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Sample records for acoustic droplet vaporization

  1. Bioeffects due to acoustic droplet vaporization

    Bull, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulated micro- and nano-droplets can be vaporized via ultrasound, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization. Our interest is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular microdroplets. Additionally, the microdroplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Early timescale vaporization events, including phase change, are directly visualized using ultra-high speed imaging, and the influence of acoustic parameters on droplet/bubble dynamics is discussed. Acoustic and fluid mechanics parameters affecting the severity of endothelial cell bioeffects are explored. These findings suggest parameter spaces for which bioeffects may be reduced or enhanced, depending on the objective of the therapy. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  2. Scavenging dissolved oxygen via acoustic droplet vaporization.

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Holland, Christy K; Haworth, Kevin J

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) of perfluorocarbon emulsions has been explored for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Previous studies have demonstrated that vaporization of a liquid droplet results in a gas microbubble with a diameter 5-6 times larger than the initial droplet diameter. The expansion factor can increase to a factor of 10 in gassy fluids as a result of air diffusing from the surrounding fluid into the microbubble. This study investigates the potential of this process to serve as an ultrasound-mediated gas scavenging technology. Perfluoropentane droplets diluted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were insonified by a 2 MHz transducer at peak rarefactional pressures lower than and greater than the ADV pressure amplitude threshold in an in vitro flow phantom. The change in dissolved oxygen (DO) of the PBS before and after ADV was measured. A numerical model of gas scavenging, based on conservation of mass and equal partial pressures of gases at equilibrium, was developed. At insonation pressures exceeding the ADV threshold, the DO of air-saturated PBS decreased with increasing insonation pressures, dropping as low as 25% of air saturation within 20s. The decrease in DO of the PBS during ADV was dependent on the volumetric size distribution of the droplets and the fraction of droplets transitioned during ultrasound exposure. Numerically predicted changes in DO from the model agreed with the experimentally measured DO, indicating that concentration gradients can explain this phenomenon. Using computationally modified droplet size distributions that would be suitable for in vivo applications, the DO of the PBS was found to decrease with increasing concentrations. This study demonstrates that ADV can significantly decrease the DO in an aqueous fluid, which may have direct therapeutic applications and should be considered for ADV-based diagnostic or therapeutic applications. PMID:26964964

  3. Characterization of Acoustic Droplet Vaporization Using MRI

    Li, David; Allen, Steven; Hernandez-Garcia, Luis; Bull, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is the selective vaporization of liquid droplets to form larger gas bubbles. The ADV process is currently being researched for biomedical applications such as gas embolotherapy, drug delivery, and phase-change contrast agents. In this study an albumin encapsulated dodecafluoropentane (DDFP, CAS: 678-26-2) microdroplet suspension was vaporized using a single element focused (f/2, D = 19 mm) 3.5 MHz transducer (Panametrics A321S, Olympus, Waltham, MA). The resulting DDFP bubble clouds were imaged using both bright field microscopy and MRI (Varian 7T, Agilent Technologies Inc., Santa Clara, CA). Field distortions due to DDFP bubble generation were characterized against the bright field images as a function of acoustic power and bubble cloud size. Experimentally a direct correlation between bubble cloud dimensions generated and field distortions seen in the MRI was observed. Additionally, MR velocimetry was used to measure the flow field resulting from ADV. The field distortions due to the bubbles were further characterized by modeling Maxwell's equations using COMSOL (COMSOL Inc., Burlington, MA). The ability to characterize ADV with alternative imaging modalities may prove useful in further development of ADV based biomedical therapies.

  4. Acoustic Droplet Vaporization in Biology and Medicine

    Chung-Yin Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the literature regarding the use of acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV in clinical applications of imaging, embolic therapy, and therapeutic delivery. ADV is a physical process in which the pressure waves of ultrasound induce a phase transition that causes superheated liquid nanodroplets to form gas bubbles. The bubbles provide ultrasonic imaging contrast and other functions. ADV of perfluoropentane was used extensively in imaging for preclinical trials in the 1990s, but its use declined rapidly with the advent of other imaging agents. In the last decade, ADV was proposed and explored for embolic occlusion therapy, drug delivery, aberration correction, and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU sensitization. Vessel occlusion via ADV has been explored in rodents and dogs and may be approaching clinical use. ADV for drug delivery is still in preclinical stages with initial applications to treat tumors in mice. Other techniques are still in preclinical studies but have potential for clinical use in specialty applications. Overall, ADV has a bright future in clinical application because the small size of nanodroplets greatly reduces the rate of clearance compared to larger contrast agent bubbles and yet provides the advantages of ultrasonographic contrast, acoustic cavitation, and nontoxicity of conventional perfluorocarbon contrast agent bubbles.

  5. On the acoustic properties of vaporized submicron perfluorocarbon droplets.

    Reznik, Nikita; Lajoinie, Guillaume; Shpak, Oleksandr; Gelderblom, Erik C; Williams, Ross; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel; Burns, Peter N

    2014-06-01

    The acoustic characteristics of microbubbles created from vaporized submicron perfluorocarbon droplets with fluorosurfactant coating are examined. Utilizing ultra-high-speed optical imaging, the acoustic response of individual microbubbles to low-intensity diagnostic ultrasound was observed on clinically relevant time scales of hundreds of milliseconds after vaporization. It was found that the vaporized droplets oscillate non-linearly and exhibit a resonant bubble size shift and increased damping relative to uncoated gas bubbles due to the presence of coating material. Unlike the commercially available lipid-coated ultrasound contrast agents, which may exhibit compression-only behavior, vaporized droplets may exhibit expansion-dominated oscillations. It was further observed that the non-linearity of the acoustic response of the bubbles was comparable to that of SonoVue microbubbles. These results suggest that vaporized submicron perfluorocarbon droplets possess the acoustic characteristics necessary for their potential use as ultrasound contrast agents in clinical practice. PMID:24462162

  6. The Short Time Scale Events of Acoustic Droplet Vaporization

    Li, David S.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph L.

    2012-11-01

    The conversion of a liquid microdroplets to gas bubbles initiated by an acoustic pulse, known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV), has been proposed as a method to selectively generate gas emboli for therapeutic purposes (gas embolotherapy), specifically for vascularized tumors. In this study we focused on the first 10 microseconds of the ADV process, namely the gas nucleation site formation and bubble evolution. BSA encapsulated dodecafluoropentane (CAS: 678-26-2) microdroplets were isolated at the bottom of a degassed water bath held at 37°C. Microdroplets, diameters ranging from 5-65 microns, were vaporized using a single pulse (4-16 cycles) from a 7.5 MHz focused single element transducer ranging from 2-5 MPa peak negative pressure and images of the vaporization process were recorded using an ultra-high speed camera (SIM802, Specialised Imaging Ltd). It was observed that typically two gas nuclei were formed in series with one another on axis with ultrasound pulse. However, relative positioning of the nucleation sites within the droplet depended on droplet diameter. Additionally, depending on acoustic parameters the bubble could deform into a toroidal shape. Such dynamics could suggest acoustic parameters that may result in tissue damage. This work is supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  7. Dual-frequency acoustic droplet vaporization detection for medical imaging.

    Arena, Christopher B; Novell, Anthony; Sheeran, Paul S; Puett, Connor; Moyer, Linsey C; Dayton, Paul A

    2015-09-01

    Liquid-filled perfluorocarbon droplets emit a unique acoustic signature when vaporized into gas-filled microbubbles using ultrasound. Here, we conducted a pilot study in a tissue-mimicking flow phantom to explore the spatial aspects of droplet vaporization and investigate the effects of applied pressure and droplet concentration on image contrast and axial and lateral resolution. Control microbubble contrast agents were used for comparison. A confocal dual-frequency transducer was used to transmit at 8 MHz and passively receive at 1 MHz. Droplet signals were of significantly higher energy than microbubble signals. This resulted in improved signal separation and high contrast-to-tissue ratios (CTR). Specifically, with a peak negative pressure (PNP) of 450 kPa applied at the focus, the CTR of B-mode images was 18.3 dB for droplets and -0.4 for microbubbles. The lateral resolution was dictated by the size of the droplet activation area, with lower pressures resulting in smaller activation areas and improved lateral resolution (0.67 mm at 450 kPa). The axial resolution in droplet images was dictated by the size of the initial droplet and was independent of the properties of the transmit pulse (3.86 mm at 450 kPa). In post-processing, time-domain averaging (TDA) improved droplet and microbubble signal separation at high pressures (640 kPa and 700 kPa). Taken together, these results indicate that it is possible to generate high-sensitivity, high-contrast images of vaporization events. In the future, this has the potential to be applied in combination with droplet-mediated therapy to track treatment outcomes or as a standalone diagnostic system to monitor the physical properties of the surrounding environment. PMID:26415125

  8. A model for acoustic vaporization of encapsulated droplets.

    Guédra, Matthieu; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-12-01

    The use of encapsulated liquid nanoparticles is currently largely investigated for medical applications, mainly because their reduced size allows them to enter targeted areas which cannot be reached by large microbubbles (contrast agents). Low-boiling point perfluorocarbon droplets can be vaporized on-site under the action of the ultrasonic field, in order to turn them into echogeneous-eventually cavitating-microbubbles. This paper presents a theoretical model describing this phenomenon, paying particular attention to the finite size of the droplet and its encapsulation by a thin viscoelastic layer. Numerical simulations are done for droplets of radii 1 and 10 μm and for frequencies of 1-5 MHz. Results reveal that droplet surface tension and shell rigidity are responsible for an increase of the acoustic droplet vaporization threshold. Furthermore, this threshold does not vary monotonically with frequency, and an optimal frequency can be found to minimize it. Finally, the role of some physical properties on the dynamics of the particle is analyzed, such as the contrast of inner and outer liquids densities and the mechanical properties of the shell. PMID:26723321

  9. Ultrasound-triggered drug delivery using acoustic droplet vaporization

    Fabiilli, Mario Leonardo

    The goal of targeted drug delivery is the spatial and temporal localization of a therapeutic agent and its associated bioeffects. One method of drug localization is acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV), whereby drug-laden perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions are vaporized into gas bubbles using ultrasound, thereby releasing drug locally. Transpulmonary droplets are converted into bubbles that occlude capillaries, sequestering the released drug within an organ or tumor. This research investigates the relationship between the ADV and inertial cavitation (IC) thresholds---relevant for drug delivery due to the bioffects generated by IC---and explores the delivery of lipophilic and hydrophilic compounds using PFC double emulsions. IC can positively and negatively affect ultrasound mediated drug delivery. The ADV and IC thresholds were determined for various bulk fluid, droplet, and acoustic parameters. At 3.5 MHz, the ADV threshold occurred at a lower rarefactional pressure than the IC threshold. The results suggest that ADV is a distinct phenomenon from IC, the ADV nucleus is internal to the droplet, and the IC nucleus is the bubble generated by ADV. The ADV triggered release of a lipophilic chemotherapeutic agent, chlorambucil (CHL), from a PFC-in-oil-in-water emulsion was explored using plated cells. Cells exposed to a CHL-loaded emulsion, without ADV, displayed 44% less growth inhibition than cells exposed to an equal concentration of CHL in solution. Upon ADV of the CHL-loaded emulsion, the growth inhibition increased to the same level as cells exposed to CHL in solution. A triblock copolymer was synthesized which enabled the formulation of stable water-in-PFC-in-water (W1/PFC/W2) emulsions. The encapsulation of fluorescein in the W1 phase significantly decreased the mass flux of fluorescein; ADV was shown to completely release the fluorescein from the emulsions. ADV was also shown to release thrombin, dissolved in the W1 phase, which could be used in vivo to extend

  10. Application of acoustic droplet vaporization in ultrasound therapy.

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Microbubbles have been used widely both in the ultrasonic diagnosis to enhance the contrast of vasculature and in ultrasound therapy to increase the bioeffects induced by bubble cavitation. However, due to their large size, the lifetime of microbubbles in the circulation system is on the order of minutes, and they cannot penetrate through the endothelial gap to enter the tumor. In an acoustic field, liquefied gas nanoparticles may be able to change the state and become the gas form in a few cycles of exposure without significant heating effects. Such a phenomenon is called as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). This review is intended to introduce the emerging application of ADV. The physics and the theoretical model behind it are introduced for further understanding of the mechanisms. Current manufacturing approaches are provided, and their differences are compared. Based on the characteristic of phase shift, a variety of therapeutic applications have been carried out both in vitro and in vivo. The latest progress and interesting results of vessel occlusion, thermal ablation using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), localized drug delivery to the tumor and cerebral tissue through the blood-brain barrier, localized tissue erosion by histotripsy are summarized. ADV may be able to overcome some limitations of microbubble-mediated ultrasound therapy and provide a novel drug and molecular targeting carrier. More investigation will help progress this technology forward for clinical translation. PMID:26566442

  11. Improving Nanoparticle Penetration in Tumors by Vascular Disruption with Acoustic Droplet Vaporization

    Ho, Yi-Ju; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Drug penetration influences the efficacy of tumor therapy. Although the leaky vessels of tumors can improve the penetration of nanodrugs via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, various aspects of the tumor microenvironment still restrict this process. This study investigated whether vascular disruption using the acoustic vaporization of micro- or nanoscale droplets (MDs or NDs) induced by ultrasound sonication can overcome the limitations of the EPR effect to allow drug diff...

  12. Improving Nanoparticle Penetration in Tumors by Vascular Disruption with Acoustic Droplet Vaporization.

    Ho, Yi-Ju; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Drug penetration influences the efficacy of tumor therapy. Although the leaky vessels of tumors can improve the penetration of nanodrugs via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, various aspects of the tumor microenvironment still restrict this process. This study investigated whether vascular disruption using the acoustic vaporization of micro- or nanoscale droplets (MDs or NDs) induced by ultrasound sonication can overcome the limitations of the EPR effect to allow drug diffusion into extensive regions. The intravital penetration of DiI-labeled liposomes (as a drug model with red fluorescence) was observed using an acousto-optical integrated system comprising a 2-MHz focused ultrasound transducer (transmitting a three-cycle single pulse and a peak negative pressure of 10 MPa) in a window-chamber mouse model. Histology images of the solid tumor were also used to quantify and demonstrate the locations where DiI-labeled liposomes accumulated. In the intravital image analyses, the cumulative diffusion area and fluorescence intensity at 180 min were 0.08±0.01 mm(2) (mean±standard deviation) and 8.5±0.4%, respectively, in the EPR group, 0.33±0.01 mm(2) and 13.1±0.4% in the MD group (p<0.01), and 0.63±0.01 mm(2) and 18.9±1.1% in the ND group (p<0.01). The intratumoral accumulations of DiI-labeled liposomes were 1.7- and 2.3-fold higher in the MD and ND groups, respectively, than in the EPR group. These results demonstrate that vascular disruption induced by acoustic droplet vaporization can improve drug penetration more than utilizing the EPR effect. The NDs showed longer lifetime in vivo than MDs and provided potential abilities of long periods of treatment, intertissue ND vaporization, and intertissue NDs-converted bubble cavitation to improve the drug penetration and transport distance. PMID:26909113

  13. Acoustic Droplet Vaporization, Cavitation, and Therapeutic Properties of Copolymer-Stabilized Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsions

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Christensen, Douglas A.; Kennedy, Anne M.; Rapoport, Natalya

    2009-04-01

    Acoustic and therapeutic properties of Doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions have been investigated in a mouse model of ovarian cancer. The nanoemulsions were stabilized by two biodegradable amphiphilic block copolymers that differed in the structure of the hydrophobic block. Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) and cavitation parameters were measured as a function of ultrasound frequency, pressure, duty cycles, and temperature. The optimal parameters that induced ADV and inertial cavitation of the formed microbubbles were used in vivo in the experiments on the ultrasound-mediated chemotherapy of ovarian cancer. A combination tumor treatment by intravenous injections of drug-loaded perfluoropentane nanoemulsions and tumor-directed 1-MHz ultrasound resulted in a dramatic decrease of ovarian or breast carcinoma tumor volume and sometimes complete tumor resolution. However, tumors often recurred three to six weeks after the treatment indicating that some cancer cells survived the treatment. The recurrent tumors proved more aggressive and resistant to the repeated therapy than initial tumors suggesting selection for the resistant cells during the first treatment.

  14. Treatment of murine tumors using acoustic droplet vaporization-enhanced high intensity focused ultrasound

    Zhu, Meili; Jiang, Lixing; Fabiilli, Mario L.; Zhang, Aili; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Lisa X.

    2013-09-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be applied focally and noninvasively to thermally ablate solid tumors. Long treatment times are typically required for large tumors, which can expose patients to certain risks while potentially decreasing the therapeutic efficacy of the treatment. Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a promising modality that can enhance the efficacy of tumor treatment using HIFU. In this study, the therapeutic effects of combined HIFU and ADV was evaluated in mice bearing subcutaneously-implanted 4T1 tumors. Histological examination showed that the combination of HIFU and ADV generated a mean necrotic area in the tumor that was 2.9-fold larger than with HIFU alone. A significant enhancement of necrosis was found in the periphery of the tumor, where the blood supply was abundant. Seven days after treatment, the tumors treated with combined HIFU and ADV were 30-fold smaller in volume than tumors treated with HIFU alone. The study demonstrates the potential advantage of combining HIFU and ADV in tumor treatment.

  15. Vaporization of Deforming Droplets

    Wang, Yanxing; Chen, Xiaodong; Ma, Dongjun; Yang, Vigor

    2012-11-01

    Droplet deformation is one of the most important factors influencing the evaporation rate. In the present study, high-fidelity numerical simulations of single evaporating droplets with deformation are carried out over a wide range of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. The formulation is based on a complete set of conservation equations for both the liquid and surrounding gas phases. A modified volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique that takes into account heat and mass transfer is used to track the behavior of the liquid/gas interface. Special attention is given to the property conservation, which can be realized by using an iterative algorithm that enforces a divergence constraint in cells containing the interface. The effect of the ambient flow on droplet dynamics and evaporation are investigated systematically. Various underlying mechanisms dictating the droplet characteristics in different deformation regimes are identified. Correlations for the droplet evaporation rate are established in terms of the Reynolds and Weber numbers.

  16. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-10-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters.

  17. Thermally induced secondary atomization of droplet in an acoustic field

    Basu, Saptarshi; Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-01-01

    We study the thermal effects that lead to instability and break up in acoustically levitated vaporizing fuel droplets. For selective liquids, atomization occurs at the droplet equator under external heating. Short wavelength [Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)] instability for diesel and bio-diesel droplets triggers this secondary atomization. Vapor pressure, latent heat, and specific heat govern the vaporization rate and temperature history, which affect the surface tension gradient and gas phase density, ultimately dictating the onset of KH instability. We develop a criterion based on Weber number to define a condition for the inception of secondary atomization.

  18. Mass spectrometry of acoustically levitated droplets.

    Westphall, Michael S; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M

    2008-08-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air-droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-microL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing charge recombination after ion desorption. PMID:18582090

  19. Dynamic response of vaporizing droplet to pressure oscillation

    Yuan, Lei; Shen, Chibing; Zhang, Xinqiao

    2016-06-01

    Combustion instability is a major challenge in the development of the liquid propellant engines, and droplet vaporization is viewed as a potential mechanism for driving instabilities. Based on the previous work, an unsteady droplet heating and vaporization model was developed. The model and numerical method are validated by experimental data available in literature, and then the oscillatory vaporization of n-Heptane droplet exposed to unsteady harmonic nitrogen atmosphere was numerically investigated over a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. Also, temperature variations inside the droplet were demonstrated under oscillation environments. It was found that the thermal wave is attenuated with significantly reduced wave intensities as it penetrates deep into droplet from the ambient gas. Droplet surface temperature exhibits smaller fluctuation than that of the ambient gas, and it exhibits a time lag with regard to the pressure variation. Furthermore, the mechanism leading to phase lag of vaporization rate with respect to pressure oscillation was unraveled. Results show that this phase lag varies during the droplet lifetime and it is strongly influenced by oscillation frequency, indicating droplet vaporization is only capable of driving combustion instability in some certain frequency domains. Instead, the amplitude of the oscillation does not have very significant effects. It is noteworthy that thermal inertia of the droplet also plays a considerable role in determining the phase lag.

  20. Rapid crystallization from acoustically levitated droplets.

    Cao, Hui-Ling; Yin, Da-Chuan; Guo, Yun-Zhu; Ma, Xiao-Liang; He, Jin; Guo, Wei-Hong; Xie, Xu-Zhuo; Zhou, Bo-Ru

    2012-04-01

    This paper reports on an ultrasonic levitation system developed for crystallization from solution in a containerless condition. The system has been proven to be able to levitate droplets stably and grow crystals rapidly and freely from a levitated droplet. Crystals of four samples, including NaCl, NH(4)Cl, lysozyme, and proteinase K, were obtained successfully utilizing the system. The studies showed that the crystals obtained from the acoustically levitated droplets all exhibited higher growth rates, larger sizes, better shapes, fewer crystals, as well as fewer twins and shards, compared with the control on a vessel wall. The results indicated that containerless ultrasonic levitation could play a key role in improving the crystallization of both inorganic salts and proteins. The ultrasonic levitation system could be used as a ground-based microgravity simulation platform, which could swiftly perform crystallization and screening of crystallization conditions for space crystallization and other ground-based containerless techniques. Moreover, the approach could also be conveniently applied to researching the dynamics and mechanism of crystallization. In addition, the device could be used for the preparation of high-purity materials, analysis of minute or poisonous samples, study of living cells, environmental monitoring, and so on. PMID:22501088

  1. Simulation of water vapor condensation on LOX droplet surface using liquid nitrogen

    Powell, Eugene A.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of ice or water layers on liquid oxygen (LOX) droplets in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) environment was investigated. Formulation of such ice/water layers is indicated by phase-equilibrium considerations under conditions of high partial pressure of water vapor (steam) and low LOX droplet temperature prevailing in the SSME preburner or main chamber. An experimental investigation was begun using liquid nitrogen as a LOX simulant. A monodisperse liquid nitrogen droplet generator was developed which uses an acoustic driver to force the stream of liquid emerging from a capillary tube to break up into a stream of regularly space uniformly sized spherical droplets. The atmospheric pressure liquid nitrogen in the droplet generator reservoir was cooled below its boiling point to prevent two phase flow from occurring in the capillary tube. An existing steam chamber was modified for injection of liquid nitrogen droplets into atmospheric pressure superheated steam. The droplets were imaged using a stroboscopic video system and a laser shadowgraphy system. Several tests were conducted in which liquid nitrogen droplets were injected into the steam chamber. Under conditions of periodic droplet formation, images of 600 micron diameter liquid nitrogen droplets were obtained with the stroboscopic video systems.

  2. Structure analysis using acoustically levitated droplets.

    Leiterer, J; Delissen, F; Emmerling, F; Thünemann, A F; Panne, U

    2008-06-01

    Synchrotron diffraction with a micrometer-sized X-ray beam permits the efficient characterization of micrometer-sized samples, even in time-resolved experiments, which is important because often the amount of sample available is small and/or the sample is expensive. In this context, we will present acoustic levitation as a useful sample handling method for small solid and liquid samples, which are suspended in a gaseous environment (air) by means of a stationary ultrasonic field. A study of agglomeration and crystallization processes in situ was performed by continuously increasing the concentration of the samples by evaporating the solvent. Absorption and contamination processes on the sample container walls were suppressed strongly by this procedure, and parasitic scattering such as that observed when using glass capillaries was also absent. The samples investigated were either dissolved or dispersed in water droplets with diameters in the range of 1 micrometer to 2 millimeters. Initial results from time-resolved synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements of ascorbic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, apoferritin, and colloidal gold are presented. PMID:18373085

  3. Investigating the Droplet Formation in a Nucleonic Vapor

    Ogul, R

    2003-01-01

    The droplet formation in a supersaturated vapor which may occur during the expansion of an excited blob of nuclear matter in the metastable region at subnuclear densities is investigated. The free energy change accompanying the formation of a drop is calculated as a function of droplet radius for various saturation ratios on the basis of Fisher's model. The results are related to the experimental data

  4. Evolution of acoustically vaporized microdroplets in gas embolotherapy

    Qamar, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic vaporization dynamics of a superheated dodecafluoropentane (DDFP) microdroplet inside a microtube and the resulting bubble evolution is investigated in the present work. This work is motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique that is intended to treat cancers by infarcting tumors using gas bubbles. A combined theoretical and computational approach is utilized and compared with the experiments to understand the evolution process and to estimate the resulting stress distribution associated with vaporization event. The transient bubble growth is first studied by ultra-high speed imaging and then theoretical and computational modeling is used to predict the entire bubble evolution process. The evolution process consists of three regimes: an initial linear rapid spherical growth followed by a linear compressed oval shaped growth and finally a slow asymptotic nonlinear spherical bubble growth. Although the droplets are small compared to the tube diameter, the bubble evolution is influenced by the tube wall. The final bubble radius is found to scale linearly with the initial droplet radius and is approximately five times the initial droplet radius. A short pressure pulse with amplitude almost twice as that of ambient conditions is observed. The width of this pressure pulse increases with increasing droplet size whereas the amplitude is weakly dependent. Although the rise in shear stress along the tube wall is found to be under peak physiological limits, the shear stress amplitude is found to be more prominently influenced by the initial droplet size. The role of viscous dissipation along the tube wall and ambient bulk fluid pressure is found to be significant in bubble evolution dynamics. © 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  5. Sectorial oscillation of acoustically levitated nanoparticle-coated droplet

    Zang, Duyang; Chen, Zhen; Geng, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of a third mode sectorial oscillation of nanoparticle-coated droplets using acoustic levitation in combination with active modulation. The presence of nanoparticles at the droplet surface changes its oscillation amplitude and frequency. A model linking the interfacial rheology and oscillation dynamics has been proposed in which the compression modulus ɛ of the particle layer is introduced into the analysis. The ɛ obtained with the model is in good agreement with that obtained by the Wilhelmy plate approach, highlighting the important role of interfacial rheological properties in the sectorial oscillation of droplets.

  6. Nanoparticle agglomeration in an evaporating levitated droplet for different acoustic amplitudes

    Tijerino, Erick; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2013-01-01

    Radiatively heated levitated functional droplets with nanosilica suspensions exhibit three distinct stages namely pure evaporation, agglomeration, and finally structure formation. The temporal history of the droplet surface temperature shows two inflection points. One inflection point corresponds to a local maximum and demarcates the end of transient heating of the droplet and domination of vaporization. The second inflection point is a local minimum and indicates slowing down of the evaporation rate due to surface accumulation of nanoparticles. Morphology and final precipitation structures of levitated droplets are due to competing mechanisms of particle agglomeration, evaporation, and shape deformation. In this work, we provide a detailed analysis for each process and propose two important timescales for evaporation and agglomeration that determine the final diameter of the structure formed. It is seen that both agglomeration and evaporation timescales are similar functions of acoustic amplitude (sound pressure level), droplet size, viscosity, and density. However, we show that while the agglomeration timescale decreases with initial particle concentration, the evaporation timescale shows the opposite trend. The final normalized diameter can be shown to be dependent solely on the ratio of agglomeration to evaporation timescales for all concentrations and acoustic amplitudes. The structures also exhibit various aspect ratios (bowls, rings, spheroids) which depend on the ratio of the deformation timescale (tdef) and the agglomeration timescale (tg). For tdef

  7. Development of a simplified model for droplet vaporization

    Xiao Helin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Droplet vaporization is an essential sub-process of fuel spray in diesel engines,which has important effects on combustion and emissions performance. Development of a simplified droplet vaporization model is necessary to simulate gas mixture formation in cylinder for lower computational costs, and it is also applicable in practical multi-dimension spray calculations for diesel engines. An empirical exponential equation is introduced in this paper to approximate the internal temperature profile of droplet instead of solving the partial differential equation for temperature distribution. Results indicate that the computational cost has been reduced by almost thirty percent in total. Also, the concept of effective diffusion is introduced by using an enlarged diffusivity to take account of the effect of internal circulations inside droplets. The calculated result of the simplified evaporation model has been compared with that of the infinite diffusivity model and one-dimensional model respectively. It shows that the calculation precision of the simplified model is among those two models.

  8. Peptide synthesis on glass substrate using acoustic droplet ejector.

    Youngki Choe; Shih-Jui Chen; Eun Sok Kim

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of a 9-mers-long peptide ladder structure of glycine on a modified glass surface using a nanoliter droplet ejector. To synthesize peptide on a glass substrate, SPOT peptide synthesis protocol was followed with a nozzleless acoustic droplet ejector being used to eject about 300 droplets of preactivated amino acid solution to dispense 60 nL of the solution per mer. The coupling efficiency of each mer was measured with FITC fluorescent tag to be 96%, resulting in net 70% efficiency for the whole 9-mer-long peptide of glycine. Usage of a nanoliter droplet ejector for SPOT peptide synthesis increases the density of protein array on a chip. PMID:24235271

  9. Acoustic response of superheated droplet detectors to neutrons

    Gao Size [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing, Fangshan 102413 (China); School of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Zhang Guiying [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing, Fangshan 102413 (China); Ni Bangfa, E-mail: bfni@ciae.ac.cn [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing, Fangshan 102413 (China); Zhao Changjun; Zhang Huanqiao [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing, Fangshan 102413 (China); Guan Yongjing [School of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Chen Zhe [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing, Fangshan 102413 (China); School of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Xiao Caijin [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing, Fangshan 102413 (China); Liu Chao [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing, Fangshan 102413 (China); School of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Liu Cunxiong [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing, Fangshan 102413 (China)

    2012-03-11

    The search for dark matter (DM) is a hot field nowadays, a number of innovative techniques have emerged. The superheated droplet technique is relatively mature; however, it is recently revitalized in a number of frontier fields including the search for DM. In this work, the acoustic response of Superheated Droplet Detectors (SDDs) to neutrons was studied by using a {sup 252}Cf neutron source, SDDs developed by the China Institute of Atomic Energy, a sound sensor, a sound card and a PC. Sound signals were filtered. The characteristics of FFT spectra, power spectra and time constants were used to determine the authenticity of the bubbles analyzed.

  10. Analytical solution for transient partitioning and reaction of a condensing vapor species in a droplet

    Liu, Albert Tianxiang; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2014-01-01

    We present the exact analytical solution of the transient equation of gas-phase diffusion of a condensing vapor to, and diffusion and reaction in, an aqueous droplet. Droplet-phase reaction is represented by first-order chemistry. The solution facilitates study of the dynamic nature of the vapor uptake process as a function of droplet size, Henry's law coefficient, and first-order reaction rate constant for conversion in the droplet phase.

  11. Acoustic levitator for contactless motion and merging of large droplets in air

    Bjelobrk, Nada; Nabavi, Majid; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-09-01

    Large droplet transport in a line-focussed acoustic manipulator in terms of maximum droplet size is achieved by employing a driving voltage control mechanism. The maximum volume of the transported droplets in the order of few microliters is thereby increased by three orders of magnitude compared to the constant voltage case, widening the application field of this method significantly. A drop-on-demand droplet generator is used to supply the liquid droplets into the system. The ejected sequence of picoliter-size droplets is guided along trajectories by the acoustic field and accumulates at the selected pressure node, merging into a single large droplet. Droplet movement is achieved by varying the reflector height. This also changes the intensity of the radiation pressure during droplet movement, which in turn could atomise the droplet. The acoustic force is adjusted by regulating the driving voltage of the actuator to keep the liquid droplet suspended in air and to prevent atomisation. In the herein presented levitation concept, liquids with a wide range of surface tension (water and tetradecane were tested) can be transported over distances of several mm. The aspect ratio of the droplet in the acoustic field is shown to be a good indicator for radiation pressure intensity and is kept between 1.1 and 1.4 during droplet transport. Despite certain limitations with volatile liquids, the presented acoustic levitator concept has the potential to expand the range of analytical characterisation and manipulation methods in applications ranging from chemistry and biology.

  12. Experiments on combusion in reduced gravity and turbulent vaporization of n-heptane droplets

    Gökalp, I.; Chauveau, C.; Monsallier, G.

    1990-01-01

    A Droplet Burning Facility which allows the investigation of droplet vaporization and burning under various dynamic and thermal conditions has been constructed. The system has been operated during the parabolic flights of the NASA KC135 aircraft. An important set of data has been collected on the low temperature turbulent vaporization and envelope burning of suspended n-heptane droplets at ground and reduced gravity conditions. From digitized images obtained by a rapid video camera, the time evolution of the droplet and the flame dimensions are determined with great accuracy. The information is used to deduce the vaporization rate constant, the flame diameter and the flame standoff ratio under various conditions.

  13. Vapor Transport of a Volatile Solvent for a Multicomponent Aerosol Droplet

    Feng, James Q

    2015-01-01

    This work presents analytical formulas derived for evaluating vapor transport of a volatile solvent for an isolated multicomponent droplet in a quiescent environment, based on quasi-steady-state approximation. Among multiple solvent components, only one component is considered to be much more volatile than the rest such that other components are assumed to be nonvolatile remaining unchanged in the droplet during the process of (single-component) volatile solvent evaporation or condensation. For evaporating droplet, the droplet size often initially decreases following the familiar "d^2 law" at an accelerated rate. But toward the end, the rate of droplet size change diminishes due to the presence of nonvolatile cosolvent. Such an acceleration-deceleration reversal behavior is unique for evaporating multicomponent droplet, while the droplet of pure solvent has an accelerated rate of size change all the way through the end. This reversal behavior is also reflected in the droplet surface temperature evolution as "...

  14. Cross-correlation video recording of gas-vapor-droplet two-phase flows

    Volkov Roman S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental investigations of gas-vapor-droplet two-phase flow formation during single water droplets and their aggregate motion through high-temperature (more than 1000 K combustion products have been conducted with usage of cross-correlation measuring facility and optical methods of “tracer” visualization (“Particle Image Velocimetry” and “Interferometric Particle Imaging”. Modes of droplet motion in high-temperature gases area have been established. It has been determined the influence of the main droplet (sizes, composition, temperature, dispersability, form, velocity and gas (temperature and velocity characteristics on parameters of forming gas-vapor-droplet mixtures. The main elements of advanced firefighting technologies with the usage of time and space apportioned polydisperse composition water droplet flows have been formulated. Physical and predictive mathematical models have been developed to determine the basic parameters of equipment which is necessary for operation with these technology usage.

  15. Cross-correlation video recording of gas-vapor-droplet two-phase flows

    Volkov Roman S.; Vysokomornaya Olga V.; Zhdanova Alyona O.; Strizhak Pavel A.

    2015-01-01

    The experimental investigations of gas-vapor-droplet two-phase flow formation during single water droplets and their aggregate motion through high-temperature (more than 1000 K) combustion products have been conducted with usage of cross-correlation measuring facility and optical methods of “tracer” visualization (“Particle Image Velocimetry” and “Interferometric Particle Imaging”). Modes of droplet motion in high-temperature gases area have been established. It has been determined the influe...

  16. On the formation of nitrogen oxides during the combustion of partially pre-vaporized droplets

    Moesl, Klaus Georg

    2012-12-12

    This study contributes to the topic of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) formation at the level of single droplet and droplet array combustion. The influence of the degree of droplet vaporization and the influence of ambient conditions on NO{sub x} emissions are studied in detail by experiments as well as by numerical simulations. Consequently, this study illustrates correlations and dependencies of the most relevant parameters with respect to the formation of NO{sub x}. It merges the fields of droplet pre-vaporization, ignition, combustion, and exhaust gas formation, including a sophisticated approach to NO{sub x} determination. Even though the study was conducted in order to help understand the fundamental process of burning idealized droplets, the processes in spray combustion have also been taken into consideration within its scope. The portability of results obtained from those idealized droplet burning regimes is evaluated for real applications. Thus, this study may also help to derive design recommendations for liquid-fueled combustion devices. While the experimental part focuses on droplet array combustion, the numerical part highlights spherically symmetric single droplet combustion. By performing experiments in a microgravity environment, quasi-spherical conditions were facilitated for droplet burning, and comparability was provided for the experimental and numerical results. A novelty of the numerical part is the investigation of mechanisms of NO{sub x} formation under technically relevant conditions. This includes partial pre-vaporization of the droplets as well as droplet combustion in a hot exhaust gas environment, such as an aero-engine. The results show that the trade-off between ambient temperature and available oxygen determines the NO{sub x} formation of droplets burning in hot exhaust gas. If the ambient temperature is high and there is still sufficient oxygen for full oxidation of the fuel provided by the droplet, the maximum of NOx formation is

  17. Reduction in the Vapor Pressure in Condensation on Cold Droplets of a Liquid

    Bochkareva, E. M.; Nemtsev, V. A.; Sorokin, V. V.; Terekhov, V. V.; Terekhov, V. I.

    2016-06-01

    A physicomathematical model of the process of depressurization in a pure saturated and superheated vapor due to the injection of monodisperse cold droplets of a liquid has been developed. A cellular model has been developed that is based on solving the equation of heat conduction in a liquid phase and on the integral method for a gas phase in a spherically symmetric one-dimensional formulation. Numerical investigation has been carried out of the influence of the size and concentration of the droplets and of the initial parameters of the steam on the dynamics of depressurization during the vapor condensation on the droplets.

  18. Deformation pathways and breakup modes in acoustically levitated bicomponent droplets under external heating

    Pathak, Binita; Basu, Saptarshi

    2016-03-01

    Controlled breakup of droplets using heat or acoustics is pivotal in applications such as pharmaceutics, nanoparticle production, and combustion. In the current work we have identified distinct thermal acoustics-induced deformation regimes (ligaments and bubbles) and breakup dynamics in externally heated acoustically levitated bicomponent (benzene-dodecane) droplets with a wide variation in volatility of the two components (benzene is significantly more volatile than dodecane). We showcase the physical mechanism and universal behavior of droplet surface caving in leading to the inception and growth of ligaments. The caving of the top surface is governed by a balance between the acoustic pressure field and the restrictive surface tension of the droplet. The universal collapse of caving profiles for different benzene concentration (70 % by volume). The findings are portable to any similar bicomponent systems with differential volatility.

  19. Sound Propagation in Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions with Evaporation and Nonlinear Particle Relaxation

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixture in the presence of evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson to accommodate the effects of nonlinear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer on sound attenuation and dispersion. The results indicate the existence of a spectral broadening effect in the attenuation coefficient (scaled with respect to the peak value) with a decrease in droplet mass concentration. It is further shown that for large values of the droplet concentration the scaled attenuation coefficient is characterized by a universal spectrum independent of droplet mass concentration.

  20. Modeling of fuel vapor jet eruption induced by local droplet heating

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2014-01-10

    The evaporation of a droplet by non-uniform heating is numerically investigated in order to understand the mechanism of the fuel-vapor jet eruption observed in the flame spread of a droplet array under microgravity condition. The phenomenon was believed to be mainly responsible for the enhanced flame spread rate through a droplet cloud at microgravity conditions. A modified Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a local phase change model is utilized to describe the interfacial dynamics between liquid droplet and surrounding air. It is found that the localized heating creates a temperature gradient along the droplet surface, induces the corresponding surface tension gradient, and thus develops an inner flow circulation commonly referred to as the Marangoni convection. Furthermore, the effect also produces a strong shear flow around the droplet surface, thereby pushing the fuel vapor toward the wake region of the droplet to form a vapor jet eruption. A parametric study clearly demonstrated that at realistic droplet combustion conditions the Marangoni effect is indeed responsible for the observed phenomena, in contrast to the results based on constant surface tension approximation

  1. Relative spectral absorption of solar radiation by water vapor and cloud droplets

    Davies, R.; Ridgway, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    A moderate (20/cm) spectral resolution model which accounts for both the highly variable spectral transmission of solar radiation through water vapor within and above cloud, as well as the more slowly varying features of absorption and anisotropic multiple scattering by the cloud droplets, is presented. Results from this model as applied to the case of a typical 1 km thick stratus cloud in a standard atmosphere, with cloud top altitude of 2 km and overhead sun, are discussed, showing the relative importance of water vapor above the cloud, water vapor within the cloud, and cloud droplets on the spectral absorption of solar radiation.

  2. Sound Propagation in Saturated Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions Considering the Effect of Transpiration on Droplet Evaporation

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixtures with evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson (1975) to accommodate the effects of transpiration on the linear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer. It is shown that the inclusion of transpiration in the presence of mass transfer improves the agreement between the theory and the experimental data of Cole and Dobbins (1971) for sound attenuation in air-water fogs at low droplet mass concentrations. The results suggest that transpiration has an appreciable effect on both sound absorption and dispersion for both low and high droplet mass concentrations.

  3. Three-axis acoustic device for levitation of droplets in an open gas stream and its application to examine sulfur dioxide absorption by water droplets.

    Stephens, Terrance L; Budwig, Ralph S

    2007-01-01

    Two acoustic devices to stabilize a droplet in an open gas stream (single-axis and three-axis levitators) have been designed and tested. The gas stream was provided by a jet apparatus with a 64 mm exit diameter and a uniform velocity profile. The acoustic source used was a Langevin vibrator with a concave reflector. The single-axis levitator relied primarily on the radial force from the acoustic field and was shown to be limited because of significant droplet wandering. The three-axis levitator relied on a combination of the axial and radial forces. The three-axis levitator was applied to examine droplet deformation and circulation and to investigate the uptake of SO(2) from the gas stream to the droplet. Droplets ranging in diameters from 2 to 5 mm were levitated in gas streams with velocities up to 9 ms. Droplet wandering was on the order of a half droplet diameter for a 3 mm diameter droplet. Droplet circulation ranged from the predicted Hadamard-Rybczynski pattern to a rotating droplet pattern. Droplet pH over a central volume of the droplet was measured by planar laser induced fluorescence. The results for the decay of droplet pH versus time are in general agreement with published theory and experiments. PMID:17503939

  4. Effect of holed reflector on acoustic radiation force in noncontact ultrasonic dispensing of small droplets

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Wada, Yuji; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the fundamental aspects of droplet dispensing, which is an important procedure in the noncontact ultrasonic manipulation of droplets in air. A holed reflector was used to dispense a droplet from a 27.4 kHz standing-wave acoustic field to a well. First, the relationship between the hole diameter of the reflector and the acoustic radiation force acting on a levitated droplet was clarified by calculating the acoustic impedance of the point just above the hole. When the hole diameter was half of (or equal to) the acoustic wavelength λ, the acoustic radiation force was ∼80% (or 50%) of that without a hole. The maximal diameters of droplets levitated above the holes through flat and half-cylindrical reflectors were then experimentally investigated. For instance, with the half-cylindrical reflector, the maximal diameter was 5.0 mm for a hole diameter of 6.0 mm, and droplets were levitatable up to a hole diameter of 12 mm (∼λ).

  5. Vapor film collapse triggered by external pressure pulse and the fragmentation of melt droplet in FCIs

    LIN Qian; TONG Lili; CAO Xuewu; KRIVENTSEV Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The fragmentation process of high-temperature molten drop is a key factor to determine the ratio heat transferred to power in FCIs,which estimates the possible damage degree during the hypothetical severe accident in the nuclear reactors.In this paper,the fragmentation process of melt droplet in FCIs is investigated by theoretic analysis.The fragmentation mechanism is studied when an external pressure pulse applied to a melt droplet,which is surrounded by vapor film.The vapor film collapse which induces fragmentation of melt droplet is analyzed and modeled.And then the generated pressure is calculated.The vapor film collapse model is introduced to fragmentation correlation,and the predicted fragment size is calculated and compared with experimental data.The result shows that the developed model can predict the diameter of fragments and can be used to calculate the fragmentation process appreciatively.

  6. Cavitation-induced fragmentation of an acoustically-levitated droplet

    Gonzalez Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the initial sequence of events that lead to the fragmentation of a millimetre sized water droplets when interacting with a focused ns-laser pulse. The experimental results show complex processes that result from the reflection of an initial shock wave from plasma generation with the soft boundary of the levitating droplet; furthermore, when the reflected waves from the walls of the droplet refocus they leave behind a trail of microbubbles that later act as cavitation inception regions. Numerical simulations of a shock wave impacting and reflecting from a soft boundary are also reported; the simulated results show that the lowest pressure inside the droplet occurs at the equatorial plane. The results of the numerical model display good agreement with the experimental results both in time and in space.

  7. Insight into morphology changes of nanoparticle laden droplets in acoustic field

    Basu, Saptarshi; Tijerino, Erick; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2013-04-01

    Hollow structures with unique morphologies form due to particle agglomeration in acoustically levitated nanofluid functional droplets when subjected to external heating. The final diameter of the structure depends only on the ratio of agglomeration to evaporation time scales for various nanoparticle laden droplets, and not on the type of the suspended particles. These time scales depend only on nanoparticle concentration. This valuable information may be exploited to form microstructures with desired properties from ceramic compounds. Phase diagrams for alumina and silica droplets indicate the transition from a bowl to ring structure depending on concentration.

  8. Investigation of vapor explosions with alumina droplets in sodium

    Within the analysis of severe hypothetical fast breeder accidents the consequence of a fuel-coolant interaction has to be considered i.e. the thermal interaction between hot molten fuel and sodium. Experiments have been performed to study the thermal fragmentation of a molten alumina droplet in sodium. Alumina temperatures up to 3100 K and sodium temperatures up to 1143 K were used. For the first time film boiling of alumina drops in sodium was achieved. With some droplets undergoing film boiling, the fragmentation was triggered by an externally applied pressure wave. The trigger was followed promptly by a strong reaction pressure wave if and only if a contact temperature threshold of TI=2060±160 K was exceeded. In agreement with similar experiments in which other materials were studied this threshold corresponds to an interfacial temperature close to the homogeneous nucleation temperature of the vaporising liquid. Based on the present and previous experimental results a model concept of thermal fragmentation is developed. (orig.)

  9. Real Time Monitoring of Containerless Microreactions in Acoustically Levitated Droplets via Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Crawford, Elizabeth A; Esen, Cemal; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2016-09-01

    Direct in-droplet (in stillo) microreaction monitoring using acoustically levitated micro droplets has been achieved by combining acoustic (ultrasonic) levitation for the first time with real time ambient tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The acoustic levitation and inherent mixing of microliter volumes of reactants (3 μL droplets), yielding total reaction volumes of 6 μL, supported monitoring the acid-catalyzed degradation reaction of erythromycin A. This reaction was chosen to demonstrate the proof-of-principle of directly monitoring in stillo microreactions via hyphenated acoustic levitation and ambient ionization mass spectrometry. The microreactions took place completely in stillo over 30, 60, and 120 s within the containerless stable central pressure node of an acoustic levitator, thus readily promoting reaction miniaturization. For the evaluation of the miniaturized in stillo reactions, the degradation reactions were also carried out in vials (in vitro) with a total reaction volume of 400 μL. The reacted in vitro mixtures (6 μL total) were similarly introduced into the acoustic levitator prior to ambient ionization MS/MS analysis. The in stillo miniaturized reactions provided immediate real-time snap-shots of the degradation process for more accurate reaction monitoring and used a fraction of the reactants, while the larger scale in vitro reactions only yielded general reaction information. PMID:27505037

  10. A computational study of droplet evaporation with fuel vapor jet ejection induced by localized heat sources

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-05-12

    Droplet evaporation by a localized heat source under microgravity conditions was numerically investigated in an attempt to understand the mechanism of the fuel vapor jet ejection, which was observed experimentally during the flame spread through a droplet array. An Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a local phase change model in order to effectively capture the interfacial dynamics between liquid droplet and surrounding air. It was found that the surface tension gradient caused by the temperature variation within the droplet creates a thermo-capillary effect, known as the Marangoni effect, creating an internal flow circulation and outer shear flow which drives the fuel vapor into a tail jet. A parametric study demonstrated that the Marangoni effect is indeed significant at realistic droplet combustion conditions, resulting in a higher evaporation constant. A modified Marangoni number was derived in order to represent the surface force characteristics. The results at different pressure conditions indicated that the nonmonotonic response of the evaporation rate to pressure may also be attributed to the Marangoni effect.

  11. Deformation pathways and breakup modes in acoustically levitated bicomponent droplets under external heating

    Pathak, Binita; Basu, Saptarshi

    2016-03-01

    Controlled breakup of droplets using heat or acoustics is pivotal in applications such as pharmaceutics, nanoparticle production, and combustion. In the current work we have identified distinct thermal acoustics-induced deformation regimes (ligaments and bubbles) and breakup dynamics in externally heated acoustically levitated bicomponent (benzene-dodecane) droplets with a wide variation in volatility of the two components (benzene is significantly more volatile than dodecane). We showcase the physical mechanism and universal behavior of droplet surface caving in leading to the inception and growth of ligaments. The caving of the top surface is governed by a balance between the acoustic pressure field and the restrictive surface tension of the droplet. The universal collapse of caving profiles for different benzene concentration (force balance. Continuous caving leads to the formation of a liquid membrane-type structure which undergoes radial extension due to inertia gained during the precursor phase. The membrane subsequently closes at the rim and the kinetic energy leads to ligament formation and growth. Subsequent ligament breakup is primarily Rayleigh-Plateau type. The breakup mode shifts to diffusional entrapment-induced boiling with an increase in concentration of the volatile component (benzene >70 % by volume). The findings are portable to any similar bicomponent systems with differential volatility.

  12. An analytical study of the effects of vaporization of twodimensional laminar droplets on a triple flame

    Bidabadi Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of triple flame propagation in combustion systems, containing uniformly distributed volatile fuel droplet was analyzed. The analysis was established for a one-step irreversible reaction with an asymptotic limit, where the value of the Zeldovich Number is large. Here, using unit Lewis number, the analytical results for the triple flame temperature were obtained considering two sections. In the first section, a non-vaporizing fuel stream was studied and in the second section, a volatile droplet fuel stream was taken into account. It is presumed that the fuel droplets vaporize to yield a gaseous fuel of known chemical structure, which is subsequently oxidized in the gaseous phase. Here two different cases are studied. In the first case, only the velocity parallel to the reactant flow was considered; while for the latter one, the vertical velocity was considered in addition. The energy equations were solved and the temperature field equations are presented. The results are first presented for a non-vaporizing fuel and compared to the experiment results. In addition, some other results of the temperature field for a vaporizing fuel stream are demonstrated within the comparison between the abovementioned cases which revealed the effect of the considering the vertical velocity component on the flame temperature field.

  13. Enzyme kinetics in acoustically levitated droplets of supercooled water: a novel approach to cryoenzymology.

    Weis, David D; Nardozzi, Jonathan D

    2005-04-15

    The rate of the alkaline phosphatase-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferone phosphate was measured in acoustically levitated droplets of aqueous tris (50 mM) at pH 8.5 at 22 +/- 2 degrees C and in supercooled solution at -6 +/- 2 degrees C. At 22 degrees C, the rate of product formation was in excellent agreement with the rate observed in bulk solution in a cuvette, indicating that the acoustic levitation process does not alter the enzyme activity. The rate of the reaction decreased 6-fold in supercooled solution at -6 +/- 2 degrees C. The acoustic levitator apparatus is described in detail. PMID:15828793

  14. The Stefan outflow in a multicomponent vapor-gas atmosphere around a droplet and its role for cloud expansion

    Kuchma, A E; Martyukova, D S

    2016-01-01

    A new comprehensive analysis of Stefan's flow caused by a free growing droplet in vapor-gas atmosphere with several condensing components is presented. This analysis, based on the nonstationary heat and material balance and diffusion transport equations, shows the appearance of the Stefan inflow in the vicinity of the growing droplet and the outflow at large distances from the droplet as a consequence of nonisothermal condensation. For an ensemble of droplets in the atmospheric cloud, this flow provides an increase of the total volume of the cloud, which can be treated as cloud thermal expansion and leads to floating the cloud as a whole due to buoyancy. We have formulated the self-similar solutions of the nonstationary diffusion and heat conduction equations for a growing multicomponent droplet and have derived analytical expressions for the nonstationary velocity profile of Stefan's flow and the expansion volume of the vapor-gas mixture around the growing droplet. To illustrate the approach, we computed the...

  15. Modeling droplet vaporization and combustion with the volume of fluid method at a small Reynolds number

    Xiao-bin ZHANG; Wei ZHANG; Xue-jun ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    The volume of fluid (VOF) formulation is applied to model the combustion process of a single droplet in a hightemperature convective air free stream environment.The calculations solve the flow field for both phases,and consider the droplet deformation based on an axisymmetrical model.The chemical reaction is modeled with one-step finite-rate mechanism and the thcrmo-physica1 properties for the gas mixture are species and temperature dependence.A mass transfer model applicable to the VOF calculations due to vaporization of the liquid phases is developed in consideration with the fluctuation of the liquid surface.The model is validated by examining the burning rate constants at different convective air temperatures,which accord well with experimental data of previous studies.Other phenomena from the simulations,such as the transient history of droplet deformation and flame structure,are also qualitatively accordant with the descriptions of other numerical results.However,a different droplet deformation mechanism for the low Reynolds number is explained compared with that for the high Reynolds number.The calculations verified the feasibility of the VOF computational fluid dynamics (CFD) formulation as well as the mass transfer model due to vaporization.

  16. Acoustic generation of femtoliter to picoliter droplets using two-dimensional micromachined microdroplet ejector arrays

    Demirci, Utkan

    There is growing demand in the fields of semiconductor manufacturing and biotechnology to reliably generate repeatable, uniform, picoliter-size fluid droplets. Such droplets can be generated using MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) technology. We propose 2-D micromachined microdroplet ejector arrays for environmentally benign deposition of photoresist and other spin-on materials, such as low-k and high-k dielectrics used in integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing. Direct deposition of these chemicals will reduce waste and production cost. These ejectors are chemically compatible with the materials used in IC manufacturing, and do not harm fluids that are heat or pressure sensitive. Moreover, these ejectors are attractive to biomedicine and biotechnology for droplet generation in applications such as printing of DNA or protein assays and drug testing. Two novel methods for generating millions of droplets per second using acoustically actuated 2-D micromachined microdroplet ejector arrays will be presented. First, membrane based 2-D micromachined ejector arrays will be introduced. Each element of a membrane based 2-D ejector array consists of a flexurally vibrating circular membrane on one face of a cylindrical fluid reservoir. The membrane has an orifice at the center. A piezoelectric transducer generating ultrasonic waves, located at the open face of the reservoir, actuates the membrane and droplets are ejected through the membrane orifice. The ejectors operated most efficiently at 1.2 MHz and generated 3--7 mum diameter droplets. Second, acoustic focus based 2-D micromachined ejector arrays will be demonstrated. The radiation pressure associated with the acoustic beam overcomes the surface tension force, and releases droplets into air in every actuation cycle. The ejectors operated most efficiently at 34.7 MHz, and generated 28 mum diameter droplets in both drop-on-demand and continuous modes of operation, as predicted by the finite element analysis

  17. Simulation and modeling of turbulent non isothermal vapor-droplet dispersed flow

    One of the reference accident that may occur in PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) is LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident). The LOCA is studied to design some emergency systems implemented in the basic nuclear installations. The LOCA corresponds to the break of a pipe in the primary loop. This accident is associated with a loss of pressure which leads to the vaporization of the water in the reactor core and then to the rise of the temperature of the assemblies. In this study, we focus on the area of vapor-droplet flow, where the cooling effectiveness of such a mixture is a major concern. The droplets act as heat sinks for the vapor and control the vapor temperature profile which, in turn, determines the wall heat transfer rate. Our general objective is to ameliorate the modeling of the vapor-droplet flow (i.e. at CFD scale). Particularly the estimation of the radial distribution of the droplets. The volume fraction distribution of the two phases depends on the size and dispersion of the droplets in the flow. The size of the droplets is controlled by the rupture and coalescence mechanisms and the interfacial mass transfer (evaporation/condensation). The distribution of the droplets is controlled by the transfer of momentum between the two phases. Our study focuses particularly on the latter point. We are restricted to flows where the liquid water flows under the form of non-deformable spherical droplets that do not interact with each other. Both phases are treated by a two-fluid approach Euler-Euler. In chapter 2, a description of two-phase flow model is presented, using separate mass, momentum, and energy equations for the two phases. These separate balance equations are obtained in an averaging process starting from the local instantaneous conservation equations of the individual phases. During the averaging process, important information on local flow processes are lost and, consequently, additional correlations are needed in order to close the system of equations. The

  18. Simulation and modeling of turbulent non isothermal vapor-droplet dispersed flow

    Baalbaki, Daoud

    2011-12-15

    One of the reference accident that may occur in PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) is LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident). The LOCA is studied to design some emergency systems implemented in the basic nuclear installations. The LOCA corresponds to the break of a pipe in the primary loop. This accident is associated with a loss of pressure which leads to the vaporization of the water in the reactor core and then to the rise of the temperature of the assemblies. In this study, we focus on the area of vapor-droplet flow, where the cooling effectiveness of such a mixture is a major concern. The droplets act as heat sinks for the vapor and control the vapor temperature profile which, in turn, determines the wall heat transfer rate. Our general objective is to ameliorate the modeling of the vapor-droplet flow (i.e. at CFD scale). Particularly the estimation of the radial distribution of the droplets. The volume fraction distribution of the two phases depends on the size and dispersion of the droplets in the flow. The size of the droplets is controlled by the rupture and coalescence mechanisms and the interfacial mass transfer (evaporation/condensation). The distribution of the droplets is controlled by the transfer of momentum between the two phases. Our study focuses particularly on the latter point. We are restricted to flows where the liquid water flows under the form of non-deformable spherical droplets that do not interact with each other. Both phases are treated by a two-fluid approach Euler-Euler. In chapter 2, a description of two-phase flow model is presented, using separate mass, momentum, and energy equations for the two phases. These separate balance equations are obtained in an averaging process starting from the local instantaneous conservation equations of the individual phases. During the averaging process, important information on local flow processes are lost and, consequently, additional correlations are needed in order to close the system of equations. The

  19. Acoustically levitated droplets: a contactless sampling method for fluorescence studies.

    Leiterer, Jork; Grabolle, Markus; Rurack, Knut; Resch-Genger, Ute; Ziegler, Jan; Nann, Thomas; Panne, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic levitation is used as a new tool to study concentration-dependent processes in fluorescence spectroscopy. With this technique, small amounts of liquid and solid samples can be measured without the need for sample supports or containers, which often limits signal acquisition and can even alter sample properties due to interactions with the support material. We demonstrate that, because of the small sample volume, fluorescence measurements at high concentrations of an organic dye are possible without the limitation of inner-filter effects, which hamper such experiments in conventional, cuvette-based measurements. Furthermore, we show that acoustic levitation of liquid samples provides an experimentally simple way to study distance-dependent fluorescence modulations in semiconductor nanocrystals. The evaporation of the solvent during levitation leads to a continuous increase of solute concentration and can easily be monitored by laser-induced fluorescence. PMID:18596335

  20. Acoustic behavior of ordered droplets in a liquid: a phase space approach.

    Rivera, A L; Palomino, M R; de Icaza, M; Lozada-Cassou, M; Castaño, V M

    2005-03-01

    The transmission of an acoustical signal through a spatial arrangement consisting of a bidimensional crystal of droplets (liquid spheres) immersed into another liquid is analyzed. As a first approximation, the paraxial case is solved by considering a set of acoustical lenses which allow us to model the effect of each droplet on the signal. An expression for the Wigner distribution function that lets us evaluate the corresponding image, diffraction pattern, and even the output signal of any given paraxial input signal to that crystalline substrate is obtained, with particular emphasis on the case of an incoming plane wave. To solve the nonparaxial situation, a generalization of the concept of focal distance interpreting every sphere as a superposition of concentric rings of different radius, which permits us to find a general expression for the Wigner distribution function is proposed. PMID:15903601

  1. Droplets displacement and oscillations induced by ultrasonic surface acoustic waves: a quantitative study

    Brunet, P.; Baudoin, M; Matar, O. Bou; Zoueshtiagh, F.

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental study of a droplet interacting with an ultrasonic surface acoustic wave (SAW). Depending on the amplitude of the wave, the drop can either experience an internal flow with its contact-line pinned, or (at higher amplitude) move along the direction of the wave also with internal flow. Both situations appear together with oscillations of the drop free-surface. The physical origins of the internal mixing flow as well as the drop displacement and surface waves are still ...

  2. Acoustic separation of oil droplets, colloidal particles and their mixtures in a microfluidic cell

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.

    2016-06-15

    Here we report direct macroscopic and microscopic observations of acoustic driven separation of dodecane oil droplets in water in the presence and absence of colloidal silica particles suspended in the water phase. The experiments were conducted in a simple rectangular channel glass microfluidic cell in which an ultrasound standing wave pattern was generated at 300 KHz frequency. The separation process of both oil droplets and colloidal particles inside the cell was recorded using a high-speed video camera equipped with a macro-objective lens for macroscopic observation or with a high-speed camera attached to an inverted optical microscope for a higher resolution microscopic observation. We characterize the clustering process in the case of emulsion droplets or solid colloidal particles and ultimately demonstrate the emulsion droplets separation from the solid particles in the mixtures based on their different acoustic contrast factors. Finally, we conduct proof of concept experiment to show that the same approach can be used in a continuous fluid flow process.

  3. Single-droplet evaporation kinetics and particle formation in an acoustic levitator. Part 1: evaporation of water microdroplets assessed using boundary-layer and acoustic levitation theories.

    Schiffter, Heiko; Lee, Geoffrey

    2007-09-01

    The suitability of a single droplet drying acoustic levitator as a model for the spray drying of aqueous, pharmaceutically-relevant solutes used to produce protein-loaded particles has been examined. The acoustic levitator was initially evaluated by measuring the drying rates of droplets of pure water in dependence of drying-air temperature and flow rate. The measured drying rates were higher than those predicted by boundary layer theory because of the effects of primary acoustic streaming. Sherwood numbers of 2.6, 3.6, and 4.4 at drying-air temperatures of 25 degrees C, 40 degrees C, and 60 degrees C were determined, respectively. Acoustic levitation theory could predict the measured drying rates and Sherwood numbers only when a forced-convection drying-air stream was used to neuralize the retarding effect of secondary acoustic streaming on evaporation rate. At still higher drying-air flow rates, the Ranz-Marshall correlation accurately predicts Sherwood number, provided a stable droplet position in the standing acoustic wave is maintained. The measured Sherwood numbers and droplet Reynolds numbers show that experiments performed in the levitator in still air are taking place effectively under conditions of substantial forced convection. The similitude of these values to those occurring in spray dryers is fortuitous for the suitability of the acoustic levitator as a droplet evaporation model for spray drying. PMID:17582811

  4. An Experimental Study on the Dynamics of a Single Droplet Vapor Explosion

    Concilio Hansson, Roberta

    2010-07-01

    The present study aims to develop a mechanistic understanding of the thermal-hydraulic processes in a vapor explosion, which may occur in nuclear power plants during a hypothetical severe accident involving interactions of high-temperature corium melt and volatile coolant. Over the past several decades, a large body of literature has been accumulated on vapor explosion phenomenology and methods for assessment of the related risk. Vapor explosion is driven by a rapid fragmentation of high temperature melt droplets, leading to a substantial increase of heat transfer areas and subsequent explosive evaporation of the volatile coolant. Constrained by the liquid-phase coolant, the rapid vapor production in the interaction zone causes pressurization and dynamic loading on surrounding structures. While such a general understanding has been established, the triggering mechanism and subsequent dynamic fine fragmentation have yet not been clearly understood. A few mechanistic fragmentation models have been proposed, however, computational efforts to simulate the phenomena generated a large scatter of results. Dynamics of the hot liquid (melt) droplet and the volatile liquid (coolant) are investigated in the MISTEE (Micro-Interactions in Steam Explosion Experiments) facility by performing well-controlled, externally triggered, single-droplet experiments, using a high-speed visualization system with synchronized digital cinematography and continuous X-ray radiography, called SHARP (Simultaneous High-speed Acquisition of X-ray Radiography and Photography). After an elaborate image processing, the SHARP images depict the evolution of both melt material (dispersal) and coolant (bubble dynamics), and their microscale interactions, i.e. the triggering phenomenology. The images point to coolant entrainment into the droplet surface as the mechanism for direct contact/mixing ultimately responsible for energetic interactions. Most importantly, the MISTEE data reveals an inverse

  5. A study of the effect of binary oxide materials in a single droplet vapor explosion

    Hansson, R.C., E-mail: rch@kth.se [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Dinh, T.N.; Manickam, L.T. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    In an effort to explore fundamental mechanisms that may govern the effect of melt material on vapor explosion's triggering, fine fragmentation and energetics, a series of experiments using a binary-oxide mixture with eutectic and non-eutectic compositions were performed. Interactions of a hot liquid (WO{sub 3}–CaO) droplet and a volatile liquid (water) were investigated in well-controlled, externally triggered, single-droplet experiments conducted in the Micro-interactions in steam explosion experiments (MISTEE) facility. The tests were visualized by means of a synchronized digital cinematography and continuous X-ray radiography system, called simultaneous high-speed acquisition of X-ray radiography and photography (SHARP). The acquired images followed by further analysis indicate milder interactions for the droplet with non-eutectic melt composition in the tests with low melt superheat, whereas no evident differences between eutectic and non-eutectic melt compositions regarding bubble dynamics, energetics and melt preconditioning was observed in the tests with higher melt superheat.

  6. Nucleation and droplet growth from supersaturated vapor at temperatures below the triple point temperature

    Toxvaerd, Søren

    2016-01-01

    In 1897 Ostwald formulated his step rule for formation of the most stable crystal state for a system with crystal polymorphism. The rule describes the irreversible way a system converts to the crystal with lowest free energy. But in fact the irreversible way a supercooled gas below the triple point temperature $T_{tr.p.}$ crystallizes via a liquid droplet is an example of Ostwald's step rule. The homogeneous nucleation in the supersaturated gas is not to a crystal, but to a liquid-like critical nucleus. We have for the first time performed constant energy (NVE) Molecular Dynamics (MD) of homogeneous nucleation without the use of a thermostat. The simulations of homogeneous nucleation in a Lennard-Jones system from supersaturated vapor at temperatures below $T_{tr.p.}$ reveals that the nucleation to a liquid-like critical nucleus is initiated by a small cold cluster [S. Toxvaerd, J. Chem. Phys. \\textbf{143} 154705 (2015)]. The release of latent heat at the subsequent droplet growth increases the temperature in...

  7. The effect of binary oxide materials on a single droplet vapor explosion triggering

    Hansson, R.C.; Manickam, L.T.; Dinh, T.N. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    In order to explore the fundamental mechanism dictated by the material influence on triggering, fine fragmentation and subsequent vapor explosion energetics, a series of experiments using a mixture of eutectic and non-eutectic binary oxide were initiated. Dynamics of the hot liquid (WO{sub 3}-CaO) droplet and the volatile liquid (water) were investigated in the MISTEE (Micro-Interactions in Steam Explosion Experiments) facility by performing well-controlled, externally triggered, single-droplet experiments, using a high-speed visualization system with synchronized digital cinematography and continuous X-ray radiography, called SHARP (Simultaneous High-speed Acquisition of X-ray Radiography and Photography). The acquired images followed by further analysis showed a milder interaction for the non-eutectic melt composition for the tests with low melt superheat, whether no evident differences between eutectic and non-eutectic melt compositions regarding bubble dynamics, energetics and melt preconditioning was perceived for the high melt superheat tests. (author)

  8. Elemental diffusion during the droplet epitaxy growth of In(Ga)As/GaAs(001) quantum dots by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Chen, Z. B.; Chen, B.; Wang, Y. B.; Liao, X. Z., E-mail: xiaozhou.liao@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Lei, W. [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Zou, J. [Materials Engineering and Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Ringer, S. P. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-01-13

    Droplet epitaxy is an important method to produce epitaxial semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Droplet epitaxy of III-V QDs comprises group III elemental droplet deposition and the droplet crystallization through the introduction of group V elements. Here, we report that, in the droplet epitaxy of InAs/GaAs(001) QDs using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, significant elemental diffusion from the substrate to In droplets occurs, resulting in the formation of In(Ga)As crystals, before As flux is provided. The supply of As flux suppresses the further elemental diffusion from the substrate and promotes surface migration, leading to large island formation with a low island density.

  9. Elemental diffusion during the droplet epitaxy growth of In(Ga)As/GaAs(001) quantum dots by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Droplet epitaxy is an important method to produce epitaxial semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Droplet epitaxy of III-V QDs comprises group III elemental droplet deposition and the droplet crystallization through the introduction of group V elements. Here, we report that, in the droplet epitaxy of InAs/GaAs(001) QDs using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, significant elemental diffusion from the substrate to In droplets occurs, resulting in the formation of In(Ga)As crystals, before As flux is provided. The supply of As flux suppresses the further elemental diffusion from the substrate and promotes surface migration, leading to large island formation with a low island density

  10. Acoustic cavitation as a mechanism of fragmentation of hot molten droplets in in cool liquids

    A mechanism that explains several of the observations of fragmentation of hot molten drops in coolants is presented. The mechanism relates the fragmentation to the development of acoustic cavitation and subsequent bubble growth within the molten material. The cavitation is assumed due to the severe pressure excursions calculated within the hot material as a result of the pressure pulses accompanying coolant vaporization at the sphere surface. The growth of the cavitation vapor nuclei inside the hot drop is shown to be influenced by the subsequent long duration surface pressure pulses. The variation of the amplitude of these surface pulses with experimental variables is shown to exhibit the same trends with these variables as does the variation in extent of fragmentation

  11. Structure formation by nanosilica particles suspended in levitated droplet

    Saha, Abhishek; Kumar, Ranganathan; Basu, Saptarshi

    2010-01-01

    Vaporization of liquid droplets containing particles has been studied extensively for its applications in combustion, thermal coating, ink-jet printing, spray cooling, drug delivery, and surface patterning. Droplets containing solid particles show a preferential solute-migration during drying process. Recently we carried out experiments with vaporizing droplet suspended in an acoustic levitator. In this work, we present detailed study of a laser irradiated droplet containing nanosilica particles. Infrared and High speed imaging of the heating process for different concentrations of nanosilica revealed an interesting solute migration pattern. Further investigation with Particle Image Velocimetry shows presence of strong recirculation within the levitated droplet. It also reveals that with increasing viscosity of the liquid the strength of this recirculation decreases. Due to the droplets rotation about the levitator axis, a centrifugal force also dominated the flow field within the droplet. High speed imaging ...

  12. A Numerical Analysis Research on Earlier Behavior of Molten Droplet Covered with Vapor Film at the Stage of Triggering and Propagation in Steam Explosion

    Mingjun Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When the molten fuel with high temperature falls into the cavity water, it will be dispersed into droplets which are covered with vapor films due to the rapid heat transfer with phase transition. This situation cannot be simply described by liquid-liquid or gas-liquid systems. And there are no sufficient experimental studies on the behavior of droplet covered with vapor film because of the rapid reaction and the difficulty in capture of the film configuration. In this paper, a multiphase code with the volume of fluid (VOF method is used to simulate the earlier behavior of droplet when vapor film exits. The earlier behavior is defined as behavior of the droplet before its disintegration. Thermal effect and pure hydrodynamic effect are, respectively, considered. The simulation results indicate that the film thickness and material density have significant effect on the earlier behavior of droplet. The situation assumed in Ciccarelli and Frost’s model (1994 is observed in current simulation of earlier thermal droplet behavior. The effect of triggering pressure pulse on earlier hydrodynamic behavior is also discussed and it indicates that vapor film has little effect on the hydrodynamic droplet deformation when the intensity of the pressure pulse is very high.

  13. Conceptual design analysis of an MHD power conversion system for droplet-vapor core reactors. Final report

    A nuclear driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator system is proposed for the space nuclear applications of few hundreds of megawatts. The MHD generator is coupled to a vapor-droplet core reactor that delivers partially ionized fissioning plasma at temperatures in range of 3,000 to 4,000 K. A detailed MHD model is developed to analyze the basic electrodynamics phenomena and to perform the design analysis of the nuclear driven MHD generator. An incompressible quasi one dimensional model is also developed to perform parametric analyses

  14. Experimental analysis of shape deformation of evaporating droplet using Legendre polynomials

    Sanyal, Apratim; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2014-01-01

    Experiments involving heating of liquid droplets which are acoustically levitated, reveal specific modes of oscillations. For a given radiation flux, certain fluid droplets undergo distortion leading to catastrophic bag type breakup. The voltage of the acoustic levitator has been kept constant to operate at a nominal acoustic pressure intensity, throughout the experiments. Thus the droplet shape instabilities are primarily a consequence of droplet heating through vapor pressure, surface tension and viscosity. A novel approach is used by employing Legendre polynomials for the mode shape approximation to describe the thermally induced instabilities. The two dominant Legendre modes essentially reflect (a) the droplet size reduction due to evaporation, and (b) the deformation around the equilibrium shape. Dissipation and inter-coupling of modal energy lead to stable droplet shape while accumulation of the same ultimately results in droplet breakup.

  15. Influence of viscosity on acoustic streaming in sessile droplets: an experimental and a numerical study with a Streaming Source Spatial Filtering (SSSF) method

    Riaud, Antoine; Matar, Oliver Bou; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Brunet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    When an acoustic wave travels in a lossy medium such as a liquid, it progressively transfers its pseudo-momentum to the fluid, which results in a steady acoustic streaming. Remarkably, the phenomenon involves a balance between sound attenuation and shear, such that viscosity vanishes in the final expression of the velocity field. For this reason, the effect of viscosity has long been ignored in acoustic streaming experiments. Here, we show experimentally that the viscosity plays a major role in cavities such as the streaming induced by surface acoustic waves in sessile droplets. We develop a numerical model based on the spatial filtering of the streaming source term to compute the induced flow motion with dramatically reduced computational requirements. We evidence that acoustic fields in droplets are a superposition of a chaotic field and a few powerful caustics. It appears that the caustics drive the flow, which allows a qualitative prediction of the flow structure. Finally, we reduce the problem to two dim...

  16. Droplet size spectra and water-vapor concentration of laboratory water clouds: inversion of Fourier transform infrared (500-5000 cm(-1)) optical-depth measurement.

    Arnott, W P; Schmitt, C; Liu, Y; Hallett, J

    1997-07-20

    Infrared extinction optical depth (500-5000 cm(-1)) has been measured with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for clouds produced with an ultrasonic nebulizer. Direct measurement of the cloud droplet size spectra agree with size spectra retrieved from inversion of the extinction measurements. Both indicate that the range of droplet sizes is 1-14 mum. The retrieval was accomplished with an iterative algorithm that simultaneously obtains water-vapor concentration. The basis set of droplet extinction functions are computed once by using numerical integration of the Lorenz-Mie theory over narrow size bins, and a measured water-vapor extinction curve was used. Extinction and size spectra are measured and computed for both steady-state and dissipating clouds. It is demonstrated that anomalous diffraction theory produces relatively poor droplet size and synthetic extinction spectra and that extinction measurements are helpful in assessing the validity of various theories. Calculations of cloud liquid-water content from retrieved size distributions agree with a parameterization based on optical-depth measurements at a wave number of 906 cm(-1) for clouds that satisfy the size spectral range assumptions of the parameterization. Significance of droplet and vapor contribution to the total optical depth is used to evaluate the reliability of spectral inversions. PMID:18259335

  17. Suppression of indium droplet formation by adding CCl4 during metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of InN films

    In this work, the influences of CCl4 on the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of InN were studied for the first time. It was found that the addition of CCl4 can effectively suppress the formation of metal indium (In) droplets during InN growth, which was ascribed to the etching effect of Cl to In. However, with increasing of CCl4 flow, the InN growth rate decreased but the lateral growth of InN islands was enhanced. This provides a possibility of promoting islands coalescence toward a smooth surface of the InN film by MOCVD. The influence of addition of CCl4 on the electrical properties was also investigated

  18. Vaporization of mercury from molten lead droplets doped with mercury: Pb/Hg source term experiment for the APT/SILC target

    Experiments were performed to measure the fraction of mercury inventory released when droplets of molten lead, doped with a known concentration of mercury, fall through a controlled environment. The temperature of molten droplets ranged from 335 C to 346 C, and the concentration of mercury in the droplets ranged from 0.2 mass % to 1.0 mass %. The environment consisted of an air stream, at a temperature nominally equal to the melt temperature, and moving vertically upwards at a velocity of 10 cm/s. Direct observations and chemical analysis showed that no mercury was released from the molten droplets. Based upon the experimental results, it is concluded that no mercury vapor is likely to be released from the potentially molten source rod material in the APT-SILC Neutron Source Array to the confinement atmosphere during a postulated Large Break Loss Of Coolant Accident scenario leading to the melting of a fraction of the source rods

  19. Enhancement of the droplet nucleation in a dense supersaturated Lennard-Jones vapor

    Zhukhovitskii, D. I.

    2016-05-01

    The vapor-liquid nucleation in a dense Lennard-Jones system is studied analytically and numerically. A solution of the nucleation kinetic equations, which includes the elementary processes of condensation/evaporation involving the lightest clusters, is obtained, and the nucleation rate is calculated. Based on the equation of state for the cluster vapor, the pre-exponential factor is obtained. The latter diverges as a spinodal is reached, which results in the nucleation enhancement. The work of critical cluster formation is calculated using the previously developed two-parameter model (TPM) of small clusters. A simple expression for the nucleation rate is deduced and it is shown that the work of cluster formation is reduced for a dense vapor. This results in the nucleation enhancement as well. To verify the TPM, a simulation is performed that mimics a steady-state nucleation experiments in the thermal diffusion cloud chamber. The nucleating vapor with and without a carrier gas is simulated using two different thermostats for the monomers and clusters. The TPM proves to match the simulation results of this work and of other studies.

  20. Dancing Droplets

    Cira, Nate J

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by the observation of intricate and beautifully dynamic patterns generated by food coloring on clean glass slides, we have investigated the behavior of propylene glycol and water droplets on high energy surfaces. In this fluid dynamics video we show a range of interesting behaviors including long distance attraction, and chasing/fleeing upon contact. We present explanations for each of these behaviors including a mechanism for the long distance interactions based on vapor facilitated coupling. Finally we use our understanding to create several novel devices which: spontaneously align droplets, drive droplets in circles, cause droplets to bounce on a vertical surface, and passively sort droplets by surface tension. The simplicity of this system lends it particularly well to application as a toy model for physical systems with force fields and biological systems such as chemotaxis and motility.

  1. A new method for measurement of droplet size distribution in superheated emulsions

    Superheated emulsion contains micron-sized superheated liquid droplets suspended in a host liquid medium. The superheated droplets nucleate to vapor bubbles when energetic radiation deposits a sufficient amount of energy within a very small localized region of the active liquid. Droplet nucleation is associated with a change in volume and also emission of an acoustic pulse, both of which can be detected electronically. When exposed to energetic radiation, the metastable superheated droplets nucleate independently of each other, and the number of drops nucleated and volume of vapor formed due to nucleation of these droplets are both acquired simultaneously as a function of time. These two data are then fitted simultaneously to obtain the droplet size distribution of the emulsion. The size distributions of R-114 (C2Cl2F4)- and R-12 (CCl2F2)-based emulsions are obtained by this method and compared with direct optical measurements

  2. The role of reactants and droplet interfaces on nucleation and growth of ZnO nanorods synthesized by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism

    Hejazi, S.R. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, H.R. Madaah [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: madaah@sharif.edu; Ghamsari, M. Sasani [Solid State Laser Division, Laser Research Center, P.O. Box 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-05-08

    Short ZnO nanorods and long ZnO nanowires have been produced on SiO{sub 2} and Si substrates by VLS and VS mechanisms via a double tube chemical vapor transport and condensation (CVTC) process. The role of reactants and droplet interfaces on the nucleation and growth of ZnO nanorods have been investigated. A conceptual model for nucleation of ZnO nanorods has been proposed by describing the half-oxidation and reduction reactions at the growth front. The importance of Zn vapor in the nucleation phenomena has been studied by changing starting materials. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and EDX analysis have been used to characterize ZnO nanorods and investigate the nucleation model.

  3. Experimental evidence supporting the insensitivity of cloud droplet formation to the mass accommodation coefficient for condensation of water vapor to liquid water

    Langridge, Justin M.; Richardson, Mathews S.; Lack, Daniel A.; Murphy, Daniel M.

    2016-06-01

    The mass accommodation coefficient for uptake of water vapor to liquid water, αM, has been constrained using photoacoustic measurements of aqueous absorbing aerosol. Measurements performed over a range of relative humidities and pressures were compared to detailed model calculations treating coupled heat and mass transfer occurring during photoacoustic laser heating cycles. The strengths and weaknesses of this technique are very different to those for droplet growth/evaporation experiments that have typically been applied to these measurements, making this a useful complement to existing studies. Our measurements provide robust evidence that αM is greater than 0.1 for all humidities tested and greater than 0.3 for data obtained at relative humidities greater than 88% where the aerosol surface was most like pure water. These values of αM are above the threshold at which kinetic limitations are expected to impact the activation and growth of aerosol particles in warm cloud formation.

  4. Experimental study of the vaporization of a droplets injection in a fluidized gas-solid media; Etude experimentale de la vaporisation d'un jet de goutelettes au contact d'un milieu gaz-solide fluidise

    Leclere, K.

    2002-09-01

    The quality of feedstock injection in the Fluid Catalytic Process (FCC) is essential to ensure a good vaporization. The vaporization should be fast so that the cracking reaction in the gaseous phase can happen within the short residence time in the riser (a few seconds). Vaporization is helped by a uniform injection of droplets as small as possible as well as a good mixing with the catalyst particles that represent the main heat source. Several models were developed to predict the droplet vaporization in a gas-solid media. However, no experimental validation exists for these models, whose predictions vary (from 1 to several hundreds of milliseconds). The objective of this study was to get a better understanding of the physical phenomena taking place during droplet vaporization. This was done in two steps. First, operating limits had to be defined to ensure an optimal vaporization and to avoid local saturation and agglomerate formation. These limits were precisely determined under laboratory conditions to validate a model that showed that agglomeration does not occur under industrial conditions. Then, a kinematic study of vaporization under operating conditions without agglomerate formation was performed. An original measurement technique was developed to get samples at very short times (tens of milliseconds). Experiments showed that heat transfer was not limiting and that mass transfer was the limiting process during vaporization. The developed model was thus based on mass transfer through a boundary layer. The validation of this model in a dense fluidized bed justified its application to operating conditions were the bed voidance is higher. A detailed study of operating parameters will help determine how to improve vaporization. (author)

  5. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Yeo, Leslie Y. [Micro/Nanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  6. Development of an acoustic wave based biosensor for vapor phase detection of small molecules

    Stubbs, Desmond

    For centuries scientific ingenuity and innovation have been influenced by Mother Nature's perfect design. One of her more elusive designs is that of the sensory olfactory system, an array of highly sensitive receptors responsible for chemical vapor recognition. In the animal kingdom this ability is magnified among canines where ppt (parts per trillion) sensitivity values have been reported. Today, detection dogs are considered an essential part of the US drug and explosives detection schemes. However, growing concerns about their susceptibility to extraneous odors have inspired the development of highly sensitive analytical detection tools or biosensors known as "electronic noses". In general, biosensors are distinguished from chemical sensors in that they use an entity of biological origin (e.g. antibody, cell, enzyme) immobilized onto a surface as the chemically-sensitive film on the device. The colloquial view is that the term "biosensors" refers to devices which detect the presence of entities of biological origin, such as proteins or single-stranded DNA and that this detection must take place in a liquid. Our biosensor utilizes biomolecules, specifically IgG monoclonal antibodies, to achieve molecular recognition of relatively small molecules in the vapor phase.

  7. Acoustics

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  8. Primary investigation on droplets rotation in gravity field

    A single droplet rotation in the steam flow field in the gravity separation space was researched. According to the mechanism of gravity separation, the force and torque on droplet in steam flow were analysed and solved by employing the single droplet model taking into account rotation. The effects of droplet rotation, diameter and velocity as well as the vapor flow on droplet trajectory were described, laying the basis for establishing the dynamic single droplet model. (authors)

  9. Image-Guided Ultrasound Characterization of Volatile Sub-Micron Phase-Shift Droplets in the 20-40 MHz Frequency Range.

    Sheeran, Paul S; Daghighi, Yasaman; Yoo, Kimoon; Williams, Ross; Cherin, Emmanuel; Foster, F Stuart; Burns, Peter N

    2016-03-01

    Phase-shift perfluorocarbon droplets are designed to convert from the liquid to the gas state by the external application of acoustic or optical energy. Although droplet vaporization has been investigated extensively at ultrasonic frequencies between 1 and 10 MHz, few studies have characterized performance at the higher frequencies commonly used in small animal imaging. In this study, we use standard B-mode imaging sequences on a pre-clinical ultrasound platform to both image and activate sub-micron decafluorobutane droplet populations in vitro and in vivo at center frequencies in the range of 20-40 MHz. Results show that droplets remain stable against vaporization at low imaging pressures but are vaporized at peak negative pressures near 3.5 MPa at the three frequencies tested. This study also found that a small number of size outliers present in the distribution can greatly influence droplet performance. Removal of these outliers results in a more accurate assessment of the vaporization threshold and produces free-flowing microbubbles upon vaporization in the mouse kidney. PMID:26725168

  10. Acoustic dispersive prism

    Hussein Esfahlani; Sami Karkar; Herve Lissek; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic ...

  11. Particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography in a levitated droplet with nanosilica suspensions

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-03-01

    Preferential accumulation and agglomeration kinetics of nanoparticles suspended in an acoustically levitated water droplet under radiative heating has been studied. Particle image velocimetry performed to map the internal flow field shows a single cell recirculation with increasing strength for decreasing viscosities. Infrared thermography and high speed imaging show details of the heating process for various concentrations of nanosilica droplets. Initial stage of heating is marked by fast vaporization of liquid and sharp temperature rise. Following this stage, aggregation of nanoparticles is seen resulting in various structure formations. At low concentrations, a bowl structure of the droplet is dominant, maintained at a constant temperature. At high concentrations, viscosity of the solution increases, leading to rotation about the levitator axis due to the dominance of centrifugal motion. Such complex fluid motion inside the droplet due to acoustic streaming eventually results in the formation of a ring structure. This horizontal ring eventually reorients itself due to an imbalance of acoustic forces on the ring, exposing larger area for laser absorption and subsequent sharp temperature rise.

  12. Swimming Droplets

    Maass, Corinna C.; Krüger, Carsten; Herminghaus, Stephan; Bahr, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Swimming droplets are artificial microswimmers based on liquid droplets that show self-propelled motion when immersed in a second liquid. These systems are of tremendous interest as experimental models for the study of collective dynamics far from thermal equilibrium. For biological systems, such as bacterial colonies, plankton, or fish swarms, swimming droplets can provide a vital link between simulations and real life. We review the experimental systems and discuss the mechanisms of self-propulsion. Most systems are based on surfactant-stabilized droplets, the surfactant layer of which is modified in a way that leads to a steady Marangoni stress resulting in an autonomous motion of the droplet. The modification of the surfactant layer is caused either by the advection of a chemical reactant or by a solubilization process. Some types of swimming droplets possess a very simple design and long active periods, rendering them promising model systems for future studies of collective behavior.

  13. Asymmetric Wettability Directs Leidenfrost Droplets

    Agapov, Rebecca; Boreyko, Jonathan; Briggs, Dayrl; Srijanto, Bernadeta; Retterer, Scott; Collier, C. Patrick; Lavrik, Nickolay

    2014-03-01

    Exploration of Leidenfrost droplets on nano- and microstructured surfaces are of great importance for increasing control over heat transfer in high power density systems using boiling phenomena. They also provide an elegant way to direct droplet motion in a variety of emerging fluidic systems. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of tilted nanopillar arrays (TNPAs) that exhibit directional Leidenfrost water droplets under dynamic conditions. The batch fabrication of the TNPAs was achieved by glancing-angle anisotropic reactive ion etching of a thermally dewet platinum mask. In contrast to previously implemented macro- and microscopic Leidenfrost ratchets, our TNPAs induce no preferential directional movement of Leidenfrost droplets under conditions approaching steady-state film boiling. This suggests that the observed droplet directionality is not a result of asymmetric vapor flow. Phase diagrams were constructed for the boiling behavior upon droplet impact onto TNPAs, straight nanopillar arrays, and smooth silicon surfaces. Asymmetric wettability and directional trajectory of droplets was exclusive to the TNPAs for impacts corresponding to the transition boiling regime, revealing this to be the mechanism for the droplet directionality. This work was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is sponsored at Oak Ridge National Lab by the Division of Scientific User Facilities, US Dept. of Energy.

  14. Edge effects on water droplet condensation

    Medici, Marie-Gabrielle; Mongruel, Anne; Royon, Laurent; Beysens, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    International audience In this study is investigated the effect of geometrical or thermal discontinuities on the growth of water droplets condensing on a cooled substrate. Edges, corners, cooled/non cooled boundaries can have a strong effect on the vapor concentration profile and mass diffusion around the drops. In comparison to growth in a pattern where droplets have to compete to catch vapor, which results in a linear water concentration profile directed perpendicularly to the substrate,...

  15. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  16. Software for the design of acoustical steam silencers of the reaction-absorption type; Software para el diseno de silenciadores acusticos de vapor del tipo reaccion-absorcion

    Buendia Dominguez, Eduardo H.; Alvarez Chavez, Jose M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1989-12-31

    This paper describes the computer program named SILRA, that determines the outline dimensions of an acoustic steam silencer of the reaction-absorption type. These silencers are employed in the geothermoelectric power plants to lower the high levels of pressure and sound caused by the steam discharge to the surrounding atmosphere. The program has the capacity of predicting the noise level generated by the discharge without silencer depending on the emitting source. On SIRLA was successfully coupled the theory described in specialized literature with optimization techniques and experiences acquired in former designs. SIRLA is a powerful tool that allows the designer to optimize the equipment as well as the design time. [Espanol] En este trabajo se describe el programa de computo SILRA, que determina las dimensiones generales de un silenciador acustico de vapor tipo reaccion-absorcion, estos silenciadores se emplean en las centrales geotermoelectricas para abatir los altos niveles de presion de sonido provocados por la descarga del vapor a la atmosfera. El programa tiene la capacidad de predecir el nivel de ruido que genera la descarga sin silenciador, dependiendo de la fuente emisora. En SILRA se acoplaron con exito la teoria descrita en la literatura especializada con tecnicas de optimacion y experiencias adquiridas en disenos anteriores. SILRA es una poderosa herramienta que permite al disenador optimar tanto el equipo como el tiempo de diseno.

  17. Acoustophoresis in Variously Shaped Liquid Droplets

    Yu, Gan; Xu, Jie; 10.1039/c1sm05871a

    2012-01-01

    The ability to precisely trap, transport and manipulate micrometer-sized objects, including biological cells, DNA-coated microspheres and microorganisms, is very important in life science studies and biomedical applications. In this study, acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave field is used for micro-objects manipulation, a technique termed as acoustophoresis. Free surfaces of liquid droplets are used as sound reflectors to confine sound waves inside the droplets. Two techniques were developed for precise control of droplet shapes: edge pinning and hydrophilic/hydrophobic interface pinning. For all tested droplet shapes, including circular, annular and rectangular, our experiments show that polymer micro particles can be manipulated by ultrasound and form into a variety of patterns, for example, concentric rings and radial lines in an annular droplet. The complexity of the pattern increases with increasing frequency, and the observations are in line with simulation results. The acoustic mani...

  18. Splashing Droplets

    VanderWal, Randall L.; Kizito, John Patrick; Berger, Gordon M.; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2002-11-01

    Current data on droplet breakup is scarce for the sizes and velocities typical of practical applications such as in spray combustion processes and coating processes. While much more representative of practical applications, the small spatial scales and rapid time-scales prevent detailed measurement of the internal fluid dynamics and liquid property gradients produced by impinging upon surfaces. Realized through the extended spatial and temporal scales afforded by a microgravity environment, an improved understanding of drop breakup dynamics is sought to understand and ultimately control the impingement dynamics of droplets upon surfaces in practical situations. The primary objective of this research will be to mark the onset of different 'splashing modes' and to determine their temperature, pressure and angle dependence for impinging droplets representative of practical fluids. In addition, we are modeling the evolution of droplets that do not initially splash but rather undergo a 'fingering' evolution observed on the spreading fluid front and the transformation of these fingers into splashed products. An example of our experimental data is presented below. These images are of Isopar V impacting a mirror-polished surface. They were acquired using a high-speed camera at 1000 frames per second. They show the spreading of a single droplet after impact and ensuing finger instabilities. Normal gravity experimental data such as this will guide low gravity measurements in the 2.2 second drop tower and KC-135 aircraft as available. Presently we are in the process of comparing the experimental data of droplet shape evolution to numerical models, which can also capture the internal fluid dynamics and liquid property gradients such as produced by impingement upon a heated surface. To-date isothermal numerical data has been modeled using direct numerical simulations of representative splashing droplets. The data obtained so far indicates that the present model describes well

  19. Asymmetric Wettability Directs Leidenfrost Droplets

    Agapov, Rebecca L [ORNL; Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Briggs, Dayrl P [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL; Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Leidenfrost phenomena on nano- and microstructured surfaces are of great importance for increasing control over heat transfer in high power density systems utilizing boiling phenomena. They also provide an elegant means to direct droplet motion in a variety of recently emerging fluidic systems. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of tilted nanopillar arrays (TNPAs) that exhibit directional Leidenfrost water droplets under dynamic conditions, namely on impact with Weber numbers 40 at T 325 C. The batch fabrication of the TNPAs was achieved by glancing-angle anisotropic reactive ion etching of a thermally dewet platinum mask, with mean pillar diameters of 100 nm and heights of 200-500 nm. In contrast to previously implemented macro- and microscopic Leidenfrost ratchets, our TNPAs induce no preferential directional movement of Leidenfrost droplets under conditions approaching steady-state film boiling, suggesting that the observed droplet directionality is not a result of asymmetric vapor flow. Using high-speed imaging, phase diagrams were constructed for the boiling behavior upon impact for droplets falling onto TNPAs, straight nanopillar arrays, and smooth silicon surfaces. The asymmetric impact and directional trajectory of droplets was exclusive to the TNPAs for impacts corresponding to the transition boiling regime, revealing that asymmetric wettability upon impact is the mechanism for the droplet directionality.

  20. Formation and Levitation of Unconfined Droplet Clusters

    Liu, S.; Ruff, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the confounding effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. The overall objective of this research is to study the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would fill a large gap in our current understanding of droplet and spray combustion and provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. This paper describes current work on the design and performance of an apparatus to generate and stabilize droplet clusters using acoustic and electrostatic forces.

  1. Modular droplet actuator drive

    Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Paik, Philip (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator drive including a detection apparatus for sensing a property of a droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling the detection apparatus electronically coupled to the detection apparatus; a droplet actuator cartridge connector arranged so that when a droplet actuator cartridge electronically is coupled thereto: the droplet actuator cartridge is aligned with the detection apparatus; and the detection apparatus can sense the property of the droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling a droplet actuator coupled to the droplet actuator connector; and the droplet actuator circuitry may be coupled to a processor.

  2. Spontaneous droplet trampolining on rigid superhydrophobic surfaces

    Schutzius, Thomas M.; Jung, Stefan; Maitra, Tanmoy; Graeber, Gustav; Köhme, Moritz; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous removal of condensed matter from surfaces is exploited in nature and in a broad range of technologies to achieve self-cleaning, anti-icing and condensation control. But despite much progress, our understanding of the phenomena leading to such behaviour remains incomplete, which makes it challenging to rationally design surfaces that benefit from its manifestation. Here we show that water droplets resting on superhydrophobic textured surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous levitation and subsequent trampoline-like bouncing behaviour, in which sequential collisions with the surface accelerate the droplets. These collisions have restitution coefficients (ratios of relative speeds after and before collision) greater than unity despite complete rigidity of the surface, and thus seemingly violate the second law of thermodynamics. However, these restitution coefficients result from an overpressure beneath the droplet produced by fast droplet vaporization while substrate adhesion and surface texture restrict vapour flow. We also show that the high vaporization rates experienced by the droplets and the associated cooling can result in freezing from a supercooled state that triggers a sudden increase in vaporization, which in turn boosts the levitation process. This effect can spontaneously remove surface icing by lifting away icy drops the moment they freeze. Although these observations are relevant only to systems in a low-pressure environment, they show how surface texturing can produce droplet-surface interactions that prohibit liquid and freezing water-droplet retention on surfaces.

  3. Comparisons of polymer/gas partition coefficients calculated from responses of thickness shear mode and surface acoustic wave vapor sensors.

    Grate, J W; Kaganove, S N; Bhethanabotla, V R

    1998-01-01

    Apparent partition coefficients, K, for the sorption of toluene by four different polymer thin films on thickness shear mode (TSM) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices are compared. The polymers examined were poly(isobutylene) (PIB), poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH), poly(butadiene) (PBD), and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Independent data on partition coefficients for toluene in these polymers were compiled for comparison, and TSM sensor measurements were made using both oscillator and impedance analysis methods. K values from SAW sensor measurements were about twice those calculated from TSM sensor measurements when the polymers were PIB and PECH, and they were also at least twice the values of the independent partition coefficient data, which is interpreted as indicating that the SAW sensor responds to polymer modulus changes as well as to mass changes. K values from SAW and TSM measurements were in agreement with each other and with independent data when the polymer was PBD. Similarly, K values from the PDMS-coated SAW sensor were not much larger than values from independent measurements. These results indicate that modulus effects were not contributing to the SAW sensor responses in the cases of PBD and PDMS. However, K values from the PDMS-coated TSM device were larger than the values from the SAW device or independent measurements, and the impedance analyzer results indicated that this sensor using our sample of PDMS at the applied thickness did not behave as a simple mass sensor. Differences in behavior among the test polymers on SAW devices are interpreted in terms of their differing viscoelastic properties. PMID:21644612

  4. Droplet size distribution in condensing flow

    Sidin, Ryan Steeve Rodney

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the problem of predicting the droplet size distribution in condensing ow is in- vestigated numerically and analytically. The work focuses on two types of problems: one where condensation occurs during the transonic expansion of a vapor-mixture, and a second one where condensation takes place in a synthetic turbulent ow, reminiscent of atmospheric clouds. For single-component condensing nozzle ow, three master equations for the prediction of the droplet size distribution are ev...

  5. Cloud droplet measurement methods

    All important techniques to measure cloud and fog droplets are mentioned in this compendium. It especially refers to those authors who established and developed measurement methods for cloud droplets and to those whose papers contained cloud droplet size distributions. (orig.)

  6. Synchronous universal droplet logic and control

    Katsikis, Georgios; Cybulski, James S.; Prakash, Manu

    2015-07-01

    Droplets are versatile digital materials; they can be produced at high throughput, perform chemical reactions as miniature beakers and carry biological entities. Droplets have been manipulated with electric, optical, acoustic and magnetic forces, but all these methods use serial controls to address individual droplets. An alternative is algorithmic manipulation based on logic operations that automatically compute where droplets are stored or directed, thereby enabling parallel control. However, logic previously implemented in low-Reynolds-number droplet hydrodynamics is asynchronous and thus prone to errors that prevent scaling up the complexity of logic operations. Here we present a platform for error-free physical computation via synchronous universal logic. Our platform uses a rotating magnetic field that enables parallel manipulation of arbitrary numbers of ferrofluid droplets on permalloy tracks. Through the coupling of magnetic and hydrodynamic interaction forces between droplets, we developed AND, OR, XOR, NOT and NAND logic gates, fanouts, a full adder, a flip-flop and a finite-state machine. Our platform enables large-scale integration of droplet logic, analogous to the scaling seen in digital electronics, and opens new avenues in mesoscale material processing.

  7. Plasma Propulsion of a Metallic Micro-droplet and its Deformation upon Laser Impact

    Kurilovich, Dmitry; Torretti, Francesco; Lassise, Adam; Hoekstra, Ronnie; Ubachs, Wim; Gelderblom, Hanneke; Versolato, Oscar O

    2016-01-01

    The propulsion of a liquid indium-tin micro-droplet by nanosecond-pulse laser impact is experimentally investigated. We capture the physics of the droplet propulsion in a scaling law that accurately describes the plasma-imparted momentum transfer, enabling the optimization of the laser-droplet coupling. The subsequent deformation of the droplet is described by an analytical model that accounts for the droplet's propulsion velocity and the liquid properties. Comparing our findings to those from vaporization-accelerated mm-sized water droplets, we demonstrate that the hydrodynamic response of laser-impacted droplets is scalable and independent of the propulsion mechanism.

  8. Droplet impact on superheated micro-structured surfaces

    Tran, A.T.; Staat, H.J.J.; Susarrey-Arce, A.; Foertsch, T.C.; Houselt, van A.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Prosperetti, A.; Lohse, D.; Sun, C.

    2013-01-01

    When a droplet impacts upon a surface heated above the liquid's boiling point, the droplet either comes into contact with the surface and boils immediately (contact boiling), or is supported by a developing vapor layer and bounces back (film boiling, or Leidenfrost state). We study the transition be

  9. Dispensing nano-pico droplets of ferrofluids

    Irajizad, Peyman; Farokhnia, Nazanin; Ghasemi, Hadi

    2015-11-01

    Dispensing miniature volumes of a ferrofluid is of fundamental and practical importance for diverse applications ranging from biomedical devices, optics, and self-assembly of materials. Current dispensing systems are based on microfluidics flow-focusing approaches or acoustic actuation requiring complicated structures. A simple method is presented to continuously dispense the miniature droplets from a ferrofluid reservoir. Once a jet of the ferrofluid is subjected to a constrained flux through a membrane and an inhomogeneous magnetic field, the jet experiences a curvature-driven instability and transforms to a droplet. Ferrofluid droplets in the range of 0.1-1000 nl are dispensed with tunable dispensing frequencies. A model is developed that predicts the dispensed volume of the ferrofluid droplets with an excellent agreement with the measurements.

  10. A Computational Study of Internal Flows in a Heated Water-Oil Emulsion Droplet

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-01-05

    The vaporization characteristics of water-oil emulsion droplets are investigated by high fidelity computational simulations. One of the key objectives is to identify the physical mechanism for the experimentally observed behavior that the component in the dispersed micro-droplets always vaporizes first, for both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsion droplets. The mechanism of this phenomenon has not been clearly understood. In this study, an Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a dynamic adaptive mesh refinement in order to effectively capture the thermo-capillary effect of a micro-droplet in an emulsion droplet efficiently. It is found that the temperature difference in an emulsion droplet creates a surface tension gradient along the micro-droplet surface, inducing surface movement. Subsequently, the outer shear flow and internal flow circulation inside the droplet, referred to as the Marangoni convection, are created. The present study confirms that the Marangoni effect can be sufficiently large to drive the micro-droplets to the emulsion droplet surface at higher temperature, for both water-in-oil and oil-and-water emulsion droplets. A further parametric study with different micro-droplet sizes and temperature gradients demonstrates that larger micro-droplets move faster with larger temperature gradient. The oil micro-droplet in oil-in-water emulsion droplets moves faster due to large temperature gradients by smaller thermal conductivity.

  11. Vaporization of synthetic fuels. Final report. [Thesis

    Sirignano, W.A.; Yao, S.C.; Tong, A.Y.; Talley, D.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of transient droplet vaporization in a hot convective environment is examined. The main objective of the present study is to develop an algorithm for the droplet vaporization which is simple enough to be feasibly incorporated into a complete spray combustion analysis and yet will also account for the important physics such as liquid-phase internal circulation, unsteady droplet heating and axisymmetric gas-phase convection. A simplified liquid-phase model has been obtained based on the assumption of the existence of a Hill's spherical vortex inside the droplet together with some approximations made in the governing diffusion equation. The use of the simplified model in a spray situation has also been examined. It has been found that droplet heating and vaporization are essentially unsteady and droplet temperature is nonuniform for a significant portion of its lifetime. It has also been found that the droplet vaporization characteristic can be quite sensitive to the particular liquid-phase and gas-phase models. The results of the various models are compared with the existing experimental data. Due to large scattering in the experimental measurements, particularly the droplet diameter, no definite conclusion can be drawn based on the experimental data. Finally, certain research problems which are related to the present study are suggested for future studies.

  12. Multicomponent evaporation model for pure and blended biodiesel droplets in high temperature convective environment

    Saha, K.; Abu-Ramadan, E.; Li, X. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Renewable energy sources are currently being investigated for their reliability, efficiency, and applicability. Biodiesel is one of the most promising alternatives to conventional diesel fuels in compression-ignition (CI) engines. This paper reported on a study that compared pure biodiesel, pure diesel and blended fuels using a comprehensive multicomponent droplet vaporization model. The model considers the difference in the gas phase diffusivity of diesel and biodiesel vapors. The paper presented the vaporization characteristics of pure diesel, pure biodiesel fuel droplets as well as the effect of mixing them in different proportions (B20 and B50). The model successfully predicted the vaporization history of a multicomponent droplet. The modeling study revealed that biodiesel droplets evaporate at a slower rate than the diesel droplets because of relatively low vapor pressure. As such, the blending of diesel fuel with small proportions of biodiesel will result in an increase in the evaporation time of diesel fuel to some extent. 31 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization

    Smith, M. K.; James, A.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal management is critical to a number of technologies used in a microgravity environment and in Earth-based systems. Examples include electronic cooling, power generation systems, metal forming and extrusion, and HVAC (heating, venting, and air conditioning) systems. One technique that can deliver the large heat fluxes required for many of these technologies is two-phase heat transfer. This type of heat transfer is seen in the boiling or evaporation of a liquid and in the condensation of a vapor. Such processes provide very large heat fluxes with small temperature differences. Our research program is directed toward the development of a new, two-phase heat transfer cell for use in a microgravity environment. In this paper, we consider the main technology used in this cell, a novel technique for the atomization of a liquid called vibration-induced droplet atomization. In this process, a small liquid droplet is placed on a thin metal diaphragm that is made to vibrate by an attached piezoelectric transducer. The vibration induces capillary waves on the free surface of the droplet that grow in amplitude and then begin to eject small secondary droplets from the wave crests. In some situations, this ejection process develops so rapidly that the entire droplet seems to burst into a small cloud of atomized droplets that move away from the diaphragm at speeds of up to 50 cm/s. By incorporating this process into a heat transfer cell, the active atomization and transport of the small liquid droplets could provide a large heat flux capability for the device. Experimental results are presented that document the behavior of the diaphragm and the droplet during the course of a typical bursting event. In addition, a simple mathematical model is presented that qualitatively reproduces all of the essential features we have seen in a burst event. From these two investigations, we have shown that delayed droplet bursting results when the system passes through a resonance

  14. Spontaneous droplet self-launching on superhydrophobic surfaces

    Schutzius, Thomas; Jung, Stefan; Maitra, Tanmoy; Graeber, Gustav; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous removal of droplets from surfaces is of significant importance in nature and many technologies, e.g., self-cleaning surfaces. Despite progress, the understanding of phenomena leading to such behavior, combined with surface design promoting their manifestation, remains a challenge. We show how water droplets in contact with superhydrophobic surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous launching and subsequent repeated bouncing behavior. We demonstrate that this bouncing results from the combined effect of droplet vaporization, vapor flow in the surface texture, and substrate adhesion leading to a forced, underdamped, mass-spring-damper system behavior. This work is a step toward understanding inherent physical phenomena of droplet-surface interactions manifesting themselves at conditions promoting vaporization, e.g. low-pressure environments, and shows how surface texture design aware of such phenomena alone, can prohibit water retention on surfaces.

  15. Hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets in one-component fluids

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2013-04-24

    Using the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], we numerically investigate the hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets under gravity in two dimensions. Some recent theoretical predictions and experimental observations are confirmed in our simulations. A Leidenfrost droplet larger than a critical size is shown to be unstable and break up into smaller droplets due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the bottom surface of the droplet. Our simulations demonstrate that an evaporating Leidenfrost droplet changes continuously from a puddle to a circular droplet, with the droplet shape controlled by its size in comparison with a few characteristic length scales. The geometry of the vapor layer under the droplet is found to mainly depend on the droplet size and is nearly independent of the substrate temperature, as reported in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 074301 (2012)]. Finally, our simulations demonstrate that a Leidenfrost droplet smaller than a characteristic size takes off from the hot substrate because the levitating force due to evaporation can no longer be balanced by the weight of the droplet, as observed in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 034501 (2012)].

  16. Acoustic dispersive prism

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  17. An evaporation model of colloidal suspension droplets

    Sartori, Silvana; Li\\ Nán, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2009-11-01

    Colloidal suspensions of polymers in water or other solvents are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry to coat tablets with different agents. These allow controlling the rate at which the drug is delivered, taste or physical appearance. The coating is performed by simultaneously spraying and drying the tablets with the colloidal suspension at moderately high temperatures. The spreading of the coating on the pills surface depends on the droplet Webber and Reynolds numbers, angle of impact, but more importantly on the rheological properties of the drop. We present a model for the evaporation of a colloidal suspension droplet in a hot air environment with temperatures substantially lower than the boiling temperature of the carrier fluid. As the liquid vaporizes from the surface, a compacting front advances into the droplet faster than the liquid surface regresses, forming a shell of a porous medium where the particles reach their maximum packing density. While the surface regresses, the evaporation rate is determined by both the rate at which heat is transported to the droplet surface and the rate at which liquid vapor is diffused away from it. This regime continues until the compacting front reaches the center of the droplet, at which point the evaporation rate is drastically reduced.

  18. Droplet Growth Kinetics in Various Environments

    Raatikainen, T. E.; Lathem, T. L.; Moore, R.; Lin, J. J.; Cerully, K. M.; Padro, L.; Lance, S.; Cozic, J.; Anderson, B. E.; Nenes, A.

    2012-12-01

    The largest uncertainties in the effects of atmospherics aerosols on the global radiation budget are related to their indirect effects on cloud properties (IPCC, the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2007). Cloud formation is a kinetic process where the resulting cloud properties depend on aerosol properties and meteorological parameters such as updraft velocity (e.g. McFiggans et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 2593-2649, 2006). Droplet growth rates are limited by the water vapor diffusion, but additional kinetic limitations, e.g., due to organic surface films, slow solute dissociation or highly viscous or glassy aerosol states have been hypothesized. Significant additional kinetic limitations can lead to increased cloud droplet number concentration, thus the effect is similar to those of increased aerosol number concentration or changes in vertical velocity (e.g. Nenes et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 29, 1848, 2002). There are a few studies where slow droplet growth has been observed (e.g. Ruehl et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L15814, 2009), however, little is currently known about their global occurrence and magnitude. Cloud micro-physics models often describe kinetic limitations by an effective water vapor uptake coefficient or similar parameter. Typically, determining aerosol water vapor uptake coefficients requires experimental observations of droplet growth which are interpreted by a numerical droplet growth model where the uptake coefficient is an adjustable parameter (e.g. Kolb et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 10561-10605, 2010). Such methods have not been practical for high time-resolution or long term field measurements, until a model was recently developed for analyzing Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT) cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) counter data (Raatikainen et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 4227-4243, 2012). Model verification experiments showed that the calibration aerosol droplet size can be predicted accurately

  19. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of self-propelled Leidenfrost droplets on ratchet surfaces

    Li, Q; Francois, M M; Hu, A J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the self-propelled motion of Leidenfrost droplets on ratchet surfaces is numerically investigated with a thermal multiphase lattice Boltzmann model with liquid-vapor phase change. The capability of the model for simulating evaporation is validated via the D2 law. Using the model, we first study the performances of Leidenfrost droplets on horizontal ratchet surfaces. It is numerically shown that the motion of self-propelled Leidenfrost droplets on ratchet surfaces is owing to the asymmetry of the ratchets and the vapor flows beneath the droplets. It is found that the Leidenfrost droplets move in the direction toward the slowly inclined side from the ratchet peaks, which agrees with the direction of droplet motion in experiments [Linke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2006, 96, 154502]. Moreover, the influences of the ratchet aspect ratio are investigated. For the considered ratchet surfaces, a critical value of the ratchet aspect ratio is approximately found, which corresponds to the maximum droplet mo...

  20. The liquid phase separation of Bi-Ga hypermonotectic alloy under acoustic levitation condition

    HONG ZhenYu; L(U) YongJun; XIE WenJun; WEI BingBo

    2007-01-01

    Containerless treatment of Bi-58.5at%Ga hypermonotectic alloy is successfully performed with acoustic levitation technique. Under acoustic levitation condition, the second phase (Ga) distributes almost homogeneously in solidification sample, opposite to macrosegregation in solidification sample under conventional condition. Stokes motion of the second liquid droplet (Ga) is significantly restrained under acoustic levitation condition. The analyses indicate that the melt vibration in the gravity direction forced by acoustic field can induce steady flow around the second liquid droplet, which influences droplet shape during its moving upward and consequently restrains Stokes motion velocity of the second liquid droplet.

  1. Triggered vaporization of gold nanodroplets for enhanced photothermal therapy

    Liu, Shu-Wei; Liu, Wei-Wen; Li, Pai-Chi

    2015-03-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization has been proposed for sonoporation. In this study, we hypothesize that, by using gold nanodroplets (AuNDs), vaporization can be triggered with external application of laser irradiation. In addition, the vaporization assisted sonoporation can enhance delivery of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) into the cells, thus potentially enhancing effects of plasmonic photothermal therapy. To test our hypothesis, in vitro studies were conducted. The delivery efficiency of AuNDs was also compared to that of AuNPs encapsulated in ultrasound microbubbles (AuMBs). The inertial cavitation dose (ICD), and optical density (OD) value of AuNPs were all measured under the applications of ultrasound only, laser only, and both ultrasound and laser. Results show that the cavitational effects and microbubble destruction were the highest with both ultrasound and laser being applied. In addition, destruction ratio of AuNDs was around 43%, compared to 35% microbubble destruction of AuMBs. Likewise, the OD value of AuNDs is 1.3 times higher than that of AuMBs under the same conditions, indicating that cavitation resulting from microbubble destruction did have the capability to assist the delivery of AuNPs into the cells. After the delivery, laser heating resulted in cell death. The cell viability with AuNDs was 45% left in the in vitro studies. Synergistic effects were also evident when combing laser with ultrasound.

  2. Experimental investigation on the bursting of single molten droplet in coolant

    LI Tianshu; YANG Yanhua; YUAN Minghao; HU Zhihua

    2007-01-01

    An experiment facility for observing low-temperature molten tin alloy droplet into water was established to investigate mechanisms of vapor explosion occurring in severe accidents of a fission nuclear reactor.The vapor explosion behaviors of the molten material were observed by a high-speed video camera and the vapor explosion pressures were recorded by a pressure transducer mounted under the water surface.The results showed that the pressure reached a peak value when the molten metal temperature was 600℃-650℃,and the coolant temperature had an obvious decreasing effect on the droplet breakups.A model for single droplet fuel/coolant interaction is proposed. It considers that in the case of Rayleigh-Taylor instability,the coolant that jets from opposite direction penetrates into the fuel and the vapor explosion occurs because of the rapid evaporation.Tllis model explained the effect of metal droplet temperature and coolant temperature on vapor explosion.

  3. Freezing of water droplets colliding with kaolinite particles

    E. A. Svensson

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Contact freezing of single supercooled water droplets colliding with kaolinite dust particles has been investigated. The experiments were performed with droplets levitated in an electrodynamic balance at temperatures from 240 to 268 K. Under relatively dry conditions (when no water vapor was added freezing was observed to occur below 249 K, while a freezing threshold of 267 K was observed when water vapor was added to the air in the chamber.

    The effect of relative humidity is attributed to an influence on the contact freezing process for the kaolinite-water droplet system, and it is not related to the lifetime of the droplets in the electrodynamic balance. Freezing probabilities per collision were derived assuming that collisions at the lowest temperature employed had a probability of unity. Mechanisms for contact freezing are briefly discussed.

  4. Excitation and dynamics of liquid tin micrometer droplet generation

    Rollinger, B.; Abhari, R. S.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of capillary breakup-based droplet generation are studied for an excitation system based on a tunable piezoelectrically actuated oscillating piston, which generates acoustic pressure waves at the dispenser nozzle. First, the non-ideal pressure boundary conditions of droplet breakup are measured using a fast response pressure probe. A structural analysis shows that the axial modes of the excitation system are the main reasons for the resonance peaks in the pressure response. Second, a correlation between the nozzle inlet pressure and the droplet timing jitter is established with the help of experiments and a droplet formation model. With decreasing wave number, the growth rate of the main excitation decreases, while noise contributions with wave numbers with higher growth rates lead to a non-deterministic structure of the droplet train. A highly coherent and monodisperse droplet stream is obtained when the excitation system is tuned to generate high acoustic pressures at the desired operation frequency and when the noise level on the jet is limited. The jet velocity, hence droplet spacing for a set frequency is then adjusted by varying the reservoir pressure, according to the trade-off between lowest wave number and acceptable timing jitter.

  5. Real time incorporation of random events in the reasoning of an on-line expert system. Application to the acoustic surveillance of vapor generators

    A study for improving an expert system applied in diagnostic assistance is presented. The results will be implemented in the vapor generators surveillance system. The aim of the work is to improve performances by reducing the time spent on reasoning and to strengthen the vigilance system. The investigation consists of four parts. In the first part, the state of the art of the different logics used in the artificial intelligence techniques is discussed, and the TMS and ATMS systems are presented. The second part of this thesis deals with problematics. Each point of the problem is studied and answered by applying the basic concepts used in the generation of on-line expert systems. In the third part, the on-line expert system generator ACTE is described. The ACTE aspects concerning the user, the inner structure and the functionality are considered. In the fourth part, an application to the surveillance of vapor generators and concluding remarks are presented

  6. Multicomponent evaporation model for pure and blended biodiesel droplets in high temperature convective environment

    Highlights: ► Developed a multicomponent vaporization model for pure and blended biodiesel droplets. ► Considered the inequalities in the gas phase diffusivities in the validated model. ► Confirmed the prolonging effect of biodiesel fraction on blended droplet lifetime. ► Showed the effect of diffusion coefficient on droplet vaporization time and temperature. ► Demonstrated the role of diesel fraction on blended droplet internal gasification. - Abstract: Biodiesel and more often its blends have been extensively used to mitigate the dependence on fossil fuel and the greenhouse gas emissions. However, a good understanding of the impact of the difference in the thermophysical properties of biodiesel and its blends from those of petroleum diesel is required to reap the benefits of biodiesel utilization. In this study a multicomponent evaporation model has been developed for pure and blended biodiesel droplets to investigate their evaporation characteristics in high temperature convective environment as encountered in practical combustion systems; and it is validated through a comparison with experimental results. The vaporization characteristics of pure diesel, pure biodiesel fuel droplets as well as the effect of mixing them in different proportions (B20 and B50) are presented. The results reveal that biodiesel droplets evaporate at a slower rate than the diesel droplets because of biodiesel’s relatively low vapor pressure. Consequently, the blending of diesel fuel with small proportions of biodiesel results in an increase in the evaporation timescale of the blended fuel droplets. Diffusion in the liquid phase is observed to be the rate controlling factor for blended droplet vaporization. The possibility of internal gasification for blended droplets is also investigated. A droplet with higher quantity of diesel is more prone to undergo internal gasification but micro-explosion is not likely to occur at atmospheric pressure.

  7. Droplet impact behavior on heated micro-patterned surfaces

    Zhang, Wenbin; Yu, Tongxu; Fan, Jing; Sun, Weijie; Cao, Zexian

    2016-03-01

    Impact behavior of droplets on a surface is an intriguing research topic, and its control should be very useful in diverse industrial applications. We investigated the impact behavior of water droplets on the textured and chemically treated surface of silicon and obtained the impact mode map on the parameter plane subtended by the Weber number (up to 85) and temperature (up to 320 °C). The patterns comprise of micropillars (14 μm in height) in square lattice with a lattice constant of 10 and 20 μm, and the surface was further made superhydrophobic by coating with graphene nanosheets. Six distinct impact modes are identified. It was found that the impact mode map can be dramatically altered by modifying the texture and chemistry of the surface, and the observations are well explained with regard to heat transfer, vapor/bubble generation and vapor flow beneath the droplet. Instability in the droplet arising from the mismatch between vapor generation rate and exhaust conditions is the dominant factor in determining the impact mode. Our results revealed more facts and features of the droplet impact phenomenon and can be very useful for target-oriented surface design towards precise control of droplet impact behavior on heated substrates.

  8. An interfacial mechanism for cloud droplet formation on organic aerosols.

    Ruehl, Christopher R; Davies, James F; Wilson, Kevin R

    2016-03-25

    Accurate predictions of aerosol/cloud interactions require simple, physically accurate parameterizations of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of aerosols. Current models assume that organic aerosol species contribute to CCN activity by lowering water activity. We measured droplet diameters at the point of CCN activation for particles composed of dicarboxylic acids or secondary organic aerosol and ammonium sulfate. Droplet activation diameters were 40 to 60% larger than predicted if the organic was assumed to be dissolved within the bulk droplet, suggesting that a new mechanism is needed to explain cloud droplet formation. A compressed film model explains how surface tension depression by interfacial organic molecules can alter the relationship between water vapor supersaturation and droplet size (i.e., the Köhler curve), leading to the larger diameters observed at activation. PMID:27013731

  9. Water droplets also swim!

    van der Linden, Marjolein; Izri, Ziane; Michelin, Sébastien; Dauchot, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    Recently there has been a surge of interest in producing artificial swimmers. One possible path is to produce self-propelling droplets in a liquid phase. The self-propulsion often relies on complex mechanisms at the droplet interface, involving chemical reactions and the adsorption-desorption kinetics of the surfactant. Here, we report the spontaneous swimming of droplets in a very simple system: water droplets immersed in an oil-surfactant medium. The swimmers consist of pure water, with no additional chemical species inside: water droplets also swim! The swimming is very robust: the droplets are able to transport cargo such as large colloids, salt crystals, and even cells. In this talk we discuss the origin of the spontaneous motion. Water from the droplet is solubilized by the reverse micellar solution, creating a concentration gradient of swollen reverse micelles around each droplet. By generalizing a recently proposed instability mechanism, we explain how spontaneous motion emerges in this system at sufficiently large Péclet number. Our water droplets in an oil-surfactant medium constitute the first experimental realization of spontaneous motion of isotropic particles driven by this instability mechanism.

  10. Nanospiral Formation by Droplet Drying: One Molecule at a Time

    Wan Lei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have created nanospirals by self-assembly during droplet evaporation. The nanospirals, 60–70 nm in diameter, formed when solvent mixtures of methanol and m-cresol were used. In contrast, spin coating using only methanol as the solvent produced epitaxial films of stripe nanopatterns and using only m-cresol disordered structure. Due to the disparity in vapor pressure between the two solvents, droplets of m-cresol solution remaining on the substrate serve as templates for the self-assembly of carboxylic acid molecules, which in turn allows the visualization of solution droplet evaporation one molecule at a time.

  11. SIMULATION OF THE TWO PHASE FLOW OF DROPLET IMPINGEMENT ON LIQUID FILM BY THE LATTICE BOLTZMANN METHOD

    GUO Jia-hong; WANG Xiao-yong

    2012-01-01

    A Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) with two-distribution functions is employed for simulating the two-phase flow induced by a liquid droplet impinging onto the film of the same liquid on solid surface.The model is suitable for solution of twophase flow problem at high density and viscosity ratios of liquid to vapor and phase transition between liquid and its vapor.The roles of the vapor flow,the density ratio of liquid to vapor and the surface tension of the droplet in the splashing formation are discussed.It is concluded that the vapour flow induced by the droplet fall and splash in the whole impinging process may affect remarkably the splash behaviour.For the case of large density ratio of liquid to vapor a crown may engender after the droplet collides with the film.However,for the case of small density ratio of liquid to vapor a “bell” like splash may be observed.

  12. Levitated droplet dye laser

    Azzouz, H.; Alkafadiji, L.; Balslev, Søren;

    2006-01-01

    a high quality optical resonator. Our 750 nL lasing droplets consist of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethylene glycol, at a concentration of 0.02 M. The droplets are optically pumped at 532 nm light from a pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, and the dye laser emission is analyzed by a fixed grating...

  13. Photopolymerization Of Levitated Droplets

    Rembaum, Alan; Rhim, Won-Kyu; Hyson, Michael T.; Chang, Manchium

    1989-01-01

    Experimental containerless process combines two established techniques to make variety of polymeric microspheres. In single step, electrostatically-levitated monomer droplets polymerized by ultraviolet light. Faster than multiple-step emulsion polymerization process used to make microspheres. Droplets suspended in cylindrical quadrupole electrostatic levitator. Alternating electrostatic field produces dynamic potential along axis. Process enables tailoring of microspheres for medical, scientific, and industrial applications.

  14. Numerical fluid dynamics calculations of nonequilibrium steam-water flows with entrained droplets

    The present work has developed a computational fluid dynamics formulation that efficiently solves the conservation laws for a vapor field, a continuous liquid field, and two dispersed droplet fields. The thermal-hydraulic effects resulting from the exchange of mass, momentum and energy between the vapor and the dispersed droplet phases has been accurately modeled. This work is an advancement of the state-of-the-art for engineering analyses of nonequilibrium steam-water-droplet flows in heated channels. It is particularly applicable for boiling steam-water flows in which it is important to represent the effects of significant thermal nonequilibrium between the vapor and the liquid phases. This work was shown to be in good agreement with unique experimental measurements of significant thermal nonequilibrium between the vapor and dispersed droplets. The tests analyzed covered a range of mass fluxes and wall heating rates, and were all at low pressures where nonequilibrium effects are most pronounced

  15. Conditions of explosive evaporation at the phase interface in an inhomogeneous droplet

    Anufriev, I. S.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Piskunov, M. V.; Strizhak, P. A.; Chernetskii, M. Yu.

    2015-08-01

    The phenomenon of water boiling at a phase interface inside an inhomogeneous (containing a carbonaceous particle) water droplet heated in a high-temperature (above 650 K) gaseous medium has been studied by high-speed (up to 105 fps) video recording. Characteristic stages of intense evaporation from the external boundary, bubble formation on the particle surface, explosive vaporization at the phase interface inside the droplet, and disintegration of the droplet have been recognized.

  16. Confinement by Carbon Nanotubes Drastically Alters the Boiling and Critical Behavior of Water Droplets

    Chaban, Vitaly V.; Prezhdo, Victor V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2012-01-01

    Vapor pressure grows rapidly above the boiling temperature, and past the critical point liquid droplets disintegrate. Our atomistic simulations show that this sequence of events is reversed inside carbon nanotubes (CNT). Droplets disintegrate first and at low temperature, while pressure remains small. The droplet disintegration temperature is independent of the CNT diameter. In contrast, depending on CNT diameter, a temperature that is much higher than the bulk boiling temperature is required...

  17. Droplets nucleation, and Smoluchowski's equation with growth and injection of particles

    Cueille, Stephane; Sire, Clement

    1997-01-01

    We show that models for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of D-dimensional droplets in a d-dimensional medium are described in mean-field by a modified Smoluchowski equation for the distribution N(s,t) of droplets masses s, with additional terms accounting for exogenous growth from vapor absorption, and injection of small droplets when the model allows renucleation. The corresponding collision kernel is derived in both cases. For a generic collision kernel K, the equation describes a c...

  18. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density

  19. Film boiling characteristics of potassium droplets on heated plate

    For providing background information on the possible vapor explosion in the event of a core disruptive accident of LMFBRs, an experiment was conducted on the film boiling characteristics of liquid metal potassium in association with the Leidenfrost phenomenon. In a steel container filled with Ar gas, K droplets were put on a joule-heated plate of 316-SS or Ta. The behaviors of droplet were observed by a camera and a color VTR through viewports. The experimental conditions were the Ar pressure 1 bar, the initial K temperature 350 -- 7600C, and the plate temperature 900 -- 1,2500C for 316-SS and 1,100 -- 1,6000C for Ta. Stable film boiling known as Leidenfrost phenomenon was observed for a high temperature condition of the plate, whereas an instantaneous break-up of droplet with extensive vaporization occurred for a low temperature. The heat transfer characteristics of film and transition boiling regions were obtaind by estimating the heat flux from the volumetric reducing rate of droplet due to vaporization. The results in the film boiling region showed an appreciably good agreement with the prediction based on Bromley's expression combined with the theory of Baumeister et al. The minimum film boiling temperature and heat flux were found to be about 1,3000C and 15 W/cm2, respectively, for a droplet size of 0.15 cm3. (author)

  20. Droplet formation and ejection from a micromachined ultrasonic droplet generator: Visualization and scaling

    Meacham, J. M.; Varady, M. J.; Degertekin, F. L.; Fedorov, A. G.

    2005-10-01

    Visualization and scaling of drop-on-demand and continuous-jet fluid atomization of water are presented to elucidate the fluid physics of the ejection process and characterize the modes of operation of a novel micromachined ultrasonic droplet generator. The device comprises a fluid reservoir that is formed between a bulk ceramic piezoelectric transducer and an array of liquid horn structures wet etched into (100) silicon. At resonance, the transducer generates a standing ultrasonic pressure wave within the cavity and the wave is focused at the tip of the nozzle by the horn structure. Device operation has been demonstrated by water droplet ejection from 5to10μm orifices at multiple resonant frequencies between 1 and 5MHz. The intimate interactions between focused ultrasonic pressure waves and capillary waves formed at the liquid-air interface located at the nozzle tip are found to govern the ejection dynamics, leading to different ejection modalities ranging from individual droplets to continuous jet. Specifically, we report the results of high-resolution stroboscopic optical imaging of the liquid-air interface evolution during acoustic pumping to elucidate the role of capillary waves in the droplet formation and ejection process. A basic understanding of the governing physics gained through careful visualization and scaling forms the basis for development of improved theoretical models for the droplet formation and ejection processes by accounting for key fluid mechanical features of the phenomena.

  1. Waveguides for walking droplets

    Filoux, Boris; Schlagheck, Peter; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    When gently placing a droplet onto a vertically vibrated bath, a drop can bounce permanently. Upon increasing the forcing acceleration, the droplet is propelled by the wave it generates and becomes a walker with a well defined speed. We investigate the confinement of a walker in different rectangular cavities, used as waveguides for the Faraday waves emitted by successive droplet bounces. By studying the walker velocities, we discover that 1d confinement is optimal for narrow channels. We also propose an analogy with waveguide models based on the observation of the Faraday instability within the channels.

  2. Finite range Droplet Model

    A treatment of nuclear masses and deformations is described which combines the Droplet Model with the folding model surface and Coulomb energy integrals. An additional exponential term, inspired by the folding model, but treated here as an independent contribution with two adjustable parameters, is included. With this term incorporated, the accuracy of the predicted masses and fission barriers was improved significantly, the ability of the Droplet Model to account for isotope shifts in charge radii was retained, and the tendency of the Droplet Model to over-predict the surface-tension squeezing of light nuclei was rectified. 20 references, 4 figures

  3. Method for using magnetic particles in droplet microfluidics

    Shah, Gaurav Jitendra (Inventor); Kim, Chang-Jin (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Methods of utilizing magnetic particles or beads (MBs) in droplet-based (or digital) microfluidics are disclosed. The methods may be used in enrichment or separation processes. A first method employs the droplet meniscus to assist in the magnetic collection and positioning of MBs during droplet microfluidic operations. The sweeping movement of the meniscus lifts the MBs off the solid surface and frees them from various surface forces acting on the MBs. A second method uses chemical additives to reduce the adhesion of MBs to surfaces. Both methods allow the MBs on a solid surface to be effectively moved by magnetic force. Droplets may be driven by various methods or techniques including, for example, electrowetting, electrostatic, electromechanical, electrophoretic, dielectrophoretic, electroosmotic, thermocapillary, surface acoustic, and pressure.

  4. Analysis of ultrasonically rotating droplet using moving particle semi-implicit and distributed point source methods

    Wada, Yuji; Yuge, Kohei; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-07-01

    Numerical analysis of the rotation of an ultrasonically levitated droplet with a free surface boundary is discussed. The ultrasonically levitated droplet is often reported to rotate owing to the surface tangential component of acoustic radiation force. To observe the torque from an acoustic wave and clarify the mechanism underlying the phenomena, it is effective to take advantage of numerical simulation using the distributed point source method (DPSM) and moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method, both of which do not require a calculation grid or mesh. In this paper, the numerical treatment of the viscoacoustic torque, which emerges from the viscous boundary layer and governs the acoustical droplet rotation, is discussed. The Reynolds stress traction force is calculated from the DPSM result using the idea of effective normal particle velocity through the boundary layer and input to the MPS surface particles. A droplet levitated in an acoustic chamber is simulated using the proposed calculation method. The droplet is vertically supported by a plane standing wave from an ultrasonic driver and subjected to a rotating sound field excited by two acoustic sources on the side wall with different phases. The rotation of the droplet is successfully reproduced numerically and its acceleration is discussed and compared with those in the literature.

  5. Bioprinting: Functional droplet networks

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-06-01

    Tissue-mimicking printed networks of droplets separated by lipid bilayers that can be functionalized with membrane proteins are able to spontaneously fold and transmit electrical currents along predefined paths.

  6. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad2/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad2/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10−9 at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10−11 τ−1/2 up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance

  7. OCS in He droplets

    Grebenev, V.

    2000-06-01

    Phenomenon of superfluidity of para-hydrogen (pH{sub 2}){sub 1-17} and helium {sup 4}He{sub 1-7000} systems doped with an OCS chromophore molecule was investigated in this work. The study of such systems became possible after the development of the depletion spectroscopy technique in helium droplets. The droplets can be easily created and doped with up to 100 particles such as OCS, para-hydrogen or ortho-hydrogen molecules and {sup 4}He atoms. The measured infrared depletion spectra give the information about the temperature of the droplets and their aggregate state. The depletion spectrum of OCS in pure {sup 4}He droplets was comprehensively studied. The rovibrational OCS spectrum shows well resolved narrow lines. The spectrum is shifted to the red relative to the corresponding gas phase spectrum and the rotational constant of OCS in {sup 4}He droplet is three times smaller than that for free molecule. Different models of OCS rotation in the helium environment were discussed. It was shown that the shapes of the rovibrational lines are defined mainly by inhomogeneous broadening due to the droplet size distribution. The sub-rotational structure of the OCS rovibrational lines was revealed in microwave-infrared double resonance experiments. This structure arises due to the interaction of the OCS with the He environment. However, the information obtained in the experiments was not enough to understand the nature of this interaction. (orig.)

  8. Functions of the Coacervate Droplets

    Okihana, Hiroyuki; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1982-12-01

    Functions of coacervate droplets as protocells are studied by using synthetic polymers. The coacervate droplets were made from PVA-A and PVA-S. When glycine or diglycine were in the surrounding medium, the coacervate droplets concentrated them. The concentration of glycine in the coacervate droplets was higher than that of diglycine. When this mixture was irradiated by UV light, the coacervate droplets protected them from the photochemical decomposition.

  9. A mechanistic model for droplet deposition heat transfer in dispersed flow film boiling

    A mechanistic droplet deposition model has been developed to quantify the direct contact heat transfer present in dispersed flow film boiling. Lagrangian subscale trajectory calculations utilizing realistic velocity and temperature distributions in the momentum boundary layer are used to determine the number of dispersed droplets able to achieve contact with the heated wall. Coupling the droplet deposition model with a physical direct contact heat transfer coefficient model allows the total direct contact heat transfer to be determined based upon the local vapor mass flux, wall superheat, and vapor superheat. Comparisons to the existing models highlight the more mechanistic nature of the proposed model. (author)

  10. Dancing droplets: Chemical space, substrates, and control

    Cira, Nate; Benusiglio, Adrien; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    Previously we showed that droplets of propylene glycol and water display remarkable properties when placed on clean glass due to an interplay between surface tension and evaporation. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). We showed that these mechanisms apply to a range of two-component mixtures of miscible liquids where one component has both higher surface tension and higher vapor pressure on a variety of high energy surfaces. We now show how this rule can be cheated using a simple trick. We go on to demonstrate applications for cleaning, and show how this system works on substrates prepared only with sunlight. We finish by demonstrating active control of droplets, allowing access to a host of new possibilities.

  11. Vortex formation in coalescence of droplets with a reservoir using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Taherian, Fereshte; Marcon, Valentina; Bonaccurso, Elmar; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2016-10-01

    The flow patterns generated by the coalescence of aqueous ethanol droplets with a water reservoir are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The influence of surface tension gradient, which leads to the spreading of the droplet along the liquid-vapor interface of the reservoir, is studied by changing the ethanol concentration of the droplet. The internal circulation (vortex strength) of the droplet and the reservoir are analyzed separately. Simulation results reveal the formation of swirling flows within the droplet at early times when the radius of the coalescence neck due to the capillary forces increases rapidly with time. The vortex strength is found to be higher at lower concentrations of ethanol (higher liquid-vapor surface tension of the droplet), where the driving force for the contact line movement (capillary force) is stronger. The circulation diminishes by moving the center of mass of the droplet toward the reservoir. The lower surface tension of the droplet compared to the reservoir leads to surface tension gradient driven flow, which transports the droplet molecules along the liquid-vapor interface of the reservoir. Such a flow motion results in the generation of convective flows in the underlying water, which forms swirling flows within the reservoir. Therefore, the vortex strength of the reservoir is higher at higher ethanol concentrations of the droplet. The reservoir circulation decays to zero as soon as the ethanol concentration becomes homogeneous along the interface of the pool. The time evolution of circulation within the droplet and the reservoir are correlated with the center of mass motion of the droplet toward the surface, the time variation of the precursor film radius and the dynamic surface tension of the reservoir. PMID:27388133

  12. Multirelaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for droplet heating and evaporation under forced convection.

    Albernaz, Daniel; Do-Quang, Minh; Amberg, Gustav

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the evaporation of a droplet surrounded by superheated vapor with relative motion between phases. The evaporating droplet is a challenging process, as one must take into account the transport of mass, momentum, and heat. Here a lattice Boltzmann method is employed where phase change is controlled by a nonideal equation of state. First, numerical simulations are compared to the D(2) law for a vaporizing static droplet and good agreement is observed. Results are then presented for a droplet in a Lagrangian frame under a superheated vapor flow. Evaporation is described in terms of the temperature difference between liquid-vapor and the inertial forces. The internal liquid circulation driven by surface-shear stresses due to convection enhances the evaporation rate. Numerical simulations demonstrate that for higher Reynolds numbers, the dynamics of vaporization flux can be significantly affected, which may cause an oscillatory behavior on the droplet evaporation. The droplet-wake interaction and local mass flux are discussed in detail. PMID:25974585

  13. Study on interfacial stability and internal flow of a droplet levitated by ultrasonic wave.

    Abe, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Yuji; Hyuga, Daisuke; Awazu, Shigeru; Aoki, Kazuyoshi

    2009-04-01

    For a microgravity environment, new and high-quality material is expected to be manufactured. However, the effect of surface instability and the internal flow become significant when the droplet becomes large. Elucidation of internal flow and surface instability on a levitated droplet is required for the quality improvement of new material manufacturing in a microgravity environment. The objectives of this study are to clarify the interfacial stability and internal flow of a levitated droplet. Surface instability and internal flow are investigated with a large droplet levitated by the ultrasonic acoustic standing wave. The experiment with a large droplet is conducted both under normal gravity and microgravity environments. In the experiment, at first, the characteristics of the levitated droplet are investigated; that is, the relationships among the levitated droplet diameter, the droplet aspect ratio, the displacement of the antinode of the standing wave, and the sound pressure are experimentally measured. As a result, it is clarified that the levitated droplet tends to be located at an optimal position with an optimal shape and diameter. Second, the border condition between the stable and the unstable levitation of the droplet is evaluated by using the existing stability theory. The experimental results qualitatively agree with the theory. It is suggested that the stability of the droplet can be evaluated with the stability theory. Finally, multidimensional visual measurement is conducted to investigate the internal flow structure in a levitated droplet. It is suggested that complex flow with the vortex is generated in the levitated droplet. Moreover, the effect of physical properties of the test fluid on the internal flow structure of the levitated droplet is investigated. As a result, the internal flow structure of the levitated droplet is affected by the surface tension and viscosity. PMID:19426319

  14. Droplet formation and growth inside a polymer network: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Jung, Jiyun; Jang, Eunseon; Shoaib, Mahbubul Alam; Jo, Kyubong; Kim, Jun Soo

    2016-04-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation study that focuses on the formation and growth of nanoscale droplets inside polymer networks. Droplet formation and growth are investigated by the liquid-vapor phase separation of a dilute Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid inside regularly crosslinked, polymer networks with varying mesh sizes. In a polymer network with small mesh sizes, droplet formation can be suppressed, the extent of which is dependent on the attraction strength between the LJ particles. When droplets form in a polymer network with intermediate mesh sizes, subsequent growth is significantly slower when compared with that in bulk without a polymer network. Interestingly, droplet growth beyond the initial nucleation stage occurs by different mechanisms depending on the mesh size: droplets grow mainly by diffusion and coalescence inside polymer networks with large mesh sizes (as observed in bulk), whereas Ostwald ripening becomes a more dominant mechanism for droplet growth for small mesh sizes. The analysis of droplet trajectories clearly reveals the obstruction effect of the polymer network on the movement of growing droplets, which leads to Ostwald ripening of droplets. This study suggests how polymer networks can be used to control the growth of nanoscale droplets.

  15. Nematic droplets on fibers.

    Batista, V M O; Silvestre, N M; Telo da Gama, M M

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of new techniques for the fabrication of nematic droplets with nontrivial topology provides new routes for the assembly of responsive devices. Here we explore some of the properties of nematic droplets on fibers, which constitute the basic units of a type of device that is able to respond to external stimuli, including the detection of gases. We perform a numerical study of spherical nematic droplets on fibers. We analyze the equilibrium textures for homogeneous and hybrid boundary conditions and find that in some cases the nematic avoids the nucleation of topological defects, which would provide a different optical response. We consider in detail a homeotropic nematic droplet wrapped around a fiber with planar anchoring. We investigate the effect of an electric field on the texture of this droplet. In the presence of a dc field, the system undergoes an orientational transition above a given threshold E(c), for which a ring defect is transformed into a figure-eight defect. We also consider ac fields, at high and low frequencies, and find that the textures are similar to those observed for static fields, in contrast with recently reported experiments. PMID:26764711

  16. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J; Døssing, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple model of a multi-quark droplet evolution based on the hydrodynamical description. This model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical model. We have considered evolution of baryon-free droplets which have different initial temperatures and expansion rates. As a typical trend we observe an oscillating behavior of the droplet radius superimposed with a gradual shrinkage due to the hadron emission. The characteristic life time of droplets with radii 1.5-2 fm are about 9-16 fm/c.

  17. A mixing and deformation mechanism for a supercritical fuel droplet

    Lee, H.S.; Fernandez-Pello, A.C.; Corcos, G.M.; Oppenheim, A.K. (Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US))

    1990-07-01

    A model is developed of the dispersion of a vapor fuel droplet that is suddenly set in motion in a gaseous environment that has a density similar to that of the fuel vapor. The objective of the analysis is to describe the mixing and deformation process encountered by a supercritically preheated fuel droplet that is suddenly injected in a gaseous environment that is well above the thermodynamic critical temperature and pressure of the fuel. The initial droplet injection process is modeled by instantaneously creating a potential flow around a moving spherical gaseous droplet, i.e., initially imposing a harmonic vortex sheet at the droplet surface. In the analysis, the transient, axisymmetric, stream function- vorticity and species equations are solved to determine the evolution of the vorticity distribution, species mixing, and the distortion of the initial interface. A time series expansion solution is developed for small times, and a fully numerical procedure is used to extend it to longer times. Specific results are obtained for Reynolds numbers of 50 and 200.

  18. Chip-based droplet sorting

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  19. Chip-based droplet sorting

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  20. Analysis of effect of flameholder characteristics on lean, premixed, partially vaporized fuel-air mixtures quality and nitrogen oxides emissions

    Cooper, L. P.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis was conducted of the effect of flameholding devices on the precombustion fuel-air characteristics and on oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for combustion of premixed partially vaporized mixtures. The analysis includes the interrelationships of flameholder droplet collection efficiency, reatomization efficiency and blockage, and the initial droplet size distribution and accounts for the contribution of droplet combustion in partially vaporized mixtures to NOx emissions. Application of the analytical procedures is illustrated and parametric predictions of NOx emissions are presented.

  1. Cloud droplet activation: solubility revisited

    L. T. Padró

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Soluble compounds present in atmospheric aerosol facilitate their transformation into cloud droplets by depressing the equilibrium vapor pressure required for activation. Their impact depends on the amount of dissolved substance in the aerosol aqueous phase, which in turn is controlled by its solubility. This study explores the impact of particle curvature on solubility, expressed in terms of a Kelvin enhancement. The augmented solubility, termed "Curvature Enhanced Solubility" (CES, is then introduced into Köhler theory for assessment of its impact on CCN activity for several organic compounds with a wide range of aqueous solubility. The interfacial energy between solute and aqueous phase required for quantification of CES is determined from existing correlations based on bulk solubility, and concurrent measurements of contact angle and surface tension. A number of important findings arise from this study: i CES can substantially increase solubility and impact CCN activity but only if the aerosol is initially wet, ii CES can stabilize highly supersaturated solutions, and provide a mechanism for retention of an aerosol aqueous phase even at very low relative humidity (RH, and, iii trace amounts of surfactant impurities can magnify the impact of CES.

  2. Sessile nanofluid droplet drying.

    Zhong, Xin; Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2015-03-01

    Nanofluid droplet evaporation has gained much audience nowadays due to its wide applications in painting, coating, surface patterning, particle deposition, etc. This paper reviews the drying progress and deposition formation from the evaporative sessile droplets with the suspended insoluble solutes, especially nanoparticles. The main content covers the evaporation fundamental, the particle self-assembly, and deposition patterns in sessile nanofluid droplet. Both experimental and theoretical studies are presented. The effects of the type, concentration and size of nanoparticles on the spreading and evaporative dynamics are elucidated at first, serving the basis for the understanding of particle motion and deposition process which are introduced afterward. Stressing on particle assembly and production of desirable residue patterns, we express abundant experimental interventions, various types of deposits, and the effects on nanoparticle deposition. The review ends with the introduction of theoretical investigations, including the Navier-Stokes equations in terms of solutions, the Diffusion Limited Aggregation approach, the Kinetic Monte Carlo method, and the Dynamical Density Functional Theory. Nanoparticles have shown great influences in spreading, evaporation rate, evaporation regime, fluid flow and pattern formation of sessile droplets. Under different experimental conditions, various deposition patterns can be formed. The existing theoretical approaches are able to predict fluid dynamics, particle motion and deposition patterns in the particular cases. On the basis of further understanding of the effects of fluid dynamics and particle motion, the desirable patterns can be obtained with appropriate experimental regulations. PMID:25578408

  3. Butschli Dynamic Droplet System

    Armstrong, R.; Hanczyc, M.

    2013-01-01

    a technology with living properties. Otto Butschli first described the system in 1898, when he used alkaline water droplets in olive oil to initiate a saponification reaction. This simple recipe produced structures that moved and exhibited characteristics that resembled, at least superficially, the...

  4. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Døssing, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple model of a multi-quark droplet evolution based on the hydrodynamical description. This model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical...

  5. Communication Acoustics

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  6. Polarimetric Retrievals of Cloud Droplet Number Concentrations

    Sinclair, K.; Cairns, B.; Hair, J. W.; Hu, Y.; Hostetler, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) is one of the most significant microphysical properties of liquid clouds and is essential for the understanding of aerosol-cloud interaction. It impacts radiative forcing, cloud evolution, precipitation, global climate and, through observation, can be used to monitor the cloud albedo effect, or the first indirect effect. The IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report continues to consider aerosol-cloud interactions as one of the largest uncertainties in radiative forcing of climate. The SABOR experiment, which was a NASA-led ship and air campaign off the east coast of the United States during July and August of 2014, provided an opportunity for the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) to develop and cross-validate a new approach of sensing CDNC with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The RSP is an airborne prototype of the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS) that was on-board the Glory satellite. It is a scanning sensor that provides high-precision measurements of polarized and full-intensity radiances at multiple angles over a wide spectral range. The distinctive feature of the polarimetric technique is that it does not make any assumption of the liquid water profile within the cloud. The approach involves (1) estimating the droplet size distribution from polarized reflectance observations in the rainbow, (2) using polarized reflectance to estimate above cloud water vapor and total reflectance to find how much near infra-red light is being absorbed in clouds, (3) finding cloud physical thickness from the absorption and cloud top pressure retrievals assuming a saturated mixing ratio for water vapor and (4) determining the cloud droplet number concentration from the physical thickness and droplet size distribution retrievals. An overview of the polarimetric technique will be presented along with the results of applying the new approach to SABOR campaign data. An analysis of the algorithm's performance when compared with the HSRL

  7. Archimedes Mass Filter Vaporizer

    Putvinski, S.; Agnew, A. F.; Cluggish, B. P.; Ohkawa, T.; Sevier, L.; Umstadter, K. R.; Dresvin, S. V.; Kuteev, B. V.; Feygenson, O. N.; Ivanov, D. V.; Zverev, S. G.; Miroshnikov, I. V.; Egorov, S. M.; Kiesewetter, D. V.; Maliugin, V. I.

    2001-10-01

    Archimedes Technology Group, Inc., is developing a plasma mass separator called the Archimedes Filter that separates waste oxide mixtures ion by ion into two mass groups: light and heavy. Since high-level waste at Hanford has 99.9its radioactivity associated with heavy elements, the Archimedes Filter can effectively decontaminate over three-quarters of that waste. The Filter process involves some preprocessing followed by volatilization and separation by the magnetic and electric fields of the main plasma. This presentation describes the approach to volatilization of the waste oxy-hydroxide mixture by means of a very high heat flux (q > 10 MW/m2). Such a high heat flux is required to ensure congruent evaporation of the complex oxy-hydroxide mixture and is achieved by injection of small droplets of molten waste into an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch. This presentation further addresses different issues related to evaporation of the waste including modeling of droplet evaporation, estimates of parameters of plasma torch, and 2D modeling of the plasma. The experimental test bed for oxide vaporization and results of the initial experiments on oxide evaporation in 60 kW ICP torch will also be described.

  8. Acoustic Neuroma

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  9. Acoustic Neuroma

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

  10. Control of Nanomaterial Self-Assembly in Ultrasonically Levitated Droplets

    Seddon, Annela M.; Richardson, Sam J.; Rastogi, Kunal; Plivelic, Tomás S.; Squires, Adam M.; Pfrang, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic trapping can be used to levitate andmanipulate droplets of soft matter, in particular, lyotropic mesophases formed from selfassembly of different surfactants and lipids, which can be analyzed in a contact-less manner by X-ray scattering in a controlled gas-phase environment. On the macroscopic length scale, the dimensions and the orientation of the particle are shaped by the ultrasonic field, while on the microscopic length scale the nanostructure can be controlle...

  11. Single droplet drying step characterization in microsphere preparation.

    Al Zaitone, Belal; Lamprecht, Alf

    2013-05-01

    Spray drying processes are difficult to characterize since process parameters are not directly accessible. Acoustic levitation was used to investigate microencapsulation by spray drying on one single droplet facilitating the analyses of droplet behavior upon drying. Process parameters were simulated on a poly(lactide-co-glycolide)/ethyl acetate combination for microencapsulation. The results allowed quantifying the influence of process parameters such as temperature (0-40°C), polymer concentration (5-400 mg/ml), and droplet size (0.5-1.37 μl) on the drying time and drying kinetics as well as the particle morphology. The drying of polymer solutions at temperature of 21°C and concentration of 5 mg/ml, shows that the dimensionless particle diameter (Dp/D0) approaches 0.25 and the particle needs 350 s to dry. At 400 mg/ml, Dp/D0=0.8 and the drying time increases to one order of magnitude and a hollow particle is formed. The study demonstrates the benefit of using the acoustic levitator as a lab scale method to characterize and study the microparticle formation. This method can be considered as a helpful tool to mimic the full scale spray drying process by providing identical operational parameters such as air velocity, temperature, and variable droplet sizes. PMID:23395666

  12. Droplets and sprays

    Sazhin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Providing a clear and systematic description of droplets and spray dynamic models, this book maximises reader insight into the underlying physics of the processes involved, outlines the development of new physical and mathematical models, and broadens understanding of interactions between the complex physical processes which take place in sprays. Complementing approaches based on the direct application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), Droplets and Sprays treats both theoretical and practical aspects of internal combustion engine process such as the direct injection of liquid fuel, subcritical heating and evaporation. Includes case studies that illustrate the approaches relevance to automotive applications,  it is also anticipated that the described models can find use in other areas such as in medicine and environmental science.

  13. Electrochemical measurements on a droplet using gold microelectrodes

    Jenabi, Amin; Souri, Asma; Rastkhadiv, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Facile methods of ion recognition are important for the fabrication of electronic tongue systems. In this work, we demonstrate performing pulsed conductometry on microliter electrolyte droplets dropped on gold microelectrodes vapor deposited on soda lime glass slides. A droplet is dropped between two microelectrodes when a voltage waveform from a preprogramed power supply is applied on them. The temporal variation of the electric current passing through the droplet is recorded, digitized and stored. The obtained data are compared with the database formed out of the previous experiences for the classification of the sample electrolytes. It is shown that the shape of the voltage waveform is the important parameter of the process. We devised a method for the optimization of the voltage waveform profile for obtaining the maximum of discriminating information from the recorded current variations.

  14. Stability of thin liquid films and sessile droplets under confinement.

    Dörfler, Fabian; Rauscher, Markus; Dietrich, S

    2013-07-01

    The stability of nonvolatile thin liquid films and of sessile droplets is strongly affected by finite size effects. We analyze their stability within the framework of density functional theory using the sharp kink approximation, i.e., on the basis of an effective interface Hamiltonian. We show that finite size effects suppress spinodal dewetting of films because it is driven by a long-wavelength instability. Therefore nonvolatile films are stable if the substrate area is too small. Similarly, nonvolatile droplets connected to a wetting film become unstable if the substrate area is too large. This instability of a nonvolatile sessile droplet turns out to be equivalent to the instability of a volatile drop which can attain chemical equilibrium with its vapor. PMID:23944464

  15. High-speed camera observation of multi-component droplet coagulation in an ultrasonic standing wave field

    Reißenweber, Marina; Krempel, Sandro; Lindner, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    With an acoustic levitator small particles can be aggregated near the nodes of a standing pressure field. Furthermore it is possible to atomize liquids on a vibrating surface. We used a combination of both mechanisms and atomized several liquids simultaneously, consecutively and emulsified in the ultrasonic field. Using a high-speed camera we observed the coagulation of the spray droplets into single large levitated droplets resolved in space and time. In case of subsequent atomization of two components the spray droplets of the second component were deposited on the surface of the previously coagulated droplet of the first component without mixing.

  16. Hovering UFO Droplets

    Anand, Sushant; Dhiman, Rajeev; Smith, J David; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2012-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video is an entry for the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 65th Annual Meeting of the APS-DFD. This video shows behavior of condensing droplets on a lubricant impregnated surface and a comparison with a superhydrophobic surface. On impregnated surfaces, drops appear like UFOs hovering over a surface. The videos were recorded in an Environmental SEM and a specially built condensation rig.

  17. Diffusive and radiative effects on vaporization times of drops in film boiling

    Baumeister, K. J.; Choessow, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    Diffusive and radiative effects are incorporated into an analysis for the vaporization time of drops in film boiling. The momentum, energy, and continuity equations are solved with some appropriate simplifications so as to obtain a simple closed form solution for the overall film boiling heat transfer coefficient. Next, a theoretical expression for the droplet vaporization time is developed and compared to the measured vaporization times of water droplets vaporizing into air, argon, nitrogen, and helium. The agreement between experiment and theory is good. Under the helium blanket, the diffusive evaporative component is significant in comparison to the film boiling component.

  18. Numerical Investigation of the Water Droplet Transport in a PEM Fuel Cell with Serpentine Flow Channel

    Bittagopal Mondal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The serpentine flow channel can be considered as one of the most common and practical channel layouts for a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC since it ensures an effective and efficient removal of water produced in a cell with acceptable parasitic load. Water management is one of the key issues to improve the cell performance since at low operating temperatures in PEMFC, water vapor condensation starts easily and accumulates the liquid water droplet within the flow channels, thus affecting the chemical reactions and reducing the fuel cell performance. In this article, a comprehensive three dimensional numerical simulation is carried out to understand the water droplet mobility in a serpentine gas flow channel for a wide range of surface properties, inlet air velocities, droplet positions (center or off-center, bottom or top and droplet sizes by deploying a finite volume based methodology. The liquid-gas interface is tracked following the volume-of-fluid (VOF method. The droplet transport is found to be greatly influenced by the surface wettability properties, inlet velocities, number of droplets emerged and initial droplet positions. Super hydrophobic surface property is not always preferable for designing the gas flow channels. It depends upon the inlet velocity conditions, droplet positions, number of droplets and surface properties.

  19. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  20. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    Chen Huanyang [School of Physical Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215006 (China); Chan, C T, E-mail: kenyon@ust.h, E-mail: phchan@ust.h [Department of Physics and the William Mong Institute of NanoScience and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong)

    2010-03-24

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  1. Rapidly pulsed helium droplet source

    Pentlehner, Dominik; Riechers, Ricarda; Dick, Bernhard; Slenczka, Alkwin [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, University of Regensburg, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Even, Uzi; Lavie, Nachum; Brown, Raviv; Luria, Kfir [Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2009-04-15

    A pulsed valve connected to a closed-cycle cryostat was optimized for producing helium droplets. The pulsed droplet beam appeared with a bimodal size distribution. The leading part of the pulse consists of droplets suitable for doping with molecules. The average size of this part can be varied between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} helium atoms, and the width of the distribution is smaller as compared to a continuous-flow droplet source. The system has been tested in a single pulse mode and at repetition rates of up to 500 Hz with almost constant intensity. The droplet density was found to be increased by more than an order of magnitude as compared to a continuous-flow droplet source.

  2. Explosive Breakup of a Water Droplet with a Nontransparent Solid Inclusion Heated in a High-Temperature Gaseous Medium

    Dmitrienko Margarita A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the evaporation of a water droplet with a comparably sized solid nontransparent inclusion in a high-temperature (500–800 K gas medium. Water evaporates from the free surface of the inclusion. During this process, intensive vapor formation occurs on the inner interface “water droplet – solid inclusion” with the subsequent explosive decay of the droplet. Experiments have been conducted using high-speed (up to 105 fps video cameras “Phantom” and software “Phantom Camera Control”. The conditions of the explosive vapor formation of the heterogeneous water droplet were found. The typical phase change mechanisms of the heterogeneous water droplet under the conditions of intensive heat exchange were determined.

  3. Mixing and deformation mechanism for a supercritical fuel droplet. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    Lee, H.S.; Fernandez-Pello, A.C.; Corcos, G.M.; Oppenheim, A.K.

    1990-12-31

    A model is developed of the dispersion of a vapor fuel droplet that is suddenly set in motion in a gaseous environment that has a density similar to that of the fuel vapor. The objective of the analysis is to describe the mixing and deformation process encountered by a supercritically preheated fuel droplet that is suddenly injected in a gaseous environment that is well above the thermodynamic critical temperature and pressure of the fuel. The initial droplet injection process is modeled by instantaneously creating a potential flow around a moving spherical gaseous droplet, i.e., initially imposing a harmonic vortex sheet at the droplet surface. In the analysis, the transient, axisymmetric, stream function vorticity and species equations are solved to determine the evolution of the vorticity distribution, species mixing, and the distortion of the initial interface. A time series expansion solution is developed for small times, and a fully numerical procedure is used to extend it to longer time. Specific results are obtained for Reynolds numbers of 50 and 200. They show that the initially spherical gaseous fuel droplet is extensively distorted, adopting a mushroom-like shape. This is caused by the evolution of the vorticity distribution that tends to form a ring vortex. It is also shown that the vapor mixing process is greatly enhanced around the vortex ring. These effects are stronger for the higher Reynolds number.

  4. Gas-phase ions of solute species from charged droplets of solutions.

    Nguyen, Steve; Fenn, John B

    2007-01-23

    Charged droplets, produced by electrostatic dispersion of solutions of amino acids and peptides are driven by a potential difference a countercurrent to a flow of heated nitrogen bath gas. Evaporation of solvent from those droplets increases surface charge density, resulting in subdivision into smaller charged droplets. Each smaller droplet repeats that sequence until the ultimate result is a dispersion of solvent-free solute ions in the bath gas. Surprisingly, mass spectrometric analyses of the final ion-bath gas mixtures showed that the relative abundances of the desolvated ions were substantially higher when the nitrogen bath gas contained vapor of a polar solvent species than when no such solvent vapor was present. Adding solvent vapor to the background bath gas can certainly not increase, but must decrease, the net rate of solvent evaporation from the charged droplets. Consequently, the observed enhancement of ion formation by the presence of solvent vapor in the bath gas constitutes persuasive evidence that the observed solute ions cannot have been produced by the charged residue mechanism originally suggested by Dole et al. [Dole M, et al. (1968) J Chem Phys 49:2240-2249 and Dole M, Rheude A, Mack LL (1970) J Chem Phys 52:4977-4986]. It is therefore concluded that electrospray ions are most likely produced by the ion evaporation mechanism of Iribarne and Thomson [Iribarne JV, Thomson BA (1975) J Chem Phys 64:2287-2294]. Moreover, and probably as important, this observed signal enhancement constitutes a welcome increase in detection sensitivity. PMID:17213314

  5. Continuous growth of cloud droplets in cumulus cloud

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Suehiro, Tamotsu; Saito, Izumi

    2016-04-01

    A new method to seamlessly simulate the continuous growth of droplets advected by turbulent flow inside a cumulus cloud was developed from first principle. A cubic box ascending with a mean updraft inside a cumulus cloud was introduced and the updraft velocity was self-consistently determined in such a way that the mean turbulent velocity within the box vanished. All the degrees of freedom of the cloud droplets and turbulence fields were numerically integrated. The box ascended quickly inside the cumulus cloud due to the updraft and the mean radius of the droplets grew from 10 to 24 μm for about 10 min. The turbulent flow tended to slow down the time evolutions of the updraft velocity, the box altitude and the mean cloud droplet radius. The size distribution of the cloud droplets in the updraft case was narrower than in the absence of the updraft. It was also found that the wavenumeber spectra of the variances of the temperature and water vapor mixing ratio were nearly constant in the low wavenumber range. The future development of the new method was argued.

  6. The liquid to vapor phase transition in excited nuclei

    Elliott, J.B.; Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Beaulieu, L.; Breuer, H.; Korteling, R.G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lefort, T.; Pienkowski, L.; Ruangma, A.; Viola, V.E.; Yennello, S.J.

    2001-05-08

    For many years it has been speculated that excited nuclei would undergo a liquid to vapor phase transition. For even longer, it has been known that clusterization in a vapor carries direct information on the liquid-vapor equilibrium according to Fisher's droplet model. Now the thermal component of the 8 GeV/c pion + 197 Au multifragmentation data of the ISiS Collaboration is shown to follow the scaling predicted by Fisher's model, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of the liquid to vapor phase transition.

  7. Uranium droplet core nuclear rocket

    Anghaie, Samim

    1991-01-01

    Uranium droplet nuclear rocket is conceptually designed to utilize the broad temperature range ofthe liquid phase of metallic uranium in droplet configuration which maximizes the energy transfer area per unit fuel volume. In a baseline system dissociated hydrogen at 100 bar is heated to 6000 K, providing 2000 second of Isp. Fission fragments and intense radian field enhance the dissociation of molecular hydrogen beyond the equilibrium thermodynamic level. Uranium droplets in the core are confined and separated by an axisymmetric vortex flow generated by high velocity tangential injection of hydrogen in the mid-core regions. Droplet uranium flow to the core is controlled and adjusted by a twin flow nozzle injection system.

  8. Acoustical Imaging

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  9. Method And Apparatus For Atomizing And Vaporizing Liquid

    Lal, Amit

    2014-09-18

    A method and apparatus for atomizing and vaporizing liquid is described. An apparatus having an ejector configured to eject one or more droplets of liquid may be inserted into a reservoir containing liquid. The ejector may have a vibrating device that vibrates the ejector and causes liquid to move from the reservoir up through the ejector and out through an orifice located on the top of the ejector. The one or more droplets of liquid ejected from the ejector may be heated and vaporized into the air.

  10. Acoustic interaction forces between small particles in an ideal fluid

    Silva, Glauber T

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical expression for the acoustic interaction force between small spherical particles suspended in an ideal fluid exposed to an external acoustic wave. The acoustic interaction force is the part of the acoustic radiation force on one given particle involving the scattered waves from the other particles. The particles, either compressible liquid droplets or elastic microspheres, are considered to be much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. In this so-called Rayleigh limit, the acoustic interaction forces between the particles are well approximated by gradients of pair-interaction potentials with no restriction on the inter-particle distance. The theory is applied to studies of the acoustic interaction force on a particle suspension in either standing or traveling plane waves. The results show aggregation regions along the wave propagation direction, while particles may attract or repel each other in the transverse direction. In addition, a mean-field approximation is developed to describe ...

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations for the motion of evaporative droplets driven by thermal gradients along nanochannels

    Wu, Congmin

    2013-04-04

    For a one-component fluid on a solid substrate, a thermal singularity may occur at the contact line where the liquid-vapor interface intersects the solid surface. Physically, the liquid-vapor interface is almost isothermal at the liquid-vapor coexistence temperature in one-component fluids while the solid surface is almost isothermal for solids of high thermal conductivity. Therefore, a temperature discontinuity is formed if the two isothermal interfaces are of different temperatures and intersect at the contact line. This leads to the so-called thermal singularity. The localized hydrodynamics involving evaporation/condensation near the contact line leads to a contact angle depending on the underlying substrate temperature. This dependence has been shown to lead to the motion of liquid droplets on solid substrates with thermal gradients (Xu and Qian 2012 Phys. Rev. E 85 061603). In the present work, we carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as numerical experiments to further confirm the predictions made from our previous continuum hydrodynamic modeling and simulations, which are actually semi-quantitatively accurate down to the small length scales in the problem. Using MD simulations, we investigate the motion of evaporative droplets in one-component Lennard-Jones fluids confined in nanochannels with thermal gradients. The droplet is found to migrate in the direction of decreasing temperature of solid walls, with a migration velocity linearly proportional to the temperature gradient. This agrees with the prediction of our continuum model. We then measure the effect of droplet size on the droplet motion. It is found that the droplet mobility is inversely proportional to a dimensionless coefficient associated with the total rate of dissipation due to droplet movement. Our results show that this coefficient is of order unity and increases with the droplet size for the small droplets (∼10 nm) simulated in the present work. These findings are in semi

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations for the motion of evaporative droplets driven by thermal gradients along nanochannels.

    Wu, Congmin; Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2013-05-15

    For a one-component fluid on a solid substrate, a thermal singularity may occur at the contact line where the liquid-vapor interface intersects the solid surface. Physically, the liquid-vapor interface is almost isothermal at the liquid-vapor coexistence temperature in one-component fluids while the solid surface is almost isothermal for solids of high thermal conductivity. Therefore, a temperature discontinuity is formed if the two isothermal interfaces are of different temperatures and intersect at the contact line. This leads to the so-called thermal singularity. The localized hydrodynamics involving evaporation/condensation near the contact line leads to a contact angle depending on the underlying substrate temperature. This dependence has been shown to lead to the motion of liquid droplets on solid substrates with thermal gradients (Xu and Qian 2012 Phys. Rev. E 85 061603). In the present work, we carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as numerical experiments to further confirm the predictions made from our previous continuum hydrodynamic modeling and simulations, which are actually semi-quantitatively accurate down to the small length scales in the problem. Using MD simulations, we investigate the motion of evaporative droplets in one-component Lennard-Jones fluids confined in nanochannels with thermal gradients. The droplet is found to migrate in the direction of decreasing temperature of solid walls, with a migration velocity linearly proportional to the temperature gradient. This agrees with the prediction of our continuum model. We then measure the effect of droplet size on the droplet motion. It is found that the droplet mobility is inversely proportional to a dimensionless coefficient associated with the total rate of dissipation due to droplet movement. Our results show that this coefficient is of order unity and increases with the droplet size for the small droplets (~10 nm) simulated in the present work. These findings are in semi

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations for the motion of evaporative droplets driven by thermal gradients along nanochannels

    For a one-component fluid on a solid substrate, a thermal singularity may occur at the contact line where the liquid–vapor interface intersects the solid surface. Physically, the liquid–vapor interface is almost isothermal at the liquid–vapor coexistence temperature in one-component fluids while the solid surface is almost isothermal for solids of high thermal conductivity. Therefore, a temperature discontinuity is formed if the two isothermal interfaces are of different temperatures and intersect at the contact line. This leads to the so-called thermal singularity. The localized hydrodynamics involving evaporation/condensation near the contact line leads to a contact angle depending on the underlying substrate temperature. This dependence has been shown to lead to the motion of liquid droplets on solid substrates with thermal gradients (Xu and Qian 2012 Phys. Rev. E 85 061603). In the present work, we carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as numerical experiments to further confirm the predictions made from our previous continuum hydrodynamic modeling and simulations, which are actually semi-quantitatively accurate down to the small length scales in the problem. Using MD simulations, we investigate the motion of evaporative droplets in one-component Lennard-Jones fluids confined in nanochannels with thermal gradients. The droplet is found to migrate in the direction of decreasing temperature of solid walls, with a migration velocity linearly proportional to the temperature gradient. This agrees with the prediction of our continuum model. We then measure the effect of droplet size on the droplet motion. It is found that the droplet mobility is inversely proportional to a dimensionless coefficient associated with the total rate of dissipation due to droplet movement. Our results show that this coefficient is of order unity and increases with the droplet size for the small droplets (∼10 nm) simulated in the present work. These findings are in semi

  14. Radiation acoustics

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  15. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Teplitsky, Ella [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  16. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF NEAR-WALL FLOWS OF TWO-PHASE MIXTURE WITH EVAPORATING DROPLETS

    WANG Bo-yi(王柏懿); A.N.Osiptsov

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of the two-continuum approach, using the matched asymptotic expansion method, the equations of a laminar boundary layer in mist flows with evaporating droplets were derived and solved. The similarity criteria controlling the mist flows were determined. For the flow along a curvilinear surface, the forms of the boundary layer equations differ from the regimes of presence and absence of the droplet inertia deposition.The numerical results were presented for the vapor-droplet boundary layer in the neighborhood of a stagnation point of a hot blunt body. It is demonstrated that, due to evaporation, a droplet-free region develops near the wall inside the boundary layer. On the upper edge of this region, the droplet radius tends to zero and the droplet number density becomes much higher than that in the free stream. The combined effect of the droplet evaporation and accumulation results in a significant enhancement of the heat transfer on the surface even for small mass concentration of the droplets in the free stream.

  17. Lossless droplet transfer of droplet-based microfluidic analysis

    Kelly, Ryan T; Tang, Keqi; Page, Jason S; Smith, Richard D

    2011-11-22

    A transfer structure for droplet-based microfluidic analysis is characterized by a first conduit containing a first stream having at least one immiscible droplet of aqueous material and a second conduit containing a second stream comprising an aqueous fluid. The interface between the first conduit and the second conduit can define a plurality of apertures, wherein the apertures are sized to prevent exchange of the first and second streams between conduits while allowing lossless transfer of droplets from the first conduit to the second conduit through contact between the first and second streams.

  18. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics. PMID:26486337

  19. Droplet resonator based optofluidic microlasers

    Kiraz, Alper; Jonáš, Alexandr; Aas, Mehdi; Karadag, Yasin; Brzobohatý, Oto; Ježek, Jan; Pilát, Zdeněk.; Zemánek, Pavel; Anand, Suman; McGloin, David

    2014-03-01

    We introduce tunable optofluidic microlasers based on active optical resonant cavities formed by optically stretched, dye-doped emulsion droplets confined in a dual-beam optical trap. To achieve tunable dye lasing, optically pumped droplets of oil dispersed in water are stretched by light in the dual-beam trap. Subsequently, resonant path lengths of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) propagating in the droplet are modified, leading to shifts in the microlaser emission wavelengths. We also report lasing in airborne, Rhodamine B-doped glycerolwater droplets which were localized using optical tweezers. While being trapped near the focal point of an infrared laser, the droplets were pumped with a Q-switched green laser. Furthermore, biological lasing in droplets supported by a superhydrophobic surface is demonstrated using a solution of Venus variant of the yellow fluorescent protein or E. Coli bacterial cells expressing stably the Venus protein. Our results may lead to new ways of probing airborne particles, exploiting the high sensitivity of stimulated emission to small perturbations in the droplet laser cavity and the gain medium.

  20. Interactions of multiphase hydrodynamics, droplet evaporation, and chemical kinetics in FCC riser reactors.

    Chang, S. L.

    1998-02-17

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code, ICRKFLO, has been developed for flow simulation of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) riser reactors, which convert crude oil into gasoline and other valuable products. The FCC flow, especially in the entry region, is a three-phase reacting flow including hot catalyst particles, inert lift gas, and feed oil droplets. The impact of the hydrodynamics processes of heat transfer, droplet evaporation, and mixing on the chemical kinetics or riser performance can be significant. ICRKFLO was used to evaluate the impact of these processes on the performance of an advanced FCC unit. The code solves for major flow properties of all three phases in an FCC riser, with models governing the transport of catalyst particles and feed oil droplet, the vaporization of the feed oil droplets, the cracking of the oil vapor, and the formation and deposition of coke on particles. First, the code was validated against available test data of a pilot-scale FCC unit. Then, flow calculations for the FCC unit were performed. Computational results indicate that the heat transfer and droplet vaporization processes have a significant impact on the performance of a pilot-scale FCC unit. The impact is expected to be even greater on commercial scale units.

  1. Orbiting pairs of walking droplets

    Siefert, Emmanuel; Bush, John W. M.; Oza, Anand

    2015-11-01

    Droplets may self-propel on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath, pushed forward by their own Faraday pilot-wave field. We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the interaction of pairs of such droplets. Particular attention is given to characterizing the system's dependence on the vibrational forcing of the bath and the impact parameter of the walking droplets. Observed criteria for the capture and stability of orbital pairs are rationalized by accompanying theoretical developments. Thanks to the NSF.

  2. Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator

    Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. Water droplets having diameters greater than 1 mm have been levitated against the force of gravity using; less than 1 W of input electrical power. Concentration of aerosol particles in air is also demonstrated.

  3. Hydrodynamic and acoustic analysis in 3-D of a section of main steam line to EPU conditions; Analisis hidrodinamico y acustico en 3D de una seccion de linea de vapor principal a condiciones de EPU

    Centeno P, J.; Castillo J, V.; Espinosa P, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Nunez C, A.; Polo L, M. A., E-mail: baldepeor21@hotmail.com [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose Ma. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The objective of this word is to study the hydrodynamic and acoustic phenomenon in the main steam lines (MSLs). For this study was considered the specific case of a pipe section of the MSL, where is located the standpipe of the pressure and/or safety relief valve (SRV). In the SRV cavities originates a phenomenon known as whistling that generates a hydrodynamic disturbance of acoustic pressure waves with different tones depending of the reactor operation conditions. In the SRV cavities the propagation velocity of the wave can originate mechanical damage in the structure of the steam dryer and on free parts. The importance of studying this phenomenon resides in the safety of the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel. To dissipate the energy of the pressure wave, acoustic side branches (ASBs) are used on the standpipe of the SRVs. The ASBs are arrangements of compacted lattices similar to a porous medium, where the energy of the whistling phenomenon is dissipate and therefore the acoustic pressure load that impacts in particular to the steam dryers, and in general to the interns of the vessel, diminishes. For the analysis of the whistling phenomenon two three-dimensional (3-D) models were built, one hydrodynamic in stationary state and other acoustic for the harmonic times in transitory regimen, in which were applied techniques of Computational Fluid Dynamics. The study includes the reactor operation analysis under conditions of extended power up rate (EPU) with ASB and without ASB. The obtained results of the gauges simulated in the MSL without ASB and with ASB, show that tones with values of acoustic pressure are presented in frequency ranges between 160 and 200 Hz around 12 MPa and of 7 MPa, respectively. This attenuation of tones implies the decrease of the acoustic loads in the steam dryer and in the interns of the vessel that are designed to support pressures not more to 7.5 MPa approximately. With the above-mentioned is possible to protect the steam dryer

  4. Vapor extractor

    Bronder, G.A.; Bronder, L.R.

    1924-10-21

    A vapor extractor is described comprising a conveyer having compartments open at their top and bottom sides for a material to be conveyed, a plate forming a support for the conveyer and its compartments, means to move the conveyer over the plate with the material in the compartments, the movements of the conveyer forming ridges in the material that project above the walls of the compartments and means to remove the peaks of the ridges and thereby distribute the material composing the ridges into the bottom portion of the conveyer.

  5. Control of Nanomaterial Self-Assembly in Ultrasonically Levitated Droplets.

    Seddon, Annela M; Richardson, Sam J; Rastogi, Kunal; Plivelic, Tomás S; Squires, Adam M; Pfrang, Christian

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic trapping can be used to levitate and manipulate droplets of soft matter, in particular, lyotropic mesophases formed from self-assembly of different surfactants and lipids, which can be analyzed in a contact-less manner by X-ray scattering in a controlled gas-phase environment. On the macroscopic length scale, the dimensions and the orientation of the particle are shaped by the ultrasonic field, while on the microscopic length scale the nanostructure can be controlled by varying the humidity of the atmosphere around the droplet. We demonstrate levitation and in situ phase transitions of micellar, hexagonal, bicontinuous cubic, and lamellar phases. The technique opens up a wide range of new experimental approaches of fundamental importance for environmental, biological, and chemical research. PMID:26979408

  6. Determination of stresses caused by fluctuation of acoustic load in the steam dryers of a BWR; Determinacion de esfuerzos originados por fluctuacion de carga acustica en los secadores de vapor de un reactor BWR

    Centeno P, J.; Quezada G, S.; Prieto G, A.; Vazquez R, A.; Espinosa P, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Nunez C, A., E-mail: javcuami26@hotmail.com [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose Ma. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The extended power up-rate (EPU) in a nuclear power plant cause various problems in BWR components also in the steam system. This due to increased steam flow generated in the reactor and is conveyed to the turbine by the four main steam lines (MSL). One of the most serious problems is the generation of acoustic pressure loads in the metal structure of the steam dryer which eventually leads to fatigue failure and even the appearance of cracks, and in turn it causes loose parts that are entrained by the steam and transported in the MSL. This problem is due to the fluctuation of load acoustics caused by the union of the safety or relief valves (SRV) with the MSL, spreading through these to reach the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) where the effect of resonance of the acoustic wave is amplified and impacts directly in the supporting structure of the steam dryer, skirt and the panels where the mixture liquid-steam is dried, by centrifugation effect and runoff of liquid water. Efforts in the steam dryer operating conditions of EPU for two cases will be analyzed in this work, the first is before the installation of Acoustic Side Branch (ASB), and in the second case we consider the installation of said ASB in the standpipes of SRV. The analysis was performed with numerical experiments on a platform for computational fluid dynamics with virtual geometries previously designed based on the actual components of the reactor and steam system. The model to study is delimited by the top of the RPV, the steam dryer and a section of each of the four MSL with ten standpipes of SRV. With the obtained data and considering the mechanical-structural properties of the steam dryer material, we can evaluate the mechanical resistance to impacts by acoustic pressure load and its possible deformation or cracking. (Author)

  7. Post-dryout heat transfer and entrained droplet sizes at low pressure and low flow conditions

    The entrainment mechanisms and the entrained droplet sizes with relation to the flow regimes are investigated. Through the analysis of many experimental post-dryout data, it is shown that the most probable flow regime near dryout or quench front is not annular flow but churn-turbulent flow when the mass flux is low. A correlation describing the initial droplet size just after the CHF position at low mass flux is suggested through regression analysis. The history-dependent post-dryout model of Varone and Rohsenow replaced by the Webb-Chen model for wall-vapor heat transfer is used as a reference model in the analysis. In the post-dryout region at low pressure and low flow, it is found that the suggested one-dimensional mechanistic model is not applicable when the vapor superficial velocity is very low. This is explained by the change of main entrainment mechanism with the change of flow regime. In bubbly or slug flow a number of tiny droplets generated from bubble burst become important in the heat transfer after dryout. Therefore, the suggested correlation is valid only in the churn-turbulent flow regime (jg* = 0.5∼4.5). It is also suggested that the droplet size generated from the churn-turbulent surface is dependent not only on the pressure but also on the vapor velocity. It turns out that the present model can predict the measured cladding and vapor temperatures within 20% and 25%, respectively

  8. Liquid Droplet Detachment and Entrainment in Microscale Flows

    Hidrovo, Carlos

    2005-11-01

    In this talk we will present a first order study of liquid water detachment and entrainment into air flows in hydrophobic microchannels. Silicon based microstructures consisting of 23 mm long U-shaped channels of different geometry were used for this purpose. The structures are treated with a Molecular Vapor Deposition (MVD) process that renders them hydrophobic. Liquid water is injected through a side slot located 2/3 of the way downstream from the air channel inlet. The water entering the air channel beads up into slugs or droplets that grow in size at this injection location until they fill and flood the channel or are carried away by the air flow. The slugs/droplets dimensions at detachment are correlated against superficial gas velocity and proper dimensionless parameters are postulated and examined to compare hydrodynamic forces against surface tension. It is found that slug/droplet detachment is dominated by two main forces: pressure gradient drag, arising from confinement of a viscous flow in the channel, and inertial drag, arising from the stagnation of the air due to obstruction by the slugs/droplets. A detachment regime map is postulated based on the relative importance of these forces under different flow conditions.

  9. Acoustical Imaging

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  10. Acoustic telemetry

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To determine movements of green turtles in the nearshore foraging areas, we deployed acoustic tags and determined their movements through active and passive...

  11. Acoustics Research

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  12. Battlefield acoustics

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  13. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification. PMID:26603612

  14. Strictly correlated uniform electron droplets

    Rasanen, E.; Seidl, M.; Gori Giorgi, P.

    2011-01-01

    We study the energetic properties of finite but internally homogeneous D-dimensional electron droplets in the strict-correlation limit. The indirect Coulomb interaction is found to increase as a function of the electron number, approaching the tighter forms of the Lieb-Oxford bound recently proposed by Rasanen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 206406 (2009)]. The bound is satisfied in three-, two-, and one-dimensional droplets, and in the latter case it is reached exactly - regardless of the type...

  15. Acoustic interaction forces and torques acting on suspended spheres in an ideal fluid

    Lopes, J Henrique; Silva, G T

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the acoustic interaction forces and torques exerted by an arbitrary time-harmonic wave on a set of N spheres suspended in an inviscid fluid are theoretically analyzed. In so doing, we utilize the partial-wave expansion method to solve the related multiple scattering problem. The acoustic interaction force and torque are computed for a sphere using the farfield radiation force and torque formulas. To exemplify the method, we calculate the interaction forces exerted by an external traveling and standing plane wave on an arrangement of two and three olive-oil droplets in water. The droplets radii are comparable to the wavelength (i.e. Mie scattering regime). The results show that the radiation force may considerably deviates from that exerted solely by the external incident wave. In addition, we find that acoustic interaction torques arise on the droplets when a nonsymmetric effective incident wave interacts with the droplets.

  16. A numerical study on turbulence attenuation model for liquid droplet impingement erosion

    Research highlights: → Applying a carrier turbulence algorithm attenuation to liquid droplet impingement (LDI) phenomena in two phase flow. → Proposing a computational procedure to LDI erosion rate in a bent pipe. → Investigating the carrier turbulence attenuation influence to the LDI erosion rate. - Abstract: The bent pipe wall thinning has been often found at the elbow of the drain line and the high-pressure secondary feed-water bent pipe in the nuclear reactors. The liquid droplet impingement (LDI) erosion could be regarded to be one of the major causes and is a significant issue of the thermal hydraulics and structural integrity in aging and life extension for nuclear power plants safety. In this paper two-phase numerical simulations are conducted for standard elbow geometry, typically the pipe diameter is 170 mm. The turbulence attenuation in vapor-droplets flow is analysed by a damping function on the energy spectrum basis of single phase flow. Considering the vapor turbulent kinetic energy attenuation due to the involved droplets, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) tool has been adopted by using two-way vapor-droplet coupled system. This computational fluid model is built up by incompressible Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stoke equations using standard k-ε model and the SIMPLE algorithm, and the numerical droplet model adopts the Lagrangian approach, a general LDI erosion prediction procedure for bent pipe geometry has been performed to supplement the CFD code. The liquid droplets diameter, velocity, volume concentration are evaluated for the effects of carrier turbulence attenuation. The result shows that carrier turbulence kinetic energy attenuation is proved to be an important effect for LDI erosion rate when investigating the bent pipe wall thinning phenomena.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Vapor Bubble Growth and Heat Transfer in a Thin Liquid Film

    TAO Yu-Jia; HUAI Xiu-Lan; LI Zhi-Gang

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to investigate the dynamics of vapor bubble growth in a thin liquid film,movement of the interface between two fluids and the surface heat transfer characteristics. The model takes into account the effects of phase change between the vapor and liquid, gravity, surface tension and viscosity. The details of the multiphase flow and heat transfer are discussed for two cases: (1) when a water micro-droplet impacts a thin liquid fihn with a vapor bubble growing and (2) when the vapor bubble grows and merges with the vapor layer above the liquid film without the droplet impacting. The development trend of the interface between the vapor and liquid is coincident qualitatively with the available literature, mostly at the first stage. We also provide an important method to better understand the mechanism of nucleate spray cooling.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Vapor Bubble Growth and Heat Transfer in a Thin Liquid Film

    A mathematical model is developed to investigate the dynamics of vapor bubble growth in a thin liquid film, movement of the interface between two fluids and the surface heat transfer characteristics. The model takes into account the effects of phase change between the vapor and liquid, gravity, surface tension and viscosity. The details of the multiphase now and heat transfer are discussed for two cases: (1) when a water micro-droplet impacts a thin liquid film with a vapor bubble growing and (2) when the vapor bubble grows and merges with the vapor layer above the liquid film without the droplet impacting. The development trend of the interface between the vapor and liquid is coincident qualitatively with the available literature, mostly at the first stage. We also provide an important method to better understand the mechanism of nucleate spray cooling. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  19. Droplets engulfing on a filament

    Wu, Xiang-Fa; Yu, Meng; Zhou, Zhengping; Bedarkar, Amol; Zhao, Youhao

    2014-03-01

    Two immiscible droplets wetting on a filament may assume engulfing, partial-engulfing, or non-engulfing morphology that depends on the wetting behavior and geometries of the resulting droplet-on-filament system. This paper studies the wetting behavior of two immiscible droplets contacting and sitting symmetrically on a straight filament. A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is formulated for determining the wetting morphology of the droplet-on-filament system. In the limiting case of engulfing or non-engulfing, the morphology of the droplet-on-filament system is determined in explicit form. In the case of partial-engulfing, surface finite element method is further employed for determining the wetting morphology, surface energy, and internal pressures of droplets of the system. Numerical scaling study is performed to explore their dependencies upon the wetting properties and geometries of the system. The study can be applicable for analysis and design of textiles with tailorable wetting properties and development of novel multifunctional fibrous materials for environmental protection such as oil-spill sorption, etc.

  20. PIV-Analysis of collapsing toroidal droplets

    Pairam, Ekapop; Berger, Eric; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Georgia Tech Team

    2012-11-01

    Toroidal droplets are unstable and always undergo a transformation into spherical droplets driven by surface tension. They either break ala Rayleigh-Plateau if the torus is thin or grow fatter to become a single spherical droplet if the torus is fat. We analyze the velocity field inside and outside the toroidal droplet as it transforms into spherical droplets using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) method and compare with recent theoretical calculations for this process. NSF CAREER.

  1. Switchable Thermal Interfaces Based on Discrete Liquid Droplets

    Yongho Sungtaek Ju

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a switchable thermal interface based on an array of discrete liquid droplets initially confined on hydrophilic islands on a substrate. The droplets undergo reversible morphological transition into a continuous liquid film when they are mechanically compressed by an opposing substrate to create low-thermal resistance heat conduction path. We investigate a criterion for reversible switching in terms of hydrophilic pattern size and liquid volume. The dependence of the liquid morphology and rupture distance on the diameter and areal fraction of hydrophilic islands, liquid volumes, as well as loading pressure is also characterized both theoretically and experimentally. The thermal resistance in the on-state is experimentally characterized for ionic liquids, which are promising for practical applications due to their negligible vapor pressure. A life testing setup is constructed to evaluate the reliability of the interface under continued switching conditions at relatively high switching frequencies.

  2. Composition measurement of bicomponent droplets using laser-induced fluorescence of acetone

    Maqua, C.; Depredurand, V.; Castanet, G.; Wolff, M.; Lemoine, F.

    2007-12-01

    Commercial fuels are complex mixtures, the evaporation of which remains particularly difficult to model. Experimental characterization of the differential vaporization of the components is a problem that is seldom addressed. In this paper, the evaporation of binary droplets made of ethyl-alcohol and acetone is investigated using a technique of measurement of the droplet composition developed in purpose. This technique exploits the laser induced fluorescence of acetone which acts as a fluorescent tracer as well as the more volatile component of the fuel associated with an accurate measurement of the droplet diameter by forward scattering interferometry. A model of the fluorescence intensity of the binary mixture, taking into account the absorption of the acetone molecules, is proposed and validated. The sensitivity of the technique is discussed. Finally, the reliability of the technique is demonstrated on binary combusting droplets in linear stream.

  3. Suppression in droplet growth kinetics by the addition of organics to sulfate particles

    Wong, Jenny P. S.; Liggio, John; Li, Shao-Meng; Nenes, Athanasios; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2014-11-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions are affected by the rate at which water vapor condenses onto particles during cloud droplet growth. Changes in droplet growth rates can impact cloud droplet number and size distribution. The current study investigated droplet growth kinetics of acidic and neutral sulfate particles which contained various amounts and types of organic compounds, from model compounds (carbonyls) to complex mixtures (α-pinene secondary organic aerosol and diesel engine exhaust). In most cases, the formed droplet size distributions were shifted to smaller sizes relative to control experiments (pure sulfate particles), due to suppression in droplet growth rates in the cloud condensation nuclei counter. The shift to smaller droplets correlated with increasing amounts of organic material, with the largest effect observed for acidic seed particles at low relative humidity. For all organics incorporated onto acidic particles, formation of high molecular weight compounds was observed, probably by acid-catalyzed Aldol condensation reactions in the case of carbonyls. To test the reversibility of this process, carbonyl experiments were conducted with acidic particles exposed to higher relative humidity. High molecular weight compounds were not measured in this case and no shift in droplet sizes was observed, suggesting that high molecular weight compounds are the species affecting the rate of water uptake. While these results provide laboratory evidence that organic compounds can slow droplet growth rates, the modeled mass accommodation coefficient of water on these particles (α > 0.1) indicates that this effect is unlikely to significantly affect cloud properties, consistent with infrequent field observations of slower droplet growth rates.

  4. Comparison of various droplet breakup models in gas-liquid flows in high-pressure environments

    Droplet breakup affects spray penetration and evaporation, and plays a critical role in engine efficiency. The purpose of this research was to examine the rate of penetration and evaporation of droplets in a combustion chamber, and the efficiency of the engine when liquid jet is injected into the compressed gas chamber in an axi-symmetrical fashion leading to a turbulent and unsteady flow. As a result of interaction with the highly compressed air in the chamber, the liquid jet breaks up and forms minute droplets. These particles will in turn breakup because of aerodynamic forces, producing even smaller droplets. A number of models are available for analyzing the breakup of droplets; however, each model is typically reliable only over a limited parameter range. In this research three well-known models are applied for droplet breakup modeling and their results are compared. To obtain the details of the flow field, the Eulerian gas phase mass, momentum and energy conservation equations, as well as equations governing the transport of turbulence and fuel vapor mass fraction are solved together with equations of trajectory, momentum, mass and energy conservation for liquid droplets in Lagrangian form. The numerical solution is performed using the finite volume method and EPISO (Engine-PISO) algorithm. The results obtained from the models show that the breakup process in a high pressure environment significantly affects the penetration and evaporation rates of the spray, and the droplet size is determined by the balance between breakup and coalescence processes. It is also shown that the details of atomization in the nozzle do not significantly influence the ultimate size of droplets. It should be mentioned that droplet collision modeling has been taken into account in the computer code and is activated wherever necessary

  5. Development of an arsenic trioxide vapor and arsine sampling train

    A sampling train was evaluated using 76As tracer for the measurement of particulate arsenic, arsine, and arsenic trioxide vapor in air and industrial process gas streams. In this train, a demister was used to remove droplets of water and oil, and particulates were removed by a filter. Vapor arsenic trioxide was collected in an impinger solution, and arsine gas was collected on silvered quartz beads. Hydrogen sulfide gas did not reduce the arsine trapping efficiency of the silvered beads, and charcoal proved to be an effective trap for both arsine and arsenic trioxide vapor. 1 figure, 2 tables

  6. The Liquid Droplet Radiator - an Ultralightweight Heat Rejection System for Efficient Energy Conversion in Space

    Mattick, A. T.; Hertzberg, A.

    1984-01-01

    A heat rejection system for space is described which uses a recirculating free stream of liquid droplets in place of a solid surface to radiate waste heat. By using sufficiently small droplets ( 100 micron diameter) of low vapor pressure liquids the radiating droplet sheet can be made many times lighter than the lightest solid surface radiators (heat pipes). The liquid droplet radiator (LDR) is less vulnerable to damage by micrometeoroids than solid surface radiators, and may be transported into space far more efficiently. Analyses are presented of LDR applications in thermal and photovoltaic energy conversion which indicate that fluid handling components (droplet generator, droplet collector, heat exchanger, and pump) may comprise most of the radiator system mass. Even the unoptimized models employed yield LDR system masses less than heat pipe radiator system masses, and significant improvement is expected using design approaches that incorporate fluid handling components more efficiently. Technical problems (e.g., spacecraft contamination and electrostatic deflection of droplets) unique to this method of heat rejectioon are discussed and solutions are suggested.

  7. Applications of adaptive focused acoustics to compound management.

    Nixon, Elizabeth; Holland-Crimmin, Sue; Lupotsky, Brian; Chan, James; Curtis, Jon; Dobbs, Karen; Blaxill, Zoe

    2009-06-01

    Since the introduction of lithotripsy kidney stone therapy, Focused Acoustics and its properties have been thoroughly utilized in medicine and exploration. More recently, Compound Management is exploring its applications and benefits to sample integrity. There are 2 forms of Focused Acoustics: Acoustic Droplet Ejection and Adaptive Focused Acoustics, which work by emitting high-powered acoustic waves through water toward a focused point. This focused power results in noncontact plate-to-plate sample transfer or sample dissolution, respectively. For the purposes of this article, only Adaptive Focused Acoustics will be addressed. Adaptive Focused Acoustics uses high-powered acoustic waves to mix, homogenize, dissolve, and thaw samples. It facilitates transferable samples through noncontact, closed-container, isothermal mixing. Experimental results show significantly reduced mixing times, limited degradation, and ideal use for heat-sensitive compounds. Upon implementation, acoustic dissolution has reduced the number of samples requiring longer mixing times as well as reducing the number impacted by incomplete compound dissolution. It has also helped in increasing the overall sample concentration from 6 to 8 mM to 8 to 10 mM by ensuring complete compound solubilization. The application of Adaptive Focused Acoustics, however, cannot be applied to all Compound Management processes, such as sample thawing and low-volume sample reconstitution. This article will go on to describe the areas where Adaptive Focused Acoustics adds value as well as areas in which it has shown no clear benefit. PMID:19487768

  8. Experiments on Nitrogen Oxide Production of Droplet Arrays Burning under Microgravity Conditions

    Moesl, Klaus; Sattelmayer, Thomas; Kikuchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Shin; Yoda, Shinichi

    The optimization of the combustion process is top priority in current aero-engine and aircraft development, particularly from the perspectives of high efficiency, minimized fuel consumption, and a sustainable exhaust gas production. Aero-engines are exclusively liquid-fueled with a strong correlation between the combustion temperature and the emissions of nitric oxide (NOX ). Due to safety concerns, the progress in NOX reduction has been much slower than in stationary gas turbines. In the past, the mixing intensity in the primary zone of aero-engine combustors was improved and air staging implemented. An important question for future aero-engine combustors, consequently, is how partial vaporization influences the NOX emissions of spray flames? In order to address this question, the combustion of partially vaporized, linear droplet arrays was studied experimentally under microgravity conditions. The influence of fuel pre-vaporization on the NOX emissions was assessed in a wide range. The experiments were performed in a drop tower and a sounding rocket campaign. The microgravity environment provided ideal experiment conditions without the disturbing ef-fect of natural convection. This allowed the study of the interacting phenomena of multi-phase flow, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. This way the understanding of the physical and chemical processes related to droplet and spray combustion could be improved. The Bremen drop tower (ZARM) was utilized for the precursor campaign in July 2008, which was com-prised of 30 drops. The sounding rocket experiments, which totaled a microgravity duration of 6 minutes, were finally performed on the flight of TEXUS-46 in November 2009. On both campaigns the "Japanese Combustion Module" (JCM) was used. It is a cooperative experi-ment on droplet array combustion between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and ESA's (European Space Agency) research team, working on the combustion properties of partially premixed sprays

  9. Water droplets make an impact

    The physics of bouncing water droplets underlies a wide range of industrial applications from crop spraying to ink-jet printing, and continues to fascinate after 200 years of research. Whether standing in the shower, spilling the morning coffee or going to work in the rain, each day typically begins with water droplets splashing off a solid surface. In fact these phenomena are so common that they often go unnoticed. However, the basic physics that governs the dynamics of water droplets is extremely rich, and understanding these events in detail has important scientific and technological consequences. In agriculture, for instance, the wax-like outer layer of a plant leaf produces a non-wetting interface that repels water and causes drops to bounce off the surface. As a result, the plant often retains less than half of an applied spray. This is both inefficient and hazardous, since the herbicides and pesticides that are destined for the plant can build up and eventually contaminate the soil and public water supplies. Finding a way to eliminate droplet rebound in such cases has both major economic and social benefits. On the other hand, promoting droplet rebound so that all drops bounce off a surface can have many advantages. Imagine a car windscreen that can repel every raindrop in a downpour. It would make driving in the rain much safer. Perhaps we can learn from the natural ability of plants to repel droplets and apply the same strategy to car windows. Thus, one sees that preventing or enhancing drop rebound off a surface can have a significant impact on our daily lives. Perhaps one of the biggest potential uses will be for ink-jet printing. The high impact velocity of the ink makes accurate droplet formation and printing a significant challenge. (U.K.)

  10. Uniform-droplet spray forming

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chun, Jung-Hoon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ando, T. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The uniform-droplet process is a new method of liquid-metal atomization that results in single droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on to substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructure. The mono-sized powder-production capability of the uniform-droplet process also has the potential of permitting engineered powder blends to produce components of controlled porosity. Metal and alloy powders are commercially produced by at least three different methods: gas atomization, water atomization, and rotating disk. All three methods produce powders of a broad range in size with a very small yield of fine powders with single-sized droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructures. The economical analysis has shown the process to have the potential of reducing capital cost by 50% and operating cost by 37.5% when applied to powder making. For the spray-forming process, a 25% savings is expected in both the capital and operating costs. The project is jointly carried out at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tuffs University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Preliminary interactions with both finished parts and powder producers have shown a strong interest in the uniform-droplet process. Systematic studies are being conducted to optimize the process parameters, understand the solidification of droplets and spray deposits, and develop a uniform-droplet-system (UDS) apparatus appropriate for processing engineering alloys.

  11. Collapsing criteria for vapor film around solid spheres as a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion

    Following a partial fuel-melting accident, a Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) can result with the fragmentation of the melt into tiny droplets. A vapor film is then formed between the melt fragments and the coolant, while preventing a contact between them. Triggering, propagation and expansion typically follow the premixing stage. In the triggering stage, vapor film collapse around one or several of the fragments occurs. This collapse can be the result of fragments cooling, a sort of mechanical force, or by any other means. When the vapor film collapses and the coolant re-establishes contact with the dry surface of the hot melt, it may lead to a very rapid and rather violent boiling. In the propagation stage the shock wave front leads to stripping of the films surrounding adjacent droplets which enhance the fragmentation and the process escalates. During this process a large quantity of liquid vaporizes and its expansion can result in destructive mechanical damage to the surrounding structures. This multiphase thermal detonation in which high pressure shock wave is formed is regarded as 'vapor explosion'. The film boiling and its possible collapse is a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion. If the interaction of the melt and the coolant does not result in a film boiling, no explosion occurs. Many studies have been devoted to determine the minimum temperature and heat flux that is required to maintain a film boiling. The present experimental study examines the minimum temperature that is required to maintain a film boiling around metal spheres immersed into a liquid (subcooled distilled water) reservoir. In order to simulate fuel fragments that are small in dimension and has mirror-like surface, small spheres coated with anti-oxidation layer were used. The heat flux from the spheres was calculated from the sphere's temperature profiles and the sphere's properties. The vapor film collapse was associated with a sharp rise of the heat flux during the cooling

  12. Explosive Breakup of a Water Droplet with a Nontransparent Solid Inclusion Heated in a High-Temperature Gaseous Medium

    Dmitrienko Margarita A.; Piskunov Maxim V.; Strizhak Pavel A.; Shcherbinina Anastasia A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the evaporation of a water droplet with a comparably sized solid nontransparent inclusion in a high-temperature (500–800 K) gas medium. Water evaporates from the free surface of the inclusion. During this process, intensive vapor formation occurs on the inner interface “water droplet – solid inclusion” with the subsequent explosive decay of the droplet. Experiments have been conducted using high-speed (up to 105 fps) video cameras “Phantom” and software “Phantom Camera...

  13. Vertical dispersion of oil droplets

    A mathematical model which predicts oil droplet mixing by breaking waves is presented. Oil spills pose a significant threat to marine and near-shore environments. The spilled oil forms a thin layer on the water surface where breaking waves cause the oil to mix vertically into the water column. The motion of the droplets plays a vital role in the oil mass exchange between the oil slick and the water column. The oil-water interfacial tension coefficient can be reduced with chemical dispersants, which promote the production of smaller droplets with weaker rising velocities compared to the mixing force of turbulence. This newly developed model uses a kinetic approach to describe vertical exchange of droplets at the interface between the water column and the oil slick. General mass conservation principles are satisfied by balancing the mass of oil between the slick and the mixing layer of the water column. This model makes it possible to quickly estimate the amount of dispersed oil under breaking waves. Future work will focus on parameterizing the impact of breaking waves on the vertical mixing of oil droplets to be used in a three-dimensional oil spill model. 31 refs., 6 figs

  14. Acoustic emission

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  15. Generation of Single, Monodisperse Compound Droplets

    Black, James

    2010-01-01

    The generation of single, monodisperse compound droplets is shown in these fluid dynamics videos. In an apparatus designed to produce single compound droplets, a piezoelectric diaphragm generates a pressure pulse from a voltage waveform input to eject a droplet. In the method presented, oil is allowed to flow into the water nozzle with the pressure pulse ejecting both fluids as a compound droplet. Experiments were performed to demonstrate how changes in water pressure affect compound droplet compositions. It was found that increasing the water pressure decreased the thickness of the compound droplet's oil layer.

  16. Soft substrates suppress droplet splashing

    Howland, Christopher J; Style, Robert W; Castrejón-Pita, A A

    2015-01-01

    Droplets splash when they impact dry, flat substrates above a critical velocity that depends on parameters such as droplet size, viscosity and air pressure. We show that substrate stiffness also impacts the splashing threshold by imaging ethanol drops impacting silicone gels of different stiffnesses. Splashing is significantly suppressed: droplets on the softest substrates need over 70% more kinetic energy to splash than they do on rigid substrates. We show that splash suppression is likely to be due to energy losses caused by deformations of soft substrates during the first few microseconds of impact. We find that solids with Youngs modulus $\\lesssim O(10^5)$Pa suppress splashing, in agreement with simple scaling arguments. Thus materials like soft gels and elastomers can be used as simple coatings for effective splash prevention.

  17. A numerical investigation of the evaporation process of a liquid droplet impinging onto a hot substrate

    Nikolopoulos, N.; Bergeles, G. [National Technical University of Athens (Greece). Department Mechanical Engineering; Theodorakakos, A. [Fluid Research, Co (Greece)

    2007-01-15

    A numerical investigation of the evaporation process of n-heptane and water liquid droplets impinging onto a hot substrate is presented. Three different temperatures are investigated, covering flow regimes below and above Leidenfrost temperature. The Navier-Stokes equations expressing the flow distribution of the liquid and gas phases, coupled with the Volume of Fluid Method (VOF) for tracking the liquid-gas interface, are solved numerically using the finite volume methodology. Both two-dimensional axisymmetric and fully three-dimensional domains are utilized. An evaporation model coupled with the VOF methodology predicts the vapor blanket height between the evaporating droplet and the substrate, for cases with substrate temperature above the Leidenfrost point, and the formation of vapor bubbles in the region of nucleate boiling regime. The results are compared with available experimental data indicating the outcome of the impingement and the droplet shape during the impingement process, while additional information for the droplet evaporation rate and the temperature and vapor concentration fields is provided by the computational model. (author)

  18. Modeling of liquid ceramic precursor droplets in a high velocity oxy-fuel flame jet

    Production of coatings by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) flame jet processing of liquid precursor droplets can be an attractive alternative method to plasma processing. This article concerns modeling of the thermophysical processes in liquid ceramic precursor droplets injected into an HVOF flame jet. The model consists of several sub-models that include aerodynamic droplet break-up, heat and mass transfer within individual droplets exposed to the HVOF environment and precipitation of ceramic precursors. A parametric study is presented for the initial droplet size, concentration of the dissolved salts and the external temperature and velocity field of the HVOF jet to explore processing conditions and injection parameters that lead to different precipitate morphologies. It is found that the high velocity of the jet induces shear break-up into several μm diameter droplets. This leads to better entrainment and rapid heat-up in the HVOF jet. Upon processing, small droplets (<5 μm) are predicted to undergo volumetric precipitation and form solid particles prior to impact at the deposit location. Droplets larger than 5 μm are predicted to form hollow or precursor containing shells similar to those processed in a DC arc plasma. However, it is found that the lower temperature of the HVOF jet compared to plasma results in slower vaporization and solute mass diffusion time inside the droplet, leading to comparatively thicker shells. These shell-type morphologies may further experience internal pressurization, resulting in possibly shattering and secondary atomization of the trapped liquid. The consequences of these different particle states on the coating microstructure are also discussed in this article

  19. A Comprehensive Model of Electric-Field-Enhanced Jumping-Droplet Condensation on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Birbarah, Patrick; Li, Zhaoer; Pauls, Alexander; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2015-07-21

    Superhydrophobic micro/nanostructured surfaces for dropwise condensation have recently received significant attention due to their potential to enhance heat transfer performance by shedding positively charged water droplets via coalescence-induced droplet jumping at length scales below the capillary length and allowing the use of external electric fields to enhance droplet removal and heat transfer, in what has been termed electric-field-enhanced (EFE) jumping-droplet condensation. However, achieving optimal EFE conditions for enhanced heat transfer requires capturing the details of transport processes that is currently lacking. While a comprehensive model has been developed for condensation on micro/nanostructured surfaces, it cannot be applied for EFE condensation due to the dynamic droplet-vapor-electric field interactions. In this work, we developed a comprehensive physical model for EFE condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces by incorporating individual droplet motion, electrode geometry, jumping frequency, field strength, and condensate vapor-flow dynamics. As a first step toward our model, we simulated jumping droplet motion with no external electric field and validated our theoretical droplet trajectories to experimentally obtained trajectories, showing excellent temporal and spatial agreement. We then incorporated the external electric field into our model and considered the effects of jumping droplet size, electrode size and geometry, condensation heat flux, and droplet jumping direction. Our model suggests that smaller jumping droplet sizes and condensation heat fluxes require less work input to be removed by the external fields. Furthermore, the results suggest that EFE electrodes can be optimized such that the work input is minimized depending on the condensation heat flux. To analyze overall efficiency, we defined an incremental coefficient of performance and showed that it is very high (∼10(6)) for EFE condensation. We finally proposed mechanisms

  20. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations

    You David J; Yoon Jeong-Yeol

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using “wire-guided” method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging o...

  1. Impinging Jets and Droplet Dynamics

    Chen, Xiaodong; Ma, Dongjun; Yang, Vigor

    2011-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video, results from high fidelity numerical simulations are presented, which have been carried out to study the flow and droplet dynamics of liquid sheets formed by two impinging jets. A three-dimensional Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) based on octree meshes [1] is used to simulate the various flow patterns associated with impinging jets, secondary breakup and binary collision of droplets. In addition to AMR, a thickness based refinement algorithm is also developed and implemented to efficiently resolve the various scales of surface tension driven interfacial flows.

  2. Droplet migration characteristics in confined oscillatory microflows

    Chaudhury, Kaustav; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the migration characteristics of a droplet in an oscillatory flow field in a parallel plate micro-confinement. Using phase filed formalism, we capture the dynamical evolution of the droplet over a wide range of the frequency of the imposed oscillation in the flow field, drop size relative to the channel gap, and the capillary number. The latter two factors imply the contribution of droplet deformability, commonly considered in the study of droplet migration under steady shear flow conditions. We show that the imposed oscillation brings in additional time complexity in the droplet movement, realized through temporally varying drop-shape, flow direction and the inertial response of the droplet. As a consequence, we observe a spatially complicated pathway of the droplet along the transverse direction, in sharp contrast to the smooth migration under a similar yet steady shear flow condition. Intuitively, the longitudinal component of the droplet movement is in tandem with the flow continuity and evolve...

  3. Quasars, Galaxies and Pseudo-Vacuum Droplets

    Veltman, M.J.G.; Klinkhamer, F.

    1991-01-01

    It is suggested that quasars and active galatic nuclei are small regions (droplets) of pseudo-vacuum, possibly containing matter, that decay into real vacuum and ordinary matter. In addition, the droplets may play a role in galaxy formation.

  4. Evaporation of elongated droplets on chemically stripe-patterned surfaces

    Jansen, H.P.; Zandvliet, H.J.W.; Kooij, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the evaporation of elongated droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces. Variation of elongation is achieved by depositing droplets on surfaces with varying ratios of hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripe widths. Elongated droplets evaporate faster than more spherical droplets. Bo

  5. Heat Transfer through a Condensate Droplet on Hydrophobic and Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Chavan, Shreyas; Cha, Hyeongyun; Orejon, Daniel; Nawaz, Kashif; Singla, Nitish; Yeung, Yip Fun; Park, Deokgeun; Kang, Dong Hoon; Chang, Yujin; Takata, Yasuyuki; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms governing vapor condensation on nonwetting surfaces is crucial to a wide range of energy and water applications. In this paper, we reconcile classical droplet growth modeling barriers by utilizing two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical simulations to study individual droplet heat transfer on nonwetting surfaces (90° environmental scanning electron microscopy on biphilic samples consisting of hydrophobic and nanostructured superhydrophobic regions, showing excellent agreement with the simulations for both constant base area and constant contact angle growth regimes. Our results demonstrate the importance of resolving local heat transfer effects for the fundamental understanding and high fidelity modeling of phase change heat transfer on nonwetting surfaces. PMID:27409353

  6. Highly sophisticated compound droplets on fiber arrays

    Weyer, Floriane; Lismont, Marjorie; Dreesen, Laurent; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The poster shows a drop of oil containing four soapy water droplets of four different colors : red, orange, green and blue. This sophisticated object is created thanks to a fiber array. Fiber networks allow processes such as droplet motion, fragmentation, trapping, releasing, mixing and encapsulation. Therefore, by using a vertical fiber decorated with successive nodes, compound droplets can be created. A soapy water droplet, with a specific color, is placed at each intersection. Then, a sili...

  7. Influence of drop size distribution and fuel vapor fraction on premixed spray combustion

    Machiroutu, Sridhar Venkatabojji

    Premixed spray combustion is affected by fuel and oxidizer properties, mixture equivalence ratio and spray quality. The spray quality is characterized by a mean droplet diameter (SMD) and a droplet size distribution (DSD). Prior experimental studies have considered only the influence of SMD, in part due to the difficulty in controlling the DSD independently. The present work provides experimental evidence demonstrating the effect of the fuel droplet size distribution and fuel vapor fraction on premixed spray combustion. Combustion experiments were performed in a pilot-ignited, continuous flow, tubular, vertical test rig wherein fuel sprays were injected into an air stream. A novel twin-atomizer technique that allowed control over overall equivalence ratio, SMD, DSD, and fuel vapor fraction of the premixed spray was used to generate test sprays. A line-of-sight, infrared (IR) extinction technique was developed to quantify the fuel vapor fraction in premixed sprays. Radial distributions of fuel vapor were evaluated using an 'onion peeling' deconvolution technique. Combustion of test sprays indicated flame propagation among regions of high fuel vapor fraction to generate a high rate of combustion. In lean premixed sprays, the presence of a low fuel vapor concentration does not impact the combustion process. Experimental evidence demonstrating the enhancement of flame propagation velocity for optimal SMDs of ethanol sprays has been found. It was observed that test sprays with narrower DSDs have faster burning rates and more complete combustion. The DSD of the sprays were characterized with a droplet surface-area-based standard deviation of the DSD.

  8. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations.

    You, David J; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2012-01-01

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using "wire-guided" method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of

  9. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations

    You David J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A computer numerical control (CNC apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using “wire-guided” method (a pipette tip was used in this study. This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate. Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction. The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability, in rapid succession (using droplets

  10. Floating Droplet Array: An Ultrahigh-Throughput Device for Droplet Trapping, Real-time Analysisand Recovery

    Louai Labanieh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe the design, fabrication and use of a dual-layered microfluidic device for ultrahigh-throughput droplet trapping, analysis, and recovery using droplet buoyancy. To demonstrate the utility of this device for digital quantification of analytes, we quantify the number of droplets, which contain a β-galactosidase-conjugated bead among more than 100,000 immobilized droplets. In addition, we demonstrate that this device can be used for droplet clustering and real-time analysis by clustering several droplets together into microwells and monitoring diffusion of fluorescein, a product of the enzymatic reaction of β-galactosidase and its fluorogenic substrate FDG, between droplets.