WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustic emission signals

  1. Time reversal signal processing in acoustic emission testing

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Krofta, Josef; Kober, Jan; Dvořáková, Zuzana; Chlada, Milan

    Brno: University of Technology, 2014. s. 10-11. ISBN 978-80-214-5019-6. [European Conference on Non-Destructive Testing (ECNDT 2014) /11./. 06.10.2014-10.10.2014, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : acoustic emission (AE) * ultrasonic testing (UT) * signal processing * source location * time reversal acoustics * acoustic emission * signal processing and transfer Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  2. Time reversal signal processing in acoustic emission testing

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Krofta, Josef; Kober, Jan; Dvořáková, Zuzana; Chlada, Milan; Dos Santos, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2014). ISSN 1435-4934. [European Conference on Non-Destructive Testing (ECNDT 2014) /11./. Praha, 06.10.2014-10.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : acoustic emission (AE) * ultrasonic testing (UT) * signal processing * source location * time reversal acoustics * acoustic emission * signal processing and transfer Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.ndt.net/events/ECNDT2014/app/content/Slides/637_Prevorovsky.pdf

  3. Study of acoustic emission sources and signals

    Pumarega, M. I. López; Armeite, M.; Oliveto, M. E.; Piotrkowski, R.; Ruzzante, J. E.

    2002-05-01

    Methods of acoustic emission (AE) signal analysis give information about material conditions, since AE generated in stressed solids can be used to indicate cracks and defect positions so as their damaging potential. We present a review of results of laboratory AE tests on metallic materials. Rings of seamless steel tubes, with and without oxide layers, were cut and then deformed by opening their ends. Seamless Zry-4 tubes were submitted to hydraulic stress tests until rupture with a purposely-constructed hydraulic system. In burst type signals, their parameters, Amplitude (A), Duration (D) and Risetime (R), were statistically studied. Amplitudes were found to follow the Log-normal distribution. This led to infer that the detected AE signal, is the complex consequence of a great number of random independent sources, which individual effects are linked. We could show, using cluster analysis for A, D and R mean values, with 5 clusters, coincidence between the clusters and the test types. A slight linear correlation was obtained for the parameters A and D. The arrival time of the AE signals was also studied, which conducted to discussing Poisson and Polya processes. The digitized signals were studied as (1/f)β noises. The general results are coherent if we consider the AE phenomena in the frame of Self Organized Criticality theory.

  4. Wavelet analysis of acoustic emission signals from thermal barrier coatings

    YANG Li; ZHOU Yi-chun

    2006-01-01

    The wavelet transform is applied to the analysis of acoustic emission signals collected during tensile test of the ZrO2-8% Y2O3 (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). The acoustic emission signals are de-noised using the Daubechies discrete wavelets,and then decomposed into different wavelet levels using the programs developed by the authors. Each level is examined for its specific frequency range. The ratio of energy in different levels to the total energy gives information on the failure modes (coating micro-failures and substrate micro-failures) associated with TBCs system.

  5. Discrimination of Acoustic Emission Signals using Pattern Recognition Analysis

    Acoustic Emission(AE) signals obtained during fracture toughness test and fatigue test for nuclear pressure vessel material(SA 508 cl.3) and artificial AE signals from pencil break and ultrasonic pulser were classified using pattern recognition methods. Three different classifiers ; namely Minimum Distance Classifier, Linear Discriminant Classifier and Maximum Likelihood Classifier were used for pattern recognition. In this study, the performance of each classifier was compared. The discrimination of AE signals from cracking and crack surface rubbing was possible and the analysis for crack propagation was applicable by pattern recognition methods

  6. Monitoring of hard turning using acoustic emission signal

    Bhaskaran, J.; Murugan, M. [B.S. Abdur Rahman University, Chennai (India); Balashanmugam, N.; Chellamalai, M. [Central Manufacturing Technology Institute, Bangalore (India)

    2012-02-15

    Monitoring of tool wear during hard turning is essential. Many investigators have analyzed the acoustic emission (AE) signals generated during machining to understand the metal cutting process and for monitoring tool wear and failure. In the current study on hard turning, the skew and kurtosis parameters of the root mean square values of AE signal (AERMS) are used to monitor tool wear. The rubbing between the tool and the workpiece increases as the tool wear crosses a threshold, thereby shifting the mass of AERMS distribution to right, leading to a negative skew. The increased rubbing also led to a high kurtosis value in the AERMS distribution curve.

  7. Identifying fatigue crack geometric features from acoustic emission signals

    Bao, Jingjing; Poddar, Banibrata; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) caused by the growth of fatigue crack were well studied by researchers. Conventional approaches predominantly are based on statistical analysis. In this study we focus on identifying geometric features of the crack from the AE signals using physics based approach. One of the main challenges of this approach is to develop a physics of materials based understanding of the generation and propagation of acoustic emissions due to the growth of a fatigue crack. As the geometry changes due to the crack growth, so does the local vibration modes around the crack. Our aim is to understand these changing local vibration modes and find possible relation between the AE signal features and the geometric features of the crack. Finite element (FE) analysis was used to model AE events due to fatigue crack growth. This was done using dipole excitation at the crack tips. Harmonic analysis was also performed on these FE models to understand the local vibration modes. Experimental study was carried out to verify these results. Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) were used to excite cracked specimen and the local vibration modes were captured using laser Doppler vibrometry. The preliminary results show that the AE signals do carry the information related to the crack geometry.

  8. Acoustic emission

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  9. Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signals using WaveletTransformation Technique

    S.V. Subba Rao

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE monitoring is carried out during proof pressure testing of pressurevessels to find the occurrence of any crack growth-related phenomenon. While carrying out AEmonitoring, it is often found that the background noise is very high. Along with the noise, thesignal includes various phenomena related to crack growth, rubbing of fasteners, leaks, etc. Dueto the presence of noise, it becomes difficult to identify signature of the original signals related to the above phenomenon. Through various filtering/ thresholding techniques, it was found that the original signals were getting filtered out along with noise. Wavelet transformation technique is found to be more appropriate to analyse the AE signals under such situations. Wavelet transformation technique is used to de-noise the AE data. The de-noised signal is classified to identify a signature based on the type of phenomena.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(4, pp.559-564, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1677

  10. Statistics of the acoustic emission signals parameters from Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding

    Statistic analysis of acoustic emission signals parameters: amplitude, duration and risetime was carried out. CANDU type Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings were pressurized up to rupture, one set of five normal pieces and six with defects included, acoustic emission was used on-line. Amplitude and duration frequency distributions were fitted with lognormal distribution functions, and risetime with an exponential one. Using analysis of variance, acoustic emission was appropriated to distinguish between defective and non-defective subsets. Clusters analysis applied on mean values of acoustic emission signal parameters were not effective to distinguish two sets of fuel claddings studied. (author)

  11. Acoustic emission source location based on signal features

    Blaháček, Michal; Chlada, Milan; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    Uetikon-Zuerich : Trans Tech Publications, 2006 - (Pullin, R.), s. 77-82 ISBN 0-87849-420-0. ISSN 1022-6680. [European Conference on AE Testing /27./. Cardiff (GB), 20.09.2006-22.09.2006] R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FT-TA/026 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 502927 - AERO-NEWS Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission * source location Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  12. Acoustic emission source localization based on distance domain signal representation

    Gawronski, M.; Grabowski, K.; Russek, P.; Staszewski, W. J.; Uhl, T.; Packo, P.

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission is a vital non-destructive testing technique and is widely used in industry for damage detection, localisation and characterization. The latter two aspects are particularly challenging, as AE data are typically noisy. What is more, elastic waves generated by an AE event, propagate through a structural path and are significantly distorted. This effect is particularly prominent for thin elastic plates. In these media the dispersion phenomenon results in severe localisation and characterization issues. Traditional Time Difference of Arrival methods for localisation techniques typically fail when signals are highly dispersive. Hence, algorithms capable of dispersion compensation are sought. This paper presents a method based on the Time - Distance Domain Transform for an accurate AE event localisation. The source localisation is found through a minimization problem. The proposed technique focuses on transforming the time signal to the distance domain response, which would be recorded at the source. Only, basic elastic material properties and plate thickness are used in the approach, avoiding arbitrary parameters tuning.

  13. Wavelet packet transform for detection of single events in acoustic emission signals

    Bianchi, Davide; Mayrhofer, Erwin; Gröschl, Martin; Betz, Gerhard; Vernes, András

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic emission signals in tribology can be used for monitoring the state of bodies in contact and relative motion. The recorded signal includes information which can be associated with different events, such as the formation and propagation of cracks, appearance of scratches and so on. One of the major challenges in analyzing these acoustic emission signals is to identify parts of the signal which belong to such an event and discern it from noise. In this contribution, a wavelet packet decomposition within the framework of multiresolution analysis theory is considered to analyze acoustic emission signals to investigate the failure of tribological systems. By applying the wavelet packet transform a method for the extraction of single events in rail contact fatigue test is proposed. The extraction of such events at several stages of the test permits a classification and the analysis of the evolution of cracks in the rail.

  14. Intensity modification of acoustic emission signals under thermocyclic tests of high-temperature steel EP33

    With the help of the acoustic emission (AE) method a study is made into structural and phase transformations in a heat resistant austenitic steel Kh12N22T3MR under conditions of cyclic heating up to 600 deg C and constant tensile loading. Based on the analysis of acoustic emission data the temperature dependence of AE signal intensity on thermal cycling is built and regularities of its variation are established for every test cycle

  15. Identification of acoustic emission signal in aluminum alloys spot welding based on fractal theory

    2007-01-01

    The acoustic emission signal of aluminum alloys spot welding includes the information of forming nugget and is one of the important parameters in the quality control. Due to the nonlinearity of the signals, classic Euclidean geometry can not be applied to depict exactly. The fractal theory is implemented to quantitatively describe the characteristics of the acoustic emission signals. The experiment and calculation results show that the box counting dimension of acoustic emission signal, between 1 and 2, are distinctive from different nugget areas in AC spot welding. It is proved that box counting dimension is an effective characteristic parameter to evaluate spot welding quality. In addition, fractal theory can also be applied in other spot welding parameters, such as voltage, current, electrode force and so on, for the purpose of recognizing the spot welding quality.

  16. Robust Clustering of Acoustic Emission Signals Using Neural Networks and Signal Subspace Projections

    Shi Zhiqiang

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission-based techniques are being used for the nondestructive inspection of mechanical systems. For reliable automatic fault monitoring related to the generation and propagation of cracks, it is important to identify the transient crack-related signals in the presence of strong time-varying noise and other interference. A prominent difficulty is the inability to differentiate events due to crack growth from noise of various origins. This work presents a novel algorithm for automatic clustering and separation of acoustic emission (AE events based on multiple features extracted from the experimental data. The algorithm consists of two steps. In the first step, the noise is separated from the events of interest and subsequently removed using a combination of covariance analysis, principal component analysis (PCA, and differential time delay estimates. The second step processes the remaining data using a self-organizing map (SOM neural network, which outputs the noise and AE signals into separate neurons. To improve the efficiency of classification, the short-time Fourier transform (STFT is applied to retain the time-frequency features of the remaining events, reducing the dimension of the data. The algorithm is verified with two sets of data, and a correct classification ratio over 95% is achieved.

  17. Surface Roughness Evaluation Based on Acoustic Emission Signals in Robot Assisted Polishing

    Beatriz de Agustina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The polishing process is the most common technology used in applications where a high level of surface quality is demanded. The automation of polishing processes is especially difficult due to the high level of skill and dexterity that is required. Much of this difficulty arises because of the lack of reliable data on the effect of the polishing parameters on the resulting surface roughness. An experimental study was developed to evaluate the surface roughness obtained during Robot Assisted Polishing processes by the analysis of acoustic emission signals in the frequency domain. The aim is to find out a trend of a feature or features calculated from the acoustic emission signals detected along the process. Such an evaluation was made with the objective of collecting valuable information for the establishment of the end point detection of polishing process. As a main conclusion, it can be affirmed that acoustic emission (AE signals can be considered useful to monitor the polishing process state.

  18. The characteristics of acoustic emission signal under composite destruction on GFRP gas cylinder

    Jee, Hyun Sup; Lee, Jong O; Ju, No Hoe [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); So, Cheal Ho [Dongsin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Kyu [Dept. of Physics, Bukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This study is investigation of the characteristics for acoustic emission signal generated by destruction on glass fiber bundles and specimen that was machined composite materials surrounding the outside of GFRP cylinder. The Amplitude of acoustic emission signal gets bigger as the cutting angle of knife increases. Accordingly, the number of hits in destruction of composite materials specimen have more in longitudinal direction (longitudinal direction to the glass fiber) than in hoop direction (horizontal direction to the glass fiber) while the amplitude of signals were bigger in hoop direction than longitudinal direction. It was found out that the amplitude of the glass fiber breakage is more than 40 dB and that the amplitude of signal for matrix crack was less than 40 dB because matrix crack signal was not observed when threshold value is 40 dB and matrix crack signal suddenly appeared when threshold value is 32 dB. The slope of the amplitude is related to the acoustic emission source and the slope of the amplitude of the horizontal and vertical directions are 0.16 and 0.08. In particular, The slope of the amplitude of longitudinal direction breakage appear similar to the glass fiber breakage and therefore Acoustic emission source of longitudinal direction breakage is estimated the glass fiber breakage.

  19. The characteristics of acoustic emission signal under composite destruction on GFRP gas cylinder

    This study is investigation of the characteristics for acoustic emission signal generated by destruction on glass fiber bundles and specimen that was machined composite materials surrounding the outside of GFRP cylinder. The Amplitude of acoustic emission signal gets bigger as the cutting angle of knife increases. Accordingly, the number of hits in destruction of composite materials specimen have more in longitudinal direction (longitudinal direction to the glass fiber) than in hoop direction (horizontal direction to the glass fiber) while the amplitude of signals were bigger in hoop direction than longitudinal direction. It was found out that the amplitude of the glass fiber breakage is more than 40 dB and that the amplitude of signal for matrix crack was less than 40 dB because matrix crack signal was not observed when threshold value is 40 dB and matrix crack signal suddenly appeared when threshold value is 32 dB. The slope of the amplitude is related to the acoustic emission source and the slope of the amplitude of the horizontal and vertical directions are 0.16 and 0.08. In particular, The slope of the amplitude of longitudinal direction breakage appear similar to the glass fiber breakage and therefore Acoustic emission source of longitudinal direction breakage is estimated the glass fiber breakage.

  20. An information processing method for acoustic emission signal inspired from musical staff

    Zheng, Wei; Wu, Chunxian

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a musical-staff-inspired signal processing method for standard description expressions for discrete signals and describing the integrated characteristics of acoustic emission (AE) signals. The method maps various AE signals with complex environments into the normalized musical space. Four new indexes are proposed to comprehensively describe the signal. Several key features, such as contour, amplitude, and signal changing rate, are quantitatively expressed in a normalized musical space. The processed information requires only a small storage space to maintain high fidelity. The method is illustrated by using experiments on sandstones and computed tomography (CT) scanning to determine its validity for AE signal processing.

  1. Type-2 Fuzzy Modeling for Acoustic Emission Signal in Precision Manufacturing

    Qun Ren; Luc Baron; Marek Balazinski

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an application of type-2 fuzzy logic on acoustic emission (AE) signal modeling in precision manufacturing. Type-2 fuzzy modeling is used to identify the AE signal in precision machining. It provides a simple way to arrive at a definite conclusion without understanding the exact physics of the machining process. Moreover, the interval set of the output from the type-2 fuzzy approach assesses the information about the uncertainty in the AE signal, which can be of great value...

  2. Low temperature tensile deformation and acoustic emission signal characteristics of AISI 304LN stainless steel

    Barat, K.; Bar, H.N. [Material Science and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Mandal, D. [Material Processing and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Roy, H., E-mail: himadri9504@gmail.com [NDT and Metallurgy Group, CSIR-Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Durgapur 713209 (India); Sivaprasad, S.; Tarafder, S. [Material Science and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2014-03-01

    This investigation examines low temperature tensile deformation behavior of AISI 304LN stainless steel along with synergistic analysis of acoustic emission signals. The tensile tests are done at a range of temperatures starting from 283 K till 223 K. The fracture surfaces of the broken specimens are investigated using scanning electron microscope. The amount of deformation induced martensite is measured using a feritscope. The obtained results reveal that with decrease in test temperature, both strength and ductility increase. The increase in strength and ductility with decreasing temperature is explained in terms of void morphologies and formation of deformation induced martensite. The rapid increment in strength and ductility at 223 K is associated with the burst of martensitic transformation at that temperature; which has been clarified from acoustic emission signals. An additional initiative has been taken to model the evolution of martensite formation from the observed cumulative emission counts using a non linear logarithmic functional form. The fitted curves from the recorded acoustic emission cumulative count data are found to be better correlated compared to earlier obtained results. However, at 223 K normal non-linear logarithmic fit is not found suitable due to presence of burst type signals at intervals, therefore; piecewise logarithmic function to model acoustic emission bursts is proposed.

  3. Low temperature tensile deformation and acoustic emission signal characteristics of AISI 304LN stainless steel

    This investigation examines low temperature tensile deformation behavior of AISI 304LN stainless steel along with synergistic analysis of acoustic emission signals. The tensile tests are done at a range of temperatures starting from 283 K till 223 K. The fracture surfaces of the broken specimens are investigated using scanning electron microscope. The amount of deformation induced martensite is measured using a feritscope. The obtained results reveal that with decrease in test temperature, both strength and ductility increase. The increase in strength and ductility with decreasing temperature is explained in terms of void morphologies and formation of deformation induced martensite. The rapid increment in strength and ductility at 223 K is associated with the burst of martensitic transformation at that temperature; which has been clarified from acoustic emission signals. An additional initiative has been taken to model the evolution of martensite formation from the observed cumulative emission counts using a non linear logarithmic functional form. The fitted curves from the recorded acoustic emission cumulative count data are found to be better correlated compared to earlier obtained results. However, at 223 K normal non-linear logarithmic fit is not found suitable due to presence of burst type signals at intervals, therefore; piecewise logarithmic function to model acoustic emission bursts is proposed

  4. Usage Autocorrelation Function in the Capacity of Indicator Shape of the Signal in Acoustic Emission Testing of Intricate Castings

    Popkov, Artem

    2016-01-01

    The article contains information about acoustic emission signals analysing using autocorrelation function. Operation factors were analysed, such as shape of signal, the origins time and carrier frequency. The purpose of work is estimating the validity of correlations methods analysing signals. Acoustic emission signal consist of different types of waves, which propagate on different trajectories in object of control. Acoustic emission signal is amplitude-, phase- and frequency-modeling signal. It was described by carrier frequency at a given point of time. Period of signal make up 12.5 microseconds and carrier frequency make up 80 kHz for analysing signal. Usage autocorrelation function like indicator the origin time of acoustic emission signal raises validity localization of emitters.

  5. Classification Identification of Acoustic Emission Signals from Underground Metal Mine Rock by ICIMF Classifier

    Hongyan Zuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the drawback that fuzzy classifier was sensitive to noises and outliers, Mamdani fuzzy classifier based on improved chaos immune algorithm was developed, in which bilateral Gaussian membership function parameters were set as constraint conditions and the indexes of fuzzy classification effectiveness and number of correct samples of fuzzy classification as the subgoal of fitness function. Moreover, Iris database was used for simulation experiment, classification, and recognition of acoustic emission signals and interference signals from stope wall rock of underground metal mines. The results showed that Mamdani fuzzy classifier based on improved chaos immune algorithm could effectively improve the prediction accuracy of classification of data sets with noises and outliers and the classification accuracy of acoustic emission signal and interference signal from stope wall rock of underground metal mines was 90.00%. It was obvious that the improved chaos immune Mamdani fuzzy (ICIMF classifier was useful for accurate diagnosis of acoustic emission signal and interference signal from stope wall rock of underground metal mines.

  6. Multi-scale morphology analysis of acoustic emission signal and quantitative diagnosis for bearing fault

    Wang, Wen-Jing; Cui, Ling-Li; Chen, Dao-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of potential bearing faults in operation is of critical importance to safe operation of high speed trains. One of the major challenges is how to differentiate relevant signals to operational conditions of bearings from noises emitted from the surrounding environment. In this work, we report a procedure for analyzing acoustic emission signals collected from rolling bearings for diagnosis of bearing health conditions by examining their morphological pattern spectrum (MPS) through a multi-scale morphology analysis procedure. The results show that acoustic emission signals resulted from a given type of bearing faults share rather similar MPS curves. Further examinations in terms of sample entropy and Lempel-Ziv complexity of MPS curves suggest that these two parameters can be utilized to determine damage modes.

  7. Acoustic emissions for particle sizing of powders through signal processing techniques

    Bastari, A.; Cristalli, C.; Morlacchi, R.; Pomponi, E. [Loccioni Group (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    The present work introduces an innovative method for measuring particle size distribution of an airborne powder, based on the application of signal processing techniques to the acoustic emission signals produced by the impacts of the powder with specific metallic surfaces. The basic idea of the proposed methodology lies on the identification of the unknown relation between the acquired acoustic emission signals and the powder particle size distribution, by means of a multi-step procedure. In the first step, wavelet packet decomposition is used to extract useful features from the acoustic emission signals: the dimensionality of feature space is further reduced through multivariate data analysis techniques. As a final step, a neural network is properly trained to map the feature vector into the particle size distribution. The proposed solution has several advantages, such as low cost and low invasiveness which allow the system based on this technique to be easily integrated in pre-existing plants. It has been successfully applied to the PSD measurement of coal powder produced by grinding mills in a coal-fired power station, and the experimental results are reported in the paper. The measurement principle can also be applied to different particle sizing applications, whenever a solid powder is carried in air or in other gases.

  8. Analysis of acoustic emission signals of fatigue crack growth and corrosion processes. Investigation of the possibilities for continuous condition monitoring of transport containers by acoustic emission testing

    Fatigue crack growth and active corrosion processes are the main causes of structural failures of transport products like road tankers, railway tank cars and ships. To prevent those failures, preventive, time-based maintenance is performed. However, preventive inspections are costly and include the risk of not detecting a defect, which could lead to a failure within the next service period. An alternative is the idea of continuous monitoring of the whole structure by means of acoustic emission testing (AT). With AT, defects within the material shall be detected and repaired directly after their appearance. Acoustic emission testing is an online non-destructive testing method. Acoustic emission (AE) arises from changes within the material and is transported by elastic waves through the material. If the AE event generates enough energy, the elastic wave propagates to the boundaries of the component, produces a displacement in the picometre scale and can be detected by a piezoelectric sensor. The sensor produces an electrical signal. From this AE signal, AE features such as the maximum amplitude or the frequency can be extracted. Methods of signal analysis are used to investigate the time and frequency dependency of signal groups. The purpose of the signal analysis is to connect the AE signal with the originating AE source. If predefined damage mechanisms are identified, referencing the damage condition of the structure is possible. Acoustic emission from events of the actual crack propagation process can for example lead to the crack growth rate or the stress intensity factor, both specific values from fracture mechanics. A new development in the domain of acoustic emission testing is the pattern recognition of AE signals. Specific features are extracted from the AE signals to assign them to their damage mechanisms. In this thesis the AE signals from the damage mechanisms corrosion and fatigue crack growth are compared and analysed. The damage mechanisms were

  9. Extruded Bread Classification on the Basis of Acoustic Emission Signal With Application of Artificial Neural Networks

    Świetlicka, Izabela; Muszyński, Siemowit; Marzec, Agata

    2015-04-01

    The presented work covers the problem of developing a method of extruded bread classification with the application of artificial neural networks. Extruded flat graham, corn, and rye breads differening in water activity were used. The breads were subjected to the compression test with simultaneous registration of acoustic signal. The amplitude-time records were analyzed both in time and frequency domains. Acoustic emission signal parameters: single energy, counts, amplitude, and duration acoustic emission were determined for the breads in four water activities: initial (0.362 for rye, 0.377 for corn, and 0.371 for graham bread), 0.432, 0.529, and 0.648. For classification and the clustering process, radial basis function, and self-organizing maps (Kohonen network) were used. Artificial neural networks were examined with respect to their ability to classify or to cluster samples according to the bread type, water activity value, and both of them. The best examination results were achieved by the radial basis function network in classification according to water activity (88%), while the self-organizing maps network yielded 81% during bread type clustering.

  10. Practical acoustic emission testing

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  11. Signal Characteristic of acoustic emission from plant by the water stress

    To improve environmental control in plant, a signal characteristics of plant has been studied by a nondestructive technique. Hereupon, the acoustic emission (AE) for plant was discussed for water stress detection. AE signals were taken from angiosperms and gymnosperm. It has found that the AE sensor could detect the AE signals on the plant stem right below the sensor. The AE hit counts in daytime was higher than that in night tim, and it was realised that the daily hit counts pattern corresponded with the water stress in the plant. The frequency band of the angiosperms was different from the gymnosperm. The frequency band from outdoor was in accord with that of indoor obtained from the same conditions.

  12. Fault diagnosis of reciprocating compressor valve with the method integrating acoustic emission signal and simulated valve motion

    Wang, Yuefei; Xue, Chuang; Jia, Xiaohan; Peng, Xueyuan

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a method of diagnosing faults in reciprocating compressor valves using the acoustic emission signal coupled with the simulated valve motion. The actual working condition of a valve can be obtained by analyzing the acoustic emission signal in the crank angle domain and the valve movement can be predicted by simulating the valve motion. The exact opening and closing locations of a normal valve, provided by the simulated valve motion, can be used as references for the valve fault diagnosis. The typical valve faults are diagnosed to validate the feasibility and accuracy of the proposed method. The experimental results indicate that this method can easily distinguish the normal valve, valve flutter and valve delayed closing conditions. The characteristic locations of the opening and closing of the suction and discharge valves can be clearly identified in the waveform of the acoustic emission signal and the simulated valve motion.

  13. Can acoustic emissions patterns signal imminence of avalanche events in a growing sand pile?

    Vögtli, Melanie; Lehmann, Peter; Breitenstein, Daniel; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    Gravity driven mass release is often triggered abruptly with limited precursory cues to indicate imminent failure and thus limiting early warning. Evidence suggests that with increased mechanical loading of a slope, numerous local damage events marking friction between rearranged particles or breakage of roots release strain energy as elastic waves measurable as acoustic emissions. We examined the potential predictability of mass release events from preceding acoustic emission (AE) signatures in a well-known and simple model system of a growing sand pile. We installed four AE-sensors within the core of a 30 cm (diameter) sand pile fed by a constant input of grains and mounted on a balance. Subsequent to the convergence of the slope to dynamic angle of repose, sand avalanche across the bottom boundary were monitored by abrupt mass change and by the amplitudes and number of AE events (recorded at high frequency and averaged to 0.2 s). We detected a systematic change of AE-patterns characterized by systematically decreasing AE standard deviation prior to each mass release. Although the lead time following minimum AE standard deviation was relatively short (10s of seconds), the AE signature already started to change minutes before the mass release. Accordingly the information embedded in AE signal dynamics could potentially offer larger lead times for systems of practical interest.

  14. Classification of acoustic emission signals using wavelets and Random Forests : Application to localized corrosion

    Morizet, N.; Godin, N.; Tang, J.; Maillet, E.; Fregonese, M.; Normand, B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to propose a novel approach to classify acoustic emission (AE) signals deriving from corrosion experiments, even if embedded into a noisy environment. To validate this new methodology, synthetic data are first used throughout an in-depth analysis, comparing Random Forests (RF) to the k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN) algorithm. Moreover, a new evaluation tool called the alter-class matrix (ACM) is introduced to simulate different degrees of uncertainty on labeled data for supervised classification. Then, tests on real cases involving noise and crevice corrosion are conducted, by preprocessing the waveforms including wavelet denoising and extracting a rich set of features as input of the RF algorithm. To this end, a software called RF-CAM has been developed. Results show that this approach is very efficient on ground truth data and is also very promising on real data, especially for its reliability, performance and speed, which are serious criteria for the chemical industry.

  15. A framework for the damage evaluation of acoustic emission signals through Hilbert-Huang transform

    Siracusano, Giulio; Lamonaca, Francesco; Tomasello, Riccardo; Garescì, Francesca; Corte, Aurelio La; Carnì, Domenico Luca; Carpentieri, Mario; Grimaldi, Domenico; Finocchio, Giovanni

    2016-06-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) is a powerful and potential nondestructive testing method for structural monitoring in civil engineering. Here, we show how systematic investigation of crack phenomena based on AE data can be significantly improved by the use of advanced signal processing techniques. Such data are a fundamental source of information that can be used as the basis for evaluating the status of the material, thereby paving the way for a new frontier of innovation made by data-enabled analytics. In this article, we propose a framework based on the Hilbert-Huang Transform for the evaluation of material damages that (i) facilitates the systematic employment of both established and promising analysis criteria, and (ii) provides unsupervised tools to achieve an accurate classification of the fracture type, the discrimination between longitudinal (P-) and traversal (S-) waves related to an AE event. The experimental validation shows promising results for a reliable assessment of the health status through the monitoring of civil infrastructures.

  16. Frequency Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signal to Monitor Damage Evolution in Masonry Structures

    A crucial aspect in damage evaluation of masonry structures is the analysis of long-term behaviour and for this reason fatigue analysis has a great influence on safety assessment of this structures. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced and unreinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude and static loading has been carried out. During these tests, the AE signals were recorded. The AE signals were analysed using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to examine the frequency distribution of the micro and macro cracking. It possible to evaluate the evolution of the wavelength of the AE signal through the two characteristic peak in the AE spectrum signals and the wave speed of the P or S waves. This wavelength evolution can be represent the microcrak and macrocrack evolution in masonry walls. This procedure permits to estimate the fracture dimension characteristic in several loading condition and for several masonry reinforced condition.

  17. Correlation of infrared thermographic patterns and acoustic emission signals with tensile deformation and fracture processes

    Venkataraman, B.; Raj, Baldev; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2001-04-01

    During tensile deformation, part of the mechanical work done on the specimen is transformed into heat and acoustic activity. The amount of acoustic activity and the thermal emissions depend on the test conditions and the deformation behavior of the specimen during loading. Authors have used thermography and acoustic emission (AE) simultaneously for monitoring tensile deformation in AISI type 316 SS. Tensile testing was carried out at 298 K at three different strain rates. It has been shown that the simultaneous use of these techniques can provide complementary information for characterizing the tensile deformation and fracture processes.

  18. The Basic Study on the Method of Acoustic Emission Signal Processing for the Failure Detection in the NPP Structures

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Jae Seong; Lee, Bo Young [Korea Aerospace University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung; Kwag, No Gwon [SAEAN, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The thermal fatigue crack(TFC) is one of the life-limiting mechanisms at the nuclear power plant operating conditions. In order to evaluate the structural integrity, various non-destructive test methods such as radiographic test, ultrasonic test and eddy current are used in the industrial field. However, these methods have restrictions that defect detection is possible after the crack growth. For this reason, acoustic emission testing(AET) is becoming one of powerful inspection methods, because AET has an advantage that possible to monitor the structure continuously. Generally, every mechanism that affects the integrity of the structure or equipment is a source of acoustic emission signal. Therefore the noise filtering is one of the major works to the almost AET researchers. In this study, acoustic emission signal was collected from the pipes which were in the successive thermal fatigue cycles. The data were filtered based on the results from previous experiments. Through the data analysis, the signal characteristics to distinguish the effective signal from the noises for the TFC were proven as the waveform difference. The experiment results provide preliminary information for the acoustic emission technique to the continuous monitoring of the structure failure detection

  19. The Basic Study on the Method of Acoustic Emission Signal Processing for the Failure Detection in the NPP Structures

    The thermal fatigue crack(TFC) is one of the life-limiting mechanisms at the nuclear power plant operating conditions. In order to evaluate the structural integrity, various non-destructive test methods such as radiographic test, ultrasonic test and eddy current are used in the industrial field. However, these methods have restrictions that defect detection is possible after the crack growth. For this reason, acoustic emission testing(AET) is becoming one of powerful inspection methods, because AET has an advantage that possible to monitor the structure continuously. Generally, every mechanism that affects the integrity of the structure or equipment is a source of acoustic emission signal. Therefore the noise filtering is one of the major works to the almost AET researchers. In this study, acoustic emission signal was collected from the pipes which were in the successive thermal fatigue cycles. The data were filtered based on the results from previous experiments. Through the data analysis, the signal characteristics to distinguish the effective signal from the noises for the TFC were proven as the waveform difference. The experiment results provide preliminary information for the acoustic emission technique to the continuous monitoring of the structure failure detection

  20. Implementing wavelet packet transform for valve failure detection using vibration and acoustic emission signals

    The efficiency of reciprocating compressors relies heavily on the health condition of its moving components, most importantly its valves. Previous studies showed good correlation between the dynamic response and the physical condition of the valves. These can be achieved by employing vibration technique which is capable of monitoring the response of the valve, and acoustic emission technique which is capable of detecting the valves' material deformation. However, the relationship/comparison between the two techniques is rarely investigated. In this paper, the two techniques were examined using time-frequency analysis. Wavelet packet transform (WPT) was chosen as the multi-resolution analysis technique over continuous wavelet transform (CWT), and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). This is because WPT could overcome the high computational time and high redundancy problem in CWT and could provide detailed analysis of the high frequency components compared to DWT. The features of both signals can be extracted by evaluating the normalised WPT coefficients for different time window under different valve conditions. By comparing the normalised coefficients over a certain time frame and frequency range, the feature vectors revealing the condition of valves can be constructed. One way analysis of variance was employed on these feature vectors to test the significance of data under different valve conditions. It is believed that AE signals can give a better representation of the valve condition as it can detect both the fluid motion and material deformation of valves as compared to the vibration signals.

  1. Implementing wavelet packet transform for valve failure detection using vibration and acoustic emission signals

    Sim, H. Y.; Ramli, R.; Abdullah, M. A. K.

    2012-05-01

    The efficiency of reciprocating compressors relies heavily on the health condition of its moving components, most importantly its valves. Previous studies showed good correlation between the dynamic response and the physical condition of the valves. These can be achieved by employing vibration technique which is capable of monitoring the response of the valve, and acoustic emission technique which is capable of detecting the valves' material deformation. However, the relationship/comparison between the two techniques is rarely investigated. In this paper, the two techniques were examined using time-frequency analysis. Wavelet packet transform (WPT) was chosen as the multi-resolution analysis technique over continuous wavelet transform (CWT), and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). This is because WPT could overcome the high computational time and high redundancy problem in CWT and could provide detailed analysis of the high frequency components compared to DWT. The features of both signals can be extracted by evaluating the normalised WPT coefficients for different time window under different valve conditions. By comparing the normalised coefficients over a certain time frame and frequency range, the feature vectors revealing the condition of valves can be constructed. One way analysis of variance was employed on these feature vectors to test the significance of data under different valve conditions. It is believed that AE signals can give a better representation of the valve condition as it can detect both the fluid motion and material deformation of valves as compared to the vibration signals.

  2. Classification of acoustic emission signals for drive systems coupling crack detection in semi-real time

    Early detection of mechanical failure in helicopter drive train components is a key safety and economical issue with both military and civil sectors of aviation. Of these components, couplings are particularly critical. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of designing and developing a reliable, real time monitoring methodology based on Supervised Pattern Recognition (SPR) for early detection of cracks in couplings used in helicopter and engine drive systems. Within this framework, a portable Acoustic Emission (AE) system was used, equipped with a semi-real time SPR software package. Results from AE tests performed in a gearbox-testing bench at different speeds and different torque values are presented. These results indicate that the energy content of different frequency bands in the AE signals power spectra is strongly correlated with the introduction of EDM notches in the main gear. Further tests indicate that a strong shift in the frequency of the AE signals is observed after spalling occurred in the pinion gear. The variation of displacement and velocity between signal classes are discussed as a potential feature in characterizing crack severity. Finally, a scope of the work for optimizing the methodology in detecting and evaluating coupling cracking in real time will be presented. (author)

  3. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook will...... present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...... from different areas, will find the self-contained chapters accessible and will be interested in the similarities and differences between the approaches and techniques used in different areas of acoustics....

  4. Real-Time Source Classification with an Waveform Parameter Filtering of Acoustic Emission Signals

    Cho, Seung Hyun; Park, Jae Ha; Ahn, Bong Young [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    The acoustic emission(AE) technique is a well established method to carry out structural health monitoring(SHM) of large structures. However, the real-time monitoring of the crack growth in the roller coaster support structures is not easy since the vehicle operation produces very large noise as well as crack growth. In this investigation, we present the waveform parameter filtering method to classify acoustic sources in real-time. This method filtrates only the AE hits by the target acoustic source as passing hits in a specific parameter band. According to various acoustic sources, the waveform parameters were measured and analyzed to verify the present filtering method. Also, the AE system employing the waveform parameter filter was manufactured and applied to the roller coaster support structure in an actual amusement park

  5. A methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission signals to identify fracture timing from human cadaver spine impact tests.

    Arun, Mike W J; Yoganandan, Narayan; Stemper, Brian D; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-12-01

    While studies have used acoustic sensors to determine fracture initiation time in biomechanical studies, a systematic procedure is not established to process acoustic signals. The objective of the study was to develop a methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission data using signal processing techniques to identify fracture initiation time. The methodology was developed from testing a human cadaver lumbar spine column. Acoustic sensors were glued to all vertebrae, high-rate impact loading was applied, load-time histories were recorded (load cell), and fracture was documented using CT. Compression fracture occurred to L1 while other vertebrae were intact. FFT of raw voltage-time traces were used to determine an optimum frequency range associated with high decibel levels. Signals were bandpass filtered in this range. Bursting pattern was found in the fractured vertebra while signals from other vertebrae were silent. Bursting time was associated with time of fracture initiation. Force at fracture was determined using this time and force-time data. The methodology is independent of selecting parameters a priori such as fixing a voltage level(s), bandpass frequency and/or using force-time signal, and allows determination of force based on time identified during signal processing. The methodology can be used for different body regions in cadaver experiments. PMID:25241279

  6. A signal processing approach for enhanced Acoustic Emission data analysis in high activity systems: Application to organic matrix composites

    Kharrat, M.; Ramasso, E.; Placet, V.; Boubakar, M. L.

    2016-03-01

    Structural elements made of Organic Matrix Composites (OMC) under complex loading may suffer from high Acoustic Emission (AE) activity caused by the emergence of different emission sources at high rates with high noise level, which finally engender continuous emissions. The detection of hits in this situation becomes a challenge particularly during fatigue tests. This work suggests an approach based on the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) denoising applied on signal segments. A particular attention is paid to the adjustment of the denoising parameters based on pencil lead breaks and their influence on the quality of the denoised AE signals. The validation of the proposed approach is performed on a ring-shaped Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) under in-service-like conditions involving continuous emissions with superimposed damage-related transients. It is demonstrated that errors in hit detection are greatly reduced leading to a better identification of the natural damage scenario based on AE signals.

  7. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Hora, Petr; Červená, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2010), s. 25-36. ISSN 1802-680X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1630 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission source * wave propagation * FEM Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  8. Quadratic Time-Frequency Analysis of Hydroacoustic Signals as Applied to Acoustic Emissions of Large Whales

    Le Bras, Ronan; Victor, Sucic; Damir, Malnar; Götz, Bokelmann

    2014-05-01

    In order to enrich the set of attributes in setting up a large database of whale signals, as envisioned in the Baleakanta project, we investigate methods of time-frequency analysis. The purpose of establishing the database is to increase and refine knowledge of the emitted signal and of its propagation characteristics, leading to a better understanding of the animal migrations in a non-invasive manner and to characterize acoustic propagation in oceanic media. The higher resolution for signal extraction and a better separation from other signals and noise will be used for various purposes, including improved signal detection and individual animal identification. The quadratic class of time-frequency distributions (TFDs) is the most popular set of time-frequency tools for analysis and processing of non-stationary signals. Two best known and most studied members of this class are the spectrogram and the Wigner-Ville distribution. However, to be used efficiently, i.e. to have highly concentrated signal components while significantly suppressing interference and noise simultaneously, TFDs need to be optimized first. The optimization method used in this paper is based on the Cross-Wigner-Ville distribution, and unlike similar approaches it does not require prior information on the analysed signal. The method is applied to whale signals, which, just like the majority of other real-life signals, can generally be classified as multicomponent non-stationary signals, and hence time-frequency techniques are a natural choice for their representation, analysis, and processing. We present processed data from a set containing hundreds of individual calls. The TFD optimization method results into a high resolution time-frequency representation of the signals. It allows for a simple extraction of signal components from the TFD's dominant ridges. The local peaks of those ridges can then be used for the signal components instantaneous frequency estimation, which in turn can be used as

  9. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...

  10. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  11. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Hora, Petr; Červená, Olga

    Plzeň : University of West Bohemia, 2009 - (Adámek, V.; Zajíček, M.). s. 1-2 ISBN 978-80-7043-824-4. [Výpočtová mechanika 2009. 09.11.2009-11.11.2009, Nečtiny] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1630 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission source * wave propagation * FEM Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  12. Neural Network Approach to Automated Condition Classification of a Check Valve by Acoustic Emission Signals

    This paper presents new techniques under development for monitoring the health and vibration of the active components in nuclear power plants, The purpose of this study is to develop an automated system for condition classification of a check valve one of the components being used extensively in a safety system of a nuclear power plant. Acoustic emission testing for a check valve under controlled flow loop conditions was performed to detect and evaluate disc movement for valve failure such as wear and leakage due to foreign object interference in a check valve, It is clearly demonstrated that the evaluation of different types of failure types such as disc wear and check valve leakage were successful by systematically analyzing the characteristics of various AE parameters, It is also shown that the leak size can be determined with an artificial neural network

  13. Source location on full-scale wind turbine blade using acoustic emission energy based signal mapping method

    Acoustic emission(AE) has emerged as a powerful nondestructive tool to detect any further growth or expansion of preexisting defects or to characterize failure mechanisms. Recently, this kind of technique, that is an in-situ monitoring of inside damages of materials or structures, becomes increasingly popular for monitoring the integrity of large structures like a huge wind turbine blade. In this study, the activities of AE signals generated from external artificial sources was evaluated and located by new developed signal mapping source location method and this test is conducted by 750 kW full-scale blade. And a new source location method was applied to assess the damage in the wind turbine blade during step-by-step static load test. In this static loading test, we have used a full scale blade of 100 kW in capacity. The results show that the acoustic emission activities give a good agreement with the stress distribution and damage location in the blade. Finally, the applicability of the new source location method was confirmed by comparison of the result of source location and experimental damage location.

  14. Detection of multiple AE signal by triaxial hodogram analysis; Sanjiku hodogram ho ni yoru taju acoustic emission no kenshutsu

    Nagano, K.; Yamashita, T. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    In order to evaluate dynamic behavior of underground cracks, analysis and detection were attempted on multiple acoustic emission (AE) events. The multiple AE is a phenomenon in which multiple AE signals generated by underground cracks developed in an extremely short time interval are superimposed, and observed as one AE event. The multiple AE signal consists of two AE signals, whereas the second P-wave is supposed to have been inputted before the first S-wave is inputted. The first P-wave is inputted first, where linear three-dimensional particle movements are observed, but the movements are made random due to scattering and sensor characteristics. When the second P-wave is inputted, the linear particle movements are observed again, but are superimposed with the existing input signals and become multiple AE, which creates poor S/N ratio. The multiple AE detection determines it a multiple AE event when three conditions are met, i. e. a condition of equivalent time interval of a maximum value in a scalogram analysis, a condition of P-wave vibrating direction, and a condition of the linear particle movement. Seventy AE signals observed in the Kakkonda geothermal field were analyzed and AE signals that satisfy the multiple AE were detected. However, further development is required on an analysis method with high resolution for the time. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Signal Simulation and Experimental Research on Acoustic Emission using LS-DYNA

    Zhang Jianchao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To calculate sound wave velocity, we performed the Hsu-Nielsen lead break experiment using the ANSYS/LS-DYNA finite element software. First, we identified the key problems in the finite element analysis, such as selecting the exciting force, dividing the grid density, and setting the calculation steps. Second, we established the finite element model of the sound wave transmission in a plate under the lead break simulation. Results revealed not only the transmission characteristics of the sound wave but also the simulation and calculation of the transmission velocity of the longitudinal and transverse waves through the time travel curve of the vibration velocity of the sound wave at various nodes. Finally, the Hsu-Nielsen lead break experiment was implemented. The results of the theoretical calculation and simulation analysis were consistent with the experimental results, thus demonstrating that the research method using the ANSYS/LS-DYNA software to simulate sound wave transmissions in acoustic emission experiments is feasible and effective.

  16. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Hora P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the acoustic emission (AE source modeling by means of FEM system COMSOL Multiphysics. The following types of sources are used: the spatially concentrated force and the double forces (dipole. The pulse excitation is studied in both cases. As a material is used steel. The computed displacements are compared with the exact analytical solution of point sources under consideration.

  17. Acoustic vector sensor signal processing

    SUN Guiqing; LI Qihu; ZHANG Bin

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic vector sensor simultaneously, colocately and directly measures orthogonal components of particle velocity as well as pressure at single point in acoustic field so that is possible to improve performance of traditional underwater acoustic measurement devices or detection systems and extends new ideas for solving practical underwater acoustic engineering problems. Although acoustic vector sensor history of appearing in underwater acoustic area is no long, but with huge and potential military demands, acoustic vector sensor has strong development trend in last decade, it is evolving into a one of important underwater acoustic technology. Under this background, we try to review recent progress in study on acoustic vector sensor signal processing, such as signal detection, DOA estimation, beamforming, and so on.

  18. Evoked acoustic emission

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...... a minor effect on the power spectra, i.e. the maximum jumps from one spectral peak to another. Experiments with deconvolution demonstrate that the emission generating system at least at a fixed intensity can be regarded as being linear and characterized by its impulse response which is similar to...... the emission evoked by click stimuli. It is concluded that significant information is obtained by the click rather than by the tonal stimuli. The click-evoked emissions were also recorded from both ears in a consecutive series of 100 full-term and otherwise normal babies 2-4 days after birth. The...

  19. World Conference on Acoustic Emission 2013

    Wu, Zhanwen; Zhang, Junjiao

    2015-01-01

    This volume collects the papers from the 2013 World Conference on Acoustic Emission in Shanghai. The latest research and applications of Acoustic Emission (AE) are explored, with particular emphasis on detecting and processing of AE signals, development of AE instrument and testing standards, AE of materials, engineering structures and systems, including the processing of collected data and analytical techniques as well as experimental case studies.

  20. Pattern recognition methods for acoustic emission analysis

    Models have been developed that relate the rate of acoustic emissions to structural integrity. The implementation of these techniques in the field has been hindered by the noisy environment in which the data must be taken. Acoustic emissions from noncritical sources are recorded in addition to those produced by critical sources, such as flaws. A technique is discussed for prescreening acoustic events and filtering out those that are produced by noncritical sources. The methodology that was investigated is pattern recognition. Three different pattern recognition techniques were applied to a data set that consisted of acoustic emissions caused by crack growth and acoustic signals caused by extraneous noise sources. Examination of the acoustic emission data presented has uncovered several features of the data that can provide a reasonable filter. Two of the most valuable features are the frequency of maximum response and the autocorrelation coefficient at Lag 13. When these two features and several others were combined with a least squares decision algorithm, 90% of the acoustic emissions in the data set were correctly classified. It appears possible to design filters that eliminate extraneous noise sources from flaw-growth acoustic emissions using pattern recognition techniques

  1. Acoustic Emission Stethoscope - Measurements with Acoustic Emission on Wind Turbines

    Krystof Kryniski [AaF Infrastructure, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-15

    A remote ultrasonic stethoscope, designed on mobile devices to help a maintenance team in diagnosing drive train problems, has been demonstrated. By implementing an acoustic emission technology, the operating conditions of wind turbines have been assessed by trending techniques and ultrasonic acoustic emission converted into audible sound. The new approach has been developed and tested and compared to other monitoring techniques. Acoustic emission has generally been shown to provide a number of advantages over vibration and shock pulse methods because the system is operating in a substantially higher frequency range (100 kHz) and therefore it is more immune to operation of surrounding machines and components. Quick attenuation of ultrasonic propagation waves in the drive-train structure helps to pin-point the origin of any fault as the signals are sharper and more pronounced. Further, with the intensity measurements a direction of the source of ultrasonic energy can be identified. Using a high frequency thus makes the method suitable for measuring local effects and to determine local defects since the disturbing signals from other parts are damped. Recently developed programmable sensors capable of processing signals onboard, producing quality outputs with extremely low noise-to-signal ratio, have been used. It is discussed how the new approach can lower the cost of a wind-turbine monitoring system, while at the same time making it simple and more reliable, see Appendix A. The method has been tested on rotating parts of wind-turbines, including traditionally difficult areas such as low speed main bearings and planetary gearboxes. The method developed in the project was designed to see physical processes such as friction, impacts and metal removal, occurring when machinery degrades, can be detected and notified with the developed notification system. Apart from reporting the status and displaying the changes of the pre-defined parameters or symptoms, the system has

  2. ACOUSTIC EMISSIONS AT THE INSTANT DESTRUCTION OF THE CUTTING TOOL

    Філоненко, С.; Національний авіаційний університет; Косицка, Т.; Національний авіаційний університет; Німченко, Т.; Національний авіаційний університет

    2013-01-01

    The outcomes of simulation of acoustic emission resulting signal are reviewed, which one is reshaped at ma­chine work of cutting material, with allowance of instantaneous composite material destruction. Is shown, that at instantaneous destruction of composite material on an acoustic emission resulting signal there is appearance of let of amplitude. Influencing the area of instantaneous destruction of composite material on value of acoustic emission resulting signal of let of amplitude is dete...

  3. Acoustic Emission Signal Processing Technique to Characterize Reactor In-Pile Phenomena

    Vivek Agarwal; Magdy Samy Tawfik; James A Smith

    2014-07-01

    Existing and developing advanced sensor technologies and instrumentation will allow non-intrusive in-pile measurement of temperature, extension, and fission gases when coupled with advanced signal processing algorithms. The transmitted measured sensor signals from inside to the outside of containment structure are corrupted by noise and are attenuated, thereby reducing the signal strength and signal-to-noise ratio. Identification and extraction of actual signal (representative of an in-pile phenomenon) is a challenging and complicated process. In this paper, empirical mode decomposition technique is proposed to reconstruct actual sensor signal by partially combining intrinsic mode functions. Reconstructed signal corresponds to phenomena and/or failure modes occurring inside the reactor. In addition, it allows accurate non-intrusive monitoring and trending of in-pile phenomena.

  4. Acoustic emission signal processing technique to characterize reactor in-pile phenomena

    Agarwal, Vivek, E-mail: vivek.agarwal@inl.gov [Department of Human Factors, Controls, and Statistics, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Tawfik, Magdy S., E-mail: magdy.tawfik@inl.gov [Nuclear Science and Technology Directorate, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Smith, James A., E-mail: james.smith@inl.gov [Department of Fuel Performance and Design, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Existing and developing advanced sensor technologies and instrumentation will allow non-intrusive in-pile measurement of temperature, extension, and fission gases when coupled with advanced signal processing algorithms. The transmitted measured sensor signals from inside to the outside of containment structure are corrupted by noise and are attenuated, thereby reducing the signal strength and the signal-to-noise ratio. Identification and extraction of actual signal (representative of an in-pile phenomenon) is a challenging and complicated process. In the paper, empirical mode decomposition technique is utilized to reconstruct actual sensor signal by partially combining intrinsic mode functions. Reconstructed signal will correspond to phenomena and/or failure modes occurring inside the reactor. In addition, it allows accurate non-intrusive monitoring and trending of in-pile phenomena.

  5. Classification of acoustic emission signal for fatigue crack opening and closure by principal component analysis

    This study was performed to present the analyzing method for fatigue crack opening and closure for three kinds of aluminum alloy by principal component analysis (PCA). Fatigue cycle loading test was conducted on a MTS closed loop hydraulic loading machine in order to acquire AE signals which come from different source mechanism such as crack opening and closure, rubbing, fretting etc.. To extract the significant feature from AE signal, correlation analysis was performed. Over 94% of the variance of AE parameters could be accounted for in the first two principal components. The results of the PCA on AE parameters showed that the first principal component was associated with the size of AE signals and the second principal component was associated with shape of AE signals. An artificial neural network (ANN) analysis was successfully used to identify AE signals to six classes. The ANN classifier based on PCA might be a promising tool to analyze AE signals for fatigue crack opening and closure.

  6. Acoustic emission testing

    Grosse, Christian U

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) techniques have been studied in civil engineering for a long time. The techniques are recently going to be more and more applied to practical applications and to be standardized in the codes. This is because the increase of aging structures and disastrous damages due to recent earthquakes urgently demand for maintenance and retrofit of civil structures in service for example. It results in the need for the development of advanced and effective inspection techniques. Thus, AE techniques draw a great attention to diagnostic applications and in material testing. The book covers all levels from the description of AE basics for AE beginners (level of a student) to sophisticated AE algorithms and applications to real large-scale structures as well as the observation of the cracking process in laboratory specimen to study fracture processes.

  7. Neural Network Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signals for Drill Wear Monitoring

    The objective of the proposed study is to produce a tool-condition monitoring (TCM) strategy that will lead to a more efficient and economical drilling tool usage. Drill-wear monitoring is an important attribute in the automatic cutting processes as it can help preventing damages of the tools and workpieces and optimizing the tool usage. This study presents the architectures of a multi-layer feed-forward neural network with back-propagation training algorithm for the monitoring of drill wear. The input features to the neural networks were extracted from the AE signals using the wavelet transform analysis. Training and testing were performed under a moderate range of cutting conditions in the dry drilling of steel plates. The results indicated that the extracted input features from AE signals to the supervised neural networks were effective for drill wear monitoring and the output of the neural networks could be utilized for the tool life management planning.

  8. A study of the characteristics of the acoustic emission signals for condition monitoring of check valves in nuclear power plants

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate that a condition-monitoring system based on acoustic emission (AE) detection can provide timely detection of check valve degradation and service aging so that maintenance or replacement can be preformed prior to the loss of safety function. This research is focused on the investigation and understanding of the capability of the acoustic emission technique to provide diagnostic information on check valve failures. AE testing for a check valve under controlled flow loop conditions was performed to detect and valve degradation such as wear and leakage due to foreign object interference. It is clearly demonstrated that the distinction of different types of failure were successful by systematically analyzing the characteristics of various AE parameters

  9. A study of the characteristics of the acoustic emission signals for condition monitoring of check valves in nuclear power plants

    Lee, Joon-Hyun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, San 30 Jangjeon-dong, Kumjeong-gu, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: johlee@pusan.ac.kr; Lee, Min-Rae [Department of Mechanical Design Engineering, Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Teak [Man-Machine Interface System Team, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Luk, Vincent [Sandia National Laboratories, Risk and Reliability Analysis Department, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jung, Yoong-Ho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, San 30 Jangjeon-dong, Kumjeong-gu, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-15

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate that a condition-monitoring system based on acoustic emission (AE) detection can provide timely detection of check valve degradation and service aging so that maintenance or replacement can be preformed prior to the loss of safety function. This research is focused on the investigation and understanding of the capability of the acoustic emission technique to provide diagnostic information on check valve failures. AE testing for a check valve under controlled flow loop conditions was performed to detect and valve degradation such as wear and leakage due to foreign object interference. It is clearly demonstrated that the distinction of different types of failure were successful by systematically analyzing the characteristics of various AE parameters.

  10. Correlation of Acoustic Emission Signals with Kinetics of Fatigue Crack Growth in the Shock Absorber of Aircraft Landing Gear

    Šanjavskis, A; Urbahs, A; Banov, M; Doroško, S; Hodoss, N

    2009-01-01

    In this article it is analyzed possibility of correlation between acoustic emission (AE) parameters and characteristics of fatigue crack development beginning from moment of crack initiation before didruption. A shock absorber cylinder of aircraft landing gear leg was used as object of investigation. In process of testing the fatigue crack was grew during action of periodic loading which imitates full flight cycle including take-off and landing and running at the ground. This testing was fini...

  11. Acoustic emission pickup essentially for waveguide

    Lambda wave length acoustic emission pickup comprising two juxtaposed piezoelectric capsules of equal lambda/2 thickness and with opposite polarization, separated by an electrically insulating foil, the two opposite sides of the capsules being earthed. The electric signal resulting from the acoustic emission is picked up on the two sides facing both sides of the insulating foil and the assembly of the two piezoelectric capsules is mounted on a base insulating it from the structure on which the acoustic emission is being listened to. Application of this pickup to the surveillance of defects in the steel vessels of nuclear reactors, characterized in that it is placed at the end of a metal ultrasonic wave guide the other end of which is welded directly to the vessel

  12. Acoustically-Induced Electrical Signals

    Brown, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have observed electrical signals excited by and moving along with an acoustic pulse propagating in a sandstone sample. Using resonance we are now studying the characteristics of this acousto-electric signal and determining its origin and the controlling physical parameters. Four rock samples with a range of porosities, permeabilities, and mineralogies were chosen: Berea, Boise, and Colton sandstones and Austin Chalk. Pore water salinity was varied from deionized water to sea water. Ag-AgCl electrodes were attached to the sample and were interfaced to a 4-wire electrical resistivity system. Under computer control, the acoustic signals were excited and the electrical response was recorded. We see strong acoustically-induced electrical signals in all samples, with the magnitude of the effect for each rock getting stronger as we move from the 1st to the 3rd harmonics in resonance. Given a particular fluid salinity, each rock has its own distinct sensitivity in the induced electrical effect. For example at the 2nd harmonic, Berea Sandstone produces the largest electrical signal per acoustic power input even though Austin Chalk and Boise Sandstone tend to resonate with much larger amplitudes at the same harmonic. Two effects are potentially responsible for this acoustically-induced electrical response: one the co-seismic seismo-electric effect and the other a strain-induced resistivity change known as the acousto-electric effect. We have designed experimental tests to separate these mechanisms. The tests show that the seismo-electric effect is dominant in our studies. We note that these experiments are in a fluid viscosity dominated seismo-electric regime, leading to a simple interpretation of the signals where the electric potential developed is proportional to the local acceleration of the rock. Toward a test of this theory we have measured the local time-varying acoustic strain in our samples using a laser vibrometer.

  13. Intelligent location of simultaneously active acoustic emission sources: Part II

    Kosel, T

    2007-01-01

    Part I describes an intelligent acoustic emission locator, while Part II discusses blind source separation, time delay estimation and location of two continuous acoustic emission sources. Acoustic emission (AE) analysis is used for characterization and location of developing defects in materials. AE sources often generate a mixture of various statistically independent signals. A difficult problem of AE analysis is separation and characterization of signal components when the signals from various sources and the mode of mixing are unknown. Recently, blind source separation (BSS) by independent component analysis (ICA) has been used to solve these problems. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the applicability of ICA to locate two independent simultaneously active acoustic emission sources on an aluminum band specimen. The method is promising for non-destructive testing of aircraft frame structures by acoustic emission analysis.

  14. Effects of signal attenuation in natural media on interpretation of acoustic emissions in the context early warning systems

    Faillettaz, Jerome; Or, Dani

    2015-04-01

    Gravity driven instabilities in natural media such as rockfalls, landslides, snow avalanches or glacier break-offs represent a significant class of natural hazards. Reliable prediction of imminence of such events combined with timely evacuation remain a challenge because material failure is a non linear process involving inherent heterogeneities affecting the outcome. Nevertheless, such materials break gradually with the weakest parts breaking first, producing precursory "micro-cracks" and associated elastic waves traveling in the material. The monitoring of such acoustic/micro-seismic activity offers valuable information on the progression of damage and imminence of global failure. The main challenge is that acoustic waves are strongly attenuated during their travel through natural media thereby introducing ambiguity in the interpretation of the magnitude (severity) or leading to loss of detection for faraway events. For example, a micro-crack event would be measured as a large event if occurring close to the sensor, and as a small event if far from the sensor ( or may not be detected at all). A more complete picture of acoustic emissions or micro- seismic activity requires deployment of a dense network of sensors that enables localization of sources and thus the determination of initial energy released with each event. However, such networks are prohibitively costly difficult to analyze in real time over scales of interest. Is it possible to find a way to analyze directly in real time the measured micro-seismic activity to infer the slope mechanical status? Following a qualitative description of the observation problem and the processes leading to attenuation, a quantitative analysis is performed using a numerical model based on the classical Fiber Bundle Model. Introducing a basic attenuation law in such simple models enables to directly compare un-attenuated and attenuated acoustic activity (and also avalanche size-frequency distribution) at any location

  15. Acoustic Emission Health Monitoring of Steel Bridges

    Pahlavan, Pooria Lotfollah; Paulissen, Joep; Pijpers, Richard; Hakkesteegt, Henk; Jansen, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive developments in the field of Acoustic Emission (AE) for monitoring fatigue cracks in steel structures, the implementation of AE systems for large-scale bridges is hindered by limitations associated with instrumentation costs and signal processing complexities. This paper sheds light on some of the most important challenges in the utilization of AE systems for steel bridge decks. These challenges are mainly related to the multi-modal character of guided waves, and the expensi...

  16. Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics

    Havelock, David; Vorländer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics presents signal processing as it is practiced in the field of acoustics. The Handbook is organized by areas of acoustics, with recognized leaders coordinating the self-contained chapters of each section. It brings together a wide range of perspectives from over 100 authors to reveal the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Success in acoustic applications often requires juggling both the acoustic and the signal processing parameters of the problem. This handbook brings the key issues from both into perspective and is complementary to other reference material on the two subjects. It is a unique resource for experts and practitioners alike to find new ideas and techniques within the diversity of signal processing in acoustics.

  17. Regularities of Acoustic Emission in the Freight Car Solebar Materials

    Bekher, S.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic emission results which were obtained during tests of the samples, which were made from foundry solebars with the developing fatigue crack, are presented. The dependences of the acoustic emission event count, the force critical value during the stationary acoustic emission process, and the growth rate of the event count from the cycles number are determined. The amplitude signal distributions relating to the crack growth were received. It is offered to use the force critical value and the amplitude threshold in the rejection criteria.

  18. Evaluation of Adhesive Bonding Quality by Acoustic Emission

    Prediction of fatigue life and monitoring of fracture process for adhesively bonded CFRP composites joint have been investigated by analysis of acoustic emission signals during the fatigue and tension tests. During fatigue test, generated acoustic emission is related to stored elastic strain energy. By results of monitoring of AE event rate, fatigue process could be divided into two regions, and boundaries of two regions, fatigue cycles of the initiation of fast crack growth, were 70-80% of fatigue life even though the fatigue life were highly scattered from specimen to specimen. The result shows the possibility of predicting catastrophic failure by acoustic emission monitoring

  19. Holographic and acoustic emission evaluation of pressure vessels

    Optical holographic interfereometry and acoustic emission monitoring were simultaneously used to evaluate two small, high pressure vessels during pressurization. The techniques provide pressure vessel designers with both quantitative information such as displacement/strain measurements and qualitative information such as flaw detection. The data from the holographic interferograms were analyzed for strain profiles. The acoustic emission signals were monitored for crack growth and vessel quality

  20. Acoustic emission location on aluminum alloy structure by using FBG sensors and PSO method

    Lu, Shizeng; Jiang, Mingshun; Sui, Qingmei; Dong, Huijun; Sai, Yaozhang; Jia, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission location is important for finding the structural crack and ensuring the structural safety. In this paper, an acoustic emission location method by using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm were investigated. Four FBG sensors were used to form a sensing network to detect the acoustic emission signals. According to the signals, the quadrilateral array location equations were established. By analyzing the acoustic emission signal propagation characteristics, the solution of location equations was converted to an optimization problem. Thus, acoustic emission location can be achieved by using an improved PSO algorithm, which was realized by using the information fusion of multiple standards PSO, to solve the optimization problem. Finally, acoustic emission location system was established and verified on an aluminum alloy plate. The experimental results showed that the average location error was 0.010 m. This paper provided a reliable method for aluminum alloy structural acoustic emission location.

  1. Condition Monitoring and Management from Acoustic Emissions

    Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik Bohl

    2005-01-01

    In the following, I will use technical terms without explanation as it gives the freedom to describe the project in a shorter form for those who already know. The thesis is about condition monitoring of large diesel engines from acoustic emission signals. The experiments have been focused on a...... this work is the analysis of the angular position changes of the engine related events such as fuel injection and valve openings, caused by operational load changes. With inspiration from speech recognition and voice effects the angular timing changes have been inverted with the event alignment...

  2. Analysis of acoustic emission signals of fatigue crack growth and corrosion processes. Investigation of the possibilities for continuous condition monitoring of transport containers by acoustic emission testing; Analyse der Schallemissionssignale aus Ermuedungsrisswachstum und Korrosionsprozessen. Untersuchung der Moeglichkeiten fuer die kontinuierliche Zustandsueberwachung von Transportbehaeltern mittels Schallemissionspruefung

    Wachsmuth, Janne

    2016-05-01

    Fatigue crack growth and active corrosion processes are the main causes of structural failures of transport products like road tankers, railway tank cars and ships. To prevent those failures, preventive, time-based maintenance is performed. However, preventive inspections are costly and include the risk of not detecting a defect, which could lead to a failure within the next service period. An alternative is the idea of continuous monitoring of the whole structure by means of acoustic emission testing (AT). With AT, defects within the material shall be detected and repaired directly after their appearance. Acoustic emission testing is an online non-destructive testing method. Acoustic emission (AE) arises from changes within the material and is transported by elastic waves through the material. If the AE event generates enough energy, the elastic wave propagates to the boundaries of the component, produces a displacement in the picometre scale and can be detected by a piezoelectric sensor. The sensor produces an electrical signal. From this AE signal, AE features such as the maximum amplitude or the frequency can be extracted. Methods of signal analysis are used to investigate the time and frequency dependency of signal groups. The purpose of the signal analysis is to connect the AE signal with the originating AE source. If predefined damage mechanisms are identified, referencing the damage condition of the structure is possible. Acoustic emission from events of the actual crack propagation process can for example lead to the crack growth rate or the stress intensity factor, both specific values from fracture mechanics. A new development in the domain of acoustic emission testing is the pattern recognition of AE signals. Specific features are extracted from the AE signals to assign them to their damage mechanisms. In this thesis the AE signals from the damage mechanisms corrosion and fatigue crack growth are compared and analysed. The damage mechanisms were

  3. Acoustic emission leak monitoring system LMS-96

    On-line acoustic emission leak monitoring under industrial conditions of nuclear power plants is a problem with specific features setting specific demands on the leak monitoring system. The paper briefly reviews those problems (attenuation pattern of a real structure, acoustic background, alarm system, etc.) and the solution of some of them is discussed. Information is presented on the Acoustic Emission Leak Monitoring System LMS-96 by SKODA NUCLEAR MACHINERY and the system's function is briefly described. (author)

  4. Acoustic emission in uranium under thermal stimulus

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was carried out during heating and cooling of uranium through alpha-to-beta phase transformation temperature. Intense AE activity was observed during heating as well as cooling of uranium in the alpha phase. During alpha ↔ beta phase transformation also, distinct AE activity was observed. The mechanisms of acoustic emission from uranium during thermal stimulus are explained. (author)

  5. ACOUSTIC EMISSION DURING STRETCHING OF POLYMERS

    QIAN Renyuan; WANG Tiangui; SHEN Jingshu

    1983-01-01

    Acoustic emission has been studied for a wide range of polymers including amorphous glasses,semi-crystalline polymers, copolymers, polymer blends and a crosslinked rubber during the course of uni-axial stretching at room temperature. For non-crystalline polymers acoustic emission occurred in rather small number of events accompanied by crazing and micro-crack formation. Strong acoustic activity appeared during yielding and necking of crystalline polymers. Rather small number or none of acoustic bursts occurred during the initial stage of neck drawing but numerous strong bursts appeared when drawing proceeded approaching specimen break. Specimens of the same polymer but of different fabrication history may be reflected in their acoustic emission behavior. Acoustic emission during stretching crosslinked polybutadiene rubber was very weak but observable when the force-elongation curve started to deviate from the linear region. No Kaiser effect was observed for the rubber. Very strong and numerous acoustic emission was observed during stretching specimens of polymer blends.High impact resistant polymer modifications showed no sharp increase of acoustic activity before specimen break. So long as the polymer and conditions of specimen fabrication are the same quite reproducible acoustic emission behavior could be observed.

  6. In situ calibration of acoustic emission sensors

    Kober, Jan; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    Brno: University of Technology, Brno, 2015 - (Mazal, P.), s. 93-97 ISBN 978-80-214-5262-6. [International Workshop NDT in Progress /8./. Praha (CZ), 12.10.2015-14.10.2015] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : standardisation * Acoustic Emission (AE) * time reversal * calibration * requency response Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  7. Acoustic emission strand burning technique for motor burning rate prediction

    Christensen, W. N.

    1978-01-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) method is being used to measure the burning rate of solid propellant strands. This method has a precision of 0.5% and excellent burning rate correlation with both subscale and large rocket motors. The AE procedure burns the sample under water and measures the burning rate from the acoustic output. The acoustic signal provides a continuous readout during testing, which allows complete data analysis rather than the start-stop clockwires used by the conventional method. The AE method helps eliminate such problems as inhibiting the sample, pressure increase and temperature rise, during testing.

  8. Time Reversal Processing in Acoustic Emission Monitoring

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Krofta, Josef; Farová, Zuzana; Chlada, Milan; Dos Santos, S.

    Singapore, 2013. s. 65-65. [International Congress on ULTRASONICS. 02.05.2013-05.05.2013, Singapore] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : time reveresal * acoustic emission * deconvolution * source identification Subject RIV: JS - Reliability ; Quality Management, Testing

  9. Studies on the primary statistics and signal analysis of the acoustic emission during the propagation of cracks in fracture mechanical samples

    As is demonstrated by the experimental results, the method of acoustic emission testing is well suited to obtain information on the statistical-microscopic material behaviour of fracture mechanically loaded materials before and during the propagation of cracks. So this method closes the gap between the on-line determination of macroscopic parameters (stress, volume enlargement, etc) and the microscopic observations which can only be performed after the material test. Based on different models, the fundamental processes of acoustic emission are presented to determine their influence on the experimental measurements. In addition models are presented for stable and unstable crack propagation. The most essential result of this work is a demonstration of a hitherto unknown interrelation between amplitude and time statistics. (orig./RW)

  10. Fracture of fiber-reinforced composites analyzed via acoustic emission.

    Ereifej, Nadia S; Oweis, Yara G; Altarawneh, Sandra K

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the fracture resistance of composite resins using a three-point bending test and acoustic emission (AE) analysis. Three groups of specimens (n=15) were prepared: non-reinforced BelleGlass HP composite (NRC), unidirectional (UFRC) and multidirectional (MFRC) fiber-reinforced groups which respectively incorporated unidirectional Stick and multidirectional StickNet fibers. Specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine while an AE system was used to detect audible signals. Initial fracture strengths and AE amplitudes were significantly lower than those at final fracture in all groups (pcomposite resin materials and the monitoring of acoustic signals revealed significant information regarding the fracture process. PMID:25904176

  11. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Cementitious Wasteforms

    A summary is presented of the potential of non-destructive acoustic emission (AE) method to be applied for structures immobilising nuclear wastes. The use and limitations of the method are discussed with given examples of experimental configurations and results obtained from AE monitoring and data analysis of two different processes addressing particular issues related to the nuclear waste immobilisation. These are (a) corrosion of aluminium, classified as intermediate level waste (ILW) in the UK, encapsulated in cementitious structures and (b) partial melting and solidification during cooling of granite at a pressure of 0.15 GPa which simulates the conditions in a deep borehole disposal of canisters of vitrified high level waste (HLW). Methodology for analysis of the collected data and characterisation of the potential AE sources is performed at different steps including simple signals count and more complex signal parameter-based approach and advanced signal processing. The AE method has been shown as a potential tool for monitoring and inspection of structures immobilising nuclear wastes in relation to the time progress of different interactions of the waste with the encapsulating matrix or the wasteform with the hosting environment for permanent disposal. (author)

  12. Signal Classification for Acoustic Neutrino Detection

    Neff, M; Enzenhöfer, A; Graf, K; Hößl, J; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Richardt, C

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on signal classification for deep-sea acoustic neutrino detection. In the deep sea, the background of transient signals is very diverse. Approaches like matched filtering are not sufficient to distinguish between neutrino-like signals and other transient signals with similar signature, which are forming the acoustic background for neutrino detection in the deep-sea environment. A classification system based on machine learning algorithms is analysed with the goal to find a robust and effective way to perform this task. For a well-trained model, a testing error on the level of one percent is achieved for strong classifiers like Random Forest and Boosting Trees using the extracted features of the signal as input and utilising dense clusters of sensors instead of single sensors.

  13. Research on the Acoustic Emission Signal Feature for the Inner Leakage of Valves%阀门内漏声发射检测信号特征研究

    刘治超; 张悠江

    2015-01-01

    阀门在天然气管道运输中具有重要的作用,阀门内漏会给天然气管道运输造成安全隐患。采集阀门内漏的声发射信号,采用改进的小波阈值去噪方法对采集的信号进行降噪处理,提高信号的信噪比,进而提取降噪后信号的频域峰值和峰值频率,探究阀门内漏的信号特征,为阀门内漏检测提供参考。%Valves have an important role in the transport of natural gas,and the safety operation of gas pipelines is threatened by valve inner leakage.The acoustic emission signals are collected,and the improved threshold de-noising algorithm is applied to signal analysis,in order to improve the signal-to-noise-ratio,and decrease the root-mean-square-error (RMSE)value.Then,the frequency domain peak and peak frequency of the de-noising signal are extracted to research the acoustic e-mission signal feature for the inner leakage of valve and lay the foundation for the valve leak de-tection.

  14. Crack detection in lap-joints using acoustic emission

    Experiments have been performed to assess the feasibility of crack growth detection in an aircraft lap-joint using acoustic emission (AE). Fatigue tests were conducted in both simple geometry specimens and lap-joint specimens. A high fidelity, wide band transient recording system was used to capture the acoustic emission due to defect growth. The simple specimens were used to determine crack growth signal characteristics, while the complex lap-joint provided a more realistic specimen. Representative waveforms from these two specimens are presented, along with a discussion of wave propagnation for the particular media. A self-organizing map was investigated as a means of automatically identify crack signals. Results and suggestions for future work are presented

  15. System for detecting acoustic emissions in multianvil experiments: Application to deep seismicity in the Earth

    One of the major goals in the experimental study of deep earthquakes is to identify slip instabilities at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) that might be responsible for the occurrence of earthquakes. Detecting acoustic emissions from a specimen during faulting provides unique constraints on the instability process. There are few experimental studies reporting acoustic emissions under HPHT conditions, due to technical challenges. And those studies have used only one or at most two acoustic sensors during the experiments. Such techniques preclude the accurate location of the acoustic emission source region and thus the ability to distinguish real signal from noise that may be coming from outside the sample. We have developed a system for detecting acoustic emissions at HPHT. Here we present a four-channel acoustic emission detecting system working in the HPHT octahedral multianvil apparatus. Each channel has high resolution (12 bits) and a sampling rate of 30 MHz. In experiments at the pressures up to 6 GPa and temperatures up to 770 deg. C, we have observed acoustic emissions under various conditions. Analyzing these signals, we are able to show that this system permits us to distinguish between signal and noise, locate the source of the acoustic emission, and obtain reliable data on the radiation pattern. This system has greatly improved our ability to study faulting instabilities under high pressure and high temperature

  16. Testing of welded clad pipelines using acoustic emission method

    Recording of signals of acoustic emission (AE) on structure loading enables not only to determine the location of defects, but also to evaluate conditions, which occur in materials in defect neighbourhood, that is to approach to evaluation of a dauger degree of one or another defect. Results of AE recording and analysis on loading of pipelines sections with welded joints on 22 K steel were considered. The behaviour of preliminarily grown fatigue cracks and natural defects of welding origin was compared

  17. Ice breakup: Observations of the acoustic signal

    Waddell, S. R.; Farmer, D. M.

    1988-03-01

    We describe observations of ambient sound beneath landfast ice in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and interpret its evolution over the period June-August in terms of ice cracking and disintegration. The data were recorded on six bands between 50 and 14,500 Hz for the period April 2 to August 7, 1986, in Dolphin and Union Strait. The frequency dependence of the attenuation of sound in water allows separation of distant and local noise sources. In conjunction with satellite imagery and meteorological data, it is shown that strong signals in the acoustic time series are associated with major breakup events. The acoustic signal can provide predictive information about ice conditions and the approach of breakup.

  18. Detection and Classification of Whale Acoustic Signals

    Xian, Yin

    This dissertation focuses on two vital challenges in relation to whale acoustic signals: detection and classification. In detection, we evaluated the influence of the uncertain ocean environment on the spectrogram-based detector, and derived the likelihood ratio of the proposed Short Time Fourier Transform detector. Experimental results showed that the proposed detector outperforms detectors based on the spectrogram. The proposed detector is more sensitive to environmental changes because it includes phase information. In classification, our focus is on finding a robust and sparse representation of whale vocalizations. Because whale vocalizations can be modeled as polynomial phase signals, we can represent the whale calls by their polynomial phase coefficients. In this dissertation, we used the Weyl transform to capture chirp rate information, and used a two dimensional feature set to represent whale vocalizations globally. Experimental results showed that our Weyl feature set outperforms chirplet coefficients and MFCC (Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients) when applied to our collected data. Since whale vocalizations can be represented by polynomial phase coefficients, it is plausible that the signals lie on a manifold parameterized by these coefficients. We also studied the intrinsic structure of high dimensional whale data by exploiting its geometry. Experimental results showed that nonlinear mappings such as Laplacian Eigenmap and ISOMAP outperform linear mappings such as PCA and MDS, suggesting that the whale acoustic data is nonlinear. We also explored deep learning algorithms on whale acoustic data. We built each layer as convolutions with either a PCA filter bank (PCANet) or a DCT filter bank (DCTNet). With the DCT filter bank, each layer has different a time-frequency scale representation, and from this, one can extract different physical information. Experimental results showed that our PCANet and DCTNet achieve high classification rate on the whale

  19. Acoustic Emission in Brittle Solids

    Swindlehurst, W. E.; Wilshaw, T. R.

    1976-01-01

    A signal/source correlation study of the stress waves emitted during unstable microscopic Hertzian fracture in glass is described. A theoretical analysis of the variation in excess strain energy with applied load is made and the results compared with experimental data covering a wide range of cra...

  20. Multilevel Analysis of Continuous Acoustic Emission Records

    Chlada, Milan; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    Praha : ČVUT Praha Fakulta jaderná a fyzikálně inženýrská, 2013 - (Hobza, T.), s. 62-71 ISBN 978-80-01-05383-6. [SPMS 2013. Nebřich (CZ), 24.06.2013-29.06.2013] R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI3/755 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : continuous acoustic emission * wavelet analysis * countogram * helicopter gearbox diagnostics Subject RIV: JR - Other Machinery

  1. Employing Acoustic Emission for Monitoring Oil Film Regimes

    David Mba

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The major purpose of a gear lubricant is to provide adequate oil film thickness to reduce and prevent gear tooth surface failures. Real time monitoring for gear failures is important in order to predict and prevent unexpected failures which would have a negative impact on the efficiency, performance and safety of the gearbox. This paper presents experimental results on the influence of specific oil film thickness on Acoustic Emission (AE activity for operational helical gears. Variation in film thickness during operations was achieved by spraying liquid nitrogen onto the rotating gear wheel. The experimental results demonstrated a clear relationship between the root mean square (r.m.s value of the AE signal and the specific film thickness. The findings demonstrate the potential of Acoustic Emission technology to quantify lubrication regimes on operational gears.

  2. Analysis of acoustic emission data for bearings subject to unbalance

    Rapinder Sawhney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic Emission (AE is an effective nondestructive method for investigating the behavior of materials under stress. In recent decades, AE applications in structural health monitoring have been extended to other areas such as rotating machineries and cutting tools. This research investigates the application of acoustic emission data for unbalance analysis and detection in rotary systems. The AE parameter of interest in this study is a discrete variable that covers the significance of count, duration and amplitude of AE signals. A statistical model based on Zero-Inflated Poisson (ZIP regression is proposed to handle over-dispersion and excess zeros of the counting data. The ZIP model indicates that faulty bearings can generate more transient wave in the AE waveform. Control charts can easily detect the faulty bearing using the parameters of the ZIP model. Categorical data analysis based on generalized linear models (GLM is also presented. The results demonstrate the significance of the couple unbalance.

  3. Design of an Acoustic Probe to Measure Otoacoustic Emissions Below 0.5 kHz

    Christensen, Anders Tornvig; Ordoñez, Rodrigo; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    Our ability to hear is reflected in low-level acoustic signals emitted from the ear. These otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) can be measured with an acoustic probe assembly coupling one or more small loudspeakers and microphones into the sealed ear canal. The electroacoustic instrumentation of...

  4. Acoustic signals of baby black caimans.

    Vergne, Amélie L; Aubin, Thierry; Taylor, Peter; Mathevon, Nicolas

    2011-12-01

    In spite of the importance of crocodilian vocalizations for the understanding of the evolution of sound communication in Archosauria and due to the small number of experimental investigations, information concerning the vocal world of crocodilians is limited. By studying black caimans Melanosuchus niger in their natural habitat, here we supply the experimental evidence that juvenile crocodilians can use a graded sound system in order to elicit adapted behavioral responses from their mother and siblings. By analyzing the acoustic structure of calls emitted in two different situations ('undisturbed context', during which spontaneous calls of juvenile caimans were recorded without perturbing the group, and a simulated 'predator attack', during which calls were recorded while shaking juveniles) and by testing their biological relevance through playback experiments, we reveal the existence of two functionally different types of juvenile calls that produce a different response from the mother and other siblings. Young black caimans can thus modulate the structure of their vocalizations along an acoustic continuum as a function of the emission context. Playback experiments show that both mother and juveniles discriminate between these 'distress' and 'contact' calls. Acoustic communication is thus an important component mediating relationships within family groups in caimans as it is in birds, their archosaurian relatives. Although probably limited, the vocal repertoire of young crocodilians is capable of transmitting the information necessary for allowing siblings and mother to modulate their behavior. PMID:21978842

  5. Wavelet-based acoustic emission detection method with adaptive thresholding

    Menon, Sunil; Schoess, Jeffrey N.; Hamza, Rida; Busch, Darryl

    2000-06-01

    Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. One such technology, the use of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults, has been investigated by Honeywell Technology Center for its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS). This ambitious, 38-month, proof-of-concept effort, which was a part of the Naval Surface Warfare Center Air Vehicle Diagnostics System program, culminated in a successful three-week flight test of the RAMS system at Patuxent River Flight Test Center in September 1997. The flight test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. This paper presents the results of stress wave data analysis of the flight-test dataset using wavelet-based techniques to assess background operational noise vs. machinery failure detection results.

  6. Acoustic Emission Analysis Applet (AEAA) Software

    Nichols, Charles T.; Roth, Don J.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research and NASA White Sands Test Facility have developed software supporting an automated pressure vessel structural health monitoring (SHM) system based on acoustic emissions (AE). The software, referred to as the Acoustic Emission Analysis Applet (AEAA), provides analysts with a tool that can interrogate data collected on Digital Wave Corp. and Physical Acoustics Corp. software using a wide spectrum of powerful filters and charts. This software can be made to work with any data once the data format is known. The applet will compute basic AE statistics, and statistics as a function of time and pressure (see figure). AEAA provides value added beyond the analysis provided by the respective vendors' analysis software. The software can handle data sets of unlimited size. A wide variety of government and commercial applications could benefit from this technology, notably requalification and usage tests for compressed gas and hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Future enhancements will add features similar to a "check engine" light on a vehicle. Once installed, the system will ultimately be used to alert International Space Station crewmembers to critical structural instabilities, but will have little impact to missions otherwise. Diagnostic information could then be transmitted to experienced technicians on the ground in a timely manner to determine whether pressure vessels have been impacted, are structurally unsound, or can be safely used to complete the mission.

  7. Application of Mellin Transform in Wideband Underwater Acoustic Signal Processing

    2007-01-01

    According to the features of the wideband underwater acoustic signals, an algorithm for the wideband ambiguity function is put forward based on Mellin transform. The wideband acoustic signal processing using the fast Mellin transform is also explored. The theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the algorithm has not only high computation efficiency but also good concentration in wideband ambiguity domain. It suits for the wideband underwater acoustic signal processing.

  8. Measuring Acoustic Wave Transit Time in Furnace Based on Active Acoustic Source Signal

    Zhen Luo; Feng Tian; Xiao-Ping Sun

    2007-01-01

    Accurate measurement of transit time for acoustic wave between two sensors installed on two sides of a furnace is a key to implementing the temperature field measurement technique based on acoustical method. A new method for measuring transit time of acoustic wave based on active acoustic source signal is proposed in this paper, which includes the followings: the time when the acoustic source signal arrives at the two sensors is measured first; then, the difference of two arriving time arguments is computed, thereby we get the transit time of the acoustic wave between two sensors installed on the two sides of the furnace. Avoiding the restriction on acoustic source signal and background noise, the new method can get the transit time of acoustic wave with higher precision and stronger ability of resisting noise interference.

  9. Low-Frequency Acoustic Signals Propagation in Buried Pipelines

    Ovchinnikov, A. L.; Lapshin, B. M.

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the issues concerning acoustic signals propagation in the large-diameter oil pipelines caused by mechanical action on the pipe body. Various mechanisms of signals attenuation are discussed. It is shown that the calculation of the attenuation caused only by internal energy loss, i.e, the presence of viscosity, thermal conductivity and liquid pipeline wall friction lead to low results. The results of experimental studies, carried out using the existing pipeline with a diameter of 1200 mm. are shown. It is experimentally proved that the main mechanism of signal attenuation is the energy emission into the environment. The numerical values of attenuation coefficients that are 0,14- 0.18 dB/m for the pipeline of 1200 mm in diameter, in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 500 Hz, are determined.

  10. Acoustic emission during the compaction of brittle UO2 particles

    One of the options considered for recycling minor actinides is to incorporate about 10% to UO2 matrix. The presence of open pores interconnected within this fuel should allow the evacuation of helium and fission gases to prevent swelling of the pellet and ultimately its interaction with the fuel clad surrounding it. Implementation of minor actinides requires working in shielded cell, reducing their retention and outlawing additions of organic products. The use of fragmentable particles of several hundred micrometers seems a good solution to control the microstructure of the green compacts and thus control the open porosity after sintering. The goal of this study is to monitor the compaction of brittle UO2 particles by acoustic emission and to link the particle characteristics to the open porosity obtained after the compact sintering. The signals acquired during tensile strength tests on individual granules and compacts show that the acoustic emission allows the detection of the mechanism of fragmentation and enables identification of a characteristic waveform of this fragmentation. The influences of compaction stress, of the initial particle size distribution and of the internal cohesion of the granules, on the mechanical strength of the compact and on the microstructure and open porosity of the sintered pellets, are analyzed. By its ability to identify the range of fragmentation of the granules during compaction, acoustic emission appears as a promising technique for monitoring the compaction of brittle particles in the manufacture of a controlled porosity fuel. (author)

  11. Spatial acoustic signal processing for immersive communication

    Atkins, Joshua

    Computing is rapidly becoming ubiquitous as users expect devices that can augment and interact naturally with the world around them. In these systems it is necessary to have an acoustic front-end that is able to capture and reproduce natural human communication. Whether the end point is a speech recognizer or another human listener, the reduction of noise, reverberation, and acoustic echoes are all necessary and complex challenges. The focus of this dissertation is to provide a general method for approaching these problems using spherical microphone and loudspeaker arrays.. In this work, a theory of capturing and reproducing three-dimensional acoustic fields is introduced from a signal processing perspective. In particular, the decomposition of the spatial part of the acoustic field into an orthogonal basis of spherical harmonics provides not only a general framework for analysis, but also many processing advantages. The spatial sampling error limits the upper frequency range with which a sound field can be accurately captured or reproduced. In broadband arrays, the cost and complexity of using multiple transducers is an issue. This work provides a flexible optimization method for determining the location of array elements to minimize the spatial aliasing error. The low frequency array processing ability is also limited by the SNR, mismatch, and placement error of transducers. To address this, a robust processing method is introduced and used to design a reproduction system for rendering over arbitrary loudspeaker arrays or binaurally over headphones. In addition to the beamforming problem, the multichannel acoustic echo cancellation (MCAEC) issue is also addressed. A MCAEC must adaptively estimate and track the constantly changing loudspeaker-room-microphone response to remove the sound field presented over the loudspeakers from that captured by the microphones. In the multichannel case, the system is overdetermined and many adaptive schemes fail to converge to

  12. Acoustic emission classification for failure prediction due to mechanical fatigue

    Emamian, Vahid; Kaveh, Mostafa; Tewfik, Ahmed H.

    2000-06-01

    Acoustic Emission signals (AE), generated by the formation and growth of micro-cracks in metal components, have the potential for use in mechanical fault detection in monitoring complex- shaped components in machinery including helicopters and aircraft. A major challenge for an AE-based fault detection algorithm is to distinguish crack-related AE signals from other interfering transient signals, such as fretting-related AE signals and electromagnetic transients. Although under a controlled laboratory environment we have fewer interference sources, there are other undesired sources which have to be considered. In this paper, we present some methods, which make their decision based on the features extracted from time-delay and joint time-frequency components by means of a Self- Organizing Map (SOM) neural network using experimental data collected in a laboratory by colleagues at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

  13. Smart acoustic emission system for wireless monitoring of concrete structures

    Yoon, Dong-Jin; Kim, Young-Gil; Kim, Chi-Yeop; Seo, Dae-Cheol

    2008-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) has emerged as a powerful nondestructive tool to detect preexisting defects or to characterize failure mechanisms. Recently, this technique or this kind of principle, that is an in-situ monitoring of inside damages of materials or structures, becomes increasingly popular for monitoring the integrity of large structures. Concrete is one of the most widely used materials for constructing civil structures. In the nondestructive evaluation point of view, a lot of AE signals are generated in concrete structures under loading whether the crack development is active or not. Also, it was required to find a symptom of damage propagation before catastrophic failure through a continuous monitoring. Therefore we have done a practical study in this work to fabricate compact wireless AE sensor and to develop diagnosis system. First, this study aims to identify the differences of AE event patterns caused by both real damage sources and the other normal sources. Secondly, it was focused to develop acoustic emission diagnosis system for assessing the deterioration of concrete structures such as a bridge, dame, building slab, tunnel etc. Thirdly, the wireless acoustic emission system was developed for the application of monitoring concrete structures. From the previous laboratory study such as AE event patterns analysis under various loading conditions, we confirmed that AE analysis provided a promising approach for estimating the condition of damage and distress in concrete structures. In this work, the algorithm for determining the damage status of concrete structures was developed and typical criteria for decision making was also suggested. For the future application of wireless monitoring, a low energy consumable, compact, and robust wireless acoustic emission sensor module was developed and applied to the concrete beam for performance test. Finally, based on the self-developed diagnosis algorithm and compact wireless AE sensor, new AE system for practical

  14. Determining peak stress history using acoustic emissions

    As part of the test program at the Nevada Test Site, there is a need for determining the peak stress induced by explosions in tuff. Standard techniques make use of various gages grouted into the tuff prior to the test. These are difficulties in interpreting the output of these gages and there is always the chance that the gage will not survive long enough to allow a stress determination to be made. As an alternative, we have been testing a passive technique for determining peak stress as a function of distance from a test. Using core samples retrieved from the vicinity of an explosion, we have tested for the existence of a threshold stress for the onset of acoustic emissions, the Kaiser effect (Kaiser 1950). From laboratory results it is known that for many rock types, the previously applied peak stress can be detected by restressing a sample while monitoring acoustic emissions. An abrupt onset for acoustic emission activity typically occurs at a stress state close to the previous peak. The point of this work was to determine if the Kaiser effect occurred in tuff and, if so, whether it could be used to determine the peak stresses induced by an explosion. On the basis of four tests it is only possible to draw tentative conclusions. There does seem to be enough evidence of the existence and stress dependence of the Kaiser effect in the tuff to allow hope for the use of this technique in studying past stress states. In future tests the saturation state of the samples should be carefully controlled. Tests should be done on variously oriented subcores from a main core to determine the other components of the in situ stress tensor. If the components are indeed decoupled, as these few tests indicate, then a complete stress determination can be made this way. It would be interesting to use the same technique to try and determine in situ stresses in tuff. 7 refs., 6 figs

  15. Acoustic emission: The first half century

    Drouillard, T.F.

    1994-08-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) is approaching the half century mark, having had its beginning in 1950 with the work of Joseph Kaiser. During the 1950s and 1960s researchers delved into the fundamentals of acoustic emission, developed instrumentation specifically for AE, and characterized the AE behavior of many materials. AE was starting to be recognized for its unique capabilities as an NDT method for monitoring dynamic processes. In the decade of the 1970s research activities became more coordinated and directed with the formation of the working groups, and its use as an NDT method continued to increase for industrial applications. In the 1980s the computer became a basic component for both instrumentation and data analysis, and today it has sparked a resurgence of opportunities for research and development. Today we are seeing a transition to waveform-based AE analysis and a shift in AE activities with more emphasis on applications than on research. From the beginning, we have been fortunate to have had so many dedicated savants with different fields of expertise contribute in a collective way to bring AE to a mature, fully developed technology and leave a legacy of knowledge recorded in its literature. AE literature has been a key indicator of the amount of activity, the proportion of research to application, the emphasis on what was of current interest, and the direction AE has taken. The following is a brief survey of the history of acoustic emission with emphasis on development of the infrastructure over the past half century.

  16. Acoustic emission: The first half century

    Drouillard, Thomas F.

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) is approaching the half century mark, having had its beginning in 1950 with the work of Joseph Kaiser. During the 1950s and 1960s researchers delved into the fundamentals of acoustic emission, developed instrumentation specifically for AE, and characterized the AE behavior of many materials. AE was starting to be recognized for its unique capabilities as an NDT method for monitoring dynamic processes. In the decade of the 1970s research activities became more coordinated and directed with the formation of the working groups, and its use as an NDT method continued to increase for industrial applications. In the 1980s the computer became a basic component for both instrumentation and data analysis, and today it has sparked a resurgence of opportunities for research and development. Today we are seeing a transition to waveform-based AE analysis and a shift in AE activities with more emphasis on applications than on research. From the beginning, we have been fortunate to have had so many dedicated savants with different fields of expertise contribute in a collective way to bring AE to a mature, fully developed technology and leave a legacy of knowledge recorded in its literature. AE literature has been a key indicator of the amount of activity, the proportion of research to application, the emphasis on what was of current interest, and the direction AE has taken. The following is a brief survey of the history of acoustic emission with emphasis on development of the infrastructure over the past half century.

  17. Acoustic Emissions (AE) Electrical Systems' Health Monitoring Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Acoustic Emissions (AE) are associated with physical events, such as thermal activity, dielectric breakdown, discharge inception, as well as crack nucleation and...

  18. Corrosion Acoustic Emission Signal Recognition Based on Relevance Vector Machine Model%基于相关向量机模型的腐蚀声发射信号识别

    马佳良; 于洋

    2014-01-01

    The classification performance of the RVM model and its associated kernel function parameter are closely related. This paper applies artificial bee colony algorithm (ABC), particle swarm optimization (PSO) and genetic algorithm (GA) to find the optimal parameter of the RVM model, and the performance of these methods was compared. Based on the binary tree structure and one-against-all method, the binary-classification RVM model is extended to establish a four-classification model. The tank bottom corrosion acoustic emission signals were recognized using the established model. The characteristics parameters of the acoustic emission signal and the frequency-domain parameters were selected as the input parameters of the model, and a good recognition was obtained.%相关向量机(RVM)模型的分类性能与其核函数参数的选择有密切关系。本文分别利用人工蜂群算法(ABC)、粒子群算法(PSO)和遗传算法(GA)寻找相关向量机模型的最优参数,对几种方法的寻优性能进行了对比。采用基于二叉树结构的一对多扩展方法,对二分类相关向量机模型进行了扩展,建立了四分类模型。基于该分类模型对罐底腐蚀声发射信号进行识别,将声发射特征参数和频域参数作为模型的输入参数,获得了较好的识别结果。

  19. Monitoring of Robot Assisted Polishing through parameters of acoustic emission

    Lazarev, Ruslan; Top, Søren; Bilberg, Arne

    duration of each process stage and predict the end of process in a precise and unmanned way. This paper presents and analyses the utilization of acoustic emission for generation of control signals in the stone polishing process for achieving these control objectives in an industrial set-up prototype....... determination of the point in time to change a polishing media or stop the process is needed for computer controlled functional surface generation. During the last years, several research works have been done in order to build grinding/polishing monitoring systems to determine process characteristics, the...

  20. Acoustic signal detection of manatee calls

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Phillips, Richard; Meyer, Michael; Beusse, Diedrich O.

    2003-04-01

    The West Indian manatee (trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of a growing number of collisions with boats. A system to warn boaters of the presence of manatees, that can signal to boaters that manatees are present in the immediate vicinity, could potentially reduce these boat collisions. In order to identify the presence of manatees, acoustic methods are employed. Within this paper, three different detection algorithms are used to detect the calls of the West Indian manatee. The detection systems are tested in the laboratory using simulated manatee vocalizations from an audio compact disc. The detection method that provides the best overall performance is able to correctly identify ~=96% of the manatee vocalizations. However the system also results in a false positive rate of ~=16%. The results of this work may ultimately lead to the development of a manatee warning system that can warn boaters of the presence of manatees.

  1. Acoustic emission monitoring of composite containment systems

    This paper considers two different types of composite containment system, and two different types of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring approach. The first system is a composite reinforced pressure vessel (CRPV) which is monitored both during construction and in-service using a broadband modal acoustic emission (MAE) technique. The second system is a membrane cargo containment system which is monitored using both a global as well as a local AE technique. For the CRPV, the damage assessment is concerned mainly with the integrity of the composite outer layer at the construction stage, and possible fatigue cracking of the inner steel liner at the in-service stage. For the membrane tank, the damage assessment is concerned with locating and quantifying any abnormal porosities that might develop in-service. By comparing and contrasting the different types of structural system and different monitoring approaches inferences are drawn as to what role AE monitoring could take in the damage assessment of other types of composite containment system. (Detailed technical data have not been included, due to client confidentiality constraints.)

  2. Acoustic emission assessment of interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings

    Yang, Li; Zhong, Zhi-Chun; Zhou, Yi-Chun; Zhu, Wang; Zhang, Zhi-Biao; Cai, Can-Ying; Lu, Chun-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation methods were applied to monitor interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings under compression. The interface failure process can be identified via its AE features, including buckling, delamination incubation and spallation. According to the Fourier transformation of AE signals, there are four different failure modes: surface vertical cracks, opening and sliding interface cracks, and substrate deformation. The characteristic frequency of AE signals from surface vertical cracks is 0.21 MHz, whilst that of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. The energy released of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. Based on the energy released from cracking and the AE signals, a relationship is established between the interface crack length and AE parameters, which is in good agreement with experimental results.

  3. Acoustic emission during hydrogen absorption and desorption in palladium

    Acoustic emission technique has been used to study charging and discharging of hydrogen in palladium. During charging, breaking of oxide film due to surface activation and saturation of hydrogen absorption have been identified by acoustic emission. In the discharging cycle, the desorption of hydrogen from the specimen leads to high AE activity immediately after initiation of discharging, followed by gradual decrease in the acoustic activity, which reaches a minimum upon completion of the desorption. The potential of the acoustic emission technique for studying the kinetics of hydrogen absorption and desorption in metals has been shown. (author)

  4. Localization of acoustic emission sources in geometrically sparse structures

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Chlada, Milan

    Berlín : Deutsche Gesellschaft für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfung e.V, 2014. ISBN 978-3-940283-63-4. [Conference of the European Working Group on Acoustic Emission : EWGAE 2014 /31./. Drážďany (DE), 03.09.2014-05.09.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : civil structures * structures health monitoring ( SHM) * acoustic emission * source location Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  5. Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing

    This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results

  6. Characteristics Analysis of HFM Signal over Underwater Acoustic Channels

    YUAN Fei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For pulse compression characteristics and not easily affected by noise, linear frequency modulation signal are widely used in underwater acoustic communication. This paper analyzes the characteristics of hyperbolic frequency modulation signal over underwater acoustic channels. Compared with linear frequency modulation signal, hyperbolic frequency modulation has the same performance of strong anti-noise and anti-multipath, what’s more, hyperbolic frequency modulation signal is better resist the influence of doppler. And discussed the influence of doppler on signal, simulation results show that the hyperbolic frequency modulation signal detection rate is better than linear frequency modulation signal in the doppler environment.

  7. Acoustic Emission from Breaking a Bamboo Chopstick

    Tsai, Sun-Ting; Wang, Li-Min; Huang, Panpan; Yang, Zhengning; Chang, Chin-De; Hong, Tzay-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic emission from breaking a bamboo chopstick or a bundle of spaghetti is found to exhibit similar behavior as the famous seismic laws of Gutenberg and Richter, Omori, and Båth. By the use of a force-sensing detector, we establish a positive correlation between the statistics of sound intensity and the magnitude of a tremor. We also manage to derive these laws analytically without invoking the concept of a phase transition, self-organized criticality, or fractal. Our model is deterministic and relies on the existence of a structured cross section, either fibrous or layered. This success at explaining the power-law behavior supports the proposal that geometry is sometimes more important than mechanics.

  8. Characteristic evaluation of acoustic emission sensors

    Jung, Hyun Kyu; Joo, Y. S.; Lee, N. H

    2000-12-01

    This report introduces the various kinds of Acoustic Emission(AE) sensors as well as the basic principle of AE sensors in order to select AE sensor suitably. The described sensors include : high sensitivity sensor, broadband sensor, underwater sensor, miniature sensor, directional sensor, integral pre-amplifier sensor. Sensor has two critical aspects of reliability and repeatability. For the high reliability, sensor has to be calibrated in accordance with ASTM standard E 1106 which explains to measure the characteristics of AE sensor accurately. For investigating the degradation of AE sensor under the severe environment for example the high radiation condition, It is important to perform the repeatability test which is described in detail in according to the ASTM standard E 976. Two kinds of AE sensor applications are also summarized.

  9. Characteristic evaluation of acoustic emission sensors

    This report introduces the various kinds of Acoustic Emission(AE) sensors as well as the basic principle of AE sensors in order to select AE sensor suitably. The described sensors include : high sensitivity sensor, broadband sensor, underwater sensor, miniature sensor, directional sensor, integral pre-amplifier sensor. Sensor has two critical aspects of reliability and repeatability. For the high reliability, sensor has to be calibrated in accordance with ASTM standard E 1106 which explains to measure the characteristics of AE sensor accurately. For investigating the degradation of AE sensor under the severe environment for example the high radiation condition, It is important to perform the repeatability test which is described in detail in according to the ASTM standard E 976. Two kinds of AE sensor applications are also summarized

  10. Acoustic emission from irradiated nuclear graphite

    Burchell, T. D.; Rose, A. P. G.; McEnaney, B.

    1986-08-01

    Measurements of acoustic emission (AE) from a range of four unirradiated nuclear graphites during three-point bend tests are reported. Results are in agreement with the trends found in earlier work using different AE apparatus. The technique is applied to the testing of small beam specimens cut from irradiated Civil Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (CAGR) graphite fuel sleeves after discharge from the reactor. The AE information is explained by considering separately the known changes in graphite microstructure that occur in the reactor due to radiolytic oxidation and fast neutron irradiation. Coarsening of the material due to radiolytic oxidation increases the total number of AE events and the proportion of events of low amplitude. Fast neutron irradiation increases the fracture stress and makes the stress-strain curve more linear. As a consequence, the number of AE events is reduced along with the proportion of events of low amplitude.

  11. Acoustic emissions correlated with hydration of Saguaro Cactus

    Wardell, L. J.; Rowe, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    For some years it has been demonstrated that hardwood trees produce acoustic emissions during periods of drought, which arise from cavitation in the xylem as water is withdrawn. These emissions not only provide insights into the fluid transport behavior within these trees, but also the degree to which cavitation can proceed before inevitable tree mortality. Such studies can have significant impact on our understanding of forest die-off in the face of climate change. Plant mortality is not limited to woody trees, however, and it is not only the coniferous and deciduous forests whose response to climate and rainfall changes are important. In the desert Southwest we observe changes to survival rates of numerous species of flora. One of the most conspicuous of these plants is the iconic Saguaro Cactus (Carnegiea gigantean). These behemoths of the Sonoran Desert are very sensitive to small perturbations in their environment. Specifically, during the summer monsoon season when the cacti become well-hydrated, they can absorb hundreds of gallons of water within a very short time frame. We have obtained a juvenile saguaro on which we are conducting experiments to monitor acoustic emissions during hydration and dessication cycles. We will report on our observations obtained using piezoelectric ceramic accelerometers whose signals are digitized up to 44 Khz and recorded during hydration.

  12. Acoustic Emission Behavior during Damage Development of Reinforced Concrete Beam

    As a preliminary study for applying the acoustic emission(AE) technique to assess the integrity of concrete structures, AE behavior of a reinforced concrete beam under cyclic loads of various loading stage was examined by laboratory experiments. By analyzing failure behavior of a reinforced concrete beam in the AE point of view, it was presumed that major sources of AE signals in concrete were micro-crack initiation, development of flexural and diagonal tension crack, and the friction between track surfaces. In addition, cyclic loading tests and failure test were carried out to obtain the AE responses under various loading conditions. The analysis of the signal patterns was aimed at discussing the differences between the normal signal and the abnormal signal, which represent the safe condition and the condition of developing damage, respectively. In this study, especially, the behavior of friction signals from crack surfaces, which were usually treated as noises, was considered as a typical pattern of the normal signal. As a result, significant differences between the normal and abnormal signal patterns were observed in the such parameters as the AE hit rate, magnitude of the primary or secondary AE peak, and AE response according to the sensor location. Based on the preliminary results, this new approach for practical AE application may provide a promising method for estimating the level of damage and distress in concrete structures

  13. Neural Fuzzy Techniques In Vehicle Acoustic Signal Classification

    Sampan, Somkiat

    1998-01-01

    Vehicle acoustic signals have long been considered as unwanted traffic noise. In this research acoustic signals generated by each vehicle will be used to detect its presence and classify its type. Circular arrays of microphones were designed and built to detect desired signals and suppress unwanted ones. Circular arrays with multiple rings have an interesting and important property that is constant sidelobe levels. A modified genetic algorithm that can work directly with real numbers is u...

  14. Signal processing and field measurements for underwater acoustic communications

    Zhang, Guosong

    2013-01-01

    The present dissertation presents new developments in the signal processing of receiver structures for high-rate underwater acoustic communications, and describes the field measurements that test the structures in real oceanic environments. The signalling methods of spectrally efficient spread spectrum are also investigated to achieve long range underwater acoustic communications. The digital signal processing is of significance in recovering distorted information, and compensating waveform d...

  15. An introduction to acoustic emission technology for in-process inspection of welds

    Weld quality monitoring, as it stands today, is primarily done by X-ray radiography and ultrasonic testing which is applied after welding is complete. Acoustic Emission Technique (AET) also presents a possible substitute for weld quality monitoring which can be used during welding. Acoustic signals are generated during welding and the sound waves of weld defects are picked up by using AE sensors. With the introduction of sophisticated instrumentation in AET, it is possible to carry out the test even in noisy shop floor environments. Large number of reports on the subject of acoustic emission in recent years is a clear indication that it is gaining importance in welding industry. The present day status of the acoustic emission technology as an on-line weld quality monitoring technique has been reviewed. This report discusses the technique and system along with the acoustic emission parameters important for weld quality analysis. This also deals with the application of this technique in different welding processes like TIG, resistance, electro slag and submerged arc. It has been reported that monitoring of emission during welding can detect crack formation, crack growth and lack of fusion precisely. Static defects like porosity and inclusion do not generate very strong acoustic signals and are therefore difficult to intercept, but, however, lately they have detected successfully. (author)

  16. Fundamental developments in acoustic emission measurements: The NBS program

    Recent NBS progress in the development of standards and improved measurement methods for quantitative acoustic emission measurements are reviewed. Results on generalizing the NBS AE transducer calibration service and on its relation to other methods are presented. Recent improvements in the design of a new piezoelectric AE transducer are presented. The new transducer measures normal surface displacement nearly as faithfully as the NBS standard capacitive transducer but with much greater sensitivity. It holds promise for use as a secondary calibration device and for application relying on causal signal processing. AE system calibration is also briefly discussed. Recent results on the determination of AE sources from remote measurement are mentioned. An indentation method for generating AE has been used to produce repeatable signals in temper and hydrogen embrittled A533B steel. A multichannel AE system for characterizing AE events in A533B steel and multichannel operation has been tested with a Nd-YAG laser thermoelastic source

  17. Signal recovery technique based on a physical method of underwater acoustics

    Guo, Xinyi; Wu, Guoqing; Ma, Li

    2010-09-01

    In the underwater sound channel we often use an array to receive signals from distant sources. The received signals are often mixed with environmental interference. In the complex acoustic environment, received signals are distorted greatly and elongated in time. In many practical applications such as sound communications, sound remote sensing and active sonar signals, we hope to obtain the original signal's waveform. In general theory, the received signals are the convolution of emission signals and Green's function of environment. In unknown Green's function of environment, simply relying on the array to record the information to determine the sound source signal wave propagation features and the environment is not enough. However, in certain circumstances, based on a physics method of underwater acoustics, the spread of recovery technology is successful.

  18. Acoustic emission measurements of PWR weld material with inserted defects using advanced instrumentation

    Twenty-one steel tensile specimens containing realistic welding defects have been monitored for acoustic emission during loading to failure. A new design of broad frequency bandwidth point contact transducer was used and the resulting signal captured using a high speed transient recording system. The data was analysed using the techniques of statistical pattern recognition to separate different types of signals. The results show that it is possible to separate true acoustic emission from background noise and to distinguish between certain types of defect. (author)

  19. Application of acoustic emission in pressure vessel testing

    Materials of the CrMoV and the NiCrMoV types were tested for integrity using an acoustic emission method developed by SKODA Trust. The materials are used for the production of reactor pressure vessels. The acoustic emission method is employed for determining the beginning of crack formation and crack proliferation. The objective of the tests was to obtain information necessary for evaluating acoustic emission sources in actual components. The use is discussed of a 24-channel system by Trodyne (USA) for testing the integrity of WWER type pressure vessels manufactured by SKODA. (B.S.)

  20. Materials for Damping Ambient Acoustic and Vibration Signals Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-term exposure to even relatively low levels of acoustic and vibration signals has been shown to be potentially harmful to humans. A new class of piezoelectric...

  1. Acoustic emission technique based rubbing identification for Rotor-bearing systems

    2001-01-01

    Rubbing is the frequent and dangerous fault in the rotating machine, and efficient identi-fication of the rubbing is a hot research subject in the field of fault diagnosis. In this paper, a newrubbing identification method is proposed, which is based on the acoustic emission technique. Inthis method, the acoustic emission signal of the rubbing in the multi-support rotor-bearing systemis acquired by the acoustic emission sensor, and then the continuous wavelet transform is utilizedto analyze this signal. Based on the rubbing mechanism, the frequency feature of the multiple fre-quency relation in the instantaneous frequency wave is extracted as the rubbing identification fea-ture. The experimental results prove that the proposed method is efficient and feasible.

  2. Development of a MEMS acoustic emission sensor system

    Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Wu, Wei; Wright, Amelia P.

    2007-04-01

    and the second mode frequency, strongly approximating the desirable rigid plate limit. The effect is modeled analytically and is verified experimentally by measurement of the resonance frequencies in the new transducers. Another improvement arises from the use of a pin grid array ceramic package, in which the MEMS chip is acoustically coupled to the structure with only two interfaces, through a ceramic medium that is negligible in thickness when compared to wavelengths of interest. Like other acoustic emission sensors, those on the 2006 MEMS chip are sensitive only to displacements normal to the surface on which the device is mounted. To overcome that long-standing limitation, a new MEMS sensor sensitive to in-plane motion has been designed, featuring a different spring-mass mechanism and creating the signal by the change in capacitance between stationary and moving fingers. Predicted damping is much lower for the case of the in-plane sensor, and squeeze-film damping is used selectively to isolate the desired in-plane mechanical response from any unwanted out-of-plane response. The new spring-mass mechanism satisfies the design rules for the PolyMUMPS fabrication (foundry) process. A 3-D MEMS sensor system is presently being fabricated, collocating two in-plane sensors and one out-of-plane sensor at the mm scale, which is very short compared to the acoustic wavelength of interest for stress waves created by acoustic emission events.

  3. Acoustic emission generated during scratch test of various thin films

    Boháč, Petr; Tomáštík, J.; Čtvrtlík, R.; Dráb, M.; Koula, V.; Cvrk, K.; Jastrabík, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2014), s. 16635. ISSN 1435-4934 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA03010743 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : acoustic emission * scratch test * thin films * AE data analysis * mechanical toughness Subject RIV: BI - Acoustic s

  4. Nonlinear ultrasonic spectroscopy and acoustic emission in SHM of aircrafts

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Chlada, Milan; Krofta, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, SI (2012), s. 36-40. ISSN 1213-3825 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/274 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : NDT * structural health monitoring * acoustic emission * nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy * time reversal mirrors Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  5. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Prestressed Concrete Structures

    Corrosion is a substantial problem in numerous structures and in particular corrosion is very serious in reinforced and prestressed concrete and must, in certain applications, be given special consideration because failure may result in loss of life and high financial cost. Furthermore corrosion cannot only be considered a long term problem with many studies reporting failure of bridges and concrete pipes due to corrosion within a short period after they were constructed. The concrete pipes which transport water are examples of structures that have suffered from corrosion; for example, the pipes of The Great Man-Made River Project of Libya. Five pipe failures due to corrosion have occurred since their installation. The main reason for the damage is corrosion of prestressed wires in the pipes due to the attack of chloride ions from the surrounding soil. Detection of the corrosion in initial stages has been very important to avoid other failures and the interruption of water flow. Even though most non-destructive methods which are used in the project are able to detect wire breaks, they cannot detect the presence of corrosion. Hence in areas where no excavation has been completed, areas of serious damage can go undetected. Therefore, the major problem which faces engineers is to find the best way to detect the corrosion and prevent the pipes from deteriorating. This paper reports on the use of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique to detect the early stages of corrosion prior to deterioration of concrete structures.

  6. Characterization of martensitic transformations using acoustic emission

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a highly sensitive technique which can reveal changes in materials not detectable by other means. The goal of this project was to obtain basic information on the AE response to martensitic transformation in steel. This information will enable the use of AE for improved quality assurance testing of rough-cut component blanks and semifinished parts. The AE response was measured as a function of temperature in four steels undergoing martensitic transformation, and the AE response was compared with martensitic start temperature M/sub s/ and finish temperature M/sub f/ obtained by other methods. As measured by AE activity, M/sub s/ occurred as much as 260C higher than previously reported using less sensitive measurement techniques. It was also found that 10 to 30% of an alloy of Fe-0.2% C-27% Ni transformed to martensite during one AE burst. These results show that AE can be used to study transformations both inside and outside the classical M/sub s/-M/sub f/ ranges. The findings will help to achieve the goal of using AE for quality assurance testing, and will add to the knowledge of the basic materials science of martensitic transformations

  7. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Prestressed Concrete Structures

    Elfergani, H. A.; Pullin, R.; Holford, K. M.

    2011-07-01

    Corrosion is a substantial problem in numerous structures and in particular corrosion is very serious in reinforced and prestressed concrete and must, in certain applications, be given special consideration because failure may result in loss of life and high financial cost. Furthermore corrosion cannot only be considered a long term problem with many studies reporting failure of bridges and concrete pipes due to corrosion within a short period after they were constructed. The concrete pipes which transport water are examples of structures that have suffered from corrosion; for example, the pipes of The Great Man-Made River Project of Libya. Five pipe failures due to corrosion have occurred since their installation. The main reason for the damage is corrosion of prestressed wires in the pipes due to the attack of chloride ions from the surrounding soil. Detection of the corrosion in initial stages has been very important to avoid other failures and the interruption of water flow. Even though most non-destructive methods which are used in the project are able to detect wire breaks, they cannot detect the presence of corrosion. Hence in areas where no excavation has been completed, areas of serious damage can go undetected. Therefore, the major problem which faces engineers is to find the best way to detect the corrosion and prevent the pipes from deteriorating. This paper reports on the use of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique to detect the early stages of corrosion prior to deterioration of concrete structures.

  8. Intelligent location of simultaneously active acoustic emission sources: Part I

    Kosel, T

    2007-01-01

    The intelligent acoustic emission locator is described in Part I, while Part II discusses blind source separation, time delay estimation and location of two simultaneously active continuous acoustic emission sources. The location of acoustic emission on complicated aircraft frame structures is a difficult problem of non-destructive testing. This article describes an intelligent acoustic emission source locator. The intelligent locator comprises a sensor antenna and a general regression neural network, which solves the location problem based on learning from examples. Locator performance was tested on different test specimens. Tests have shown that the accuracy of location depends on sound velocity and attenuation in the specimen, the dimensions of the tested area, and the properties of stored data. The location accuracy achieved by the intelligent locator is comparable to that obtained by the conventional triangulation method, while the applicability of the intelligent locator is more general since analysis o...

  9. Detection of acoustic signal emitted during corrosion of 304 stainless steel

    In this work, corrosion of 304 stainless steel was evaluated by using acoustic emission(AE) technique. AE measurement system was set for detecting acoustic signal during accelerated corrosion test of the specimen. AE signal started to be detected after the time of pitting corrosion initiation was evaluated by anodic polarization curve. Pitting corrosion damage was confirmed by optical microscopic observation of the surface morphology. AE cumulative counts and amplitude according to corrosion time could be divided into three stages. These trends were discussed in relation with changing pitting corrosion mechanism. Feasibilities of AE technique for evaluation of corrosion damage and mechanism were suggested.

  10. STUDY ON STABILITY OF UNDERGROUND STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING BY ACOUSTIC EMISSION MONITORING SYSTEM

    来兴平; 张冰川; 蔡美峰

    2000-01-01

    A simulation acoustic emission (AE) signal was processed. And an effective algorithm was presented to obtain the useful signal about the place information from the simulation signal. This paper introduces the artificial monitoring system, its application at underground roadway and its monitoring results, and tries to explore theoretically analyzing method of stability of underground concrete roadway by AE parameters. A simulation AE signal was processed. And an effective algorithm was presented to obtain the useful signal about the place information from the simulation signal It shows the nice future of the application in the active damage detection of composite material.

  11. Acoustic emission monitoring of recycled aggregate concrete under bending

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    The amount of construction and demolition waste has increased considerably over the last few years, making desirable the reuse of this waste in the concrete industry. In the present study concrete specimens are subjected at the age of 28 days to four-point bending with concurrent monitoring of their acoustic emission (AE) activity. Several concrete mixtures prepared using recycled aggregates at various percentages of the total coarse aggregate and also a reference mix using natural aggregates, were included to investigate their influence of the recycled aggregates on the load bearing capacity, as well as on the fracture mechanisms. The results reveal that for low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates on the flexural strength is negligible while higher levels of substitution lead into its deterioration. The total AE activity, as well as the AE signals emitted during failure, was related to flexural strength. The results obtained during test processing were found to be in agreement with visual observation.

  12. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: Stephen.Avery@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien [Ion Beam Applications SA, Louvain-la-Neuve 1348 (Belgium); Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A. [School of Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Sehgal, Chandra M. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  13. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring

  14. A wireless acoustic emission sensor remotely powered by light

    In this paper, wireless sensing of acoustic emission (AE) signals using a battery-free sensor node remotely powered by light is presented. The wireless sensor consists of a piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) for AE signal acquisition and a wireless transponder that performs signal conditioning, frequency conversion, and wireless transmission. For signal conditioning, a voltage follower that consumes less than 2 mW was introduced to buffer the high impedance of the PWAS from the low impedance of the wireless transponder. A photocell-based energy harvester with a stable voltage output was developed to power the voltage follower so that the wireless AE sensor can operate without an external power source. The principle of operation of the battery-free wireless AE sensor node and the sensor interrogation system is described, followed by a detailed description of the hardware implementation. The voltage follower and the wireless channel were characterized by ultrasound pitch–catch and pencil lead break experiments. (paper)

  15. Design of the Acoustic Signal Receiving Unit of Acoustic Telemetry While Drilling

    Li Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal receiving unit is one of the core units of the acoustic telemetry system. A new type of acoustic signal receiving unit is designed to solve problems of the existing devices. The unit is a short joint in whole. It not only can receive all the acoustic signals transmitted along the drill string, without losing any signal, but will not bring additional vibration and interference. In addition, the structure of the amplitude transformer is designed, which can amplify the signal amplitude and improve the receiving efficiency. The design of the wireless communication module makes the whole device can be used in normal drilling process when the drill string is rotating. So, it does not interfere with the normal drilling operation.

  16. Application of acoustic emission testing as a non-destructive quality control of conrete

    The time dependence of texture changes in concrete is studied in short-time pressure experiments, using the method of acoustic emission testing. These investigations have been performed as a function of strength and composition of the material under study. As a result, the method of acoustic emission testing is shown to be an adequate method to evaluate the evolution and the character of the structural changes. In the case where only the time developement is of interest, a simple electronic method, the pulse-sum-method or pulse rate method can be applied. However only a signal evaluation procedure can give information on the character of the structure changes. (orig./RW)

  17. Acoustic signal analysis of underwater elastic cylinder

    LI Xiukun; YANG Shi'e

    2001-01-01

    The echoes of underwater elastic cylinder comprise two types of acoustic components: Geometrical scattering waves and elastic scattering waves. The transfer function is appropriate to characterize the echo of targets. And the discrete wavelet transform of amplitude spectrum is presented and used to identify the resonant components of underwater targets.PACS numbers: 43.30, 43.60

  18. Detecting acoustic emission during cyclic crack growth in simulated BWR environment

    An attempt is made to detect and analyze acoustic emissions from cyclic crack growth in SA 533 grade B steel in the simulated BWR water environment. Significant levels of signals caused by the environment-enhanced crack growth were obtained through appropriate noise reduction techniques. By reducing the frictional noises between the loading pins and the specimen, as well as characterizing the spectrum of signals emitted from various sources, discrete signal identification was made possible. The following empirical relationship was obtained between the energy of emission and the crack growth rate: da/dN = C(dΣE sub(AE)/mm/dN)sup(n) where C and n are material constant and exponent respectively. The possibility of utilizing this type of acoustic emission technique was also discussed in relation to future continuous monitoring of operating nuclear plants. (author)

  19. Low Bandwidth Vocoding using EM Sensor and Acoustic Signal Processing

    Ng, L C; Holzrichter, J F; Larson, P E

    2001-10-25

    Low-power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference [1]. By combining these data with the corresponding acoustic signal, we've demonstrated an almost 10-fold bandwidth reduction in speech compression, compared to a standard 2.4 kbps LPC10 protocol used in the STU-III (Secure Terminal Unit, third generation) telephone. This paper describes a potential EM sensor/acoustic based vocoder implementation.

  20. Speaker verification using combined acoustic and EM sensor signal processing

    Ng, L C; Gable, T J; Holzrichter, J F

    2000-11-10

    Low Power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference. This greatly enhances the quality and quantity of information for many speech related applications. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J. Acoustic. SOC. Am . 103 ( 1) 622 (1998). By combining the Glottal-EM-Sensor (GEMS) with the Acoustic-signals, we've demonstrated an almost 10 fold reduction in error rates from a speaker verification system experiment under a moderate noisy environment (-10dB).

  1. Low Bandwidth Vocoding using EM Sensor and Acoustic Signal Processing

    Low-power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference [1]. By combining these data with the corresponding acoustic signal, we've demonstrated an almost 10-fold bandwidth reduction in speech compression, compared to a standard 2.4 kbps LPC10 protocol used in the STU-III (Secure Terminal Unit, third generation) telephone. This paper describes a potential EM sensor/acoustic based vocoder implementation

  2. A novel Communication Technique for Nanobots based on acoustic signals

    Loscri, Valeria; Natalizio, Enrico; Mannara, Valentina; Gianluca ALOI

    2012-01-01

    International audience In this work we present the simulation of a swarm of nanobots that behave in a distributed fashion and communicate through vibrations, permitting a decentralized control to treat endogenous diseases of the brain. Each nanobot is able to recognize a cancer cell, eliminate it and announces through a communication based on acoustic signals the presence of the cancer to the other nanobots. We assume that our nano-devices vibrate and these vibrations cause acoustic waves ...

  3. DETECTION OF DRUGSTORE BEETLES IN 9975 PACKAGES USING ACOUSTIC EMISSIONS

    Shull, D.

    2013-03-04

    This report documents the initial feasibility tests performed using a commercial acoustic emission instrument for the purpose of detecting beetles in Department of Energy 9975 shipping packages. The device selected for this testing was a commercial handheld instrument and probe developed for the detection of termites, weevils, beetles and other insect infestations in wooden structures, trees, plants and soil. The results of two rounds of testing are presented. The first tests were performed by the vendor using only the hand-held instrument’s indications and real-time operator analysis of the audio signal content. The second tests included hands-free positioning of the instrument probe and post-collection analysis of the recorded audio signal content including audio background comparisons. The test results indicate that the system is promising for detecting the presence of drugstore beetles, however, additional work would be needed to improve the ease of detection and to automate the signal processing to eliminate the need for human interpretation. Mechanisms for hands-free positioning of the probe and audio background discrimination are also necessary for reliable detection and to reduce potential operator dose in radiation environments.

  4. Use of Macro Fibre Composite Transducers as Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Mark Eaton

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The need for ever lighter and more efficient aerospace structures and components has led to continuous optimization pushing the limits of structural performance. In order to ensure continued safe operation during long term service it is desirable to develop a structural health monitoring (SHM system. Acoustic emission (AE offers great potential for real time global monitoring of aerospace structures, however currently available commercial sensors have limitations in size, weight and adaptability to complex structures. This work investigates the potential use of macro-fibre composite (MFC film transducers as AE sensors. Due to the inhomogeneous make-up of MFC transducers their directional dependency was examined and found to have limited effect on signal feature data. However, signal cross-correlations revealed a strong directional dependency. The sensitivity and signal attenuation with distance of MFC sensors were compared with those of commercially available sensors. Although noticeably less sensitive than the commercial sensors, the MFC sensors still had an acceptable operating range. Furthermore, a series of compressive carbon fiber coupon tests were monitored in parallel using both an MFC sensor and a commercially available sensor for comparison. The results showed good agreement of AE trends recorded by both sensors.

  5. Investigation of the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect by the acoustic emission

    B. Grzegorczyk

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this paper is to determine the relation existing between the behaviour of the signals of acoustic emissions generated in the course of plastic deformation at elevated temperature, and the shape of the work-hardening curves σ-ε and the Portevin - Le Chatelier effect. Design/methodology/approach: Single crystal was investigated applying the method of free compression at a constant strain rate and a temperature within the range from 20°C to 400°C at a strain rate of 10-5 sec-1 to 10-1 sec-1, simultaneously recording this phenomenon by means of acoustic emission. Findings: The analysis of the results of these investigations permitted to prove considerable relations between the work-hardening curve σ-ε displaying the PLC effect and the characteristics of the signals of the acoustic emission generated in the uniaxial compression. Practical implications: The AE method applied in the process of plastic deformation of single crystals of the alloy CuZn30 displays also a dependence of the activity of acoustic emissions on the stage of strain-hardening of the investigated alloy. Originality/value: In the range of the occurrence of the PLC effect during the compression test of the investigated single crystals the signal AE displays a cyclic character, distinctly correlated qualitatively with the oscillations of stresses on the curve σ-ε.

  6. Acoustic Emission from Arctic Steels and Fractographic Investigations

    Hartwig, Cathrine Gjerstad

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for better understanding of brittle fracture due to an increased interest in exploring the undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in the arctic region. There is also a need for development of steels with better low temperature fracture toughness, as steels are experiencing a drastic decrease in toughness in the HAZ after welding. This thesis uses acoustic emission in the investigation of the brittle initiation and propagation micromechanisms for a low carbon HSLA steel. Acoust...

  7. Emission Enhancement of Sound Emitters using an Acoustic Metamaterial Cavity

    Song, Kyungjun; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Kiwon; Hur, Shin; Kim, Jedo

    2014-01-01

    The emission enhancement of sound without electronic components has wide applications in a variety of remote systems, especially when highly miniaturized (smaller than wavelength) structures can be used. The recent advent of acoustic metamaterials has made it possible to realize this. In this study, we propose, design, and demonstrate a new class of acoustic cavity using a double-walled metamaterial structure operating at an extremely low frequency. Periodic zigzag elements which exhibit Fabr...

  8. ADVANCED ACOUSTIC EMISSION SOURCE LOCATION IN COMPLEX AIRCRAFT STRUCTURE

    Blaháček, Michal; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    Krakow: University of Technology Krakov, 2008 - (Kanji, O.), s. 172-177 ISBN 978-83-7242-478-5. [European Conference on Acoustic Emission Testing EWGAE /28./. Krakow (PL), 17.09.2008-19.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/07/1518 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : source location * aircraft structure * fuzzy Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  9. In situ high temperature oxidation analysis of Zircaloy-4 using acoustic emission coupled with thermogravimetry

    Highlights: • Thermogravimetry associated to acoustic emission (AE) improves knowledge on the corrosion of metals at high temperature. • Kinetic transition is detected under air oxidation tests at 900 °C of Zircaloy-4 by a change in the rate of mass gain and by the AE activity. • AE analysis is complementary to characterizations of post mortem oxidized samples. • AE allows us to distinguish the cracks which occur during the Zircaloy-4 oxidation from the cracks which arise during the cooling of the samples. - Abstract: Zircaloy-4 oxidation behavior at high temperature (900 °C), which can be reached in case of severe accidental situations in nuclear pressurised water reactor, was studied using acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry. Two different atmospheres were used to study the oxidation of Zircaloy-4: (a) helium and pure oxygen, (b) helium and oxygen combined with slight addition of air. The experiments with 20% of oxygen confirm the dependence on oxygen anions diffusion in the oxide scale. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion was observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen. The kinetic rate increased significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration was accompanied by an acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition (post-transition) or during the cooling of the sample. The characteristic features of the acoustic emission signals appear to be correlated with the different populations of cracks and their occurrence in the ZrO2 layer or in the α-Zr(O) layer. Acoustic events were recorded during the isothermal dwell time at high temperature under air. They were associated with large cracks in the zirconia porous layer. Acoustic events were also recorded during cooling after oxidation tests both under air or oxygen. For the latter, cracks were observed in the oxygen enriched zirconium metal phase and not in

  10. Potential of acoustic emissions from three point bending tests as rock failure precursors

    Agioutantis Z.; Kaklis K.; Mavrigiannakis S.; Verigakis M.; Vallianatos F.; Saltas V.

    2016-01-01

    Development of failure in brittle materials is associated with microcracks, which release energy in the form of elastic waves called acoustic emissions. This paper presents results from acoustic emission mea-surements obtained during three point bending tests on Nestos marble under laboratory conditions. Acoustic emission activity was monitored using piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors, and the potential for accurate prediction of rock damage based on acoustic emission data was investigated. Damage local-ization was determined based on acoustic emissions generated from the critically stressed region as scat-tered events at stresses below and close to the strength of the material.

  11. New methods for leaks detection and localisation using acoustic emission

    Real time monitoring of Pressurized Water nuclear Reactor secondary coolant system tends to integrate digital processing machines. In this context, the method of acoustic emission seems to exhibit good performances. Its principle is based on passive listening of noises emitted by local micro-displacements inside a material under stress which propagate as elastic waves. The lack of a priori knowledge on leak signals leads us to go deeper into understanding flow induced noise generation. Our studies are conducted using a simple leak model depending on the geometry and the king of flow inside the slit. Detection and localization problems are formulated according to the maximum likelihood principle. For detection, the methods using a indicator of similarity (correlation, higher order correlation) seems to give better results than classical ones (rms value, envelope, filter banks). For leaks location, a large panel of classical (generalized inter-correlation) and innovative (convolution, adaptative, higher order statistics) methods of time delay estimation are presented. The last part deals with the applications of higher order statistics. The analysis of higher order estimators of a non linear non Gaussian stochastic process family, the improvement of non linear prediction performances and the optimal-order choice problem are addressed in simple analytic cases. At last, possible applications to leak signals analysis are pointed out. (authors).264 refs., 7 annexes

  12. Characterisation of Damage in Composite Structures using Acoustic Emission

    Eaton, M; Featherston, C; Holford, K; Pullin, R [Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, Newport Road, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); May, M [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Kurzzeitdynamik, Ernst-Mach-Institut, Eckerstr. 4, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Hallet, S, E-mail: eatonm@cf.ac.uk, E-mail: michael.may@emi.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: featherstoncaf@cardiff.ac.uk, E-mail: holford@cardiff.ac.uk, E-mail: stephen.hallett@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: pullinr@cf.ac.uk [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Bristol, Queens Building, University Walk, Bristol, BS8 1TR (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-19

    Detection and characterisation of damage in composite structures during in-service loading is highly desirable. Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of composite components offers a highly sensitive method for detecting matrix cracking and delamination damage mechanisms in composites. AE relies on the detection of stress waves that are released during damage propagation and using an array of sensors, damage location may be determined. A methodology for damage characterisation based on measuring the amplitude ratio (MAR) of the two primary lamb wave modes; symmetric (in-plane) and asymmetric (out-of-plane) that propagate in plate like structures has been developed. This paper presents the findings of a series of tensile tests in composite coupons with large central ply blocks. The specimens were monitored using AE sensors throughout loading and once significant AE signals were observed the loading process was stopped. The specimens were removed and subjected to x-ray inspection to assess for any damage. The onset of damage was successfully detected using AE and was identified as being matrix cracking using the MAR methodology. The results were validated with x-ray inspection and a strong correlation was observed between the number of significant AE signals recorded and the number of identified matrix cracks.

  13. Current state of acoustic emission as an aid to the structural integrity assessment of nuclear power plants

    As an integral method permitting continuous monitoring and remote defect location, acoustic emission offers promising benefits for the nuclear industry. The potential applications relating to the integrity of the primary pressure boundary of nuclear reactors that are considered in this presentation are: detection of flaws during pre-service and requalification hydrotests and continuous monitoring for crack growth and leakage. The correlations between fracture mechanics and acoustic emission are discussed on the basis of certain fundamentals of material emission behaviour. The influence of instrumentation and wave propagation related aspects on the detectability and evaluation of acoustic emission signals is considered. A critical review is given of the application of acoustic emission to the assessment of reactor pressure vessel integrity, which demands a precise knowledge of the method's ability to distinguish different origins of acoustic emission, to detect and locate cracks and to evaluate the severity of cracks. World wide, at least 40 reactor pressure vessels and nuclear primary systems have been monitored by acoustic emission, either during acceptance pressure tests at the manufacturer's shop or during pre-service testing after installation in a plant. Together with the monitoring of requalification hydrotests after a certain period of operation, these applications of acoustic emission are currently receiving the most attention. The experience gained with continuous monitoring by acoustic emission is reported. The technique of leak detection by acoustic emission shows promising results, which permit the location and quantification of leaks. It is expected that practical experience and future research work will enhance the accuracy and detection sensitivity. (author)

  14. Phonon Emission from Acoustic Black Hole

    Fang, Hengzhong; Zhou, Kaihu; Song, Yuming

    2012-08-01

    We study the phonon tunneling through the horizon of an acoustic black hole by solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. We also make use of the closed-path integral to calculate the tunneling probability, and an improved way to determine the temporal contribution is used. Both the results from the two methods agree with Hawking's initial analysis.

  15. Contribution of in situ acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry to study zirconium alloy oxidation

    Zirconium alloy (zircaloy-4) corrosion behavior under oxidizing atmosphere at high temperature was studied using thermogravimetric experiment associated with acoustic emission analysis. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion is observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen which produces zirconium nitride. The kinetic rate increases significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration is accompanied by an acoustic emission (AE) activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition or during the cooling of the sample. Acoustic emission signals analysis allows us to distinguish different populations of cracks in the ZrO2 layer. These cracks have also been observed by SEM on post mortem cross section of oxidized samples and by in-situ microscopy observations on the top surface of the sample during oxidation. The numerous small convoluted thin cracks observed deeper in the zirconia scale are not detected by the AE technique. From these studies we can conclude that mechanisms as irreversible mechanisms, as cracks initiation and propagation, generate AE signals

  16. Time reverse modeling of acoustic emissions in a reinforced concrete beam.

    Kocur, Georg Karl; Saenger, Erik H; Grosse, Christian U; Vogel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The time reverse modeling (TRM) is applied for signal-based acoustic emission (AE) analysis of reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. TRM uses signals obtained from physical experiments as input. The signals are re-emitted numerically into a structure in a time-reversed manner, where the wavefronts interfere and appear as dominant concentrations of energy at the origin of the AE. The experimental and numerical results presented for selected AE signals confirm that TRM is capable of localizing AE activity in RC caused by concrete cracking. The accuracy of the TRM results is corroborated by three-dimensional crack distributions obtained from X-ray computed tomography images. PMID:26518525

  17. Acoustic Emission Defects Localized by Means of Geodetic Iterative Procedure - Algorithms, Tests, AE Experiment

    Kůs, V.; Záveský, M.; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    Granada : University of Granada, 2012 - (Gallego, A.; Ono, K.), s. 1-12 ISBN 978-84-615-9941-7. [Europen Conference on Acoustic Emission Testing/30./ & International Conference on Acoustic Emission/7./. Granada (ES), 12.09.2012-15.09.2012] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : acoustic emissio * geodesic * Newton -Raphson method * iterative source localization Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  18. Acoustic emission testing on an F/A-18 E/F titanium bulkhead

    Martin, Christopher A.; Van Way, Craig B.; Lockyer, Allen J.; Kudva, Jayanth N.; Ziola, Steve M.

    1995-04-01

    An important opportunity recently transpired at Northrop Grumman Corporation to instrument an F/A - 18 E/F titanium bulkhead with broad band acoustic emission sensors during a scheduled structural fatigue test. The overall intention of this effort was to investigate the potential for detecting crack propagation using acoustic transmission signals for a large structural component. Key areas of experimentation and experience included (1) acoustic noise characterization, (2) separation of crack signals from extraneous noise, (3) source location accuracy, and (4) methods of acoustic transducer attachment. Fatigue cracking was observed and monitored by strategically placed acoustic emission sensors. The outcome of the testing indicated that accurate source location still remains enigmatic for non-specialist engineering personnel especially at this level of structural complexity. However, contrary to preconceived expectations, crack events could be readily separated from extraneous noise. A further dividend from the investigation materialized in the form of close correspondence between frequency domain waveforms of the bulkhead test specimen tested and earlier work with thick plates.

  19. Proton beam characterization by proton-induced acoustic emission: simulation studies

    Due to their Bragg peak, proton beams are capable of delivering a targeted dose of radiation to a narrow volume, but range uncertainties currently limit their accuracy. One promising beam characterization technique, protoacoustic range verification, measures the acoustic emission generated by the proton beam. We simulated the pressure waves generated by proton radiation passing through water. We observed that the proton-induced acoustic signal consists of two peaks, labeled α and γ, with two originating sources. The α acoustic peak is generated by the pre-Bragg peak heated region whereas the source of the γ acoustic peak is the proton Bragg peak. The arrival time of the α and γ peaks at a transducer reveals the distance from the beam propagation axis and Bragg peak center, respectively. The maximum pressure is not observed directly above the Bragg peak due to interference of the acoustic signals. Range verification based on the arrival times is shown to be more effective than determining the Bragg peak position based on pressure amplitudes. The temporal width of the α and γ peaks are linearly proportional to the beam diameter and Bragg peak width, respectively. The temporal separation between compression and rarefaction peaks is proportional to the spill time width. The pressure wave expected from a spread out Bragg peak dose is characterized. The simulations also show that acoustic monitoring can verify the proton beam dose distribution and range by characterizing the Bragg peak position to within ∼1 mm. (paper)

  20. Ellipsoidal reflector for measuring oto-acoustic emissions

    Epp, Bastian; Pulkki, Ville; Heiskanen, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    A truncated prolate ellipsoidal reflector having the ear canal of a listener at one focal point and large- diaphragm low-noise microphone at the other focal point is proposed for free-field recordings of oto-acoustic emissions. A prototype reflector consisting of three pieces is presented, which...

  1. Decision-making for acoustic emission data set

    Acoustic emission techniques are widely applied in proof tests of pressure vessels. Correct interpretation of experimental data is of primary importance. The AE DATA EXPERT system performs this task in three procedures: source separation, source purification and source classification. Basic production rules are discussed. (author) 19 refs.; 16 figs.; 2 tabs

  2. Correlation of acoustic emission and dislocation damping in beryllium

    In a study of the acoustic emission generated in beryllium during tensile deformation, there is substantial evidence showing that the burst rate peak at yield is due to the generation of new dislocations and the burst rate peak at higher strains is due to the breakaway of dislocation line segments from deformation produce pins

  3. Monitoring the viscosity of diesel engine lubricating oil by using acoustic emission technique, the selection of measurement parameters

    Acoustic emission technique has been developed through years of monitoring and diagnosis of bearing, but it is still new in the diagnosis and monitoring of lubrication oil to bearings drive. The propagation of acoustic emission signal is generated when the signal piston on the cylinder liner lubricating oil which is a par. The signal is analyzed in time domain to obtain the parameters of root mean squared, amplitude, energy and courtesy. Lubricant viscosity will undergo changes due to temperature, pressure and useful. This study focuses on the appropriate parameters for the diagnosis and monitoring of lubricating oil viscosity. Studies were conducted at a constant rotational speed and temperature, but use a different age. The results showed that the energy parameter is the best parameter used in this monitoring. However, this parameter cannot be used directly and it should be analyzed using mathematical formulas. This mathematical formula is a relationship between acoustic emission energy with the viscosity of lubricating oil. (author)

  4. Acoustic emission during quench training of superconducting accelerator magnets

    Marchevsky, M.; Sabbi, G.; Bajas, H.; Gourlay, S.

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) sensing is a viable tool for superconducting magnet diagnostics. Using in-house developed cryogenic amplified piezoelectric sensors, we conducted AE studies during quench training of the US LARP's high-field quadrupole HQ02 and the LBNL's high-field dipole HD3. For both magnets, AE bursts were observed, with spike amplitude and frequency increasing toward the quench current during current up-ramps. In the HQ02, the AE onset upon current ramping is distinct and exhibits a clear memory of the previously-reached quench current (Kaiser effect). On the other hand, in the HD3 magnet the AE amplitude begins to increase well before the previously-reached quench current (felicity effect), suggesting an ongoing progressive mechanical motion in the coils. A clear difference in the AE signature exists between the untrained and trained mechanical states in HD3. Time intervals between the AE signals detected at the opposite ends of HD3 coils were processed using a combination of narrow-band pass filtering; threshold crossing and correlation algorithms, and the spatial distributions of AE sources and the mechanical energy release were calculated. Both distributions appear to be consistent with the quench location distribution. Energy statistics of the AE spikes exhibits a power-law scaling typical for the self-organized critical state.

  5. Damage Accumulation in Cyclically-Loaded Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    Aggelis, D. G.; Dassios, K. G.; Kordatos, E. Z.; Matikas, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    Barium osumilite (BMAS) ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE) sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism. PMID:24381524

  6. Application of Acoustic Emission Testing for the Assessment of Wind Turbine Blade

    Lee, Sang Il; Yun, Dong Jin; Hur, Yong Jin; Kim, Dong Jin [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to verify the applicability of acoustic emission (AE) to detect damage in wind turbine blade. Nondestructive behavior of a GFRP wind turbine blade (WTB) was evaluated using AE analysis under stepwise cyclic loading. AE hits of the blade were correspondence with strain change within 80% of the maximum load. From the analysis of AE signals, the low energy signals due to electrical/mechanical noise were well distinguished from the signals of the blade delamination with higher amplitude or energy. When the AE test is performed with full blade test, AE will play an important role as a major nondestructive technique to assess damages of the WTB.

  7. The Analysis of Efficiency of Acoustic Emission Diagnostic Method for the Determination of Defect Coordinates

    Urbahs, A; Valberga, A; Banov, M; Carjova, K; Stelpa, I

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) method is widely used as a non-destructive control tool of vehicle points and construction and also as a tool for technical condition monitoring. One of the most important AE diagnostic technological operations is the determination of AE source defect coordinates. Modern defect location techniques allow detecting coordinates of developing defects with high accuracy and reliability. There are several AE source detection methods, but the most popular one is a signal arriv...

  8. A New Fault Location Approach for Acoustic Emission Techniques in Wind Turbines

    Carlos Quiterio Gómez Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The renewable energy industry is undergoing continuous improvement and development worldwide, wind energy being one of the most relevant renewable energies. This industry requires high levels of reliability, availability, maintainability and safety (RAMS for wind turbines. The blades are critical components in wind turbines. The objective of this research work is focused on the fault detection and diagnosis (FDD of the wind turbine blades. The FDD approach is composed of a robust condition monitoring system (CMS and a novel signal processing method. CMS collects and analyses the data from different non-destructive tests based on acoustic emission. The acoustic emission signals are collected applying macro-fiber composite (MFC sensors to detect and locate cracks on the surface of the blades. Three MFC sensors are set in a section of a wind turbine blade. The acoustic emission signals are generated by breaking a pencil lead in the blade surface. This method is used to simulate the acoustic emission due to a breakdown of the composite fibers. The breakdown generates a set of mechanical waves that are collected by the MFC sensors. A graphical method is employed to obtain a system of non-linear equations that will be used for locating the emission source. This work demonstrates that a fiber breakage in the wind turbine blade can be detected and located by using only three low cost sensors. It allows the detection of potential failures at an early stages, and it can also reduce corrective maintenance tasks and downtimes and increase the RAMS of the wind turbine.

  9. Acoustic Signal based Traffic Density State Estimation using SVM

    Prashant Borkar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the information present in cumulative acoustic signal acquired from a roadside-installed single microphone, this paper considers the problem of vehicular traffic density state estimation. The occurrence and mixture weightings of traffic noise signals (Tyre, Engine, Air Turbulence, Exhaust, and Honks etc are determined by the prevalent traffic density conditions on the road segment. In this work, we extract the short-term spectral envelope features of the cumulative acoustic signals using MFCC (Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients. Support Vector Machines (SVM is used as classifier is used to model the traffic density state as Low (40 Km/h and above, Medium (20-40 Km/h, and Heavy (0-20 Km/h. For the developing geographies where the traffic is non-lane driven and chaotic, other techniques (magnetic loop detectors are inapplicable. SVM classifier with different kernels are used to classify the acoustic signal segments spanning duration of 20–40 s, which results in average classification accuracy of 96.67% for Quadratic kernel function and 98.33% for polynomial kernel function, when entire frames are considered for classification.

  10. The use of acoustic emission to detect stress relief cracking

    Stress rupture tests have been carried out on CrMoV steel specimens containing weld heat affected zone structures. An acoustic emission technique is described which has been used to detect cracking in these tests. Cavitational damage is associated with bursts of acoustic output and these results have been supported by fractograpic examination. The features of progressive cavitational damage are described for materials of different cracking susceptibility. It is implied that cavity formation can occur in the heat affected zone of CrMoV welds when heating to the stress relieving temperature. (orig.)

  11. In process acoustic emission in multirun submerged arc welding

    In order to avoid the formation of deep grooves when repairing defects in welded joints in heavy plates, an investigation was made aiming to detect and locate the defects by in-process acoustic emission in multirun submerged arc welding. Twelve defects (lack of penetration, cracks, inclusions, lack of fusion together with inclusions, blowholes) were intentionally introduced when the first plate was welded. A space-time method for processing the acoustic activity during welding allowed the detection and the location of the intentional defects as well as of the most important accidental defects evidenced by ultrasonic testing

  12. The sound emission board of the KM3NeT acoustic positioning system

    We describe the sound emission board proposed for installation in the acoustic positioning system of the future KM3NeT underwater neutrino telescope. The KM3NeT European consortium aims to build a multi-cubic kilometre underwater neutrino telescope in the deep Mediterranean Sea. In this kind of telescope the mechanical structures holding the optical sensors, which detect the Cherenkov radiation produced by muons emanating from neutrino interactions, are not completely rigid and can move up to dozens of meters in undersea currents. Knowledge of the position of the optical sensors to an accuracy of about 10 cm is needed for adequate muon track reconstruction. A positioning system based on the acoustic triangulation of sound transit time differences between fixed seabed emitters and receiving hydrophones attached to the kilometre-scale vertical flexible structures carrying the optical sensors is being developed. In this paper, we describe the sound emission board developed in the framework of KM3NeT project, which is totally adapted to the chosen FFR SX30 ultrasonic transducer and fulfils the requirements imposed by the collaboration in terms of cost, high reliability, low power consumption, high acoustic emission power for short signals, low intrinsic noise and capacity to use arbitrary signals in emission mode.

  13. Signal processing methodologies for an acoustic fetal heart rate monitor

    Pretlow, Robert A., III; Stoughton, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Research and development is presented of real time signal processing methodologies for the detection of fetal heart tones within a noise-contaminated signal from a passive acoustic sensor. A linear predictor algorithm is utilized for detection of the heart tone event and additional processing derives heart rate. The linear predictor is adaptively 'trained' in a least mean square error sense on generic fetal heart tones recorded from patients. A real time monitor system is described which outputs to a strip chart recorder for plotting the time history of the fetal heart rate. The system is validated in the context of the fetal nonstress test. Comparisons are made with ultrasonic nonstress tests on a series of patients. Comparative data provides favorable indications of the feasibility of the acoustic monitor for clinical use.

  14. Distributed feedback fiber laser acoustic emission sensor for concrete structure health monitoring

    Hao, Gengjie; Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Sun, Baochen; Li, Fang

    2014-05-01

    This paper introduces a highly-sensitive fiber optical acoustic emission (AE) sensor and a parameter analysis method aiming at concrete structure health monitoring. Distributed feedback fiber-laser (DFB-FL), which is encapsulated to have a high acoustic sensitivity, is used for sensor unit of the AE sensor. The AE signal of concrete beam in different work stages, based on the four-point bending experiment of the concrete beam, is picked up, and the relationship between the concrete beam work stages and the AE parameter is found. The results indicate that DFB-FLAES can be used as sensitive transducers for recording acoustic events and forecasting the imminent failure of the concrete beam.

  15. Development of acoustic emission monitoring system for fault detection of thermal reduction reactor

    The research on the development of the fault monitoring system for the thermal reduction reactor has been performed preliminarily in order to support the successful operation of the thermal reduction reactor. The final task of the development of the fault monitoring system is to assure the integrity of the thermal reduction reactor by the Acoustic Emission (AE) method. The objectives of this paper are to identify and characterize the fault-induced signals for the discrimination of the various AE signals acquired during the reactor operation. The AE data acquisition and analysis system was constructed and applied to the fault monitoring of the small-scale reduction reactor. Through the series of experiments, the various signals such as background noise, operating signals, and fault-induced signals were measured and their characteristics were identified, which will be used in the signal discrimination for further application to full-scale thermal reduction reactor

  16. INSTRUMENTATION FOR SURVEYING ACOUSTIC SIGNALS IN NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION LINES

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-09-01

    In the U.S. natural gas is distributed through more than one million miles of high-pressure transmission pipelines. If all leaks and infringements could be detected quickly, it would enhance safety and U.S. energy security. Only low frequency acoustic waves appear to be detectable over distances up to 60 km where pipeline shut-off valves provide access to the inside of the pipeline. This paper describes a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) developed to record and identify acoustic signals characteristic of: leaks, pump noise, valve and flow metering noise, third party infringement, manual pipeline water and gas blow-off, etc. This PAMP consists of a stainless steel 1/2 inch NPT plumbing tree rated for use on 1000 psi pipelines. Its instrumentation is designed to measure acoustic waves over the entire frequency range from zero to 16,000 Hz by means of four instruments: (1) microphone, (2) 3-inch water full range differential pressure transducer with 0.1% of range sensitivity, (3) a novel 3 inch to 100 inch water range amplifier, using an accumulator with needle valve and (4) a line-pressure transducer. The weight of the PAMP complete with all accessories is 36 pounds. This includes a remote control battery/switch box assembly on a 25-foot extension chord, a laptop data acquisition computer on a field table and a sun shield.

  17. Study and Application of Acoustic Emission Testing in Fault Diagnosis of Low-Speed Heavy-Duty Gears

    Peng Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most present studies on the acoustic emission signals of rotating machinery are experiment-oriented, while few of them involve on-spot applications. In this study, a method of redundant second generation wavelet transform based on the principle of interpolated subdivision was developed. With this method, subdivision was not needed during the decomposition. The lengths of approximation signals and detail signals were the same as those of original ones, so the data volume was twice that of original signals; besides, the data redundancy characteristic also guaranteed the excellent analysis effect of the method. The analysis of the acoustic emission data from the faults of on-spot low-speed heavy-duty gears validated the redundant second generation wavelet transform in the processing and denoising of acoustic emission signals. Furthermore, the analysis illustrated that the acoustic emission testing could be used in the fault diagnosis of on-spot low-speed heavy-duty gears and could be a significant supplement to vibration testing diagnosis.

  18. Could Acoustic Emission Testing Show a Pipe Failure in Advance?

    Soares, S. D.; Teixeira, J. C. G.

    2004-02-01

    During the last 20 years PETROBRAS has been attempting to use Acoustic Emission (AE) as an inspection tool. In this period the AE concept has changed from a revolutionary method to a way of finding areas to make a complete inspection. PETROBRAS has a lot of pressure vessels inspected by AE and with other NDTs techniques to establish their relationship. In other hand, PETROBRAS R&D Center has conducted destructive hydrostatic tests in pipelines samples with artificial defects made by milling. Those tests were monitored by acoustic emission and manual ultrasonic until the complete failure of pipe sample. This article shows the results obtained and a brief proposal of analysis criteria for this environment of test.

  19. Acoustic emission/flaw relationships for inservice monitoring of LWRs

    The program concerning Acoustic Emission/Flaw Relationships for Inservice Monitoring of LWRs was initiated in FY76 with the objective of validating the application of acoustic emission (AE) to monitor nuclear reactor pressure-containing components during operation to detect cracking. The program has been supported by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Research and development has been performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle Memorial Institute. The program has shown the feasibility of continuous, on-line AE monitoring to detect crack growth and produced validated methods for applying the technology. Included are relationships for estimating flaw severity from AE data and field applications at Watts Bar Unit 1 Reactor, Limerick Unit 1 Reactor, and the High Flux Isotope Reactor. This report discusses the program scope and organization, the three program phases and the results obtained, standard and code activities, and instrumentation and software developed under this program

  20. Damage Modes Recognition and Hilbert-Huang Transform Analyses of CFRP Laminates Utilizing Acoustic Emission Technique

    WenQin, Han; Ying, Luo; AiJun, Gu; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-04-01

    Discrimination of acoustic emission (AE) signals related to different damage modes is of great importance in carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite materials. To gain a deeper understanding of the initiation, growth and evolution of the different types of damage, four types of specimens for different lay-ups and orientations and three types of specimens for interlaminar toughness tests are subjected to tensile test along with acoustic emission monitoring. AE signals have been collected and post-processed, the statistical results show that the peak frequency of AE signal can distinguish various damage modes effectively. After a AE signal were decomposed by Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method, it may separate and extract all damage modes included in this AE signal apart from damage mode corresponding to the peak frequency. Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) of AE signals can clearly illustrate the frequency distribution of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) components in time-scale in different damage stages, and can calculate accurate instantaneous frequency for damage modes recognition to help understanding the damage process.

  1. An Approach to Acoustic Emission Technique Applications to Evaluate Damage Mechanisms in Composite Materials

    Rios-Soberanis C.R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic Emission technique is a versatile method for characterization in materials science. It is considered to be a “passive” non-destructive method since damage can be only evaluated when de defects are being developed during the test which, at the end of the day, it is considered an advantage because failure mechanisms and damage process can be monitored and identified during the load history. When a failure mechanism is activated due to a discontinuity in the material such as crack propagation, part of the total strain energy is dissipated as an elastic waves that propagate from the damage source through the medium. Therefore, this released energy can be detected by piezoelectric sensors that perceive the emitted signal from the damage notation site by the surface dynamic movement and convert it in an electrical response. Acoustic emission signals can be correlated with the onset of damage process occurring in the tested materials and also to de diverse failure mechanisms such as matrix cracking, interface damage, fiber fracture, etc. This paper proposes to discuss our information and results on acoustic emission materials characterization undertaken on different types of materials.

  2. Acoustic emission monitoring for assessment of steel bridge details

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing was deployed on details of two large steel Interstate Highway bridges: one cantilever through-truss and one trapezoidal box girder bridge. Quantitative measurements of activity levels at known and suspected crack locations were made by monitoring AE under normal service loads (e.g., live traffic and wind). AE indications were used to direct application of radiography, resulting in identification of a previously unknown flaw, and to inform selection of a retrofit detail.

  3. Utilization of acoustic emission in scratch test evaluation

    Tomáštík, J.; Čtvrtlík, Radim; Boháč, Petr; Dráb, M.; Koula, V.; Cvrk, K.; Jastrabík, Lubomír

    Pfafficon: Trans Tech Publications Ltd, 2015 - (Kovalčíková, A.; Lofaj, F.), s. 119-122 ISBN 978-3-03835-555-7. ISSN 1662-9795. [Conference on Local Mechanical Properties (LMP 2014) /11./. Stará Lesná (SK), 12.11.2014-14.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA03010743 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : acoustic emission * scratch test * thin films Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  4. Application of acoustic emission to the testing pressure tubing materials

    Acoustic emission is one of the promising techniques for the detection of embrittlement. The Zr-2.5 Nb alloy used as pressure tubing material shows slightly low stress intensity factor when it absorbs hydrogen. In this paper, the relationship between acoustic emission count N and stress intensity factor K in the tensile test of edge-notched specimens is described. The K value is proportional to the square root of crack opening displacement phi in the elastic region. The double-notched specimens were cut from pressure tubes, and the single-notched specimens were cut from extruded bars. The crack opening displacement was measured with a clip gauge recommended by ASTM STP 410 Appendix, and the acoustic emission was measured with a Nortec AEMS-4 system and PZT-5 type sensors. The sensors were bonded on the surfaces of the specimens with epoxy adhesive or rubber contact. A peak of the acoustic emission count rate was observed at the yield point of each specimen similarly to many other metals. The N values and the size of plastic zone showed the theoretical relationship following 4th power law, on the other hand, the size of plastic zone depended linearly on the K values in elastic region. The slope and the intersection point of the regression curves for the total N count vs the square root of phi corresponding to the elastic field of stress-strain curves showed almost same values for the specimens of same shape. The influence of the bonding methods was not observed. (Kako, I.)

  5. Acoustic emission monitoring of fracturing process of migmatite samples

    Petružálek, Matěj; Lokajíček, Tomáš; Svitek, Tomáš

    Montréal: Canadian Institute of Mining , Metallurgy and Petroleum, 2015. ISBN 978-1-926872-25-4. [International Congress of Rock Mechanics /13./. Montréal (CA), 10.05.2015-13.05.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP104/12/0915; GA MŠk LH13102 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy * fracturing process * acoustic emission * ultrasonic sounding Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  6. Failure Mechanism of Rock Bridge Based on Acoustic Emission Technique

    Guoqing Chen; Yan Zhang; Runqiu Huang; Fan Guo; Guofeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is widely used in various fields as a reliable nondestructive examination technology. Two experimental tests were carried out in a rock mechanics laboratory, which include (1) small scale direct shear tests of rock bridge with different lengths and (2) large scale landslide model with locked section. The relationship of AE event count and record time was analyzed during the tests. The AE source location technology and comparative analysis with its actual failu...

  7. Why and how acoustic emission in pressure vessel first hydrotest

    The main advantages obtained performing the Acoustic Emission (AE) examination during pressure vessel first hydrotest are presented. The characteristics and performance of the AE instrumentation to be used for a correct test are illustrated. The main criteria for AE source characterization (location, typical AE parameters and their correlation with pressure value), the calibration and test procedures are discussed. The ndt post-test examinations and laboratory specimen experiments are also outlined. Personnel qualification requirements are finally indicated. (Author)

  8. Acoustic emission characteristics of single edge notched glass fiber/metal laminates

    Fracture behaviors of single-edge-notched monolithic aluminum sheets and glass fiber/aluminum laminates under tensile loadings have been investigated using acoustic emission(AE) monitoring. AE signals from monolithic aluminum could be classified into two different types. For glass fiber/aluminum laminates, AE signals with high amplitude and long duration were additionally confirmed on FFT frequency analysis, which corresponded to macrocrack propagation and/or delamination. On the basis of the above AE analysis and fracture observation, characteristic features of fracture processes of single-edge-notched glass fiber/aluminum laminates were elucidated according to different fiber ply orientations.

  9. Hyperbolic source location of crack related acoustic emission in bone.

    O'Toole, John; Creedon, Leo; Hession, John; Muir, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Little work has been done on the localization of microcracks in bone using acoustic emission. Microcrack localization is useful to study the fracture process in bone and to prevent fractures in patients. Locating microcracks that occur before fracture allows one to predict where fracture will occur if continued stress is applied to the bone. Two source location algorithms were developed to locate microcracks on rectangular bovine bone samples. The first algorithm uses a constant velocity approach which has some difficulty dealing with the anisotropic nature of bone. However, the second algorithm uses an iterative technique to estimate the correct velocity for the acoustic emission source location being located. In tests with simulated microcracks, the constant velocity algorithm achieves a median error of 1.78 mm (IQR 1.51 mm) and the variable velocity algorithm improves this to a median error of 0.70 mm (IQR 0.79 mm). An experiment in which the bone samples were loaded in a three point bend test until they fractured showed a good correlation between the computed location of detected microcracks and where the final fracture occurred. Microcracks can be located on bovine bone samples using acoustic emission with good accuracy and precision. PMID:23363217

  10. Standard guide for acoustic emission system performance verification

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 System performance verification methods launch stress waves into the examination article on which the sensor is mounted. The resulting stress wave travels in the examination article and is detected by the sensor(s) in a manner similar to acoustic emission. 1.2 This guide describes methods which can be used to verify the response of an Acoustic Emission system including sensors, couplant, sensor mounting devices, cables and system electronic components. 1.3 Acoustic emission system performance characteristics, which may be evaluated using this document, include some waveform parameters, and source location accuracy. 1.4 Performance verification is usually conducted prior to beginning the examination. 1.5 Performance verification can be conducted during the examination if there is any suspicion that the system performance may have changed. 1.6 Performance verification may be conducted after the examination has been completed. 1.7 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other u...

  11. Emission enhancement of sound emitters using an acoustic metamaterial cavity.

    Song, Kyungjun; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Kiwon; Hur, Shin; Kim, Jedo

    2014-01-01

    The emission enhancement of sound without electronic components has wide applications in a variety of remote systems, especially when highly miniaturized (smaller than wavelength) structures can be used. The recent advent of acoustic metamaterials has made it possible to realize this. In this study, we propose, design, and demonstrate a new class of acoustic cavity using a double-walled metamaterial structure operating at an extremely low frequency. Periodic zigzag elements which exhibit Fabry-Perot resonant behavior below the phononic band-gap are used to yield strong sound localization within the subwavelength gap, thus providing highly effective emission enhancement. We show, both theoretically and experimentally, 10 dB sound emission enhancement near 1060 Hz that corresponds to a wavelength approximately 30 times that of the periodicity. We also provide a general guideline for the independent tuning of the quality factor and effective volume of acoustic metamaterials. This approach shows the flexibility of our design in the efficient control of the enhancement rate. PMID:24584552

  12. Band-limited Green's Functions for Quantitative Evaluation of Acoustic Emission Using the Finite Element Method

    Leser, William P.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Leser, William P.

    2013-01-01

    A method of numerically estimating dynamic Green's functions using the finite element method is proposed. These Green's functions are accurate in a limited frequency range dependent on the mesh size used to generate them. This range can often match or exceed the frequency sensitivity of the traditional acoustic emission sensors. An algorithm is also developed to characterize an acoustic emission source by obtaining information about its strength and temporal dependence. This information can then be used to reproduce the source in a finite element model for further analysis. Numerical examples are presented that demonstrate the ability of the band-limited Green's functions approach to determine the moment tensor coefficients of several reference signals to within seven percent, as well as accurately reproduce the source-time function.

  13. Codetection of acoustic emissions during failure of heterogeneous media: New perspectives for natural hazard early warning

    Faillettaz, Jerome; Or, Dani; Reiweger, Ingrid

    2016-02-01

    A simple method for real-time early warning of gravity-driven rupture that considers both the heterogeneity of natural media and characteristics of acoustic emissions attenuation is proposed. The method capitalizes on codetection of elastic waves emanating from microcracks by multiple and spatially separated sensors. Event codetection is considered as surrogate for large event size with more frequent codetected events marking imminence of catastrophic failure. Using a spatially explicit fiber bundle numerical model with spatially correlated mechanical strength and two load redistribution rules, we constructed a range of mechanical failure scenarios and associated failure events (mapped into acoustic emission) in space and time. Analysis considering hypothetical arrays of sensors and consideration of signal attenuation demonstrate the potential of the codetection principles even for insensitive sensors to provide early warning for imminent global failure.

  14. Effect of thermionic emission on dust-acoustic solitons

    The effect of thermionic emission on dust-acoustic solitons of very small but finite amplitude in dusty plasmas is studied taking into account the self-consistent variation of the dust charge. It is shown that thermionic emission can significantly lower the amplitude of the dust negative charge and can even make the dust charge positive. Results on the dependence of the phase velocity, amplitude and width of solitons on the dust temperature and the work function of dust material were obtained and are discussed here.

  15. Estimation of knock acoustical signal by parametric inversion method; Estimation du signal acoustique de cliquetis par inversion parametrique

    Boubal, O.; Oksman, J. [Ecole Superieure d' Electricite, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1999-07-01

    Knock on spark ignition engines goes against car manufacturers efforts to reduce fuel consumption and exhaust gas emissions. This article develops a signal processing method to quantify knock. After discussing some classical techniques of knock energy estimation, an acoustical measurement technique is presented. An original signal processing method based on a parametric behavioral model for both knock and apparatus and a special inversion technique are used to get actual knock parameters. The knock related parameters are computed in a two step process. A deconvolution algorithm is used to obtain a signal made of unitary pulses, followed by an efficient inversion method. The whole process is applied to real data from a one-cylinder engine. Moreover, the results are compared to those obtained from an existing technique to suit a common industrial application. (authors)

  16. Multipath time delay estimation of underwater acoustic sinusoidal signals

    TONG Feng; XU Xiaomei; FANG Shiliang

    2009-01-01

    To overcome the performance limitation of multipath time-delay estimation posed by underwater acoustic sinusoidal signals, an approach incorporating the frequency-domain weighting of the highly oscillatory Nonlinear Least Squares (NLS) cost function with the evolutionary optimization was proposed to facilitate the accurate estimation of the multipath timedelay of sinusoidal signals. In the described method, the number of the effective multipath signals, which is included into the parameter model as well as the multipath time-delay and amplitude factor, can be estimated simultaneously thus avoiding the requirement of additional computation. The experimental results performed with numerical simulation and sea-trial data are provided, demonstrating the effectiveness and precision enhancement of the proposed algorithm.

  17. Inverse Problem Solution in Acoustic Emission Source Analysis : Classical and Artificial Neural Network Approach

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Chlada, Milan; Vodička, Josef

    New York : Springer, 2006 - (Delsanto, P.), s. 515-529 ISBN 0-387-33860-8 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission * artificial neural network s * inverse problems Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  18. Gearbox fault diagnosis based on deep random forest fusion of acoustic and vibratory signals

    Li, Chuan; Sanchez, René-Vinicio; Zurita, Grover; Cerrada, Mariela; Cabrera, Diego; Vásquez, Rafael E.

    2016-08-01

    Fault diagnosis is an effective tool to guarantee safe operations in gearboxes. Acoustic and vibratory measurements in such mechanical devices are all sensitive to the existence of faults. This work addresses the use of a deep random forest fusion (DRFF) technique to improve fault diagnosis performance for gearboxes by using measurements of an acoustic emission (AE) sensor and an accelerometer that are used for monitoring the gearbox condition simultaneously. The statistical parameters of the wavelet packet transform (WPT) are first produced from the AE signal and the vibratory signal, respectively. Two deep Boltzmann machines (DBMs) are then developed for deep representations of the WPT statistical parameters. A random forest is finally suggested to fuse the outputs of the two DBMs as the integrated DRFF model. The proposed DRFF technique is evaluated using gearbox fault diagnosis experiments under different operational conditions, and achieves 97.68% of the classification rate for 11 different condition patterns. Compared to other peer algorithms, the addressed method exhibits the best performance. The results indicate that the deep learning fusion of acoustic and vibratory signals may improve fault diagnosis capabilities for gearboxes.

  19. ACOUSTIC SIGNALLING IN EURASIAN PENDULINE TITS REMIZ PENDULINUS : REPERTOIRE SIZE SIGNALS MALE NEST DEFENCE

    Pogany, A.; van Dijk, R. E.; Menyhart, O.; Miklosi, A.; DeVoogd, T. J.; Szekely, T.

    2013-01-01

    Elaborate male song may restrain competitors in various songbirds, although the exact mechanism, information content and information flow of acoustic signals are not completely understood. Here we focus on the interactions between resident and intruder males using the Eurasian penduline tit Remiz pe

  20. Correlated terahertz acoustic and electromagnetic emission in dynamically screened InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    van Capel, P. J. S.; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Porte, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    signals and THz electromagnetic radiation signals demonstrates that transient strain generation in InGaN/GaN MQWs is correlatedwith electromagnetic THz generation, and both types of emission find their origin in ultrafast dynamical screening of the built-in piezoelectric field in the MQWs. The measured......We investigate acoustic and electromagnetic emission from optically excited strained piezoelectric In0.2Ga0.8N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs), using optical pump-probe spectroscopy, time-resolved Brillouin scattering, and THz emission spectroscopy. A direct comparison of detected acoustic...... emission. This confirms the ultrafast dynamical screening mechanism in MQWs as a highly efficient method for impulsive strain generation....

  1. Study of acoustic signal in the process of resistance spot welding based on array sensor system

    2008-01-01

    This investigation was performed to study acoustic field signal in order to improve RSW quality. Researchers firstly built an acoustic array sensor system, which included 8 MPA-416 acoustic sensors, data acquisition card and LabVIEW. The system obtained the acoustic field information in the process of nugget growing. Due to the nonlinearity field signal, array sensor algorithm was utilized to quantitatively analyze the characteristics of acoustic field and reduced noise. The experiment and calculation results show that array sensor system can acquire acoustic field signal of nugget growing in the RSW process and array processing algorithm based on acoustic field can extract characteristic parameters to evaluate RSW quality. It was concluded that the acoustic array sensor system offers a new methodology for RSW quality inspection.

  2. Frequency Analysis of Acoustic Emission - Application to machining and welding

    Ultrasonic acoustic waves have been seized and exploited within a bandwidth ranging from 30 kHz to 55 kHz for non-destructive control when boring 3 kinds of steel with a digitaly programmed drill. In addition, these waves have been considered in soldering two steels and one aluminium using T.I.G. process. Spectrum analysis of acoustic emissions produced during the drill is closely related to the extraction of turnings from the metal. Because of the wick's progressive wearing out, the spectrum tends to be close to the machine's own noise spectrum. Meanwhile in the soldering operation of test-tubes of 2 mm thickness, the frequency analysis shows a particular frequency called ''signature'' corresponding to the flow of protection gas. Other frequencies associated to some internal defects in the soldering process as a delay in the fissure and a lack in the fusion have been detected

  3. Frequency Analysis of Acoustic Emission - Application to machining and welding

    Snoussi, A.

    1987-01-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic waves were seized and exploited within a bandwidth ranging from 30 kHz to 55 kHz for non-destructive control when boring three kinds of steel with a digitally programmed drill. In addition, these waves were considered in soldering two steels and one aluminum using T.I.G. process. Spectrum analysis of acoustic emissions produced during the drill is closely related to the extraction of turnings from the metal. Because of the wick's progressive wearing out, the spectrum tends to be close to the machine's own noise spectrum. Meanwhile in the soldering operation of test-tubes of 2 mm thickness, the frequency analysis shows a particular frequency called signature corresponding to the flow of protection gas. Other frequencies associated to some internal defects in the soldering process as a delay in the fissure and a lack in the fusion were detected.

  4. Extraction of Partial Discharge Acoustic Signal by Wavelet Transform with Teager's Energy Operator

    DU Boxue; OUYANG Mingjian; WU Yuan; WEI Guozhong

    2005-01-01

    To develop a measurement system for monitoring partial discharge (PD) without the effect of external interferences,an algorithm of PD signal extraction based on wavelet transform with Teager's energy operators was presented.Acoustic signal generated by PD was selected to remove excessive interfering signals and electromagnetic interferences.Acoustic signals were collected and decomposed into 10 levels by wavelet transform into approximation and detail components."Daubechies 25"was proved to be the most suitable mother wavelet for the extraction of PD acoustic signals.Compared with conventional wavelet denoising method,Teager's energy operators were adopted to the PD signal reconstruction and the signal to noise ratio was pulse amplitude.

  5. Simulating neurobiological localization of acoustic signals based on temporal and volumetric differentiations

    Dattani, Nikesh S.

    2008-01-01

    The localization of sound sources by the human brain is computationally simulated from a neurobiological perspective. The simulation includes the neural representation of temporal differences in acoustic signals between the ipsilateral and contralateral ears for constant sound intensities (angular localization), and of volumetric differences in acoustic signals for constant azimuthal angles (radial localization). The transmission of the original acoustic signal from the environment, through e...

  6. Fatigue damage monitoring for basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites using acoustic emission technique

    Wang, Wentao; Li, Hui; Qu, Zhi

    2012-04-01

    Basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) is a structural material with superior mechanical properties. In this study, unidirectional BFRP laminates with 14 layers are made with the hand lay-up method. Then, the acoustic emission technique (AE) combined with the scanning electronic microscope (SEM) technique is employed to monitor the fatigue damage evolution of the BFRP plates in the fatigue loading tests. Time-frequency analysis using the wavelet transform technique is proposed to analyze the received AE signal instead of the peak frequency method. A comparison between AE signals and SEM images indicates that the multi-frequency peaks picked from the time-frequency curves of AE signals reflect the accumulated fatigue damage evolution and fatigue damage patterns. Furthermore, seven damage patterns, that is, matrix cracking, delamination, fiber fracture and their combinations, are identified from the time-frequency curves of the AE signals.

  7. Acoustic Emission Characteristics during fracture Process of Glass Fiber/Aluminum Hybrid Laminates

    Fracture behaviors and acoustic emission (AE) characteristics of single-edge-notched monolithic aluminum plates and glass fiber/aluminum hybrid laminate plates have been investigated under tensile loads. AE signals from monolithic aluminum could be classified into two different types: signals with low frequency band and high frequency band. High frequency signals were detected in the post stage of loading beyond displacement of 0.45mm. For glass fiber/aluminum laminates, AE signals with high amplitude and long duration were additionally confirmed on FFT frequency analysis, which corresponded to macro-crack propagation and/or delamination between A1 and fiber layers. On the basis of the above AE analysis and fracture observation with optical microscopy and ultrasonic T scan, characteristic features of AE associated with fracture processes of single-edge-notched glass fiber/aluminum laminates were elucidated according to different fiber ply orientations

  8. Variation of solar acoustic emission and its relation to phase of the solar cycle

    Chen, Ruizhu; Zhao, Junwei

    2016-05-01

    Solar acoustic emission is closely related to solar convection and photospheric magnetic field. Variation of acoustic emission and its relation to the phase of solar cycles are important to understand dynamics of solar cycles and excitation of acoustic waves. In this work we use 6 years of SDO/HMI Dopplergram data to study acoustic emissions of the whole sun and of the quiet-sun regions, respectively, in multiple acoustic frequency bands. We show the variation of acoustic emission from May 2010 to April 2016, covering half of the solar cycle 24, and analyze its correlation with the solar activity level indexed by daily sunspot number and total magnetic flux. Results show that the correlation between the whole-Sun acoustic emission and the solar activity level is strongly negative for low frequencies between 2.5 and 4.5 mHz, but strongly positive for high frequencies between 4.5 and 6.0 mHz. For high frequencies, the acoustic emission excess in sunspot halos overwhelms the emission deficiency in sunspot umbrae and penumbrae. The correlation between the acoustic emission in quiet regions and the solar activity level is negative for 2.5-4.0 mHz and positive for 4.0-5.5 mHz. This shows that the solar background acoustic power, with active regions excluded, also varies during a solar cycle, implying the excitation frequencies or depths are highly related to the solar magnetic field.

  9. Failure Progress of 3D Reinforced GFRP Laminate during Static Bending, Evaluated by Means of Acoustic Emission and Vibrations Analysis

    Mateusz Koziol

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The work aimed to assess the failure progress in a glass fiber-reinforced polymer laminate with a 3D-woven and (as a comparison plain-woven reinforcement, during static bending, using acoustic emission signals. The innovative method of the separation of the signal coming from the fiber fracture and the one coming from the matrix fracture with the use of the acoustic event’s energy as a criterion was applied. The failure progress during static bending was alternatively analyzed by evaluation of the vibration signal. It gave a possibility to validate the results of the acoustic emission. Acoustic emission, as well as vibration signal analysis proved to be good and effective tools for the registration of failure effects in composite laminates. Vibration analysis is more complicated methodologically, yet it is more precise. The failure progress of the 3D laminate is “safer” and more beneficial than that of the plain-woven laminate. It exhibits less rapid load capacity drops and a higher fiber effort contribution at the moment of the main laminate failure.

  10. Study on demodulated signal distribution and acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system

    Shang, Ying; Yang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chen; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-06-01

    We propose a demodulated signal distribution theory for a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system. The distribution region of Rayleigh backscattering including the acoustic sensing signal in the sensing fiber is investigated theoretically under different combinations of both the path difference and pulse width Additionally we determine the optimal solution between the path difference and pulse width to obtain the maximum phase change per unit length. We experimentally test this theory and realize a good acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of  ‑150 dB re rad/(μPa·m) of fiber in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz.

  11. Acoustic emission study of deformation behavior of nacre

    Luo, Shunfei; Luo, Hongyun; Han, Zhiyuan

    2016-02-01

    A study on the acoustic emission (AE) characteristics during deformation of nacre material was performed. We found that intermittent AE events are generated during nacre deformation. These avalanches may be attributed to microfracture events of the aragonite (CaCO3) nano-asperities and bridges during tablet sliding. These events show several critical features, such as the power-law distributions of the avalanche sizes and interval. These results suggest that the underlying fracture dynamics during nacre deformation display a self-organized criticality (SOC). The results also imply that the disorder and long-range correlation between local microfracture events may play important roles in nacre deformation.

  12. STUDY OF ACOUSTIC EMISSION DURING NON- ISOTHERMAL CRYSTALLIZATION OF POLYPROPYLENE

    SHEN Jingshu; XU Duanfu; YAO Ruigang; LIU Ruixia; LI Dawei

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we have presented the results of acoustic emission (AE) during non-isothemal crystallization of polypropylene (PP) melt with mean cooling rate 4 ℃ /min , and discussed the effects of molecular weight (MW) on AE activity. It is shown that the amount of AE ring-down counts during whole crystallization of PP depends on the MW strongly. The copious AE bursts have been observed at the late stage of PPcrystallization.AE bursts are caused by cracking ,crazing and cavitation between spherulites and inside spherulites.

  13. Acoustic emission mechanism at switching of ferroelectric crystals

    Process of acoustic emission (AE) in lead germanate (PGO) representing pure ferroelectric, and gadolinium molybdate (GMO) representing ferroelectric-ferroelastic, for which switching may be conducted both by the field and pressure, were studied. A conclusion has been drawn that piezoelectric excitation of a crystal from the surface by pulses of overpolarization current in the process of domain coalescence is the main AE source in PGO. Not only piezoresponse, but also direct sound generation in the moment of domain penetration and collapse is considered as AE mechanism in GMO

  14. The application of acoustic emission measurements on laboratory testpieces to large scale pressure vessel monitoring

    A test pressure vessel containing 4 artificial defects was monitored for emission whilst pressure cycling to failure. Testpieces cut from both the failed vessel and from as-rolled plate material were tested in the laboratory. A marked difference in emission characteristics was observed between plate and vessel testpieces. Activity from vessel material was virtually constant after general yield and emission amplitudes were low. Plate testpieces showed maximum activity at general yield and more frequent high amplitude emissions. An attempt has been made to compare the system sensitivities between the pressure vessel test and laboratory tests. In the absence of an absolute calibration device, system sensitivities were estimated using dummy signals generated by the excitation of an emission sensor. The measurements have shown an overall difference in sensitivity between vessel and laboratory tests of approximately 25db. The reduced sensitivity in the vessel test is attributed to a combination of differences in sensors, acoustic couplant, attenuation, and dispersion relative to laboratory tests and the relative significance of these factors is discussed. Signal amplitude analysis of the emissions monitored from laboratory testpieces showed that, whith losses of the order of 25 to 30db, few emissions would be detected from the pressure vessel test. It is concluded that no reliable prediction of acoustic behaviour of a structure may be made from laboratory test unless testpieces of the actual structural material are used. A considerable improvement in detection sensitivity, is also required for reliable detection of defects in low strength ductile materials and an absolute method of system calibration is required between tests

  15. Spectral characteristics of Acoustic Emission of rock based on Singular point of HHT Analysis

    Zhou Xiaoshan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sandstone test of uniaxial compression acoustic emission (AE test has been studied, the HHT analysis is applied to AE signal processing, and through the analysis of AE signal to reveal the process of rock fracture. The results show that HHT is a method that based on principal component analysis of time-frequency analysis. The method of HHT can very convenient to deal the singular signal; it can be determine the main composition of singular signal. The instantaneous frequency can be used to describe precisely the time-frequency characteristics of singular signal. The method has a very important significance to reveal the frequency characteristics of AE signal. The EMD signal is decomposed into 8 IMF components in the failure process of rock sound. The component of IMF1 ~ IMF4 is the main component, and the IMF5 ~ IMF8 for low frequency noise signal. Through the EMD of AE signal frequency, the rock fracture has been decomposition into three stages: the initial zone, wave zone, quiet zone. This shows that in the analysis of rupture must eliminate noise interference signal characteristics of AE.

  16. Characterization of granular collapse onto hard substrates by acoustic emissions

    Farin, Maxime; Mangeney, Anne; Toussaint, Renaud; De Rosny, Julien

    2013-04-01

    Brittle deformation in granular porous media can generate gravitational instabilities such as debris flows and rock avalanches. These phenomena constitute a major natural hazard for the population in mountainous, volcanic and coastal areas but their direct observation on the field is very dangerous. Recent studies showed that gravitational instabilities can be detected and characterized (volume, duration,...) thanks to the seismic signal they generate. In an avalanche, individual block bouncing and rolling on the ground are expected to generated signals of higher frequencies than the main flow spreading. The identification of the time/frequency signature of individual blocks in the recorded signal remains however difficult. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the acoustic signature of diverse simple sources corresponding to grains falling over thin plates of plexiglas and rock blocks. The elastic energy emitted by a single bouncing steel bead into the support was first quantitatively estimated and compared to the potential energy of fall and to the potential energy change during the shock. Next, we consider the collapse of granular columns made of steel spherical beads onto hard substrates. Initially, these columns were held by a magnetic field allowing to suppress suddenly the cohesion between the beads, and thus to minimize friction effects that would arise from side walls. We varied systematically the column volume, the column aspect ratio (height over length) and the grain size. This is shown to affect the signal envelope and frequency content. In the experiments, two types of acoustic sensors were used to record the signals in a wide frequency range: accelerometers (1 Hz to 56 kHz) and piezoelectric sensors (100 kHz to 1 MHz). The experiments were also monitored optically using fast cameras. We developed a technique to use quantitatively both types of sensors to evaluate the elastic energy emitted by the sources. Eventually, we looked at what

  17. Signal processing approaches on otoacoustic emissions

    Cheng, Jun

    2000-01-01

    The recent achievement on the measurement of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) is based on a novel technical development of digital signal processing. OAEs measured in the external ear canal are normal by-products of the active process in hearing, which was discovered by Kemp (1978). Outer hair cells (OHCs) are thought to be the active source in the generation of this energy. Signal processing methods play a crucial role in the detection of OAEs in noise and artifacts, and in the...

  18. Application of acoustic emission technique for check valve monitoring

    Very limited choice is available in monitoring the health of check valves during service. Ultrasonics, magnetic flux leakage and acoustic emission (AE) monitoring are three methods, of which AE is the prominent. The paper describes work done on swing check valves in the ECCS circuit of Cirus using AE. It indicates that the valves can be monitored for any abnormal behaviour during their stable operation and during opening and closing. AE can also sense any abnormality at the hinge pin, hinge arm, disc etc., if they give AE emission. However, many of these may require background data from a spare valve of similar design or a working stand by. In absence of such a valve, data from the present study will be used as a baseline data for comparison with signatures taken during future inspections. (author). 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. Progressive Shear Failure in Granular Materials: Linking Force Fluctuations With Acoustic Emissions

    Michlmayr, G. K.; Cohen, D. O.; Or, D.

    2011-12-01

    Natural hazards associated with rapid mass movements such as shallow landslides, rock falls or debris flows are notoriously difficult to predict even though precursor events associated with small internal failures are known to occur. In this study we focus on grain scale processes preceding the formation of a shear plane in granular materials such as frictional sliding of grain contacts, accommodation of contact networks and fracturing of grain bonds (in cohesive materials) - all of which are discrete micro-mechanical failure events that emit characteristic acoustic emissions that could be used to study internal failure and potentially provide early warning (albeit short). Experiments involving direct shear tests using glass beads and sand were combined with acoustic emission (AE) measurements using piezoelectric sensors with sensitivities to frequencies in the range of 20kHz - 200kHz and accelerometers (0.2kHz - 20kHz) buried within the sheared sample. We obtained good correlations between shear deformation and associated grain-scale mechanical behavior with key characteristics of measured AE (frequency content, signal energy). Fluctuations of shear force occurring during strain controlled deformation are assumed to represent micro-structural rearrangements of the material. We obtained exponential distributions of force fluctuation magnitudes and low frequency AE event statistics. The number of AE events increased with confining stress as well as with particle roughness and were inversely related to grain size. These results were linked with conceptual models of failure accumulation such as the fiber-bundle model. The statistics of AE event occurrence, particularly magnitude-frequency distributions may provide prediction of imminent mechanical collapse. The strong attenuation of acoustic signals within most earth materials present a major challenge to field applications requiring innovative deployment strategies such as the use of acoustic waveguides.

  20. Electrical Resistance and Acoustic Emission Measurements for Monitoring the Structural Behavior of CFRP Laminate

    Zhou, Wei

    2015-07-12

    Electrical resistance and acoustic emission (AE) measurement are jointly used to monitor the degradation in CFRP laminates subjected to tensile tests. The objective of this thesis is to perform a synergertic analysis between a passive and an active methods to better access how these perform when used for Structural Health Moni- toring (SHM). Laminates with three different stacking sequences: [0]4, [02/902]s and [+45/ − 45]2s are subjected to monotonic and cyclic tensile tests. In each laminate, we carefully investigate which mechanisms of degradation can or cannot be detect- ed by each technique. It is shown that most often, that acoustic emission signals start before any electrical detection is possible. This is is explained based on the redundance of the electrical network that makes it less sensitive to localized damages. Based on in depth study of AE signals clustering, a new classification is proposed to recognize the different damage mechanims based on only two parameters: the RA (rise time/amplitude) and the duration of the signal.

  1. Acoustic emission of retrofitted fiber-wrapped columns

    El Echary, Hazem; Mirmiran, Amir

    1998-03-01

    In recent years, fiber-wrapping technique has become increasingly popular for retrofitting of existing bridge pier columns in seismic zones. By the way of confinement, the external jacket enhances strength, ductility and shear performance of the column. However, since state of the concrete core is not visible from outside of the jacket, it is of great necessity to develop proper non-destructive methods to evaluate structural integrity of the column. Extensive research on FRP-confined concrete at the University of Central Florida has shown that failure of such hybrid columns is often accompanied by considerable audible and sub-audible noise, making acoustic emission (AE) a viable NDE technique for retrofitted columns. Acoustic emission from fiber-wrapped concrete specimens were monitored. A total of 24 concrete specimens with two types of construction (bonded and unbonded) and four different number of layers (1, 3, 5 and 7) were tested under uniaxial compression. All specimens were made of S-glass fabric and polyester resin with a core diameter of 6' and a length of 12'. Some of the specimens were subjected to cycles of loading and unloading to examine the presence of the Kaiser and the Felicity effects. A 4-channel AEDSP-32/16 (Mistras-2001) machine from Physical Acoustics Corp. was used for the experiments. Results indicate that AE energy and the number of AE counts can both be good representatives for the response of confined concrete. Further, plots of AE energy versus load follows the same bilinear trend that has been observed in the stress-strain response of such specimens. Finally, Felicity effect was observed in all composite specimens.

  2. Relation between welding parameter and acoustic emission information during laser deep penetration welding

    陈彦宾; 张忠典; 王欣

    2002-01-01

    In laser non-penetration deep penetration welding process, welding material will vaporize, metal vapor and ambient gas will produce a higher degree ionization, which forms plasma of high concentration. In the case of forming a small hole, plasma will eject from the hole, and form acoustic emission (AE) signals. Because AE information has many advantages such as non-contact measuring, fast response, and high ratio of signal to noise, it can be used as a monitor variable for in-process control. By studying AE information, information of welding pool and small hole can be obtained. According to characteristic of AE information, this paper reveals the correlation between welding parameters and AE signals, and provides a good base for further quality control.

  3. Localization of acoustic emission sources in tensile and ct specimens using a broadband acquisition technique.

    Fleischmann, P; Rouby, D; Malaprade, G; Lanchon, I

    1981-11-01

    The acoustic emission sources in a conventional cylindrical tensile test sample of short transversely-cut carbon manganese steel are localized. There is not always a good correlation between the localization of the first signals and the zone which eventually fractures. During the Lüder's plateau, the ae signals are emitted in the deformation band and, in the hardening range, there is no significant ae in the gauge length of the sample. In ct samples precracked by fatigue, the signals are due to the growth of the plastic zone around the crack tip, and the plastic zone size, measured by source localization, agrees with those provided by models derived from fracture mechanics. PMID:7292774

  4. [Acoustic emission diagnostic techniques for high-field high current-density super inducting poles

    Acoustic emission technology was introduced in the late 1970's to monitor superconducting magnets. It has now been firmly established that acoustic signals in superconducting magnets are emitted principally by mechanical events such as conductor strain, conductor motion, frictional motion, and epoxy cracking. Despite earlier suggestions, flux motion, except during flux jumping, does not appear to be an important source of AE signals in superconducting magnets. Of these several potential sources of AE signals in superconducting magnets, mechanical disturbances have been identified to be most important in high-performance, ''adiabatic'' magnets such as the dipoles used in accelerators. These mechanical disturbances are transitory, each generating a packet of AE signals that can be located with sensors. Source identification and location has been achieved with a number of superconducting magnets. In this section, the basic principle for the operation of adiabatic magnets is discussed, followed by presentation of some of the important experimental results relevant to the question of premature quench obtained at MIT

  5. Study of oxygen reduction on stainless steel surfaces and its contribution to acoustic emission recorded during corrosion processes

    Acoustic emission technique is often used to monitor corrosion processes. Yet, among the potential sources of AE associated to corrosion phenomena, the emissivity of oxygen reduction on metallic surfaces has never been studied up to now. In that context, dissolved oxygen reduction was monitored by acoustic emission (AE) on as polished, pre-reduced, electrochemically or chemically passivated surfaces of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel. The influence of the composition of the passive film on the oxygen reduction reaction has been confirmed. Moreover, in our experimental configuration, it has been demonstrated that proton reduction or iron oxide reduction were not at the origin of AE signals recorded during cathodic polarization of the specimens. On the other hand, oxygen reduction involving O-O bond rupture and/or atomic oxygen desorption from metallic surface appears to be the source of detected acoustic emission. However, these mechanisms generally occur too slowly during free corrosion processes, such as crevice corrosion, to promote any significant acoustic emission when developing naturally on metallic surfaces

  6. Coating adherence in galvanized steel assessed by acoustic emission wavelet analysis

    Coating-substrate adherence in galvanized steel is evaluated by acoustic emission wavelet analysis in scratch tests on hot-dip galvanized samples. The acoustic emission results are compared with optical and electron microscopy observations in order to understand coating features related to adherence and to establish criteria aimed at improving the manufacture process

  7. Acoustic emission-based condition monitoring methods: Review and application for low speed slew bearing

    Caesarendra, Wahyu; Kosasih, Buyung; Tieu, Anh Kiet; Zhu, Hongtao; Moodie, Craig A. S.; Zhu, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an acoustic emission-based method for the condition monitoring of low speed reversible slew bearings. Several acoustic emission (AE) hit parameters as the monitoring parameters for the detection of impending failure of slew bearings are reviewed first. The review focuses on: (1) the application of AE in typical rolling element bearings running at different speed classifications, i.e. high speed (>600 rpm), low speed (10-600 rpm) and very low speed (<10 rpm); (2) the commonly used AE hit parameters in rolling element bearings and (3) AE signal processing, feature extraction and pattern recognition methods. In the experiment, impending failure of the slew bearing was detected by the AE hit parameters after the new bearing had run continuously for approximately 15 months. The slew bearing was then dismantled and the evidence of the early defect was analysed. Based on the result, we propose a feature extraction method of the AE waveform signal using the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) algorithm and demonstrate that the LLE feature can detect the sign of failure earlier than the AE hit parameters with improved prediction of the progressive trend of the defect.

  8. Combined optical fiber interferometric sensors for the detection of acoustic emission

    LIANG Yi-jun; MU Lin-lin; LIU Jun-feng; YU Xiao-tao

    2008-01-01

    A type of combined optical fiber interferometric acoustic emission sensor is proposed.The sensor can be independent on the laser source and make light interference by matching the lengths of two arms,so it can be used to monitor the health of large structure.Theoretical analyses indicate that the system can be equivalent to the Michelson interferometer with two optical fiber loop reflectors,and its sensitivity has been remarkably increased because of the decrease of the losses of light energy.PZT is powered by DC regulator to control the operating point of the system,so the system can accurately detect feeble vibration which is generated by ultrasonic waves propagating on the surface of solid.The amplitude and the frequency of feeble vibration signal are obtained by detecting the output light intensity of intefferometer and using Fourier transform technique.The results indicate that the system can be used to detect the acoustic emission signals by the frequency characteristics.

  9. Acoustics

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  10. Analysis of concrete fracture evolution by simulation and acoustic emission

    Shuhong Wang; Chun' an Tang; Wancheng Zhu; Kai Zhang [School of Racecourse and Civil Engineering, Northeastern Univ., Shenyang (China)

    2003-07-01

    According to the physical model of the three-point bending test on concrete and mortar, the numerical model of three-point bending specimen of concrete are established and a numerical code named material failure process analysis (MFPA{sup 2D}) is used to simulate the fracture process of this concrete specimen. The distribution of acoustic emission (AE), crack propagation process, and load-deflection curve of specimen are obtained for the mortar specimen and concrete specimen with and without preexisted crack. All these numerical results compare well with those experimental observations. Compared with other similar numerical model to simulate the fracture process of concrete, MFPA{sup 2D} has the advantage that the preexisted crack because the crack propagation path should not be known in advance. (orig.)

  11. Laser method of acoustical emission control from vibrating surfaces

    Motyka, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    For limitation of the noise in environment, the necessity occurs of determining and location of sources of sounds emitted from surfaces of many machines and devices, assuring in effect the possibility of suitable constructional changes implementation, targeted at decreasing of their nuisance. In the paper, the results of tests and calculations are presented for plane surface sources emitting acoustic waves. The tests were realized with the use of scanning laser vibrometer which enabled remote registration and the spectral analysis of the surfaces vibrations. The known hybrid digital method developed for determination of sound wave emission from such surfaces divided into small finite elements was slightly modified by distinguishing the phase correlations between such vibrating elements. The final method being developed may find use in wide range of applications for different forms of vibrations of plane surfaces.

  12. Quality Testing of Gaseous Helium Pressure Vessels by Acoustic Emission

    Barranco-Luque, M; Hervé, C; Margaroli, C; Sergo, V

    1998-01-01

    The resistance of pressure equipment is currently tested, before commissioning or at periodic maintenance, by means of normal pressure tests. Defects occurring inside materials during the execution of these tests or not seen by usual non-destructive techniques can remain as undetected potential sources of failure . The acoustic emission (AE) technique can detect and monitor the evolution of such failures. Industrial-size helium cryogenic systems employ cryogens often stored in gaseous form under pressure at ambient temperature. Standard initial and periodic pressure testing imposes operational constraints which other complementary testing methods, such as AE, could significantly alleviate. Recent reception testing of 250 m3 GHe storage vessels with a design pressure of 2.2 MPa for the LEP and LHC cryogenic systems has implemented AE with the above-mentioned aims.

  13. Acoustic emission diagnosis of concrete-piles damaged by earthquakes

    Earthquakes often impose unexpected damage on structures. Concerning the soundness of the structure, the upper portion is easily estimated by visual observation, while the lower portion located in deep underground is difficult to be estimated. Thus there exist few effective methods to investigate underground structures. In this paper, a new inspection technique for damage evaluation of concrete-piles utilizing acoustic emission (AE) is proposed, and is verified by a series of experiments. Firstly, such basic characteristics as the attenuation and effective wave-guides for detecting AE underground, are examined through laboratory tests. Secondary, fracture tests of full-scale prefabricated concrete piles are conducted, and the characteristics of the AE are examined. Finally, actual concrete-piles attacked by the 1995 Great Hanshin Earthquake are investigated. Results confirm that the estimated damages by the proposed method are in good agreement with actual damaged locations. Thus, the method is very effective for the diagnosis of the concrete-piles.

  14. Acoustic emission study on WC-Co thermal sprayed coatings

    Miguel, J.M.; Guilemany, J.M.; Mellor, B.G.; Xu, Y.M

    2003-07-15

    Thermally sprayed coatings contain residual stresses that are produced in the spraying process. These may reduce the coating lifetime. In order to determine the optimum spraying conditions with respect to the residual stress level present, the acoustic emission (AE) during four-point bend tests on tungsten carbide-cobalt coatings sprayed onto mild steel substrates was investigated. Samples tested at different levels of deformation were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and AE in order to understand the cracking mechanisms. Relationships between the number and amplitude of AE events detected and the type of cracking processes occurring were established. It has been possible to compare the residual stresses caused by the effect of different spraying parameters, such as coating thickness, spraying distance and high velocity oxy-fuel gun.

  15. Design of crude oil storage tank for acoustic emission testing

    The integrity of crude oil storage tank needs to be well managed because they can contain a large inventory of hazardous material and because of the high cost such as cleaning and waste disposal prior to disposal and maintenance. Costs involved in cleaning and inspection can be up to several hundreds thousand Malaysian Ranting. If the floor then proves to be in good condition, these costs have been wasted. Acoustic Emission (AE) is proposed to be use for monitoring the floor of the storage tank on line without doing cleaning and waste disposal. A storage tank will be fabricated for storing the crude oil and then the corrosion process will be monitor using AE method. This paper will discuss the background, material and is technical specification, design and also the difficulties faced during design and fabrication process. (Author)

  16. Quantitative Analysis Of Acoustic Emission From Rock Fracture Experiments

    Goodfellow, Sebastian David

    This thesis aims to advance the methods of quantitative acoustic emission (AE) analysis by calibrating sensors, characterizing sources, and applying the results to solve engi- neering problems. In the first part of this thesis, we built a calibration apparatus and successfully calibrated two commercial AE sensors. The ErgoTech sensor was found to have broadband velocity sensitivity and the Panametrics V103 was sensitive to surface normal displacement. These calibration results were applied to two AE data sets from rock fracture experiments in order to characterize the sources of AE events. The first data set was from an in situ rock fracture experiment conducted at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL). The Mine-By experiment was a large scale excavation response test where both AE (10 kHz - 1 MHz) and microseismicity (MS) (1 Hz - 10 kHz) were monitored. Using the calibration information, magnitude, stress drop, dimension and energy were successfully estimated for 21 AE events recorded in the tensile region of the tunnel wall. Magnitudes were in the range -7.5 quantitative AE analysis. We found AE magnitudes in the range -7.8 quantitative analysis in the laboratory, which in- hibited our ability to study parameter scaling (M0 ∝ fc -3 scaling). These challenges were 0c (1) limited knowledge of attenuation which we proved was continuously evolving, (2) the use of a narrow frequency band for acquisition, (3) the inability to identify P and S waves given the small sample size, and (4) acquisition using a narrow amplitude range given a low signal to noise ratio. Moving forward to the final stage of this thesis, with the ability to characterize the sources of AE, we applied our method to study an engineering problem. We chose hydraulic fracturing because of its obvious importance in the future of Canadian energy production. During a hydraulic fracture treatment, whether in a lab or in the field, energy is added to the system via hydraulic pressure. The injection

  17. ANALYSIS OF MULTIPLE PITTING DEFECTS ON SPUR GEAR USING ACOUSTIC SIGNALS

    Mr. Vijay Kumar Karma

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gears are very important mechanical elements in industrial applications and it is generally made for high performance, efficiency and reliability. Any defect/fault in gear will reduce its operations/performance etc. Acoustic signal is the tool to detect fault and it is widely used for gear fault diagnostics in moving element like gear box, machine etc. The Acoustic signals can be captured from the machine with the help of acoustic sensors. The aim of this paper is to analyze the acoustic signals to capture from single stage spur gear. Here the faults consider is pitting on single and multiple teeth. The fault is created artificially. The Acoustic signal data is collected from the experimental setup at different pitting defects and then the energy dissipated is found out. The Wavelet technique is used for analysis through MATLAB software.

  18. Acoustic signal associated with the bursting of a soap film which initially closes an overpressurized cavity . Experiment and theory

    Vidal, V.; Géminard, J.-C.; Divoux, T.; Melo, F.

    2006-12-01

    We report an experimental study of the sound produced by the bursting of a thin liquid film, which initially closes an overpressurized cylindrical cavity. There is a need for a deep understanding of the phenomenon, which can be very useful in numerous practical cases. For instance, in the nature, the volcanologists observe the bursting of large, elongated, gas-bubbles at the surface of lava lakes and record the associated sound emission. One can wonder which pieces of information they can get from such acoustic measurements. For a didactic purpose, we provide also the reader with all the theoretical background necessary for the understanding of the physical processes that govern the various characteristics of the acoustic signals: the cavity geometry governs the frequency; the viscous dissipation and the radiation are responsible for the damping; the acoustic energy informs about the characteristic time associated with the film-rupture more than about the energy initially loaded in the cavity.

  19. Fatigue crack growth monitoring of idealized gearbox spline component using acoustic emission

    Zhang, Lu; Ozevin, Didem; Hardman, William; Kessler, Seth; Timmons, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. The acoustic emission (AE) method is a direct way of detecting active flaws; however, the method suffers from the influence of background noise and location/sensor based pattern recognition method. It is important to identify the source mechanism and adapt it to different test conditions and sensors. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method in a laboratory environment. The test sample has the major details of the spline component on a flattened geometry. The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges strategically positions on the structure. The fatigue test characteristics are 4 Hz frequency and 0.1 as the ratio of minimum to maximum loading in tensile regime. It is observed that there are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The frequency spectra of continuous emissions and burst emissions are compared to understand the difference of sudden crack growth and gradual crack growth. The predicted crack growth rate is compared with the AE data using the cumulative AE events at the notch tip. The source mechanism of sudden crack growth is obtained solving the inverse mathematical problem from output signal to input signal. The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges. There are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The source mechanism of

  20. Origin of burst-type acoustic emission in unflawed 7075-T6 aluminum

    Tensile tests were used to study the acoustic emission from several 7075-T6 aluminum plates. Specimens from one plate produced a large burst-type emission in addition to the continuous emission. Metallographic and fracture surface studies indicated that the burst-type emission resulted from the brittle fracture of large (20 to 60 μm) primary inclusions in the microstructure

  1. Laser cleaning of steam generator tubing based on acoustic emission technology

    As a physical method, laser cleaning technology in equipment maintenance will be a good prospect. The experimental apparatus for laser cleaning of heat tubes in the steam generator was designed according to the results of theoretical analysis. There are two conclusions; one is that laser cleaning technology is attached importance to traditional methods. Which has advantages in saving on much manpower and material resource and it is a good cleaning method for heat tubes. The other is that the acoustic emission signal includes lots of information on the laser cleaning process, which can be used as real-time monitoring in laser cleaning processes. When the laser acts for 350 s, 100 % contaminants of heat tubes is cleaned off, and the sensor only receives weak AE signal at that time.

  2. Evaluation of corrosion damage of aluminum alloy using acoustic emission testing

    GENG Rongsheng; FU Gangqiang

    2004-01-01

    Current studies are aiming at monitoring corrosion damage of aircraft main structures by using acoustic emission (AE) technique and at supplying useful data for determining calendar life of the aircraft. The characteristics of AE signals produced during accelerating corrosion process are described, and methods for evaluating corrosion damages and determining remaining life of main structures of aircraft using AE testing are outlined. Experimental results have shown that AE technique can detect corrosion damage of aluminum alloy much earlier than conventional non-destructive testing means, such as ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing. Relationship between corrosion damage and AE parameters was obtained through investigating corrosion damage extent and changes of AE signals during accelerating corrosion test, and showing that AE technique can be used to detect early corrosion, investigating corrosion developing trend, and in monitoring and evaluating corrosion damages.

  3. Laser cleaning of steam generator tubing based on acoustic emission technology

    Hou, Su-xia; Luo, Ji-jun; Shen, Tao; Li, Ru-song [Xi' an Hi-Tech Institute, Xi' an (China)

    2015-12-15

    As a physical method, laser cleaning technology in equipment maintenance will be a good prospect. The experimental apparatus for laser cleaning of heat tubes in the steam generator was designed according to the results of theoretical analysis. There are two conclusions; one is that laser cleaning technology is attached importance to traditional methods. Which has advantages in saving on much manpower and material resource and it is a good cleaning method for heat tubes. The other is that the acoustic emission signal includes lots of information on the laser cleaning process, which can be used as real-time monitoring in laser cleaning processes. When the laser acts for 350 s, 100 % contaminants of heat tubes is cleaned off, and the sensor only receives weak AE signal at that time.

  4. On acoustic emission for failure investigation in CFRP: Pattern recognition and peak frequency analyses

    Gutkin, R.; Green, C. J.; Vangrattanachai, S.; Pinho, S. T.; Robinson, P.; Curtis, P. T.

    2011-05-01

    This paper investigates failure in Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastics CFRP using Acoustic Emission (AE). Signals have been collected and post-processed for various test configurations: tension, Compact Tension (CT), Compact Compression (CC), Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and four-point bend End Notched Flexure (4-ENF). The signals are analysed with three different pattern recognition algorithms: k-means, Self Organising Map (SOM) combined with k-means and Competitive Neural Network (CNN). The SOM combined with k-means appears as the most effective of the three algorithms. The results from the clustering analysis follow patterns found in the peak frequencies distribution. A detailed study of the frequency content of each test is then performed and the classification of several failure modes is achieved.

  5. Evaluation of fatigue damage for wind turbine blades using acoustic emission

    In this study, the flap fatigue test of a 48 m long wind turbine blade was performed for 1 million cycles to evaluate the characteristics of acoustic emission signals generated from fatigue damage of the wind blades. As the number of hits and total energy continued to increase during the first 0.6 million cycles, blade damage was constant. The rise-time result showed that the major aspects of damage were initiation and propagation of matrix cracks. In addition, the signal analysis of each channel showed that the most seriously damaged sections were the joint between the skin and spar, 20 m from the connection, and the spot of actual damage was observable by visual inspection. It turned out that the event source location was related to the change in each channels total energy. It is expected that these findings will be useful for the optimal design of wind turbine blades

  6. Detection of simulated pitting corrosion and noises in crude oil storage tank by acoustic emission

    The damage mechanisms associated with crude oil storage tanks can be complex and varied and include pitting corrosion due to presence of species such as sulphate reducing bacteria. Acoustic Emission (AE) could be used to characterise the pitting corrosion signal in crude oil storage tanks but it is extremely difficult to simulate the pitting corrosion in the laboratory using crude oil as electrolyte because crude oil is considered as non corrosive medium. In this study, induced current have been introduced onto a surface ASTM 516 steel as an electrical source to simulate the electrical noise produced during pitting corrosion process and AE sensor have been used to detect this current. It is found that AE system could detect AE signal release during current induction this current and is expected that if the exact simulation of the current magnitude produced during pitting corrosion process is made available, AE characterisation of pitting corrosion in such tank could be made possible. (Author)

  7. Effect of hydrogen attack on acoustic emission behavior of low carbon steel

    2002-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of hydrogen attack degree on acoustic emission (AE) behavior of low carbon steel during tensiling, specimens made of low carbon steel was exposed to hydrogen gas of 18 MPa at 450 and 500℃ for 240, 480 and 720 h respectively. Experimental results show that with increase of the hydrogen attack degree, the totally AE activity decreases during tensiling. In addition, the count of AE signals with high amplitude for the specimens with hydrogen attack keeps a constant which is less than that without hydrogen attack. It is concluded that AE signals originate in the specimens with hydrogen attack from intergranular fracture induced by methane blisterings or/and microcracks on grain boundaries.

  8. Near-field signal acquisition for smartglasses using two acoustic vector-sensors

    Levin, Dovid Y.; Habets, Emanuël A.P.; Gannot, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Smartglasses, in addition to their visual-output capabilities, often contain acoustic sensors for receiving the user's voice. However, operation in noisy environments may lead to significant degradation of the received signal. To address this issue, we propose employing an acoustic sensor array which is mounted on the eyeglasses frames. The signals from the array are processed by an algorithm with the purpose of acquiring the user's desired near-filed speech signal while suppressing noise sig...

  9. Acoustic diagnosis of mechanical fault feature based on reference signal frequency domain semi-blind extraction

    Zeguang YI; Pan, Nan; Liu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at fault diagnosis problems caused by complex machinery parts, serious background noises and the application limitations of traditional blind signal processing algorithm to the mechanical acoustic signal processing, a failure acoustic diagnosis based on reference signal frequency domain semi-blind extraction is proposed. Key technologies are introduced: Based on frequency-domain blind deconvolution algorithm, the artificial fish swarm algorithm which is good for global optimization is ...

  10. Use of Acoustic Emission During Scratch Testing for Understanding Adhesion Behavior of Aluminum Nitride Coatings

    Choudhary, R. K.; Mishra, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, acoustic emission during scratch testing of the aluminum nitride coatings formed on stainless steel substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering was analyzed to assess the coating failure. The AlN coatings were formed under the variation of substrate temperature, substrate bias potential, and discharge power. The coatings deposited in the temperature range of 100 to 400 °C showed peak acoustic emission less than 1.5%, indicating ductile nature of the coating. However, for coatings formed with substrate negative bias potential of 20 to 50 V, numerous sharp acoustic bursts with maximum emission approaching 80% were observed, indicating brittle nature of the coatings with large number of defects present. The shift in the intensity of the first major acoustic peak toward higher load, with the increasing bias potential, confirmed improved adhesion of the coating. Also, the higher discharge power resulted in increased acoustic emission.

  11. Use of Acoustic Emission During Scratch Testing for Understanding Adhesion Behavior of Aluminum Nitride Coatings

    Choudhary, R. K.; Mishra, P.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, acoustic emission during scratch testing of the aluminum nitride coatings formed on stainless steel substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering was analyzed to assess the coating failure. The AlN coatings were formed under the variation of substrate temperature, substrate bias potential, and discharge power. The coatings deposited in the temperature range of 100 to 400 °C showed peak acoustic emission less than 1.5%, indicating ductile nature of the coating. However, for coatings formed with substrate negative bias potential of 20 to 50 V, numerous sharp acoustic bursts with maximum emission approaching 80% were observed, indicating brittle nature of the coatings with large number of defects present. The shift in the intensity of the first major acoustic peak toward higher load, with the increasing bias potential, confirmed improved adhesion of the coating. Also, the higher discharge power resulted in increased acoustic emission.

  12. Monitoring of the deformation and fracture process of dual phase steels employing acoustic emission techniques

    Highlights: ► Acoustic emission (AE) signals from a tensile test of dual phase steels (DPS)s with various morphologies were captured. ► By utilizing sentry function we tried to relate the AE signals and micromechanisms of fracture of these steels. ► SEM observations for verification of results, indicate that AE monitoring is an efficient tool to detect micromechanisms identifying failure in DPSs. - Abstract: In this paper, continuing our previous works, a new approach for detection of fracture micro mechanisms of ferrite–martensite dual-phase steels (DPSs) with various microstructures was investigated. For this purpose, dual phase steels with different volume fractions of martensite (VM) were produced by various heat treatment methods on a low carbon steel (0.1% C), and acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was then used during tensile testing of these DPSs. The AE signals from a tensile test using DPS in the range of 12–73% VM and various morphologies, like equiaxed or fibrous martensite phase, were captured. Principally, to understand the AE response and behavior of the martensite or ferrite phase separately, some samples of martensite and heat treated ferrite were tested. After the tests, by utilizing a new function named “sentry function”, we tried to relate the AE signals to various failure mechanisms of these steels. In confirmation of our earlier works, the results show that AE monitoring and sentry function are efficient tools to detect failure micromechanisms, consisting of ferrite–martensite interface decohesion and/or martensite phase fracture, identifying the correlation of failure mechanisms to microstructure in DPS. The results were verified with scanning electron microscopic observations and they indicate that AE monitoring is an efficient tool to detect micromechanisms identifying failure in DPSs.

  13. Acoustic signal detection through the cross-correlation method in experiments with different signal to noise ratio and reverberation conditions

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Bou-Cabo, M; Felis, I; Llorens, C; Martínez-Mora, J A; Saldaña, M

    2015-01-01

    The study and application of signal detection techniques based on cross-correlation method for acoustic transient signals in noisy and reverberant environments are presented. These techniques are shown to provide high signal to noise ratio, good signal discernment from very close echoes and accurate detection of signal arrival time. The proposed methodology has been tested on real data collected in environments and conditions where its benefits can be shown. This work focuses on the acoustic detection applied to tasks of positioning in underwater structures and calibration such those as ANTARES and KM3NeT deep-sea neutrino telescopes, as well as, in particle detection through acoustic events for the COUPP/PICO detectors. Moreover, a method for obtaining the real amplitude of the signal in time (voltage) by using cross correlation has been developed and tested and is described in this work.

  14. Wireless Acoustic Signal Monitoring Using MEMS sensor and ATmega on LabVIEW Platform

    Swathy L; Lizy Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics and vibrations caused on machine structures can result in faulty or collapse of the whole mechanical system. These acoustics produced by machinery are vital indicators of machine health. Acoustic signals analysis can be used as a tool for locating the problem and thus taking necessary actions. MEMS sensors provide high accurate low size and low cost microphones which can be even used in low cost space applications such as sounding rockets, nano-satellites etc. This paper...

  15. Acoustic cardiac signals analysis: a Kalman filter–based approach

    Salleh SH

    2012-06-01

    for the given measurement. The model is formulated into state-space form to enable use of a Kalman filter to estimate the clean cycles of heart sounds. The estimates obtained by Kalman filtering are optimal in mean squared sense.Keywords: heart sound, murmurs, ECG, Kalman filters, acoustic cardiac signals

  16. Acoustic emission detection of macro-cracks on engraving tool steel inserts during the injection molding cycle using PZT sensors.

    Svečko, Rajko; Kusić, Dragan; Kek, Tomaž; Sarjaš, Andrej; Hančič, Aleš; Grum, Janez

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an improved monitoring system for the failure detection of engraving tool steel inserts during the injection molding cycle. This system uses acoustic emission PZT sensors mounted through acoustic waveguides on the engraving insert. We were thus able to clearly distinguish the defect through measured AE signals. Two engraving tool steel inserts were tested during the production of standard test specimens, each under the same processing conditions. By closely comparing the captured AE signals on both engraving inserts during the filling and packing stages, we were able to detect the presence of macro-cracks on one engraving insert. Gabor wavelet analysis was used for closer examination of the captured AE signals' peak amplitudes during the filling and packing stages. The obtained results revealed that such a system could be used successfully as an improved tool for monitoring the integrity of an injection molding process. PMID:23673677

  17. On the possibility of the soliton description of acoustic emission during plastic deformation of crystals

    Two basic sources of acoustic emission (AE) during plastic deformation of pure crystals are discussed. One is related to non-stationary dislocation motion (the bremsstrahlung type of acoustic radiation), and the other to dislocation annihilation processes (the main component of the transition type of acoustic radiation). The possible soliton description of the bremsstrahlung acoustic radiation by oscillating dislocation kink and by bound kink-antikink pair (dislocation breather) is cosidered on the basis of Eshelby's theory (Proc. Roy. Soc. London A266, 222 (1962)). The dislocation annihilation component of transition acoustic emission is considered only in relation to the Frank-Read source operation. A soliton model for this type of acoustic radiation is proposed and the simple quantum-mechanical hypothesis is advanced for the purpose. Both soliton descriptions are discussed on the basis of available experimental data on the AE intensity behaviour during tensile deformation of crystals. (author). 36 refs, 5 figs

  18. Acoustic wave focusing in complex media using Nonlinear Time Reversal coded signal processing

    Dos Santos, S.; Dvořáková, Zuzana; Lints, M.; Kůs, V.; Salupere, A.; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    Brno : University of Technology, 2014. s. 144-145. ISBN 978-80-214-5019-6. [European Conference on Non-Destructive Testing (ECNDT 2014) /11./. 06.10.2014-10.10.2014, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : ultrasonic testing (UT) * signal processing * TR-NEWS * Nonlinear Time Reversal * NDT * nonlinear acoustic s Subject RIV: BI - Acoustic s

  19. Acoustic emission measurements in petroleum-related rock mechanics

    Unander, Tor Erling

    2002-07-01

    Acoustic emission activity in rock has usually been studied in crystalline rock, which reflects that rock mechanics has also mostly been occupied with such rocks in relations to seismology, mining and tunneling. On the other hand, petroleum-related rock mechanics focuses on the behaviour of sedimentary rock. Thus, this thesis presents a general study of acoustic emission activity in sedimentary rock, primarily in sandstone. Chalk, limestone and shale have also been tested, but to much less degree because the AE activity in these materials is low. To simplify the study, pore fluids have not been used. The advent of the personal computer and computerized measuring equipment have made possible new methods both for measuring and analysing acoustic emissions. Consequently, a majority of this work is devoted to the development and implementation of new analysis techniques. A broad range of topics are treated: (1) Quantification of the AE activity level, assuming that the event rate best represents the activity. An algorithm for estimating the event rate and a methodology for objectively describing special changes in the activity e.g., onset determination, are presented. (2) Analysis of AE waveform data. A new method for determining the source energy of an AE event is presented, and it is shown how seismic source theory can be used to analyze even intermediate quality data. Based on these techniques, it is shown that a major part of the measured AE activity originates from a region close to the sensor, not necessarily representing the entire sample. (3) An improved procedure for estimating source locations is presented. The main benefit is a procedure that better handles arrival time data with large errors. Statistical simulations are used to quantify the uncertainties in the locations. The analysis techniques are developed with the application to sedimentary rock in mind, and in two articles, the techniques are used in the study of such materials. The work in the first

  20. Determination of bearing steel heat treatment with the use of the acoustic emission method

    T. Z. Wozniak

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A study on the control of an extremely important stage of the martensitic-bainitic austempering and obtaining the M-B structure in the 100CrMnSi6-4 steel with the use of the acoustic emission (AE has been undertaken. In order to enrich retained austenite with carbon, steels are austempered at appropriately low temperatures. A martensitic transformation, resulting from diffusionless and displacive transformation is associated with significant AE signs. The strain energy produced during growth due to the shape change is reduced by plastic deformation. Predominant source of (AE is the movement of dislocations in order to relieve internal stresses.The heat treatment was performed in a modern, purpose-constructed device which simultaneously records acoustic emission effects. The signals were recorded with the use of an AE analyzer 20–800 kHz, and they were received by means of a broadband piezoelectric transducer with the use of a specialist card with a sampling frequency of 1200 kHz. The results regarding a correlation of austempering temperature and the maximum number of AE events and dilatometric results have been presented. This parameter can be used for precise Ms temperature estimation. Basing on microstructural investigations, it has been found that previously formed martensite with midrib morphology also accelerates the bainitic transformation.

  1. Acoustic emission from stress corrosion crack initiation and growth in Type 304 SS

    Acoustic emission (AE) studies of intergranular stress corrosion crack (IGSCC) initiation and growth and pit initiated crack initiation have been conducted. IGSCC occurs with a moderate number of AE events, on the order of 20 ev/mm2 of crack extension, for both crack initiation and growth processes. There was no obvious difference in the AE signal amplitude or risetime distributions for crack initiation or growth. Acoustic emission appear to emanate from plastic zone formation ahead of the crack tip and ligament or inclusion failure behind the crack. Pitting was found to occur with a significant number of AE events but there was no evidence that transgranular stress corrosion (TGSCC) produced measurable AE. The source of the AE from pitting was suggested as being from the rupture of salt caps over the pits. These results suggest that AE is a potential tool for monitoring stress corrosion cracking of reactor piping; however, development of methods to discriminate between AE from stress corrosion and other reactor noise will be necessary

  2. Development of Novel Optical Fiber Interferometric Sensors with High Sensitivity for Acoustic Emission Detection

    Deng, Jiangdong

    2004-01-01

    For the purpose of developing a new highly-sensitive and reliable fiber optical acoustic sensor capable of real-time on-line detection of acoustic emissions in power transformers, this dissertation presents the comprehensive research work on the theory, modeling, design, instrumentation, noise analysis, and performance evaluation of a diaphragm-based optical fiber acoustic (DOFIA) sensor system. The optical interference theory and the diaphragm dynamic vibration analysis form the two fou...

  3. Contralateral acoustic suppression of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions: Activation of the medial olivocochlear system

    Komazec Zoran

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Medial olivocochlear pathway represents the final part of efferent acoustic pathway which comes from the superior olivary complex ending at outer hair cells. Activation of medial olivocochlear system (MOCS alters the cochlear output decreasing the travelling wave within cochlea. Stimulation of MOCS provides protection against moderate levels of noise, encoding noise signals as well as selecting hearing attention. Activation of MOCS can be performed using contralateral acoustic stimulation. The principal result of presentation of contralateral acoustic stimulation during screening of transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE is an attenuation of the TEOAE amplitude. Thirty-eight ears were examined in this study: twenty-eight ears from 14 normal-hearing adults and 10 patients with unilateral deafness. Healthy subjects were exposed to contralateral broad-band noise of various intensities (40, 30, 20 and 10 dB SL, as well as 30 dB SL pure tone stimulation (1 kHz and 4 kHz. A decrease of TEOAE amplitudes during contralateral stimulation with 40 and 30 dB SL broad-band noise and pure tones was established. This effect was a result of MOCS activation. A greater intensity of contralateral stimulation evoked greater decrease of TEOAE amplitude; stimulation with broad-band noise caused greater attenuation than with pure tone stimulation. Contralateral stimulation of deaf ears in the group with unilateral deafness was also performed. Statistically significant difference between TEOAE amplitude before and during contralateral stimulation was not established. This circumstance explains that activation of MOCS and consequent reduction of outer hair cells motility is very possibly caused by contralateral acoustic stimulation. Apart from studying physiological significance of efferent auditory system, results of this and similar studies can be used for production of hearing aids improving speech discrimination in noisy environment.

  4. Avalanche dynamics of structural phase transitions in shape memory alloys by acoustic emission spectroscopy

    Ludwig, Benno

    2009-09-24

    In this work the avalanche dynamics of five shape memory samples has been analyzed by acoustic emission spectroscopy. The acoustic emission spectroscopy is particularly suitable for this analysis as it couples with high sensitivity to small structural changes caused by nucleation processes, interface movements, or variant rearrangements [91]. Owing to its high time resolution it provides a statistical approach to describe the jerky and intermittent character of the avalanche dynamics [20]. Rate-dependent cooling and heating runs have been conducted in order to study time-dependent aspects of the transition dynamics of the single crystals Ni{sub 63}Al{sub 37}, Au{sub 50.5}Cd{sub 49.5}, and Fe{sub 68.8}Pd{sup single}{sub 31.2}, and the polycrystalline sample Fe{sub 68.8}Pd{sup poly}{sub 31.2}. Moreover, a ferromagnetic Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 23}Ga{sub 25} single crystal has been studied by temperature cycles under an applied magnetic field and additionally by magnetic-field cycles at a constant temperature in the martensitic phase. All samples analyzed in this work show power law behavior in the acoustic emission features amplitude, energy, and duration, which indicates scale-free behavior. The access to these power law spectra allows an investigation of energy barriers separating the metastable states, which give rise to avalanche transition dynamics. By performing rate-dependent experiments the importance of thermal fluctuations and the impact of martensite respectively twin stabilization processes have been examined. In the case of the Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 23}Ga{sub 25} sample, the magnetic-field-induced variant rearrangement at slow field cycles leads to stronger signals than the rearrangement at quick cycles. This behavior can be explained by twin stabilization processes, which are accompanied by a reduction of the twin boundary mobility. For Ni{sub 63}Al{sub 37}, the combination of relevant thermal fluctuations, different involved time scales, and a high degree of

  5. Avalanche dynamics of structural phase transitions in shape memory alloys by acoustic emission spectroscopy

    In this work the avalanche dynamics of five shape memory samples has been analyzed by acoustic emission spectroscopy. The acoustic emission spectroscopy is particularly suitable for this analysis as it couples with high sensitivity to small structural changes caused by nucleation processes, interface movements, or variant rearrangements [91]. Owing to its high time resolution it provides a statistical approach to describe the jerky and intermittent character of the avalanche dynamics [20]. Rate-dependent cooling and heating runs have been conducted in order to study time-dependent aspects of the transition dynamics of the single crystals Ni63Al37, Au50.5Cd49.5, and Fe68.8Pdsingle31.2, and the polycrystalline sample Fe68.8Pdpoly31.2. Moreover, a ferromagnetic Ni52Mn23Ga25 single crystal has been studied by temperature cycles under an applied magnetic field and additionally by magnetic-field cycles at a constant temperature in the martensitic phase. All samples analyzed in this work show power law behavior in the acoustic emission features amplitude, energy, and duration, which indicates scale-free behavior. The access to these power law spectra allows an investigation of energy barriers separating the metastable states, which give rise to avalanche transition dynamics. By performing rate-dependent experiments the importance of thermal fluctuations and the impact of martensite respectively twin stabilization processes have been examined. In the case of the Ni52Mn23Ga25 sample, the magnetic-field-induced variant rearrangement at slow field cycles leads to stronger signals than the rearrangement at quick cycles. This behavior can be explained by twin stabilization processes, which are accompanied by a reduction of the twin boundary mobility. For Ni63Al37, the combination of relevant thermal fluctuations, different involved time scales, and a high degree of intrinsic disorder leads to a lower acoustic activity and weaker signals under decreasing cooling rates. In the

  6. Development of leak detection system of heat exchanger using acoustic emission technique

    Acoustic Emission(AE) technique has been applied to not only mechanical property testing but also on-line monitoring of the entire structure or a limit zone only. Although several AE devices have already been developed for on-line monitoring, the price of these systems is very high and it is difficult for the field to apply yet. In this study, we developed a specially designed PC-based leak detection system using A/D board. In this paper, AE technique has been applied to detect leak for heat exchanger by analyzing the characteristics of signal obtained from leak. It was confirmed that the characteristics of the signal generated by the turbulence of gas in the heat exchanger is narrow band signal having between 130-250kHz. Generally, the amplitude of leak signal is increased as the leak size increasing, but showed no significant change at frequency characteristic. Leak source location can be found by determining for the point of highest signal amplitude by comparing with several fixed sensors. In this paper, AE results are compared with the PC-based leak detection system using A/D board

  7. Inverse Problem Solution in Acoustic Emission Source Analysis: Classical and Artificial Neural Network Approaches

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Chlada, Milan; Vodička, Josef

    Torino : Springer, 2007 - (Delsanto, P.), s. 515-529 ISBN 0-387-33860-8 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/03/0071; GA ČR GA201/04/2102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission * artificial neural network s * inverse problems Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  8. An effective sensor for tool wear monitoring in face milling: Acoustic emission

    M T Mathew; P Srinivasa Pai; L A Rocha

    2008-06-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) has been widely used for monitoring manufacturing processes particularly those involving metal cutting. Monitoring the condition of the cutting tool in the machining process is very important since tool condition will affect the part size, quality and an unexpected tool failure may damage the tool, work-piece and sometimes the machine tool itself. AE can be effectively used for tool condition monitoring applications because the emissions from process changes like tool wear, chip formation i.e. plastic deformation, etc. can be directly related to the mechanics of the process. Also AE can very effectively respond to changes like tool fracture, tool chipping, etc. when compared to cutting force and since the frequency range is much higher than that of machine vibrations and environmental noises, a relatively uncontaminated signal can be obtained. AE signal analysis was applied for sensing tool wear in face milling operations. Cutting tests were carried out on a vertical milling machine. Tests were carried out for a given cutting condition, using single insert, two inserts (adjacent and opposite) and three inserts in the cutter. AE signal parameters like ring down count and rms voltage were measured and were correlated with flank wear values (VB max). The results of this investigation indicate that AE can be effectively used for monitoring tool wear in face milling operations.

  9. Courtship initiation is stimulated by acoustic signals in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Aki Ejima

    Full Text Available Finding a mating partner is a critical task for many organisms. It is in the interest of males to employ multiple sensory modalities to search for females. In Drosophila melanogaster, vision is thought to be the most important courtship stimulating cue at long distance, while chemosensory cues are used at relatively short distance. In this report, we show that when visual cues are not available, sounds produced by the female allow the male to detect her presence in a large arena. When the target female was artificially immobilized, the male spent a prolonged time searching before starting courtship. This delay in courtship initiation was completely rescued by playing either white noise or recorded fly movement sounds to the male, indicating that the acoustic and/or seismic stimulus produced by movement stimulates courtship initiation, most likely by increasing the general arousal state of the male. Mutant males expressing tetanus toxin (TNT under the control of Gr68a-GAL4 had a defect in finding active females and a delay in courtship initiation in a large arena, but not in a small arena. Gr68a-GAL4 was found to be expressed pleiotropically not only in putative gustatory pheromone receptor neurons but also in mechanosensory neurons, suggesting that Gr68a-positive mechanosensory neurons, not gustatory neurons, provide motion detection necessary for courtship initiation. TNT/Gr68a males were capable of discriminating the copulation status and age of target females in courtship conditioning, indicating that female discrimination and formation of olfactory courtship memory are independent of the Gr68a-expressing neurons that subserve gustation and mechanosensation. This study suggests for the first time that mechanical signals generated by a female fly have a prominent effect on males' courtship in the dark and leads the way to studying how multimodal sensory information and arousal are integrated in behavioral decision making.

  10. Temporal analysis of acoustic emission from a plunged granular bed

    Tsuji, Daisuke; Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2015-10-01

    The statistical property of acoustic emission (AE) events from a plunged granular bed is analyzed by means of actual-time and natural-time analyses. These temporal analysis methods allow us to investigate the details of AE events that follow a power-law distribution. In the actual-time analysis, the calm-time distribution, and the decay of the event-occurrence density after the largest event (i.e., the Omori-Utsu law) are measured. Although the former always shows a power-law form, the latter does not always obey a power law. Markovianity of the event-occurrence process is also verified using a scaling law by assuming that both of them exhibit power laws. We find that the effective shear strain rate is a key parameter to classify the emergence rate of power-law nature and Markovianity in granular AE events. For the natural-time analysis, the existence of self-organized critical states is revealed by calculating the variance of natural time χk, where k th natural time of N events is defined as χk=k /N . In addition, the energy difference distribution can be fitted by a q -Gaussian form, which is also consistent with the criticality of the system.

  11. Continuous acoustic emission monitoring of reinforced concrete under accelerated corrosion

    Di Benedetti, M.; Loreto, G.; Nanni, A.; Matta, F.; Gonzalez-Nunez, M. A.

    2011-04-01

    The development of techniques capable of evaluating deterioration of reinforced concrete (RC) structures is instrumental to the advancement of techniques for the structural health monitoring (SHM) and service life estimate for constructed facilities. One of the main causes leading to degradation of RC is the corrosion of the steel reinforcement. This process can be modeled phenomenologically, while laboratory tests aimed at studying durability responses are typically accelerated in order to provide useful results within a realistic period of time. To assess the condition of damage in RC, a number of nondestructive methods have been recently studied. Acoustic emission (AE) is emerging as a nondestructive tool to detect the onset and progression of deterioration mechanisms. In this paper, the development of accelerated corrosion and continuous AE monitoring test set-up for RC specimens are presented. Relevant information are provided with regard to the characteristics of the corrosion circuit, continuous measurement and acquisition of corrosion potential, selection of AE sensors and AE parameter setting. The effectiveness of the setup in detecting and characterizing the initiation and progression of the corrosion phenomenon is discussed on the basis of preliminary results from small-scale, pre-cracked RC specimens, which are representative of areas near the clear cover in typical RC bridge members.

  12. Early corrosion monitoring of prestressed concrete piles using acoustic emission

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul H.

    2013-04-01

    The depassivation and corrosion of bonded prestressing steel strands in concrete bridge members may lead to major damage or collapse before visual inspections uncover evident signs of damage, and well before the end of the design life. Recognizing corrosion in its early stage is desirable to plan and prioritize remediation strategies. The Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is a rational means to develop structural health monitoring and prognosis systems for the early detection and location of corrosion in concrete. Compelling features are the sensitivity to events related to micro- and macrodamage, non-intrusiveness, and suitability for remote and wireless applications. There is little understanding of the correlation between AE and the morphology and extent of early damage on the steel surface. In this paper, the evidence collected from prestressed concrete (PC) specimens that are exposed to salt water is discussed vis-à-vis AE data from continuous monitoring. The specimens consist of PC strips that are subjected to wet/dry salt water cycles, representing portions of bridge piles that are exposed to tidal action. Evidence collected from the specimens includes: (a) values of half-cell potential and linear polarization resistance to recognize active corrosion in its early stage; and (b) scanning electron microscopy micrographs of steel areas from two specimens that were decommissioned once the electrochemical measurements indicated a high probability of active corrosion. These results are used to evaluate the AE activity resulting from early corrosion.

  13. Hydraulic Fracturing of Heterogeneous Rock Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    Stanchits, Sergey; Burghardt, Jeffrey; Surdi, Aniket

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the results of laboratory studies of hydraulic fracture in homogeneous sandstone blocks with man-made interfaces and heterogeneous shale blocks with weak natural interfaces are reported. Tests were conducted under similar stress conditions, with fluids of different viscosity and at different injection rates. The measurements and analysis allows the identification of fracture initiation and behavior. Fracturing with high-viscosity fluids resulted in stable fracture propagation initiated before breakdown, while fracturing with low-viscosity fluids resulted in unstable fracture propagation initiated almost simultaneously with breakdown. Analysis also allows us to measure the fluid volume entering the fracture and the fracture volume. Monitoring of acoustic emission hypocenter localizations, indicates the development of created fractured area including the intersection with interfaces, fluid propagation along interfaces, crossing interfaces, and approaching the boundaries of the block. We observe strong differences in hydraulic fracture behavior, fracture geometry and fracture propagation speed, when fracturing with water and high-viscosity fluids. We also observed distinct differences between sandstone blocks and shale blocks, when a certain P-wave velocity ray path is intersected by the hydraulic fracture. The velocity increases in sandstones and decreases in shale.

  14. CORROSION PROCESS IN REINFORCED CONCRETE IDENTIFIED BY ACOUSTIC EMISSION

    Kawasaki, Yuma; Kitaura, Misuzu; Tomoda, Yuichi; Ohtsu, Masayasu

    Deterioration of Reinforced Concrete (RC) due to salt attack is known as one of serious problems. Thus, development of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques is important to assess the corrosion process. Reinforcement in concrete normally does not corrode because of a passive film on the surface of reinforcement. When chloride concentration at reinfo rcement exceeds the threshold level, the passive film is destroyed. Thus maintenance is desirable at an early stage. In this study, to identify the onset of corrosion and the nucleation of corrosion-induced cracking in concrete due to expansion of corrosion products, continuous acoustic emission (AE) monitoring is applied. Accelerated corrosion and cyclic wet and dry tests are performed in a laboratory. The SiGMA (Simplified Green's functions for Moment tensor Analysis) proce dure is applied to AE waveforms to clarify source kinematics of micro-cracks locations, types and orientations. Results show that the onset of corrosion and the nu cleation of corrosion-induced cracking in concrete are successfully identified. Additionally, cross-sections inside the reinforcement are observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). From these results, a great promise for AE techniques to monitor salt damage at an early stage in RC structures is demonstrated.

  15. Dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emission from alkali halide crystals

    B P Chandra; Anubha S Gour; Vivek K Chandra; Yuvraj Patil

    2004-06-01

    The present paper reports the dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emission (AE) from alkali halide crystals. Equations are derived for the strain dependence of the transient AE pulse rate, peak value of the AE pulse rate and the total number of AE pulse emitted. It is found that the AE pulse rate should be maximum for a particular strain of the crystals. The peak value of the AE pulse rate should depend on the volume and strain rate of the crystals, and also on the pinning time of dislocations. Since the pinning time of dislocations decreases with increasing strain rate, the AE pulse rate should be weakly dependent on the strain rate of the crystals. The total number of AE should increase linearly with deformation and then it should attain a saturation value for the large deformation. By measuring the strain dependence of the AE pulse rate at a fixed strain rate, the time constant $_{\\text{s}}$ for surface annihilation of dislocations and the pinning time $_{\\text{p}}$ of the dislocations can be determined. A good agreement is found between the theoretical and experimental results related to the AE from alkali halide crystals.

  16. Transient cavitation and acoustic emission produced by different laser lithotripters.

    Zhong, P; Tong, H L; Cocks, F H; Pearle, M S; Preminger, G M

    1998-08-01

    Transient cavitation and shockwave generation produced by pulsed-dye and holmium:YAG laser lithotripters were studied using high-speed photography and acoustic emission measurements. In addition, stone phantoms were used to compare the fragmentation efficiency of various laser and electrohydraulic lithotripters. The pulsed-dye laser, with a wavelength (504 nm) strongly absorbed by most stone materials but not by water, and a short pulse duration of approximately 1 microsec, induces plasma formation on the surface of the target calculi. Subsequently, the rapid expansion of the plasma forms a cavitation bubble, which expands spherically to a maximum size and then collapses violently, leading to strong shockwave generation and microjet impingement, which comprises the primary mechanism for stone fragmentation with short-pulse lasers. In contrast, the holmium laser, with a wavelength (2100 nm) most strongly absorbed by water as well as by all stone materials and a long pulse duration of 250 to 350 microsec, produces an elongated, pear-shaped cavitation bubble at the tip of the optical fiber that forms a vapor channel to conduct the ensuing laser energy to the target stone (Moss effect). The expansion and subsequent collapse of the elongated bubble is asymmetric, resulting in weak shockwave generation and microjet impingement. Thus, stone fragmentation in holmium laser lithotripsy is caused primarily by thermal ablation (drilling effect). PMID:9726407

  17. Acoustic Emission, b-values and Foliation Plane Anisotropy

    Sehizadeh, Mahdi; Nasseri, Mohammad H.; Ye, Sheng; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    The b-value and D-value are two parameters related to size and distance distribution of earthquakes. There are many different factors affecting b-value such as stress state, thermal gradients, focal mechanism and heterogeneity. For example, the literature shows that the b-value changes systematically with respect to the focal mechanism. In laboratory experiments, foliation planes introduce a weakness in samples and can be considered as a potential for rupture or pre-existing faults, so they may exhibit similar relationships. The D-value defines the degree of clustering of earthquakes and would be expected to have a defined relationship with respect to the anisotropy. Using a unique facility in the Rock Fracture Dynamics laboratory at the University of Toronto, three sets of polyaxial experiments have been performed on cubic samples with foliation planes systematically oriented at different angles to the principal stress direction. During these tests, samples were loaded under controlled true-triaxial stress conditions until they failed or had severe damage and acoustic emission events were recorded using 18 sensors around the samples. The paper describes how the combination of stress state and foliation planes affects the b-value and D-value under laboratory conditions.

  18. Various numerical simulation methods for acoustic emission in rock

    Acoustic Emission (AE) or Microseismicity (MS) is a very useful method to understand fracture mechanism and to predict serious rock fracture like rockburst. This method can be applied to monitor reservoirs where water and gas are injected, for example, in underground sequestration of carbon dioxide and in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) of petroleum industry. If a numerical simulation helps to interpret AE monitoring results, AE monitoring would become much more powerful tool for the rock engineering. Thus, in this paper, the authors review various methods that can simulate occurrence of AE events incorporating inhomogeneity of rock. A code of Finite Element Method (FEM) developed by Tang et al., those of Boundary Element Method (BEM) by Napier's and Stephansson's groups and those of Distinct Element Method (DEM) by Shimizu et. al., Fakhimi et al. and Cai et al. are briefly introduced as simulation methods of brittle fracture like rockburst. For simulation of AE events induced by water or gas injection, DEM incorporating Fluid Flow Algorism by Shimizu et al. are introduced, with showing their simulation results of hydraulic fracturing. (author)

  19. Multivariate data-driven modelling and pattern recognition for damage detection and identification for acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonics

    Different methods are commonly used for non-destructive testing in structures; among others, acoustic emission and ultrasonic inspections are widely used to assess structures. The research presented in this paper is motivated by the need to improve the inspection capabilities and reliability of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems based on ultrasonic guided waves with focus on the acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonics techniques. The use of a guided wave based approach is driven by the fact that these waves are able to propagate over relatively long distances, and interact sensitively and uniquely with different types of defect. Special attention is paid here to the development of efficient SHM methodologies. This requires robust signal processing techniques for the correct interpretation of the complex ultrasonic waves. Therefore, a variety of existing algorithms for signal processing and pattern recognition are evaluated and integrated into the different proposed methodologies. As a contribution to solve the problem, this paper presents results in damage detection and classification using a methodology based on hierarchical nonlinear principal component analysis, square prediction measurements and self-organizing maps, which are applied to data from acoustic emission tests and acousto-ultrasonic inspections. At the end, the efficiency of these methodologies is experimentally evaluated in diverse anisotropic composite structures. (paper)

  20. ?Smart COPVs? - Continued Successful Development of JSC IR&D Acoustic Emissions (AE) SHM Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop and apply promising quantitative pass/fail criteria to CPV using acoustic emission (AE) and lay the foundation for continued development of an automated...

  1. Denoising of human speech using combined acoustic and em sensor signal processing

    Ng, L C; Burnett, G C; Holzrichter, J F; Gable, T J

    1999-11-29

    Low Power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference. This greatly enhances the quality and quantify of information for many speech related applications. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J. Acoustic. Soc. Am. 103 (1) 622 (1998). By using combined Glottal-EM- Sensor- and Acoustic-signals, segments of voiced, unvoiced, and no-speech can be reliably defined. Real-time Denoising filters can be constructed to remove noise from the user's corresponding speech signal.

  2. Monotonic tensile behavior analysis of three-dimensional needle-punched woven C/SiC composites by acoustic emission

    Peng Fang; Laifei Cheng; Litong Zhang; Jingjiang Nie

    2008-01-01

    High toughness and reliable three-dimensional needled C/SiC composites were fabricated by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). An approach to analyze the tensile behaviors at room temperature and the damage accumulation of the composites by means of acoustic emission was researched. Also the fracture morphology was examined by S-4700 SEM after tensile tests to prove the damage mechanism. The results indicate that the cumulative energy of acoustic emission (AE) signals can be used to monitor and evaluate the damage evolution in ceramic-matrix composites. The initiation of room-temperature tensile damage in C/SiC composites occurred with the growth of micro-cracks in the matrix at the stress level about 40% of the ultimate fracture stress. The level 70% of the fracture stress could be defined as the critical damage strength.

  3. Detecting and identifying damage in sandwich polymer composite by using acoustic emission

    McGugan, M.; Sørensen, Bent F.; Østergaard, R.;

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic emission is a useful monitoring tool for extracting extra information during mechanical testing of polymer composite sandwich materials. The study of fracture mechanics within test specimens extracted from wind turbine blade material ispresented. The contribution of the acoustic emission...... monitoring technique in defining different failure modes identified during the testing is discussed. The development of in-situ structural monitoring and control systems is considered....

  4. Detecting and identifying damage in sandwich polymer composite by using acoustic emission

    McGugan, M.; Soerensen, Bent F.; Oestergaard, R.; Bech, T.

    2006-12-15

    Acoustic emission is a useful monitoring tool for extracting extra information during mechanical testing of polymer composite sandwich materials. The study of fracture mechanics within test specimens extracted from wind turbine blade material is presented. The contribution of the acoustic emission monitoring technique in defining different failure modes identified during the testing is discussed. The development of in-situ structural monitoring and control systems is considered. (au)

  5. Way and device for estimation of constructions technical state during acoustic-emission control

    Kosenkov, I. V.

    2007-01-01

    The search urgency of new non-destructive control methods for responsible constructions is proved. An acoustic-emission responsible structures control method is suggested which is based on invariants method and Mann-Whitney U-criterion. A generalization of analytical relations for invariants method is performed. A device for estimating the constructions destruction processes during acoustic-emission control using invariants method is described.

  6. Acoustic Emission Technique for Characterizing Deformation and Fatigue Crack Growth in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Raj, Baldev; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2003-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) during tensile deformation and fatigue crack growth (FCG) of austenitic stainless steels has been studied. In AISI type 316 stainless steel (SS), AE has been used to detect micro plastic yielding occurring during macroscopic plastic deformation. In AISI type 304 SS, relation of AE with stress intensity factor and plastic zone size has been studied. In AISI type 316 SS, fatigue crack growth has been characterised using acoustic emission.

  7. Model ideas of acoustic emission sources in elastoplastic and brittle salt rocks

    In laboratory experiments, under uninterrupted deformation conditions, the influence of surface pressure and deformation rate on the deformation and fracture behaviour of salt rocks with different in-situ behaviour, and the acoustic emission caused by it, were studied (sylvite, carnallite). The results obtained are the starting basis for simple model ideas on the reactions occurring in the material; reactions which determine the shape of the stress-deformation curve and are accompanied by acoustic emissions. (orig./MM)

  8. Avalanches in compressed Ti-Ni shape-memory porous alloys: An acoustic emission study.

    Soto-Parra, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Cao, Shanshan; Vives, Eduard; Salje, Ekhard K H; Planes, Antoni

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical avalanches during compression of martensitic porous Ti-Ni have been characterized by high-frequency acoustic emission (AE). Two sequences of AE signals were found in the same sample. The first sequence is mainly generated by detwinning at the early stages of compression while fracture dominates the later stages. Fracture also determines the catastrophic failure (big crash). For high-porosity samples, the AE energies of both sequences display power-law distributions with exponents ɛ≃2 (twinning) and 1.7 (fracture). The two power laws confirm that twinning and fracture both lead to avalanche criticality during compression. As twinning precedes fracture, the observation of twinning allows us to predict incipient fracture of the porous shape memory material as an early warning sign (i.e., in bone implants) before the fracture collapse actually happens. PMID:26172646

  9. Acoustic emission detection of rail defect based on wavelet transform and Shannon entropy

    Zhang, Xin; Feng, Naizhang; Wang, Yan; Shen, Yi

    2015-03-01

    In order to detect cracks in railroad tracks, various experiments have been examined by Acoustic Emission (AE) method. However, little work has been done on studying rail defect detection at high speed. This paper presents a study on AE detection of rail defect at high speed based on rail-wheel test rig. Meanwhile, Wavelet Transform and Shannon entropy are employed to detect defects. Signals with and without defects are acquired, and characteristic frequencies from them at different speeds are analyzed. Based on appropriate decomposition level and Energy-to-Shannon entropy ratio, the optimal wavelet is selected. In order to suppress noise effects and ensure appropriate time resolution, the length of time window is investigated. Further, the characteristic frequency of time window is employed to detect defect. The results clearly illustrate that the proposed method can detect rail defect at high speed effectively.

  10. Acoustic Emission Detection of Macro-Cracks on Engraving Tool Steel Inserts during the Injection Molding Cycle Using PZT Sensors

    Aleš Hančič

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved monitoring system for the failure detection of engraving tool steel inserts during the injection molding cycle. This system uses acoustic emission PZT sensors mounted through acoustic waveguides on the engraving insert. We were thus able to clearly distinguish the defect through measured AE signals. Two engraving tool steel inserts were tested during the production of standard test specimens, each under the same processing conditions. By closely comparing the captured AE signals on both engraving inserts during the filling and packing stages, we were able to detect the presence of macro-cracks on one engraving insert. Gabor wavelet analysis was used for closer examination of the captured AE signals’ peak amplitudes during the filling and packing stages. The obtained results revealed that such a system could be used successfully as an improved tool for monitoring the integrity of an injection molding process.

  11. A Study of the Development of PC-Based Source Location System using Acoustic Emission Technique

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique has been applied to not only mechanical property testing but also on-line monitoring of the el)tire structure or a limit zone only. Although several AE devices have already been developed for the on-line monitoring, the price of these systems is very high and it is difficult for the field to apply yet. In this study, wc developed a specially designed PC-based source location system using the A/D board. The source location technique is very important to identify the source, such as crack, leak detection. However, since the AE waveforms obtained from transducers are very difficult to distinguish the defect signals, therefore, it is necessary to consider the signal analyses of the transient waveform. Wavelet Transform (WT) is a powerful tool for processing transient signals with temporally varying spectra that helps to resolve high and low frequency transients components effectively In this study, the analyses of the AE signals are presented by employing the WT analyses. AE results are compared the PC-based source location system using A/D board with the commercial AE system

  12. Acoustic emission (AE) health monitoring of diaphragm type couplings using neural network analysis

    Godinez-Azcuaga, Valery F.; Shu, Fong; Finlayson, Richard D.; O'Donnell, Bruce

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the latest results obtained from Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring and detection of cracks and/or damage in diaphragm couplings, which are used in some aircraft and engine drive systems. Early detection of mechanical failure in aircraft drive train components is a key safety and economical issue with both military and civil sectors of aviation. One of these components is the diaphragm-type coupling, which has been evaluated as the ideal drive coupling for many application requirements such as high speed, high torque, and non-lubrication. Its flexible axial and angular displacement capabilities have made it indispensable for aircraft drive systems. However, diaphragm-type couplings may develop cracks during their operation. The ability to monitor, detect, identify, and isolate coupling cracks on an operational aircraft system is required in order to provide sufficient advance warning to preclude catastrophic failure. It is known that metallic structures generate characteristic Acoustic Emission (AE) during crack growth/propagation cycles. This phenomenon makes AE very attractive among various monitoring techniques for fault detection in diaphragm-type couplings. However, commercially available systems capable of automatic discrimination between signals from crack growth and normal mechanical noise are not readily available. Positive classification of signals requires experienced personnel and post-test data analysis, which tend to be a time-consuming, laborious, and expensive process. With further development of automated classifiers, AE can become a fully autonomous fault detection technique requiring no human intervention after implementation. AE has the potential to be fully integrated with automated query and response mechanisms for system/process monitoring and control.

  13. Design of acoustic logging signal source of imitation based on field programmable gate array

    An acoustic logging signal source of imitation is designed and realized, based on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), to improve the efficiency of examining and repairing acoustic logging tools during research and field application, and to inspect and verify acoustic receiving circuits and corresponding algorithms. The design of this signal source contains hardware design and software design,and the hardware design uses an FPGA as the control core. Four signals are made first by reading the Random Access Memory (RAM) data which are inside the FPGA, then dealing with the data by digital to analog conversion, amplification, smoothing and so on. Software design uses VHDL, a kind of hardware description language, to program the FPGA. Experiments illustrate that the ratio of signal to noise for the signal source is high, the waveforms are stable, and also its functions of amplitude adjustment, frequency adjustment and delay adjustment are in accord with the characteristics of real acoustic logging waveforms. These adjustments can be used to imitate influences on sonic logging received waveforms caused by many kinds of factors such as spacing and span of acoustic tools, sonic speeds of different layers and fluids, and acoustic attenuations of different cementation planes. (paper)

  14. Acoustic emission (AT) monitoring of metallic Ariane 5 boostervessel from MAN Technologie AG

    The Ariane 5 comprises high-grade products and components, including those qualified and tested by acoustic emission: The steel boostervessel, the SPELTRA structure consisting of a CFRP/aluminium honeycomb and the GAT/GAM high-pressure vessel of CFRP/steel. Classic nondestructive test methods like X-ray and ultrasound cannot be applied, so acoustic emission testing was used instead. It was applied for detecting and localizing active acoustic sources in order to monitor the test stand and initiate pressure reduction if necessary. (orig.)

  15. Diagnostics of DC and Induction Motors Based on the Analysis of Acoustic Signals

    Glowacz, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a non-invasive method of early fault diagnostics of electric motors was proposed. This method uses acoustic signals generated by electric motors. Essential features were extracted from acoustic signals of motors. A plan of study of acoustic signals of electric motors was proposed. Researches were carried out for faultless induction motor, induction motor with one faulty rotor bar, induction motor with two faulty rotor bars and flawless Direct Current, and Direct Current motor with shorted rotor coils. Researches were carried out for methods of signal processing: log area ratio coefficients, Multiple signal classification, Nearest Neighbor classifier and the Bayes classifier. A pattern creation process was carried out using 40 samples of sound. In the identification process 130 five-second test samples were used. The proposed approach will also reduce the costs of maintenance and the number of faulty motors in the industry.

  16. Diagnostics of DC and Induction Motors Based on the Analysis of Acoustic Signals

    Glowacz A.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a non-invasive method of early fault diagnostics of electric motors was proposed. This method uses acoustic signals generated by electric motors. Essential features were extracted from acoustic signals of motors. A plan of study of acoustic signals of electric motors was proposed. Researches were carried out for faultless induction motor, induction motor with one faulty rotor bar, induction motor with two faulty rotor bars and flawless Direct Current, and Direct Current motor with shorted rotor coils. Researches were carried out for methods of signal processing: log area ratio coefficients, Multiple signal classification, Nearest Neighbor classifier and the Bayes classifier. A pattern creation process was carried out using 40 samples of sound. In the identification process 130 five-second test samples were used. The proposed approach will also reduce the costs of maintenance and the number of faulty motors in the industry.

  17. Call transmission efficiency in native and invasive anurans: competing hypotheses of divergence in acoustic signals.

    Llusia, Diego; Gómez, Miguel; Penna, Mario; Márquez, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are a leading cause of the current biodiversity decline, and hence examining the major traits favouring invasion is a key and long-standing goal of invasion biology. Despite the prominent role of the advertisement calls in sexual selection and reproduction, very little attention has been paid to the features of acoustic communication of invasive species in nonindigenous habitats and their potential impacts on native species. Here we compare for the first time the transmission efficiency of the advertisement calls of native and invasive species, searching for competitive advantages for acoustic communication and reproduction of introduced taxa, and providing insights into competing hypotheses in evolutionary divergence of acoustic signals: acoustic adaptation vs. morphological constraints. Using sound propagation experiments, we measured the attenuation rates of pure tones (0.2-5 kHz) and playback calls (Lithobates catesbeianus and Pelophylax perezi) across four distances (1, 2, 4, and 8 m) and over two substrates (water and soil) in seven Iberian localities. All factors considered (signal type, distance, substrate, and locality) affected transmission efficiency of acoustic signals, which was maximized with lower frequency sounds, shorter distances, and over water surface. Despite being broadcast in nonindigenous habitats, the advertisement calls of invasive L. catesbeianus were propagated more efficiently than those of the native species, in both aquatic and terrestrial substrates, and in most of the study sites. This implies absence of optimal relationship between native environments and propagation of acoustic signals in anurans, in contrast to what predicted by the acoustic adaptation hypothesis, and it might render these vertebrates particularly vulnerable to intrusion of invasive species producing low frequency signals, such as L. catesbeianus. Our findings suggest that mechanisms optimizing sound transmission in native habitat can play a less

  18. Acoustic emission in ITER CS model coil and CS insert coil

    Acoustic emission (AE) signals induced from the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) and the Central Solenoid Insert Coil (CSIC) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are described. Two kinds of AE data acquisition methods for the AE signals are adopted during series of energizing, i.e., one is the whole waveform recording, and the other is the AE envelope recording. It can be estimated that the AE signals are mainly induced by motion of a superconductor because the AE signals synchronize with the voltage spikes, especially in the virgin current region. The multi channel measurement provided us with information about the spatial distribution of disturbances by the AE sensors at each installed point in CSMC. The observation of AE with high-time resolution shows that the disturbances in CSMC decrease with the iteration number of excitation, judging from instantaneous AE levels, AE energies, and AE event count. Meanwhile, under the background field of 13 T by CSMC, charging and discharging tests of the CSIC at the rate of 5 kA/s from 0 kA to 40 kA were repeated 10,003 times. We monitored the disturbances in CSIC and in CSMC during this cyclic test by using envelope signals of an AE sensor installed near the bottom of the innermost layer of CSMC. The detected AE signals were large, in the range of 1,000 to 2,000 times and 3,000 to 4,000 times. And after that, the AE signals were very small, until 10,003 times. From 3,000 through 4,000 times, we monitored strange AE behaviours that can be attributed to the loosening of bolts. (author)

  19. Acoustic evaluation of cementing quality using obliquely incident ultrasonic signals

    Duan Wen-Xing; Qiao Wen-Xiao; Che Xiao-Hua; Xie Hui

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic cement bond logging is a widely used method for evaluating cementing quality. Conventional ultrasonic cement bond logging uses vertical incidence and cannot accurately evaluate lightweight cement bonding. Oblique incidence is a new technology for evaluating cement quality with improved accuracy for lightweight cements. In this study, we simulated models of acoustic impedance of cement and cementing quality using ultrasonic oblique incidence, and we obtained the relation between cementing quality, acoustic impedance of cement, and the acoustic attenuation coeffi cient of the A0-mode and S0-mode Lamb waves. Then, we simulated models of different cement thickness and we obtained the relation between cement thickness and the time difference of the arrival between the A0 and A0′ modes.

  20. Acoustic emission monitoring of cement-based structures immobilising radioactive waste

    The long term performance of cementitious structures immobilising radioactive waste can be affected by physical and chemical processes within the encapsulating materials such as formation of new phases (e.g., vaterite, brucite), degradation of cement phases (e.g., CSH gel, portlandite), degradation of some waste components (e.g., organics), corrosion of metallic constituents (aluminium, magnesium), gas emission, further hydration etc. The corrosion of metals in the high pH cementitious environment is of especial concern as it can potentially cause wasteform cracking. One of the perspective non-destructive methods used to monitor and assess the mechanical properties of materials and structures is based on an acoustic emission (AE) technique. In this study an AE non-destructive technique was used to evaluate the mechanical performance of cementitious structures with encapsulated metallic waste such as aluminium. AE signals generated as a result of aluminium corrosion in a small-size blast furnace slag (BFS)/ordinary Portland cement (OPC) sample were detected, recorded and analysed. A procedure for AE data analysis including conventional parameter-based AE approach and signal-based analysis was applied and demonstrated to provide information on the aluminium corrosion process and its impact on the mechanical performance of the encapsulating cement matrix. (authors)

  1. Investigation of correlation of LF power modulation of light in natural and artificial illumination situations and acoustic emission

    Kleeberg, Florian P.; Gutzmann, Holger L.; Weyer, Cornelia; Weiß, Jürgen; Dörfler, Joachim; Hahlweg, Cornelius F.

    2014-09-01

    The present paper is a follow up of a paper presented in 2013 at the Novel Optical Systems conference in the session on Optics and Music. It is derived from an ongoing study on the human perception of combined optical and acoustical periodical stimuli. Originating from problems concerning artificial illumination and certain machinery with coherent optical and acoustical emissions there are effects to be observed which are interesting in the context of occupational medicine. It seems, that acoustic stimuli in the frequency range of the flicker fusion and below might lead to unexpected perceptible effects beyond those of the single stimuli. The effect of infrasound stimuli as a whole body perception seems to be boosted. Because of the difficulties in evaluation of physical and psychological effects of such coherent stimuli in a first step we question if such coherence is perceivable at all. Further, the problem of modulation of optical signals by acoustical signal is concerned. A catalogue of scenarios and 'effects to look for' including measurement concepts is presented and discussed.

  2. Preliminary studies for monitoring erosion in pipelines by the acoustic emission technique

    Tiboni, G.B. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais; Marquardt, T.A.S; SantaMaria, V.A.R.; Silva, C.H. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work is to present some applications of Acoustic Emission (AE), which is a powerful technique for nondestructive testing in Tribology, treated here as tests of friction, wear by contact fatigue, wear by slip and wear by erosion. In this work a special attention is given to solid particle erosion and hydro-abrasive erosion, problems found in almost every pipeline that lead to local loss of material and eventually rupture of the line. The technique of AE can be used as an efficient online tool when, primarily, to monitor tribological aspects such as the rate of wear of materials, as well as detect the spread of flaws in them. In wear by erosion, specifically, the parameters of RMS and acoustic energy are capable of correlation with the type of mechanism for removal of material. As a preliminary goal, erosive tests were performed with gas (air) without erosive particles, monitored by AE, varying the surface of the samples and the internal diameter the nozzle, taking the differences in signs of AE. Correlation between parameters of RMS and amplitude were noticed with the variables of the tests, such as roughness and fluid velocity. The RMS parameter showed a exponential correction with the fluid velocity, however the amplitude signals had a linear behavior. The knowledge of these parameters is essential for the development of a system that is able to quantify the wear rate of a pipeline without taking it out of operation. (author)

  3. Identification of the fragmentation of brittle particles during compaction process by the acoustic emission technique.

    Favretto-Cristini, Nathalie; Hégron, Lise; Sornay, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Some nuclear fuels are currently manufactured by a powder metallurgy process that consists of three main steps, namely preparation of the powders, powder compaction, and sintering of the compact. An optimum between size, shape and cohesion of the particles of the nuclear fuels must be sought in order to obtain a compact with a sufficient mechanical strength, and to facilitate the release of helium and fission gases during irradiation through pores connected to the outside of the pellet after sintering. Being simple to adapt to nuclear-oriented purposes, the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is used to control the microstructure of the compact by monitoring the compaction of brittle Uranium Dioxide (UO2) particles of a few hundred micrometers. The objective is to identify in situ the mechanisms that occur during the UO2 compaction, and more specifically the particle fragmentation that is linked to the open porosity of the nuclear matter. Three zones of acoustic activity, strongly related to the applied stress, can be clearly defined from analysis of the continuous signals recorded during the compaction process. They correspond to particle rearrangement and/or fragmentation. The end of the noteworthy fragmentation process is clearly defined as the end of the significant process that increases the compactness of the material. Despite the fact that the wave propagation strongly evolves during the compaction process, the acoustic signature of the fragmentation of a single UO2 particle and a bed of UO2 particles under compaction is well identified. The waveform, with a short rise time and an exponential-like decay of the signal envelope, is the most reliable descriptor. The impact of the particle size and cohesion on the AE activity, and then on the fragmentation domain, is analyzed through the discrete AE signals. The maximum amplitude of the burst signals, as well as the mean stress corresponding to the end of the recorded AE, increase with increasing mean diameter of

  4. Physiologic signal detection in positron emission tomography

    Positron emission tomography enables the noninvasive quantification in vivo of three-dimensional radionuclide distributions throughout the human body. Estimation of neurotransmitter and receptor function is performed through the application of tracer kinetic models and non-linear multiple regression parameter estimation methods. These quantitative estimates are often limited by the interaction between imaging characteristics of the PET scanner and the three-dimensional radionuclide distribution within the organ of interest. In order to assess the potential of PET to detect subtle changes in the function of the central nervous system, a three-dimensional PET simulation procedure based upon a digital brain phantom and tomograph detector response functions has been performed. Radiopharmaceutical kinetics for individual structures of the brain phantom (cortex, white matter, basal ganglia, etc.) have been assigned based upon in vitro autoradiography of human postmortem tissue and animal biodistribution studies. The recovery of the PET signals which originate from anatomic structures of interest has been evaluated for studies of the benzodiazepine, muscarinic, opiate, and GABA systems of the human brain. Typical results and the limitations of signal detection in PET neurotransmitter and receptor studies are discussed

  5. Localization of acoustic emission sources. Possibilities and limits

    It is necessary to dispose of a system capable of data acquisition and processing in real time. The coordinates of emissive sources must be calculated either immediately after the detection of information or after a brief storage time. Emphasis is laid on the various parameters liable to affect the measurement precision: transducers (type, selectivity, form of signal), threshold device (dynamics, influence on the precision), screening device (influence on the number of data received). Four-transducer patterns are now in common use: square, centred equilateral triangle, lozenge mesh ... Each geometry possesses zones of indetermination. The accuracy on the coordinates of the source varies according to the position of this source with respect to the four-transducer mesh, which leads to a case-by-case study of the arrangement and dimensions of the meshes placed on the structure to be observed. Detection and localization equipment must be designed as a whole system flexible and easy to adapt to any structure

  6. Corruption of ant acoustical signals by mimetic social parasites

    Schönrogge, Karsten; Bonelli, Simona; Barbero, Francesca; Balletto, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Recent recordings of the stridulations of Myrmica ants revealed that their queens made distinctive sounds from their workers, although the acoustics of queens and workers, respectively, were the same in different species of Myrmica. Queen recordings induced enhanced protective behavior when played to workers in the one species tested. Larvae and pupae of the butterfly genus Maculinea inhabit Myrmica colonies as social parasites, and both stages generate sounds that mimic those of a Myrmica queen, inducing similar superior treatments from workers as their model. We discuss how initial penetration and acceptance as a colony member is achieved by Maculinea through mimicking the species-specific semio-chemicals of their hosts, and how acoustical mimicry is then employed to elevate the parasite’s membership of that society towards the highest attainable level in their host’s hierarchy. We postulate that, if acoustics is as well developed a means of communication in certain ants as these studies suggest, then others among an estimated 10,000 species of ant social parasite may supplement their well-known use of chemical and tactile mimicry to trick host ants with mimicry of host acoustical systems. PMID:20585513

  7. Avalanche dynamics of structural phase transitions in shape memory alloys by acoustic emission spectroscopy

    Ludwig, Benno

    2009-09-24

    In this work the avalanche dynamics of five shape memory samples has been analyzed by acoustic emission spectroscopy. The acoustic emission spectroscopy is particularly suitable for this analysis as it couples with high sensitivity to small structural changes caused by nucleation processes, interface movements, or variant rearrangements [91]. Owing to its high time resolution it provides a statistical approach to describe the jerky and intermittent character of the avalanche dynamics [20]. Rate-dependent cooling and heating runs have been conducted in order to study time-dependent aspects of the transition dynamics of the single crystals Ni{sub 63}Al{sub 37}, Au{sub 50.5}Cd{sub 49.5}, and Fe{sub 68.8}Pd{sup single}{sub 31.2}, and the polycrystalline sample Fe{sub 68.8}Pd{sup poly}{sub 31.2}. Moreover, a ferromagnetic Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 23}Ga{sub 25} single crystal has been studied by temperature cycles under an applied magnetic field and additionally by magnetic-field cycles at a constant temperature in the martensitic phase. All samples analyzed in this work show power law behavior in the acoustic emission features amplitude, energy, and duration, which indicates scale-free behavior. The access to these power law spectra allows an investigation of energy barriers separating the metastable states, which give rise to avalanche transition dynamics. By performing rate-dependent experiments the importance of thermal fluctuations and the impact of martensite respectively twin stabilization processes have been examined. In the case of the Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 23}Ga{sub 25} sample, the magnetic-field-induced variant rearrangement at slow field cycles leads to stronger signals than the rearrangement at quick cycles. This behavior can be explained by twin stabilization processes, which are accompanied by a reduction of the twin boundary mobility. For Ni{sub 63}Al{sub 37}, the combination of relevant thermal fluctuations, different involved time scales, and a high degree of

  8. Monitoring of pipeline hydrostatic testing with artificial flaws applying acoustic emission and ultra-sonic techniques; Monitoracao de teste hidrostatico de tubos com descontinuidades artificiais empregando as tecnicas de emissao acustica e ultra-som

    Soares, Sergio Damasceno [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2003-07-01

    Charts and parameters used to perform and analyzing the acoustic emission data collected during the hydrostatic test in pipe samples build in API XL 60 with 20 inches of diameter and 14 millimeters of thickness are shown. These pipes had internal and external artificial flaws done by electro-erosion process with aspect ratio 1 x 20. A relationship between acoustic emission results, ultrasound and J-Integral were established using the applied pressurization sequence. Characteristics values of acoustic emission signals were shown as a criteria of field tests. (author)

  9. Signals structural analysis and processing: application to acoustic signals recorded during sodium boiling in a nuclear reactor

    An acoustic system that uses examples to learn the structure of specific signals linked to a corresponding class of physical phenomena, and classify an unknown signal (possibly with noise present) into one of the learned classes is presented. The first stage consists of smoothing the data. The signal is represented as a trace according to background and event. To learn the structures in each class, smoothed, segmented signals are used. For classification, three operations to modify the signal so that it perfectly verifies the model description are available

  10. A Study on the Evaluation of Valve Leak Rates Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    Lee, Sang Guk; Lee, Jun Shin; Lee, Sun Ki; Shon, Seok Man; Lee, Wook Ryun; Kim, Tae Ryong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yong Jae; Choo, Kee Young [Hana Evertech Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate the feasibility of acoustic emission method for the internal leak from the valves. In this study, two types of valve(a 3 1/2 inch glove valve for 600 psi steam and a 4 inch ball valve water ) leak tests using three different leak path and numerous leak rates were performed in order to analyze acoustic emission properties when leaks arise in valve seat. As a result of leak test for specimens simulated valve seat, we conformed that leak sound amplitude increased in proportion to the increase of leak rate, and leak rates were plotted versus peak acoustic amplitudes recorded within those two narrow frequency bands on each spectral plot. The resulting plots of leak rate versus peak acoustic amplitude were the primary basis for determining the feasibility of quantifying leak acoustically. The large amount of data collected also allowed a grief investigation of the effects of different leak paths, leakage rates, pressure differentials and transducers on the acoustic amplitude spectra. From the experimental results, it was suggested that the acoustic emission method for monitoring of leak was feasible.

  11. An application of acoustic emission technique for detecting fatigue crack in steel bridge members

    The basic study about the application of acoustic emission technique was performed for detecting fatigue crack in steel bridge. The most serious problem of AE technique in steel bridge structure is the noise problem. The characteristics of crack signal and crack propagation should be identified to filter the noise effectively and to determine the crack detectability of the technique. Laboratory experiment was carried out to identify AE characteristics of real fatigue crack. Through all of tests, load amplitude of specimen affected significantly to the results such as the crack growth rate and the amount of generating AE signals. The straight curve obtained from theoretical calculation by Paris equation was well correlated to the experimental results. AE location events were not early detected although several AE hits from each sensor were generated in the early of the test. However the features of three parameters, that is, crack growth length, AE location events and cumulative AE events, shooed almost same trend in their increase with the number of cycles. Peak amplitude of AE signal which determining detectability increased in accordance with stress intensity factor. It implies that correlation between peak amplitude and stress intensity factor could be quantified. Although there were somewhat scattered location in the vicinity of upper flange, which were considered as environmental noises, good locations near the actual crack tip were obtained. Post filtering work was carried out to eliminate these unwanted location, good results were obtained from filtering work using AE parameters.

  12. Recognition of Acoustic Signals of Synchronous Motors with the Use of MoFS and Selected Classifiers

    Glowacz Adam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an approach based on acoustic signals for detecting faults appearing in synchronous motors. Acoustic signals of a machine were used for fault detection. These faults contained: broken coils and shorted stator coils. Acoustic signals were used to assess the usefulness of early fault diagnostic of synchronous motors. The acoustic signal recognition system was based on methods of data processing: normalization of the amplitude, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT, method of frequency selection (MoFS, backpropagation neural network, classifier based on words coding, and Nearest Neighbor classifier. A plan of study of acoustic signals of synchronous motors was proposed. Software of acoustic signal recognition of synchronous motors was implemented. Four states of a synchronous motor were used in analysis. A pattern creation process was carried out for 28 training samples of noise. An identification process was carried out for 60 test samples. This system can be used to diagnose synchronous motors and other electrical machines.

  13. Nonlinear ball chain waveguides for acoustic emission and ultrasound sensing of ablation

    Pearson, Stephen H.

    packed with 17 steel particles are studied with a frequency sweep. The deformation experienced by a single steel particle in the dimer chain is approximated. Steel ball waveguides and steel rods are fitted with piezoelectric sensors to monitor the force at different points inside the waveguide during testing. The corresponding frequency responses, including intermodulation products, are compared based on amplitude and preloads. A nonlinear mechanical model describes the motion of the dimer chains in a vacuum. Based on the results of these studies it is anticipated that a nonlinear waveguide will be designed, built, and tested as a possible replacement for the high-fidelity waveguides presently being used in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch facility for high heat flux thermal protection system testing. The design is intended to accentuate acoustic emission signals of interest, while suppressing other forms of elastic wave noise.

  14. Acoustic wave focusing in complex media using Nonlinear Time Reversal coded signal processing

    Dos Santos, S.; Dvořáková, Zuzana; Lints, M.; Kůs, V.; Salupere, A.; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2014). ISSN 1435-4934. [European Conference on Non-Destructive Testing (ECNDT 2014) /11./. Praha, 06.10.2014-10.10.2014] Institutional support : RVO:61388998 Keywords : ultrasonic testing (UT) * signal processing * TR-NEWS * nonlinear time reversal * NDT * nonlinear acoustics Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics http://www.ndt.net/events/ECNDT2014/app/ content /Slides/590_DosSantos_Rev1.pdf

  15. Sources and Radiation Patterns of Volcano-Acoustic Signals Investigated with Field-Scale Chemical Explosions

    Bowman, D. C.; Lees, J. M.; Taddeucci, J.; Graettinger, A. H.; Sonder, I.; Valentine, G.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the processes that give rise to complex acoustic signals during volcanic blasts by monitoring buried chemical explosions with infrasound and audio range microphones, strong motion sensors, and high speed imagery. Acoustic waveforms vary with scaled depth of burial (SDOB, units in meters per cube root of joules), ranging from high amplitude, impulsive, gas expansion dominated signals at low SDOB to low amplitude, longer duration, ground motion dominated signals at high SDOB. Typically, the sudden upward acceleration of the substrate above the blast produces the first acoustic arrival, followed by a second pulse due to the eruption of pressurized gas at the surface. Occasionally, a third overpressure occurs when displaced material decelerates upon impact with the ground. The transition between ground motion dominated and gas release dominated acoustics ranges between 0.0038-0.0018 SDOB, respectively. For example, one explosion registering an SDOB=0.0031 produced two overpressure pulses of approximately equal amplitude, one due to ground motion, the other to gas release. Recorded volcano infrasound has also identified distinct ground motion and gas release components during explosions at Sakurajima, Santiaguito, and Karymsky volcanoes. Our results indicate that infrasound records may provide a proxy for the depth and energy of these explosions. Furthermore, while magma fragmentation models indicate the possibility of several explosions during a single vulcanian eruption (Alidibirov, Bull Volc., 1994), our results suggest that a single explosion can also produce complex acoustic signals. Thus acoustic records alone cannot be used to distinguish between single explosions and multiple closely-spaced blasts at volcanoes. Results from a series of lateral blasts during the 2014 field experiment further indicates whether vent geometry can produce directional acoustic radiation patterns like those observed at Tungarahua volcano (Kim et al., GJI, 2012). Beside

  16. Regularities of acoustic emission and thermoemission memory effect in coal specimens under varying thermal conditions

    Shkuratnik, V.L.; Kuchurin, S.V.; Vinnikov, V.A. [Moscow State Mining University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-15

    The experimental data on acoustic emission regularities are presented for specimens of different genetic coal types exposed to a wide range of cyclic heating modes. Peculiarities of formation and manifestation of thermal-emission memory effect depending on amplitude and duration of the thermal-field action are revealed.

  17. Interrelation between acoustic emission parameters and fracture mode of bimetals at 77K

    Studied are the singularities of acoustic emission during the fracture of industrial bimetals at a boiling temperature of liquid nitrogen (77K), as well as determined is the possibility of estimation of the fracture mode in bimetallic materials (St. 3+Kh18N9T, St. 3+0Kh13) by the acoustic emission method. It is shown that the registration of accoustic emission in combination with the spectral analysis permits to determine rather accurately the micromechanism and time brittle fracture, as well as a change of the fracture mechanism while crack propagation

  18. Wireless Acoustic Signal Monitoring Using MEMS sensor and ATmega on LabVIEW Platform

    Swathy L

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acoustics and vibrations caused on machine structures can result in faulty or collapse of the whole mechanical system. These acoustics produced by machinery are vital indicators of machine health. Acoustic signals analysis can be used as a tool for locating the problem and thus taking necessary actions. MEMS sensors provide high accurate low size and low cost microphones which can be even used in low cost space applications such as sounding rockets, nano-satellites etc. This paper explains the algorithm to extract acoustic signals from ADMP401, which is a high quality, high performance, low power, analog output, bottom-ported omnidirectional MEMS microphone. The sensor output will give the error free data even in noisy conditions. ATmega microcontroller is used to read the data from the sensor and send to LabVIEW software running on the computer which will extract and display the data from the serial port in real time. As rotating structures are those machine parts which may experience high vibration and acoustic noises, the same is implemented in wireless also which helps in extracting acoustic signals from rotating as well as inaccessible parts of the machinery.

  19. Real-time implementation of non-linear signal-dependent acoustic beamforming

    Merilaid, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    A real-time acoustical beamforming system incorporating the cross pattern coherence (CroPaC) post filtering method is implemented in this thesis. The real-time implementation consists of a signal-independent beamformer that is used for spatial discrimination of a sound field. The signal of the beamformer is post filtered by modulating it with a parameter that is derived from the cross-spectrum of two directional microphone signals. The post filter is implemented to enhance performance of beam...

  20. Acoustic emission during necking and plastic elongation of semi-crystalline polymer blends

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Krofta, Josef; Blaháček, Michal; Raab, M.

    Praha : Ústav termomechaniky AV ČR, 2001 - (Plešek, J.; Gabriel, D.; Poživilová, A.), s. 41 ISBN 80-85918-66-8. [Euromech colloquium 430 - Formulations and constitutive laws for very large strains. Praha (CZ), 03.10.2001-05.10.2001] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : acoustic emission * polymer blends * plastic elongation Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  1. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring

    Haycox, Jon; Pettitt, Will; Young, R. Paul [Applied Seismology Consultants Ltd., Shrewsbury (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    This report describes the results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring of the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The APSE is being undertaken to demonstrate the current capability to predict spalling in a fractured rock mass using numerical modelling techniques, and to demonstrate the effect of backfill and confining pressure on the propagation of micro-cracks in rock adjacent to deposition holes within a repository. An ultrasonic acquisition system has provided acoustic emission and ultrasonic survey monitoring throughout the various phases of the experiment. Results from the entire data set are provided with this document so that they can be effectively compared to several numerical modelling studies, and to mechanical and thermal measurements conducted around the pillar volume, in an 'integrated analysis' performed by SKB staff. This document provides an in-depth summary of the AE and ultrasonic survey results for future reference. The pillar has been produced by excavating two 1.8 m diameter deposition holes 1 m apart. These were bored in 0.8 m steps using a Tunnel Boring Machine specially adapted for vertical drilling. The first deposition hole was drilled in December 2003. Preceding this a period of background monitoring was performed so as to obtain a datum for the results. The hole was then confined to 0.7 MPa internal over pressure using a specially designed water-filled bladder. The second deposition hole was excavated in March 2004. Heating of the pillar was performed over a two month period between ending in July 2004, when the confined deposition hole was slowly depressurised. Immediately after depressurisation the pillar was allowed to cool with cessation of monitoring occurring a month later. A total of 36,676 AE triggers were recorded over the reporting period between 13th October 2003 and 14th July 2004. Of these 15,198 have produced AE locations. The AE data set

  2. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring

    This report describes the results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring of the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The APSE is being undertaken to demonstrate the current capability to predict spalling in a fractured rock mass using numerical modelling techniques, and to demonstrate the effect of backfill and confining pressure on the propagation of micro-cracks in rock adjacent to deposition holes within a repository. An ultrasonic acquisition system has provided acoustic emission and ultrasonic survey monitoring throughout the various phases of the experiment. Results from the entire data set are provided with this document so that they can be effectively compared to several numerical modelling studies, and to mechanical and thermal measurements conducted around the pillar volume, in an 'integrated analysis' performed by SKB staff. This document provides an in-depth summary of the AE and ultrasonic survey results for future reference. The pillar has been produced by excavating two 1.8 m diameter deposition holes 1 m apart. These were bored in 0.8 m steps using a Tunnel Boring Machine specially adapted for vertical drilling. The first deposition hole was drilled in December 2003. Preceding this a period of background monitoring was performed so as to obtain a datum for the results. The hole was then confined to 0.7 MPa internal over pressure using a specially designed water-filled bladder. The second deposition hole was excavated in March 2004. Heating of the pillar was performed over a two month period between ending in July 2004, when the confined deposition hole was slowly depressurised. Immediately after depressurisation the pillar was allowed to cool with cessation of monitoring occurring a month later. A total of 36,676 AE triggers were recorded over the reporting period between 13th October 2003 and 14th July 2004. Of these 15,198 have produced AE locations. The AE data set shows an intense

  3. Combining Passive Thermography and Acoustic Emission for Large Area Fatigue Damage Growth Assessment of a Composite Structure

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.Keywords: Thermal nondestructive evaluation, fatigue damage detection, aerospace composite inspection, acoustic emission, passive thermography

  4. In situ calibration of acoustic emission transducers by time reversal method

    Kober, Jan; Převorovský, Zdeněk; Chlada, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 240, April (2016), s. 50-56. ISSN 0924-4247 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : time reversed acoustics * calibration * in situ * acoustic emission Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.903, year: 2014 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0924424716300334/1-s2.0-S0924424716300334-main.pdf?_tid=0acf4736-ef6d-11e5-b826-00000aacb362&acdnat=1458568911_1c21eda9762b905a684ff939463ef3fe

  5. Acoustic emission at the premartensitic and martensitic transitions of Ni2MnGa shape memory alloy

    An acoustic emission (AE) study of the martensitic and premartensitic transitions in nearly stoichiometric Ni-Mn-Ga alloy is reported. By comparing the AE with calorimetric results, it is shown that AE is generated at both transitions. The AE intensity at the premartensitic transition is extremely weak, in accordance with its weakly first-order character. The amplitude distribution of the AE signals recorded during the martensitic transformation is a power law, with an exponent α = 2.2 ± 0.1. This value is compared with recent results obtained in other shape-memory alloys. (orig.)

  6. Beeping and piping: characterization of two mechano-acoustic signals used by honey bees in swarming.

    Schlegel, Thomas; Visscher, P Kirk; Seeley, Thomas D

    2012-12-01

    Of the many signals used by honey bees during the process of swarming, two of them--the stop signal and the worker piping signal--are not easily distinguished for both are mechano-acoustic signals produced by scout bees who press their bodies against other bees while vibrating their wing muscles. To clarify the acoustic differences between these two signals, we recorded both signals from the same swarm and at the same time, and compared them in terms of signal duration, fundamental frequency, and frequency modulation. Stop signals and worker piping signals differ in all three variables: duration, 174 ± 64 vs. 602 ± 377 ms; fundamental frequency, 407 vs. 451 Hz; and frequency modulation, absent vs. present. While it remains unclear which differences the bees use to distinguish the two signals, it is clear that they do so for the signals have opposite effects. Stop signals cause inhibition of actively dancing scout bees whereas piping signals cause excitation of quietly resting non-scout bees. PMID:23149930

  7. Acoustic Emission Methodology to Evaluate the Fracture Toughness in Heat Treated AISI D2 Tool Steel

    Mostafavi, Sajad; Fotouhi, Mohamad; Motasemi, Abed; Ahmadi, Mehdi; Sindi, Cevat Teymuri

    2012-10-01

    In this article, fracture toughness behavior of tool steel was investigated using Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring. Fracture toughness ( K IC) values of a specific tool steel was determined by applying various approaches based on conventional AE parameters, such as Acoustic Emission Cumulative Count (AECC), Acoustic Emission Energy Rate (AEER), and the combination of mechanical characteristics and AE information called sentry function. The critical fracture toughness values during crack propagation were achieved by means of relationship between the integral of the sentry function and cumulative fracture toughness (KICUM). Specimens were selected from AISI D2 cold-work tool steel and were heat treated at four different tempering conditions (300, 450, 525, and 575 °C). The results achieved through AE approaches were then compared with a methodology proposed by compact specimen testing according to ASTM standard E399. It was concluded that AE information was an efficient method to investigate fracture characteristics.

  8. The application of Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm to Wavelet Neural Networks for acoustic emission source location

    Cheng, Xinmin; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Li; Deng, Aideng; Bao, Yongqiang; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Yunliang

    2014-04-01

    When using acoustic emission to locate the friction fault source of rotating machinery, the effects of strong noise and waveform distortion make accurate locating difficult. Applying neural network for acoustic emission source location could be helpful. In the BP Wavelet Neural Network, BP is a local search algorithm, which falls into local minimum easily. The probability of successful search is low. We used Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm (SFLA) to optimize the parameters of the Wavelet Neural Network, and the optimized Wavelet Neural Network to locate the source. After having performed the experiments of friction acoustic emission's source location on the rotor friction test machine, the results show that the calculation of SFLA is simple and effective, and that locating is accurate with proper structure of the network and input parameters.

  9. Research on power-law acoustic transient signal detection based on wavelet transform

    Han, Jian-hui; Yang, Ri-jie; Wang, Wei

    2007-11-01

    Aiming at the characteristics of acoustic transient signal emitted from antisubmarine weapon which is being dropped into water (torpedo, aerial sonobuoy and rocket assisted depth charge etc.), such as short duration, low SNR, abruptness and instability, based on traditional power-law detector, a new method to detect acoustic transient signal is proposed. Firstly wavelet transform is used to de-noise signal, removes random spectrum components and improves SNR. Then Power- Law detector is adopted to detect transient signal. The simulation results show the method can effectively extract envelop characteristic of transient signal on the condition of low SNR. The performance of WT-Power-Law markedly outgoes that of traditional Power-Law detection method.

  10. Gearbox Tooth Cut Fault Diagnostics Using Acoustic Emission and Vibration Sensors — A Comparative Study

    Yongzhi Qu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, acoustic emission (AE sensors and AE-based techniques have been developed and tested for gearbox fault diagnosis. In general, AE-based techniques require much higher sampling rates than vibration analysis-based techniques for gearbox fault diagnosis. Therefore, it is questionable whether an AE-based technique would give a better or at least the same performance as the vibration analysis-based techniques using the same sampling rate. To answer the question, this paper presents a comparative study for gearbox tooth damage level diagnostics using AE and vibration measurements, the first known attempt to compare the gearbox fault diagnostic performance of AE- and vibration analysis-based approaches using the same sampling rate. Partial tooth cut faults are seeded in a gearbox test rig and experimentally tested in a laboratory. Results have shown that the AE-based approach has the potential to differentiate gear tooth damage levels in comparison with the vibration-based approach. While vibration signals are easily affected by mechanical resonance, the AE signals show more stable performance.

  11. Acoustic emission studies for characterization of fatigue crack growth behavior in HSLA steel

    Kumar, Jalaj; Ahmad, S.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    High strength low alloy (HSLA) steels are a group of low carbon steels and used in oil and gas pipelines, automotive components, offshore structures and shipbuilding. Fatigue crack growth (FCG) characteristics of a HSLA steel have been studied at two different stress ratios (R = 0.3 and 0.5). Acoustic emission (AE) signals generated during the FCG tests have been used to understand the FCG processes. The AE signals were captured by mounting two piezoelectric sensors on compact tension specimens in liner location configuration. The AE generated in stage II of the linear Paris region of FCG has been attributed to the presence of two sub-stages with two different slopes. The AE generated at higher values of stress intensity factor is found to be useful to identify the transition from stage II to stage III of the FCG. AE location analysis has provided support for increased damage at the crack tip for higher stress ratio. The peak stress intensity (Kmax) values at the crack tip have shown good correlation with the transitions from stage IIa to stage IIb and stage II to stage III of the FCG for the two stress ratios.

  12. Application of acoustic emission technique and friction welding for excavator hose nipple

    Kong, Yu Sik [A-plus linc institute, Bukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Kyung [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Dongeui University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Friction welding is a very useful joining process to weld metals which have axially symmetric cross section. In this paper, the feasibility of industry application was determined by analyzing the mechanical properties of weld region for a specimen of tube-to-tube shape for excavator hose nipple with friction welding, and optimized welding variables were suggested. In order to accomplish this object, friction heating pressure and friction heating time were selected as the major process variables and the experiment was performed in three levels of each parameter. An acoustic emission(AE) technique was applied to evaluate the optimal friction welding conditions nondestructively. AE parameters of accumulative count and event were analyzed in terms of generating trend of AE signals across the full range of friction weld. The typical waveform and frequency spectrum of AE signals which is generated by friction weld were discussed. From this study the optimal welding variables could be suggested as rotating speed of 1300 rpm, friction heating pressure of 15 MPa, and friction heating time of 10 sec. AE event was a useful parameter to estimate the tensile strength of tube-to tube specimen with friction weld.

  13. Application of acoustic emission technique and friction welding for excavator hose nipple

    Friction welding is a very useful joining process to weld metals which have axially symmetric cross section. In this paper, the feasibility of industry application was determined by analyzing the mechanical properties of weld region for a specimen of tube-to-tube shape for excavator hose nipple with friction welding, and optimized welding variables were suggested. In order to accomplish this object, friction heating pressure and friction heating time were selected as the major process variables and the experiment was performed in three levels of each parameter. An acoustic emission(AE) technique was applied to evaluate the optimal friction welding conditions nondestructively. AE parameters of accumulative count and event were analyzed in terms of generating trend of AE signals across the full range of friction weld. The typical waveform and frequency spectrum of AE signals which is generated by friction weld were discussed. From this study the optimal welding variables could be suggested as rotating speed of 1300 rpm, friction heating pressure of 15 MPa, and friction heating time of 10 sec. AE event was a useful parameter to estimate the tensile strength of tube-to tube specimen with friction weld.

  14. Sources and characteristics of acoustic emissions from mechanically stressed geologic granular media — A review

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Cohen, Denis; Or, Dani

    2012-05-01

    The formation of cracks and emergence of shearing planes and other modes of rapid macroscopic failure in geologic granular media involve numerous grain scale mechanical interactions often generating high frequency (kHz) elastic waves, referred to as acoustic emissions (AE). These acoustic signals have been used primarily for monitoring and characterizing fatigue and progressive failure in engineered systems, with only a few applications concerning geologic granular media reported in the literature. Similar to the monitoring of seismic events preceding an earthquake, AE may offer a means for non-invasive, in-situ, assessment of mechanical precursors associated with imminent landslides or other types of rapid mass movements (debris flows, rock falls, snow avalanches, glacier stick-slip events). Despite diverse applications and potential usefulness, a systematic description of the AE method and its relevance to mechanical processes in Earth sciences is lacking. This review is aimed at providing a sound foundation for linking observed AE with various micro-mechanical failure events in geologic granular materials, not only for monitoring of triggering events preceding mass mobilization, but also as a non-invasive tool in its own right for probing the rich spectrum of mechanical processes at scales ranging from a single grain to a hillslope. We review first studies reporting use of AE for monitoring of failure in various geologic materials, and describe AE generating source mechanisms in mechanically stressed geologic media (e.g., frictional sliding, micro-crackling, particle collisions, rupture of water bridges, etc.) including AE statistical features, such as frequency content and occurrence probabilities. We summarize available AE sensors and measurement principles. The high sampling rates of advanced AE systems enable detection of numerous discrete failure events within a volume and thus provide access to statistical descriptions of progressive collapse of systems

  15. Real-time adaptive concepts in acoustics blind signal separation and multichannel echo cancellation

    Schobben, Daniel W E

    2001-01-01

    Blind Signal Separation (BSS) deals with recovering (filtered versions of) source signals from an observed mixture thereof. The term `blind' relates to the fact that there are no reference signals for the source signals and also that the mixing system is unknown. This book presents a new method for blind signal separation, which is developed to work on microphone signals. Acoustic Echo Cancellation (AEC) is a well-known technique to suppress the echo that a microphone picks up from a loudspeaker in the same room. Such acoustic feedback occurs for example in hands-free telephony and can lead to a perceived loud tone. For an application such as a voice-controlled television, a stereo AEC is required to suppress the contribution of the stereo loudspeaker setup. A generalized AEC is presented that is suited for multi-channel operation. New algorithms for Blind Signal Separation and multi-channel Acoustic Echo Cancellation are presented. A background is given in array signal processing methods, adaptive filter the...

  16. Beeping and piping: characterization of two mechano-acoustic signals used by honey bees in swarming

    Schlegel, Thomas; Visscher, P. Kirk; Seeley, Thomas D.

    2012-12-01

    Of the many signals used by honey bees during the process of swarming, two of them—the stop signal and the worker piping signal—are not easily distinguished for both are mechano-acoustic signals produced by scout bees who press their bodies against other bees while vibrating their wing muscles. To clarify the acoustic differences between these two signals, we recorded both signals from the same swarm and at the same time, and compared them in terms of signal duration, fundamental frequency, and frequency modulation. Stop signals and worker piping signals differ in all three variables: duration, 174 ± 64 vs. 602 ± 377 ms; fundamental frequency, 407 vs. 451 Hz; and frequency modulation, absent vs. present. While it remains unclear which differences the bees use to distinguish the two signals, it is clear that they do so for the signals have opposite effects. Stop signals cause inhibition of actively dancing scout bees whereas piping signals cause excitation of quietly resting non-scout bees.

  17. Wing, tail, and vocal contributions to the complex acoustic signals of courting Calliope hummingbirds

    Christopher James CLARK

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Multi-component signals contain multiple signal parts expressed in the same physical modality. One way to identify individual components is if they are produced by different physical mechanisms. Here, I studied the mechanisms generating acoustic signals in the courtship displays of the Calliope hummingbird Stellula calliope. Display dives consisted of three synchronized sound elements, a high-frequency tone (hft, a low frequency tone (lft, and atonal sound pulses (asp, which were then followed by a frequency-modulated fall. Manipulating any of the rectrices (tail-feathers of wild males impaired production of the lft and asp but not the hft or fall, which are apparently vocal. I tested the sound production capabilities of the rectrices in a wind tunnel. Single rectrices could generate the lft but not the asp, whereas multiple rectrices tested together produced sounds similar to the asp when they fluttered and collided with their neighbors percussively, representing a previously unknown mechanism of sound production. During the shuttle display, a trill is generated by the wings during pulses in which the wingbeat frequency is elevated to 95 Hz, 40% higher than the typical hovering wingbeat frequency. The Calliope hummingbird courtship displays include sounds produced by three independent mechanisms, and thus include a minimum of three acoustic signal components. These acoustic mechanisms have different constraints and thus potentially contain different messages. Producing multiple acoustic signals via multiple mechanisms may be a way to escape the constraints present in any single mechanism [Current Zoology 57 (2: 187–196, 2011].

  18. Application of a novel optical fiber sensor to detection of acoustic emissions by various damages in CFRP laminates

    In this research, we applied a novel optical fiber sensor, phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating balanced sensor with high sensitivity and broad bandwidth, to acoustic emission (AE) detection in carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs). AE signals generated in the tensile testing of angle-ply and cross-ply CFRP laminates were both detected by the novel optical fiber sensor and traditional PZT sensors. The cumulative hits detected by both sensors coincided after applying simple data processing to eliminate the noise, and clearly exhibited Kaiser effect and Felicity effect. Typical AE signals detected by both sensors were discussed and were tried to relate to micro CFRP damages observed via microscope. These results demonstrate that this novel optical fiber sensor can reliably detect AE signals from various damages. It has the potential to be used in practical AE detection, as an alternative to the piezoelectric PZT sensor. (paper)

  19. Wayside acoustic diagnosis of defective train bearings based on signal resampling and information enhancement

    He, Qingbo; Wang, Jun; Hu, Fei; Kong, Fanrang

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of train bearing defects plays a significant role to maintain the safety of railway transport. Among various defect detection techniques, acoustic diagnosis is capable of detecting incipient defects of a train bearing as well as being suitable for wayside monitoring. However, the wayside acoustic signal will be corrupted by the Doppler effect and surrounding heavy noise. This paper proposes a solution to overcome these two difficulties in wayside acoustic diagnosis. In the solution, a dynamically resampling method is firstly presented to reduce the Doppler effect, and then an adaptive stochastic resonance (ASR) method is proposed to enhance the defective characteristic frequency automatically by the aid of noise. The resampling method is based on a frequency variation curve extracted from the time-frequency distribution (TFD) of an acoustic signal by dynamically minimizing the local cost functions. For the ASR method, the genetic algorithm is introduced to adaptively select the optimal parameter of the multiscale noise tuning (MST)-based stochastic resonance (SR) method. The proposed wayside acoustic diagnostic scheme combines signal resampling and information enhancement, and thus is expected to be effective in wayside defective bearing detection. The experimental study verifies the effectiveness of the proposed solution.

  20. Detection of bond failure in the anchorage zone of reinforced concrete beams via acoustic emission monitoring

    Abouhussien, Ahmed A.; Hassan, Assem A. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was utilised to identify the onset of bond failure in reinforced concrete beams. Beam anchorage specimens were designed and tested to fail in bond in the anchorage zone. The specimens included four 250 × 250 × 1500 mm beams with four variable bonded lengths (100, 200, 300, and 400 mm). Meanwhile, an additional 250 × 250 × 2440 mm beam, with 200 mm bonded length, was tested to investigate the influence of sensor location on the identification of bond damage. All beams were tested under four-point loading setup and continuously monitored using three distributed AE sensors. These attached sensors were exploited to record AE signals resulting from both cracking and bond deterioration until failure. The variations in the number of AE hits and cumulative signal strength (CSS) versus test time were evaluated to achieve early detection of crack growth and bar slippage. In addition, AE intensity analysis was performed on signal strength of collected AE signals to develop two additional parameters: historic index (H (t)) and severity (S r). The analysis of these AE parameters enabled an early detection of both first cracks (at almost the mid-span of the beam) and bar slip in either of the anchorage zones at the beams’ end before their visual observation, regardless of sensor location. The results also demonstrated a clear correlation between the damage level in terms of crack development/measured free end bar slip and AE parameters (number of hits, CSS, H(t), and S r).

  1. Additional evidence of nuclear emissions during acoustic cavitation.

    Taleyarkhan, R P; Cho, J S; West, C D; Lahey, R T; Nigmatulin, R I; Block, R C

    2004-03-01

    Time spectra of neutron and sonoluminescence emissions were measured in cavitation experiments with chilled deuterated acetone. Statistically significant neutron and gamma ray emissions were measured with a calibrated liquid-scintillation detector, and sonoluminescence emissions were measured with a photomultiplier tube. The neutron and sonoluminescence emissions were found to be time correlated over the time of significant bubble cluster dynamics. The neutron emission energy was less than 2.5 MeV and the neutron emission rate was up to approximately 4 x 10(5) n/s. Measurements of tritium production were also performed and these data implied a neutron emission rate due to D-D fusion which agreed with what was measured. In contrast, control experiments using normal acetone did not result in statistically significant tritium activity, or neutron or gamma ray emissions. PMID:15089363

  2. Acoustic Emission Characteristics of Notched Aluminum Plate Repaired with a Composite Patch

    Yoon, Hyun Sung; Choi, Nak Sam [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Edge notched Al6061-T6 aluminum was repaired with a GFRP composite patch as a function of the number of stacking. Damage progress of specimen for tension load has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). AE energy rate, hit rate, amplitude, waveform and 1st peak frequency distribution were analyzed. Fracture processes were classified into Al cracking, Fiber breakage, Resin cracking and Delamination. Displacement of a specimen can be divided into Region I, II and III according to acoustic emission characteristics. Region II where the patch itself was actually fractured was focused on to clarify the AE characteristics difference for the number of stacking

  3. Study on acoustic emission characteristics of Beishan granite under triaxial compression conditions

    Beishan granite is the candidate host rock of China's high-level radioactive waste repository. Compression tests with different confining stresses in combination with acoustic emission (AE) monitoring technique are used to study the strength and failure mechanism of granite in the depth of Xinchang pluton of Beishan area, Gansu province. The variation characteristics of the acoustic emission parameters during rock failure were investigated. The characteristic stress thresholds associated with crack initiation, crack damage and peak strength envelops at different fracturing stages of rocks were obtained. The presented study has provided preconditions and mechanical parameters for establishing the failure criterion and further stability analysis of underground engineering. (authors)

  4. Analysis of acoustic cardiac signals for heart rate variability and murmur detection using nonnegative matrix factorization-based hierarchical decomposition

    Shah, Ghafoor; Koch, Peter; Papadias, Constantinos B.

    novel method based on hierarchical decomposition of the single channel mixture using various nonnegative matrix factorization techniques is proposed, which provides unsupervised clustering of the underlying component signals. HRV is determined over the recovered normal cardiac acoustic signals. This...

  5. Acoustic emission from magnetic flux tubes in the solar network

    Vigeesh, G

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of three-dimensional numerical simulations to investigate the excitation of waves in the magnetic network of the Sun due to footpoint motions of a magnetic flux tube. We consider motions that typically mimic granular buffeting and vortex flows and implement them as driving motions at the base of the flux tube. The driving motions generates various MHD modes within the flux tube and acoustic waves in the ambient medium. The response of the upper atmosphere to the underlying photospheric motion and the role of the flux tube in channeling the waves is investigated. We compute the acoustic energy flux in the various wave modes across different boundary layers defined by the plasma and magnetic field parameters and examine the observational implications for chromospheric and coronal heating.

  6. Acoustic Signal Processing for Pipe Condition Assessment (WaterRF Report 4360)

    Unique to prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP), individual wire breaks create an excitation in the pipe wall that may vary in response to the remaining compression of the pipe core. This project was designed to improve acoustic signal processing for pipe condition assessment...

  7. The spatial context of free-ranging Hawaiian spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) producing acoustic signals

    Lammers, MO; Schotten, M; Au, WWL

    2006-01-01

    To improve our understanding of how dolphins use acoustic signals in the wild, a three-hydrophone towed array was used to investigate the spatial occurrence of Hawaiian spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) relative to each other as they produced whistles, burst pulses, and echolocation clicks. G

  8. Infrasonic and seismic signals from earthquakes and explosions observed with Plostina seismo-acoustic array

    Ghica, D.; Ionescu, C.

    2012-04-01

    Plostina seismo-acoustic array has been recently deployed by the National Institute for Earth Physics in the central part of Romania, near the Vrancea epicentral area. The array has a 2.5 km aperture and consists of 7 seismic sites (PLOR) and 7 collocated infrasound instruments (IPLOR). The array is being used to assess the importance of collocated seismic and acoustic sensors for the purposes of (1) seismic monitoring of the local and regional events, and (2) acoustic measurement, consisting of detection of the infrasound events (explosions, mine and quarry blasts, earthquakes, aircraft etc.). This paper focuses on characterization of infrasonic and seismic signals from the earthquakes and explosions (accidental and mining type). Two Vrancea earthquakes with magnitude above 5.0 were selected to this study: one occurred on 1st of May 2011 (MD = 5.3, h = 146 km), and the other one, on 4th October 2011 (MD = 5.2, h = 142 km). The infrasonic signals from the earthquakes have the appearance of the vertical component of seismic signals. Because the mechanism of the infrasonic wave formation is the coupling of seismic waves with the atmosphere, trace velocity values for such signals are compatible with the characteristics of the various seismic phases observed with PLOR array. The study evaluates and characterizes, as well, infrasound and seismic data recorded from the explosion caused by the military accident produced at Evangelos Florakis Naval Base, in Cyprus, on 11th July 2011. Additionally, seismo-acoustic signals presumed to be related to strong mine and quarry blasts were investigated. Ground truth of mine observations provides validation of this interpretation. The combined seismo-acoustic analysis uses two types of detectors for signal identification: one is the automatic detector DFX-PMCC, applied for infrasound detection and characterization, while the other one, which is used for seismic data, is based on array processing techniques (beamforming and frequency

  9. Theory and signal processing of acoustic correlation techniques for current velocity measurement

    ZHU Weiqing; FENG Lei; WANG Changhong; WANG Yuling; QIU Wei

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model and signal processing of acoustic correlation measurements to estimate current velocity are discussed. The sonar space-time correlation function of vol-ume reverberations within Fraunhofer zone is derived. The function, which is in exponential forms, is the theoretical model of acoustic correlation measurements. The characteristics of the correlation values around the maximum of the amplitude of the correlation function, where most information about current velocity is contained, are primarily analyzed. Localized Least Mean Squares (LLMS) criterion is put forward for velocity estimation. Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) method is adopted as the optimization method. So the systematic sig-nal processing method of acoustic correlation techniques for current velocity measurement is established. A prototype acoustic correlation current profiler (ACCP) underwent several sea trials, the results show that theoretical model approximately coincides with experimental re-sults. Current profiles including the speed and direction from ACCP are compared with those from acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). The current profiles by both instruments agree reasonably well. Also, the standard deviation of velocity measurement by ACCP is statistically calculated and it is a little larger than predicted value.

  10. Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.

    Beattie, Alan G.

    2013-09-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

  11. Acoustic emission analysis for structural health monitoring of hot metal components

    For the application of acoustic emission analysis on hot components such as pipes special application techniques are necessary to protect the sensor from the heat. The Fraunhofer IKTS-MD has developed a waveguide solution that meets these requirements. Major challenges in the application of acoustic emission analysis in an industrial environment is the strong ambient noise. This requirement meets the developed acoustic measurement system at the Fraunhofer Institute by a high measurement dynamics, storage and assessment of the complete waveforms and by special algorithms. The attractiveness of the method lies in the relatively low number of sensors with which the integrity of large plant areas (e.g. several meters under high alternating load standing superheated steam pipe) can be permanently monitored.

  12. Prospects of Frequency-Time Correlation Analysis for Detecting Pipeline Leaks by Acoustic Emission Method

    In the current work the relevance of nondestructive test method development applied for pipeline leak detection is considered. It was shown that acoustic emission testing is currently one of the most widely spread leak detection methods. The main disadvantage of this method is that it cannot be applied in monitoring long pipeline sections, which in its turn complicates and slows down the inspection of the line pipe sections of main pipelines. The prospects of developing alternative techniques and methods based on the use of the spectral analysis of signals were considered and their possible application in leak detection on the basis of the correlation method was outlined. As an alternative, the time-frequency correlation function calculation is proposed. This function represents the correlation between the spectral components of the analyzed signals. In this work, the technique of time-frequency correlation function calculation is described. The experimental data that demonstrate obvious advantage of the time-frequency correlation function compared to the simple correlation function are presented. The application of the time-frequency correlation function is more effective in suppressing the noise components in the frequency range of the useful signal, which makes maximum of the function more pronounced. The main drawback of application of the time- frequency correlation function analysis in solving leak detection problems is a great number of calculations that may result in a further increase in pipeline time inspection. However, this drawback can be partially reduced by the development and implementation of efficient algorithms (including parallel) of computing the fast Fourier transform using computer central processing unit and graphic processing unit

  13. Bridging aero-fracture evolution with the characteristics of the acoustic emissions in a porous medium

    Semih eTurkaya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The characterization and understanding of rock deformation processes due to fluid flow is a challenging problem with numerous applications. The signature of this problem can be found in Earth Science and Physics, notably with applications in natural hazard understanding, mitigation or forecast (e.g. earthquakes, landslides with hydrological control, volcanic eruptions, or in industrial applications such as hydraulic-fracturing, steam-assisted gravity drainage, CO₂ sequestration operations or soil remediation. Here we investigate the link between the visual deformation and the mechanical wave signals generated due to fluid injection into porous media. In a rectangular Hele-Shaw Cell, side air injection causes burst movement and compaction of grains along with channeling (creation of high permeability channels empty of grains. During the initial compaction and emergence of the main channel, the hydraulic fracturing in the medium generates a large non-impulsive low frequency signal in the frequency range 100 Hz - 10 kHz. When the channel network is established, the relaxation of the surrounding medium causes impulsive aftershock-like events, with high frequency (above 10 kHz acoustic emissions, the rate of which follows an Omori Law. These signals and observations are comparable to seismicity induced by fluid injection. Compared to the data obtained during hydraulic fracturing operations, low frequency seismicity with evolving spectral characteristics have also been observed. An Omori-like decay of microearthquake rates is also often observed after injection shut-in, with a similar exponent p≃0.5 as observed here, where the decay rate of aftershock follows a scaling law dN/dt ∝(t-t₀-p . The physical basis for this modified Omori law is explained by pore pressure diffusion affecting the stress relaxation.

  14. Bridging aero-fracture evolution with the characteristics of the acoustic emissions in a porous medium

    Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Eriksen, Fredrik; Zecevic, Megan; Daniel, Guillaume; Flekkøy, Eirik; Måløy, Knut Jørgen

    2015-09-01

    The characterization and understanding of rock deformation processes due to fluid flow is a challenging problem with numerous applications. The signature of this problem can be found in Earth Science and Physics, notably with applications in natural hazard understanding, mitigation or forecast (e.g. earthquakes, landslides with hydrological control, volcanic eruptions), or in industrial applications such as hydraulic-fracturing, steam-assisted gravity drainage, CO sequestration operations or soil remediation. Here we investigate the link between the visual deformation and the mechanical wave signals generated due to fluid injection into porous media. In a rectangular Hele-Shaw Cell, side air injection causes burst movement and compaction of grains along with channeling (creation of high permeability channels empty of grains). During the initial compaction and emergence of the main channel, the hydraulic fracturing in the medium generates a large non-impulsive low frequency signal in the frequency range 100 Hz - 10 kHz. When the channel network is established, the relaxation of the surrounding medium causes impulsive aftershock-like events, with high frequency (above 10 kHz) acoustic emissions, the rate of which follows an Omori Law. These signals and observations are comparable to seismicity induced by fluid injection. Compared to the data obtained during hydraulic fracturing operations, low frequency seismicity with evolving spectral characteristics have also been observed. An Omori-like decay of microearthquake rates is also often observed after injection shut-in, with a similar exponent p≃0.5 as observed here, where the decay rate of aftershock follows a scaling law dN/dt ∝(t-t₀ )-p . The physical basis for this modified Omori law is explained by pore pressure diffusion affecting the stress relaxation.

  15. Effect of Thermionic Emission on Dust-Acoustic Solitons in a Dust-Electron Plasma

    REN Li-Wen; WANG Zheng-Xiong; LIU Yue; WANG Xiao-Gang

    2007-01-01

    The effects of thermionic emission on dust-acoustic solitons with a very small but finite amplitude in a dustelectron plasma are studied using the reductive perturbation technique. The self-consistent variation of dust charge is taken into account. It is shown that the thermionic emission could significantly increase the dust positive charge. The dependences of the phase velocity, amplitude, and width of such solitons on the dust temperature and the dust work function of dust material are plotted and discussed.

  16. Evoked acoustic emissions from the human ear. III. Findings in neonates

    Johnsen, N J; Bagi, P; Elberling, C

    1983-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in a consecutive series of 20 full-term and otherwise normal neonates with the equipment and method previously used in adults. One ear randomly chosen was tested in each baby, and otoscopy and tympanometry were normal in all ears. A 2 kHz click stimulus...

  17. Statistical fracture of E-glass fibres using a bundle tensile test and acoustic emission monitoring

    R'Mili, M.; Moevus, M.; Godin, N.

    2009-01-01

    Statistical fracture of E-glass fibres using a bundle tensile test and acoustic emission monitoring correspondance: Corresponding author.Tel.: +33472436127; fax: +33472438528. (R?Mili, M.) (R?Mili, M.) Universite de Lyon--> , INSA-Lyon--> , MATEIS--> , 7 Avenue Jean Capelle--> , 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex--> - FRANCE (R?Mili, M.) Universite de Lyon--> , INSA-Lyo...

  18. Inspection of nuclear reactor welding by acoustic emission. 1st interim report

    The goal of the first phase of a 3-year research program is to show feasibility and develop equipment design parameters for real time production monitoring of nuclear power piping welding by acoustic emission. The project work to date is discussed. This work includes the incorporation of GARD equipment into a field-portable acoustic emission weld monitor, performance of one ''calibration'' field test, and one production field test. The calibration field test consisted of 96 weld passes, some of which were intentionally flawed, and all of which were monitored and recorded for laboratory study. The production field tests consisted of 17 multi-pass welds on actual production pieces. The welding in both tests was performed at Southwest Fabricating and Welding Corporation, an N-stamp pipe fabricating facility. The welding monitored was standard nuclear practice using code-approved materials for the calibration work. The production welding was on actual code-certified pipe. Calibration data on 20 multi-pass welds (96 weld passes) showed 7 classes of weld types, 1 with excellent to very good acoustic emission detection properties, 2 with very good properties, 1 with good properties, and 4 that need further study. No weld type has proven to be completely without some acoustic emission monitorability. The production tests have not been completely analyzed; initial analysis show results in line with the calibration data. (auth)

  19. Network sensor calibration for retrieving accurate moment tensors of acoustic emissions

    Davi, Rosalia; Vavryčuk, Václav; Charalampidou, E.-M.; Kwiatek, G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, September (2013), s. 59-67. ISSN 1365-1609 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP210/12/1491 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 230669 - AIM Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : acoustic emissions * focal mechanisms * fracturing * moment tensors * sensor calibration Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.424, year: 2013

  20. Detection and localization of defects in complex structures by Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy and Acoustic Emission

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Chlada, Milan; Krofta, Josef; Kober, Jan; Dos Santos, S.

    Le Mans: The University of Maine in Le Mans, 2013 - (Bentahar, M.; Kenderian, S.; Green, R.). s. 95 [Internanational Symposium on Nondestructive Characterization of Materials /13./. 20.05.2013-24.05.2013, Le Mans] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy * acoustic emission * nondestructive testing * damage initiation * civil structure Subject RIV: JS - Reliability ; Quality Management, Testing

  1. On the possibilities of acoustic emission method using for estimation of large diameter quality tubes

    Results of investigation of acoustic emission (AE) method are given. It is shown that using the AE method for control of large diameter tubes in the process of cooling tube welded joints is possible. The comparison of results of control by AE and UST methods, which showed a good cerrelation between them, was performed

  2. Quality control of graphite mold by acoustic emission testing

    The brittleness of the graphite used for producing uranium tubes by gravity casting is monitored by acoustic test. Ancillary units, around a central data processing unit, also have a data processing function (micro-informatics) enabling the three following essential functions to be met: (1) control of the movement of integrating waves to five degrees of freedom, (2) control of the monitoring appliance and (3) pre-processing acquisition and presentation of the data. Mention is made of the facilities being used and of the progress of some research work

  3. Implementation of Adaptive Filter Structures on a Fixed Point Signal Processor for Acoustical Noise Reduction

    Chunduri, Krishna Chaitanya; Gutti, Chalapathi

    2005-01-01

    The problem of controlling the noise level in the environment has been the focus of a tremendous amount of research over the years. Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) is one such approach that has been proposed for reduction of steady state noise. ANC refers to an electromechanical or electro acoustic technique of canceling an acoustic disturbance to yield a quieter environment. The basic principle of ANC is to introduce a canceling “anti-noise” signal that has the same amplitude but the exact o...

  4. Leak detection in gas pipeline by acoustic and signal processing - A review

    Adnan, N. F.; Ghazali, M. F.; Amin, M. M.; Hamat, A. M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The pipeline system is the most important part in media transport in order to deliver fluid to another station. The weak maintenance and poor safety will contribute to financial losses in term of fluid waste and environmental impacts. There are many classifications of techniques to make it easier to show their specific method and application. This paper's discussion about gas leak detection in pipeline system using acoustic method will be presented in this paper. The wave propagation in the pipeline is a key parameter in acoustic method when the leak occurs and the pressure balance of the pipe will generated by the friction between wall in the pipe. The signal processing is used to decompose the raw signal and show in time- frequency. Findings based on the acoustic method can be used for comparative study in the future. Acoustic signal and HHT is the best method to detect leak in gas pipelines. More experiments and simulation need to be carried out to get the fast result of leaking and estimation of their location.

  5. Leak detection evaluation of boiler tube for power plant using acoustic emission

    Main equipment of thermal power plant, such as boiler and turbine, are designed and manufactured by domestic techniques. And also the automatic control facilities controlling the main equipment are at the applying step of the localization. and many parts of BOP(Balance Of Plant) equipment are utilizing, localized. But because the special equipment monitoring the operation status of the main facilities such as boiler and turbine are still dependent upon foreign technology and especially boiler tube leak detection system is under the initial step of first application to newly-constructed plants and the manufacturing and application are done by foreign techniques mostly, fast localization development is required. Therefore, so as to study and develop boiler tube leak detection system, we performed studying on manufacturing, installation in site, acoustic emission(AE) signal analysis and discrimination etc. As a result of studying on boiler tube leak detection using AE, we conformed that diagnosis for boiler tube and computerized their trend management is possible, and also it is expected to contribute to safe operation of power generation facilities.

  6. Application of acoustic emission for assessing corrosion damage reinforced concrete beams

    The acoustic emission (AE) behavior of reinforced concrete beams tested under flexural loading was investigated to characterize and identify the source of damage. This research was aimed at identifying the characteristic AE response associated with micro-crack development, localized crack propagation, corrosion, and debonding of the reinforcing steel. Concrete beams were prepared to isolate the damage mechanisms by using plain, notched-plain, reinforced, and corroded-reinforced specimens. The beams were tested using four-point cyclic step-loading. The AE response was analyzed to obtain key parameters such as the total number and rate of AE events, the amplitude and duration of the events, and the characteristic features of the waveform. Initial analysis of the AE signal has shown that a clear difference in the AE response is observed depending on the source of the damage. The Felicity ratio exhibited a correlation with the overall damage level, while the number of AE events during unloading can be an effective criterion to estimate the level of corrosion distress in reinforced concrete structures. Consequently, AE measurement characterization appears to provide a promising approach for estimating the level of corrosion distress in reinforced concrete structure.

  7. Acoustic emission monitoring of medieval towers considered as sensitive earthquake receptors

    A. Carpinteri

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Many ancient masonry towers are present in Italian territory. In some cases these structures are at risk on account of the intensity of the stresses they are subjected to due to the high level of regional seismicity. In order to preserve this inestimable cultural heritage, a sound safety assessment should take into account the evolution of damage phenomena. In this connection, acoustic emission (AE monitoring can be highly effective. This study concerns the structural stability of three medieval towers rising in the centre of Alba, a characteristic town in Piedmont (Italy. During the monitoring period a correlation between peaks of AE activity in the masonry of these towers and regional seismicity was found. Earthquakes always affect structural stability. Besides that, the towers behaved as sensitive earthquake receptors. Here a method to correlate bursts of AE activity in a masonry building and regional seismicity is proposed. In particular, this method permits to identify the premonitory signals that precede a catastrophic event on a structure, since, in most cases, these warning signs can be captured well in advance.

  8. Gaussian mixture modeling of acoustic emissions for structural health monitoring of reinforced concrete structures

    Farhidzadeh, Alireza; Dehghan-Niri, Ehsan; Salamone, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    Reinforced Concrete (RC) has been widely used in construction of infrastructures for many decades. The cracking behavior in concrete is crucial due to the harmful effects on structural performance such as serviceability and durability requirements. In general, in loading such structures until failure, tensile cracks develop at the initial stages of loading, while shear cracks dominate later. Therefore, monitoring the cracking modes is of paramount importance as it can lead to the prediction of the structural performance. In the past two decades, significant efforts have been made toward the development of automated structural health monitoring (SHM) systems. Among them, a technique that shows promises for monitoring RC structures is the acoustic emission (AE). This paper introduces a novel probabilistic approach based on Gaussian Mixture Modeling (GMM) to classify AE signals related to each crack mode. The system provides an early warning by recognizing nucleation of numerous critical shear cracks. The algorithm is validated through an experimental study on a full-scale reinforced concrete shear wall subjected to a reversed cyclic loading. A modified conventional classification scheme and a new criterion for crack classification are also proposed.

  9. Application of acoustic emission as a monitoring system during hydrostatic tests of nuclear reactor components

    The paper presents the state of art for the surveillance of nuclear reactor components by acoustic emission during hydrostatic tests as obtained during several inspections made by KWU and Battelle-Frankfurt/Main. The following four points are relevant: a) Measures designed to suppress background noise, b) adapted pressure increase rate, c) extensive and practically oriented calibration measurements, d) suitable measuring technique. These necessary preconditions are discussed and results on the wave propagation, location accuracy, attenuation of AE-signals due to geometrical configurations (nozzles) and on the correlation between AE-sources and defects as detected by other NDE-methods presented. Two selected examples of AE-tests on reactor components will demonstrate the results which can be obtained at the present time. These investigations have shown till now that: 1) AE is a sensitive NDE-method, able to detect even very small flaws. The AE-sources lie for the most part in areas of seam welds, welded-on attachments, nozzles, closure studs, or other prominent areas (see rolling track). 2) Indications which were found by AE need not necessarily be detectable by other NDE-methods, e.g. ultrasound. 3) Small leaks can be identified in a short time and can be located within certain limits. An essential point however is that leaks with higher noise level must be sealed off. (orig.)

  10. Detection of Adult Beetles Inside the Stored Wheat Mass Based on Their Acoustic Emissions.

    Eliopoulos, P A; Potamitis, I; Kontodimas, D Ch; Givropoulou, E G

    2015-12-01

    The efficacy of bioacoustics in detecting the presence of adult beetles inside the grain mass was evaluated in the laboratory. A piezoelectric sensor and a portable acoustic emission amplifier connected with a computer were used. Adults of the most common beetle pests of stored wheat have been detected in varying population densities (0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2 adults per kilogram of wheat). The verification of the presence of the insect individuals was achieved through automated signal parameterization and classification. We tried out two different ways to detect impulses: 1) by applying a Hilbert transform on the audio recording and 2) by subtracting a noise estimation of the recording from the spectral content of the recording, thus allowing the frequency content of possible impulses to emerge. Prediction for infestation was rated falsely negative in 60-74%, 48-60%, 0-28%, and 0-4% of the cases when actual population density was 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2 adults per kilogram, respectively, irrespective of pest species. No significant differences were recorded in positive predictions among different species in almost all cases. The system was very accurate (72-100%) in detecting 1 or 2 insects per kilogram of hard wheat grain, which is the standard threshold for classifying a grain mass "clean" or "infested." Our findings are discussed on the basis of enhancing the use of bioacoustics in stored-product IPM framework. PMID:26470377

  11. Analytical modelling of acoustic emission from buried or surface-breaking cracks under stress

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a non-destructive testing method used in various industries (aerospace, petrochemical and pressure-vessel industries in general, power generation, civil engineering, mechanical engineering, etc...) for the examination of large structures subjected to various stresses (e.g. mechanical loading).The energy released by a defect under stress (the AE phenomenon) can propagate as guided waves in thin structures or as surface Rayleigh waves in thick ones. Sensors (possibly permanently) are positioned at various locations on the structure under examination and are assumed to be sensitive to these waves. Then, post-processing tools typically based on signal processing and triangulation algorithms can be used to inverse these data, allowing one to estimate the position of the defect from which emanates the waves measured. The French Atomic Energy Commission is engaged in the development of tools for simulating AE examinations. These tools are based on specific models for the AE sources, for the propagation of guided or Rayleigh waves and for the behaviour of AE sensors. Here, the coupling of a fracture mechanics based model for AE source and surface/guided wave propagation models is achieved through an integral formulation relying on the elastodynamic reciprocity principle. As a first approximation, a simple piston-like model is used to predict the sensitivity of AE sensors. Predictions computed by our simulation tool are compared to results from the literature for validation purpose.

  12. Characterization of metal matrix composite using acoustic emission and single fiber composite

    Interfacial shear strength(IFSS) between fiber and matrix is one of the most important factors in characterizing the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced composites. The single fiber composites(SFC) test, originally proposed by Kelly and Tyson, is one of the most frequently used techniques to evaluate the IFSS of composites. This method gives comparatively abundant information such as the interfacial failure mode and the IFSS using only several specimens. In this study, the SFC test with the aid of acoustic emission(AE) technique has been conducted to evaluate the IFSS and micro-failure mechanism of SiC fiber reinforced metal matrix composite(MMC). For this purpose, dog-bone shaped single fiber composite specimens were fabricated. It is obviously shown that the failure mechanisms of MMC were divided by three groups which were matrix cracking, fiber breakage and debonding and fiber breakage. AE amplitude and AE energy versus duration time respectively were useful distinguishing AE signals by fiber breakage between from by matrix cracking. One-to-one correspondence between the AE event and fiber breakage can be established vis optical microscope and ultrasonic C-scanning technique.

  13. Acoustic emission monitoring of the fatigue crack activity in steel bridge members

    Acoustic emission technique was employed for the monitoring of crack activity in steel bridge members. Laboratory experiment was carried out to identify active fatigue crack for the several test condition such as a different specimen type, a varying of cyclic load ratio. The results of this test indicated that the crack propagation characteristics for fatigue cycles did not change significantly with different type of beam. Through all of tests, load ratio of specimen affected significantly to the results such as the crack growth rate and the amount of generating AE signals. From fracture mechanics point of view, the straight curve obtained from theoretical calculation by Paris equation was well correlated to the experimental results. AE location events were not early detected although several AE hits from each sensor were generated in the early of the test. However the features of three parameters, that is, crack growth length, AE location events and cumulative AE events, showed almost same trend in their increase with the number of cycles. Although there were somewhat scattered location in the vicinity of upper flange, which were considered as environmental noises, good locations near the actual crack tip were obtained. Post filtering work was carried out to eliminate these unwanted location, good results were obtained from filtering work using AE parameters.

  14. Development of Methodology to Assess the Failure Behaviour of Bamboo Single Fibre by Acoustic Emission Technique

    Alam, Md. Saiful; Gulshan, Fahmida; Ahsan, Qumrul; Wevers, Martine; Pfeiffer, Helge; van Vuure, Aart-Willem; Osorio, Lina; Verpoest, Ignaas

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) was used as a tool for detecting, evaluating and for better understanding of the damage mechanism and failure behavior in composites during mechanical loading. Methodology was developed for tensile test of natural fibres (bamboo single fibre). A series of experiments were performed and load drops (one or two) were observed in the load versus time graphs. From the observed AE parameters such as amplitude, energy, duration etc. significant information corresponding to the load drops were found. These AE signals from the load drop occurred from such failure as debonding between two elementary fibre or from join of elementary fibre at edge. The various sources of load at first load drop was not consistent for the different samples (for a particular sample the value is 8 N, stress: 517.51 MPa). Final breaking of fibre corresponded to saturated level AE amplitude of preamplifier (99.9 dB) for all samples. Therefore, it was not possible to determine the exact AE energy value for final breaking. Same methodology was used for tensile test of three single fibres, which gave clear indication of load drop before the final breaking of first and second fibre.

  15. Condition monitoring of a check valve for nuclear power plants by means of acoustic emission technique

    The primary object of this work is to investigate advanced condition monitoring systems based on acoustic emission (AE) detection that can provide timely detection of check valve degradation and service aging so that maintenance/replacement could be performed prior to loss of safety function. The research is focused on the capability of AE technique to provide diagnostic information useful in determining check valve aging and degradation, check valve failures and undesirable operating modes. The systematic approach to classify the dynamic responses of AE signatures associated with typical failure modes of check valve for nuclear power plants is performed in this study. The characteristics of AE signature responses of internal parts of check valves due to local aging and degradation is analyzed by extracting effective AE parameters. This work also includes the investigation and adaptation of several advanced sensor technologies such as accelerometer and advanced ultrasonic technique. In addition, this work will develop advanced sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms from check valve degradation. (author)

  16. Acoustic emission signature analysis. Technical progress report No. 2, 1 March 1979-29 February 1980

    Acoustic emission in plate glass and steel has been studied as a function of angle. The low frequency AE in glass (< 1 MHz) was studied in detail, and contributions from P, S and Rayleigh waves identified. These results are isotropic, as expected theoretically. Limited high frequency (5-20 MHz) results have been obtained in glass. This is the first time, that AE energy has been measured above 3 MHz. The measurement of AE on transgranular crack growth in steel during fatigue crack growth was accomplished by use of a low noise manual hydraulic loading system and an electronic gate to reject grip noise. The signals are complex, and not yet understood in detail. The concept of the wave momentum of an AE, first introduced during the previous year, was elaboratored and a measurement technique suggested. The theoretical study of this problem led to the discovery of an infinite, previously unknown, family of elastic surface (Rayleigh-like) waves, and to further cylindrical, radially propagating plate waves. It appears these waves may be useful in other areas of ultrasonics

  17. A novel technique for acoustic emission monitoring in civil structures with global fiber optic sensors

    The application of acoustic emission (AE)-based damage detection is gaining interest in the field of civil structural health monitoring. Damage progress can be detected and located in real time and the recorded AEs hold information on the fracture process which produced them. One of the drawbacks for on-site application in large-scale concrete and masonry structures is the relatively high attenuation of the ultrasonic signal, which limits the detection range of the AE sensors. Consequently, a large number of point sensors are required to cover a certain area. To tackle this issue, a global damage detection system, based on AE detection with a polarization-modulated, single mode fiber optic sensor (FOS), has been developed. The sensing principle, data acquisition and analysis in time and frequency domain are presented. During experimental investigations, this AE-FOS is applied for the first time as a global sensor for the detection of crack-induced AEs in a full-scale concrete beam. Damage progress is monitored during a cyclic four-point bending test and the AE activity, detected with the FOS, is related to the subsequent stages of damage progress in the concrete element. The results obtained with the AE-FOS are successfully linked to the mechanical behavior of the concrete beam and a qualitative correspondence is found with AE data obtained by a commercial system. (papers)

  18. Failure of compression molded all-polyolefin composites studied by acoustic emission

    I. Z. Halasz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at studying the failure behavior of polyolefin-based self-reinforced polymer composites (SRPCs via acoustic emission (AE. Three matrix materials (ethylene octene copolymer (EOC, polypropylene-based thermoplastic elastomer (ePP, random polypropylene copolymer (rPP, and three kinds of reinforcing structures of PP homopolymer (unidirectional (UD, cross-ply (CP and woven fabric (WF were used. SRPCs were produced by compression molding using the film-stacking method. The composites were characterized by mechanical tests combined with in situ assessment of the burst-type AE events. The results showed that rPP matrix and UD reinforcement produced the greatest reinforcement, with a tensile strength more than six times as high as that of the matrix and a Young’s modulus nearly doubled compared to the neat matrix. The number of the detected AE events increased with increasing Young’s modulus of the applied matrices being associated with reduced sound damping. The AE amplitude distributions shows that failure of the SRPC structure produces AE signals in a broad amplitude range, but the highest detected amplitude range can be clearly linked to fiber fractures.

  19. Identification of the Onset of Cracking in Gear Teeth Using Acoustic Emission

    The development of diagnostic methods for gear tooth faults in aerospace power transmission systems is an active research area being driven largely by the interests of military organisations or large aerospace organisations. In aerospace applications, the potential results of gear failure are serious, ranging from increased asset downtime to, at worst, catastrophic failure with life-threatening consequences. New monitoring techniques which can identify the onset of failure at earlier stages are in demand. Acoustic Emission (AE) is the most sensitive condition monitoring tool and is a passive technique that detects the stress wave emitted by a structure as cracks propagate. In this study a gear test rig that allows the fatigue loading of an individual gear tooth was utilised. The rig allows a full AE analysis of damage signatures in gear teeth without the presence of constant background noise due to rotational and frictional sources. Furthermore this approach allows validation of AE results using crack gauges or strain gauges. Utilising a new approach to AE monitoring a sensor was mounted on the gear and used to continuously capture AE data for a complete fatigue load cycle of data, rather than the traditional approach where discrete signals are captured on a threshold basis. Data was captured every 10th load cycle for the duration of the test. A developed fast fourier transform analysis technique was compared with traditional analytical methods. In this investigation the developed techniques were validated against visual inspection and were shown to be far superior to the traditional approach.

  20. Temperature and Pressure Dependence of Signal Amplitudes for Electrostriction Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    The relative signal strength of electrostriction-only (no thermal grating) laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) in gas-phase air is reported as a function of temperature T and pressure P. Measurements were made in the free stream of a variable Mach number supersonic wind tunnel, where T and P are varied simultaneously as Mach number is varied. Using optical heterodyning, the measured signal amplitude (related to the optical reflectivity of the acoustic grating) was averaged for each of 11 flow conditions and compared to the expected theoretical dependence of a pure-electrostriction LITA process, where the signal is proportional to the square root of [P*P /( T*T*T)].

  1. A comparative evaluation of piezoelectric sensors for acoustic emission-based impact location estimation and damage classification in composite structures

    Uprety, Bibhisha; Kim, Sungwon; Mathews, V. John; Adams, Daniel O.

    2015-03-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) based Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is of great interest for detecting impact damage in composite structures. Within the aerospace industry the need to detect and locate these events, even when no visible damage is present, is important both from the maintenance and design perspectives. In this investigation, four commercially available piezoelectric sensors were evaluated for usage in an AE-based SHM system. Of particular interest was comparing the acoustic response of the candidate piezoelectric sensors for impact location estimations as well as damage classification resulting from the impact in fiber-reinforced composite structures. Sensor assessment was performed based on response signal characterization and performance for active testing at 300 kHz and steel-ball drop testing using both aluminum and carbon/epoxy composite plates. Wave mode velocities calculated from the measured arrival times were found to be in good agreement with predictions obtained using both the Disperse code and finite element analysis. Differences in the relative strength of the received wave modes, the overall signal strengths and signal-to-noise ratios were observed through the use of both active testing as well as passive steel-ball drop testing. Further comparative is focusing on assessing AE sensor performance for use in impact location estimation algorithms as well as detecting and classifying damage produced in composite structures due to impact events.

  2. Acoustic emission study of the plastic deformation of quenched and partitioned 35CrMnSiA steel

    Yang Li; Gui-yong Xiao; Lu-bin Chen; Yu-peng Lu

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitored tensile tests were performed on 35CrMnSiA steel subjected to different heat treatments. The results showed that quenching and partitioning (Q−P) heat treatments enhanced the combined mechanical properties of high strength and high ductility for commercial 35CrMnSiA steel, as compared with traditional heat treatments such as quenching and tempering (Q−T) and austempering (AT). AE signals with high amplitude and high energy were produced during the tensile deformation of 35CrMnSiA steel with retained austenite (RA) in the microstructure (obtained via Q−P and AT heat treatments) due to an austenite-to-martensite phase transforma-tion. Moreover, additional AE signals would not appear again and the mechanical properties would degenerate to a lower level once RA de-generated by tempering for the Q−P treated steel.

  3. Fast X-ray tomography and acoustic emission study of damage in metals during continuous tensile tests

    Model AA-2124 matrix composites with two different reinforcement sizes were pulled with a strain rate of 10-5 using a dedicated tensile rig suitable for in situ tomography. Two main novelty aspects characterize the present study. First, tomography provides a new approach towards understanding the significance of AE signals, recorded simultaneously, during image acquisition on the same sample. The number of acoustic emission events is found to be in good agreement with the number of cracks as detected by image analysis and the energy of the signals is proportional to the dimension of the cracks. Secondly, fast tomography was used to perform the first continuous in situ tensile test. The continuous procedure is compared in the paper with the standard step by step procedure

  4. Combining passive thermography and acoustic emission for large area fatigue damage growth assessment of a composite structure

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-05-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.

  5. The use of cluster analysis method for the localization of acoustic emission sources detected during the hydrotest of PWR pressure vessels

    The acoustic emission method is a promising tool for checking reactor pressure vessel integrity. Localization of emission sources is the first and the most important step in processing emission signals. The paper describes the emission sources localization method which is based on cluster analysis of a set of points depicting the emission events in the plane of coordinates of their occurrence. The method is based on using this set of points for constructing the minimum spanning tree and its partition into fragments corresponding to point clusters. Furthermore, the laws are considered of probability distribution of the minimum spanning tree edge length for one and several clusters with the aim of finding the optimum length of the critical edge for the partition of the tree. Practical application of the method is demonstrated on localizing the emission sources detected during a hydrotest of a pressure vessel used for testing the reactor pressure vessel covers. (author)

  6. Acoustic emission measurement in a 20MJ superconducting magnet system of the cluster test coil

    This paper describes acoustic emission (AE) results which were measured during the second major experiment on the Cluster Test Coil at JAERI. This is the largest superconducting magnet system to date on which acoustic emission measurement has been carried out. The amplitudes and the counting rates of AE are shown as functions of coil operating current on three full current excursions. The amplitude results show the on-going process of emission and reduction during successive runs. A strong tendency of the AE counting rate to increase was observed at high currents after successive runs. The phenomenon of amplitude reduction and counting rate increase is attributed to an energy release change from larger single events to numerous smaller events. (author)

  7. SHM based on Acoustic Emission and Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy with Time Reversal Mirrors

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Vejvodová, Šárka; Chlada, Milan; Krofta, Josef

    Drážďany: Fraunhofer Institute for Non-Destructive Testing Dresden Branch (IZFP-D), 2010, s. 1-1. ISBN N. [Dresden Aiport Seminar - Recent Trends in SHM and NDE /5./. Drážďany (DE), 03.11.2010-04.11.2010] R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI1/274 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission * nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy * time reversal mirrors * defect detection * aircraft structural health monitoring Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics www.airportseminar.fraunhofer.de

  8. Multi Reflection of Lamb Wave Emission in an Acoustic Waveguide Sensor

    Leonhard Michael Reindl

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid—liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner.

  9. Extraction of fault component from abnormal sound in diesel engines using acoustic signals

    Dayong, Ning; Changle, Sun; Yongjun, Gong; Zengmeng, Zhang; Jiaoyi, Hou

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a method for extracting fault components from abnormal acoustic signals and automatically diagnosing diesel engine faults is presented. The method named dislocation superimposed method (DSM) is based on the improved random decrement technique (IRDT), differential function (DF) and correlation analysis (CA). The aim of DSM is to linearly superpose multiple segments of abnormal acoustic signals because of the waveform similarity of faulty components. The method uses sample points at the beginning of time when abnormal sound appears as the starting position for each segment. In this study, the abnormal sound belonged to shocking faulty type; thus, the starting position searching method based on gradient variance was adopted. The coefficient of similar degree between two same sized signals is presented. By comparing with a similar degree, the extracted fault component could be judged automatically. The results show that this method is capable of accurately extracting the fault component from abnormal acoustic signals induced by faulty shocking type and the extracted component can be used to identify the fault type.

  10. Cerenkov emission of acoustic phonons electrically generated from three-dimensional Dirac semimetals

    Kubakaddi, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    Cerenkov acoustic phonon emission is theoretically investigated in a three-dimensional Dirac semimetal (3DDS) when it is driven by a dc electric field E. Numerical calculations are made for Cd3As2 in which mobility and electron concentration are large. We find that Cerenkov emission of acoustic phonons takes place when the electron drift velocity vd is greater than the sound velocity vs. This occurs at small E (˜few V/cm) due to large mobility. Frequency (ωq) and angular (θ) distribution of phonon emission spectrum P(ωq, θ) are studied for different electron drift velocities vd (i.e., different E) and electron concentrations ne. The frequency dependence of P(ωq, θ) shows a maximum Pm(ωq, θ) at about ωm ≈ 1 THz and is found to increase with the increasing vd and ne. The value of ωm shifts to higher region for larger ne. It is found that ωm/ne1/3 and Pm(ωq, θ)/ne2/3 are nearly constants. The latter is in contrast with the Pm(ωq, θ)ne1/2 = constant in conventional bulk semiconductor. Each maximum is followed by a vanishing spectrum at nearly "2kf cutoff," where kf is the Fermi wave vector. Angular dependence of P(ωq, θ) and the intensity P(θ) of the phonon emission shows a maximum at an emission angle 45° and is found to increase with increasing vd. P(θ) is found to increase linearly with ne giving the ratio P(θ)/(nevd) nearly a constant. We suggest that it is possible to have the controlled Cerenkov emission and generation of acoustic phonons with the proper choice of E, θ, and ne. 3DDS with large ne and mobility can be a good source of acoustic phonon generation in ˜THz regime.

  11. 基于声发射信号模糊函数综合相关系数的海洋平台各类损伤识别方法%Damage Identification Method of Offshore Platforms by Ambiguity Function Integrated Correlation Coefficient of the Acoustic Emission Signals

    李潇; 杨国安; 吴贞焕; 张杨; 马斓擎

    2014-01-01

    As the critical working environment and the diversity of the background noises, traditional non-destructive testing (NDT) methods don’t work well for the monitoring of offshore platforms. A damage identification method for offshore platforms with an ambiguity function integrated correlation coefficient of the acoustic emission(AE) signals is proposed. Some tests are taken to get the AE signals that are produced by the cracks, corrosion, impact and friction what may happen on offshore platforms frequently, then the templates of the ambiguity function images are built, and an expression to calculate the correlation coefficient of these images is created. Analyzing the testing samples with the templates, the faults are identified correctly, and the validity of this method is proved. Providing the reliable theoretical basis and method to build the identification system based on the correlation coefficient of the ambiguity function images template library of AE signals. Meanwhile, the cross-component is restrained effectively in ambiguity function domain, and improving the treatment efficiency of offshore platforms for real-time monitoring and big data analysis.%海洋平台工作环境恶劣且背景噪声多样,传统的无损检测方法对海洋平台结构监测效果并不理想。针对海洋平台损伤识别现状,提出一种基于声发射信号模糊函数综合相关系数的海洋平台损伤识别方法。通过试验测取海洋平台服役过程中可能会出现的裂纹、腐蚀、撞击和摩擦四类故障或海况所产生的声发射信号,建立起声发射源信号模糊函数图像模板,构造出基于模糊函数图像的归一化相关系数表达式。将测试样本与模糊函数图像模板进行相关分析,准确有效地识别出各类损伤,验证了该方法的有效性,为建立基于声发射源信号模糊函数图像模板库的相关系数自动识别系统提供可靠的理论依据和方法。同时,该方

  12. Stimulated emission of phonons in an acoustic cavity

    Tilstra, Lieuwe Gijsbert

    2002-01-01

    This thesis will present experiments on stimulated emission of phonons in dilute ruby following complete population inversion of the Zeeman-split E(2E) Kramers doublet by selective pulsed optical pumping into its upper component. The resulting phonon avalanches are detected by use of the R1 luminesc

  13. Standard practice for acoustic emission examination of cast iron yankee and steam heated paper dryers

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides guidelines for carrying out acoustic emission (AE) examinations of Yankee and Steam Heated Paper Dryers (SHPD) of the type to make tissue, paper, and paperboard products. 1.2 This practice requires pressurization to levels used during normal operation. The pressurization medium may be high temperature steam, air, or gas. The dryer is also subjected to significant stresses during the heating up and cooling down periods of operation. Acoustic Emission data maybe collected during these time periods but this testing is beyond the scope of this document. 1.3 The AE measurements are used to detect, as well as, localize emission sources. Other methods of nondestructive testing (NDT) may be used to further evaluate the significance of acoustic emission sources. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine th...

  14. Dual fiber Bragg gratings configuration-based fiber acoustic sensor for low-frequency signal detection

    Yang, Dong; Wang, Shun; Lu, Ping; Liu, Deming

    2014-11-01

    We propose and fabricate a new type fiber acoustic sensor based on dual fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) configuration. The acoustic sensor head is constructed by putting the sensing cells enclosed in an aluminum cylinder space built by two Cband FBGs and a titanium diaphragm of 50 um thickness. One end of each FBG is longitudinally adhered to the diaphragm by UV glue. Both of the two FBGs are employed for reflecting light. The dual FBGs play roles not only as signal transmission system but also as sensing component, and they demodulate each other's optical signal mutually during the measurement. Both of the two FBGs are pre-strained and the output optical power experiences fluctuation in a linear relationship along with a variation of axial strain and surrounding acoustic interference. So a precise approach to measure the frequency and sound pressure of the acoustic disturbance is achieved. Experiments are performed and results show that a relatively flat frequency response in a range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz with the average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) above 21 dB is obtained. The maximum sound pressure sensitivity of 11.35mV/Pa is achieved with the Rsquared value of 0.99131 when the sound pressure in the range of 87.7-106.6dB. It has potential applications in low frequency signal detection. Owing to its direct self-demodulation method, the sensing system reveals the advantages of easy to demodulate, good temperature stability and measurement reliability. Besides, performance of the proposed sensor could be improved by optimizing the parameters of the sensor, especially the diaphragm.

  15. EDP-assisted system solutions in machine monitoring and quality assurance based on acoustic signals

    In many fields of engineering and technology, experienced staff are able to assess the condition of machines, plants and production processes by changes in both noise and vibrations ('old hand's touch'). Similar to these subjective methods based on mental expertise, complete EDP-assisted system solutions are needed to implement reliable and objective monitoring based on acoustic signals. The author describes such a system including its mature hardware components, problem-oriented software and engineering people ware. (orig./DG)

  16. Acoustic, electromagnetic, neutron emissions from fracture and earthquakes

    Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Manuello, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the relevant consequences of recently discovered and interdisciplinary phenomena, triggered by local mechanical instabilities. In particular, it looks at emissions from nano-scale mechanical instabilities such as fracture, turbulence, buckling and cavitation, focussing on vibrations at the TeraHertz frequency and Piezonuclear reactions. Future applications for this work could include earthquake precursors, climate change, energy production, and cellular biology. A series of fracture experiments on natural rocks demonstrates that the TeraHertz vibrations are able to induce fission reactions on medium weight elements accompanied by neutron emissions. The same phenomenon appears to have occurred in several different situations, particularly in the chemical evolution of the Earth and Solar System, through seismicity (rocky planets) and storms (gaseous planets). As the authors explore, these phenomena can also explain puzzles related to the history of our planet, like the ocean formation or th...

  17. The Acoustic Structure and Information Content of Female Koala Vocal Signals.

    Benjamin D Charlton

    Full Text Available Determining the information content of animal vocalisations can give valuable insights into the potential functions of vocal signals. The source-filter theory of vocal production allows researchers to examine the information content of mammal vocalisations by linking variation in acoustic features with variation in relevant physical characteristics of the caller. Here I used a source-filter theory approach to classify female koala vocalisations into different call-types, and determine which acoustic features have the potential to convey important information about the caller to other conspecifics. A two-step cluster analysis classified female calls into bellows, snarls and tonal rejection calls. Additional results revealed that female koala vocalisations differed in their potential to provide information about a given caller's phenotype that may be of importance to receivers. Female snarls did not contain reliable acoustic cues to the caller's identity and age. In contrast, female bellows and tonal rejection calls were individually distinctive, and the tonal rejection calls of older female koalas had consistently lower mean, minimum and maximum fundamental frequency. In addition, female bellows were significantly shorter in duration and had higher fundamental frequency, formant frequencies, and formant frequency spacing than male bellows. These results indicate that female koala vocalisations have the potential to signal the caller's identity, age and sex. I go on to discuss the anatomical basis for these findings, and consider the possible functional relevance of signalling this type of information in the koala's natural habitat.

  18. The Acoustic Structure and Information Content of Female Koala Vocal Signals.

    Charlton, Benjamin D

    2015-01-01

    Determining the information content of animal vocalisations can give valuable insights into the potential functions of vocal signals. The source-filter theory of vocal production allows researchers to examine the information content of mammal vocalisations by linking variation in acoustic features with variation in relevant physical characteristics of the caller. Here I used a source-filter theory approach to classify female koala vocalisations into different call-types, and determine which acoustic features have the potential to convey important information about the caller to other conspecifics. A two-step cluster analysis classified female calls into bellows, snarls and tonal rejection calls. Additional results revealed that female koala vocalisations differed in their potential to provide information about a given caller's phenotype that may be of importance to receivers. Female snarls did not contain reliable acoustic cues to the caller's identity and age. In contrast, female bellows and tonal rejection calls were individually distinctive, and the tonal rejection calls of older female koalas had consistently lower mean, minimum and maximum fundamental frequency. In addition, female bellows were significantly shorter in duration and had higher fundamental frequency, formant frequencies, and formant frequency spacing than male bellows. These results indicate that female koala vocalisations have the potential to signal the caller's identity, age and sex. I go on to discuss the anatomical basis for these findings, and consider the possible functional relevance of signalling this type of information in the koala's natural habitat. PMID:26465340

  19. Moisture estimation in power transformer oil using acoustic signals and spectral kurtosis

    Leite, Valéria C. M. N.; Veloso, Giscard F. C.; Borges da Silva, Luiz Eduardo; Lambert-Torres, Germano; Borges da Silva, Jonas G.; Onofre Pereira Pinto, João

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a new technique for estimating the contamination by moisture in power transformer insulating oil based on the spectral kurtosis analysis of the acoustic signals of partial discharges (PDs). Basically, in this approach, the spectral kurtosis of the PD acoustic signal is calculated and the correlation between its maximum value and the moisture percentage is explored to find a function that calculates the moisture percentage. The function can be easily implemented in DSP, FPGA, or any other type of embedded system for online moisture monitoring. To evaluate the proposed approach, an experiment is assembled with a piezoelectric sensor attached to a tank, which is filled with insulating oil samples contaminated by different levels of moisture. A device generating electrical discharges is submerged into the oil to simulate the occurrence of PDs. Detected acoustic signals are processed using fast kurtogram algorithm to extract spectral kurtosis values. The obtained data are used to find the fitting function that relates the water contamination to the maximum value of the spectral kurtosis. Experimental results show that the proposed method is suitable for online monitoring system of power transformers.

  20. Honest signaling and oxidative stress: the special case of avian acoustic communication

    Stefania eCasagrande

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Much research on animal communication has addressed how costs or constraints determined by the oxidative status of an individual can assure the honesty of visual signals, such as sexually selected color ornaments. However, acoustic communication has been largely overlooked in this respect. Here, we describe the few available studies that have considered the role of oxidative status in mediating vocal behavior in adult and nestling birds. Further, we discuss the theoretical principles of how the honesty of avian acoustic signals may be maintained by an organism’s oxidative status. We here distinguish between studies that considered songs and begging calls as indicators of oxidative status and studies where vocalizations were assumed to be the source of oxidative costs. We outline experimental and methodological issues related to the study of bird vocalizations and oxidative stress and describe opportunities for future work in this field of research. Investigating the interactions between acoustic signals and redox state may help address some unresolved questions in avian vocalization, thereby increasing our understanding of the evolutionary pressures shaping animal communication. Finally, we argue that it will be important to extend this line of research beyond birds and include other taxa as well.

  1. Welding stability assessment in the GMAW-S process based on fuzzy logic by acoustic sensing from arc emissions

    E. Huanca Cayo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present research work has as purpose detecting perturbations, measuring and assessing the welding stability in GMAW process in short circuit mode named hereafter as GMAW-S process.Design/methodology/approach: Welding trials were performed with a set of optimal input welding parameters. During experiments were induced some perturbations on the welding trajectory. It causes alteration on the stability of welding resulting as consequence geometrical shape deformations. During each experiments, acoustic emission signal coming from electric arc as well as arc voltage and welding current were acquired aided by a card acquisition and virtual instrumentation software. A heuristic model was performed as knowledge base rules of a fuzzy logic system. This system has two inputs and one output. Some additional welding trials were performed for assessing its performance.Findings: It was performed a welding stability assessment system based on fuzzy logic. As well as, this system is based on non-contact sensing what reduces the loading effects on the welding process.Research limitations/implications: In the present work was monitored just the acoustic emissions coming from arc. Although that, the results were satisfactory, an approach on data fusion of sensors including electromagnetic emission sensors could improve the quality assessments system.Originality/value: The non-contact welding stability assessment methods have reduces loading effects and a heuristic approach on the relations between arc emissions and welding stability allows quantifying nonlinear variables such as knowledge and experience of skilled welders, such that, it is possible to represent linguistic terms numerically what could be used as an on-line monitoring system of welding processes.

  2. Acoustic Transmitters for Underwater Neutrino Telescopes

    Ardid, Miguel; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Larosa, Giuseppina; Adrián-Martínez, Silvia; Llorens, Carlos D

    2012-01-01

    In this paper acoustic transmitters that were developed for use in underwater neutrino telescopes are presented. Firstly, an acoustic transceiver has been developed as part of the acoustic positioning system of neutrino telescopes. These infrastructures are not completely rigid and require a positioning system in order to monitor the position of the optical sensors which move due to sea currents. To guarantee a reliable and versatile system, the transceiver has the requirements of reduced cost, low power consumption, high pressure withstanding (up to 500 bars), high intensity for emission, low intrinsic noise, arbitrary signals for emission and the capacity of acquiring and processing received signals. Secondly, a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed for the calibration of acoustic neutrino detection systems. The array is able to mimic the signature of ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction in emission directivity and signal shape. The technique of parametric acoustic sources has been used to...

  3. Response of acoustic signals generated in water by energetic xenon ions

    Miyachi, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Kuraza, G.; Fujii, M.; Nagashima, A.; Hasebe, N.; Kobayashi, M. N.; Kobayashi, S.; Miyajima, M.; Okudaira, O.; Yamashita, N.; Shibata, H.; Murakami, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Okada, N.; Tou, T.

    2006-05-01

    The acoustic signals generated by bombarding 400 MeV/n xenon ions in water were studied using an array of piezoelectric lead-zirconate-titanate elements. The observed signal was reduced to a bipolar form through Fourier analysis. The output voltage corresponded to the amount of energy deposit in water, and it tailed off beyond the range of 400 MeV/n xenon in water. This magnitude was explained qualitatively as cumulative processes. Its behavior was consistent with the calculations based on the Bethe-Bloch formula. Possible applications of this detector to radiology and heavily doped radiation detectors are described.

  4. Development of an acoustic emission equipment for valves of the Nuclear Power Station Atucha 1

    A four channel Acoustic Emission was developed by the Acoustic Emission Group, INEND Department, of the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina, for the detection of leaks in valves of the pressurized air system: ''Sistema de desconexion de emergencias por acido deuteroborico''. Basically, the system consists of four piezoelectric transducers with their corresponding preamplifiers coupled to the piping close to the valves. The following stages: amplifiers, threshold levels, channel identifications and visual alarm system are gathered in a box. The system was installed in the controlled zone of the Nuclear Power Stations Atucha I. It was calibrated and works on line. The values shown on the display are registered daily in order to separate the normal values from the leak ones. (author). 4 refs, 9 figs

  5. Experimental study of advanced continuous acoustic-emission monitoring of BWR components. Final report

    This report presents the results of a four year research program on the utilization of acoustic emission techniques on light water reactor component applications. Two techniques of the acoustic emission technology were applied to specific problems occurring within the light water reactor system. Crack detection AE monitoring was applied to thermal cycle fatigue cracking problems and stress corrosion cracking problems. Leak detection AE monitoring was applied to valve leakage in the main steam safety relief valves and incontainment packing gland valves. The report provides AE data showing how AE crack detection can be used as an on-line diagnostic monitoring tool. By having an active monitor on light water reactor components, the inservice inspection of the components is being performed during operation rather than refueling periods, thereby reducing critical path time during outages. The resultant benefit is increased plant availability and a reduction in accumulated radiation exposure

  6. Natural and laser-induced cavitation in corn stems: On the mechanisms of acoustic emissions

    Gabriel Mario Bilmes

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Water in plant xylem is often superheated, and therefore in a meta-stable state. Under certain conditions, it may suddenly turn from the liquid to the vapor state. This cavitation process produces acoustic emissions. We report the measurement of ultrasonic acoustic emissions (UAE produced by natural and induced cavitation in corn stems. We induced cavitation and UAE in vivo, in well controlled and reproducible experiments, by irradiating the bare stem of the plants with a continuous-wave laser beam. By tracing the source of UAE, we were able to detect absorption and frequency filtering of the UAE propagating through the stem. This technique allows the unique possibility of studying localized embolism of plant conduits, and thus to test hypotheses on the hydraulic architecture of plants. Based on our results, we postulate that the source of UAE is a transient "cavity oscillation"' triggered by the disruptive effect of cavitation inception.

  7. Natural and laser-induced cavitation in corn stems: On the mechanisms of acoustic emissions

    Fernández, E; Bilmes, G M; 10.4279/PIP.040003

    2012-01-01

    Water in plant xylem is often superheated, and therefore in a meta-stable state. Under certain conditions, it may suddenly turn from the liquid to the vapor state. This cavitation process produces acoustic emissions. We report the measurement of ultrasonic acoustic emissions (UAE) produced by natural and induced cavitation in corn stems. We induced cavitation and UAE in vivo, in well controlled and reproducible experiments, by irradiating the bare stem of the plants with a continuous-wave laser beam. By tracing the source of UAE, we were able to detect absorption and frequency filtering of the UAE propagating through the stem. This technique allows the unique possibility of studying localized embolism of plant conduits, and thus to test hypotheses on the hydraulic architecture of plants. Based on our results, we postulate that the source of UAE is a transient "cavity oscillation" triggered by the disruptive effect of cavitation inception.

  8. Study of electromagnetic and acoustic emission in creep experiments of water-containing rock samples

    JING Hong-wen; ZHANG Zhong-yu; XU Guo-an

    2008-01-01

    Based on biaxial shear creep tests conducted on rock samples with different water contents, we present the results of our study on the regularities of electromagnetic and acoustic emission during the process of creep experiments in which we have ana-lyzed the contribution of water to the occurrence of electromagnetic radiation. The result shows that in the creep-fracturing course of rock samples, when the water content increases, the initial frequency and amplitude of electromagnetic and acoustic emission also increases, but at a decreasing growth rate caused by loading stress. This can be used as a criterion for the long-term stability of rock masses under conditions of repeated inundation and discharge of water.

  9. Effects of Specimen Height on the Acoustic Emission Rate Value ‘a’ for Cement Mortar

    WANG Yan; HU Hongxiang; LU Guijuan; CHEN Shijie; LIU Shaojun; WANG Yao

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the size effect on the AE rate ‘a’ value, three kinds of mix ratios were set up by different particle sizes and water cement ratios, 45 cement mortar specimens with ifve different heights were tested under axial compression. And the whole damage processes were monitored by full-digital acoustic emission acquisition system, followed by an analysis of mechanical behavior and AE activity. The experimental results show that the height of the cement specimen has signiifcant effects on the compressive strength and the acoustic emission rate ‘a’ value, but a slight effect on the accumulated AE hits number, which is analyzed from aspects of failure process of cement mortar specimens.

  10. ACEMAN (II): a PDP-11 software package for acoustic emission analysis

    A powerful, but easy-to-use, software package (ACEMAN) for acoustic emission analysis has been developed at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories. The system is based on a PDP-11 minicomputer with 24 K of memory, an RK05 DISK Drive and a Tektronix 4010 Graphics terminal. The operation of the system is described in detail in terms of the functions performed in response to the various command mnemonics. The ACEMAN software package offers many useful facilities not found on other acoustic emission monitoring systems. Its main features, many of which are unique, are summarised. The ACEMAN system automatically handles arrays of up to 12 sensors in real-time operation during which data are acquired, analysed, stored on the computer disk for future analysis and displayed on the terminal if required. (author)

  11. Springer handbook of acoustics

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and electronics. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is also in his 2nd edition an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents. This new edition of the Handbook features over 11 revised and expanded chapters, new illustrations, and 2 new chapters covering microphone arrays  and acoustic emission.  Updated chapters contain the latest research and applications in, e.g. sound propagation in the atmosphere, nonlinear acoustics in fluids, building and concert hall acoustics, signal processing, psychoacoustics, computer music, animal bioacousics, sound intensity, modal acoustics as well as new chapters on microphone arrays an...

  12. Behavioral assessment of acoustic parameters relevant to signal recognition and preference in a vocal fish.

    McKibben, J R; Bass, A H

    1998-12-01

    Acoustic signal recognition depends on the receiver's processing of the physical attributes of a sound. This study takes advantage of the simple communication sounds produced by plainfin midshipman fish to examine effects of signal variation on call recognition and preference. Nesting male midshipman generate both long duration (> 1 min) sinusoidal-like "hums" and short duration "grunts." The hums of neighboring males often overlap, creating beat waveforms. Presentation of humlike, single tone stimuli, but not grunts or noise, elicited robust attraction (phonotaxis) by gravid females. In two-choice tests, females differentiated and chose between acoustic signals that differed in duration, frequency, amplitude, and fine temporal content. Frequency preferences were temperature dependent, in accord with the known temperature dependence of hum fundamental frequency. Concurrent hums were simulated with two-tone beat stimuli, either presented from a single speaker or produced more naturally by interference between adjacent sources. Whereas certain single-source beats reduced stimulus attractiveness, beats which resolved into unmodulated tones at their sources did not affect preference. These results demonstrate that phonotactic assessment of stimulus relevance can be applied in a teleost fish, and that multiple signal parameters can affect receiver response in a vertebrate with relatively simple communication signals. PMID:9857511

  13. Seismo-acoustic Signals Recorded at KSIAR, the Infrasound Array Installed at PS31

    Kim, T. S.; Che, I. Y.; Jeon, J. S.; Chi, H. C.; Kang, I. B.

    2014-12-01

    One of International Monitoring System (IMS)'s primary seismic stations, PS31, called Korea Seismic Research Station (KSRS), was installed around Wonju, Korea in 1970s. It has been operated by US Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC) for more than 40 years. KSRS is composed of 26 seismic sensors including 19 short period, 6 long period and 1 broad band seismometers. The 19 short period sensors were used to build an array with a 10-km aperture while the 6 long period sensors were used for a relatively long period array with a 40-km aperture. After KSRS was certified as an IMS station in 2006 by Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) which is the Korea National Data Center started to take over responsibilities on the operation and maintenance of KSRS from AFTAC. In April of 2014, KIGAM installed an infrasound array, KSIAR, on the existing four short period seismic stations of KSRS, the sites KS05, KS06, KS07 and KS16. The collocated KSIAR changed KSRS from a seismic array into a seismo-acoustic array. The aperture of KSIAR is 3.3 km. KSIAR also has a 100-m small aperture infrasound array at KS07. The infrasound data from KSIAR except that from the site KS06 is being transmitted in real time to KIGAM with VPN and internet line. An initial analysis on seismo-acoustic signals originated from local and regional distance ranges has been performed since May 2014. The analysis with the utilization of an array process called Progressive Multi-Channel Correlation (PMCC) detected seismo-acoustic signals caused by various sources including small explosions in relation to constructing local tunnels and roads. Some of them were not found in the list of automatic bulletin of KIGAM. The seismo-acoustic signals recorded by KSIAR are supplying a useful information for discriminating local and regional man-made events from natural events.

  14. Solid waves and acoustic emission first phase: Problems direct and inverse and equations elasto dynamics fields

    The present work is the first of a series of three memoirs briefs, destinadas to revise the classic theoretical foundations that allow to understand the generation,la diffusion and the detection of the elastic waves in those been accustomed to from the point of view of the mechanics of the means continuos. The study is faced in the mark of the non destructive rehearsals, emphasizing aspects related with the rehearsals based on the acoustic emission of the material defects

  15. Application of acoustic emission analysis as a non-destructive test method for production control

    The application of acoustic emission measurements with a bandpass of 50 kHz - 1,5 MHz for the detection of fatigue-crack propagation in pressure vessels and to the perception of welding cracks is investigated. The method can also be used in laboratory tests for the determination of structural transformations of metals, for examinations in connection with stress-corrosion cracking and for tests of laminated materials. Some possibilities of application and the limits of the methode are shown. (orig.)

  16. Experimental investigation of acoustic emissions and their moment tensors in rock during failure

    Aker, E.; Kühn, D.; Vavryčuk, Václav; Soldal, M.; Oye, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 70, September (2014), s. 286-295. ISSN 1365-1609 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP210/12/1491 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 230669 - AIM Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : acoustic emissions * focal mechanisms * moment tensors * rock fracturing * hoop stresses * laboratory experiment Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.686, year: 2014

  17. Acoustic emission characteristics of instability process of a rock plate under concentrated loading

    S. R. Wang; Li, C. Y.; Z.S. Zou; Liu, X. L.

    2016-01-01

    It can facilitate the understanding of the mechanical properties and failure laws of rocks to research on the rock failure mechanism and evolution characteristics of Acoustic Emission (AE). Under the concentrated loading condition, the fracture and instability test of a rock plate was conducted by using the rock Mechanics Testing System (MTS), meanwhile, these AE events were recorded through the AE recording system. Based on the laboratory test, the numerical simulation was completed by us...

  18. Stress Corrosion Cracking—Crevice Interaction in Austenitic Stainless Steels Characterized By Acoustic Emission

    Leinonen, H.; Schildt, T.; Hänninen, H.

    2011-02-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of austenitic EN1.4301 (AISI 304) and EN1.4404 (AISI 316L) stainless steels was studied using the constant load method and polymer (PTFE) crevice former in order to study the effects of crevice on SCC susceptibility. The uniaxial active loading tests were performed in 50 pct CaCl2 at 373 K (100 °C) and in 0.1 M NaCl at 353 K (80 °C) under open-circuit corrosion potential (OCP) and electrochemical polarization. Pitting, crevice, and SCC corrosion were characterized and identified by acoustic emission (AE) analysis using ∆ t filtering and the linear locationing technique. The correlation of AE parameters including amplitude, duration, rise time, counts, and energy were used to identify the different types of corrosion. The stages of crevice corrosion and SCC induced by constant active load/crevice former were monitored by AE. In the early phase of the tests, some low amplitude AE activity was detected. In the steady-state phase, the AE activity was low, and toward the end of the test, it increased with the increasing amplitude of the impulses. AE allowed a good correlation between AE signals and corrosion damage. Although crevice corrosion and SCC induced AE signals overlapped slightly, a good correlation between them and microscopical characterization and stress-strain data was found. Especially, the activity of AE signals increased in the early and final stages of the SCC experiment under constant active load conditions corresponding to the changes in the measured steady-state creep strain rate of the specimen. The results of the constant active load/crevice former test indicate that a crevice can initiate SCC even in the mild chloride solution at low temperatures. Based on the mechanistic model of SCC, the rate determining step in SCC is thought to be the generation of vacancies by selective dissolution, which is supported by the low activity phase of AE during the steady-state creep strain rate region.

  19. New approaches for automatic threedimensional source localization of acoustic emissions--Applications to concrete specimens.

    Kurz, Jochen H

    2015-12-01

    The task of locating a source in space by measuring travel time differences of elastic or electromagnetic waves from the source to several sensors is evident in varying fields. The new concepts of automatic acoustic emission localization presented in this article are based on developments from geodesy and seismology. A detailed description of source location determination in space is given with the focus on acoustic emission data from concrete specimens. Direct and iterative solvers are compared. A concept based on direct solvers from geodesy extended by a statistical approach is described which allows a stable source location determination even for partly erroneous onset times. The developed approach is validated with acoustic emission data from a large specimen leading to travel paths up to 1m and therefore to noisy data with errors in the determined onsets. The adaption of the algorithms from geodesy to the localization procedure of sources of elastic waves offers new possibilities concerning stability, automation and performance of localization results. Fracture processes can be assessed more accurately. PMID:26233938

  20. Acoustic emission monitoring and ultrasonic examination correlation on a reactor pressure vessel. Final report

    The acoustic emission monitoring and corroborative ultrasonic examination of the acoustic emission (AE) locations established during the hydrostatic pressure test of a BWR primary pressure vessel is described. Descriptive information regarding AE is provided as a background and details of the AE and ultrasonic instrumentation, procedures, problems encountered, and test results are discussed. In total, 42 acoustic emission locations were detected, located, and ultrasonically examined during this project. At all 42 AE locations ultrasonic indications were obtained. Of the AE locations, 76% (or 32 of the 42) were confirmed at amplitudes greater than or equal to 2.5% Distance Amplitude Correction (DAC) by either L-wave or shear wave ultrasonic examination, the largest of these being 18% DAC. The remainder of the AE locations were confirmed at amplitudes less than 2.5% DAC. ASME Code requires that ultrasonic examination record for permanent reference indications of 50% DAC or greater. As is to be expected ultrasonic examination detected examinations which were not located by AE monitoring since AE locates only active flaws. Results show the complementary value of AE monitoring to ultrasonic examination in two primary uses: determining the existence and the location of active discontinuities; and assuring that active discontinuities are not overlooked. Results reflect the position that AE monitoring and ultrasonics are supplementary to each other, not replacements for one another

  1. Acoustic Emission Technique, an Overview as a Characterization Tool in Materials Science

    C. R. Ríos-Soberanis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to predict the mechanical behavior of a composite during its service life, it is important to evaluate its mechanical response under different types of external stresses by studying the initiation and development of cracks and the effects induced by damage and degradation. The onset of damage is related to the structural integrity of the component and its fatigue life. For this, among other reasons, non-destructive techniques such as acoustic emission(AE have been widely used nowadays for composite materials haracterization. This method has demonstrated excellent results on detecting and identifying initiations sites, cracking propagation and fracture mechanisms of polymer matrix composite and ceramic materials. This paper focuses on commenting the importance of the acoustic emission technique as a unique tool for characterizing mechanical parameters in response to external stresses and degradation processes by reviewing previous investigations carried out by the author as participant. Acoustic emission was employed to monitor the micro-failure mechanisms in composites in relation to the stress level in real-time during the tests carried out. Some results obtained from different analysis are discussed to support the significance of using AE, technique that will be increasingly employed in the composite materials field due to its several lternatives for understanding the mechanical behavior; therefore, the objective of this manuscript is to involve the benefits andadvantages of AE in the characterization of materials.

  2. Delayed Alumina Scale Spallation on Rene'n5+y: Moisture Effects and Acoustic Emission

    Smialek, James L.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    2001-01-01

    The single crystal superalloy Rene'N5 (with or without Y-doping and hydrogen annealing) was cyclically oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 hours. After considerable scale growth (>= 500 hours), even the adherent alumina scales formed on Y-doped samples exhibited delayed interfacial spallation during subsequent water immersion tests, performed up to one year after oxidation. Spallation was characterized by weight loss, the amount of spalled area, and acoustic emission response. Hydrogen annealing (prior to oxidation) reduced spallation both before and after immersion, but without measurably reducing the bulk sulfur content of the Y-doped alloys. The duration and frequency of sequential, co-located acoustic emission events implied an interfacial crack growth rate at least 10(exp -3) m/s, but possibly higher than 10(exp 2) m/s. This is much greater than classic moisture-assisted slow crack growth rates in bulk alumina (10(exp -6) to 10(exp -3) m/s), which may still have occurred undetected by acoustic emission. An alternative failure sequence is proposed: an incubation process for preferential moisture ingress leads to a local decrease in interfacial toughness, thus allowing fast fracture driven by stored strain energy.

  3. Experimental study of advanced continuous acoustic emission monitoring of BWR components. Final report

    The program consisted of installing, maintaining, and monitoring AE sensors located on primary piping, nozzles, and valves in the BWR system. Analysis of the AE data was correlated to the results of supplementary nondestructive testing techniques used during the in-service inspection, performed at refueling outages. Purpose of the program was to develop the on-line surveillance acoustic emission technique in order to identify areas of possible structural degradation. Result of reducing inspection time was to reduce accumulated radiation exposure to inspecting personnel and to reduce the amount of critical plant outage time by identifying the critical inspection areas during operation. The program demonstrated the capability of acoustic emission instrumentation to endure the nuclear reactor environment. The acoustic emission sensors withstood 12 months of reactor operation at temperatures of 4000F and greater in high radiation fields. The preamplifiers, also mounted in the reactor environment, operated for the 12-month period in 100% humidity, 2500F conditions. The remaining cable and AE instrumentation were operated in controlled environments

  4. Health monitoring of Ceramic Matrix Composites from waveform-based analysis of Acoustic Emission

    Maillet Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs are anticipated for use in the hot section of aircraft engines. Their implementation requires the understanding of the various damage modes that are involved and their relation to life expectancy. Acoustic Emission (AE has been shown to be an efficient technique for monitoring damage evolution in CMCs. However, only a waveform-based analysis of AE can offer the possibility to validate and precisely examine the recorded AE data with a view to damage localization and identification. The present work fully integrates wave initiation, propagation and acquisition in the analysis of Acoustic Emission waveforms recorded at various sensors, therefore providing more reliable information to assess the relation between Acoustic Emission and damage modes. The procedure allows selecting AE events originating from damage, accurate determination of their location as well as the characterization of effects of propagation on the recorded waveforms. This approach was developed using AE data recorded during tensile tests on carbon/carbon composites. It was then applied to melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composites.

  5. Experimental study of advanced continuous acoustic emission monitoring of BWR components. Final report

    McElroy, J W; Hartman, W F

    1980-09-01

    The program consisted of installing, maintaining, and monitoring AE sensors located on primary piping, nozzles, and valves in the BWR system. Analysis of the AE data was correlated to the results of supplementary nondestructive testing techniques used during the in-service inspection, performed at refueling outages. Purpose of the program was to develop the on-line surveillance acoustic emission technique in order to identify areas of possible structural degradation. Result of reducing inspection time was to reduce accumulated radiation exposure to inspecting personnel and to reduce the amount of critical plant outage time by identifying the critical inspection areas during operation. The program demonstrated the capability of acoustic emission instrumentation to endure the nuclear reactor environment. The acoustic emission sensors withstood 12 months of reactor operation at temperatures of 400/sup 0/F and greater in high radiation fields. The preamplifiers, also mounted in the reactor environment, operated for the 12-month period in 100% humidity, 250/sup 0/F conditions. The remaining cable and AE instrumentation were operated in controlled environments.

  6. Generation of desired signals from acoustic drivers. [for aircraft engine internal noise propagation experiment

    Ramakrishnan, R.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1982-01-01

    A procedure to control transient signal generation is developed for the study of internal noise propagation from aircraft engines. A simple algorithm incorporating transform techniques is used to produce signals of any desired waveform from acoustic drivers. The accurate driver response is then calculated, and from this the limiting frequency characteristics are determined and the undesirable frequencies where the driver response is poor are eliminated from the analysis. A synthesized signal is then produced by convolving the inverse of the response function with the desired signal. Although the shape of the synthesized signal is in general quite awkward, the driver generates the desired signal when the distorted signal is fed into the driver. The results of operating the driver in two environments, in a free field and in a duct, are presented in order to show the impedance matching effect of the driver. In addition, results using a high frequency cut-off value as a parameter is presented in order to demonstrate the extent of the applicability of the synthesis procedure. It is concluded that the desired signals can be generated through the signal synthesis procedure.

  7. A study on the condition monitoring of check valve at nuclear power plants using the acoustic emission and a neural network technique

    Lee, Min Rae; Lee, Joon Hyun [Busan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Teak [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The analysis of Acoustic Emission (AE) signals produced during object leakage is promising for condition monitoring of the components. In this study, an advanced condition monitoring technique based on acoustic emission detection and artificial neural networks was applied to a check valve, one of the components being used extensively in a safety system of a nuclear power plant. AE testing for a check valve under controlled flow loop conditions was performed to detect and evaluate disk movement for valve degradation such as wear and leakage due to foreign object interference in a check valve. It is clearly demonstrated that the evaluation of different types of failure modes such as disk wear and check valve leakage were successful by systematically analyzing the characteristics of various AE parameters. It is also shown that the leak size can be determined with an artificial neural network.

  8. A study on the condition monitoring of check valve at nuclear power plants using the acoustic emission and a neural network technique

    The analysis of Acoustic Emission (AE) signals produced during object leakage is promising for condition monitoring of the components. In this study, an advanced condition monitoring technique based on acoustic emission detection and artificial neural networks was applied to a check valve, one of the components being used extensively in a safety system of a nuclear power plant. AE testing for a check valve under controlled flow loop conditions was performed to detect and evaluate disk movement for valve degradation such as wear and leakage due to foreign object interference in a check valve. It is clearly demonstrated that the evaluation of different types of failure modes such as disk wear and check valve leakage were successful by systematically analyzing the characteristics of various AE parameters. It is also shown that the leak size can be determined with an artificial neural network

  9. Damage characterization on human femur bone by means of ultrasonics and acoustic emission

    Strantza, M.; Polyzos, D.; Louis, O.; Boulpaep, F.; Van Hemelrijck, D.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2015-07-01

    Human bone tissue is characterized as a material with high brittleness. Due to this nature, visible signs of cracking are not easy to be detected before final failure. The main objective of this work is to investigate if the acoustic emission (AE) technique can offer valuable insight to the fracture process of human femur specimens as in other engineering materials characterization. This study describes the AE activity during fracture of whole femur bones under flexural load. Before fracture, broadband AE sensors were used in order to measure parameters like wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Waveform parameters like the duration, rise time and average frequency, were also examined relatively to the propagation distance as a preparation for the AE monitoring during fracture. After the ultrasonic study, the samples were partly cast in concrete and fixed as cantilevers. A point load was applied on the femur head, which due to the test geometry resulted in a combination of two different patterns of fracture, bending and torsion. Two AE broadband sensors were placed in different points of the sample, one near the fixing end and the other near the femur head. Preliminary analysis shows that parameters like the number of acquired AE signals and their amplitude are well correlated with the load history. Furthermore, the parameters of rise time and frequency can differentiate the two fracture patterns. Additionally, AE allows the detection of the load at the onset of fracture from the micro-cracking events that occur at the early loading stages, allowing monitoring of the whole fracture process. Parameters that have been used extensively for monitoring and characterization of fracture modes of engineering materials seem to poses characterization power in the case of bone tissue monitoring as well.

  10. Acoustic Emission Characteristics of Gas-Containing Coal during Loading Dilation Process

    Z. Q. Yin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Raw coal was used as the study object in this paper to identify the evolution characteristics of acoustic emission (AE during the dilation process of gas-containing coal. The coal specimens were stored in gas seal devices filled with gas at different pressures (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 MPa for 24 h prior to testing. Then, the specimens were tested in a rock-testing machine, and the deformation and crack fracture patterns were recorded by using strain gauges and an AE system. The axial and volumetric strains–stress curves were analyzed in relation to the AE and the failure mode. Results show that as gas pressure increases, the uniaxial compression strength and elasticity modulus of gas-containing coal decreases, whereas the Poisson’s ratio increases. In all the coal specimens, the dilation initiation stress decreases, and the dilation degree increases. During the dilation process, before the loaded coal specimens reach peak stress, and as the load increases, the changes in the specimens and in the AE energy parameter of specimens can be divided into four phases: crack closure deformation, elastic deformation, stable crack propagation, and unstable crack propagation (dilation process. Across the four phases, the AE energy increases evidently during crack closure and elastic deformation but decreases during stable crack propagation. As the gas pressure increases, the AE signal frequency increases from 4.5 KHz to 8.1 KHz during the dilation process. Thus, the gas presence in coal specimens exerts a significant influence on the closure of sample cracks and dilation damage.

  11. Characteristics of ultrasonic acoustic emissions from walnut branches during freeze-thaw-induced embolism formation.

    Kasuga, Jun; Charrier, Guillaume; Uemura, Matsuo; Améglio, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic emission (UAE) methods have been applied for the detection of freeze-thaw-induced embolism formation in water conduits of tree species. Until now, however, the exact source(s) of UAE has not been identified especially in angiosperm species, in which xylem tissues are composed of diverse types of cells. In this study, UAE was recorded from excised branches of walnut (Juglans regia cv. Franquette) during freeze-thaw cycles, and attempts were made to characterize UAEs generated by cavitation events leading to embolism formation according to their properties. During freeze-thaw cycles, a large number of UAEs were generated from the sample segments. However, the cumulative numbers of total UAE during freeze-thawing were not correlated with the percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity after thawing, suggesting that the sources of UAE were not only cavitation leading to embolism formation in vessels. Among the UAEs, cumulative numbers of UAEs with absolute energy >10.0 fJ strongly correlated with the increase in percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity. The high absolute energy of the UAEs might reflect the formation of large bubbles in the large lumen of vessels. Therefore, UAEs generated by cavitation events in vessels during freeze-thawing might be distinguished from other signals according to their magnitudes of absolute energy. On the other hand, the freezing of xylem parenchyma cells was followed by a certain number of UAEs. These results indicate the possibility that UAE methods can be applied to the detection of both freeze-thaw-induced embolism and supercooling breakdown in parenchyma cells in xylem. PMID:25662846

  12. Development of Acoustic Emission Technology for Condition Monitoring and Diagnosis of Rotating Machines; Bearings, Pumps, Gearboxes, Engines and Rotating Structures.

    Mba, David; Rao, Raj B. K. N.

    2006-01-01

    One of the earliest documented applications of Acoustic Emission Technology (AET) to rotating machinery monitoring was in the late 1960s. Since then there has been an explosion in research and application based studies covering bearings, pumps, gearboxes, engines and rotating structures. This paper presents a comprehensive and critical review to date on the application of Acoustic Emission Technology to condition monitoring and diagnostics of rotating machinery.

  13. Simulated performance of an acoustic modem using phase-modulated signals in a time-varying, shallow-water environment

    Bjerrum-Niese, Christian; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1996-01-01

    Underwater acoustic modems using coherent modulation, such as phase-shift keying, have proven to efficiently exploit the bandlimited underwater acoustical communication channel. However, the performance of an acoustic modem, given as maximum range and data and error rate, is limited in the complex...... relative to the first arrival, while longer delays give rise to intersymbol interference. Following this, the signal-to-multipath ratio (SMR) is introduced. It is claimed that the SMR determines the performance rather than the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Using a ray model including temporal variations...

  14. Acoustic emission for on-line reactor monitoring: results of intermediate vessel test monitoring and reactor hot functional

    The objective of the acoustic emission (AE)/flaw characterization program presented is to develop use of the AE method on a continuous basis during operation and during hydrotest, to detect and analyze flow growth in reactor pressure vessels and primary piping. The program scope is described by three primary areas of effort: develop a method to identify crack growth AE signals; develop a relationship between measured AE and crack growth; demonstrate the total concept through off-reactor vessel tests; and, on-reactor monitoring. The laboratory speciments used to determine fundamental feasibility of program objectives were ASTM A533 B, Class 1 steel. The ZB-1 vessel test is described, and the results are presented. Reactor hot functional testing was done on the Watts Bar Unit 1. Evidence shows that AE from cracking in inaccessible parts of the reactor system such as the vessel beltline should be detectable

  15. Co-detection of acoustic emissions during failure of heterogeneous media: new perspectives for natural hazard early warning

    Faillettaz, J; Reiweger, I

    2015-01-01

    A promising method for real time early warning of gravity driven rupture that considers both the heterogeneity of natural media and characteristics of acoustic emissions attenuation is proposed. The method capitalizes on co-detection of elastic waves emanating from micro-cracks by multiple and spatially separated sensors. Event co-detection is considered as surrogate for large event size with more frequent co-detected events marking imminence of catastrophic failure. Using a spatially explicit fiber bundle numerical model with spatially correlated mechanical strength and two load redistribution rules, we constructed a range of mechanical failure scenarios and associated failure events (mapped into AE) in space and time. Analysis considering hypothetical arrays of sensors and consideration of signal attenuation demonstrate the potential of the co-detection principles even for insensitive sensors to provide early warning for imminent global failure.

  16. Fatigue crack propagation behavior and acoustic emission characteristics of the heat affected zone of super duplex stainless steel

    Because duplex stainless steel shows the good strength and corrosion resistance properties, the necessity of duplex stainless steel, which has long life in severe environments, has been increased with industrial development. The fatigue crack propagation behavior of Heat Affected Zone(HAZ) has been investigated in super duplex stainless steel. The fatigue crack propagation rate of HAZ of super duplex stainless steel was faster than that of base metal of super duplex stainless steel. We also analysed acoustic emission signals during the fatigue test with time-frequency analysis method. According to the results of time-frequency analysis, the frequency ranges of 200-400 kHz were obtained by striation and the frequency range of 500 kHz was obtained due to dimple and separate of inclusion

  17. Acoustic emission analysis and ultrasonic backscattering analysis for characterisation of fissure systems in saline rock; Akustische Emission und Ultraschall-Rueckstreuung zur Charakterisierung von Rissgeflechten im Salzgestein

    Kuehnicke, Horst; Schulze, Eberhard [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren, Institutsteil Dresden (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    For long-lived toxic or radioactive wastes, underground storage in geologically stable and near non-permeable saline rock strata is a relatively safe storage option. Correct characterisation of the so-called loosening zone of the saline bedrock is very important as the stresses around man-made caverns will cause extensive systems of microcracks that enhance the permeability for liquid and solid hazardous materials. Non-destructive characterisation of the loosening zone has the advantage of detailed 3D imaging without additional damage to the rock. The methods employed are microseismic (acoustic emission testing) and geosonar (ultrasonic backscattering). With acoustic emission testing, the temporal and spatial variations in the loosening zone can be observed without complex instrumentation. The ultrasonic method has a mean frequency of 200 kHz; it measures the backscattering of the microcrack systems and is well suited for determining the state of loosening at a given moment. Validations in a 35 year-old cavern with a circular cross section of about 3 m and in two more recent caverns with rectangular cross sections of 3 x 9 m were positive. The loosening zones had a thickness of about 0.5 m. Cracks were oriented parallel to the cavern surface; most of them were normal stress fractures. Permeabilities were 10{sup -16} m at the edge and 10{sup -23} m{sup 2}. The good results wre mostly due to the application of signal shape based techniques, e.g. conditioned signals or moment sensor analysis. The measuring system is protected against dust and water. Both the measuring systems and the evaluation algorithms can also be used in other materials with coarse structures, e.g. concrete or fibre-reinforced polymers. (orig.)

  18. Effects of temporal envelope modulation on acoustic signal recognition in a vocal fish, the plainfin midshipman.

    McKibben, J R; Bass, A H

    2001-06-01

    Amplitude modulation is an important parameter defining vertebrate acoustic communication signals. Nesting male plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, emit simple, long duration hums in which modulation is strikingly absent. Envelope modulation is, however, introduced when the hums of adjacent males overlap to produce acoustic beats. Hums attract gravid females and can be mimicked with continuous tones at the fundamental frequency. While individual hums have flat envelopes, other midshipman signals are amplitude modulated. This study used one-choice playback tests with gravid females to examine the role of envelope modulation in hum recognition. Various pulse train and two-tone beat stimuli resembling natural communication signals were presented individually, and the responses compared to those for continuous pure tones. The effectiveness of pulse trains was graded and depended upon both pulse duration and the ratio of pulse to gap length. Midshipman were sensitive to beat modulations from 0.5 to 10 Hz, with fewer fish approaching the beat than the pure tone. Reducing the degree of modulation increased the effectiveness of beat stimuli. Hence, the lack of modulation in the midshipman's advertisement call corresponds to the importance of envelope modulation for the categorization of communication signals even in this relatively simple system. PMID:11425135

  19. Basic test of acoustic emission sensor as a leak detector from pressure vessels and piping of nuclear power plant

    Basic tests of AE (Acoustic Emission) sensor that measures elastic wave of solid caused by leak of high pressure vessels, pipes or valves have been performed. The relation of leak flow rate and AE sensor's signal level, and the characteristics of AE signal attenuation vs. distance have been obtained experimentally as basic data. The test system consists of a pipe that can contain gas, water or steam whose maximum temperature is 275degC and maximum pressure is 6 MPa. A small scale crack is simulated by a small circular hole or a slit type rectangular shaped hole. It is observed that the AE signal level generated from leak part is proportional to the density of leaking fluid, to the fourth power of the velocity and to the cross sectional area of simulated crack. It is also observed that AE signal attenuation against distance on uniform cross section pipe is negligible small. This basic technology can be applied to detect leak from pressure vessels and piping in a nuclear power plant. (author)

  20. Simultaneous investigation of thermal, acoustic, and magnetic emission during martensitic transformation in single-crystalline Ni2MnGa

    Tóth, László Z.; Daróczi, Lajos; Szabó, Sándor; Beke, Dezső L.

    2016-04-01

    Simultaneous thermal, acoustic, and magnetic emission (AE and ME) measurements during thermally induced martensitic transformation in Ni2MnGa single crystals demonstrate that all three types of the above noises display many coincident peaks and the same start and finish temperatures. The amplitude and energy distribution functions for AE and ME avalanches satisfy power-law behavior, corresponding to the symmetry of the martensite. At zero external magnetic field asymmetry in the exponents was obtained: their value was larger for heating than for cooling. Application of constant, external magnetic fields (up to B =722 mT) leads to the disappearance of the above asymmetry, due to the decrease of the multiplicity of the martensite variants. Time correlations (i.e., the existence of nonhomogeneous temporal processes) within AE as well as ME emission events are demonstrated by deviations from the uncorrelated behavior on probability distributions of waiting times as well as of a sequence of number of events. It is shown that the above functions collapse on universal master curves for cooling and heating as well as for AE and ME noises. The analysis of the existence of temporal correlations between AE and ME events revealed that at short times the acoustic signals show a time delay relative to the magnetic one, due to the time necessary for the propagation of the ultrasound. At intermediate times, as expected, the magnetic signal is delayed, i.e., the magnetic domain rearrangement followed the steps of structural transformation. At much longer times the deviation from an uncorrelated (Poisson-type) behavior is attributed to the nonhomogeneity of the avalanche statistics.

  1. Sequential Labelling and Acoustic Emission Analysis of Damage Occurring in Cortical Bone During Indentation Cutting

    Reilly, Ger; Safari, Ashkan; Taylor, David; McCormack, Brendan

    2005-01-01

    When a surgeon uses a wedge shaped blade or an osteotome to cut cortical bone during an operative procedure the bone will fail by a process of microcracking and primary crack propagation. It has previously been observed that crack propagation is dependent on the direction of cutting relative to the main axis of the bone. It has also been observed that microcracks occurring during fracture release acoustic signals that facilitate real-time monitoring of a cutting process. In these novel studi...

  2. Detection of geodesic acoustic mode oscillations, using multiple signal classification analysis of Doppler backscattering signal on Tore Supra

    This paper presents the first observation of geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) on Tore Supra plasmas. Using the Doppler backscattering system, the oscillations of the plasma flow velocity, localized between r/a = 0.85 and r/a = 0.95, and with a frequency, typically around 10 kHz, have been observed at the plasma edge in numerous discharges. When the additional heating power is varied, the frequency is found to scale with Cs/R. The MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm is employed to access the temporal evolution of the perpendicular velocity of density fluctuations. The method is presented in some detail, and is validated and compared against standard methods, such as the conventional fast Fourier transform method, using a synthetic signal. It stands out as a powerful data analysis method to follow the Doppler frequency with a high temporal resolution, which is important in order to extract the dynamics of GAMs. (paper)

  3. Detection of geodesic acoustic mode oscillations, using multiple signal classification analysis of Doppler backscattering signal on Tore Supra

    Vermare, L.; Hennequin, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; the Tore Supra Team

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the first observation of geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) on Tore Supra plasmas. Using the Doppler backscattering system, the oscillations of the plasma flow velocity, localized between r/a = 0.85 and r/a = 0.95, and with a frequency, typically around 10 kHz, have been observed at the plasma edge in numerous discharges. When the additional heating power is varied, the frequency is found to scale with Cs/R. The MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm is employed to access the temporal evolution of the perpendicular velocity of density fluctuations. The method is presented in some detail, and is validated and compared against standard methods, such as the conventional fast Fourier transform method, using a synthetic signal. It stands out as a powerful data analysis method to follow the Doppler frequency with a high temporal resolution, which is important in order to extract the dynamics of GAMs.

  4. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    Bulanov, Alexey V., E-mail: a-bulanov@me.com [Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russia 690950 (Russian Federation); V.I. Il’ichev Pacific Oceanological Institute, Vladivostok, Russia 690041 (Russian Federation); Nagorny, Ivan G., E-mail: ngrn@mail.ru [Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russia 690950 (Russian Federation); Institute for automation and control processes, Vladivostok, Russia 690041 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained.

  5. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained

  6. The influence of acoustic emission on critical velocity of turbulence in superfluid helium

    The conditions for transition from laminar to turbulent flow in superfluid 4He and the effect of wide power range acoustic radiation on critical velocity of the transition are studied experimentally. The experiments were carried out by using the method of quartz tuning fork in the temperature range from 2 K down to 0.3 K. In a wide pressure range from the saturated vapor pressure up to 24.8 atm. It is found that at high temperatures (T > 0.9 K) the critical velocity is determined by viscous friction whereas at low temperatures (T < 0.5 K) the effect of acoustic radiation is observed which leads to a noticeable decrease in the critical velocity of transition to a turbulent state. The critical velocity depends on acoustic emission power, and the transition to the turbulent state of the superfluid is similar to that in ordinary liquids or gases. With no effect of acoustic radiation the critical velocity of transition is almost independent on temperature and exciting power and is mainly determined by the ballistic scattering of thermal excitations

  7. Acoustic evolution in crickets: need for phylogenetic study and a reappraisal of signal effectiveness

    Laure Desutter-Grandcolas

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Cricket stridulums and calls are highly stereotyped, except those with greatly modified tegmina and/or vena-tion, or ''unusual'' frequency, duration and/or intensity. This acoustic diversity remained unsuspected until recently, and current models of acoustic evolution in crickets erroneously consider this clade homogeneous for acoustic features. The few phylogenetic studies analyzing acoustic evolution in crickets demonstrated that acoustic behavior could be particularly labile in some clades. The ensuing pattern for cricket evolution is consequently extremely complex. We argue that: (1 phylogeny should always be considered when analyzing acoustic evolution, whatever characters are considered (signals, stridulums or behaviors. Consequently, future studies should be devoted to entire clades, and not consider isolated taxa; character and character state definitions should allow significant reconstructions of character evolutionary transformations; and homologies should be carefully defined for all characters, including behavior. (2 The factors responsible for song effectiveness should be reconsidered and hypotheses on their potential influence on signal evolution tested jointly by phylogenies (for example, to assess correlated transformations of acoustic and ecological features, and population studies (for example, to correlate call range and population structure, or test the predation risk associated with a signal structure. Better understanding these points should help clarifying acoustic evolution in crickets.Os aparelhos estridulatórios e os chamados dos grilos são altamente estereotipados, exceto aqueles com áreas e/ou venação tegminais fortemente modificadas ou com freqüência, duração e/ou intensidade fora do ''normal''. Esta diversidade acústica ficou insuspeita até recentemente, e os modelos correntes de evolução acústica em grilos consideram erroneamente este clado como homogêneo para as características acústicas. Os

  8. Time-distance domain transformation for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin metallic plates.

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Gawronski, Mateusz; Baran, Ireneusz; Spychalski, Wojciech; Staszewski, Wieslaw J; Uhl, Tadeusz; Kundu, Tribikram; Packo, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic Emission used in Non-Destructive Testing is focused on analysis of elastic waves propagating in mechanical structures. Then any information carried by generated acoustic waves, further recorded by a set of transducers, allow to determine integrity of these structures. It is clear that material properties and geometry strongly impacts the result. In this paper a method for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin plates is presented. The approach is based on the Time-Distance Domain Transform, that is a wavenumber-frequency mapping technique for precise event localization. The major advantage of the technique is dispersion compensation through a phase-shifting of investigated waveforms in order to acquire the most accurate output, allowing for source-sensor distance estimation using a single transducer. The accuracy and robustness of the above process are also investigated. This includes the study of Young's modulus value and numerical parameters influence on damage detection. By merging the Time-Distance Domain Transform with an optimal distance selection technique, an identification-localization algorithm is achieved. The method is investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. The latter involves both laboratory and large scale industrial tests. PMID:26950889

  9. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock walls

    L. Girard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a custom acoustic emission (AE monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node integrated into a wireless sensor network (WSN customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  10. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock-walls

    L. Girard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a custom acoustic emission (AE monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock-walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node integrated into a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock-wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock-wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock-wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock-fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  11. Acoustic signals in the sand fly Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia intermedia (Diptera: Psychodidae

    Peixoto Alexandre A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acoustic signals are part of the courtship of many insects and they often act as species-specific signals that are important in the reproductive isolation of closely related species. Here we report the courtship songs of the sand fly Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia intermedia, one of the main vectors of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil. Findings Recordings were performed using insects from three localities from Eastern Brazil: Posse and Jacarepaguá in Rio de Janeiro State and Corte de Pedra in Bahia State. The three areas have remnants of the Brazilian Atlantic forest, they are endemic for cutaneous leishmaniasis and L. intermedia is the predominant sand fly species. We observed that during courtship L. intermedia males from all populations produced pulse songs consisting of short trains. No significant differences in song parameters were observed between the males of the three localities. Conclusions L. intermedia males produce acoustic signals as reported for some other sand flies such as the sibling species of the Lutzomyia longipalpis complex. The lack of differences between the males from the three localities is consistent with previous molecular studies of the period gene carried out in the same populations, reinforcing the idea that L. intermedia is not a species complex in the studied areas and that the three populations are likely to have similar vectorial capacities.

  12. Signal diversification in Oecanthus tree crickets is shaped by energetic, morphometric, and acoustic trade-offs.

    Symes, L B; Ayres, M P; Cowdery, C P; Costello, R A

    2015-06-01

    Physiology, physics, and ecological interactions can generate trade-offs within species, but may also shape divergence among species. We tested whether signal divergence in Oecanthus tree crickets is shaped by acoustic, energetic, and behavioral trade-offs. We found that species with faster pulse rates, produced by opening and closing wings up to twice as many times per second, did not have higher metabolic costs of calling. The relatively constant energetic cost across species is explained by trade-offs between the duration and repetition rate of acoustic signals-species with fewer stridulatory teeth closed their wings more frequently such that the number of teeth struck per second of calling and the resulting duty cycle were relatively constant across species. Further trade-offs were evident in relationships between signals and body size. Calling was relatively inexpensive for small males, permitting them to call for much of the night, but at low amplitude. Large males produced much louder calls, reaching up to four times more area, but the energetic costs increased substantially with increasing size and the time spent calling dropped to only 20% of the night. These trade-offs indicate that the trait combinations that arise in these species represent a limited subset of conceivable trait combinations. PMID:25903317

  13. The potential influence of morphology on the evolutionary divergence of an acoustic signal.

    Pitchers, W R; Klingenberg, C P; Tregenza, T; Hunt, J; Dworkin, I

    2014-10-01

    The evolution of acoustic behaviour and that of the morphological traits mediating its production are often coupled. Lack of variation in the underlying morphology of signalling traits has the potential to constrain signal evolution. This relationship is particularly likely in field crickets, where males produce acoustic advertisement signals to attract females by stridulating with specialized structures on their forewings. In this study, we characterize the size and geometric shape of the forewings of males from six allopatric populations of the black field cricket (Teleogryllus commodus) known to have divergent advertisement calls. We sample from each of these populations using both wild-caught and common-garden-reared cohorts, allowing us to test for multivariate relationships between wing morphology and call structure. We show that the allometry of shape has diverged across populations. However, there was a surprisingly small amount of covariation between wing shape and call structure within populations. Given the importance of male size for sexual selection in crickets, the divergence we observe among populations has the potential to influence the evolution of advertisement calls in this species. PMID:25223712

  14. Transmission experiment by the simulated LMFBR model and propagation analysis of acoustic signals

    Acoustic transducers to detect a boiling of sodium may be installed in the upper structure and at the upper position of reactor vessel wall under constricted conditions. A set of the experiments of transmission of acoustic vibration to various points of the vessel was performed utilizing the half scale-hydraulic flow test facility simulating reactor vessel over the frequency range 20 kHz -- 100 kHz. Acoustic signals from an installed sound source in the core were measured at each point by both hydrophones in the vessel and vibration pickups on the vessel wall. In these experiments transmission of signals to each point of detectors were clearly observed to background noise level. These data have been summarized in terms of the transmission loss and furthermore are compared with background noise level of flow to estimate the feasibility of detection of sodium boiling sound. The ratio of signal to noise was obtained to be about 13 dB by hydrophone in the upper structure, 8 dB by accelerometer and 16 dB by AE-sensor at the upper position on the vessel in experiments used the simulation model. Sound waves emanated due to sodium boiling also propagate along the wall of the vessel may be predicted theoretically. The result of analysis suggests a capability of detection at the upper position of the reactor vessel wall. Leaky Lamb waves of the first symmetric (L1) and of the antisymmetric (F1) mode and shear horizontal wave (SH) have been derived in light of the attenuation due to coupling to liquid sodium as the traveling modes over the frequency range 10 kHz -- 100 kHz up to 50 mm in thickness of the vessel wall. Leaky Lamb wave (L1) and (SH) mode have been proposed theoretically on the some assumption to be most available to detect the boiling sound of sodium propagating along the vessel wall. (author)

  15. Surface acoustic wave regulated single photon emission from a coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system

    Weiß, Matthias; Reichert, Thorsten; Finley, Jonathan J; Wixforth, Achim; Kaniber, Michael; Krenner, Hubert J

    2016-01-01

    A coupled quantum dot--nanocavity system in the weak coupling regime of cavity quantumelectrodynamics is dynamically tuned in and out of resonance by the coherent elastic field of a $f_{\\rm SAW}\\simeq800\\,\\mathrm{MHz}$ surface acoustic wave. When the system is brought to resonance by the sound wave, light-matter interaction is strongly increased by the Purcell effect. This leads to a precisely timed single photon emission as confirmed by the second order photon correlation function $g^{(2)}$. All relevant frequencies of our experiment are faithfully identified in the Fourier transform of $g^{(2)}$, demonstrating high fidelity regulation of the stream of single photons emitted by the system. The implemented scheme can be directly extended to strongly coupled systems and acoustically drives non-adiabatic entangling quantum gates based on Landau-Zener transitions.

  16. Separating medial olivocochlear from acoustic reflex effects on transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in unanesthetized mice

    Xu, Yingyue; Cheatham, Mary Ann; Siegel, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Descending neural pathways in the mammalian auditory system are believed to modulate the function of the peripheral auditory system [3, 8, 10]. These pathways include the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent innervation to the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) and the acoustic reflex pathways mediating middle ear muscle (MEM) contractions. The MOC effects can be monitored noninvasively using otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) [5, 6], which are acoustic byproducts of cochlear function [7]. In this study, we applied a sensitive method to determine when and to what degree contralateral MEM suppression contaminated MOC efferent effects on TEOAEs in unanesthetized mice. The lowest contralateral broadband noise evoking MEM contractions varied across animals. Examples of potential MOC-mediated TEOAE suppression with contralateral noise below MEM contraction thresholds were seen, but this behavior did not occur in the majority of cases.

  17. Traffic signals - alternative method for emissions reduction; Liikennevaloillako paeaestoet alas

    Niittymaeki, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    2001-07-01

    Traffic signalling is a process, which adapts to the prevailing traffic. The objective of traffic signalling is to direct traffic as safely as possible through a road junction. Other objectives are to maximize the road capacity, to clarify the traffic, and to effect the selection of routs. The target of design and timing of traffic signalling is to minimize the delays of the traffic. However, traffic signalling increases the emissions and fuel consumption. Traditionally the traffic adaptive control has been arranged on the basis of the extension principle, which means the extension of the green light as long as there is demand for the signal, however, only to a set maximum time. In practice the systems seeks an adequate distance in the traffic for cutting off the green light. New methods, such as mathematical optimization, fuzzy logic, neural networks and generic algorithms have been included traffic signalling. These new methods have proven to be 10-20% more efficient than the old ones. Results of the researches have shown that it is possible to achieve significant savings in social economy, including savings in fuels consumption and environmental impacts of the traffic, by development/renovation of traffic signalling. This article reviews the studies carried out in Finland on traffic signalling. A typical driving process through a signalized road junction: deceleration, idle running, acceleration and steady driving. The emissions of these phases differ from each other. Gasoline-fueled cars equipped with catalyst produces significantly more CO during idle running than in the other phases, and the HC content is highest during deceleration. On the other hand NO{sub x} formation is highest during acceleration. Formation of CO, HC and aldehydes is lowest during steady driving, and the formation of NO{sub x} during deceleration. CO and NO{sub x} emissions of diesel engines are highest during acceleration, and HC emissions during idle running. Total emissions of diesel

  18. Neural Mechanisms for Acoustic Signal Detection under Strong Masking in an Insect.

    Kostarakos, Konstantinos; Römer, Heiner

    2015-07-22

    Communication is fundamental for our understanding of behavior. In the acoustic modality, natural scenes for communication in humans and animals are often very noisy, decreasing the chances for signal detection and discrimination. We investigated the mechanisms enabling selective hearing under natural noisy conditions for auditory receptors and interneurons of an insect. In the studied katydid Mecopoda elongata species-specific calling songs (chirps) are strongly masked by signals of another species, both communicating in sympatry. The spectral properties of the two signals are similar and differ only in a small frequency band at 2 kHz present in the chirping species. Receptors sharply tuned to 2 kHz are completely unaffected by the masking signal of the other species, whereas receptors tuned to higher audio and ultrasonic frequencies show complete masking. Intracellular recordings of identified interneurons revealed two mechanisms providing response selectivity to the chirp. (1) Response selectivity is when several identified interneurons exhibit remarkably selective responses to the chirps, even at signal-to-noise ratios of -21 dB, since they are sharply tuned to 2 kHz. Their dendritic arborizations indicate selective connectivity with low-frequency receptors tuned to 2 kHz. (2) Novelty detection is when a second group of interneurons is broadly tuned but, because of strong stimulus-specific adaptation to the masker spectrum and "novelty detection" to the 2 kHz band present only in the conspecific signal, these interneurons start to respond selectively to the chirp shortly after the onset of the continuous masker. Both mechanisms provide the sensory basis for hearing at unfavorable signal-to-noise ratios. Significance statement: Animal and human acoustic communication may suffer from the same "cocktail party problem," when communication happens in noisy social groups. We address solutions for this problem in a model system of two katydids, where one species

  19. Multiple target tracking and classification improvement using data fusion at node level using acoustic signals

    Damarla, T. R.; Whipps, Gene

    2005-05-01

    Target tracking and classification using passive acoustic signals is difficult at best as the signals are contaminated by wind noise, multi-path effects, road conditions, and are generally not deterministic. In addition, microphone characteristics, such as sensitivity, vary with the weather conditions. The problem is further compounded if there are multiple targets, especially if some are measured with higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) than the others and they share spectral information. At the U. S. Army Research Laboratory we have conducted several field experiments with a convoy of two, three, four and five vehicles traveling on different road surfaces, namely gravel, asphalt, and dirt roads. The largest convoy is comprised of two tracked vehicles and three wheeled vehicles. Two of the wheeled vehicles are heavy trucks and one is a light vehicle. We used a super-resolution direction-of-arrival estimator, specifically the minimum variance distortionless response, to compute the bearings of the targets. In order to classify the targets, we modeled the acoustic signals emanated from the targets as a set of coupled harmonics, which are related to the engine-firing rate, and subsequently used a multivariate Gaussian classifier. Independent of the classifier, we find tracking of wheeled vehicles to be intermittent as the signals from vehicles with high SNR dominate the much quieter wheeled vehicles. We used several fusion techniques to combine tracking and classification results to improve final tracking and classification estimates. We will present the improvements (or losses) made in tracking and classification of all targets. Although improvements in the estimates for tracked vehicles are not noteworthy, significant improvements are seen in the case of wheeled vehicles. We will present the fusion algorithm used.

  20. GMAW process stability evaluation through acoustic emission by time and frequency domain analysis

    E. Huanca Cayo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the present work was made the comparative analysis in time domain and frequency domain to the acoustical pressure generate by the electric arc to determinate which of the two analysis methods is better to evaluates the stability in GMAW process.Design/methodology/approach: Welds had been made with the parameters adjusted to get the highest stability. In these conditions, were simulated instabilities that had been generated by the grease presence in the weld trajectory. In both experimental groups was acquired the acoustical pressure signal produced by electric arc to made analysis based in time domain and frequency domain.Findings: After this comparative study we conclude that the acoustical evaluation of the stability on the GMAW process presents more clarity for the analysis based in the time domain that the frequency domain.Research limitations/implications: In the gotten results, the time domain analysis method could represent adequately the stability and the instability of the process. The stability characterizes for the continuity and minim variation of the statistical parameters, but in the presence of instabilities, these parameters present chaotic changes. In the frequency domain method the variations are imperceptible for steady and unstable regions, but it presents little definite variations in the amplitude of determined bands of frequencies.Originality/value: The stability evaluation in welding is crucial because it is responsible in the weld quality. The non contact methods as the acoustical method have a potentiality extraordinary to monitoring and detect instabilities in welding. The acoustical sensing has the capacity to make an on-line monitoring of the weld process.

  1. Phenomenological Description of Acoustic Emission Processes Occurring During High-Pressure Sand Compaction

    Delgado-Martín, Jordi; Muñoz-Ibáñez, Andrea; Grande-García, Elisa; Rodríguez-Cedrún, Borja

    2016-04-01

    Compaction, pore collapse and grain crushing have a significant impact over the hydrodynamic properties of sand formations. The assessment of the crushing stress threshold constitutes valuable information in order to assess the behavior of these formations provided that it can be conveniently identified. Because of the inherent complexities of the direct observation of sand crushing, different authors have developed several indirect methods, being acoustic emission a promising one. However, previous researches have evidenced that there are different processes triggering acoustic emissions which need to be carefully accounted. Worth mentioning among them are grain bearing, grain to container friction, intergranular friction and crushing. The work presented here addresses this purpose. A broadband acoustic emission sensor (PA MicroHF200) connected to a high-speed data acquisition system and control software (AeWIN for PCI1 2.10) has been attached to a steel ram and used to monitor the different processes occurring during the oedometric compaction of uniform quartz sand up to an axial load of about 110 MPa and constant temperature. Load was stepwise applied using a servocontrolled hydraulic press acting at a constant load rate. Axial strain was simultaneously measured with the aid of a LDT device. Counts, energy, event duration, rise time and amplitude were recorded along each experiment and after completion selected waveforms were transformed from the time to the frequency domain via FFT transform. Additional simplified tests were performed in order to isolate the frequency characteristics of the dominant processes occurring during sand compaction. Our results show that, from simple tests, it is possible to determine process-dependent frequency components. When considering more complex experiments, many of the studied processes overlap but it is still possible to identify when a particular one dominates as well as the likely onset of crushing.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of rejuvenators to restore embrittlement temperatures in oxidized asphalt mixtures using acoustic emission

    Sun, Zhe; Farace, Nicholas; Arnold, Jacob; Behnia, Behzad; Buttlar, William G.; Reis, Henrique

    2015-03-01

    Towards developing a method capable to assess the efficiency of rejuvenators to restore embrittlement temperatures of oxidized asphalt binders towards their original, i.e., unaged values, three gyratory compacted specimens were manufactured with mixtures oven-aged for 36 hours at 135 °C. In addition, one gyratory compacted specimen manufactured using a short-term oven-aged mixture for two hours at 155 °C was used for control to simulate aging during plant production. Each of these four gyratory compacted specimens was then cut into two cylindrical specimen 5 cm thick for a total of six 36-hour oven-aged specimens and two short term aging specimens. Two specimens aged for 36 hours and the two short-term specimens were then tested using an acoustic emission approach to obtain base acoustic emission response of short-term and severely-aged specimens. The remaining four specimens oven-aged for 36 hours were then treated by spreading their top surface with rejuvenator in the amount of 10% of the binder by weight. These four specimens were then tested using the same acoustic emission approach after two, four, six, and eight weeks of dwell time. It was observed that the embrittlement temperatures of the short-term aged and severely oven-aged specimens were -25 °C and - 15 °C, respectively. It was also observed that after four weeks of dwell time, the rejuvenator-treated samples had recuperated the original embrittlement temperatures. In addition, it was also observed that the rejuvenator kept acting upon the binder after four weeks of dwell time; at eight weeks of dwell time, the specimens had an embrittlement temperature about one grade cooler than the embrittlement temperature corresponding to the short-term aged specimen.

  3. Visual and acoustic signaling in three species of Brazilian nocturnal tree frogs (Anura, Hylidae

    Luís Felipe Toledo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Visual communication seems to be widespread among nocturnal anurans, however, reports of these behaviors in many Neotropical species are lacking. Therefore, we gathered information collected during several sporadic field expeditions in central and southern Brazil with three nocturnal tree frogs: Aplastodiscus perviridis, Hypsiboas albopunctatus and H. bischoffi. These species displayed various aggressive behaviors, both visual and acoustic, towards other males. For A. perviridis we described arm lifting and leg kicking; for H. albopunctatus we described the advertisement and territorial calls, visual signalizations, including a previously unreported behavior (short leg kicking, and male-male combat; and for H. bischoffiwe described the advertisement and fighting calls, toes and fingers trembling, leg lifting, and leg kicking. We speculate about the evolution of some behaviors and concluded that the use of visual signals among Neotropical anurans may be much more common than suggested by the current knowledge.

  4. The Prediction of Metal Slopping in LD Converter on Base an Acoustic Signal

    Kostúr, K.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The negative influences of slopping in a BOF are pollution to the environment. They give lower yield and cause equipment damage. The prediction of these phenomena is based on information processing from the measuring microphone. The change of frequency in certain range is done by a signal for the prediction of slopping. In this paper two methods for prediction of slopping are described. The first method is based on measuring and processing of sound emitted from the vessel during the blow. The second method utilizes Fourier’s transformation for processing of acoustic signal from sonic meter. The success rate of prediction has been evaluated by help of five criterions. It is possible to forecast the slopping on selected frequency (band. It is the essence of the second method, because this method has high success (criterion K1. Note, that criterion K5 defines acknowledgment of duration slopping. This criterion has the highest value.

  5. An efficient closed-form solution for acoustic emission source location in three-dimensional structures

    Xibing Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an efficient closed-form solution (ECS for acoustic emission(AE source location in three-dimensional structures using time difference of arrival (TDOA measurements from N receivers, N ≥ 6. The nonlinear location equations of TDOA are simplified to linear equations. The unique analytical solution of AE sources for unknown velocity system is obtained by solving the linear equations. The proposed ECS method successfully solved the problems of location errors resulting from measured deviations of velocity as well as the existence and multiplicity of solutions induced by calculations of square roots in existed close-form methods.

  6. An Analytical Solution for Acoustic Emission Source Location for Known P Wave Velocity System

    Longjun Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a three-dimensional analytical solution for acoustic emission source location using time difference of arrival (TDOA measurements from N receivers, N⩾5. The nonlinear location equations for TDOA are simplified to linear equations, and the direct analytical solution is obtained by solving the linear equations. There are not calculations of square roots in solution equations. The method solved the problems of the existence and multiplicity of solutions induced by the calculations of square roots in existed close-form methods. Simulations are included to study the algorithms' performance and compare with the existing technique.

  7. On-line acoustic emission monitoring for crack growth in LWRs

    Program activities to develop Acoustic Emission/Flaw Relationships for Inservice Monitoring of LWRs are discussed in this paper. The program is supported by the NRC Research Office with supplemental funding provided by the TVA. Accomplishments for FY87 and plans for FY88 are presented under the topics of technology development, validation on a reactor, standard and code acceptance, and dissemination of the technology. Subjects include detection of very slow crack growth, pattern recognition, on-reactor AE system performance testing, ASTM Standard, ASME Code item, and technology dissemination through application. The current program work continues to emphasize technology transfer. (author)

  8. Acoustic emission monitoring of preservice testing at Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Plant in the US during hot functional preservice testing is described. Background, methodology, and results are included. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by the US NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing to AE monitoring during reactor operation. 3 refs., 6 figs

  9. Couple analyzing the acoustic emission characters from hard composite rock fracture

    Xingping Lai; Linhai Wang; Meifeng Cai

    2004-01-01

    Rock mass is fractured media. Its fracture is a nonlinear process. The accumulation of acoustic emission (AE) is closely related to the degree of damage. The dynamics problem is simply described based on the non-equilibrium statistical theory of crack evolvement, trying to use the hybrid analysis of the statistical theory and scan electron microscopy (SEM), the characters of AE sig nals from rock damage in a mined-out area is synthetically analyzed and evaluated. These provide an evidence to reverse deduce and accurately infer the position of rock fracture for dynamical hazard control.

  10. Acoustic emission-based in-process monitoring of surface generation in robot-assisted polishing

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo;

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) measurements for in-process monitoring of surface generation in the robot-assisted polishing (RAP) was investigated. Surface roughness measurements require interruption of the process, proper surface cleaning and measurements that sometimes necessitate...... removal of the part from the machine tool. In this study, stabilisation of surface roughness during polishing rotational symmetric surfaces by the RAP process was monitored by AE measurements. An AE sensor was placed on a polishing arm in direct contact with a bonded abrasive polishing tool...

  11. Processing of simple and complex acoustic signals in a tonotopically organized ear.

    Hummel, Jennifer; Wolf, Konstantin; Kössl, Manfred; Nowotny, Manuela

    2014-12-01

    Processing of complex signals in the hearing organ remains poorly understood. This paper aims to contribute to this topic by presenting investigations on the mechanical and neuronal response of the hearing organ of the tropical bushcricket species Mecopoda elongata to simple pure tone signals as well as to the conspecific song as a complex acoustic signal. The high-frequency hearing organ of bushcrickets, the crista acustica (CA), is tonotopically tuned to frequencies between about 4 and 70 kHz. Laser Doppler vibrometer measurements revealed a strong and dominant low-frequency-induced motion of the CA when stimulated with either pure tone or complex stimuli. Consequently, the high-frequency distal area of the CA is more strongly deflected by low-frequency-induced waves than by high-frequency-induced waves. This low-frequency dominance will have strong effects on the processing of complex signals. Therefore, we additionally studied the neuronal response of the CA to native and frequency-manipulated chirps. Again, we found a dominant influence of low-frequency components within the conspecific song, indicating that the mechanical vibration pattern highly determines the neuronal response of the sensory cells. Thus, we conclude that the encoding of communication signals is modulated by ear mechanics. PMID:25339727

  12. Silent katydid females are at higher risk of bat predation than acoustically signalling katydid males.

    Raghuram, Hanumanthan; Deb, Rittik; Nandi, Diptarup; Balakrishnan, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    Males that produce conspicuous mate attraction signals are often at high risk of predation from eavesdropping predators. Females of such species typically search for signalling males and their higher motility may also place them at risk. The relative predation risk faced by males and females in the context of mate-finding using long-distance signals has rarely been investigated. In this study, we show, using a combination of diet analysis and behavioural experiments, that katydid females, who do not produce acoustic signals, are at higher risk of predation from a major bat predator, Megaderma spasma, than calling males. Female katydids were represented in much higher numbers than males in the culled remains beneath roosts of M. spasma. Playback experiments using katydid calls revealed that male calls were approached in only about one-third of the trials overall, whereas tethered, flying katydids were always approached and attacked. Our results question the idea that necessary costs of mate-finding, including risk of predation, are higher in signalling males than in searching females. PMID:25429019

  13. A new setup for studying thermal microcracking through acoustic emission monitoring

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Thermal stressing is common in geothermal environments and has been shown in the laboratory to induce changes in the physical and mechanical properties of rocks. These changes are generally considered to be a consequence of the generation of thermal microcracks and debilitating chemical reactions. Thermal microcracks form as a result of the build-up of internal stresses due to: (1) the thermal expansion mismatch between the different phases present in the material, (2) thermal expansion anisotropy within individual minerals, and (3) thermal gradients. The generation of cracks during thermal stressing has been monitored in previous studies using the output of acoustic emissions (AE), a common proxy for microcrack damage, and through microstructural observations. Here we present a new experimental setup which is optimised to record AE from a rock sample at high temperatures and under a servo-controlled uniaxial stress. The design is such that the AE transducer is embedded in the top of the piston, which acts as a continuous wave guide to the sample. In this way, we simplify the ray path geometry whilst minimising the number of interfaces between the microcrack and the transducer, maximising the quality of the signal. This allows for an in-depth study of waveform attributes such as energy, amplitude, counts and duration. Furthermore, the capability of this device to apply a servo-controlled load on the sample, whilst measuring strain in real time, leads to a spectrum of possible tests combining mechanical and thermal stress. It is also an essential feature to eliminate the build-up of stresses through thermal expansion of the pistons and the sample. We plan a systematic experimental study of the AE of thermally stressed rock during heating and cooling cycles. We present results from pilot tests performed on Darley Dale sandstone and Westerly granite. Understanding the effects of thermal stressing in rock is of particular interest at a geothermal site, where

  14. Discovering Differences in Acoustic Emission Between Healthy and Osteoarthritic Knees Using a Four-Phase Model of Sit-Stand-Sit Movements

    Shark, Lik-Kwan; Chen, Hongzhi; Goodacre, John

    2010-01-01

    By performing repeated sit-stand-sit movements to create stress on knee joints, short transient bursts of high frequency acoustic emission (AE) released by the knee joints were acquired from two age matched groups consisting of healthy and osteoarthritic (OA) knees, and significant differences between these two groups were discovered from the signal analysis performed. The analysis is based on a four-phase model of sit-stand-sit movements and a two-feature descriptor of AE bursts. The four ph...

  15. Multi-bearing defect detection with trackside acoustic signal based on a pseudo time-frequency analysis and Dopplerlet filter

    Zhang, Haibin; Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of train bearing defects based on the acoustic signal acquired by a trackside microphone plays a significant role in the transport system. However, the wayside acoustic signal suffers from the Doppler distortion due to the high moving speed and also contains the multi-source signals from different train bearings. This paper proposes a novel solution to overcome the two difficulties in trackside acoustic diagnosis. In the method a pseudo time-frequency analysis (PTFA) based on an improved Dopplerlet transform (IDT) is presented to acquire the time centers for different bearings. With the time centers, we design a series of Dopplerlet filters (DF) in time-frequency domain to work on the signal's time-frequency distribution (TFD) gained by the short time Fourier transform (STFT). Then an inverse STFT (ISTFT) is utilized to get the separated signals for each sound source which means bearing here. Later the resampling method based on certain motion parameters eliminates the Doppler Effect and finally the diagnosis can be made effectively according to the envelope spectrum of each separated signal. With the effectiveness of the technique validated by both simulated and experimental cases, the proposed wayside acoustic diagnostic scheme is expected to be available in wayside defective bearing detection.

  16. Optical observations of meteors generating infrasound-I: Acoustic signal identification and phenomenology

    Silber, Elizabeth A.; Brown, Peter G.

    2014-11-01

    We analyse infrasound signals from 71 bright meteors/fireballs simultaneously detected by video to investigate the phenomenology and characteristics of meteor-generated near-field infrasound (trail where the infrasound signal originates, we find most signals are associated with cylindrical shocks, with about a quarter of events evidencing spherical shocks associated with fragmentation episodes and optical flares. The video data indicate that all events with ray launch angles >117° from the trajectory heading are most likely generated by a spherical shock, while infrasound produced by the meteors with ray launch angles ≤117° can be attributed to both a cylindrical line source and a spherical shock. We find that meteors preferentially produce infrasound toward the end of their trails with a smaller number showing a preference for mid-trail production. Meteors producing multiple infrasound arrivals show a strong infrasound source height skewness to the end of trails and are much more likely to be associated with optical flares. We find that about 1% of all our optically-recorded meteors have associated detected infrasound and estimate that regional meteor infrasound events should occur on the order of once per week and dominate in numbers over infrasound associated with more energetic (but rarer) bolides. While a significant fraction of our meteors generating infrasound (~1/4 of single arrivals) are produced by fragmentation events, we find no instances where acoustic radiation is detectable more than about 60° beyond the ballistic regime at our meteoroid sizes (grams to tens of kilograms) emphasizing the strong anisotropy in acoustic radiation for meteors which are dominated by cylindrical line source geometry, even in the presence of fragmentation.

  17. New methods for leaks detection and localisation using acoustic emission; Nouvelles methodes de detection et de localisation de fuites par emission acoustique

    Boulanger, P.

    1993-12-08

    Real time monitoring of Pressurized Water nuclear Reactor secondary coolant system tends to integrate digital processing machines. In this context, the method of acoustic emission seems to exhibit good performances. Its principle is based on passive listening of noises emitted by local micro-displacements inside a material under stress which propagate as elastic waves. The lack of a priori knowledge on leak signals leads us to go deeper into understanding flow induced noise generation. Our studies are conducted using a simple leak model depending on the geometry and the king of flow inside the slit. Detection and localization problems are formulated according to the maximum likelihood principle. For detection, the methods using a indicator of similarity (correlation, higher order correlation) seems to give better results than classical ones (rms value, envelope, filter banks). For leaks location, a large panel of classical (generalized inter-correlation) and innovative (convolution, adaptative, higher order statistics) methods of time delay estimation are presented. The last part deals with the applications of higher order statistics. The analysis of higher order estimators of a non linear non Gaussian stochastic process family, the improvement of non linear prediction performances and the optimal-order choice problem are addressed in simple analytic cases. At last, possible applications to leak signals analysis are pointed out. (authors).264 refs., 7 annexes.

  18. Experimental analysis of crack evolution in concrete by the acoustic emission technique

    J. Saliba

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The fracture process zone (FPZ was investigated on unnotched and notched beams with different notch depths. Three point bending tests were realized on plain concrete under crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD control. Crack growth was monitored by applying the acoustic emission (AE technique. In order to improve our understanding of the FPZ, the width and length of the FPZ were followed based on the AE source locations maps and several AE parameters were studied during the entire loading process. The bvalue analysis, defined as the log-linear slope of the frequency-magnitude distribution of acoustic emissions, was also carried out to describe quantitatively the influence of the relative notch depth on the fracture process. The results show that the number of AE hits increased with the decrease of the relative notch depth and an important AE energy dissipation was observed at the crack initiation in unnotched beams. In addition, the relative notch depth influenced the AE characteristics, the process of crack propagation, and the brittleness of concrete.

  19. Monitoring and failure analysis of corroded bridge cables under fatigue loading using acoustic emission sensors.

    Li, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping; Lan, Chengming; Li, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Cables play an important role in cable-stayed systems, but are vulnerable to corrosion and fatigue damage. There is a dearth of studies on the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cable. In the present study, the acoustic emission (AE) technology is adopted to monitor the fatigue damage evolution process. First, the relationship between stress and strain is determined through a tensile test for corroded and non-corroded steel wires. Results show that the mechanical performance of corroded cables is changed considerably. The AE characteristic parameters for fatigue damage are then established. AE energy cumulative parameters can accurately describe the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cables. The failure modes in each phase as well as the type of acoustic emission source are determined based on the results of scanning electron microscopy. The waveform characteristics, damage types, and frequency distribution of the corroded cable at different damage phases are collected. Finally, the number of broken wires and breakage time of the cables are determined according to the variation in the margin index. PMID:22666009

  20. Monitoring and Failure Analysis of Corroded Bridge Cables under Fatigue Loading Using Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Hui Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cables play an important role in cable-stayed systems, but are vulnerable to corrosion and fatigue damage. There is a dearth of studies on the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cable. In the present study, the acoustic emission (AE technology is adopted to monitor the fatigue damage evolution process. First, the relationship between stress and strain is determined through a tensile test for corroded and non-corroded steel wires. Results show that the mechanical performance of corroded cables is changed considerably. The AE characteristic parameters for fatigue damage are then established. AE energy cumulative parameters can accurately describe the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cables. The failure modes in each phase as well as the type of acoustic emission source are determined based on the results of scanning electron microscopy. The waveform characteristics, damage types, and frequency distribution of the corroded cable at different damage phases are collected. Finally, the number of broken wires and breakage time of the cables are determined according to the variation in the margin index.