalian-Assl, Amir; Aghili Yajadda, Mir Massoud; Prawer, Steven; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2016-02-24

    Insulating nanoporous materials are promising platforms for soft-ionizing membranes; however, improvement in fabrication processes and the quality and high breakdown resistance of the thin insulator layers are needed for high integration and performance. Here, scalable fabrication of highly porous, thin, silicon dioxide membranes with controlled thickness is demonstrated using plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposition. The fabricated membranes exhibit good insulating properties with a breakdown voltage of 1 × 10(7) V/cm. Our calculations suggest that the average electric field inside a nanopore of the membranes can be as high as 1 × 10(6) V/cm; sufficient for ionization of wide range of molecules. These metal-insulator-metal nanoporous arrays are promising for applications such soft ionizing membranes for mass spectroscopy. PMID:26846250

  6. Chromatin domain boundaries: insulators and beyond

    Gong Hong WEI; De Pei LIU; Chih Chuan LIANG

    2005-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is organized into functionally and structurally distinct domains, representing regulatory units for gene expression and chromosome behavior. DNA sequences that mark the border between adjacent domains are the insulators or boundary elements, which are required in maintenance of the function of different domains. Some insulators need others enable to play insulation activity. Chromatin domains are defined by distinct sets of post-translationally modified histones. Recent studies show that these histone modifications are also involved in establishment of sharp chromatin boundaries in order to prevent the spreading of distinct domains. Additionally, in some loci, the high-order chromatin structures for long-range looping interactions also have boundary activities, suggesting a correlation between insulators and chromatin loop domains. In this review, we will discuss recent progress in the field of chromatin domain boundaries.

  7. Frequency Steered Acoustic Transducer Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is to develop, fabricate, and characterize a novel frequency steered acoustic transducer (FSAT) for the...

  8. Frequency Steered Acoustic Transducer Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project is to fabricate, characterize, and verify performance of a new type of frequency steered acoustic...

  9. Airborne synthetic aperture acoustic imaging.

    Soumekh, M

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a system model and inversion for airborne synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) imaging. The system model accurately represents the intercation of the acoustic source and the target region at near range values. Moreover, the model incorporates the fact that the relative speed of the vehicle's (transmitter/receiver) with respect to the target region is comparable to the acoustic wave propagation speed. The inversion utilizes the principle of spectral decomposition of spherical phase functions to develop a wavefront reconstruction method from SAA data. Processing issues and selection of appropriate acoustic FM-CW sources are discussed. Results are provided that exhibit the superior accuracy of the proposed SAA system model and inversion over their synthetic aperture radar (SAR) counterpart in which the vehicle's speed is assumed to be much smaller than the wave propagation speed. PMID:18282912

  10. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will explore and test the feasibility and effectiveness of using a cryogenic fluid (liquid nitrogen) to facilitate acoustic suppression in a...

  11. Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The very large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, is currently under construction and is due to...

  12. Metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal structured titanium dioxide ultraviolet photodetector

    Wang, W J; Ma, F Y [College of Physical Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, 450001 (China); Shan, C X; Zhu, H; Shen, D Z; Fan, X W [Key Laboratory of Excited State Processes, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Choy, K L, E-mail: phycxshan@yahoo.com.c [School of Mechanical Materials, and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-03

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) thin films were prepared by an atomic layer deposition technique and a metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal structured ultraviolet photodetector was fabricated from the TiO{sub 2} thin films. Meanwhile, a metal-semiconductor-metal structured photodetector was also fabricated under the same condition for comparison. By measuring their photoresponse properties, it was found that the existence of an insulation layer is effective in improving the photodetector's responsivity. The mechanism for the improvement has been attributed to the carrier multiplication occurring in the insulation layer under a high electric field.

  13. Contact electrification of insulating materials

    The electrostatic charge that is generated when two materials are contacted or rubbed and then separated is a well-known physical process that has been studied for more than 2500 years. Contact electrification occurs in many contexts, both natural and technological. For example, in dust storms the collisions between particles lead to electrostatic charging and in extreme cases, extraordinary lightning displays. In electrophotography, toner particles are intentionally charged to guide their deposition in well-defined patterns. Despite such a long history and so many important consequences, a fundamental understanding of the mechanism behind contact electrification remains elusive. An open question is what type of species are transferred between the surfaces to generate charge—experiments suggest various species ranging from electrons to ions to nanoscopic bits of material, and theoretical work suggests that non-equilibrium states may play an important role. Another open question is the contact electrification that occurs when two insulating materials with identical physical properties touch—since there is no apparent driving force, it is not clear why charge transfer occurs. A third open question involves granular systems—models and experiments have shown that a particle-size dependence for the charging often exists. In this review, we discuss the fundamental aspects of contact electrification and highlight recent research efforts aimed at understanding these open questions. (topical review)

  14. Topological insulators in random potentials

    Pieper, Andreas; Fehske, Holger

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effects of magnetic and nonmagnetic impurities on the two-dimensional surface states of three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs). Modeling weak and strong TIs using a generic four-band Hamiltonian, which allows for a breaking of inversion and time-reversal symmetries and takes into account random local potentials as well as the Zeeman and orbital effects of external magnetic fields, we compute the local density of states, the single-particle spectral function, and the conductance for a (contacted) slab geometry by numerically exact techniques based on kernel polynomial expansion and Green's function approaches. We show that bulk disorder refills the surface-state Dirac gap induced by a homogeneous magnetic field with states, whereas orbital (Peierls-phase) disorder preserves the gap feature. The former effect is more pronounced in weak TIs than in strong TIs. At moderate randomness, disorder-induced conducting channels appear in the surface layer, promoting diffusive metallicity. Random Zeeman fields rapidly destroy any conducting surface states. Imprinting quantum dots on a TI's surface, we demonstrate that carrier transport can be easily tuned by varying the gate voltage, even to the point where quasibound dot states may appear.

  15. Superplastic forming of ceramic insulation

    Nieh, T. G.; Wittenauer, J. P.; Wadsworth, J.

    1992-01-01

    Superplasticity has been demonstrated in many fine-grained structural ceramics and ceramic composites, including yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (YTZP), alumina, and Al2O3-reinforced zirconia (Al2O3/YTZ) duplex composites and SiC-reinforced Si3N4. These superplastic ceramics obviously offer the potential benefit of forming net shape or near net shape parts. This could be particularly useful for forming complicated shapes that are difficult to achieve using conventional forming techniques, or require elaborate, subsequent machining. In the present study, we successfully demonstrated the following: (1) superplastic 3Y-TXP and 20 percent Al2O3/YTZ composite have for the first time been successfully deformed into hemispherical caps via a biaxial gas-pressure forming technique; (2) no experimental difficulty was encountered in applying the required gas pressures and temperatures to achieve the results, thus, it is certain that higher rates of deformation than those presented in this study will be possible by using the current test apparatus at higher temperatures and pressures; and (3) an analytical model incorporating material parameters, such as variations during forming in the strain rate sensitivity exponent and grain growth-induced strain hardening, is needed to model accurately and therefore precisely control the biaxial gas-pressure forming of superplastic ceramics. Based on the results of this study, we propose to fabricate zirconia insulation tubes by superplastic extrusion of zirconia polycrystal. This would not only reduce the cost, but also improve the reliability of the tube products.

  16. Dual vortex theory of doped Mott insulators

    Balents, Leon; Sachdev, Subir

    2006-01-01

    We present a general framework for describing the quantum phases obtained by doping paramagnetic Mott insulators on the square lattice. The undoped insulators are efficiently characterized by the projective transformations of various fields under the square lattice space group (the PSG). We show that the PSG also imposes powerful constraints on the doped system, and on the effective action for the vortex and Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations of superconducting states. This action can also ...

  17. Pumping and Depressurizing of Insulation Materials

    Porter, Amber

    2010-01-01

    The Fluids Testing and Technology Branch is a group that researches and tests efficient ways to use various Cryogenic Fluids, such as Liquid Nitrogen or Liquid Helium, in ground and space systems. Their main goal is to develop new technologies involving Cryogenic temperatures as well as making sure the existing technologies are understood. During my time here a lot of insulation testing has been done which is where insulation systems are tested for cryogenic systems that are in space for long durations.

  18. Development of radiation resistant electrical cable insulations

    Two new polyethylene cable insulations have been formulated for nuclear applications, and have been tested under gamma radiation. Both insulations are based on low density polyethylene, one with PbO and the other with Sb2O3 as additives. The test results show that the concept of using inorganic antioxidants to retard radiation initiated oxidation (RIO) is viable. PbO is more effective than Sb2O3 in minimizing RIO

  19. Topological Order Parameters for Interacting Topological Insulators

    Wang, Zhong; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    We propose a topological order parameter for interacting topological insulators, expressed in terms of the full Green's functions of the interacting system. We show that it is exactly quantized for a time reversal invariant topological insulator, and it can be experimentally measured through the topological magneto-electric effect. This topological order parameter can be applied to both interacting and disordered systems, and used for determining their phase diagrams.

  20. Quantitative analysis of thermal insulation coatings

    Kiil, Søren

    2014-01-01

    This work concerns the development of simulation tools for mapping of insulation properties of thermal insulation coatings based on selected functional filler materials. A mathematical model, which includes the underlying physics (i.e. thermal conductivity of a heterogeneous two-component coating and porosity and thermal conductivity of selected fillers) was recently developed. The model has been validated against data from a previous experimental investigation with hollow glass sphere-based ...

  1. Periodic Table for Floquet Topological Insulators

    Roy, Rahul; Harper, Fenner

    2016-01-01

    Dynamical phases with novel topological properties are known to arise in driven systems of free fermions. In this paper, we obtain a `periodic table' to describe the phases of such time-dependent systems, generalizing the periodic table for static topological insulators. Using K-theory, we systematically classify Floquet topological insulators from the ten Altland-Zirnbauer symmetry classes across all dimensions. We find that the static classification scheme described by a group $G$ becomes $...

  2. Cryogenic insulation standard data and methodologies

    Demko, J. A.; Fesmire, J. E.; Johnson, W. L.; Swanger, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Although some standards exist for thermal insulation, few address the sub-ambient temperature range and cold-side temperatures below 100 K. Standards for cryogenic insulation systems require cryostat testing and data analysis that will allow the development of the tools needed by design engineers and thermal analysts for the design of practical cryogenic systems. Thus, this critically important information can provide reliable data and methodologies for industrial efficiency and energy conservation. Two Task Groups have been established in the area of cryogenic insulation systems Under ASTM International's Committee C16 on Thermal Insulation. These are WK29609 - New Standard for Thermal Performance Testing of Cryogenic Insulation Systems and WK29608 - Standard Practice for Multilayer Insulation in Cryogenic Service. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center and the Thermal Energy Laboratory of LeTourneau University are conducting Inter-Laboratory Study (ILS) of selected insulation materials. Each lab carries out the measurements of thermal properties of these materials using identical flat-plate boil-off calorimeter instruments. Parallel testing will provide the comparisons necessary to validate the measurements and methodologies. Here we discuss test methods, some initial data in relation to the experimental approach, and the manner reporting the thermal performance data. This initial study of insulation materials for sub-ambient temperature applications is aimed at paving the way for further ILS comparative efforts that will produce standard data sets for several commercial materials. Discrepancies found between measurements will be used to improve the testing and data reduction techniques being developed as part of the future ASTM International standards.

  3. Measure Guideline. Internal Insulation of Masonry Walls

    Straube, J. F. [Building Science Corporation (BSC), Somerville, MA (United States); Ueno, K. [Building Science Corporation (BSC), Somerville, MA (United States); Schumacher, C. J. [Building Science Corporation (BSC), Somerville, MA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This measure guideline provides recommendations for interior insulation assemblies that control interstitial condensation and durability risks; recommendations for acceptable thermal performance are also provided. An illustrated guide of high-risk exterior details (which concentrate bulk water), and recommended remediation details is provided. This is followed by a recommended methodology for risk assessment of a masonry interior insulation project: a series of steps are suggested to assess the risks associated with this retrofit, with greater certainty with added steps.

  4. Measure Guideline: Internal Insulation of Masonry Walls

    Straube, J. F.; Ueno, K.; Schumacher, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    This measure guideline provides recommendations for interior insulation assemblies that control interstitial condensation and durability risks; recommendations for acceptable thermal performance are also provided. An illustrated guide of high-risk exterior details (which concentrate bulk water), and recommended remediation details is provided. This is followed by a recommended methodology for risk assessment of a masonry interior insulation project: a series of steps are suggested to assess the risks associated with this retrofit, with greater certainty with added steps.

  5. Heat Insulation materials from environmental aspect

    Utochkina, Evgenia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to do an objective opinion how different insulation manufacturers promote their products from environmental point of view. The main heat insulation materials which include in this thesis are glass wool, stone wool, cellulose, PIR and PUR, EPS and XPS. The study used the data from the websites of companies, video materials, and data of the materials of exhibitions, trade journals and specialized publications. The methodology is based on conduct competitive ana...

  6. Topological Oxide Insulator in Cubic Perovskite Structure

    Hosub Jin; Rhim, Sonny H.; Jino Im; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of topologically protected conducting states with the chiral spin texture is the most prominent feature at the surface of topological insulators. On the application side, large band gap and high resistivity to distinguish surface from bulk degrees of freedom should be guaranteed for the full usage of the surface states. Here, we suggest that the oxide cubic perovskite YBiO3, more than just an oxide, defines itself as a new three-dimensional topological insulator exhibiting both ...

  7. Acoustic Invisibility in Turbulent Fluids

    Huang, Xun; Zhong, Siyang

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic invisibility of a cloaking system in turbulent uids has been poorly understood. Here we show that evident scattering would appear in turbulent wakes owing to the submergence of a classical cloaking device. The inherent mechanism is explained using our theoretical model, which eventually inspires us to develop an optimized cloaking approach. Both the near- and far-?eld scatted ?elds are examined using high order computational acoustic methods. The remarkably low scattering demonstrate...

  8. Passive/Active Acoustic metamaterials

    Lissek, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    Within the last years, an increasing number of studies have been carried out in the field of acoustic metamaterials. These artificial composite materials aim at achieving new macroscopic properties, like negative refraction, that are not readily present in nature. In analogy to electromagnetics, where such concepts are already more mature, a novel concept of artificial acoustic transmission line has recently been reported, which presents such artificial behavior. In this presentation, the des...

  9. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  10. Simplified Rotation In Acoustic Levitation

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.; Trinh, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    New technique based on old discovery used to control orientation of object levitated acoustically in axisymmetric chamber. Method does not require expensive equipment like additional acoustic drivers of precisely adjustable amplitude, phase, and frequency. Reflecting object acts as second source of sound. If reflecting object large enough, close enough to levitated object, or focuses reflected sound sufficiently, Rayleigh torque exerted on levitated object by reflected sound controls orientation of object.

  11. Computational Modeling of Airway Acoustic

    Horáček, Jaromír

    Salt Lake City: National Center for Voice and Speech, University of Utah, 2014. s. 14-14. [International Conference on Voice Physiology and Biomechanics /9./. 10.04.2014-12.04.2014, Salt Lake City] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/12/1306 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : biomechanics of voice * finite element method * acoustic waves propagation Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  12. High-Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    Goldberg, Louise F. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Mosiman, Garrett E. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A more accurate assessment of slab-on-grade foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated).

  13. PC operated acoustic transient spectroscopy of deep levels in MIS structures

    A new version of acoustic deep-level transient spectroscopy is presented to study the traps at the insulator-semiconductor interface. The acoustic deep-level transient spectroscopy uses an acoustoelectric response signal produced by the MIS structure interface when a longitudinal acoustic wave propagates through a structure. The acoustoelectric response signal is extremely sensitive to external conditions of the structure and reflects any changes in the charge distribution, connected also with charged traps. In comparison with previous version of acoustic deep-level transient spectroscopy that closely coincides with the principle of the original deep-level transient spectroscopy technique, the present technique is based on the computer-evaluated isothermal transients and represents an improved, more efficient and time saving technique. Many tests on the software used for calculation as well as on experimental setup have been performed. The improved acoustic deep-level transient spectroscopy method has been applied for the Si(p) MIS structures. The deep-level parameters as activation energy and capture cross-section have been determined. (authors)

  14. Load responsive multilayer insulation performance testing

    Cryogenic insulation designed to operate at various pressures from one atmosphere to vacuum, with high thermal performance and light weight, is needed for cryogenically fueled space launch vehicles and aircraft. Multilayer insulation (MLI) performs well in a high vacuum, but the required vacuum shell for use in the atmosphere is heavy. Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) is often used in these systems because of its light weight, but can have a higher heat flux than desired. We report on the continued development of Load Responsive Multilayer Insulation (LRMLI), an advanced thermal insulation system that uses dynamic beam discrete spacers that provide high thermal performance both in atmosphere and vacuum. LRMLI consists of layers of thermal radiation barriers separated and supported by micromolded polymer spacers. The spacers have low thermal conductance, and self-support a thin, lightweight vacuum shell that provides internal high vacuum in the insulation. The dynamic load responsive spacers compress to support the external load of a vacuum shell in one atmosphere, and decompress under reduced atmospheric pressure for lower heat leak. Structural load testing was performed on the spacers with various configurations. LRMLI was installed on a 400 liter tank and boil off testing with liquid nitrogen performed at various chamber pressures from one atmosphere to high vacuum. Testing was also performed with an MLI blanket on the outside of the LRMLI

  15. Topological insulators and superconductors from string theory

    Ryu, Shinsei; Takayanagi, Tadashi

    2010-10-01

    Topological insulators and superconductors in different spatial dimensions and with different discrete symmetries have been fully classified recently, revealing a periodic structure for the pattern of possible types of topological insulators and superconductors, both in terms of spatial dimensions and in terms of symmetry classes. It was proposed that K theory is behind the periodicity. On the other hand, D-branes, a solitonic object in string theory, are also known to be classified by K theory. In this paper, by inspecting low-energy effective field theories realized by two parallel D-branes, we establish a one-to-one correspondence between the K-theory classification of topological insulators/superconductors and D-brane charges. In addition, the string theory realization of topological insulators and superconductors comes naturally with gauge interactions, and the Wess-Zumino term of the D-branes gives rise to a gauge field theory of topological nature, such as ones with the Chern-Simons term or the θ term in various dimensions. This sheds light on topological insulators and superconductors beyond noninteracting systems, and the underlying topological field theory description thereof. In particular, our string theory realization includes the honeycomb lattice Kitaev model in two spatial dimensions, and its higher-dimensional extensions. Increasing the number of D-branes naturally leads to a realization of topological insulators and superconductors in terms of holography (AdS/CFT).

  16. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  17. Prediction of acoustic comfort and acoustic silence in Goan Catholic churches

    Menino A. S. M. P. Tavares; S. Rajagopalan; Satish J. Sharma; António P. O. Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic Comfort and Acoustic Silence are determinants of tranquility in a worship space. The results presented here are part of a study that investigates the behaviour of acoustically constituted worship parameters in six Catholic churches (Goa, India). Acoustic comfort is quantified through an Acoustic Comfort Impression Index which measures the net comfort induced through the optimization of the desired subjective acoustic impressions for different types of music and different music source...

  18. Development of insulating coatings for liquid metal blankets

    It is shown that self-cooled liquid metal blankets are feasible only with electrically insulating coatings at the duct walls. The requirements on the insulation properties are estimated by simple analytical models. Candidate insulator materials are selected based on insulating properties and thermodynamic consideration. Different fabrication technologies for insulating coatings are described. The status of the knowledge on the most crucial feasibility issue, the degradation of the resisivity under irradiation, is reviewed

  19. ENERGY, ACOUSTICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ANALYSIS OF BUILDING SYSTEMS BASED ON WOOD WOOL MINERALIZED WITH PORTLAND CEMENT

    Pavarin, Cora

    2014-01-01

    In the present work various aspects of the energetic, thermal and acoustic properties of porous materials with wood wool mineralized Portland cement have been analyzed, in cooperation with the company Celenit Srl, a manufacturer of panels for building insulation. These products are also recognized interesting and desirable for their environmental sustainability through specific certifications. Remind that sustainability means "development that meets the needs of the present without comprom...

  20. Perfect sound insulation property of reclaimed waste tire rubber

    Ubaidillah, Harjana, Yahya, Iwan; Kristiani, Restu; Muqowi, Eki; Mazlan, Saiful Amri

    2016-03-01

    This article reports an experimental investigation of sound insulation and absorption performance of a materials made of reclaimed ground tire rubber which is known as un-recyclable thermoset. The bulk waste tire is processed using single step recycling methods namely high-pressure high-temperature sintering (HPHTS). The bulk waste tire is simply placed into a mold and then a pressure load of 3 tons and a heating temperature of 200°C are applied to the mold. The HPHTS conducted for an hour and then it is cooled in room temperature. The resulted product is then evaluated the acoustical properties namely sound transmission loss (STL) and sound absorption coefficient using B&K Tube Kit Type 4206-T based on ISO 10534-2, ASTM E1050 and ASTM E2611. The sound absorption coefficient is found about 0.04 until 0.08 while STL value ranges between 50 to 60 dB. The sound absorption values are found to be very low (<0.1), while the average STL is higher than other elastomeric matrix found in previous work. The reclaimed tire rubber through HPHTS technique gives good soundproof characteristic.

  1. Buoyancy, transport, and head loss of fibrous reactor insulation

    In the event of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in a nuclear power plant, it is possible that insulation for pipes or other items inside the containment building could be dislodged by the high energy break jet. This insulation debris could affect the recirculation of water from the sump of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) by collecting on the screen surrounding this sump. To help in assessing the possible effect of detached insulation on the ECCS, buoyancy, transport, and head loss characteristics of the insulation were studied experimentally. Three types of insulation pillows with mineral wool and fiberglass cores were tested in undamaged state, with their covers opened and with the insulation core in broken-up and shredded conditions. Small samples of reflective metallic and closed cell insulations were also tested for transport and buoyancy. The buoyancy studies revealed that the insulation core material sank more rapidly in hot water than in cold, that the tested mineral wool insulation did not readily sink, but that the fiberglass insulation did and that undamaged pillows could remain afloat for several days due to trapped air pockets forming inside the pillow covers. The transport studies furnished values of the flow velocity needed (i) to initiate the movement of sunken insulation towards a screen, (ii) to bring all the insulation on the screen, and (iii) to flip the insulation vertically on the screen. The head loss studies resulted in graphs of head loss versus approach velocity for undisturbed insulation and for beds of accumulated insulation fragments

  2. Optimized multisectioned acoustic liners

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    A critical examination is presented of the use of optimized axially segmented acoustic liners to increase the attenuation of a liner. New calculations show that segmenting is most efficient at high frequencies with relatively long duct lengths where the attenuation is low for both uniform and segmented liners. Statistical considerations indicate little advantage in using optimized liners with more than two segments while the bandwidth of an optimized two-segment liner is shown to be nearly equal to that of a uniform liner. Multielement liner calculations show a large degradation in performance due to changes in assumed input modal structure. Finally, in order to substantiate previous and future analytical results, in-house (finite difference) and contractor (mode matching) programs are used to generate theoretical attenuations for a number of liner configurations for liners in a rectangular duct with no mean flow. Overall, the use of optimized multisectioned liners (sometimes called phased liners) fails to offer sufficient advantage over a uniform liner to warrant their use except in low frequency single mode application.

  3. Overhauser effects in insulating solids

    Can, T. V.; Corzilius, B.; Walish, J. J.; Griffin, R. G. [Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Caporini, M. A.; Rosay, M.; Maas, W. E. [Bruker BioSpin, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States); Mentink-Vigier, F.; Vega, S. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Baldus, M. [NMR Spectroscopy, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Swager, T. M. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-08-14

    We report magic angle spinning, dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments at magnetic fields of 9.4 T, 14.1 T, and 18.8 T using the narrow line polarizing agents 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (BDPA) dispersed in polystyrene, and sulfonated-BDPA (SA-BDPA) and trityl OX063 in glassy glycerol/water matrices. The {sup 1}H DNP enhancement field profiles of the BDPA radicals exhibit a significant DNP Overhauser effect (OE) as well as a solid effect (SE) despite the fact that these samples are insulating solids. In contrast, trityl exhibits only a SE enhancement. Data suggest that the appearance of the OE is due to rather strong electron-nuclear hyperfine couplings present in BDPA and SA-BDPA, which are absent in trityl and perdeuterated BDPA (d{sub 21}-BDPA). In addition, and in contrast to other DNP mechanisms such as the solid effect or cross effect, the experimental data suggest that the OE in non-conducting solids scales favorably with magnetic field, increasing in magnitude in going from 5 T, to 9.4 T, to 14.1 T, and to 18.8 T. Simulations using a model two spin system consisting of an electron hyperfine coupled to a {sup 1}H reproduce the essential features of the field profiles and indicate that the OE in these samples originates from the zero and double quantum cross relaxation induced by fluctuating hyperfine interactions between the intramolecular delocalized unpaired electrons and their neighboring nuclei, and that the size of these hyperfine couplings is crucial to the magnitude of the enhancements. Microwave power dependent studies show that the OE saturates at considerably lower power levels than the solid effect in the same samples. Our results provide new insights into the mechanism of the Overhauser effect, and also provide a new approach to perform DNP experiments in chemical, biophysical, and physical systems at high magnetic fields.

  4. An Insulating Glass Knowledge Base

    Michael L. Doll; Gerald Hendrickson; Gerard Lagos; Russell Pylkki; Chris Christensen; Charlie Cureija

    2005-08-01

    This report will discuss issues relevant to Insulating Glass (IG) durability performance by presenting the observations and developed conclusions in a logical sequential format. This concluding effort discusses Phase II activities and focuses on beginning to quantifying IG durability issues while continuing the approach presented in the Phase I activities (Appendix 1) which discuss a qualitative assessment of durability issues. Phase II developed a focus around two specific IG design classes previously presented in Phase I of this project. The typical box spacer and thermoplastic spacer design including their Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA) and Fault Tree diagrams were chosen to address two currently used IG design options with varying components and failure modes. The system failures occur due to failures of components or their interfaces. Efforts to begin quantifying the durability issues focused on the development and delivery of an included computer based IG durability simulation program. The focus/effort to deliver the foundation for a comprehensive IG durability simulation tool is necessary to address advancements needed to meet current and future building envelope energy performance goals. This need is based upon the current lack of IG field failure data and the lengthy field observation time necessary for this data collection. Ultimately, the simulation program is intended to be used by designers throughout the current and future industry supply chain. Its use is intended to advance IG durability as expectations grow around energy conservation and with the growth of embedded technologies as required to meet energy needs. In addition the tool has the immediate benefit of providing insight for research and improvement prioritization. Included in the simulation model presentation are elements and/or methods to address IG materials, design, process, quality, induced stress (environmental and other factors), validation, etc. In addition, acquired data

  5. Focusing of Acoustic Waves through Acoustic Materials with Subwavelength Structures

    Xiao, Bingmu

    2013-05-01

    In this thesis, wave propagation through acoustic materials with subwavelength slits structures is studied. Guided by the findings, acoustic wave focusing is achieved with a specific material design. By using a parameter retrieving method, an effective medium theory for a slab with periodic subwavelength cut-through slits is successfully derived. The theory is based on eigenfunction solutions to the acoustic wave equation. Numerical simulations are implemented by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for the two-dimensional acoustic wave equation. The theory provides the effective impedance and refractive index functions for the equivalent medium, which can reproduce the transmission and reflection spectral responses of the original structure. I analytically and numerically investigate both the validity and limitations of the theory, and the influences of material and geometry on the effective spectral responses are studied. Results show that large contrasts in impedance and density are conditions that validate the effective medium theory, and this approximation displays a better accuracy for a thick slab with narrow slits in it. Based on the effective medium theory developed, a design of a at slab with a snake shaped" subwavelength structure is proposed as a means of achieving acoustic focusing. The property of focusing is demonstrated by FDTD simulations. Good agreement is observed between the proposed structure and the equivalent lens pre- dicted by the theory, which leads to robust broadband focusing by a thin at slab.

  6. Moisture estimation in power transformer oil using acoustic signals and spectral kurtosis

    Leite, Valéria C. M. N.; Veloso, Giscard F. C.; Borges da Silva, Luiz Eduardo; Lambert-Torres, Germano; Borges da Silva, Jonas G.; Onofre Pereira Pinto, João

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a new technique for estimating the contamination by moisture in power transformer insulating oil based on the spectral kurtosis analysis of the acoustic signals of partial discharges (PDs). Basically, in this approach, the spectral kurtosis of the PD acoustic signal is calculated and the correlation between its maximum value and the moisture percentage is explored to find a function that calculates the moisture percentage. The function can be easily implemented in DSP, FPGA, or any other type of embedded system for online moisture monitoring. To evaluate the proposed approach, an experiment is assembled with a piezoelectric sensor attached to a tank, which is filled with insulating oil samples contaminated by different levels of moisture. A device generating electrical discharges is submerged into the oil to simulate the occurrence of PDs. Detected acoustic signals are processed using fast kurtogram algorithm to extract spectral kurtosis values. The obtained data are used to find the fitting function that relates the water contamination to the maximum value of the spectral kurtosis. Experimental results show that the proposed method is suitable for online monitoring system of power transformers.

  7. SILICON COMPATIBLE ACOUSTIC WAVE RESONATORS: DESIGN, FABRICATION AND PERFORMANCE

    Aliza Aini Md Ralib

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Continuous advancement in wireless technology and silicon microfabrication has fueled exciting growth in wireless products. The bulky size of discrete vibrating mechanical devices such as quartz crystals and surface acoustic wave resonators impedes the ultimate miniaturization of single-chip transceivers. Fabrication of acoustic wave resonators on silicon allows complete integration of a resonator with its accompanying circuitry.  Integration leads to enhanced performance, better functionality with reduced cost at large volume production. This paper compiles the state-of-the-art technology of silicon compatible acoustic resonators, which can be integrated with interface circuitry. Typical acoustic wave resonators are surface acoustic wave (SAW and bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonators.  Performance of the resonator is measured in terms of quality factor, resonance frequency and insertion loss. Selection of appropriate piezoelectric material is significant to ensure sufficient electromechanical coupling coefficient is produced to reduce the insertion loss. The insulating passive SiO2 layer acts as a low loss material and aims to increase the quality factor and temperature stability of the design. The integration technique also is influenced by the fabrication process and packaging.  Packageless structure using AlN as the additional isolation layer is proposed to protect the SAW device from the environment for high reliability. Advancement in miniaturization technology of silicon compatible acoustic wave resonators to realize a single chip transceiver system is still needed. ABSTRAK: Kemajuan yang berterusan dalam teknologi tanpa wayar dan silikon telah menguatkan pertumbuhan yang menarik dalam produk tanpa wayar. Saiz yang besar bagi peralatan mekanikal bergetar seperti kristal kuarza menghalang pengecilan untuk merealisasikan peranti cip. Silikon serasi  gelombang akustik resonator mempunyai potensi yang besar untuk menggantikan unsur

  8. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    John l. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-07-01

    The 1st generation acoustic monitoring package was designed to detect and analyze weak acoustic signals inside natural gas transmission lines. Besides a microphone it housed a three-inch diameter aerodynamic acoustic signal amplifier to maximize sensitivity to leak induced {Delta}p type signals. The theory and test results of this aerodynamic signal amplifier was described in the master's degree thesis of our Research Assistant Deepak Mehra who is about to graduate. To house such a large three-inch diameter sensor required the use of a steel 300-psi rated 4 inch weld neck flange, which itself weighed already 29 pounds. The completed 1st generation Acoustic Monitoring Package weighed almost 100 pounds. This was too cumbersome to mount in the field, on an access port at a pipeline shut-off valve. Therefore a 2nd generation and truly Portable Acoustic Monitor was built. It incorporated a fully self-contained {Delta}p type signal sensor, rated for line pressures up to 1000 psi with a base weight of only 6 pounds. This is the Rosemont Inc. Model 3051CD-Range 0, software driven sensor, which is believed to have industries best total performance. Its most sensitive unit was purchased with a {Delta}p range from 0 to 3 inch water. This resulted in the herein described 2nd generation: Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) for pipelines up to 1000 psi. Its 32-pound total weight includes an 18-volt battery. Together with a 3 pound laptop with its 4-channel data acquisition card, completes the equipment needed for field acoustic monitoring of natural gas transmission pipelines.

  9. Energy conservation through thermally insulated structures

    The propose of this paper is to explicate its title through investigating the different available thermal insulating materials and the various techniques of application, as practiced in Jordan, in particular, and as practiced in many parts of the world in general, which will satisfy Jordanian standards in terms of heat transmittance and thermal comfort. A brief comparison with international standards will shed some light on the stringent measures enforced in the developed world and on our striving aspirations to keep pace. The paper consists of four main parts, pseudoally divided. The first part will deal with the mechanism of heat loss and heat gain in structures during summer and winter. It will also explain the Time-lag phenomenon which is vital for providing thermal comfort inside the dwellings. The second part will evaluate the damages induced by the temperature gradients on the different elements of the structure, particularly next to exterior opening. The paper will also demonstrate the damages induced by water condensation and fungus growth on the internal surfaces of the structure and within its skeleton. A correlation between condensation and thermal insulation will be established. The third part of the paper will evaluate the different available thermal insulating materials and the application techniques which will satisfy the needs for thermal insulating and thermal comfort at the least cost possible. The criteria of an economical design shall be established. As a conclusion, the paper infers answers to the following different criteria discussed throughout the different parts of the paper. The main theme of questions can be summarized as follows: 1)How energy conservation is possible due to thermal insulation? 2)The feasibility of investing in thermal insulation? 3)Is thermal comfort and a healthy atmosphere possible inside the dwellings during all season! What are the conditions necessary to sustain them? 4)What environmental impacts can exist due to

  10. Wrapped multilayer insulation design and testing

    Dye, S. A.; Tyler, P. N.; Mills, G. L.; Kopelove, A. B.

    2014-11-01

    New vehicles need improved cryogenic propellant storage and transfer capabilities for long duration missions. Multilayer insulation (MLI) for cryogenic propellant feedlines is much less effective than MLI tank insulation, with heat leak into spiral wrapped MLI on pipes 3-10 times higher than conventional tank MLI. Better insulation for cryogenic feed lines is an important enabling technology that could help NASA reach cryogenic propellant storage and transfer requirements. Improved insulation for Ground Support Equipment could reduce cryogen losses during launch vehicle loading. Wrapped-MLI (WMLI) is a high performance multilayer insulation using innovative discrete spacer technology specifically designed for cryogenic transfer lines and Vacuum Jacketed Pipe (VJP) to reduce heat flux. The poor performance of traditional MLI wrapped on feed lines is due in part to compression of the MLI layers, with increased interlayer contact and heat conduction. WMLI uses discrete spacers that maintain precise layer spacing, with a unique design to reduce heat leak. A Triple Orthogonal Disk spacer was engineered to minimize contact area/length ratio and reduce solid heat conduction for use in concentric MLI configurations. A new insulation, WMLI, was developed and tested. Novel polymer spacers were designed, analyzed and fabricated; different installation techniques were examined; and rapid prototype nested shell components to speed installation on real world piping were designed and tested. Prototypes were installed on tubing set test fixtures and heat flux measured via calorimetry. WMLI offered superior performance to traditional MLI installed on cryogenic pipe, with 2.2 W/m2 heat flux compared to 26.6 W/m2 for traditional spiral wrapped MLI (5 layers, 77-295 K). WMLI as inner insulation in VJP can offer heat leaks as low as 0.09 W/m, compared to industry standard products with 0.31 W/m. WMLI could enable improved spacecraft cryogenic feedlines and industrial hot/cold transfer

  11. Reflective echo tomographic imaging using acoustic beams

    Kisner, Roger; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2014-11-25

    An inspection system includes a plurality of acoustic beamformers, where each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers including a plurality of acoustic transmitter elements. The system also includes at least one controller configured for causing each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers to generate an acoustic beam directed to a point in a volume of interest during a first time. Based on a reflected wave intensity detected at a plurality of acoustic receiver elements, an image of the volume of interest can be generated.

  12. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  13. Achieving planar plasmonic subwavelength resolution using alternately arranged insulator-metal and insulator-insulator-metal composite structures.

    Cheng, Bo Han; Chang, Kai Jiun; Lan, Yung-Chiang; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-01-01

    This work develops and analyzes a planar subwavelength device with the ability of one-dimensional resolution at visible frequencies that is based on alternately arranged insulator-metal (IM) and insulator-insulator-metal (IIM) composite structures. The mechanism for the proposed device to accomplish subwavelength resolution is elucidated by analyzing the dispersion relations of the IM-IIM composite structures. Electromagnetic simulations based on the finite element method (FEM) are performed to verify that the design of the device has subwavelength resolution. The ability of subwavelength resolution of the proposed device at various visible frequencies is achieved by slightly varying the constituent materials and geometric parameters. The proposed devices have potential applications in multi-functional material, real-time super-resolution imaging, and high-density photonic components. PMID:25613463

  14. CALCULATION OF ACOUSTIC EFFICIENCY OF PORTABLE ACOUSTIC SCREEN

    Aleksandr Skvortsov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The research of influence of life environment adverse factors on physical development and health of population is an actual problem of ecology. The aspects of the most actual problems of the modern world, namely environmental industrial noise pollution are considered in the article. Industrial facilities everywhere have noisy equipment. Noise is a significant factors of negative influenceon people and environment. Combined effects of noise and of other physical pollutions on people may cause amplification of their negative impact. If the noise pollution level from the object in a residential area exceeds the permissible levels (MPL, noise protection measures can be initiated. Today, the most common design decisions for noise protection are sound absorbing construction, noise screens and barriers, acousting housings, soundproff cabins. Many of them are popular, others are less known. The article deals with one of the most wide spread means of noise protection – a portable acoustic screen. The aim of the research is to determine the efficiency of portable acoustic screens. It is shown that the installation of such structures can reduce the average value of the sound level. The authors analyzed acoustic screens as device to reduce noise pollution. The authors offer a potable acoustic screen differing from the used easyness, mobility, minimum price and good sound protective properties. Effectiveness, a sound absorption coefficient and sound conductivity coefficient of a portable acoustic screen are evaluated. The descriptions of the algorithm calculations and the combination of technical solutions have practical originality. The results of the research demonstrate the advantages of the proposed solutions for reducing noise levels in the agro-industrial complex.

  15. My 65 years in acoustics

    Beranek, Leo L.

    2001-05-01

    My entry into acoustics began as research assistant to Professor F. V. Hunt at Harvard University. I received my doctorate in 1940 and directed the Electro-Acoustic Laboratory at Harvard from October 1940 until September 1945. In 1947, I became a tenured associate professor at MIT, and, with Richard H. Bolt, formed the consulting firm Bolt and Beranek, that later included Robert B. Newman, becoming BBN. My most significant contributions before 1970 were design of wedge-lined anechoic chambers, systemization of noise reduction in ventilation systems, design of the world's largest muffler for the testing of supersonic jet engines at NASA's Lewis Laboratory in Cleveland, speech interference level, NC noise criterion curves, heading New York Port Authority's noise study that resulted in mufflers on jet aircraft, and steep aircraft climb procedures, and publishing books titled, Acoustical Measurements, Acoustics, Noise Reduction, Noise and Vibration Control, and Music, Acoustics and Architecture. As President of BBN, I supervised the formation of the group that built and operated the ARPANET (1969), which, when split in two (using TCP/IP protocol) became the INTERNET (1984). Since then, I have written two books on Concert Halls and Opera Houses and have consulted on four concert halls and an opera house.

  16. New high-voltage insulation design

    Ponomarev, L.T.

    1985-07-01

    Nontraditional electric insulating tapes with regular mica barrier called Elastonit have been recently developed in the USSR. Characteristics of several types of electric insulating tapes are presented. The practical problem of synthesis of new Elastonit materials with assigned combinations of properties is solved by selecting conditions of reaction of the functional groups with the corresponding components such that the required structure and, consequently, properties are achieved. The All-Union Scientific Research Institute of Electric Machinery has developed a stable corona-resistant composition of polyfluoroethylene-epoxy and epoxy-polybutadiene functional groups plus mica particles which, when heat treated with the addition of certain additives, yields glass-Elastonit tapes with 1 10/sup 13/ ohm m resistance and superior dielectric properties. The material with regular mica barrier and elastic base capable of damping partial discharges arising in the gap has a service life significantly superior to traditional insulation. Electrical aging of high voltage insulation in a 10 MV/m field is related to the development of partial discharges and shorting by gas pores, leading to a significant increase in capacitance. The new designs of high voltage insulation with their capability to damp partial discharges must be considered quite promising.

  17. Artificial heart system thermal insulation component development

    A concentric cup vacuum multifoil insulation system has been selected by virtue of its size, weight, and thermal performance to insulate the hot radioisotope portion of the thermal converter of an artificial implantable heart system. A factor of 2 improvement in thermal performance, based on the heat loss per number of foil layers (minimum system weight and volume) has been realized over conventional spiral wrapped multifoil vacuum insulation. This improvement is the result of the concentric cup construction to maintain a uniform interfoil spacing and the elimination of corner heat losses. Based on external insulation system dimensions (surface area in contact with host body), heat losses of 0.019 W/ cm2 at 11400K (16000F) and 0.006 W/cm2 at 9200K (12000F) have been achieved. Factors which influence thermal performance of the nickel foil concentric cup insulation system include the number of cups, configuration and method of application of zirconia (ZrO2) spacer material, system pressure, emittance of the cups, and operating temperature

  18. Transparent insulations. Cold-region applications

    Kouhia, I.; Nieminen, J.; Rautiainen, L. [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland). Building Materials Lab.; Ojanen, T.; Salonvaara, M. [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland). Lab. of Heating and Ventilation

    1992-12-31

    The study was carried out to determine the properties of various transparent insulation materials and the performance of wall structures comprising transparent insulation materials and to investigate the performance of a number of experimental walls in full-scale tests in actual service conditions. The thermal stability range of currently available transparent insulation materials made of plastic is 80-125 deg C. It is necessary to have sufficient thermal mass and thermal conductivity of the wall in order to be able to maintain the temperature of the insulation within this range. Another option is an active application, there excessive thermal energy is removed from the wall by means of the air in the air gap or liquid in a liquid absorber. The need for heating energy in buildings reaches its peak in midwinter when solar radiation is at its lowest. Passive structures perform best in the spring and autumn and can lead to overheating problems in summer, which, however, can be controlled by the means of shading. At best, passive structures account for 10 % of the annual energy consumption at a building. Another potential application is the use of transparent thermal insulation for preheating of domestic hot water. Water consumption remains more or less constant around the year. Such a design would yield about 50 % of energy required for heating of domestic water.

  19. Dual mode acoustic wave sensor for precise pressure reading

    Mu, Xiaojing; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Wang, Yong; Randles, Andrew Benson; Chuan Chai, Kevin Tshun; Cai, Hong; Gu, Yuan Dong

    2014-09-01

    In this letter, a Microelectromechanical system acoustic wave sensor, which has a dual mode (lateral field exited Lamb wave mode and surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode) behavior, is presented for precious pressure change read out. Comb-like interdigital structured electrodes on top of piezoelectric material aluminium nitride (AlN) are used to generate the wave modes. The sensor membrane consists of single crystalline silicon formed by backside-etching of the bulk material of a silicon on insulator wafer having variable device thickness layer (5 μm-50 μm). With this principle, a pressure sensor has been fabricated and mounted on a pressure test package with pressure applied to the backside of the membrane within a range of 0 psi to 300 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency was experimentally measured in the temperature range of -50 °C to 300 °C. This idea demonstrates a piezoelectric based sensor having two modes SAW/Lamb wave for direct physical parameter—pressure readout and temperature cancellation which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications using the dual mode behavior of the sensor and differential readout at the same time.

  20. Application of acoustically tuned resonators for the improvement of sound insulation in aircraft

    Hannink, M.H.C.; Vlasma, J.P.; Wijnant, Y.H.; Boer, de A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the aims of the EU project FACE (Friendly Aircraft Cabin Environment) is to reduce aircraft interior noise. For modern aircraft flying at cruise conditions, the turbulent boundary layer is the main source for cabin noise. Normally, the turbulent boundary layer causes the trim panels to vibrat

  1. Turn, layer and ground insulation for superconducting magnets

    Evans, D.

    2001-05-01

    The mechanical, electrical and thermal characteristics of insulating materials can have a significant influence on the performance and reliability of superconducting magnets. This paper considers the various ways in which ground, turn and layer insulation may be provided and the likely physical properties of such materials. A comparison between vacuum impregnated insulation and low pressure, pre-impregnated laminated materials is made and details are provided on the bond strength of insulating films that may be included in the insulation layer to provide electrical integrity. One method of providing electrically insulating ‘breaks’ in the liquid helium supply line for superconducting magnets is discussed.

  2. Acoustic metasurface with hybrid resonances.

    Ma, Guancong; Yang, Min; Xiao, Songwen; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2014-09-01

    An impedance-matched surface has the property that an incident wave generates no reflection. Here we demonstrate that by using a simple construction, an acoustically reflecting surface can acquire hybrid resonances and becomes impedance-matched to airborne sound at tunable frequencies, such that no reflection is generated. Each resonant cell of the metasurface is deep-subwavelength in all its spatial dimensions, with its thickness less than the peak absorption wavelength by two orders of magnitude. As there can be no transmission, the impedance-matched acoustic wave is hence either completely absorbed at one or multiple frequencies, or converted into other form(s) of energy, such as an electrical current. A high acoustic-electrical energy conversion efficiency of 23% is achieved. PMID:24880731

  3. Prototype acoustic resonance spectroscopy monitor

    This report reports on work performed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) through the Program Office for Technical Assistance (POTAS). In this work, we investigate possible applications of nondestructive acoustics measurements to facilitate IAEA safeguards at bulk processing facilities. Two different acoustic techniques for verifying the internal structure of a processing tank were investigated. During this effort we also examined two acoustic techniques for assessing the fill level within a processing tank. The fill-level measurements could be made highly portable and have an added safeguards advantage that they can also detect stratification of fill material. This later application may be particularly useful in confirming the absence of stratification in plutonium processing tanks before accountability samples are withdrawn

  4. Acoustic Communication for Medical Nanorobots

    Hogg, Tad

    2012-01-01

    Communication among microscopic robots (nanorobots) can coordinate their activities for biomedical tasks. The feasibility of in vivo ultrasonic communication is evaluated for micron-size robots broadcasting into various types of tissues. Frequencies between 10MHz and 300MHz give the best tradeoff between efficient acoustic generation and attenuation for communication over distances of about 100 microns. Based on these results, we find power available from ambient oxygen and glucose in the bloodstream can readily support communication rates up to 10,000 bits/second between micron-sized robots. We discuss techniques, such as directional acoustic beams, that can increase this rate. The acoustic pressure fields enabling this communication are unlikely to damage nearby tissue, and short bursts at considerably higher power could be of therapeutic use.

  5. Acoustic multivariate condition monitoring - AMCM

    Rosenhave, P.E. [Vestfold College, Maritime Dept., Toensberg (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    In Norway, Vestfold College, Maritime Department presents new opportunities for non-invasive, on- or off-line acoustic monitoring of rotating machinery such as off-shore pumps and diesel engines. New developments within acoustic sensor technology coupled with chemometric data analysis of complex signals now allow condition monitoring of hitherto unavailable flexibility and diagnostic specificity. Chemometrics paired with existing knowledge yields a new and powerful tool for condition monitoring. By the use of multivariate techniques and acoustics it is possible to quantify wear and tear as well as predict the performance of working components in complex machinery. This presentation describes the AMCM method and one result of a feasibility study conducted onboard the LPG/C `Norgas Mariner` owned by Norwegian Gas Carriers as (NGC), Oslo. (orig.) 6 refs.

  6. Acoustics of a broadcast center

    Beristain, Sergio

    2003-04-01

    A broadcast system in Mexico City had to change facilities in order to concentrate in a single site all related broadcast stations and production studios in order to facilitate its normal operation. This led to a design which included the acoustic noise isolation and the interior acoustics of every studio and control room, together with the audio interconection, the electricity layout, the air conditioning system, the office building, etc. This paper presents the acoustics profile of the center, including final results of the construction as they were measured on completion of the installation. The complex has seven AM and FM broadcast stations, plus seven production studios for news, commercials and radio-novels plus an audio master control room, and everything was completed within four months.

  7. Classroom acoustics: Three pilot studies

    Smaldino, Joseph J.

    2005-04-01

    This paper summarizes three related pilot projects designed to focus on the possible effects of classroom acoustics on fine auditory discrimination as it relates to language acquisition, especially English as a second language. The first study investigated the influence of improving the signal-to-noise ratio on the differentiation of English phonemes. The results showed better differentiation with better signal-to-noise ratio. The second studied speech perception in noise by young adults for whom English was a second language. The outcome indicated that the second language learners required a better signal-to-noise ratio to perform equally to the native language participants. The last study surveyed the acoustic conditions of preschool and day care classrooms, wherein first and second language learning occurs. The survey suggested an unfavorable acoustic environment for language learning.

  8. Acoustic metamaterials for sound mitigation

    Assouar, Badreddine; Oudich, Mourad; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    We provide theoretical and numerical analyses of the behavior of a plate-type acoustic metamaterial considered in an air-borne sound environment in view of sound mitigation application. Two configurations of plate are studied, a spring-mass one and a pillar system-based one. The acoustic performances of the considered systems are investigated with different approaches and show that a high sound transmission loss (STL) up to 82 dB is reached with a metamaterial plate with a thickness of 0.5 mm. The physical understanding of the acoustic behavior of the metamaterial partition is discussed based on both air-borne and structure-borne approaches. Confrontation between the STL, the band structure, the displacement fields and the effective mass density of the plate metamaterial is made to have a complete physical understanding of the different mechanisms involved. xml:lang="fr"

  9. Phoneme Recognition Using Acoustic Events

    Huebener, K; Huebener, Kai; Carson-Berndsen, Julie

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to phoneme recognition using nonsequential sub--phoneme units. These units are called acoustic events and are phonologically meaningful as well as recognizable from speech signals. Acoustic events form a phonologically incomplete representation as compared to distinctive features. This problem may partly be overcome by incorporating phonological constraints. Currently, 24 binary events describing manner and place of articulation, vowel quality and voicing are used to recognize all German phonemes. Phoneme recognition in this paradigm consists of two steps: After the acoustic events have been determined from the speech signal, a phonological parser is used to generate syllable and phoneme hypotheses from the event lattice. Results obtained on a speaker--dependent corpus are presented.

  10. Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis

    ... Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis On this page: ... more information about vestibular schwannomas? What is a vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma)? Inner ear with vestibular schwannoma ( ...

  11. On the Synchronization of Acoustic Gravity Waves

    Lonngren, Karl E.; Bai, Er-Wei

    Using the model proposed by Stenflo, we demonstrate that acoustic gravity waves found in one region of space can be synchronized with acoustic gravity waves found in another region of space using techniques from modern control theory.

  12. Acoustojet: acoustic analogue of photonic jet phenomenon

    Minin, Igor V

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated for the first time that an existence of acoustic analogue of photonic jet phenomenon, called acoustojet, providing for subwavelength localization of acoustic field in the shadow area of arbitrary 3D penetrable mesoscale particle, is possible.

  13. Golden Gate and Pt. Reyes Acoustic Detections

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains detections of acoustic tagged fish from two general locations: Golden Gate (east and west line) and Pt. Reyes. Several Vemco 69khz acoustic...

  14. Acoustic remote sensing of ocean flows

    Joseph, A.; Desa, E.

    Acoustic techniques have become powerful tools for measurement of ocean circulation mainly because of the ability of acoustic signals to travel long distances in water, and the inherently non-invasive nature of measurement. The satellite remote...

  15. Insulated Piston Heads for Diesel Engines

    Tricoire, A.; Kjellman, B.; Wigren, J.; Vanvolsem, M.; Aixala, L.

    2009-06-01

    Widely studied in the 1980s, the insulation of pistons in engines aimed at reducing the heat losses and thus increasing the indicated efficiency. However, those studies stopped in the beginning of the 1990s because of NO x emission legislation and also because of lower oil prices. Currently, with the improvement of exhaust after treatment systems (diesel particulate filter, selective catalytic reduction, and diesel oxidation catalyst) and engine technologies (exhaust gas recirculation), there are more trade-offs for NO x reduction. In addition, the fast rise of the oil prices tends to lead back to insulation technologies in order to save fuel. A 1 mm thick plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating with a graded transition between the topcoat and the bondcoat was deposited on top of a serial piston for heavy-duty truck engines. The effects of the insulated pistons on the engine performance are also discussed, and the coating microstructure is analyzed after engine test.

  16. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  17. Equivalent topological invariants of topological insulators

    Wang Zhong [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China); Qi Xiaoliang; Zhang Shoucheng, E-mail: sczhang@stanford.ed [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    A time-reversal (TR) invariant topological insulator can be generally defined by the effective topological field theory with a quantized {theta} coefficient, which can only take values of 0 or {pi}. This theory is generally valid for an arbitrarily interacting system and the quantization of the {theta} invariant can be directly measured experimentally. Reduced to the case of a non-interacting system, the {theta} invariant can be expressed as an integral over the entire three-dimensional Brillouin zone. Alternatively, non-interacting insulators can be classified by topological invariants defined over discrete TR invariant momenta. In this paper, we show the complete equivalence between the integral and the discrete invariants of the topological insulator.

  18. Investigations of magnetically insulated electron flows

    Magnetic insulation of electron flow has become very important in super-power pulsers used with X-ray sources, inertially confined fusion experiments, etc. This paper will describe several recent experiments on these flows, and compare the results to advances in theoretical understanding. The experiments include flows in pitched magnetic fields like those found in magnetically insulated ion diodes, some initial experiments on the internal structure of the flows, and measurements on the loss of insulation at magnetic nulls (sometimes called zingers). Some surprising results on recapture of large electron currents will be presented. These results are not yet fully understood, but have encouraging implications for pulsed power devices such as ion diodes. 11 refs., 7 figs

  19. Study of High Temperature Insulation Materials

    Vaclav Mentlik

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available One of current objectives of the electro insulating technology is the development of the material for extreme conditions. There is a need to operate some devices in extreme temperatures, for example the propulsion of the nuclear fuel bars. In these cases there is necessary to provide not just insulating property, but also the thermal endurance with the required durability of the insulating materials. Critical is the determination of the limit stress for the irreversible structure modification with relation to material property changes. For this purpose there is necessary to conduct lot of test on chosen materials to determine the limits mentioned above. Content of this article is the definition of diagnostic mode, including the definition of the exposure factors, definitions of the diagnostic system for data acquisition and first result of examinations.

  20. Electromagnetic Green's function for layered topological insulators

    Crosse, J. A.; Fuchs, Sebastian; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2015-12-01

    The dyadic Green's function of the inhomogeneous vector Helmholtz equation describes the field pattern of a single frequency point source. It appears in the mathematical description of many areas of electromagnetism and optics including both classical and quantum, linear and nonlinear optics, dispersion forces (such as the Casimir and Casimir-Polder forces), and in the dynamics of trapped atoms and molecules. Here we compute the Green's function for a layered topological insulator. Via the magnetoelectric effect, topological insulators are able to mix the electric E and magnetic induction B fields and, hence, one finds that the TE and TM polarizations mix on reflection from or transmission through an interface. This leads to unusual field patterns close to the surface of a topological insulator.

  1. Dynamical gap generation in topological insulators

    Cea, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    We developed a quantum field theoretical description for the surface states of three-dimensional topological insulators. Within the relativistic quantum field theory formulation, we investigated the dynamics of low-lying surface states in an applied transverse magnetic field. We argued that, by taking into account quantum fluctuations, in three-dimensional topological insulators there is dynamical generation of a gap by a rearrangement of the Dirac sea. By comparing with available experimental data we found that our theoretical results allowed a consistent and coherent description of the Landau level spectrum of the surface low-lying excitations. Finally, we showed that the recently detected zero-Hall plateau at the charge neutral point could be accounted for by chiral edge states residing at the magnetic domain boundaries between the top and bottom surfaces of the three-dimensional topological insulator.

  2. Insulation systems for superconducting transmission cables

    Tønnesen, Ole

    This paper describes shortly the status of superconducting transmission lines and assesses what impact the recently discovered BSCCO superconductors may have on the design of the cables.Two basically different insulation systems are discussed:1) The room temperature dielectric design, where the...... electrical insulation is placed outside both the superconducting tube and the cryostat. The superconducting tube is cooled by liquid nitrogen which is pumped through the hollow part of the tube.2) The cryogenic dielectric design, where the electrical insulation is placed inside the cryostat and thus is kept...... at temperature near 77 K.The optimal design is determined by a loss evaluation in relation to the power transfer capacity of the cable. Development work in progress on the design and construction of superconducting cables in Denmark is described as an example....

  3. Structure Change of the Insulating Composite

    Vaclav Mentlik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern power electric drives brought advantages in induction motor control. In the same time appeared problems with high frequency square waveform voltage (pulse stress produced by the voltage converters. Voltage converters produce repetitive pulses with high level of voltage rise fronts (slew rates. Rise fronts attained values of up to tens kilovolts per microsecond and voltage pulse repetition frequency up to some tens of kilohertz. This technology is an advantage for a drive control. Significant is the impact of these voltage waveforms on the motor insulations. Degradation of the main wall insulation can reduce the reliability of the electric motor and whole drive. In this paper is discussed one possible solution. The promising modification in the insulation material structure is presented in the paper.

  4. Surface plasmons in doped topological insulators

    Schütky, Robert; Ertler, Christian; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich

    2013-11-01

    We investigate surface plasmons at a planar interface between a normal dielectric and a topological insulator, where the Fermi energy lies inside the bulk gap of the topological insulator and gives rise to a two-dimensional charge distribution of free Dirac electrons. We develop the methodology for the calculation of plasmon dispersions using the framework of classical electrodynamics, with modified constituent equations due to Hall currents in the topological insulator, together with a Lindhard-type description for the two-dimensional charge distribution of free Dirac electrons. For a system representative for Bi2X3 binary compounds, we find in agreement with recent related work that the modified constituent equations have practically no impact on the surface plasmon dispersion but lead to a rotation of the magnetic polarization of surface plasmons out of the interface plane.

  5. Dynamical Gap Generation in Topological Insulators

    Cea, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We developed a quantum field theoretical description for the surface states of three-dimensional topological insulators. Within the relativistic quantum field theory formulation, we investigated the dynamics of low-lying surface states in an applied transverse magnetic field. We argued that, by taking into account quantum fluctuations, in three-dimensional topological insulators there is dynamical generation of a gap by a rearrangement of the Dirac sea. By comparing with available experimental data we found that our theoretical results allowed a consistent and coherent description of the Landau level spectrum of the surface low-lying excitations. Finally, we showed that the recently detected zero-Hall plateau at the charge neutral point could be accounted for by chiral edge states residing at the magnetic domain boundaries between the top and bottom surfaces of the three-dimensional topological insulator.

  6. Detection of damage initiation and its evolution in insulating brick from non-linearity of stress/strain curve

    This paper deals with experimental verification of the present author's theory relating to estimation of damage accumulation in materials showing non-linear stress/strain curves. The theory is based on parallel elements model and gives that the second order derivative of a stress/strain curve is proportional to a probability density function of strain at which each element is damaged. Uni-axial compression test was conducted for an insulating brick and its probability density function is obtained from the non-linear stress/strain curve. The function coincides well with acoustic emission data simultaneously measured in the compression test. This fact shows that the theory is useful for quick and brief estimation of damage initiation and its evolution in insulating bricks.

  7. CT findings of acoustic neuroma

    Sim, Do Choul; Lee, Jae Mun; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Computed Tomography (CT) is very accurate in evaluating the location, size, shape and extension of acoustic neuroma. We analysed CT findings of 23 acoustic neuromas seen at Department of Radiology, Kangnam St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic University Medical College during the period of from January 1981 to June 1987. 1. Five (22%) were men and 18 (78%) were women with the high incidence occurring in the 4th and 5th decades. 2. Twenty two cases were diagnosed satisfactorily by CT examinations which included axial, coronal and reconstruction images. One with the smallest dimension of 8 mm in diameter could not be detected by the conventional CT scan. But is could be seen after metrizamide cisternography. mean size of the tumor masses was estimated 3.6 cm in diameter. 3. The shape of the tumor was oval in 50%, round in 27% and lobulated in 23%. The masses were presented as hypodense in 50%, isodense in 32% and hyperdense in 18%. All tumors were extended from the internal acoustic and toward the cerebellopontine angle. The internal acoustic canal was widened in 77%. Hydrocephalus was associated in 45%. Widening of cerebellopontine angle cistern was noted in 50%. 4. After contrast infusion the tumors were enhanced markedly in 45%, moderately in 32% and mildly in 23%. The enhanced pattern was homogeneous in 41%, mixed in 41% and rim in 18%. The margin of the tumors was sharply defined in 82%. The tumors were attached to the petrous bone with acute angle in 73%. Cystic change within the tumor was found in 27%. The peritumoral edema was noted in 45%. In conclusion, CT is of most effective modalities to evaluate size, shape, extent and internal architecture of acoustic neuroma as well as relationship with adjacent anatomic structures including the internal acoustic canal.

  8. Acoustically-Induced Electrical Signals

    Brown, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have observed electrical signals excited by and moving along with an acoustic pulse propagating in a sandstone sample. Using resonance we are now studying the characteristics of this acousto-electric signal and determining its origin and the controlling physical parameters. Four rock samples with a range of porosities, permeabilities, and mineralogies were chosen: Berea, Boise, and Colton sandstones and Austin Chalk. Pore water salinity was varied from deionized water to sea water. Ag-AgCl electrodes were attached to the sample and were interfaced to a 4-wire electrical resistivity system. Under computer control, the acoustic signals were excited and the electrical response was recorded. We see strong acoustically-induced electrical signals in all samples, with the magnitude of the effect for each rock getting stronger as we move from the 1st to the 3rd harmonics in resonance. Given a particular fluid salinity, each rock has its own distinct sensitivity in the induced electrical effect. For example at the 2nd harmonic, Berea Sandstone produces the largest electrical signal per acoustic power input even though Austin Chalk and Boise Sandstone tend to resonate with much larger amplitudes at the same harmonic. Two effects are potentially responsible for this acoustically-induced electrical response: one the co-seismic seismo-electric effect and the other a strain-induced resistivity change known as the acousto-electric effect. We have designed experimental tests to separate these mechanisms. The tests show that the seismo-electric effect is dominant in our studies. We note that these experiments are in a fluid viscosity dominated seismo-electric regime, leading to a simple interpretation of the signals where the electric potential developed is proportional to the local acceleration of the rock. Toward a test of this theory we have measured the local time-varying acoustic strain in our samples using a laser vibrometer.

  9. HgTe based topological insulators

    This PhD thesis summarizes the discovery of topological insulators and highlights the developments on their experimental observations. The work focuses on HgTe. The thesis is structured as follows: - The first chapter of this thesis will give a brief overview on discoveries in the field of topological insulators. It focuses on works relevant to experimental results presented in the following chapters. This includes a short outline of the early predictions and a summary of important results concerning 2-dimensional topological insulators while the final section discusses observations concerning 3-dimensional topological insulators. - The discovery of the quantum spin Hall effect in HgTe marked the first experimental observation of a topological insulator. Chapter 2 focuses on HgTe quantum wells and the quantum spin Hall effect. The growth of high quality HgTe quantum wells was one of the major goals for this work. In a final set of experiments the spin polarization of the edge channels was investigated. Here, we could make use of the advantage that HgTe quantum well structures exhibit a large Rashba spin orbit splitting. - HgTe as a 3-dimensional topological insulator is presented in chapter 3. - Chapters 4-6 serve as in depth overviews of selected works: Chapter 4 presents a detailed overview on the all electrical detection of the spin Hall effect in HgTe quantum wells. The detection of the spin polarization of the quantum spin Hall effect is shown in chapter 5 and chapter 6 gives a detailed overview on the quantum Hall effect originating from the topological surface state in strained bulk HgTe.

  10. Acoustic characterization of rehabilitated cloisters

    A. P. O. Carvalho; S. R. C. Vilela

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results of field measurements in eight rehabilitated cloisters of old monasteries in Portugal (length: 20 to 35 m and height: 3.3 to 6.3 m) regarding their acoustic behavior to two objective parameters: RT and RASTI. The goal is to characterize the acoustic effect of the rehabilitation done on theses spaces to adapt them to new uses. All these cloisters had recently their galleries#8217; openings to the central yard closed with glass panels. Simple formulas were obtain...

  11. Physical foundations of technical acoustics

    Malecki, I

    1969-01-01

    Physical Foundations of Technical Acoustics discusses theoretical foundations of acoustical engineering. It is not so much a technical compendium as a systematic statement of physical laws so conceived that technologists might find in it all the information they need to become acquainted with the physical meaning and mathematical expression of phenomena they encounter in their work. To facilitate the acquirement of notions, which lie beyond a layman's grasp, the plan of narration adopted consists in beginning with the simplest idealized cases and then gradually moving on to the truest possibl

  12. Resonant modal group theory of membrane-type acoustical metamaterials for low-frequency sound attenuation

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng

    2015-09-01

    In order to overcome the influence of the structural resonance on the continuous structures and obtain a lightweight thin-layer structure which can effectively isolate the low-frequency noises, an elastic membrane structure was proposed. In the low-frequency range below 500 Hz, the sound transmission loss (STL) of this membrane type structure is greatly higher than that of the current sound insulation material EVA (ethylene-vinyl acetate copo) of vehicle, so it is possible to replace the EVA by the membrane-type metamaterial structure in practice engineering. Based on the band structure, modal shapes, as well as the sound transmission simulation, the sound insulation mechanism of the designed membrane-type acoustic metamaterials was analyzed from a new perspective, which had been validated experimentally. It is suggested that in the frequency range above 200 Hz for this membrane-mass type structure, the sound insulation effect was principally not due to the low-level locally resonant mode of the mass block, but the continuous vertical resonant modes of the localized membrane. So based on such a physical property, a resonant modal group theory is initially proposed in this paper. In addition, the sound insulation mechanism of the membrane-type structure and thin plate structure were combined by the membrane/plate resonant theory.

  13. Acoustic concerns related to multi cultural societies

    Gade, Anders Christian

    2001-01-01

    Immigration has increased cultural diversity in western societies. The process of integrating immigrants into their host countries can be smoothed if acousticians learn to recognize (1) the acoustic traditions of immigrant cultures and (2) the specific acoustic needs of the new society members. Two related projects are discussed. The ``Cahrisma'' project (Conservation of Acoustical Heritage by the Revival and Identification of the Sinan's Mosque Acoustics) is sponsored by the European Commiss...

  14. Absorption boundary conditions for geomertical acoustics

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Defining accurate acoustical boundary conditions is of crucial importance for room acoustic simulations. In predicting sound fields using phased geometrical acoustics methods, the absorption coefficients or surface impedances of the boundary surfaces can be used, but no guideline has been developed...... solutions. Two rectangular rooms with uniform and non-uniform absorption distributions are tested. It is concluded that the impedance and random incidence absorption boundary conditions produce reasonable results with some exceptions at low frequencies for acoustically soft materials....

  15. Sound insulation requirements in the Nordic countries

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    All Nordic countries have sound insulation requirements for housing and sound classification schemes originating from a common INSTA‐proposal in the mid 90’s, but unfortunately being increasingly diversified since then. The present situation impedes development and create barriers for trade...... Spaces, Interreg IV project (Swedish‐Danish project 2010‐2013) http://www.interreg‐oks.eu/en/Menu/Projects/Project+List/Silent+Spaces Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions COST Action TU0901 (European network 2009‐2013, 26 countries) http://w3...

  16. Forage density effect on sound insulation properties

    Green, Ole; Tortajada, Vicent Gassó; Gislum, René;

    2010-01-01

    One of the main parameters affecting forage management and quality is density. Existing methods used for measuring physical properties of forage involve costly destructive analysis. A frequent and appropriate control of the forage density is required for optimizing the management of silage, hay and...... forage density. The method has been used to analyse the correlation of the density with the sound insulation spectra produced by small-scale models of hay, silage and straw. Results show that the sound insulation spectra of forage have a high correlation with the density and a significant congruence with...

  17. Multilayer Impregnated Fibrous Thermal Insulation Tiles

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Szalai, Christine e.; Hsu, Ming-ta; Carroll, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    The term "secondary polymer layered impregnated tile" ("SPLIT") denotes a type of ablative composite-material thermal- insulation tiles having engineered, spatially non-uniform compositions. The term "secondary" refers to the fact that each tile contains at least two polymer layers wherein endothermic reactions absorb considerable amounts of heat, thereby helping to prevent overheating of an underlying structure. These tiles were invented to afford lighter-weight alternatives to the reusable thermal-insulation materials heretofore variously used or considered for use in protecting the space shuttles and other spacecraft from intense atmospheric-entry heating.

  18. Composite insulators and their aging: An overview

    Muhammad; AMIN; Muhammad; AKBAR; Muhammad; SALMAN

    2007-01-01

    The aging (biological deterioration) is a major problem of composite insulators now-a-days. The main thing in aging is to predict how, when and with what speed it occurs and under what conditions it can lead to failure and what overall average expected life of a composite insulator is. For this a lot of researches have been done. This review summarizes the methods of artificial field testing (aging), natural testing, standards the developed for aging, techniques of analysis, results achieved until now about various parameters from various locations, handling guidelines and a conclusion on what is further needed.

  19. Inversion symmetry protected topological insulators and superconductors

    Lee, Dung-Hai; Lu, Yuan-Ming

    2015-03-01

    Three dimensional topological insulator represents a class of novel quantum phases hosting robust gapless boundary excitations, which is protected by global symmetries such as time reversal, charge conservation and spin rotational symmetry. In this work we systematically study another class of topological phases of weakly interacting electrons protected by spatial inversion symmetry, which generally don't support stable gapless boundary states. We classify these inversion-symmetric topological insulators and superconductors in the framework of K-theory, and construct their lattice models. We also discuss quantized response functions of these inversion-protected topological phases, which serve as their experimental signatures.

  20. High Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    Goldberg, Louise F. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Mosiman, Garrett E. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    ?A more accurate assessment of SOG foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated). The optimum insulation strategy was applied to single and multi-family residential buildings in climate zone 4 - 7. The highest site energy savings of 5% was realized for a single family home in Duluth, MN, and the lowest savings of 1.4 % for a 4-unit townhouse in Richmond, VA. SOG foundation insulation retrofit simple paybacks ranged from 18 to 47 years. There are other benefits of SOG foundation insulation resulting from the increase in the slab surface temperatures. These include increased occupant thermal comfort, and a decrease in slab surface condensation particularly around the slab perimeter.

  1. Calculating room acoustic parameters from pseudo-impulsive acoustic sources

    San Martin, Maria L.; Vela, Antonio; San Martin, Ricardo; Arana, Miguel A.

    2002-11-01

    The impulse response function provides complete information to predict the acoustic response of a room to an acoustic input of arbitrary characteristics. At this job study, small explosions of firecrackers are proposed to be used as pseudo-impulsive acoustics sources to determine some acoustic parameters of a room such as reverberation time, definition, and clarity, comparing these results to those obtained with other techniques. A previous characterization of these sources allows us to state that they can be used for this purpose because they are, in practice, omnidirectional, their temporary pattern is highly repetitive and their spectral power is, as well, repetitive and with enough power in octave bands from 125 Hz to 8 kHz. If the linear time-invariant system impulse response h(t) is known, output signal s(t) regarding any arbitrary signal s(t) can be obtained. For our pseudo-impulsive sources, the output signal s(t) has been taken as impulse response h(t). Using the integrated impulse response method suggested by Schroeder, it has been stated that both the mean values and standard deviations for some parameters are practically identical to results obtained with other usual techniques. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  2. Acoustic Test Characterization of Melamine Foam for Usage in NASA's Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The external acoustic liftoff levels predicted for NASA's future heavy lift launch vehicles are expected to be significantly higher than the environment created by today's commercial launch vehicles. This creates a need to develop an improved acoustic attenuation system for future NASA payload fairings. NASA Glenn Research Center initiated an acoustic test series to characterize the acoustic performance of melamine foam, with and without various acoustic enhancements. This testing was denoted as NEMFAT, which stands for NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test, and is the subject of this paper. Both absorption and transmission loss testing of numerous foam configurations were performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory in July 2013. The NEMFAT test data provides an initial acoustic characterization and database of melamine foam for NASA. Because of its acoustic performance and lighter mass relative to fiberglass blankets, melamine foam is being strongly considered for use in the acoustic attenuation systems of NASA's future launch vehicles.

  3. Acoustically swept rotor. [helicopter noise reduction

    Schmitz, F. H.; Boxwell, D. A.; Vause, R. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Impulsive noise reduction is provided in a rotor blade by acoustically sweeping the chord line from root to tip so that the acoustic radiation resulting from the summation of potential singularities used to model the flow about the blade tend to cancel for all times at an observation point in the acoustic far field.

  4. Predicting and auralizing acoustics in classrooms

    Christensen, Claus Lynge

    2005-01-01

    Although classrooms have fairly simple geometries, this type of room is known to cause problems when trying to predict their acoustics using room acoustics computer modeling. Some typical features from a room acoustics point of view are: Parallel walls, low ceilings (the rooms are flat), uneven...

  5. Aero-acoustic Computations of Wind Turbines

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Michelsen, Jess; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    A numerical algorithm for acoustic noise generation is extended to 3D flows. The approach involves two parts comprising a viscous incompressible flow part and an inviscid acoustic part. In order to simulate noise generated from a wind turbine, the incompressible and acoustic equations are written...

  6. Design of acoustic devices by topology optimization

    Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    The goal of this study is to design and optimize structures and devices that are subjected to acoustic waves. Examples are acoustic lenses, sound walls, waveguides and loud speakers. We formulate the design problem as a topology optimization problem, i.e. distribute material in a design domain such...... that the acoustic response is optimized....

  7. Modeling and analysis of silicon-on-insulator elliptical microring resonators for future high-density integrated photonic circuits

    We propose a novel resonator containing an elliptical microring based on a silicon-on-insulator platform. Simulations using the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method show that the novel elliptical microring can efficiently enhance the mode coupling between straight bus waveguides and resonator waveguides or between adjacent resonators while preserving relatively high intrinsic quality factors with large free spectral range. The proposed resonator would be an alternative choice for future high-density integrated photonic circuits. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  8. Electric field driven quantum phase transition between band insulator and topological insulator

    Jun LI; Chang, Kai

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that electric field can drive a quantum phase transition between band insulator to topological insulator in CdTe/HgCdTe/CdTe quantum wells. The numerical results suggest that the electric field could be used as a switch to turn on or off the topological insulator phase, and temperature can affect significantly the phase diagram for different gate voltage and compositions. Our theoretical results provide us an efficient way to manipulate the quantum phase of HgTe q...

  9. Optical measurement of acoustic radiation pressure of the near-field acoustic levitation through transparent object

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Sasao, Yasuhiro; Katsura, Kogure; Naoki, Kondo

    2013-01-01

    It is known that macroscopic objects can be levitated for few to several hundred micrometers by near-field acoustic field and this phenomenon is called near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL). Although there are various experiments conducted to measure integrated acoustic pressure on the object surface, up to now there was no direct method to measure pressure distribution. In this study we measured the acoustic radiation pressure of the near-field acoustic levitation via pressure-sensitive paint.

  10. The quantum spin Hall effect and topological insulators

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Comment: 7 pages, 5 figures, an introduction of the quantum spin Hall effect and topological insulators. For a video introduction of topological insulators, see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qg8Yu-Ju3Vw

  11. Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    2013-10-01

    In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption.

  12. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Basement Insulation Systems

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes research on basement insulation, which identifies the wall installation methods and materials that perform best in terms of insulation and water resistance.

  13. Nonlinear acoustic-gravity waves

    Stenflo, Lennart; Shukla, P. K.

    2009-01-01

    Previous results on nonlinear acoustic-gravity waves are reconsidered. It turns out that the mathematical techniques used are somewhat similar to those already adopted by the plasma physics community. Consequently, a future interaction between physicists On different fields, e.g in meteorology and plasma physics, can be very fruitful.

  14. Acoustics in the Martian Atmosphere

    Williams, J.-P.

    2000-10-01

    With the advent of the first attempt to deliver an acoustic microphone to the Martian surface aboard the failed Mars Polar Lander, there has been growing interests in the development of acoustic sensors to compliment scientific payloads on future spacecraft. Terrestrial scientist have been very successful in using infrasound (sound at frequencies below human detection, detect and monitor atmospheric phenomena related to weather, tornadoes, mountain waves, microbaroms, ionospheric and auroral disturbances, and meteror/fireballs, as well as anthropogenic sources such as aircraft and nuclear explosions. Sounds on Mars at the audible frequencies (20 Hz to 20 kHz) will be severely attenuated due to viscous relaxation and thermal diffusion (collectively referred to as classical attenuation) which will be much more severe in the colder, less dense Martian atmosphere. Molecular relaxation of carbon dioxide will also contribute to the sound absorption in the lower audible frequencies. Since classical attenuation increases as a function of the frequency squared, at low infrasonic frequencies ( < 10 Hz), classical attenuation becomes less significant and sound absorption in the Martian atmosphere becomes more similar to that of the terrestrial atmosphere for the same frequencies. At these longer wavelengths, geometric spreading will dominate as the source of attenuation as the acoustic energy is spread out over an ever increasing spherical wave front. This implies that infrasound (10 to 0.01 Hz) will be a useful frequency range for future acoustic sensors developed for scientific payloads delivered to the Martian surface.

  15. Satellite and acoustic tracking device

    Berumen, Michael L.

    2014-02-20

    The present invention relates a method and device for tracking movements of marine animals or objects in large bodies of water and across significant distances. The method and device can track an acoustic transmitter attached to an animal or object beneath the ocean surface by employing an unmanned surface vessel equipped with a hydrophone array and GPS receiver.

  16. Digitization of acoustic sounder data

    A method of archiving acoustic sounder data in a format compatible with a computer is used development. The collected data will be used to compile a climatology of the atmospheric surface boundary layer to predict the transport and diffusion of atmospheric pollutants

  17. SES and Acoustics at GSFC

    Hogue, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents air and surface cleanliness characterization of the acoustics test facility and large (SES) thermal vacuum chamber at Goddard Space flight Center in Greenbelt, MD during the New Horizons Pluto probe program. It is shown that slow back-fill of the SES chamber is necessary to prevent excessive particle redistribution.

  18. Topology optimization for acoustic problems

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    In this paper a method to control acoustic properties in a room with topology optimization is presented. It is shown how the squared sound pressure amplitude in a certain part of a room can be minimized by distribution of material in a design domain along the ceiling in 2D and 3D. Nice 0-1 designs...

  19. Acoustic optic hybrid (AOH) sensor

    Matthews; Arrieta

    2000-09-01

    The ability of laser vibrometers to receive and process acoustic echoes from the water surface above a submerged target is established and evaluated. Sonar echoes from a submerged target are collected from the water surface by a laser vibrometer. Feasibility of this approach to sensing underwater sound is demonstrated. If the acoustic excitation at an otherwise undisturbed water surface is 195 to 168 dB re: 1 microPa, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), at the vibrometer output, is shown to range from about 46 to 6 dB. Capillary waves and gravity waves at the water surface are expected and shown to have some destructive effect on the process of echo retrieval. A series of experiments to quantify the surface wave effects is described. The wave experiment results are reported. A successful attempt to acquire echoes from a submerged target over a grid of points for further processing into a three-dimensional image is made and described. The data acquisition and beamforming techniques constitute a three-dimensional, acoustic optic, synthetic aperture sonar (SAS). Beamformed images are included. For an aircraft towing acoustic sensors through the water with a mechanical link, this technique holds the promise of increased safety and improved fuel efficiency. PMID:11008811

  20. Acoustics SIMOPS: managing the unnecessary

    Hanton, Samuel John [Nautronix Marine Technology Solutions, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Time is money, and offshore operations are expensive. The desire therefore, is to increase efficiency through the condensing of schedules. This inevitably leads to SIMOPS of some degree, and this paper discusses SIMOPS along with, more specifically, the challenges they provide to acoustic positioning. (author)

  1. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja;

    2009-01-01

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10(-15) g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise i...

  2. A lightweight vibro-acoustic metamaterial demonstrator: Numerical and experimental investigation

    Claeys, C.; Deckers, E.; Pluymers, B.; Desmet, W.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years metamaterials gained a lot of attention due to their superior noise and vibration insulation properties, be it at least in some targeted and tuneable frequency ranges, referred to as stopbands. These are frequency zones for which free wave propagation is prevented throughout the metamaterial, resulting in frequency zones of pronounced wave attenuation. Metamaterials are achieved due to addition of an, often periodic, grid of resonant structures to a host material or structure. The interaction between resonant inclusions and host structure can lead to a performance which is superior to the ones of any of the constituent materials. A key element in this concept is that waves can be affected by incorporating structural resonant elements of sub-wavelength sizes, i.e. features that are actually smaller than the wavelength of the waves to be affected. This paves the way towards compact and light vibro-acoustic solutions in the lower frequency ranges. This paper discusses the numerical design and experimental validation of acoustic insulation based on the concept of metamaterials: a hollow core periodic sandwich structure with added local resonant structures. In order to investigate the sensitivity to specific parameters in the metamaterial design and the robustness of the design, a set of variations on the nominal design are investigated. The stop bands are numerically predicted through unit cell modelling after which a full vibro-acoustic finite element model is applied to predict the insertion loss of the demonstrator. The results of these analyses are compared with measurements; both indicate that this metamaterials concept can be applied to combine light weight, compact volume and good acoustic behaviour.

  3. Insulation Verification Using Low Voltage and High Current Sensitivity

    Garma, Tonko; Milanović, Željka; Marasović, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The classic approach for determining insulating resistance by using commercial testers is not reliable for testing different types of insulation, especially for cables with one conductor and nanoelectronic oxide-based devices (nanotransistors). In this paper an alternative low-voltage method for measuring insulation resistance based on strongly increased current sensitivity is proposed. The proposed method of measuring insulation resistance at low voltages is realized by using a high sensitiv...

  4. Theoretical prediction of topological insulator in ternary rare earth chalcogenides

    Yan, Binghai; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Frauenheim, Thomas; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    A new class of three-dimensional topological insulator, ternary rare earth chalcogenides, is theoretically investigated with ab initio calculations. Based on both bulk band structure analysis and the direct calculation of topological surface states, we demonstrate that LaBiTe3 is a topological insulator. La can be substituted by other rare earth elements, which provide candidates for novel topological states such as quantum anomalous Hall insulator, axionic insulator and topological Kondo ins...

  5. Gas insulated transmission line having tapered particle trapping ring

    Cookson, Alan H.

    1982-01-01

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, insulating supports and an insulating gas. A particle-trapping ring is secured to each insulating support, and it is comprised of a central portion and two tapered end portions. The ends of the particle trapping ring have a smaller diameter than the central portion of the ring, so as to enable the use of the particle trapping ring in a curved transmission line.

  6. Corrugated outer sheath gas-insulated transmission line

    Kemeny, George A.; Cookson, Alan H.

    1981-01-01

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes two transmission line sections each of which are formed of a corrugated outer housing enclosing an inner high-voltage conductor disposed therein, with insulating support means supporting the inner conductor within the outer housing and an insulating gas providing electrical insulation therebetween. The outer housings in each section have smooth end sections at the longitudinal ends thereof which are joined together by joining means which provide for a sealing fixed joint.

  7. Process for Self-Repair of Insulation Material

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A self-healing system for an insulation material initiates a self-repair process by rupturing a plurality of microcapsules disposed on the insulation material. When the plurality of microcapsules are ruptured reactants witlun the plurality of microcapsules react to form a replacement polymer in a break of the insulation material. This self-healing system has the ability to repair multiple breaks in a length of insulation material without exhausting the repair properties of the material.

  8. Estimation of winding insulation resistance to the corona discharges

    Leonov, A.; Red'ko, V.; Soldatenko, E.

    2014-10-01

    This article presents test results of enameled winding wires, characterizing an insulation electrical and mechanical strength. Standard and original test methods were used. Note that existing standard test methods do not estimate enamel insulation resistance to the electrical loads under winding operation of variable-speed drive. We show that estimation of wire corona resistance can be done by high frequency electrical impulse testing. Wire insulation plays the main role of reliability of insulation system.

  9. Nonlocal edge state transport in topological insulators

    Protogenov, Alexander P.; Verbus, Valery A.; Chulkov, Evgueni V.

    2013-11-01

    We use the N-terminal scheme for studying the edge-state transport in two-dimensional topological insulators. We find the universal nonlocal response in the ballistic transport approach. This macroscopic exhibition of the topological order offers different areas for applications.

  10. Holographic Entanglement Renormalization of Topological Insulators

    Wen, Xueda; Lopes, Pedro L S; Gu, Yingfei; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Ryu, Shinsei

    2016-01-01

    We study the real-space entanglement renormalization group flows of topological band insulators in (2+1) dimensions by using the continuum multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz (cMERA). Given the ground state of a Chern insulator, we construct and study its cMERA by paying attention, in particular, to how the bulk holographic geometry and the Berry curvature depend on the topological properties of the ground state. It is found that each state defined at different energy scale of cMERA carries a nonzero Berry flux, which is emanated from the UV layer of cMERA, and flows towards the IR. Hence, a topologically nontrivial UV state flows under the RG to an IR state, which is also topologically nontrivial. On the other hand, we found that there is an obstruction to construct the exact ground state of a topological insulator with a topologically trivial IR state. I.e., if we try to construct a cMERA for the ground state of a Chern insulator by taking a topologically trivial IR state, the resulting cMERA do...

  11. Power flow studies of magnetically insulated lines

    The designs for relativistic electron beam accelerators with power levels of 20 to 100 TW are greatly restricted by the inductance of a single diode of reasonable size. This fact leads to modular designs of very large accelerators. One concept uses several small insulators at a large radius arranged around the accelerator center. The total effective inductance is then low, but the energy must then be transported by self-magnetic insulated vacuum lines to the target volume. A triplate vacuum line configuration eases many mechanical support problems and allows more A-K gaps or feeds to be packaged around a given radius. This type of vacuum transmission line was chosen for initial experiments at Sandia. The experiments were conducted on the MITE (Magnetically Insulated Transmission Experiment) accelerator. The water pulse forming lines are connected to a vacuum triplate line through a conventional stacked insulator. Diagnostics on the experiment consisted of: (1) input V; (2) input I; (3) I monitors at the input, middle, and output of both the center conductor and ground plane of the transmission line; (4) magnetic energy analyzer to view peak electron energy in the A-K gap; (5) calorimetry; and (6) Faraday cups to look at electron current flowing across the transmission line. The main goal of the experiment is to obtain input impedance of the transmission line as a function of voltage and to measure electron loss currents. These measurements are compared to theoretical models for the input impedance and energy losses

  12. Heat Transfer in High Temperature Multilayer Insulation

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Miller, Steve D.; Cunnington, George R.

    2007-01-01

    High temperature multilayer insulations have been investigated as an effective component of thermal-protection systems for atmospheric re-entry of reusable launch vehicles. Heat transfer in multilayer insulations consisting of thin, gold-coated, ceramic reflective foils and Saffil(TradeMark) fibrous insulation spacers was studied both numerically and experimentally. A finite volume numerical thermal model using combined conduction (gaseous and solid) and radiation in porous media was developed. A two-flux model with anisotropic scattering was used for radiation heat transfer in the fibrous insulation spacers between the reflective foils. The thermal model was validated by comparison with effective thermal conductivity measurements in an apparatus based on ASTM standard C201. Measurements were performed at environmental pressures in the range from 1x10(exp -4) to 760 torr over the temperature range from 300 to 1300 K. Four multilayer samples with nominal densities of 48 kg/cu m were tested. The first sample was 13.3 mm thick and had four evenly spaced reflective foils. The other three samples were 26.6 mm thick and utilized either one, two, or four reflective foils, located near the hot boundary with nominal foil spacing of 1.7 mm. The validated thermal model was then used to study relevant design parameters, such as reflective foil spacing and location in the stack-up and coating of one or both sides of foils.

  13. Robust Multilayer Insulation for Cryogenic Systems

    Fesmire, J. E.; Scholtens, B. F.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    New requirements for thermal insulation include robust Multilayer insulation (MU) systems that work for a range of environments from high vacuum to no vacuum. Improved MLI systems must be simple to install and maintain while meeting the life-cycle cost and thermal performance objectives. Performance of actual MLI systems has been previously shown to be much worse than ideal MLI. Spacecraft that must contain cryogens for both lunar service (high vacuum) and ground launch operations (no vacuum) are planned. Future cryogenic spacecraft for the soft vacuum environment of Mars are also envisioned. Industry products using robust MLI can benefit from improved cost-efficiency and system safety. Novel materials have been developed to operate as excellent thermal insulators at vacuum levels that are much less stringent than the absolute high vacuum requirement of current MLI systems. One such robust system, Layered Composite Insulation (LCI), has been developed by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at NASA Kennedy Space Center. The experimental testing and development of LCI is the focus of this paper. LCI thermal performance under cryogenic conditions is shown to be six times better than MLI at soft vacuum and similar to MLI at high vacuum. The experimental apparent thermal conductivity (k-value) and heat flux data for LCI systems are compared with other MLI systems.

  14. Nonflammable, Hydrophobic Aerogel Composites for Insulation

    Redouane, Begag

    2005-01-01

    Aerogel composites that are both nonflammable and hydrophobic have been developed for use as lightweight thermal- insulation materials for cryogenic systems. Aerogels are well known in the industry for their effectiveness as thermal insulators under cryogenic conditions, but the treatments used heretofore to render them hydrophobic also make them flammable. Nonflammability would make it safer to use aerogel insulation, especially in oxygen-rich environments and on cryogenic systems that contain liquid oxygen. A composite of this type is a silica aerogel reinforced with fibers. In comparison with unreinforced aerogels, the aerogel composite is about ten times as stiff and strong, better able to withstand handling, and more amenable to machining to required shapes. The composite can be made hydrophobic and nonflammable by appropriate design of a sol-gel process used to synthesize the aerogel component. In addition to very low thermal conductivity needed for insulation, aerogel composites of this type have been found to exhibit high resistance to moisture and nonflammability in oxygen-rich atmospheres: Samples floating on water for months gained no weight and showed no signs of deterioration. Samples were found to be nonflammable, even in pure oxygen at atmospheric pressure [14.7 psia (0.10 MPa)

  15. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    Baker, P.; Eng, P.; Lepage, R.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1. What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2. Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3. What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

  16. Aerogel Blanket Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Applications

    Coffman, B. E.; Fesmire, J. E.; White, S.; Gould, G.; Augustynowicz, S.

    2009-01-01

    Aerogel blanket materials for use in thermal insulation systems are now commercially available and implemented by industry. Prototype aerogel blanket materials were presented at the Cryogenic Engineering Conference in 1997 and by 2004 had progressed to full commercial production by Aspen Aerogels. Today, this new technology material is providing superior energy efficiencies and enabling new design approaches for more cost effective cryogenic systems. Aerogel processing technology and methods are continuing to improve, offering a tailor-able array of product formulations for many different thermal and environmental requirements. Many different varieties and combinations of aerogel blankets have been characterized using insulation test cryostats at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Detailed thermal conductivity data for a select group of materials are presented for engineering use. Heat transfer evaluations for the entire vacuum pressure range, including ambient conditions, are given. Examples of current cryogenic applications of aerogel blanket insulation are also given. KEYWORDS: Cryogenic tanks, thermal insulation, composite materials, aerogel, thermal conductivity, liquid nitrogen boil-off

  17. Aerosol behaviour in an acoustic field

    The average size of an aerosol submitted to acoustic waves is increased. This results from coagulation of the finest particles on the largest ones. The mechanisms responsible for acoustic agglomeration are mentioned. An experimental apparatus was developed in order to control the evolution of aerosol distribution in an acoustic field. Important deposition on the walls of the agglomeration chamber was observed as a consequence of the acoustically induced turbulent flow. Finally, a dimensionless relationship was established between deposition rates and particle diameters as a function of experimental parameters (aeraulic and acoustic conditions, etc...)

  18. Determining Equilibrium Position For Acoustical Levitation

    Barmatz, M. B.; Aveni, G.; Putterman, S.; Rudnick, J.

    1989-01-01

    Equilibrium position and orientation of acoustically-levitated weightless object determined by calibration technique on Earth. From calibration data, possible to calculate equilibrium position and orientation in presence of Earth gravitation. Sample not levitated acoustically during calibration. Technique relies on Boltzmann-Ehrenfest adiabatic-invariance principle. One converts resonant-frequency-shift data into data on normalized acoustical potential energy. Minimum of energy occurs at equilibrium point. From gradients of acoustical potential energy, one calculates acoustical restoring force or torque on objects as function of deviation from equilibrium position or orientation.

  19. Two-dimensional topological crystalline insulator phase in quantum wells of trivial insulators

    Niu, Chengwang; Buhl, Patrick M.; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Wortmann, Daniel; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2016-06-01

    The realization of two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators (TIs) in HgTe/CdTe quantum wells (QWs) has generated an explosion of research on TIs and novel topologically nontrivial phases. Here we predict, based on first-principles calculations, that the newly discovered 2D topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) phase exists even in the QWs of trivial insulators, e.g. (Sn/Pb)Te and Na(Cl/Br), with mirror Chern number {n}{{M}}=-2. Tunable nontrivial energy gaps ranging from 4 to 238 meV are obtained, guaranteeing further room-temperature observations and applications. The combined effect of strain and electrostatic interaction that can be engineered by the cladding layers leads to a band inversion, resulting in the phase transition from trivial insulator to 2D TCIs. Our work provides a new strategy for engineering topological states in 2D materials.

  20. Insulating process for HT-7U central solenoid model coils

    2003-01-01

    The HT-7U superconducting Tokamak is a whole superconducting magnetically confined fusion device. The insulating system of its central solenoid coils is critical to its properties. In this paper the forming of the insulating system and the vacuum-pressure-impregnating (VPI) are introduced, and the whole insulating process is verified under the superconducting experiment condition.

  1. 49 CFR 236.752 - Joint, rail, insulated.

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Joint, rail, insulated. 236.752 Section 236.752..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.752 Joint, rail, insulated. A joint in which electrical insulation is provided between adjoining rails....

  2. 49 CFR 234.235 - Insulated rail joints.

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insulated rail joints. 234.235 Section 234.235..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SIGNAL SYSTEM SAFETY AND STATE ACTION PLANS Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.235 Insulated rail joints. Each insulated rail joint...

  3. 49 CFR 236.59 - Insulated rail joints.

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insulated rail joints. 236.59 Section 236.59..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.59 Insulated rail joints. Insulated rail joints shall be...

  4. Thermal insulation of the CTS-1 pipeline using rock wool

    The utilization of computer code BL-ITTT to calculate the thermal insulation thickness for horizontal pipelines, vertical pipelines and tanks are presented. The insulating Material used is rock wool, considered the best material for sodium loop insulation. (E.G.)

  5. Determination of the Thermal Resistance of Pipe Insulation Material from Thermal Conductivity of Flat Insulation Products

    Koenen, Alain; Marquis, Damien M.

    2015-01-01

    New European product standards now include a mandatory requirement for manufacturers to declare the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity for each insulation used in building equipments and industrial installations. For pipe insulation systems, the measurement is usually performed by a standard pipe test method, in which the value on a large temperature range is integrated to reduce temperature range and improve temperature measurement control. The alternative proposed in this article co...

  6. Effect of Stress on Transformer Insulation

    Kapil Gandhi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Power transformers use Kraft paper as insulation in the electrical windings present in the core, which is immersed in oil. In service, the temperature of the windings of core will go to 750C to 850C. If the transformer is over loaded, then the temperature can exceed upto 100°C causing the cellulose chains in the paper to cleave at an accelerated rate, which results in the degradation of mechanical strength and performance of the insulation. The Degree of Polymerization (DP will also decrease. If proper action will not take, this can lead to failure of the transformer and disruption to electricity supply and large economic losses to the operating utility. Transformer condition should be maintained because of its importance to electricity network. The life of transformer depends on the life of the oil impregnated paper insulation system to greater extent. Degradation of the cellulose insulation is an irreversible process. After thermal degradation of the paper winding, Furfuraldehyde (FFA is the chemical compound, which is released into the oil from paper. The concentration of FFA has been directly related to the condition of the paper insulation. In the present paper an experimental investigation has been made to evaluate the degradation of transformer oil contaminated by nano-particles of pine wood under accelerated thermal and electrical stress and results are correlated with breakdown strength, density & interfacial tension of the pure oil. The contaminated oil samples are tested at electric stress of 2.0 kV, 3.0 kV, 4.0 kV & 5.0 kV for 24, 48, 72 & 96 hours simultaneously.

  7. Tests on irradiated magnet insulator materials

    Fusion reactor coils, located in areas where they will be only partially shielded, must be fabricated from materials which are as resistant to radiation as possible. They will probably incorporate resistive conductors with either water or cryogenic cooling. Inorganic insulators have been recommended for these situations, but the possibility exists that some organic insulators may be usable as well. Five insulator materials were investigated in this work, two containing E-glass cloth (contains B2O2) and three containing S-glass cloth (boron free). Disks of these materials were irradiated in two capsules in the Advanced Test Reactor at 325 K to a gamma dose of over 3.2 x 109 Gy, a fast neutron fluence of 3.5 x 1023 n/m2 (E > 1.0 MeV), and a total neutron fluence of 3.5 x 1024 n/m2 for the lower fluence capsule. Following irradiation, compressive fatigue tests were made at room temperature on all five candidate materials. No failures were observed for the three insulators containing S-glass when cycled to a maximum stress of 345 MPa (50 ksi) for over 1.5 x 105 cycles. In comparison, the G-11CR failed in a few cycles at the lowest stress level applied and the G-10 failed after a number of cycles which varied according to the applied stress level. Electrical resistivity measurements were also made; G-10 showed the largest decrease, and the materials containing S-glass showed the smallest decrease in resistivity due to irradiation. These insulators containing S-glass have given encouraging results for fusion magnet applications and should receive further consideration. (orig.)

  8. Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics

    Havelock, David; Vorländer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics presents signal processing as it is practiced in the field of acoustics. The Handbook is organized by areas of acoustics, with recognized leaders coordinating the self-contained chapters of each section. It brings together a wide range of perspectives from over 100 authors to reveal the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Success in acoustic applications often requires juggling both the acoustic and the signal processing parameters of the problem. This handbook brings the key issues from both into perspective and is complementary to other reference material on the two subjects. It is a unique resource for experts and practitioners alike to find new ideas and techniques within the diversity of signal processing in acoustics.

  9. Comparison tests of cellular glass insulation for the development of cryogenic insulation standards

    Demko, J. A.; Fesmire, J. E.; Dookie, J.; Bickley, J.; Kraft, S.

    2015-12-01

    Standards for thermal insulation used in applications between ambient and low temperatures, below 100 K, require test data under relevant conditions and by different laboratories to develop data sets for the proper comparisons of materials. This critically important technology is needed to provide reliable data and methodologies for industrial energy efficiency and energy conservation. Under ASTM International's Committee C16 on Thermal Insulation, two standards have been issued on cryogenic thermal insulation systems. Thermal conductivity data sets have been taken using identical flat-plate boiloff calorimeter instruments independently operated at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Thermal Energy Laboratory of LeTourneau University (LETU). Precision specimens of cellular glass insulation were produced for both laboratories to provide the necessary comparisons to validate the thermal measurements and test methodologies. Additional specimens of commercial cellular glass pipe insulation were tested at LETU to compare with the flat plate results. The test data are discussed in relation to the experimental approach, test methods, and manner of reporting the thermal performance data. This initial Inter-Laboratory Study (ILS) of insulation materials for sub-ambient temperature applications provides a foundation for further ILS work to produce standard data sets for several key commercial materials.

  10. Acoustic Properties of a Renovated Building

    Tomas Januševičius

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the effects of partitions, ceilings and facades on noise insulation in the renovated different buildings. The conducted experiments were aimed at analyzing partitions of 120 mm brick mounted gypsum panels while other walls were 520 mm thick and plastered on both sides. Under natural conditions, sound insulation factors of facades were measured and compared according to comfort classes. The obtained results revealed that thick brick walls of 520 mm insulated the sound of 58 decibels (dB (class B. In contrast, 120 mm brick masonry partition reduced sound only to 48 dB which is class E and agrees with the lowest class of sound insulation. We also calculated the sound insulation factor applying three formulas considering the mass law of sound insulation and comparing it with other previous studies. The paper examines and discusses the findings of the performed calculations and measurements.Article in Lithuanian

  11. USE OF SCALE MODELING FOR ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS

    ERÖZ, Ferhat

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, acoustic science and hearing has become important. Acoustic design used in tests of acoustic devices is crucial. Sound propagation is a complex subject, especially inside enclosed spaces. From the 19th century on, the acoustic measurements and tests were carried out using modeling techniques that are based on room acoustic measurement parameters.In this study, the effects of architectural acoustic design of modeling techniques and acoustic parameters were studied. In this con...

  12. Nearly Seamless Vacuum-Insulated Boxes

    Stepanian, Christopher J.; Ou, Danny; Hu, Xiangjun

    2010-01-01

    A design concept, and a fabrication process that would implement the design concept, have been proposed for nearly seamless vacuum-insulated boxes that could be the main structural components of a variety of controlled-temperature containers, including common household refrigerators and insulating containers for shipping foods. In a typical case, a vacuum-insulated box would be shaped like a rectangular parallelepiped conventional refrigerator box having five fully closed sides and a hinged door on the sixth side. Although it is possible to construct the five-closed-side portion of the box as an assembly of five unitary vacuum-insulated panels, it is not desirable to do so because the relatively high thermal conductances of the seams between the panels would contribute significant amounts of heat leakage, relative to the leakage through the panels themselves. In contrast, the proposal would make it possible to reduce heat leakage by constructing the five-closed-side portion of the box plus the stationary portion (if any) of the sixth side as a single, seamless unit; the only remaining seam would be the edge seal around the door. The basic cross-sectional configuration of each side of a vacuum-insulated box according to the proposal would be that of a conventional vacuum-insulated panel: a low-density, porous core material filling a partially evacuated space between face sheets. However, neither the face sheets nor the core would be conventional. The face sheets would be opposite sides of a vacuum bag. The core material would be a flexible polymer-modified silica aerogel of the type described in Silica/Polymer and Silica/Polymer/Fiber Composite Aero - gels (MSC-23736) in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. As noted in that article, the stiffness of this core material against compression is greater than that of prior aerogels. This is an important advantage because it translates to greater retention of thickness and, hence, of insulation performance when pressure is

  13. Observation of phononic helical edge states in a mechanical topological insulator

    Süsstrunk, Roman; Huber, Sebastian D.

    2015-07-01

    A topological insulator, as originally proposed for electrons governed by quantum mechanics, is characterized by a dichotomy between the interior and the edge of a finite system: The bulk has an energy gap, and the edges sustain excitations traversing this gap. However, it has remained an open question whether the same physics can be observed for systems obeying Newton’s equations of motion. We conducted experiments to characterize the collective behavior of mechanical oscillators exhibiting the phenomenology of the quantum spin Hall effect. The phononic edge modes are shown to be helical, and we demonstrate their topological protection via the stability of the edge states against imperfections. Our results may enable the design of topological acoustic metamaterials that can capitalize on the stability of the surface phonons as reliable wave guides.

  14. PHYSICS. Observation of phononic helical edge states in a mechanical topological insulator.

    Süsstrunk, Roman; Huber, Sebastian D

    2015-07-01

    A topological insulator, as originally proposed for electrons governed by quantum mechanics, is characterized by a dichotomy between the interior and the edge of a finite system: The bulk has an energy gap, and the edges sustain excitations traversing this gap. However, it has remained an open question whether the same physics can be observed for systems obeying Newton's equations of motion. We conducted experiments to characterize the collective behavior of mechanical oscillators exhibiting the phenomenology of the quantum spin Hall effect. The phononic edge modes are shown to be helical, and we demonstrate their topological protection via the stability of the edge states against imperfections. Our results may enable the design of topological acoustic metamaterials that can capitalize on the stability of the surface phonons as reliable wave guides. PMID:26138969

  15. APPLICATION OF DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION IN ACOUSTIC AND STRUCTURAL ACOUSTIC ANALYSIS

    2007-01-01

    Conventional element based methods for modeling acoustic problems are limited to low-frequency applications due to the huge computational efforts. For high-frequency applications, probabilistic techniques, such as statistical energy analysis (SEA), are used. For mid-frequency range, currently no adequate and mature simulation methods exist. Recently, wave based method has been developed which is based on the indirect TREFFTZ approach and has shown to be able to tackle problems in the mid-frequency range. In contrast with the element based methods, no discretization is required. A sufficient, but not necessary, condition for convergence of this method is that the acoustic problem domain is convex. Non-convex domains have to be partitioned into a number of (convex) subdomains. At the interfaces between subdomains, specific coupling conditions have to be imposed. The considered two-dimensional coupled vibro-acoustic problem illustrates the beneficial convergence rate of the proposed wave based prediction technique with high accuracy. The results show the new technique can be applied up to much higher frequencies.

  16. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    Polzikova, N. I.; Alekseev, S. G.; Pyataikin, I. I.; Kotelyanskii, I. M.; Luzanov, V. A.; Orlov, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonator (HBAR) formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  17. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    N. I. Polzikova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonator (HBAR formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  18. The Wick-Concept for Thermal Insulation of Cold Piping

    Koverdynsky, Vit; Korsgaard, Vagn; Rode, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    The wick-concept for thermal insulation of cold piping is based on capillary suction of a fiber fabric to remove excess water from the pipe surface by transporting it to the outer surface of the insulation. From the surface of the insulation jacket, the water will evaporate to the ambient air. This...... will prevent long-term accumulation of moisture in the insulation material. The wick keeps the hydrophobic insulation dry, allowing it to maintain its thermal performance. The liquid moisture is kept only in the wick fabric. This article presents the principle of operation of cold pipe insulation using...... that the variations of these types of insulation systems work for pipes with temperature above 0C and for ambient conditions within common ranges for industrial applications....

  19. Economical evaluation of damaged vacuum insulation panels in buildings

    Kim, Y. M.; Lee, H. Y.; Choi, G. S.; Kang, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    In Korea, thermal insulation standard of buildings have been tightened annually to satisfy the passive house standard from the year 2009. The current domestic policies about disseminating green buildings are progressively conducted. All buildings should be the zero energy building in the year 2025, obligatorily. The method is applied to one of the key technologies for high-performance insulation for zero energy building. The vacuum insulation panel is an excellent high performance insulation. But thermal performance of damaged vacuum insulation panels is reduced significantly. In this paper, the thermal performance of damaged vacuum insulation panels was compared and analyzed. The measurement result of thermal performance depends on the core material type. The insulation of building envelope is usually selected by economic feasibility. To evaluate the economic feasibility of VIPs, the operation cost was analyzed by simulation according to the types and damaged ratio of VIPs

  20. Acoustic metamaterial design and applications

    Zhang, Shu

    The explosion of interest in metamaterials is due to the dramatically increased manipulation ability over light as well as sound waves. This material research was stimulated by the opportunity to develop an artificial media with negative refractive index and the application in superlens which allows super-resolution imaging. High-resolution acoustic imaging techniques are the essential tools for nondestructive testing and medical screening. However, the spatial resolution of the conventional acoustic imaging methods is restricted by the incident wavelength of ultrasound. This is due to the quickly fading evanescent fields which carry the subwavelength features of objects. By focusing the propagating wave and recovering the evanescent field, a flat lens with negative-index can potentially overcome the diffraction limit. We present the first experimental demonstration of focusing ultrasound waves through a flat acoustic metamaterial lens composed of a planar network of subwavelength Helmholtz resonators. We observed a tight focus of half-wavelength in width at 60.5 KHz by imaging a point source. This result is in excellent agreement with the numerical simulation by transmission line model in which we derived the effective mass density and compressibility. This metamaterial lens also displays variable focal length at different frequencies. Our experiment shows the promise of designing compact and light-weight ultrasound imaging elements. Moreover, the concept of metamaterial extends far beyond negative refraction, rather giving enormous choice of material parameters for different applications. One of the most interesting examples these years is the invisible cloak. Such a device is proposed to render the hidden object undetectable under the flow of light or sound, by guiding and controlling the wave path through an engineered space surrounding the object. However, the cloak designed by transformation optics usually calls for a highly anisotropic metamaterial, which