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Sample records for acoustic detection

  1. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (ppneumothorax states (pPneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (pPneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  2. Golden Gate and Pt. Reyes Acoustic Detections

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains detections of acoustic tagged fish from two general locations: Golden Gate (east and west line) and Pt. Reyes. Several Vemco 69khz acoustic...

  3. Acoustic detection of manatee vocalizations

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Phillips, Richard; Meyer, Michael; Beusse, Diedrich O.

    2003-09-01

    The West Indian manatee (trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of a growing number of collisions with boats. A system to warn boaters of the presence of manatees, that can signal to boaters that manatees are present in the immediate vicinity, could potentially reduce these boat collisions. In order to identify the presence of manatees, acoustic methods are employed. Within this paper, three different detection algorithms are used to detect the calls of the West Indian manatee. The detection systems are tested in the laboratory using simulated manatee vocalizations from an audio compact disk. The detection method that provides the best overall performance is able to correctly identify ~96% of the manatee vocalizations. However, the system also results in a false alarm rate of ~16%. The results of this work may ultimately lead to the development of a manatee warning system that can warn boaters of the presence of manatees.

  4. Acoustic detection of electron spin resonance

    Coufal, H.

    1981-07-01

    The ESR-signal of DPPH was recorded by detecting the modulation of the absorbed microwave power with a gas-coupled microphone. This photo-acoustic detection scheme is compared with conventional ESR-detection. Applications of the acoustical detection method to other modulation spectroscopic techniques, particularly NMR, are discussed.

  5. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  6. Integration of Acoustic Detection Equipment into ANTARES

    Lahmann, R; Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Katz, U; Naumann, C; Salomon, K

    2005-01-01

    The ANTARES group at the University of Erlangen is working towards the integration of a set of acoustic sensors into the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope. With this setup, tests of acoustic particle detection methods and background studies shall be performed. The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope, which is currently being constructed in the Mediterranean Sea, will be equipped with the infrastructure to accommodate a 3-dimensional array of photomultipliers for the detection of Cherenkov light. Within this infrastructure, the required resources for acoustic sensors are available: Bandwidth for the transmission of the acoustic data to the shore, electrical power for the off-shore electronics and physical space to install the acoustic sensors and to route the connecting cables (transmitting signals and power) into the electronics containers. It will be explained how the integration will be performed with minimal modifications of the existing ANTARES design and which setup is foreseen for the acquisition of the acoustic data.

  7. Software for neutrino acoustic detection and localization

    The evidence of the existing of UHE (E>1019eV) cosmic rays and its possible connection to UHE neutrino suggests the building of an acoustic telescope for neutrino, exploiting thermo-acoustic effect. We present software for neutrino acoustic signal detection and localization. The main points discussed here are the sea noise model, the determination of time differences of arrival (TDOA) between hydrophones signals, the source localization algorithm, and the telescope geometry effect. The effect of TDOAs errors and telescope geometry on the localization accuracy is also discussed.

  8. Software for neutrino acoustic detection and localization

    Bouhadef, B. [INFN Sezione Pisa, Polo Fibonacci, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, ' E. Fermi' University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: bouhadef@df.unipi.it

    2009-06-01

    The evidence of the existing of UHE (E>10{sup 19}eV) cosmic rays and its possible connection to UHE neutrino suggests the building of an acoustic telescope for neutrino, exploiting thermo-acoustic effect. We present software for neutrino acoustic signal detection and localization. The main points discussed here are the sea noise model, the determination of time differences of arrival (TDOA) between hydrophones signals, the source localization algorithm, and the telescope geometry effect. The effect of TDOAs errors and telescope geometry on the localization accuracy is also discussed.

  9. Software for neutrino acoustic detection and localization

    Bouhadef, B.

    2009-06-01

    The evidence of the existing of UHE (E>10eV) cosmic rays and its possible connection to UHE neutrino suggests the building of an acoustic telescope for neutrino, exploiting thermo-acoustic effect. We present software for neutrino acoustic signal detection and localization. The main points discussed here are the sea noise model, the determination of time differences of arrival (TDOA) between hydrophones signals, the source localization algorithm, and the telescope geometry effect. The effect of TDOAs errors and telescope geometry on the localization accuracy is also discussed.

  10. Humanitarian mine detection by acoustic resonance

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-03-01

    The JASON Committee at MITRE Corp. was tasked by DARPA to inquire into suitable technologies for humanitarian mine detection. Acoustic resonance was one of the very few technologies that the JASONs determined might be promising for the task, but was as yet unexplored at the time that they conducted their inquiry. The objective of this Seed Money investigation into acoustic resonance was to determine if it would be feasible to use acoustic resonance to provide an improvement to present methods for humanitarian mine detection. As detailed in this report, acoustic resonance methods do not appear to be feasible for this task. Although acoustic resonant responses are relatively easy to detect when they exist, they are very difficult to excite by the non-contact means that must be used for buried objects. Despite many different attempts, this research did not discover any practical means of using sound to excite resonant responses in objects known to have strong resonances. The shaker table experiments did see an effect that might be attributable to the resonance of the object under test, but the effect was weak, and exploited the a priori knowledge of the resonant frequency of the object under test to distinguish it from the background. If experiments that used objects known to have strong acoustic resonances produced such marginal results, this does not seem to be a practical method to detect objects with weak resonances or non-existent resonances. The results of this work contribute to the ORNL countermine initiative. ORNL is exploring several unconventional mine detection technologies, and is proposed to explore others. Since this research has discovered some major pitfalls in non-metallic mine detection, this experience will add realism to other strategies proposed for mine detection technologies. The experiment provided hands-on experience with inert plastic mines under field conditions, and gives ORNL additional insight into the problems of developing practical

  11. Improving Accuracy in Detecting Acoustic Onsets

    Duyck, Wouter; Anseel, Frederik; Szmalec, Arnaud; Mestdagh, Pascal; Tavernier, Antoine; Hartsuiker, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    In current cognitive psychology, naming latencies are commonly measured by electronic voice keys that detect when sound exceeds a certain amplitude threshold. However, recent research (e.g., K. Rastle & M. H. Davis, 2002) has shown that these devices are particularly inaccurate in precisely detecting acoustic onsets. In this article, the authors…

  12. Mobile platform for acoustic mine detection applications

    Libbey, Brad; Fenneman, Douglas; Burns, Brian

    2005-06-01

    Researchers in academia have successfully demonstrated acoustic landmine detection techniques. These typically employ acoustic or seismic sources to induce vibration in the mine/soil system, and use vibration sensors such as laser vibrometers or geophones to measure the resultant surface motion. These techniques exploit the unique mechanical properties of landmines to discriminate the vibration response of a buried mine from an off-target measurement. The Army requires the ability to rapidly and reliably scan an area for landmines and is developing a mobile platform at NVESD to meet this requirement. The platform represents an initial step toward the implementation of acoustic mine detection technology on a representative field vehicle. The effort relies heavily on the acoustic mine detection cart system developed by researchers at the University of Mississippi and Planning Systems, Inc. The NVESD platform consists of a John Deere E-gator configured with a robotic control system to accurately position the vehicle. In its present design, the E-gator has been outfitted with an array of laser vibrometers and a bank of loudspeakers. Care has been taken to ensure that the vehicle"s mounting hardware and data acquisition algorithms are sufficiently robust to accommodate the implementation of other sensor modalities. A thorough discussion of the mobile platform from its inception to its present configuration will be provided. Specific topics to be addressed include the vehicle"s control and data acquisition systems. Preliminary results from acoustic mine detection experiments will also be presented.

  13. Acoustic detectability of Rhynchophorus cruentatus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae)

    The palmetto weevil, Rhynchophorus cruentatus Fabricius, native to Florida, attacks palm trees. Like its economically destructive relatives, R. ferrugineus (Olivier) and R. palmarum L., it feeds internally and often is not detected until irreparable damage occurs. Acoustic methods previously used su...

  14. Acoustic detection for hydraulic research

    Three distinct physical effects are discussed, each of which is used for a particular method of detecting and locating minor leaks. The principle, considered phenomena and equipment requirements for each method are discussed, together with results of laboratory tests with calibrated leakage orifices varying between 20 μm and 180 μm in diameter. Two of the methods are being tested in industry and one is still at the laboratory development stage

  15. Signal Classification for Acoustic Neutrino Detection

    Neff, M; Enzenhöfer, A; Graf, K; Hößl, J; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Richardt, C

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on signal classification for deep-sea acoustic neutrino detection. In the deep sea, the background of transient signals is very diverse. Approaches like matched filtering are not sufficient to distinguish between neutrino-like signals and other transient signals with similar signature, which are forming the acoustic background for neutrino detection in the deep-sea environment. A classification system based on machine learning algorithms is analysed with the goal to find a robust and effective way to perform this task. For a well-trained model, a testing error on the level of one percent is achieved for strong classifiers like Random Forest and Boosting Trees using the extracted features of the signal as input and utilising dense clusters of sensors instead of single sensors.

  16. Sensor development and calibration for acoustic neutrino detection in ice

    Karg, Timo; Bissok, Martin; Laihem, Karim; Semburg, Benjamin; Tosi, Delia; Collaboration, for the IceCube

    2009-01-01

    A promising approach to measure the expected low flux of cosmic neutrinos at the highest energies (E > 1 EeV) is acoustic detection. There are different in-situ test installations worldwide in water and ice to measure the acoustic properties of the medium with regard to the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection. The parameters of interest include attenuation length, sound speed profile, background noise level and transient backgrounds. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been ...

  17. Acoustic metamaterial for subwavelength edge detection

    Molerón, Miguel; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-08-01

    Metamaterials have demonstrated the possibility to produce super-resolved images by restoring propagative and evanescent waves. However, for efficient information transfer, for example, in compressed sensing, it is often desirable to visualize only the fast spatial variations of the wave field (carried by evanescent waves), as the one created by edges or small details. Image processing edge detection algorithms perform such operation, but they add time and complexity to the imaging process. Here we present an acoustic metamaterial that transmits only components of the acoustic field that are approximately equal to or smaller than the operating wavelength. The metamaterial converts evanescent waves into propagative waves exciting trapped resonances, and it uses periodicity to attenuate the propagative components. This approach achieves resolutions ~5 times smaller than the operating wavelength and makes it possible to visualize independently edges aligned along different directions.

  18. Detection and Classification of Whale Acoustic Signals

    Xian, Yin

    This dissertation focuses on two vital challenges in relation to whale acoustic signals: detection and classification. In detection, we evaluated the influence of the uncertain ocean environment on the spectrogram-based detector, and derived the likelihood ratio of the proposed Short Time Fourier Transform detector. Experimental results showed that the proposed detector outperforms detectors based on the spectrogram. The proposed detector is more sensitive to environmental changes because it includes phase information. In classification, our focus is on finding a robust and sparse representation of whale vocalizations. Because whale vocalizations can be modeled as polynomial phase signals, we can represent the whale calls by their polynomial phase coefficients. In this dissertation, we used the Weyl transform to capture chirp rate information, and used a two dimensional feature set to represent whale vocalizations globally. Experimental results showed that our Weyl feature set outperforms chirplet coefficients and MFCC (Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients) when applied to our collected data. Since whale vocalizations can be represented by polynomial phase coefficients, it is plausible that the signals lie on a manifold parameterized by these coefficients. We also studied the intrinsic structure of high dimensional whale data by exploiting its geometry. Experimental results showed that nonlinear mappings such as Laplacian Eigenmap and ISOMAP outperform linear mappings such as PCA and MDS, suggesting that the whale acoustic data is nonlinear. We also explored deep learning algorithms on whale acoustic data. We built each layer as convolutions with either a PCA filter bank (PCANet) or a DCT filter bank (DCTNet). With the DCT filter bank, each layer has different a time-frequency scale representation, and from this, one can extract different physical information. Experimental results showed that our PCANet and DCTNet achieve high classification rate on the whale

  19. Fiber optic hydrophones for acoustic neutrino detection

    Buis, E. J.; Doppenberg, E. J. J.; Lahmann, R.; Toet, P. M.; de Vreugd, J.

    2016-04-01

    Cosmic neutrinos with ultra high energies can be detected acoustically using hydrophones. The detection of these neutrinos may provide crucial information about then GZK mechanism. The flux of these neutrinos, however, is expected to be low, so that a detection volume is required more than a order of magnitude larger than what has presently been realized. With a large detection volume and a large number of hydrophones, there is a need for technology that is cheap and easy to deploy. Fiber optics provide a natural way for distributed sensing. In addition, a sensor has been designed and manufactured that can be produced cost-effectively on an industrial scale. Sensitivity measurements show that the sensor is able to reach the required sea-state zero level. For a proper interpretation of the expected bipolar signals, filtering techniques should be applied to remove the effects of the unwanted resonance peaks.

  20. Acoustic signal detection of manatee calls

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Phillips, Richard; Meyer, Michael; Beusse, Diedrich O.

    2003-04-01

    The West Indian manatee (trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of a growing number of collisions with boats. A system to warn boaters of the presence of manatees, that can signal to boaters that manatees are present in the immediate vicinity, could potentially reduce these boat collisions. In order to identify the presence of manatees, acoustic methods are employed. Within this paper, three different detection algorithms are used to detect the calls of the West Indian manatee. The detection systems are tested in the laboratory using simulated manatee vocalizations from an audio compact disc. The detection method that provides the best overall performance is able to correctly identify ~=96% of the manatee vocalizations. However the system also results in a false positive rate of ~=16%. The results of this work may ultimately lead to the development of a manatee warning system that can warn boaters of the presence of manatees.

  1. detection of buried objects using acoustic waves

    Many obstacles are faced in removing the buried landmines such as the loss or absence of maps or information about these mines and the high financial costs needed to remove these mines. So that many techniques were designed and developed for demining (detecting and clearing) these buried mines. Each technique has some strengths and drawbacks. This thesis presents a survey on the landmine detection techniques, the strengths and limitations of these techniques are highlighted and compared to show the ideal conditions and the challenges facing each technique. Furthermore, a comparison between these techniques from the points of view of cost, complexity, speed, safety, false alarms in detection and the effect of the environmental conditions is presented. one of the reliable and powerful landmine detection techniques is the Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV)-based Acoustic to Seismic (A/S) landmine detection system. The interpretation of the LDV-based A/S data is performed off-line manually, depending heavily on the skills, experience, alertness and consistency of a trained operator. This requires a significantly long time. Results typically suffer from inconsistency and errors, particularly when dealing with large volumes of data. This thesis proposes several image processing techniques to automate the process of landmine detection from the data scanned by the LDV-based A/S system. The obtained results are so far promising in terms of accuracy, consistency, reliability and processing speed. The previously proposed techniques for landmine detection give high false alarm rates. This thesis proposes some techniques to improve the performance of the automatic object detection techniques. These techniques are based on segmentation, masking, morphology image processing and the wavelet transform. These techniques have achieved a high detection rate.

  2. Recent experiments on acoustic leak detection

    In the ASB-sodium loop a series of injection experiments with water, helium, argon and nitrogen was performed. The aim of these tests was to get: a comparison of the acoustic signals, generated by water and gas injections with regard to intensity and frequency content; an experimental basis for the design of an acoustic calibration source. The experimental set-up, the variation parameters and first results will be discussed. The principal design of an acoustic calibration source and its range of application will be given. (author)

  3. Integration of Acoustic Neutrino Detection Methods into ANTARES

    The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope is a water Cherenkov detector currently under construction in the Mediterranean Sea. It is also designed to serve as a platform for investigations of the deep-sea environment. In this context, the ANTARES group at the University of Erlangen will integrate acoustic sensors within the infrastructure of the experiment. With this dedicated setup, tests of acoustic particle detection methods and deep-sea acoustic background studies shall be performed. The aim of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of a future acoustic neutrino telescope in the deep sea operating in the ultra-high energy regime. In these proceedings, the implementation of the project is described in the context of the premises and challenges set by the physics of acoustic particle detection and the integration into an existing infrastructure

  4. Integration of Acoustic Neutrino Detection Methods into ANTARES

    Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Katz, U F; Lahmann, R; Naumann, C; Salomon, K

    2007-01-01

    The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope is a water Cherenkov detector currently under construction in the Mediterranean Sea. It is also designed to serve as a platform for investigations of the deep-sea environment. In this context, the ANTARES group at the University of Erlangen will integrate acoustic sensors within the infrastructure of the experiment. With this dedicated setup, tests of acoustic particle detection methods and deep-sea acoustic background studies shall be performed. The aim of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of a future acoustic neutrino telescope in the deep sea operating in the ultra-high energy regime. In these proceedings, the implementation of the project is described in the context of the premises and challenges set by the physics of acoustic particle detection and the integration into an existing infrastructure.

  5. Acoustic detection of air shower cores

    Gao, X.; Liu, Y.; Du, S.

    1985-01-01

    At an altitude of 1890m, a pre-test with an Air shower (AS) core selector and a small acoustic array set up in an anechoic pool with a volume of 20x7x7 cu m was performed, beginning in Aug. 1984. In analyzing the waveforms recorded during the effective working time of 186 hrs, three acoustic signals which cannot be explained as from any source other than AS cores were obtained, and an estimation of related parameters was made.

  6. Acoustic Event Detection Based on MRMR Selected Feature Vectors

    VOZARIKOVA Eva; Juhar, Jozef; CIZMAR Anton

    2012-01-01

    This paper is focused on the detection of potentially dangerous acoustic events such as gun shots and breaking glass in the urban environment. Various feature extraction methods can be used forrepresenting the sound in the detection system based on Hidden Markov Models of acoustic events. Mel – frequency cepstral coefficients, low - level descriptors defined in MPEG-7 standard and another time andspectral features were considered in the system. For the selection of final subset of features Mi...

  7. HADES - Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole

    Semburg, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) is located in the upper part of the optical neutrino observatory IceCube, currently under construction. SPATS consists of four strings at depths between 80 m and 500 m below the surface of the ice with seven stages per string. Each stage is equipped with an acoustic sensor and a transmitter. Three strings (string A-C) were deployed in the austral summer 2006/07. SPATS was extended by a fourth string (string D) with second generation sensors and transmitters in 2007/08. One second generation sensor type HADES (Hydrophone for Acoustic Detection at South Pole) consists of a ring-shaped piezo-electric element coated with polyurethane. The development of the sensor, optimization of acoustic transmission by acoustic impedance matching and first in-situ results will be discussed.

  8. Acoustic detection in superconducting magnets for performance characterization and diagnostics

    Marchevsky, M; Sabbi, G; Prestemon, S

    2013-01-01

    Quench diagnostics in superconducting accelerator magnets is essential for understanding performance limitations and improving magnet design. Applicability of the conventional quench diagnostics methods such as voltage taps or quench antennas is limited for long magnets or complex winding geometries, and alternative approaches are desirable. Here, we discuss acoustic sensing technique for detecting mechanical vibrations in superconducting magnets. Using LARP high-field Nb3Sn quadrupole HQ01 [1], we show how acoustic data is connected with voltage instabilities measured simultaneously in the magnet windings during provoked extractions and current ramps to quench. Instrumentation and data analysis techniques for acoustic sensing are reviewed.

  9. Project DUMAND and the tradeoffs between acoustic and optical detection

    The Deep Underseas Muon and Neutrino Detection (DUMAND) Project is briefly described, with emphasis upon the trade-offs between optical and acoustic detection in the proposed cubic kilometer detector. The status of the program, which is nearing the detector design study and testing stage, is discussed

  10. Acoustic Helicopter and FW Aircraft Detection and Classification

    Koersel, A.C. van

    2001-01-01

    The possibility to detect the passage of aircraft (either propeller or jet) with one or more mechanical wave sensors (acoustic or seismic) is investigated. An existing algorithm-sensor demonstator can detect and classify helicopter targets. In its current form it is developed to reject other targets

  11. Sensor development and calibration for acoustic neutrino detection in ice

    Karg, Timo; Laihem, Karim; Semburg, Benjamin; Tosi, Delia

    2009-01-01

    A promising approach to measure the expected low flux of cosmic neutrinos at the highest energies (E > 1 EeV) is acoustic detection. There are different in-situ test installations worldwide in water and ice to measure the acoustic properties of the medium with regard to the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection. The parameters of interest include attenuation length, sound speed profile, background noise level and transient backgrounds. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been deployed in the upper 500 m of drill holes for the IceCube neutrino observatory at the geographic South Pole. In-situ calibration of sensors under the combined influence of low temperature, high ambient pressure, and ice-sensor acoustic coupling is difficult. We discuss laboratory calibrations in water and ice. Two new laboratory facilities, the Aachen Acoustic Laboratory (AAL) and the Wuppertal Water Tank Test Facility, have been set up. They offer large volumes of bubble free ice (3 m^3) and water (11 m^3) for the devel...

  12. Passive acoustic detection of deep-diving beaked whales

    Zimmer, W.M.X.; Harwood, J.; Tyack, P.L.;

    2008-01-01

    clicks regularly to echolocate on prey during deep foraging dives. The effectiveness of PAD for beaked whales depends not only on the acoustic behavior and output of the animals but also on environmental conditions and the quality of the passive sonar implemented. A primary constraint on the range at...... receiver close to the surface should be able to detect acoustically Cuvier's beaked whales with a high probability at distances up to 0.7  km, provided the listening duration exceeds the deep dive interval, about 2.5  h on average. Detection ranges beyond 4  km are unlikely and would require low ambient...

  13. Background studies for acoustic neutrino detection at the South Pole

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdrmann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Denger, T; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Geisler, M; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; Hülß, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K -H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Krings, T; Kroll, G; Kuehn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nießen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Prikockis, M; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stössl, A; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Stür, M; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Turčan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P

    2011-01-01

    The detection of acoustic signals from ultra-high energy neutrino interactions is a promising method to measure the tiny flux of cosmogenic neutrinos expected on Earth. The energy threshold for this process depends strongly on the absolute noise level in the target material. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), deployed in the upper part of four boreholes of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, has monitored the noise in Antarctic ice at the geographic South Pole for more than two years down to 500 m depth. The noise is very stable and Gaussian distributed. Lacking an in-situ calibration up to now, laboratory measurements have been used to estimate the absolute noise level in the 10 to 50 kHz frequency range to be smaller than 20 mPa. Using a threshold trigger, sensors of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup registered acoustic pulse-like events in the IceCube detector volume and its vicinity. Acoustic signals from refreezing IceCube holes and from anthropogenic sources have been used to localize acoustic e...

  14. Theoretical detection ranges for acoustic based manatee avoidance technology.

    Phillips, Richard; Niezrecki, Christopher; Beusse, Diedrich O

    2006-07-01

    The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of watercraft collisions in Florida's coastal waterways. To reduce the number of collisions, warning systems based upon detecting manatee vocalizations have been proposed. One aspect of the feasibility of an acoustically based warning system relies upon the distance at which a manatee vocalization is detectable. Assuming a mixed spreading model, this paper presents a theoretical analysis of the system detection capabilities operating within various background and watercraft noise conditions. This study combines measured source levels of manatee vocalizations with the modeled acoustic properties of manatee habitats to develop a method for determining the detection range and hydrophone spacing requirements for acoustic based manatee avoidance technologies. In quiet environments (background noise approximately 70 dB) it was estimated that manatee vocalizations are detectable at approximately 250 m, with a 6 dB detection threshold, In louder environments (background noise approximately 100dB) the detection range drops to 2.5 m. In a habitat with 90 dB of background noise, a passing boat with a maximum noise floor of 120 dB would be the limiting factor when it is within approximately 100 m of a hydrophone. The detection range was also found to be strongly dependent on the manatee vocalization source level. PMID:16875213

  15. Development of a compact transmitter array for the acoustic neutrino detection calibration

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Bou-Cabo, M; Larosa, G; Llorens, C D; Martínez-Mora, J A

    2011-01-01

    Parametric acoustic sources technique has been widely used in several fields of acoustics, especially in underwater acoustics with the aim to obtain very directive transducers. In this paper we present different studies and developments done during last years to develop a compact acoustic calibrator that allows emitting acoustic neutrino like signal with the goal to calibrate arrays of acoustic receiver sensors to detect ultra-high energy neutrinos.

  16. On Marine Mammal Acoustic Detection Performance Bounds

    Xian, Yin; Nolte, Loren; Tantum, Stacy; Liao, Xuejun; Zhang, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Since the spectrogram does not preserve phase information contained in the original data, any algorithm based on the spectrogram is not likely to be optimum for detection. In this paper, we present the Short Time Fourier Transform detector to detect marine mammals in the time-frequency plane. The detector uses phase information for detection. We evaluate this detector by comparing it to the existing spectrogram based detectors for different SNRs and various environments including a known ocea...

  17. Measurements and Simulation Studies of Piezoceramics for Acoustic Particle Detection

    Salomon, K; Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Naumann, C

    2005-01-01

    Calibration sources are an indispensable tool for all detectors. In acoustic particle detection the goal of a calibration source is to mimic neutrino signatures as expected from hadronic cascades. A simple and promising method for the emulation of neutrino signals are piezo ceramics. We will present results of measruements and simulations on these piezo ceramics.

  18. The use of acoustic emission to detect stress relief cracking

    Stress rupture tests have been carried out on CrMoV steel specimens containing weld heat affected zone structures. An acoustic emission technique is described which has been used to detect cracking in these tests. Cavitational damage is associated with bursts of acoustic output and these results have been supported by fractograpic examination. The features of progressive cavitational damage are described for materials of different cracking susceptibility. It is implied that cavity formation can occur in the heat affected zone of CrMoV welds when heating to the stress relieving temperature. (orig.)

  19. Wavelet-based acoustic emission detection method with adaptive thresholding

    Menon, Sunil; Schoess, Jeffrey N.; Hamza, Rida; Busch, Darryl

    2000-06-01

    Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. One such technology, the use of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults, has been investigated by Honeywell Technology Center for its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS). This ambitious, 38-month, proof-of-concept effort, which was a part of the Naval Surface Warfare Center Air Vehicle Diagnostics System program, culminated in a successful three-week flight test of the RAMS system at Patuxent River Flight Test Center in September 1997. The flight test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. This paper presents the results of stress wave data analysis of the flight-test dataset using wavelet-based techniques to assess background operational noise vs. machinery failure detection results.

  20. Factors Affecting Detection Probability of Acoustic Tags in Coral Reefs

    Bermudez, Edgar F.

    2012-05-01

    Acoustic telemetry is an important tool for studying the movement patterns, behaviour, and site fidelity of marine organisms; however, its application is challenged in coral reef environments where complex topography and intense environmental noise interferes with acoustic signals, and there has been less study. Therefore, it is particularly critical in coral reef telemetry studies to first conduct a long-term range test, a tool that provides informa- tion on the variability and periodicity of the transmitter detection range and the detection probability. A one-month range test of a coded telemetric system was conducted prior to a large-scale tagging project investigating the movement of approximately 400 fishes from 30 species on offshore coral reefs in the central Red Sea. During this range test we determined the effect of the following factors on transmitter detection efficiency: distance from receiver, time of day, depth, wind, current, moon-phase and temperature. The experiment showed that biological noise is likely to be responsible for a diel pattern of -on average- twice as many detections during the day as during the night. Biological noise appears to be the most important noise source in coral reefs overwhelming the effect of wind-driven noise, which is important in other studies. Detection probability is also heavily influenced by the location of the acoustic sensor within the reef structure. Understanding the effect of environmental factors on transmitter detection probability allowed us to design a more effective receiver array for the large-scale tagging study.

  1. Passive acoustic detection of deep-diving beaked whales.

    Zimmer, Walter M X; Harwood, John; Tyack, Peter L; Johnson, Mark P; Madsen, Peter T

    2008-11-01

    Beaked whales can remain submerged for an hour or more and are difficult to sight when they come to the surface to breathe. Passive acoustic detection (PAD) not only complements traditional visual-based methods for detecting these species but also can be more effective because beaked whales produce clicks regularly to echolocate on prey during deep foraging dives. The effectiveness of PAD for beaked whales depends not only on the acoustic behavior and output of the animals but also on environmental conditions and the quality of the passive sonar implemented. A primary constraint on the range at which beaked whale clicks can be detected involves their high frequencies, which attenuate rapidly, resulting in limited ranges of detection, especially in adverse environmental conditions. Given current knowledge of source parameters and in good conditions, for example, with a wind speed of 2 ms, a receiver close to the surface should be able to detect acoustically Cuvier's beaked whales with a high probability at distances up to 0.7 km, provided the listening duration exceeds the deep dive interval, about 2.5 h on average. Detection ranges beyond 4 km are unlikely and would require low ambient noise or special sound propagation conditions. PMID:19045770

  2. On Marine Mammal Acoustic Detection Performance Bounds

    Xian, Yin; Tantum, Stacy; Liao, Xuejun; Zhang, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Since the spectrogram does not preserve phase information contained in the original data, any algorithm based on the spectrogram is not likely to be optimum for detection. In this paper, we present the Short Time Fourier Transform detector to detect marine mammals in the time-frequency plane. The detector uses phase information for detection. We evaluate this detector by comparing it to the existing spectrogram based detectors for different SNRs and various environments including a known ocean, uncertain ocean, and mean ocean. The results show that this detector outperforms the spectrogram based detector. Simulations are presented using the polynomial phase signal model of the North Atlantic Right Whale (NARW), along with the bellhop ray tracing model.

  3. Topography and biological noise determine acoustic detectability on coral reefs

    Cagua, Edgar F.

    2013-08-19

    Acoustic telemetry is an increasingly common tool for studying the movement patterns, behavior and site fidelity of marine organisms, but to accurately interpret acoustic data, the variability, periodicity and range of detectability between acoustic tags and receivers must be understood. The relative and interactive effects of topography with biological and environmental noise have not been quantified on coral reefs. We conduct two long-term range tests (1- and 4-month duration) on two different reef types in the central Red Sea to determine the relative effect of distance, depth, topography, time of day, wind, lunar phase, sea surface temperature and thermocline on detection probability. Detectability, as expected, declines with increasing distance between tags and receivers, and we find average detection ranges of 530 and 120 m, using V16 and V13 tags, respectively, but the topography of the reef can significantly modify this relationship, reducing the range by ~70 %, even when tags and receivers are in line-of-sight. Analyses that assume a relationship between distance and detections must therefore be used with care. Nighttime detection range was consistently reduced in both locations, and detections varied by lunar phase in the 4-month test, suggesting a strong influence of biological noise (reducing detection probability up to 30 %), notably more influential than other environmental noises, including wind-driven noise, which is normally considered important in open-water environments. Analysis of detections should be corrected in consideration of the diel patterns we find, and range tests or sentinel tags should be used for more than 1 month to quantify potential changes due to lunar phase. Some studies assume that the most usual factor limiting detection range is weather-related noise; this cannot be extrapolated to coral reefs. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  4. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-12-01

    The extensive network of high-pressure natural gas transmission pipelines covering the United States provides an important infrastructure for our energy independence. Early detection of pipeline leaks and infringements by construction equipment, resulting in corrosion fractures, presents an important aspect of our national security policy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCVG) is and has been funding research on various applicable techniques. The WVU research team has focused on monitoring pipeline background acoustic signals generated and transmitted by gas flowing through the gas inside the pipeline. In case of a pipeline infringement, any mechanical impact on the pipe wall, or escape of high-pressure gas, generates acoustic signals traveling both up and down stream through the gas. Sudden changes in flow noise are detectable with a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP), developed under this contract. It incorporates a pressure compensating microphone and a signal- recording device. Direct access to the gas inside the line is obtained by mounting such a PAMP, with a 1/2 inch NPT connection, to a pipeline pressure port found near most shut-off valves. An FFT of the recorded signal subtracted by that of the background noise recorded one-second earlier appears to sufficiently isolate the infringement signal to allow source interpretation. Using cell phones for data downloading might allow a network of such 1000-psi rated PAMP's to acoustically monitor a pipeline system and be trained by neural network software to positively identify and locate any pipeline infringement.

  5. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-10-31

    The extensive network of high-pressure natural gas transmission pipelines covering the United States provides an important infrastructure for our energy independence. Early detection of pipeline leaks and infringements by construction equipment, resulting in corrosion fractures, presents an important aspect of our national security policy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCVG) is and has been funding research on various applicable techniques. The WVU research team has focused on monitoring pipeline background acoustic signals generated and transmitted by gas flowing through the gas inside the pipeline. In case of a pipeline infringement, any mechanical impact on the pipe wall, or escape of high-pressure gas, generates acoustic signals traveling both up and down stream through the gas. Sudden changes in flow noise are detectable with a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP), developed under this contract. It incorporates a pressure compensating microphone and a signal- recording device. Direct access to the gas inside the line is obtained by mounting such a PAMP, with a 1/2 inch NPT connection, to a pipeline pressure port found near most shut-off valves. An FFT of the recorded signal subtracted by that of the background noise recorded one-second earlier appears to sufficiently isolate the infringement signal to allow source interpretation. Using cell phones for data downloading might allow a network of such 1000-psi rated PAMP's to acoustically monitor a pipeline system and be trained by neural network software to positively identify and locate any pipeline infringement.

  6. Acoustic detection of ultra-high energy cascades in ice

    Boeser, S.

    2006-12-08

    Current underwater optical neutrino telescopes are designed to detect neutrinos from astrophysical sources with energies in the TeV range. Due to the low fluxes and small cross sections, no high energy neutrinos of extraterrestrial origin have been observed so far. Only the Cherenkov neutrino detectors on the km{sup 3} scale that are currently under construction will have the necessary volume to observe these rare interactions. For the guaranteed source of neutrinos from interactions of the ultra-high energy cosmic at EeV energies rays with the ambient cosmic microwave background, event rates of only one per year are expected in these experiments. To measure the flux and verify the predicted cross sections of these cosmogenic neutrinos, an observed volume of the order of 100 km{sup 3} will be necessary, that will not be feasible with existing detection techniques. Alternative methods are required to build a detector on these scales. One promising idea is to record the acoustic waves generated in hadronic or electromagnetic cascades following the neutrino interaction. The higher amplitudes of the sonic signal and the large expected absorption length of sound favour South Polar ice instead of sea water as a medium. The prerequisites for an estimate of the potential of such a detector are suitable acoustic sensors, a verification of the model of thermo-acoustic sound generation and a determination of the acoustic properties of the ice. In a theoretical derivation the mechanism of thermo-elastic excitation of acoustic waves was shown to be equivalent for isotropic solids and liquids. Following a detailed analysis of the existing knowledge a simulation study of a hybrid optical-radio-acoustic detector has been performed. Ultrasonic sensors dedicated to in-ice application were developed and have been used to record acoustic signals from intense proton and laser beams in water and ice. With the obtained experience, the hitherto largest array of acoustic sensors and

  7. Acoustic detection of ultra-high energy cascades in ice

    Current underwater optical neutrino telescopes are designed to detect neutrinos from astrophysical sources with energies in the TeV range. Due to the low fluxes and small cross sections, no high energy neutrinos of extraterrestrial origin have been observed so far. Only the Cherenkov neutrino detectors on the km3 scale that are currently under construction will have the necessary volume to observe these rare interactions. For the guaranteed source of neutrinos from interactions of the ultra-high energy cosmic at EeV energies rays with the ambient cosmic microwave background, event rates of only one per year are expected in these experiments. To measure the flux and verify the predicted cross sections of these cosmogenic neutrinos, an observed volume of the order of 100 km3 will be necessary, that will not be feasible with existing detection techniques. Alternative methods are required to build a detector on these scales. One promising idea is to record the acoustic waves generated in hadronic or electromagnetic cascades following the neutrino interaction. The higher amplitudes of the sonic signal and the large expected absorption length of sound favour South Polar ice instead of sea water as a medium. The prerequisites for an estimate of the potential of such a detector are suitable acoustic sensors, a verification of the model of thermo-acoustic sound generation and a determination of the acoustic properties of the ice. In a theoretical derivation the mechanism of thermo-elastic excitation of acoustic waves was shown to be equivalent for isotropic solids and liquids. Following a detailed analysis of the existing knowledge a simulation study of a hybrid optical-radio-acoustic detector has been performed. Ultrasonic sensors dedicated to in-ice application were developed and have been used to record acoustic signals from intense proton and laser beams in water and ice. With the obtained experience, the hitherto largest array of acoustic sensors and transmitters was

  8. Acoustic metamaterial for subwavelength edge detection

    Molerón, Miguel; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials have demonstrated the possibility to produce super-resolved images by restoring propagative and evanescent waves. However, for efficient information transfer, for example, in compressed sensing, it is often desirable to visualize only the fast spatial variations of the wave field (carried by evanescent waves), as the one created by edges or small details. Image processing edge detection algorithms perform such operation, but they add time and complexity to the ima...

  9. DETECTION OF EPR USING A PULSED MICROWAVE ACOUSTIC TECHNIQUE

    Netzelmann, U.; Lerchner, H.; Pelzl, J.; Sigrist, M.

    1983-01-01

    A new pulsed microwave acoustic method is shown to be suited for the detection of EPR. Pressure amplitudes obtained for DPPH in n-hexane agree with theoretical predictions. Our calculations clearly demonstrate that temperature gradients within the sample are important for generating large signal amplitudes. Hence this technique is of special interest for samples with an inhomogeneous distribution of paramagnetic centers or for the study of interfaces.

  10. Resonance and Nonlinear Seismo-Acoustic Land Mine Detection

    Donskoy, Dimitri M.

    2008-01-01

    We have presented an overview of our team’s (at Stevens Institute of Technology) contribution in development of resonance and nonlinear Seismo-Acoustic Mine Detection (SAMD) techniques. Among our major accomplishments are the discovery and quantitative characterization of mine resonances; the discovery of a very strong nonlinear dynamics of the buried mines manifesting itself through the combination and intermodulation frequencies; the development of a physical model describing the linear a...

  11. Acoustic detection in superconducting magnets for performance characterization and diagnostics

    Marchevsky, M.; Wang, X.; Sabbi, G.; Prestemon, S.

    2014-01-01

    Quench diagnostics in superconducting accelerator magnets is essential for understanding performance limitations and improving magnet design. Applicability of the conventional quench diagnostics methods such as voltage taps or quench antennas is limited for long magnets or complex winding geometries, and alternative approaches are desirable. Here, we discuss acoustic sensing technique for detecting mechanical vibrations in superconducting magnets. Using LARP high-field Nb3Sn quadrupole HQ01 [...

  12. Detecting baryon acoustic oscillations by 3d weak lensing

    Grassi, Alessandra; Schaefer, Bjoern Malte

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of detecting baryon acoustic oscillation features in the cosmic matter distribution by 3d weak lensing. Baryon oscillations are inaccessible even to weak lensing tomography because of wide line-of-sight weighting functions and require a specialized approach via 3d shear estimates. We quantify the uncertainty of estimating the matter spectrum amplitude at the baryon oscillations wave vectors by a Fisher-matrix approach with a fixed cosmology and show in this way ...

  13. Towards an Automated Acoustic Detection System for Free Ranging Elephants

    Zeppelzauer, Matthias; Hensman, Sean; Stoeger, Angela S

    2015-01-01

    The human-elephant conflict is one of the most serious conservation problems in Asia and Africa today. The involuntary confrontation of humans and elephants claims the lives of many animals and humans every year. A promising approach to alleviate this conflict is the development of an acoustic early warning system. Such a system requires the robust automated detection of elephant vocalizations under unconstrained field conditions. Today, no system exists that fulfills these requirements. In t...

  14. Acoustic monitoring of safety/relief valves for leak detection

    The results presented here indicate that there is a high probability of confidentially detecting pilot stage leakage in safety/relief valves through the use of acoustic monitoring, especially in the frequency range 30-60 kHz. This should be particularly true if the sensors and signal processing equipment are designed for sensitivity to this range, and if routine or continuous monitoring is performed so that trends can be recognized

  15. Underwater acoustic detection of ultra high energy neutrinos in Antares

    We investigate the possibility to detect ultra high energy neutrinos (UHE, 1018+ eV) by the mean of underwater acoustic methods. This study is based on experimental measurements and, when none of those are available, on numerical simulations. The sea water acts as a target for neutrinos of cosmic origin. The electroweak interaction of high energy neutrinos with water molecules leads to a cascade of secondary particles resulting in the emission of an ultra-sonic impulse by a thermo-acoustic coupling mechanism. This mechanism is little efficient, however the generated signal has good propagation properties. Ambient sea noise, as well as the self noise of the ceramic transducers used for the detection, restrict the method to UHE. In addition, the strong directivity of the signal implies that location methods, by the detection in coincidence on multiple detectors, are little efficient. At extremely high energies (1020+ eV) and for a single detector we estimate the sensitivity limit of this acoustic method to be of the order of E2*φ 106 GeV cm-2 sr-1*s-1, for an astrophysical flux 0 falling as 1/E2. (author)

  16. Acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos in South Pole ice

    Vandenbroucke, Justin

    2012-01-01

    When high-energy particles interact in dense media to produce a particle shower, most of the shower energy is deposited in the medium as heat. This causes the medium to expand locally and emit a shock wave with a medium-dependent peak frequency on the order of 10 kHz. In South Pole ice in particular, the elastic properties of the medium have been theorized to provide good coupling of particle energy to acoustic energy. The acoustic attenuation length has been theorized to be several km, which could enable a sparsely instrumented large-volume detector to search for rare signals from high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. We simulated a hybrid optical/radio/acoustic extension to the IceCube array, specifically intended to detect cosmogenic (GZK) neutrinos with multiple methods simultaneously in order to achieve high confidence in a discovered signal and to measure angular, temporal, and spectral distributions of GZK neutrinos. This work motivated the design, deployment, and operation of the South Pole Acoustic Te...

  17. High-performance air acoustic detection and classification sensor

    Porter, Richard; Raines, Robert; Jones, Barry

    2009-05-01

    Acoustic signals are a principal detection modality for unattended sensor systems. However, the performance of these systems is frequently suboptimal due to insufficient dynamic range in small systems or excess power consumption in larger systems. This paper discusses an approach to developing an unattended ground sensor (UGS) system that has the best features of both worlds. This system, developed by McQ Inc., has exceptional dynamic range (> 100 dB) while operating at power levels of 1.5-5 watts. The system also has a user definable signal parameter library and automated detection methodology that will be described.

  18. Acoustic leak-detection system for railroad transportation security

    Womble, P. C.; Spadaro, J.; Harrison, M. A.; Barzilov, A.; Harper, D.; Hopper, L.; Houchins, E.; Lemoff, B.; Martin, R.; McGrath, C.; Moore, R.; Novikov, I.; Paschal, J.; Rogers, S.

    2007-04-01

    Pressurized rail tank cars transport large volumes of volatile liquids and gases throughout the country, much of which is hazardous and/or flammable. These gases, once released in the atmosphere, can wreak havoc with the environment and local populations. We developed a system which can non-intrusively and non-invasively detect and locate pinhole-sized leaks in pressurized rail tank cars using acoustic sensors. The sound waves from a leak are produced by turbulence from the gas leaking to the atmosphere. For example, a 500 μm hole in an air tank pressurized to 689 kPa produces a broad audio frequency spectrum with a peak near 40 kHz. This signal is detectable at 10 meters with a sound pressure level of 25 dB. We are able to locate a leak source using triangulation techniques. The prototype of the system consists of a network of acoustic sensors and is located approximately 10 meters from the center of the rail-line. The prototype has two types of acoustic sensors, each with different narrow frequency response band: 40 kHz and 80 kHz. The prototype is connected to the Internet using WiFi (802.11g) transceiver and can be remotely operated from anywhere in the world. The paper discusses the construction, operation and performance of the system.

  19. Detection and tracking of drones using advanced acoustic cameras

    Busset, Joël.; Perrodin, Florian; Wellig, Peter; Ott, Beat; Heutschi, Kurt; Rühl, Torben; Nussbaumer, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Recent events of drones flying over city centers, official buildings and nuclear installations stressed the growing threat of uncontrolled drone proliferation and the lack of real countermeasure. Indeed, detecting and tracking them can be difficult with traditional techniques. A system to acoustically detect and track small moving objects, such as drones or ground robots, using acoustic cameras is presented. The described sensor, is completely passive, and composed of a 120-element microphone array and a video camera. The acoustic imaging algorithm determines in real-time the sound power level coming from all directions, using the phase of the sound signals. A tracking algorithm is then able to follow the sound sources. Additionally, a beamforming algorithm selectively extracts the sound coming from each tracked sound source. This extracted sound signal can be used to identify sound signatures and determine the type of object. The described techniques can detect and track any object that produces noise (engines, propellers, tires, etc). It is a good complementary approach to more traditional techniques such as (i) optical and infrared cameras, for which the object may only represent few pixels and may be hidden by the blooming of a bright background, and (ii) radar or other echo-localization techniques, suffering from the weakness of the echo signal coming back to the sensor. The distance of detection depends on the type (frequency range) and volume of the noise emitted by the object, and on the background noise of the environment. Detection range and resilience to background noise were tested in both, laboratory environments and outdoor conditions. It was determined that drones can be tracked up to 160 to 250 meters, depending on their type. Speech extraction was also experimentally investigated: the speech signal of a person being 80 to 100 meters away can be captured with acceptable speech intelligibility.

  20. Understanding Piezo Based Sensors for Acoustic Neutrino Detection

    The ANTARES collaboration is currently installing a neutrino telescope off the French Mediterranean coast to measure diffuse fluxes and point sources of high energy cosmic neutrinos. The complete detector will consist of 900 photomultipliers on 12 detector lines, using 0.01km3 of sea water as target material. As part of the ANTARES deep-sea research infrastructure, the Erlangen group is planning to modify several ANTARES storeys by fitting them with acoustic receivers to study the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection in the deep sea. In this paper, studies of the electromechanical properties of piezoelectric sensors are presented, based on an equivalent circuit diagram for the coupled mechanical and electrical oscillations of a piezoelectric element. A method for obtaining the system parameters as well as derivations of sensor properties like pressure sensitivity and intrinsic noise are treated and results compared to measurements. Finally, a possible application of these results for simulating system response and optimising reconstruction algorithms is discussed

  1. Crack detection in lap-joints using acoustic emission

    Experiments have been performed to assess the feasibility of crack growth detection in an aircraft lap-joint using acoustic emission (AE). Fatigue tests were conducted in both simple geometry specimens and lap-joint specimens. A high fidelity, wide band transient recording system was used to capture the acoustic emission due to defect growth. The simple specimens were used to determine crack growth signal characteristics, while the complex lap-joint provided a more realistic specimen. Representative waveforms from these two specimens are presented, along with a discussion of wave propagnation for the particular media. A self-organizing map was investigated as a means of automatically identify crack signals. Results and suggestions for future work are presented

  2. Laser-induced acoustic landmine detection with experimental results on buried landmines

    Heuvel, J.C. van den; Putten, F.J.M. van; Koersel, A.C. van; Schleijpen, H.M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic landmine detection (ALD) is a technique for the detection of buried landmines including non-metal mines. Since it gives complementary results with GPR or metal detection, sensor fusion of these techniques with acoustic detection would give promising results. Two methods are used for the aco

  3. Thermal Acoustic Oscillation: Causes, Detection, Analysis, and Prevention

    Christie, R. J.; Hartwig, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Acoustic Oscillations (TAO) can occur in cryogenic systems and produce significant sources of heat. This source of heat can increase the boil off rate of cryogenic propellants in spacecraft storage tanks and reduce mission life. This paper discusses the causes of TAO, how it can be detected, what analyses can be done to predict it, and how to prevent it from occurring.The paper provides practical insight into what can aggravate instability, practical methods for mitigation, and when TAO does not occur. A real life example of a cryogenic system with an unexpected heat source is discussed, along with how TAO was confirmed and eliminated.

  4. Gravitational Wave Detection with High Frequency Phonon Trapping Acoustic Cavities

    Goryachev, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of theoretical predictions for astrophysical and cosmological objects, which emit high frequency ($10^6-10^9$~Hz) Gravitation Waves (GW) or contribute somehow to the stochastic high frequency GW background. Here we propose a new sensitive detector in this frequency band, which is based on existing cryogenic ultra-high quality factor quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave cavity technology, coupled to near-quantum-limited SQUID amplifiers at $20$~mK. We show that spectral strain sensitivities reaching $10^{-22}$ per $\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ per mode is possible, which in principle can cover the frequency range with multiple ($>100$) modes with quality factors varying between $10^6-10^{10}$ allowing wide bandwidth detection. Due to its compactness and well established manufacturing process, the system is easily scalable into arrays and distributed networks that can also impact the overall sensitivity and introduce coincidence analysis to ensure no false detections.

  5. DETECTION OF DRUGSTORE BEETLES IN 9975 PACKAGES USING ACOUSTIC EMISSIONS

    Shull, D.

    2013-03-04

    This report documents the initial feasibility tests performed using a commercial acoustic emission instrument for the purpose of detecting beetles in Department of Energy 9975 shipping packages. The device selected for this testing was a commercial handheld instrument and probe developed for the detection of termites, weevils, beetles and other insect infestations in wooden structures, trees, plants and soil. The results of two rounds of testing are presented. The first tests were performed by the vendor using only the hand-held instrument’s indications and real-time operator analysis of the audio signal content. The second tests included hands-free positioning of the instrument probe and post-collection analysis of the recorded audio signal content including audio background comparisons. The test results indicate that the system is promising for detecting the presence of drugstore beetles, however, additional work would be needed to improve the ease of detection and to automate the signal processing to eliminate the need for human interpretation. Mechanisms for hands-free positioning of the probe and audio background discrimination are also necessary for reliable detection and to reduce potential operator dose in radiation environments.

  6. Towards Acoustic Detection of UHE Neutrinos in the Mediterranean Sea - The AMADEUS Project in ANTARES

    Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Katz, U F; Lahmann, R; Naumann, C; Salomon, K

    2007-01-01

    The acoustic detection method is a promising option for future neutrino telescopes operating in the ultra-high energy regime. It utilises the effect that a cascade evolving from a neutrino interaction generates a sound wave, and is applicable in different target materials like water, ice and salt. Described here are the developments in and the plans for the research on acoustic particle detection in water performed by the ANTARES group at the University of Erlangen within the framework of the ANTARES experiment in the Mediterranean Sea. A set of acoustic sensors will be integrated into this optical neutrino telescope to test acoustic particle detection methods and perform background studies.

  7. ACOUSTIC DETECTING AND LOCATING GAS PIPE LINE INFRINGEMENT

    John L Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-04-01

    The West Virginia University natural gas transmission line leak detection research is only considering using readily available 1/2 inch pipeline access ports for the detection of leak generated signals. The main problem with leak signals is the low signal to noise ratio. One of the acoustic signals associated with gas escaping through a leak is only temporary and is in the form of a rarefaction wave originating when the leak is formed. Due to pipeline friction, over distance such a step function transitions to a ramp function. The ability to identify a leak by pipeline monitoring and signal processing depends a great deal on the quality and signal to noise ratio of the characteristics of the detectors used. Combinations of sensing devices are being used for the WVU sensor package and are contained in a removable sensor housing. The four sensors currently installed are a 1/2 inch 3 Hz-40 Khz microphone, an audible range moving coil sensor, a piezo-electric pressure transducer, and the WVU designed floating 3 inch diameter diaphragm to detect flow transient induced pressure ramp type signals. The WVU diaphragm sensor, which is currently under development, uses the same diaphragm principle as a high quality capacitance type microphone, but utilizes aerodynamic signal amplification. This type of amplification only amplifies the ramp-signal itself, not the random pipeline noise.

  8. Detection of cavitation vortex in hydraulic turbines using acoustic techniques

    Cavitation phenomena are known for their destructive capacity in hydraulic machineries and are caused by the pressure decrease followed by an implosion when the cavitation bubbles find an adverse pressure gradient. A helical vortex appears in the turbine diffuser cone at partial flow rate operation and can be cavitating in its core. Cavity volumes and vortex frequencies vary with the under-pressure level. If the vortex frequency comes close to one of the eigen frequencies of the turbine, a resonance phenomenon may occur, the unsteady fluctuations can be amplified and lead to important turbine and hydraulic circuit damage. Conventional cavitation vortex detection techniques are based on passive devices (pressure sensors or accelerometers). Limited sensor bandwidths and low frequency response limit the vortex detection and characterization information provided by the passive techniques. In order to go beyond these techniques and develop a new active one that will remove these drawbacks, previous work in the field has shown that techniques based on acoustic signals using adapted signal content to a particular hydraulic situation, can be more robust and accurate. The cavitation vortex effects in the water flow profile downstream hydraulic turbines runner are responsible for signal content modifications. Basic signal techniques use narrow band signals traveling inside the flow from an emitting transducer to a receiving one (active sensors). Emissions of wide band signals in the flow during the apparition and development of the vortex embeds changes in the received signals. Signal processing methods are used to estimate the cavitation apparition and evolution. Tests done in a reduced scale facility showed that due to the increasing flow rate, the signal -- vortex interaction is seen as modifications on the received signal's high order statistics and bandwidth. Wide band acoustic transducers have a higher dynamic range over mechanical elements; the system

  9. Damage detection in wind turbine blades using acoustic techniques

    Facing climate change, the use of renewable energy gains importance. The wind energy sector grows very fast. Bigger and more powerful wind turbines will be built in the coming decades and the safety and reliability of the turbines will become more important. Wind turbine blades have to be inspected at regular intervals, because they are highly stressed during operation and a blade breakdown can cause big economic damages. The turbine blades consist of fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP/CFRP) and sandwich areas containing wood or plastic foam. The blades are manufactured as two halves and glued together afterwards. Typical damages are delaminations within the GFRP or the sandwich and missing adhesive or deficient bond at the bonding surfaces. The regular inspections of wind turbine blades are performed manually by experts and are limited to visual appraisals and simple tapping tests. To improve the inspections of wind turbine blades non-destructive testing techniques using acoustic waves are being developed. To detect delaminations within the laminates of the turbine blade, a local resonance spectroscopy was used. To detect missing bond areas from the outside of the blade the impulse-echo-technique was applied. This paper is an updated reprint of an article published on ndt.net in 2008. (author)

  10. New methods for leaks detection and localisation using acoustic emission

    Real time monitoring of Pressurized Water nuclear Reactor secondary coolant system tends to integrate digital processing machines. In this context, the method of acoustic emission seems to exhibit good performances. Its principle is based on passive listening of noises emitted by local micro-displacements inside a material under stress which propagate as elastic waves. The lack of a priori knowledge on leak signals leads us to go deeper into understanding flow induced noise generation. Our studies are conducted using a simple leak model depending on the geometry and the king of flow inside the slit. Detection and localization problems are formulated according to the maximum likelihood principle. For detection, the methods using a indicator of similarity (correlation, higher order correlation) seems to give better results than classical ones (rms value, envelope, filter banks). For leaks location, a large panel of classical (generalized inter-correlation) and innovative (convolution, adaptative, higher order statistics) methods of time delay estimation are presented. The last part deals with the applications of higher order statistics. The analysis of higher order estimators of a non linear non Gaussian stochastic process family, the improvement of non linear prediction performances and the optimal-order choice problem are addressed in simple analytic cases. At last, possible applications to leak signals analysis are pointed out. (authors).264 refs., 7 annexes

  11. Damage detection in wind turbine blades using acoustic techniques

    Juengert, A., E-mail: anne.juengert@mpa.uni-stuttgart.de [Univ. of Stuttgart, Materialpruefungsanstalt Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Facing climate change, the use of renewable energy gains importance. The wind energy sector grows very fast. Bigger and more powerful wind turbines will be built in the coming decades and the safety and reliability of the turbines will become more important. Wind turbine blades have to be inspected at regular intervals, because they are highly stressed during operation and a blade breakdown can cause big economic damages. The turbine blades consist of fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP/CFRP) and sandwich areas containing wood or plastic foam. The blades are manufactured as two halves and glued together afterwards. Typical damages are delaminations within the GFRP or the sandwich and missing adhesive or deficient bond at the bonding surfaces. The regular inspections of wind turbine blades are performed manually by experts and are limited to visual appraisals and simple tapping tests. To improve the inspections of wind turbine blades non-destructive testing techniques using acoustic waves are being developed. To detect delaminations within the laminates of the turbine blade, a local resonance spectroscopy was used. To detect missing bond areas from the outside of the blade the impulse-echo-technique was applied. This paper is an updated reprint of an article published on ndt.net in 2008. (author)

  12. Multiuser sonar watermarking and detection in an underwater acoustic channel

    Mobasseri, Bijan G.; Lynch, Robert S.; Andiario, David

    2013-06-01

    Sonar watermarking is the practice of embedding low-power, secure digital signatures in the time frequency space of a waveform. The algorithm is designed for a single source/receiver configuration. However, in a multiuser environment, multiple sources broadcast sonar waveforms that overlap in both time and frequency. The receiver can be configured as a filter bank where each bank is dedicated to detecting a specific watermark. However, a filter bank is prone to mutual interference as multiple sonar waveforms are simultaneously present at the detector input. To mitigate mutual interference, a multiuser watermark detector is formulated as a decorrelating detector that decouples detection amongst the watermark signatures. The acoustic channel is simulated in software and modeled by an FIR filter. This model is used to compensate for the degradation of spreading sequences used for watermark embedding. The test statistic generated at the output of the decorrelating detector is used in a joint maximum likelihood ratio detector to establish the presence or absence of the watermark in each sonar waveform. ROC curves are produced for multiple sources positioned at varying ranges subject to ambient ocean noise controlled by varying sea states.

  13. Acoustic Leak Detection Requirements for a SFR Steam Generator Protection

    A large volume of fast reactor research has been executed in Russia, Japan, France, India and the United Kingdom. At present, an unique fast reactor named BN- 600 is operating in Russia. Also, the operation of research reactors such as Phenix (France), JOYO (Japan), BOR-60 (Russia) and FBTR (India) proceeds. The last project to be completed was the reactor Monju (Japan) which is now stopped. In addition activities for the development of fast reactors are being conducted in China, India, and South Korea. Fast reactors are a choice for the subsequent nuclear power generation in Korea, and their increased safety is one of the basic requirements. The basis for a tightening of the requirements on safety is the emergencies in NPPs in Russia, USA, France, Japan and other countries. These emergencies testify that the existing monitoring systems do not fully provide a well-timed detection of the distresses arising in a NPP, because of a poor sensitivity and response, thus the necessity for a better diagnostic system is obvious. In accordance with the USA GNEP initiative in Obninsk, Russia, 2007 the main efforts should be directed toward a sodium-water steam generator safety increase due to improvement of the hydrogen monitoring system and the acoustic leak detection system

  14. A prototype device for acoustic neutrino detection in Lake Baikal

    Budnev, N M

    2007-01-01

    In April 2006, a 4-channel acoustic antenna has been put in long-term operation on Lake Baikal. The detector was installed at a depth of about 100 m on the instrumentation string of Baikal Neutrino Telescope NT200+. This detector may be regarded as a prototype of a subunit for a future underwater acoustic neutrino telescope. We describe the design of acoustic detector and present first results obtained from data analysis.

  15. Detection of impulsive sources from an aerostat-based acoustic array data collection system

    Prather, Wayne E.; Clark, Robert C.; Strickland, Joshua; Frazier, Wm. Garth; Singleton, Jere

    2009-05-01

    An aerostat based acoustic array data collection system was deployed at the NATO TG-53 "Acoustic Detection of Weapon Firing" Joint Field Experiment conducted in Bourges, France during the final two weeks of June 2008. A variety of impulsive sources including mortar, artillery, gunfire, RPG, and explosive devices were fired during the test. Results from the aerostat acoustic array will be presented against the entire range of sources.

  16. Development of Novel Optical Fiber Interferometric Sensors with High Sensitivity for Acoustic Emission Detection

    Deng, Jiangdong

    2004-01-01

    For the purpose of developing a new highly-sensitive and reliable fiber optical acoustic sensor capable of real-time on-line detection of acoustic emissions in power transformers, this dissertation presents the comprehensive research work on the theory, modeling, design, instrumentation, noise analysis, and performance evaluation of a diaphragm-based optical fiber acoustic (DOFIA) sensor system. The optical interference theory and the diaphragm dynamic vibration analysis form the two fou...

  17. Investigation of acoustic sensors to detect coconut rhinoceros beetle in Guam

    The coconut rhinoceros beetle, Oryctes rhinoceros, was accidentally introduced into Guam last year and now threatens the Island’s forests and tourist industry. These large insects can be detected easily with acoustic sensors, and procedures are being developed to incorporate acoustic technology int...

  18. Development of an acoustic steam generator leak detection system using delay-and-sum beamformer

    A new acoustic steam generator leak detection system using delay-and-sum beamformer is proposed. The major advantage of the delay-and-sum beamformer is it could provide information of acoustic source direction. An acoustic source of a sodium-water reaction is supposed to be localized while the background noise of the steam generator operation is uniformly distributed in the steam generator tube region. Therefore the delay-and-sum beamformer could distinguish the acoustic source of the sodium-water reaction from steam generator background noise. In this paper, results from numerical analyses are provided to show fundamental feasibility of the new method. (author)

  19. Review of German activities in the field of acoustic boiling detection

    The potential and the feasibility of acoustic boiling detection systems in LMFBRs are mainly determined by the four following items: The availability of radiation and temperature resistant acoustic transducers; Kind and intensity of the noise source; The acoustic transfer behaviour of the core structure and the coolant; The acoustic background noise. Although these four elements are more or less present in any practical case, this differentiation is useful for several reasons. It helps to analyse the .problem, to define appropriate theoretical and experimental investigations, and finally to synthesize the single results to an overall judgement. This paper reviews the German (KfK and Interatom) activities in the four areas

  20. Acoustic detection, tracking, and characterization of three tornadoes.

    Frazier, William Garth; Talmadge, Carrick; Park, Joseph; Waxler, Roger; Assink, Jelle

    2014-04-01

    Acoustic data recorded at 1000 samples per second by two sensor arrays located at ranges of 1-113 km from three tornadoes that occurred on 24 May 2011 in Oklahoma are analyzed. Accurate bearings to the tornadoes have been obtained using beamforming methods applied to the data at infrasonic frequencies. Beamforming was not viable at audio frequencies, but the data demonstrate the ability to detect significant changes in the shape of the estimated power spectral density in the band encompassing 10 Hz to approximately 100 Hz at distances of practical value from the sensors. This suggests that arrays of more closely spaced sensors might provide better bearing accuracy at practically useful distances from a tornado. Additionally, a mathematical model, based on established relationships of aeroacoustic turbulence, is demonstrated to provide good agreement to the estimated power spectra produced by the tornadoes at different times and distances from the sensors. The results of this analysis indicate that, qualitatively, an inverse relationship appears to exist between the frequency of an observed peak of the power spectral density and the reported tornado intensity. PMID:25234974

  1. [INVITED] Laser generation and detection of ultrafast shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids

    Pezeril, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the up-to-date findings related to ultrafast shear acoustic waves. Recent progress obtained for the laser generation and detection of picosecond shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids is reviewed. Examples in which the transverse isotropic symmetry of the sample structure is broken in order to permit shear acoustic wave generation through sudden laser heating are described in detail. Alternative photo-induced mechanisms for ultrafast shear acoustic generation in metals, semiconductors, insulators, magnetostrictive, piezoelectric and electrostrictive materials are reviewed as well. With reference to key experiments, an all-optical technique employed to probe longitudinal and shear structural dynamics in the GHz frequency range in ultra-thin liquid films is described. This technique, based on specific ultrafast shear acoustic transducers, has opened new perspectives that will be discussed for ultrafast shear acoustic probing of viscoelastic liquids at the nanometer scale.

  2. System for detecting acoustic emissions in multianvil experiments: Application to deep seismicity in the Earth

    One of the major goals in the experimental study of deep earthquakes is to identify slip instabilities at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) that might be responsible for the occurrence of earthquakes. Detecting acoustic emissions from a specimen during faulting provides unique constraints on the instability process. There are few experimental studies reporting acoustic emissions under HPHT conditions, due to technical challenges. And those studies have used only one or at most two acoustic sensors during the experiments. Such techniques preclude the accurate location of the acoustic emission source region and thus the ability to distinguish real signal from noise that may be coming from outside the sample. We have developed a system for detecting acoustic emissions at HPHT. Here we present a four-channel acoustic emission detecting system working in the HPHT octahedral multianvil apparatus. Each channel has high resolution (12 bits) and a sampling rate of 30 MHz. In experiments at the pressures up to 6 GPa and temperatures up to 770 deg. C, we have observed acoustic emissions under various conditions. Analyzing these signals, we are able to show that this system permits us to distinguish between signal and noise, locate the source of the acoustic emission, and obtain reliable data on the radiation pattern. This system has greatly improved our ability to study faulting instabilities under high pressure and high temperature

  3. Acoustic neutrino detection investigations within ANTARES and prospects for KM3NeT

    Lahmann Robert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic neutrino detection technique is a promising approach for future large-scale detectors with the aim of measuring the small expected flux of cosmogenic neutrinos at energies exceeding 1 EeV. It suggests itself to investigate this technique in the context of underwater Cherenkov neutrino telescopes, in particular KM3NeT, because acoustic sensors are present by design to allow for the calibration of the positions of the optical sensors. For the future, the KM3NeT detector in the Mediterranean Sea will provide an ideal infrastructure for a dedicated array of acoustic sensors. In this presentation results from the acoustic array AMADEUS of the ANTARES detector will be discussed with respect to the potential and implications for acoustic neutrino detection with KM3NeT and beyond.

  4. The role of gravity in ocean acoustics propagation and its implication to early tsunami detection

    Oliveira, Tiago; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    Oceanic low frequency sound generated by submarine earthquake travels much faster than tsunamis and leaves pressure signatures that can act as tsunami precursors. In this regard, it is anticipated that the correct measurement and analysis of low frequency acoustics would enhance current early tsunami detection systems. In this work we model the low frequency acoustics generated by the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake using the "Method of Normal Modes" and the "Acoustics-Gravity Wave" theory. Ocean acoustic theories usually neglect the effect of gravity. However, we show for rigid and elastic bottom conditions how gravity influences the acoustic normal mode propagation speed. Practically, our results can help in the real time characterization of low frequency sources in the ocean. This will enhance the robustness of early tsunami detection systems.

  5. Detection of respiratory compromise by acoustic monitoring, capnography, and brain function monitoring during monitored anesthesia care.

    Tanaka, Pedro P; Tanaka, Maria; Drover, David R

    2014-12-01

    Episodes of apnea in sedated patients represent a risk of respiratory compromise. We hypothesized that acoustic monitoring would be equivalent to capnography for detection of respiratory pauses, with fewer false alarms. In addition, we hypothesized that the patient state index (PSI) would be correlated with the frequency of respiratory pauses and therefore could provide information about the risk of apnea during sedation. Patients undergoing sedation for surgical procedures were monitored for respiration rate using acoustic monitoring and capnography and for depth of sedation using the PSI. A clinician blinded to the acoustic and sedation monitor observed the capnograph and patient to assess sedation and episodes of apnea. Another clinician retrospectively reviewed the capnography and acoustic waveform and sound files to identify true positive and false positive respiratory pauses by each method (reference method). Sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio for detection of respiratory pause was calculated for acoustic monitoring and capnography. The correlation of PSI with respiratory pause events was determined. For the 51 respiratory pauses validated by retrospective analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio positive for detection were 16, 96 %, and 3.5 for clinician observation; 88, 7 %, and 1.0 for capnography; and 55, 87 %, and 4.1 for acoustic monitoring. There was no correlation between PSI and respiratory pause events. Acoustic monitoring had the highest likelihood ratio positive for detection of respiratory pause events compared with capnography and clinician observation and, therefore, may provide the best method for respiration rate monitoring during these procedures. PMID:24420342

  6. Site specific probability of passive acoustic detection of humpback whale calls from single fixed hydrophones.

    Helble, Tyler A; D'Spain, Gerald L; Hildebrand, John A; Campbell, Gregory S; Campbell, Richard L; Heaney, Kevin D

    2013-09-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammal calls is an increasingly important method for assessing population numbers, distribution, and behavior. A common mistake in the analysis of marine mammal acoustic data is formulating conclusions about these animals without first understanding how environmental properties such as bathymetry, sediment properties, water column sound speed, and ocean acoustic noise influence the detection and character of vocalizations in the acoustic data. The approach in this paper is to use Monte Carlo simulations with a full wave field acoustic propagation model to characterize the site specific probability of detection of six types of humpback whale calls at three passive acoustic monitoring locations off the California coast. Results show that the probability of detection can vary by factors greater than ten when comparing detections across locations, or comparing detections at the same location over time, due to environmental effects. Effects of uncertainties in the inputs to the propagation model are also quantified, and the model accuracy is assessed by comparing calling statistics amassed from 24,690 humpback units recorded in the month of October 2008. Under certain conditions, the probability of detection can be estimated with uncertainties sufficiently small to allow for accurate density estimates. PMID:23968053

  7. Application of acoustic leak detection technology for the detection and location of leaks in light water reactors

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the adequacy of leak detection systems in light water reactors. The sources of numerous reported leaks and methods of detection have been documented. Research to advance the state of the art of acoustic leak detection is presented, and procedures for implementation are discussed. 14 refs., 70 figs., 10 tabs

  8. Acoustics

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  9. A Four-Quadrant PVDF Transducer for Surface Acoustic Wave Detection

    Zhi Chen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF piezoelectric transducer was developed to detect laser-induced surface acoustic waves in a SiO2-thin film–Si-substrate structure. In order to solve the problems related to, firstly, the position of the probe, and secondly, the fact that signals at different points cannot be detected simultaneously during the detection process, a four-quadrant surface acoustic wave PVDF transducer was designed and constructed for the purpose of detecting surface acoustic waves excited by a pulse laser line source. The experimental results of the four-quadrant piezoelectric detection in comparison with the commercial nanoindentation technology were consistent, the relative error is 0.56%, and the system eliminates the piezoelectric surface wave detection direction deviation errors, improves the accuracy of the testing system by 1.30%, achieving the acquisition at the same time at different testing positions of the sample.

  10. Neutrino detection, position calibration and marine science with acoustic arrays in the deep sea

    Lahmann, R., E-mail: robert.lahmann@physik.uni-erlangen.de [Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-10-11

    Arrays of acoustic receivers are an integral part of present and potential future Cherenkov neutrino telescopes in the deep sea. They measure the positions of individual detector elements which vary with time as an effect of undersea currents. At the same time, the acoustic receivers can be employed for marine science purposes, in particular for monitoring the ambient noise environment and the signals emitted by the fauna of the sea. And last but not least, they can be used for studies towards acoustic detection of ultra-high-energy neutrinos. Measuring acoustic pressure pulses in huge underwater acoustic arrays with an instrumented volume of the order of 100 km{sup 3} is a promising approach for the detection of cosmic neutrinos with energies exceeding 1 EeV. Pressure signals are produced by the particle cascades that evolve when neutrinos interact with nuclei in water, and can be detected over large distances in the kilometre range. In this article, the status of acoustic detection will be reviewed and plans for the future – most notably in the context of KM3NeT – will be discussed. The connection between neutrino detection, position calibration and marine science will be illustrated.

  11. Theory, simulation and experimental results of the acoustic detection of magnetization changes in superparamagnetic iron oxide

    Borgert Jörn

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnetic Particle Imaging is a novel method for medical imaging. It can be used to measure the local concentration of a tracer material based on iron oxide nanoparticles. While the resulting images show the distribution of the tracer material in phantoms or anatomic structures of subjects under examination, no information about the tissue is being acquired. To expand Magnetic Particle Imaging into the detection of soft tissue properties, a new method is proposed, which detects acoustic emissions caused by magnetization changes in superparamagnetic iron oxide. Methods Starting from an introduction to the theory of acoustically detected Magnetic Particle Imaging, a comparison to magnetically detected Magnetic Particle Imaging is presented. Furthermore, an experimental setup for the detection of acoustic emissions is described, which consists of the necessary field generating components, i.e. coils and permanent magnets, as well as a calibrated microphone to perform the detection. Results The estimated detection limit of acoustic Magnetic Particle Imaging is comparable to the detection limit of magnetic resonance imaging for iron oxide nanoparticles, whereas both are inferior to the theoretical detection limit for magnetically detected Magnetic Particle Imaging. Sufficient data was acquired to perform a comparison to the simulated data. The experimental results are in agreement with the simulations. The remaining differences can be well explained. Conclusions It was possible to demonstrate the detection of acoustic emissions of magnetic tracer materials in Magnetic Particle Imaging. The processing of acoustic emission in addition to the tracer distribution acquired by magnetic detection might allow for the extraction of mechanical tissue parameters. Such parameters, like for example the velocity of sound and the attenuation caused by the tissue, might also be used to support and improve ultrasound imaging. However, the method

  12. Detection of large acoustic energy flux in the solar atmosphere

    González, N Bello; Pillet, V Martínez; Bonet, J A; Solanki, S K; Iniesta, J C del Toro; Schmidt, W; Gandorfer, A; Domingo, V; Barthol, P; Berkefeld, T; Knölker, M

    2010-01-01

    We study the energy flux carried by acoustic waves excited by convective motions at sub-photospheric levels. The analysis of high-resolution spectropolarimetric data taken with IMaX/Sunrise provides a total energy flux of ~ 6400--7700 Wm$^{-2}$ at a height of ~ 250 km in the 5.2-10 mHz range, i.e. at least twice the largest energy flux found in previous works. Our estimate lies within a factor of 2 of the energy flux needed to balance radiative losses from the chromosphere according to Anderson & Athay (1989) and revives interest in acoustic waves for transporting energy to the chromosphere. The acoustic flux is mainly found in the intergranular lanes but also in small rapidly-evolving granules and at the bright borders, forming dark dots and lanes of splitting granules.

  13. Acoustic wave detection of chemical species electrokinetically transported within a capillary tube.

    Li, Paul C H; Prasad, Ronald

    2003-06-01

    For the first time, we report the acoustic wave detection of chemical species being transported in a capillary tube to a region where acoustic coupling occurs. The measured parameter was a change in phase, which was originally only attributed to a change in solution density as the analyte passed by the detection region. Accordingly, we report the detection of change in phase as various chemical species (e.g. Cy5 dye, Cy5-derivatized glycine and underivatized glycine) were introduced into and migrated along a capillary tube through electrokinetic processes. To improve detection sensitivity, we modified various experimental parameters, such as run buffer concentration, capillary wall thickness and transducer frequency. Although acoustic wave detection was feasible, the peak width and detection limit were inadequate as compared to conventional detection methods for HPLC or CE. Nevertheless, the effects of various physical and chemical relaxation processes on acoustic wave absorption were discussed, and this has shed some light on explaining some observations, which cannot be explained by density differences alone. Accordingly, the acoustic wave method is suggested to investigate these processes, as studied in ultrasonic relaxation spectroscopy, in a flow system. PMID:12866892

  14. Neutrino Detection, Position Calibration and Marine Science with Acoustic Arrays in the Deep Sea

    Lahmann, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Arrays of acoustic receivers are an integral part of present and potential future Cherenkov neutrino telescopes in the deep sea. They measure the positions of individual detector elements which vary with time as an effect of undersea currents. At the same time, the acoustic receivers can be employed for marine science purposes, in particular for monitoring the ambient noise environment and the signals emitted by the fauna of the sea. And last but not least, they can be used for studies towards acoustic detection of ultra-high-energy neutrinos. Measuring acoustic pressure pulses in huge underwater acoustic arrays with an instrumented volume of the order of 100 km^3 is a promising approach for the detection of cosmic neutrinos with energies exceeding 1 EeV. Pressure signals are produced by the particle cascades that evolve when neutrinos interact with nuclei in water, and can be detected over large distances in the kilometre range. In this article, the status of acoustic detection will be reviewed and plans for...

  15. AMADEUS - The Acoustic Neutrino Detection Test System of the ANTARES Deep-Sea Neutrino Telescope

    Aguilar, J A; Albert, A; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; Jesus, A C Assis; Astraatmadja, T; Aubert, J-J; Auer, R; Barbarito, E; Baret, B; Basa, S; Bazzotti, M; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bigongiari, C; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouwhuis, M C; Brown, A; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Camarena, F; Capone, A; Cârloganu, C; Carminati, G; Carr, J; Cassano, B; Castorina, E; Cavasinni, V; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Charvis, Ph; Chiarusi, T; Sen, N Chon; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Cottini, N; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; De Bonis, G; Decowski, M P; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Drouhin, D; Eberl, T; Emanuele, U; Ernenwein, J-P; Escoffier, S; Fehr, F; Fiorello, C; Flaminio, V; Fritsch, U; Fuda, J-L; Gay, P; Giacomelli, G; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; Guillard, G; Halladjian, G; Hallewell, G; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Heine, E; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hößl, J; de Jong, M; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Keller, P; Kooijman, P; Kopper, C; Kouchner, A; Kretschmer, W; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Lambard, G; Larosa, G; Laschinsky, H; Le Provost, H; Lefèvre, D; Lelaizant, G; Lim, G; Presti, D Lo; Loehner, H; Loucatos, S; Louis, F; Lucarelli, F; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Martinez-Mora, J A; Mazure, A; Mongelli, M; Montaruli, T; Morganti, M; Moscoso, L; Motz, H; Naumann, C; Neff, M; Ostasch, R; Palioselitis, D; Pavalas, G E; Payre, P; Petrovic, J; Picot-Clemente, N; Picq, C; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Presani, E; Racca, C; Radu, A; Reed, C; Riccobene, G; Richardt, C; Rujoiu, M; Ruppi, M; Russo, G V; Salesa, F; Sapienza, P; Schöck, F; Schuller, J-P; Shanidze, R; Simeone, F; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Tasca, L; Toscano, S; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vannoni, G; Vecchi, M; Vernin, P; Wijnker, G; de Wolf, E; Yepes, H; Zaborov, D; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; 10.1016/j.nima.2010.09.053

    2010-01-01

    The AMADEUS (ANTARES Modules for the Acoustic Detection Under the Sea) system which is described in this article aims at the investigation of techniques for acoustic detection of neutrinos in the deep sea. It is integrated into the ANTARES neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. Its acoustic sensors, installed at water depths between 2050 and 2300 m, employ piezo-electric elements for the broad-band recording of signals with frequencies ranging up to 125 kHz. The typical sensitivity of the sensors is around -145 dB re 1V/muPa (including preamplifier). Completed in May 2008, AMADEUS consists of six "acoustic clusters", each comprising six acoustic sensors that are arranged at distances of roughly 1 m from each other. Two vertical mechanical structures (so-called lines) of the ANTARES detector host three acoustic clusters each. Spacings between the clusters range from 14.5 to 340 m. Each cluster contains custom-designed electronics boards to amplify and digitise the acoustic signals from the sensors. An on...

  16. NATO TG-53: acoustic detection of weapon firing joint field experiment

    Robertson, Dale N.; Pham, Tien; Scanlon, Michael V.; Srour, Nassy; Reiff, Christian G.; Sim, Leng K.; Solomon, Latasha; Thompson, Dorothea F.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the NATO Task Group 53 (TG-53) acoustic detection of weapon firing field joint experiment at Yuma Proving Ground during 31 October to 4 November 2005. The participating NATO countries include France, the Netherlands, UK and US. The objectives of the joint experiments are: (i) to collect acoustic signatures of direct and indirect firings from weapons such as sniper, mortar, artillery and C4 explosives and (ii) to share signatures among NATO partners from a variety of acoustic sensing platforms on the ground and in the air distributed over a wide area.

  17. Automatic Music Boundary Detection Using Short Segmental Acoustic Similarity in a Music Piece

    Tanaka Kazuyo; Lee Shi-Wook; Itoh Yoshiaki; Iwabuchi Akira; Kojima Kazunori; Ishigame Masaaki

    2008-01-01

    The present paper proposes a new approach for detecting music boundaries, such as the boundary between music pieces or the boundary between a music piece and a speech section for automatic segmentation of musical video data and retrieval of a designated music piece. The proposed approach is able to capture each music piece using acoustic similarity defined for short-term segments in the music piece. The short segmental acoustic similarity is obtained by means of a new algorithm called segmen...

  18. Inclusion of video information for detection of acoustic events using the fuzzy integral

    Butko, Taras; Temko, Andrey A.; Nadeu Camprubí, Climent; Canton Ferrer, Cristian

    2008-01-01

    When applied to interactive seminars, the detection of acoustic events from only audio information shows a large amount of errors, which are mostly due to the temporal overlaps of sounds. Video signals may be a useful additional source of information to cope with that problem for particular events. In this work, we aim at improving the detection of steps by using two audio-based Acoustic Event Detection (AED) systems, with SVM and HMM, and a video-based AED system, which employs the output of...

  19. Experiment Observation on Acoustic Forward Scattering for Underwater Moving Object Detection

    LEI Bo; MA Yuan-Liang; YANG Kun-De

    2011-01-01

    The problem of detecting an object in shallow water by observing changes in the acoustic field as the object passes between an acoustic source and receiver is addressed. A signal processing scheme based on forward scattering is proposed to detect the perturbed field in the presence of the moving object. The periodic LFM wideband signal is transmitted and a sudden change of field is acquired using a normalized median filter. The experimental results on the lake show that the proposed scheme is successful for the detection of a slowly moving object in the bistatic blind zone.

  20. Underwater acoustic detection of UHE neutrinos with the ANTARES experiment

    Simeone, Francesco; collaboration, for the ANTARES

    2009-01-01

    The ANTARES Neutrino Telescope is a water Cherenkov detector composed of an array of approximately 900 photomultiplier tubes in 12 vertical strings, spread over an area of about 0.1 km^2 with an instrumented height of about 350 metres. ANTARES, built in the Mediterranean Sea, is the biggest neutrino Telescope operating in the northern hemisphere. Acoustic sensors (AMADEUS project) have been integrated into the infrastructure of ANTARES, grouped in small arrays, to evaluate the feasibility of ...

  1. A Summary Comparison of Active Acoustic Detections and Visual Observations of Marine Mammals in the Canadian Beaufort Sea.

    Pyć, Cynthia D; Geoffroy, Maxime; Knudsen, Frank R

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries sonar was used to determine the applicability of active acoustic monitoring (AAM) for marine mammal detection in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. During 170 h of simultaneous observation by marine mammal observers and active acoustic observation, 119 Balaena mysticetus (bowheads) and 4 Delphinapterus leucas (belugas) were visually sighted, while 59 acoustic signals of bowheads were detected by AAM operators. Observations and detection of seals were also recorded. Comparative results indicate that commercially available active acoustic systems can detect seals at distances up to 500 m and large baleen whales at distances up to 2 km. PMID:26611045

  2. Detecting acoustic events during thermal and mechanical loading

    Por, Gabor; Bereczki, Peter; Danka, Zsolt; Trampus, Peter [College of Dunaujvaros (Hungary)

    2014-11-01

    We examined Acoustic Emission (AE) events during combined heat and tensile test carried out in different steels (S235JRG2, TRIP and TWIP steels) on Gleeble simulator. The simulator enabled us to control parameters for fast heating and cooling parallel with pressing and tensile the sample until its real break. The aim was to investigate the structural change of the material, phase transformation in the steel at different temperatures, and connect them to signatures measured by acoustic emission sensors. During testing we noticed characteristics of Barkhausen noise. We demonstrate and prove definitely that we were facing Acoustic Barkhausen Noise (ABN) due to AC current used to heating and to maintaining the temperature in the cylindrical ferritic sample. It was observed, that the magnitude of the ABN dropped suddenly to the half when the tensile test started after preheating, and it was growing back when the tensile test went to plastic deformation with elongation of the tested sample. Localization of the ABN sources has been done showing the distribution of the sources along the whole material. ABN sources were observed all along the sample with interesting density growth in the section where the diameter was smaller, thus the tension was higher. Nevertheless, this was not the only observation, since the place of the densest sources was displaced from one position to another position until the break occurred near to the densest place of ANB and AE source. Off-line examination of the structure of material afterward using destructive test proved that we could register those cooling periods, where phase transition took place in the material. Ferrite-bainite and magnetite-bainite transitions were connected to some higher distribution of ANB and AE signals during the test. Rate of hits and sum of hit were connected to material transition during cooling. The first results of AE measurements during tensile test in TWIP materials showed that AE events are connected with

  3. AMADEUS-The acoustic neutrino detection test system of the ANTARES deep-sea neutrino telescope

    The AMADEUS (ANTARES Modules for the Acoustic Detection Under the Sea) system which is described in this article aims at the investigation of techniques for acoustic detection of neutrinos in the deep sea. It is integrated into the ANTARES neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. Its acoustic sensors, installed at water depths between 2050 and 2300 m, employ piezo-electric elements for the broad-band recording of signals with frequencies ranging up to 125 kHz. The typical sensitivity of the sensors is around -145 dB re 1 V/μPa (including preamplifier). Completed in May 2008, AMADEUS consists of six 'acoustic clusters', each comprising six acoustic sensors that are arranged at distances of roughly 1 m from each other. Two vertical mechanical structures (so-called lines) of the ANTARES detector host three acoustic clusters each. Spacings between the clusters range from 14.5 to 340 m. Each cluster contains custom-designed electronics boards to amplify and digitise the acoustic signals from the sensors. An on-shore computer cluster is used to process and filter the data stream and store the selected events. The daily volume of recorded data is about 10 GB. The system is operating continuously and automatically, requiring only little human intervention. AMADEUS allows for extensive studies of both transient signals and ambient noise in the deep sea, as well as signal correlations on several length scales and localisation of acoustic point sources. Thus the system is excellently suited to assess the background conditions for the measurement of the bipolar pulses expected to originate from neutrino interactions.

  4. AMADEUS-The acoustic neutrino detection test system of the ANTARES deep-sea neutrino telescope

    Aguilar, J.A. [IFIC - Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, CSIC - Universitat de Valencia, Apdo. de Correos 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Al Samarai, I. [CPPM - Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, CNRS/IN2P3 et Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 Avenue de Luminy, Case 902, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Albert, A. [GRPHE - Institut Universitaire de Technologie de Colmar, 34 rue du Grillenbreit BP 50568, 68008 Colmar (France); Anghinolfi, M. [INFN - Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Anton, G. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Anvar, S. [Direction des Sciences de la Matiere - Institut de Recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l' Univers - Service d' Electronique des Detecteurs et d' Informatique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Ardid, M. [Institut d' Investigacio per a la Gestio Integrada de Zones Costaneres (IGIC) - Universitat Politecnica de Valencia. C/ Paranimf 1., 46730 Gandia (Spain); Assis Jesus, A.C.; Astraatmadja, T. [FOM Instituut voor Subatomaire Fysica Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Aubert, J.-J. [CPPM - Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, CNRS/IN2P3 et Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 Avenue de Luminy, Case 902, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Auer, R. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Barbarito, E. [INFN - Sezione di Bari, Via E. Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Baret, B. [APC - Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie, UMR 7164 (CNRS, Universite Paris 7 Diderot, CEA, Observatoire de Paris) 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Basa, S. [LAM - Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Pole de l' Etoile Site de Chateau-Gombert, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France)

    2011-01-21

    The AMADEUS (ANTARES Modules for the Acoustic Detection Under the Sea) system which is described in this article aims at the investigation of techniques for acoustic detection of neutrinos in the deep sea. It is integrated into the ANTARES neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. Its acoustic sensors, installed at water depths between 2050 and 2300 m, employ piezo-electric elements for the broad-band recording of signals with frequencies ranging up to 125 kHz. The typical sensitivity of the sensors is around -145 dB re 1 V/{mu}Pa (including preamplifier). Completed in May 2008, AMADEUS consists of six 'acoustic clusters', each comprising six acoustic sensors that are arranged at distances of roughly 1 m from each other. Two vertical mechanical structures (so-called lines) of the ANTARES detector host three acoustic clusters each. Spacings between the clusters range from 14.5 to 340 m. Each cluster contains custom-designed electronics boards to amplify and digitise the acoustic signals from the sensors. An on-shore computer cluster is used to process and filter the data stream and store the selected events. The daily volume of recorded data is about 10 GB. The system is operating continuously and automatically, requiring only little human intervention. AMADEUS allows for extensive studies of both transient signals and ambient noise in the deep sea, as well as signal correlations on several length scales and localisation of acoustic point sources. Thus the system is excellently suited to assess the background conditions for the measurement of the bipolar pulses expected to originate from neutrino interactions.

  5. Detection of acoustic signal emitted during corrosion of 304 stainless steel

    In this work, corrosion of 304 stainless steel was evaluated by using acoustic emission(AE) technique. AE measurement system was set for detecting acoustic signal during accelerated corrosion test of the specimen. AE signal started to be detected after the time of pitting corrosion initiation was evaluated by anodic polarization curve. Pitting corrosion damage was confirmed by optical microscopic observation of the surface morphology. AE cumulative counts and amplitude according to corrosion time could be divided into three stages. These trends were discussed in relation with changing pitting corrosion mechanism. Feasibilities of AE technique for evaluation of corrosion damage and mechanism were suggested.

  6. The Timing of Change Detection and Change Perception in Complex Acoustic Scenes

    Jaunmahomed, Zahrah; Chait, Maria

    2012-01-01

    We investigated how listeners perceive the temporal relationship of a light flash and a complex acoustic signal. The stimulus mimics ubiquitous events in busy scenes which are manifested as a change in the pattern of on-going fluctuation. Detecting pattern emergence inherently requires integration over time; resulting in such events being detected later than when they occurred. How does delayed detection time affect the perception of such events relative to other events in the scene? To model...

  7. Detection of ultra high energy neutrinos with an underwater very large volume array of acoustic sensors: A simulation study

    Karg, Timo

    2006-01-01

    This thesis investigates a new approach towards the detection of ultra high energy (E > 1 EeV) cosmic neutrinos using acoustic sensors immersed in water. The method is based on the thermoacoustic model describing the production of microsecond acoustic pulses from neutrino-induced particle cascades. These cascades locally heat the medium which leads to rapid expansion and a short sonic pulse detectable in water with hydrophones over distances of several kilometres. This makes acoustic detectio...

  8. Helmet-mounted acoustic array for hostile fire detection and localization in an urban environment

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2008-04-01

    The detection and localization of hostile weapons firing has been demonstrated successfully with acoustic sensor arrays on unattended ground sensors (UGS), ground-vehicles, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Some of the more mature systems have demonstrated significant capabilities and provide direct support to ongoing counter-sniper operations. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is conducting research and development for a helmet-mounted system to acoustically detect and localize small arms firing, or other events such as RPG, mortars, and explosions, as well as other non-transient signatures. Since today's soldier is quickly being asked to take on more and more reconnaissance, surveillance, & target acquisition (RSTA) functions, sensor augmentation enables him to become a mobile and networked sensor node on the complex and dynamic battlefield. Having a body-worn threat detection and localization capability for events that pose an immediate danger to the soldiers around him can significantly enhance their survivability and lethality, as well as enable him to provide and use situational awareness clues on the networked battlefield. This paper addresses some of the difficulties encountered by an acoustic system in an urban environment. Complex reverberation, multipath, diffraction, and signature masking by building structures makes this a very harsh environment for robust detection and classification of shockwaves and muzzle blasts. Multifunctional acoustic detection arrays can provide persistent surveillance and enhanced situational awareness for every soldier.

  9. Effect of passive acoustic sampling methodology on detecting bats after declines from white nose syndrome

    Coleman, Laci S.; Ford, W. Mark; Dobony, Christopher A.; Britzke, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant with the emergence and spread of white-nose syndrome (WNS) and precipitous decline of many bat species in North America, natural resource managers need modified and/or new techniques for bat inventory and monitoring that provide robust occupancy estimates. We used Anabat acoustic detectors to determine the most efficient passive acoustic sampling design for optimizing detection probabilities of multiple bat species in a WNS-impacted environment in New York, USA. Our sampling protocol included: six acoustic stations deployed for the entire duration of monitoring as well as a 4 x 4 grid and five transects of 5-10 acoustic units that were deployed for 6-8 night sample durations surveyed during the summers of 2011-2012. We used Program PRESENCE to determine detection probability and site occupancy estimates. Overall, the grid produced the highest detection probabilities for most species because it contained the most detectors and intercepted the greatest spatial area. However, big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) and species not impacted by WNS were detected easily regardless of sampling array. Endangered Indiana (Myotis sodalis) and little brown (Myotis lucifugus) and tri-colored bats (Perimyotis subflavus) showed declines in detection probabilities over our study, potentially indicative of continued WNS-associated declines. Identification of species presence through efficient methodologies is vital for future conservation efforts as bat populations decline further due to WNS and other factors.   

  10. Experimental study on the detection of free fluids and gases in waste packages by acoustic methods

    The objective of the project was to evaluate the potential and the limits of various nondestructive methods for testing the contents of 200-litre drums filled with radioactive waste. The following test problems were to be studied: 1. Detection of free water on the surface of the waste matrix (concrete); 2. Determination of the waste matrix level; 3. Determination of internal gas pressure. The following methods were found to be suitable: For Test problem 1: Measurement of Lamb wave attenuation, Acoustic impedance measurement (AIM) and Analysis of swash sound; For Test problem 2: Acoustic impedance measurement (AIM) and Measurement of Lamb wave attenuation; For Test problem 3: A method of pressure compensation and Analysis of cover resonances after striking the cover. It was not possible, however, to detect the concrete level by localisation of friction points using acoustic emission methods. 53 figs

  11. Acoustic detection and localization of weapons fire by unattended ground sensors and aerostat-borne sensors

    Naz, P.; Marty, Ch.; Hengy, S.; Miller, L. S.

    2009-05-01

    The detection and localization of artillery guns on the battlefield is envisaged by means of acoustic and seismic waves. The main objective of this work is to examine the different frequency ranges usable for the detection of small arms, mortars, and artillery guns on the same hardware platform. The main stages of this study have consisted of: data acquisition of the acoustic signals of the different weapons used, signal processing and evaluation of the localization performance for various types of individual arrays, and modeling of the wave propagation in the atmosphere. The study of the propagation effects on the signatures of these weapons is done by comparing the acoustic signals measured during various days, at ground level and at the altitude of our aerostat (typically 200 m). Numerical modeling has also been performed to reinforce the interpretation of the experimental results.

  12. Robotic vehicle uses acoustic array for detection and localization in urban environments

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2001-09-01

    Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites are quickly replacing the eyes and ears of soldiers on the complex battlefield. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) in Adelphi, Maryland has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing or door slam, and activate a pan-tilt to orient a visible and infrared camera toward the detected sound. Once the cameras are cued to the target, onboard image processing can then track the target and/or transmit the imagery to a remote operator for navigation, situational awareness, and target detection. Such a vehicle can provide reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition for soldiers, law enforcement, and rescue personnel, and remove these people from hazardous environments. ARL's primary robotic platforms contain 16-in. diameter, eight-element acoustic arrays. Additionally, a 9- in. array is being developed in support of DARPA's Tactical Mobile Robot program. The robots have been tested in both urban and open terrain. The current acoustic processing algorithm has been optimized to detect the muzzle blast from a sniper's weapon, and reject many interfering noise sources such as wind gusts, generators, and self-noise. However, other detection algorithms for speech and vehicle detection/tracking are being developed for implementation on this and smaller robotic platforms. The collaboration between two robots, both with known positions and orientations, can provide useful triangulation information for more precise localization of the acoustic events. These robots can be mobile sensor nodes in a larger, more expansive, sensor network that may include stationary ground sensors, UAVs, and other command and control assets. This report will document the performance of the robot's acoustic localization, describe the algorithm, and outline future work.

  13. RAP: acoustic detection of particles in ultracryogenic resonant antenna

    Bertolucci, S.; Coccia, E.; D' Antonio, S.; Waard, A. de; Delle Monache, G.; Di Gioacchino, D.; Fafone, V.; Fauth, A.; Frossati, G.; Ligi, C. E-mail: carlo.ligi@inf.infn.it; Marini, A.; Mazzitelli, G.; Modestino, G.; Pizzella, G.; Quintieri, L.; Raffone, G.; Ronga, F.; Tripodi, P.; Valente, P

    2004-03-11

    The resonant-mass gravitational wave detector NAUTILUS has recently recorded signals due to cosmic rays crossing. Very large signals have been observed in the superconductive state of the antenna. In order to investigate this anomalous response at low temperatures, the Rivelazione Acustica di Particelle experiment has been approved. Its purpose is the measurement of the mechanical vibrations in a superconducting (T{approx}100 mK) cylindrical aluminium bar when hit by 10{sup 5} electrons at 510 MeV from the DAPHINE Beam Test Facility, corresponding to the energies released by extensive air showers in the NAUTILUS antenna. The results of this measurement are crucial to understand the interaction of ionizing particles with bulk superconductors and to confirm the results on the thermo-acoustic model of the past experiments.

  14. Water experiment on phased array acoustic leak detection system for sodium-heated steam generator

    Highlights: • An acoustic leak detection system for sodium heated steam generator is proposed. • The new system can separate leak source from steam generator background noise. • Performance of the new system has been confirmed in water experiments. - Abstract: A phased array acoustic leak detection system for sodium heated steam generator has been proposed. The major advantage of the new system is it could provide information of acoustic source direction. An acoustic source of a sodium–water reaction is supposed to be localized while the background noise of the steam generator operation is uniformly distributed in the steam generator tube region. Therefore the new system could separate the target leak source from steam generator background noise. In the previous study, the methodology was proposed and basic performance was confirmed by numerical analysis. However, in the numerical analysis, acoustic transportation through the SG tube bundle was not modeled. In the present study, performance the proposed system has been confirmed in water experiments with mockup tube bundles

  15. Detection of nonlinear picosecond acoustic pulses by time-resolved Brillouin scattering

    In time-resolved Brillouin scattering (also called picosecond ultrasonic interferometry), the time evolution of the spatial Fourier component of an optically excited acoustic strain distribution is monitored. The wave number is determined by the momentum conservation in photon-phonon interaction. For linear acoustic waves propagating in a homogeneous medium, the detected time-domain signal of the optical probe transient reflectivity shows a sinusoidal oscillation at a constant frequency known as the Brillouin frequency. This oscillation is a result of heterodyning the constant reflection from the sample surface with the Brillouin-scattered field. Here, we present an analytical theory for the nonlinear reshaping of a propagating, finite amplitude picosecond acoustic pulse, which results in a time-dependence of the observed frequency. In particular, we examine the conditions under which this information can be used to study the time-evolution of the weak-shock front speed. Depending on the initial strain pulse parameters and the time interval of its nonlinear transformation, our theory predicts the detected frequency to either be monotonically decreasing or oscillating in time. We support these theoretical predictions by comparison with available experimental data. In general, we find that picosecond ultrasonic interferometry of nonlinear acoustic pulses provides access to the nonlinear acoustic properties of a medium spanning most of the GHz frequency range

  16. Object Detection and Tracking Method of AUV Based on Acoustic Vision

    ZHANG Tie-dong; WAN Lei; ZENG Wen-jing; XU Yu-ru

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a new framework for object detection and tracking of AUV including underwater acoustic data interpolation,underwater acoustic images segmentation and underwater objects tracking.This framework is applied to the design of vision-based method for AUV based on the forward looking sonar sensor.First,the real-time data flow (underwater acoustic images) is pre-processed to form the whole underwater acoustic image,and the relevant position information of objects is extracted and determined.An improved method of double threshold segmentation is proposed to resolve the problem that the threshold cannot be adjusted adaptively in the traditional method.Second,a representation of region information is created in light of the Gaussian particle filter.The weighted integration strategy combining the area and invariant moment is proposed to perfect the weight of particles and to enhance the tracking robustness.Results obtained on the real acoustic vision platform of AUV during sea trials are displayed and discussed.They show that the proposed method can detect and track the moving objects underwater online,and it is effective and robust.

  17. Experimental results of passive vibro-acoustic leak detection in SFR steam generator mock-up

    Regarding to GEN 4 context, it is necessary to fulfil the high safety standards for sodium fast reactors (SFR), particularly against water-sodium reaction which may occur in the steam generator units (SGU) in case of leak. This reaction can cause severe damages in the component in a short time. Detecting such a leak by visual in-sodium inspection is impossible because of sodium opacity. Hydrogen detection is then used but the time response of this method can be high in certain operating conditions. Active and passive acoustic leak detection methods were studied before SUPERPHENIX plant shutdown in 1997 to detect a water-into-sodium leak with a short time response. In the context of the new R and D studies for SFR, an innovative passive vibro-acoustic method is developed in the framework of a Ph.D. thesis to match with GEN 4 safety requirements. The method consists in assuming that a small leak emits spherical acoustic waves in a broadband frequency domain, which propagate in the liquid sodium and excite the SGU cylindrical shell. These spatially coherent waves are supposed to be buried by a spatially incoherent background noise. The radial velocities of the shell is measured by an array of accelerometers positioned on the external envelop of the SGU and a beam forming treatment is applied to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and to detect and localize the acoustic source. Previous numerical experiments were achieved and promising results were obtained. In this paper, experimental results of the proposed passive vibro-acoustic leak detection are presented. The experiment consists in a cylindrical water-filled steel pipe representing a model of SGU shell without tube bundle. A hydro-phone emitting an acoustic signal is used to simulate an acoustic monopole. Spatially uncorrelated noise or water-flow induced shell vibrations are considered as the background noise. The beam-forming method is applied to vibration signals measured by a linear array of

  18. Leak detection and localization system through acoustics; Sistema de deteccao e localizacao de vazamentos por acustica

    Alonso, Julio [Aselco Automacao, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Acoustic Leak Detection Systems (ALDS) are used on both liquid and gas pipelines as well as multi-phase flow pipelines to detect leaks quickly and provide a means of limiting product loss. The real-time acoustic signal is continuously compared against signature leak profiles for the particular operating and geometric conditions. These profiles were developed from a database established from over 20 years of experimental and field leak tests. This technique not only drastically reduces the false alarm rate, but also significantly improves the sensitivity and leak location accuracy. This system will also detect leaks with shut-in flow (zero flow rate in the pipeline). With the use of GPS (Global Positioning System) it not only improves leak location accuracy, but also allows for continuous leak detection during the loss of communications. (author)

  19. Passive acoustic monitoring to detect spawning in large-bodied catostomids

    Straight, Carrie A.; Freeman, Byron J.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    Documenting timing, locations, and intensity of spawning can provide valuable information for conservation and management of imperiled fishes. However, deep, turbid or turbulent water, or occurrence of spawning at night, can severely limit direct observations. We have developed and tested the use of passive acoustics to detect distinctive acoustic signatures associated with spawning events of two large-bodied catostomid species (River Redhorse Moxostoma carinatum and Robust Redhorse Moxostoma robustum) in river systems in north Georgia. We deployed a hydrophone with a recording unit at four different locations on four different dates when we could both record and observe spawning activity. Recordings captured 494 spawning events that we acoustically characterized using dominant frequency, 95% frequency, relative power, and duration. We similarly characterized 46 randomly selected ambient river noises. Dominant frequency did not differ between redhorse species and ranged from 172.3 to 14,987.1 Hz. Duration of spawning events ranged from 0.65 to 11.07 s, River Redhorse having longer durations than Robust Redhorse. Observed spawning events had significantly higher dominant and 95% frequencies than ambient river noises. We additionally tested software designed to automate acoustic detection. The automated detection configurations correctly identified 80–82% of known spawning events, and falsely indentified spawns 6–7% of the time when none occurred. These rates were combined over all recordings; rates were more variable among individual recordings. Longer spawning events were more likely to be detected. Combined with sufficient visual observations to ascertain species identities and to estimate detection error rates, passive acoustic recording provides a useful tool to study spawning frequency of large-bodied fishes that displace gravel during egg deposition, including several species of imperiled catostomids.

  20. Theoretical detection threshold of the proton-acoustic range verification technique

    Purpose: Range verification in proton therapy using the proton-acoustic signal induced in the Bragg peak was investigated for typical clinical scenarios. The signal generation and detection processes were simulated in order to determine the signal-to-noise limits. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distribution and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. In this method, the acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were generated by the general 3D pressure wave equation implemented using a finite element method. Various beam pulse widths (0.1–10 μs) were simulated by convolving the acoustic waves with Gaussian kernels. A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth bandpass filter with consideration of random noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio on a per-proton basis was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons required to generate a detectable pulse. The maximum spatial resolution of the proton-acoustic imaging modality was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer central frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons detectable by the technique was on the order of 3–30 × 106 per pulse, with 30–800 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak. Wider pulses produced signal with lower acoustic frequencies, with 10 μs pulses producing signals with frequency less than 100 kHz. Conclusions: The proton-acoustic process was simulated using a realistic model and the minimal detection limit was established for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a single large detector with no losses and detector thermal noise as the sensitivity limiting factor. Our study indicated practical proton-acoustic range

  1. Theoretical detection threshold of the proton-acoustic range verification technique

    Ahmad, Moiz; Yousefi, Siavash; Xing, Lei, E-mail: lei@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States); Xiang, Liangzhong [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019-1101 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Range verification in proton therapy using the proton-acoustic signal induced in the Bragg peak was investigated for typical clinical scenarios. The signal generation and detection processes were simulated in order to determine the signal-to-noise limits. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distribution and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. In this method, the acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were generated by the general 3D pressure wave equation implemented using a finite element method. Various beam pulse widths (0.1–10 μs) were simulated by convolving the acoustic waves with Gaussian kernels. A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth bandpass filter with consideration of random noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio on a per-proton basis was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons required to generate a detectable pulse. The maximum spatial resolution of the proton-acoustic imaging modality was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer central frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons detectable by the technique was on the order of 3–30 × 10{sup 6} per pulse, with 30–800 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak. Wider pulses produced signal with lower acoustic frequencies, with 10 μs pulses producing signals with frequency less than 100 kHz. Conclusions: The proton-acoustic process was simulated using a realistic model and the minimal detection limit was established for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a single large detector with no losses and detector thermal noise as the sensitivity limiting factor. Our study indicated practical proton-acoustic

  2. Development of sensors for the acoustic detection of ultra high energy neutrinos in the deep sea

    In addition to the optical detection system used by the ANTARES detector, a proposal was made to include an acoustic system consisting of several modified ANTARES storeys to investigate the feasibility of building and operating an acoustic particle detection system in the deep sea and at the same time perform an extensive study of the acoustic properties of the deep sea environment. The directional characteristics of the sensors and their placement within the ANTARES detector had to be optimised for the study of the correlation properties of the acoustic noise at different length scales - from below a metre to above 100 metres. The so-called ''equivalent circuit diagram (=ECD) model'' - was applied to predict the acoustic properties of piezo elements, such as sensitivity and intrinsic noise, and was extended by including effects resulting from the geometrical shape of the sensors. A procedure was devised to gain the relevant ECD parameters from electrical impedance measurements of the piezo elements, both free and coupled to a surrounding medium. Based on the findings of this ECD model, intensive design studies were performed with prototype hydrophones using piezo elements as active sensors. The design best suited for the construction of acoustic sensors for ANTARES was determined, and a total of twelve hydrophones were built with a sensitivity of -145 to -140 dB re 1V/μPa between 5 and 50 kHz and an intrinsic noise power density around -90 dB re 1 V/√(Hz), giving a total noise rms of 7 mV in this frequency range. The hydrophones were pressure tested and calibrated for integration into the ANTARES acoustic system. In addition, three so-called Acoustic Modules, sensors in pressure resistant glass spheres with a sensitive bandwidth of about 80 kHz, were developed and built. The calibration procedure employed during the sensor design studies as well as for the final sensors to be installed in the ANTARES framework is presented, together with exemplary results for

  3. Development of sensors for the acoustic detection of ultra high energy neutrinos in the deep sea

    Naumann, C.L.

    2007-09-17

    In addition to the optical detection system used by the ANTARES detector, a proposal was made to include an acoustic system consisting of several modified ANTARES storeys to investigate the feasibility of building and operating an acoustic particle detection system in the deep sea and at the same time perform an extensive study of the acoustic properties of the deep sea environment. The directional characteristics of the sensors and their placement within the ANTARES detector had to be optimised for the study of the correlation properties of the acoustic noise at different length scales - from below a metre to above 100 metres. The so-called 'equivalent circuit diagram (=ECD) model' - was applied to predict the acoustic properties of piezo elements, such as sensitivity and intrinsic noise, and was extended by including effects resulting from the geometrical shape of the sensors. A procedure was devised to gain the relevant ECD parameters from electrical impedance measurements of the piezo elements, both free and coupled to a surrounding medium. Based on the findings of this ECD model, intensive design studies were performed with prototype hydrophones using piezo elements as active sensors. The design best suited for the construction of acoustic sensors for ANTARES was determined, and a total of twelve hydrophones were built with a sensitivity of -145 to -140 dB re 1V/{mu}Pa between 5 and 50 kHz and an intrinsic noise power density around -90 dB re 1 V/{radical}(Hz), giving a total noise rms of 7 mV in this frequency range. The hydrophones were pressure tested and calibrated for integration into the ANTARES acoustic system. In addition, three so-called Acoustic Modules, sensors in pressure resistant glass spheres with a sensitive bandwidth of about 80 kHz, were developed and built. The calibration procedure employed during the sensor design studies as well as for the final sensors to be installed in the ANTARES framework is presented, together with

  4. Detecting nonlinear acoustic waves in liquids with nonlinear dipole optical antennae

    Maksymov, Ivan S

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important imaging modality for biological systems. High-frequency ultrasound can also (e.g., via acoustical nonlinearities) be used to provide deeply penetrating and high-resolution imaging of vascular structure via catheterisation. The latter is an important diagnostic in vascular health. Typically, ultrasound requires sources and transducers that are greater than, or of order the same size as the wavelength of the acoustic wave. Here we design and theoretically demonstrate that single silver nanorods, acting as optical nonlinear dipole antennae, can be used to detect ultrasound via Brillouin light scattering from linear and nonlinear acoustic waves propagating in bulk water. The nanorods are tuned to operate on high-order plasmon modes in contrast to the usual approach of using fundamental plasmon resonances. The high-order operation also gives rise to enhanced optical third-harmonic generation, which provides an important method for exciting the higher-order Fabry-Perot modes of the dipole...

  5. Dual-frequency acoustic droplet vaporization detection for medical imaging.

    Arena, Christopher B; Novell, Anthony; Sheeran, Paul S; Puett, Connor; Moyer, Linsey C; Dayton, Paul A

    2015-09-01

    Liquid-filled perfluorocarbon droplets emit a unique acoustic signature when vaporized into gas-filled microbubbles using ultrasound. Here, we conducted a pilot study in a tissue-mimicking flow phantom to explore the spatial aspects of droplet vaporization and investigate the effects of applied pressure and droplet concentration on image contrast and axial and lateral resolution. Control microbubble contrast agents were used for comparison. A confocal dual-frequency transducer was used to transmit at 8 MHz and passively receive at 1 MHz. Droplet signals were of significantly higher energy than microbubble signals. This resulted in improved signal separation and high contrast-to-tissue ratios (CTR). Specifically, with a peak negative pressure (PNP) of 450 kPa applied at the focus, the CTR of B-mode images was 18.3 dB for droplets and -0.4 for microbubbles. The lateral resolution was dictated by the size of the droplet activation area, with lower pressures resulting in smaller activation areas and improved lateral resolution (0.67 mm at 450 kPa). The axial resolution in droplet images was dictated by the size of the initial droplet and was independent of the properties of the transmit pulse (3.86 mm at 450 kPa). In post-processing, time-domain averaging (TDA) improved droplet and microbubble signal separation at high pressures (640 kPa and 700 kPa). Taken together, these results indicate that it is possible to generate high-sensitivity, high-contrast images of vaporization events. In the future, this has the potential to be applied in combination with droplet-mediated therapy to track treatment outcomes or as a standalone diagnostic system to monitor the physical properties of the surrounding environment. PMID:26415125

  6. Background noise cancellation for improved acoustic detection of manatee vocalizations

    Yan, Zheng; Niezrecki, Christopher; Beusse, Diedrich O.

    2005-06-01

    The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of an increase in the number of collisions with boats. A device to alert boaters of the presence of manatees, so that a collision can be avoided, is desired. A practical implementation of the technology is dependent on the hydrophone spacing and range of detection. These parameters are primarily dependent on the manatee vocalization strength, the decay of the signal's strength with distance, and the background noise levels. An efficient method to extend the detection range by using background noise cancellation is proposed in this paper. An adaptive line enhancer (ALE) that can detect and track narrow band signals buried in broadband noise is implemented to cancel the background noise. The results indicate that the ALE algorithm can efficiently extract the manatee calls from the background noise. The improved signal-to-noise ratio of the signal can be used to extend the range of detection of manatee vocalizations and reduce the false alarm and missing detection rate in their natural habitat. .

  7. Research on power-law acoustic transient signal detection based on wavelet transform

    Han, Jian-hui; Yang, Ri-jie; Wang, Wei

    2007-11-01

    Aiming at the characteristics of acoustic transient signal emitted from antisubmarine weapon which is being dropped into water (torpedo, aerial sonobuoy and rocket assisted depth charge etc.), such as short duration, low SNR, abruptness and instability, based on traditional power-law detector, a new method to detect acoustic transient signal is proposed. Firstly wavelet transform is used to de-noise signal, removes random spectrum components and improves SNR. Then Power- Law detector is adopted to detect transient signal. The simulation results show the method can effectively extract envelop characteristic of transient signal on the condition of low SNR. The performance of WT-Power-Law markedly outgoes that of traditional Power-Law detection method.

  8. Acoustic detection of DNA conformation in genetic assays combined with PCR.

    Papadakis, G; Tsortos, A; Kordas, A; Tiniakou, I; Morou, E; Vontas, J; Kardassis, D; Gizeli, E

    2013-01-01

    Application of PCR to multiplexing assays is not trivial; it requires multiple fluorescent labels for amplicon detection and sophisticated software for data interpretation. Alternative PCR-free methods exploiting new concepts in nanotechnology exhibit high sensitivities but require multiple labeling and/or amplification steps. Here, we propose to simplify the problem of simultaneous analysis of multiple targets in genetic assays by detecting directly the conformation, rather than mass, of target amplicons produced in the same PCR reaction. The new methodology exploits acoustic wave devices which are shown to be able to characterize in a fully quantitative manner multiple double stranded DNAs of various lengths. The generic nature of the combined acoustic/PCR platform is shown using real samples and, specifically, during the detection of SNP genotyping in Anopheles gambiae and gene expression quantification in treated mice. The method possesses significant advantages to TaqMan assay and real-time PCR regarding multiplexing capability, speed, simplicity and cost. PMID:23778520

  9. Experimental and numerical study on microcrack detection using contact nonlinear acoustics

    Xiaojia CHEN; Yuanlin WANG

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a non-classical nonlinear acoustic theory for microcrack detection in materials,comparing contact nonlinearity with material nonlinearity.The paper's main work concentrates on the experimental and numerical verification of the effectivity of contact nonlinear acoustic detection by using the contact nonlinear parameter fl', which can be represented by the ratio of the second-harmonic amplitude to the square of the firstharmonic amplitude. Both experiments and numerical tests are performed. The results show that fl' is sensitive to the initiation of microcracks and varies with the development of the microcracks. The numerical test illustrates the decline offl' when microcracks penetrate each other.Kcywords microcrack detection, contact nonlinearity,numerical analysis

  10. A micro-machined thin film electro-acoustic biosensor for detection of pesticide residuals

    Jing-jing WANG; Wei-hui LIU; Da CHEN; Yan XU; Lu-yin ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    Increasing awareness concerning food safety problems has been driving the search for simple and efficient bio-chemical analytical methods. In this paper, we develop a portable electro-acoustic biosensor based on a film bulk acoustic reso-nator for the detection of pesticide residues in agricultural products. A shear mode ZnO film bulk acoustic resonator with a mi-cro-machining structure was fabricated as a mass-sensitive transducer for the real-time detection of antibody-antigen reactions in liquids. In order to obtain an ultra-low detection level, the artificial antigens were immobilized on the sensing surface of the resonator to employ a competitive format for the immunoassays. The competitive immunoreactions can be observed clearly through monitoring the frequency changes. The presence of pesticides was detected through the diminution of the frequency shift compared with the level without pesticides. The limit of detection for carbaryl (a widely used pesticide for vegetables and crops) is 2´10-10 M. The proposed device represents a potential alternative to the complex optical systems and electrochemical methods that are currently being used, and represents a significant opportunity in terms of simplicity of use and portability for on-site food safety testing.

  11. Acoustic leak detection at complicated topologies using neural netwoks

    Considering the shortcomings of all the existing leak detecting principles, a new method again based on the measurement of the leak induced sound but also applying pattern recognition is being developed. The capability of neural networks to localize leaks at the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) head of VVER-440 reactors is discussed. (orig./DG)

  12. Leak detection in gas pipeline by acoustic and signal processing - A review

    Adnan, N. F.; Ghazali, M. F.; Amin, M. M.; Hamat, A. M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The pipeline system is the most important part in media transport in order to deliver fluid to another station. The weak maintenance and poor safety will contribute to financial losses in term of fluid waste and environmental impacts. There are many classifications of techniques to make it easier to show their specific method and application. This paper's discussion about gas leak detection in pipeline system using acoustic method will be presented in this paper. The wave propagation in the pipeline is a key parameter in acoustic method when the leak occurs and the pressure balance of the pipe will generated by the friction between wall in the pipe. The signal processing is used to decompose the raw signal and show in time- frequency. Findings based on the acoustic method can be used for comparative study in the future. Acoustic signal and HHT is the best method to detect leak in gas pipelines. More experiments and simulation need to be carried out to get the fast result of leaking and estimation of their location.

  13. Reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy for detecting internal voids in structural ceramics

    Roth, D.J.; Baaklini, G.Y.

    1986-01-01

    The reliability of 100 MHz scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting internal voids in sintered specimens of silicon nitride and silicon carbide was evaluated. The specimens contained artificially implanted voids and were positioned at depths ranging up to 2 mm below the specimen surface. Detection probability of 0.90 at a 0.95 confidence level was determined as a function of material, void diameter, and void depth. The statistical results presented for void detectability indicate some of the strengths and limitations of SLAM as a nondestructive evaluation technique for structural ceramics.

  14. Reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy for detecting internal voids in structural ceramics

    Roth, D.J.; Baaklini, G.Y.

    1986-07-01

    The reliability of 100 MHz scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting internal voids in sintered specimens of silicon nitride and silicon carbide was evaluated. The specimens contained artificially implanted voids and were positioned at depths ranging up to 2 mm below the specimen surface. Detection probability of 0.90 at a 0.95 confidence level was determined as a function of material, void diameter, and void depth. The statistical results presented for void detectability indicate some of the strengths and limitations of SLAM as a nondestructive evaluation technique for structural ceramics. 28 references.

  15. Analysis of acoustic to seismic coupling technique for buried landmines detection

    WANG Chi; XIE Yulai; LI Xingfei; SUN Fei; ZHANG Guoxiong

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical interaction between the induced seismic waves and landmines was analyzed according to acoustic-to-seismic coupling theory. And a geophone array based exper-imental system for landmine detection was developed. By modeling a compliant mine and the soil on top of the mine as a mass-spring system, analytic method was adopted to study the resonance mechanism of the system. A loudspeaker was employed as energy source to excite a swept sine tone over the soil. We also used a geophone array to measure the vibration velocity of the ground surface. In order to analysis the landmine effect on the surface vibration, the magnitude spectra curves of the measured velocity values on-and-off mine were plotted. The results showed that the data measured on mine is much bigger than that off target and the proposed system can be applied to further investigation of acoustic landmines detection.

  16. Detection of internal quality in seedless watermelon by acoustic impulse response

    Diezma Iglesias, Belen; Ruiz-Altisent, Margarita; Barreiro Elorza, Pilar

    2004-01-01

    Recent commercialisation of seedless watermelon varieties relies on the guarantee of a high quality product. Several internal defects may deteriorate greatly this fruit: (a) creases and/or large voids in the flesh, (b) overripeness and (c) bruises due to impact. The objective of this research was to develop a feasible non-destructive procedure for detecting these defects in individual fruits, based on acoustic impulse response. A device consisting of a microphone, structural elements and a...

  17. First Detection of the Acoustic Oscillation Phase Shift Expected from the Cosmic Neutrino Background.

    Follin, Brent; Knox, Lloyd; Millea, Marius; Pan, Zhen

    2015-08-28

    The unimpeded relativistic propagation of cosmological neutrinos prior to recombination of the baryon-photon plasma alters gravitational potentials and therefore the details of the time-dependent gravitational driving of acoustic oscillations. We report here a first detection of the resulting shifts in the temporal phase of the oscillations, which we infer from their signature in the cosmic microwave background temperature power spectrum. PMID:26371637

  18. Acoustic emission detection of rail defect based on wavelet transform and Shannon entropy

    Zhang, Xin; Feng, Naizhang; Wang, Yan; Shen, Yi

    2015-03-01

    In order to detect cracks in railroad tracks, various experiments have been examined by Acoustic Emission (AE) method. However, little work has been done on studying rail defect detection at high speed. This paper presents a study on AE detection of rail defect at high speed based on rail-wheel test rig. Meanwhile, Wavelet Transform and Shannon entropy are employed to detect defects. Signals with and without defects are acquired, and characteristic frequencies from them at different speeds are analyzed. Based on appropriate decomposition level and Energy-to-Shannon entropy ratio, the optimal wavelet is selected. In order to suppress noise effects and ensure appropriate time resolution, the length of time window is investigated. Further, the characteristic frequency of time window is employed to detect defect. The results clearly illustrate that the proposed method can detect rail defect at high speed effectively.

  19. The timing of change detection and change perception in complex acoustic scenes

    MariaChait

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated how listeners perceive the temporal relationship of a light-flash and a complex acoustic signal. The stimulus mimics ubiquitous events in busy scenes which are manifested as a change in the pattern of on-going fluctuation. Detecting pattern emergence inherently requires integration over time; resulting in such events being detected later than when they occurred. How does delayed detection-time affect the perception of such events relative to other events in the scene? To model these situations, we use rapid sequences of tone-pips with a time-frequency pattern that changes from random to regular (‘REG-RAND’ or vice versa (‘RAND-REG’. REG-RAND transitions are detected rapidly, but RAND-REG take longer to detect (~880ms post nominal-transition. Using a Temporal Order Judgment task, we instructed subjects to indicate whether the flash appeared before or after the acoustic transition. The point of subjective simultaneity between the flash and RAND-REG does not occur at the point of detection (~880ms post nominal-transition but ~470ms closer to the nominal acoustic-transition. In a second experiment we halved the tone-pip duration. The resulting pattern of performance was qualitatively similar to that in Experiment 1, but scaled by half. Our results indicates that the brain possesses mechanisms that survey the proximal history of an on-going stimulus and automatically adjust perception so as to compensate for prolonged detection time, thus producing more accurate representations of scene dynamics. However, this re-adjustment is not complete.

  20. Acoustic properties of glacial ice for neutrino detection and the Enceladus Explorer

    Helbing, K; Naumann, U; Eliseev, D; Heinen, D; Scholz, F; Wiebusch, C; Zierke, S

    2016-01-01

    Ultra high energy neutrinos may be observed in ice by the emission of acoustic signals. The SPATS detector has investigated the possibility of observing GZK-neutrinos in the clear ice near the South Pole at the IceCube detector site. To explore other potential detection sites glacial ice in the Alps and in Antarctica has been surveyed for its acoustical properties. The purpose of the Enceladus Explorer (EnEx), on the other hand, is the search for extraterrestrial life on the Saturn moon Enceladus. Here acoustics is used to maneuver a subsurface probe inside the ice by trilateration of signals. A system of acoustic transducers has been developed to study both applications. In the south polar region of the moon Enceladus there are secluded crevasses. These are filled with liquid water, probably heated by tidal forces due to the short distance to Saturn. We intend to take a sample of water from these crevasses by using a combination of a melt down and steering probe called IceMole (IM). Maneuvering IM requires a...

  1. Detection of acoustic resonance effects on the ground and in the ionosphere at the total eclipses

    Complete text of publication follows. The ground - lower atmosphere - thermosphere (ionosphere) coupling effects through acoustic resonance have been observed, for example, for the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in 1991 (Kanamori and Mori, 1992) and the great 2004 Sumatra earthquake (Iyemori et al., 2005). In the Mt. Pinatubo case, it was assumed that the acoustic wave (i.e., pressure variation) caused a very low frequency oscillation of the ground observed worldwide. However, a volcanic eruption or earthquake can also cause the ground oscillation directly. The ground oscillation may cause atmospheric oscillations but with a complicated causality. In the case of typhoons when the resonance effects have been detected, the ocean waves also make the situation complicated. When a total eclipse occurs, the rapid pressure variations, caused by the rapid decrease of temperature may also generate the acoustic resonance, however, in this case, the situation is expected to be simpler than for volcanic eruptions. This situation provides better conditions for quantitative modeling of the acoustic resonance effects. On July 22, 2009, a total eclipse will be observed along a band from China, Iwo Island, and through the Tokara Islands, south of Japan. We plan to make barometric, geomagnetic, GPS-TEC and HF Doppler observations at several points along the eclipse path. In this paper, we show some results of analysis of the data obtained from the total eclipses in the past and preliminary results of the observations from the July 22, 2009 event.

  2. A compact array calibrator to study the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection

    Ardid, M.; Camarena, F.; Felis, I.; Herrero, A.; Llorens, C. D.; Martínez-Mora, J.; Saldaña, M.

    2016-04-01

    Underwater acoustic detection of ultra-high-energy neutrinos was proposed already in 1950s: when a neutrino interacts with a nucleus in water, the resulting particle cascade produces a pressure pulse that has a bipolar temporal structure and propagates within a flat disk-like volume. A telescope that consists of thousands of acoustic sensors deployed in the deep sea can monitor hundreds of cubic kilometres of water looking for these signals and discriminating them from acoustic noise. To study the feasibility of the technique it is critical to have a calibrator able to mimic the neutrino "signature" that can be operated from a vessel. Due to the axial-symmetry of the signal, their very directive short bipolar shape and the constraints of operating at sea, the development of such a calibrator is very challenging. Once the possibility of using the acoustic parametric technique for this aim was validated with the first compact array calibrator prototype, in this paper we describe the new design for such a calibrator composed of an array of piezo ceramic tube transducers emitting in axial direction.

  3. A compact array calibrator to study the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection

    Ardid M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Underwater acoustic detection of ultra-high-energy neutrinos was proposed already in 1950s: when a neutrino interacts with a nucleus in water, the resulting particle cascade produces a pressure pulse that has a bipolar temporal structure and propagates within a flat disk-like volume. A telescope that consists of thousands of acoustic sensors deployed in the deep sea can monitor hundreds of cubic kilometres of water looking for these signals and discriminating them from acoustic noise. To study the feasibility of the technique it is critical to have a calibrator able to mimic the neutrino “signature” that can be operated from a vessel. Due to the axial-symmetry of the signal, their very directive short bipolar shape and the constraints of operating at sea, the development of such a calibrator is very challenging. Once the possibility of using the acoustic parametric technique for this aim was validated with the first compact array calibrator prototype, in this paper we describe the new design for such a calibrator composed of an array of piezo ceramic tube transducers emitting in axial direction.

  4. An experimental study on antipersonnel landmine detection using acoustic-to-seismic coupling.

    Xiang, Ning; Sabatier, James M

    2003-03-01

    An acoustic-to-seismic system to detect buried antipersonnel mines exploits airborne acoustic waves penetrating the surface of the ground. Acoustic waves radiating from a sound source above the ground excite Biot type I and II compressional waves in the porous soil. The type I wave and type II waves refract toward the normal and cause air and soil particle motion. If a landmine is buried below the surface of the insonified area, these waves are scattered or reflected by the target, resulting in distinct changes to the acoustically coupled ground motion. A scanning laser Doppler vibrometer measures the motion of the ground surface. In the past, this technique has been employed with remarkable success in locating antitank mines during blind field tests [Sabatier and Xiang, IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 39, 1146-1154 (2001)]. The humanitarian demining mission requires an ability to locate antipersonnel mines, requiring a surmounting of additional challenges due to a plethora of shapes and smaller sizes. This paper describes an experimental study on the methods used to locate antipersonnel landmines in recent field measurements. PMID:12656368

  5. Detection and localization of leak of pipelines of RBMK reactor. Methods of processing of acoustic noise

    For realization of leak detection of input pipelines and output pipelines of RBMK reactor the method, based on detection and control of acoustic leak signals, was designed. In this report the review of methods of processing and analysis of acoustic noise is submitted. These methods were included in the software of the leak detection system and are used for the decision of the following problems: leak detection by method of sound pressure level in conditions of powerful background noise and strong attenuation of a signal; detection of a small leak in early stage by high-sensitivity correlation method; determination of a point of a sound source in conditions of strong reflection of a signal by a correlation method and sound pressure method; evaluation of leak size by the analysis of a sound level and point of a sound source. The work of considered techniques is illustrated on an example of test results of a fragment of the leak detection system. This test was executed on a Leningrad NPP, operated at power levels of 460, 700, 890 and 1000 MWe. 16 figs

  6. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics by use of scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    Roth, D.J.; Klima, S.J.; Kiser, J.D.; Baaklini, G.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics. 20 references.

  7. Using of acoustic technologies for detection of explosives in gas, liquid and solid medium

    Full text: Some industrial nuclear power objects are very attractive for the realization of radiological and chemical terrorism acts with using of explosives. Although up today this type of terrorism is not revealed itself, but the problem of detection of explosives at these objects is becoming very actual one, for example, in connection with the implementation of the urgent decommissioning of nuclear powered vessels. Such decommissioning includes the utilization the dangerous radioactive and chemical elements, contained in submarines and vessels. This actual problem is existed not only in Russia, but also in abroad. It is noticed that catastrophes at these objects will have in addition the great negative mental effect on population of all over the world, as it was after the Chernobyl accident. The using of the modern nuclear physics methods for detection and analysis of explosives is connected with the following difficulties: (1) we have to have the unique and the expensive equipment; (2) the special preparation of sample probes; (3) a long time is often necessary for analysis; (4) the high qualification of service personal is needed. We proposed to use for these purposes the complex of acoustic techniques, that are based on the high sensitivity of acoustic characteristics of any matter to their physical and chemical properties.Any acoustic signal has the following main parameters: (1) frequency (ω); (2) amplitude of pressure (ρ); (3) wave and amplitude bands; (4) velocity of acoustic wave propagation (sound velocity) (C); (5) space and temporal signal evolution, that is determined by the values of coefficients of temporal attenuation (α), space adsorption (β) and sound dispersion on obstacles and impurities. Our acoustic analysis is included the determination of C, α and β values for solid and liquid explosives. The exact measurements of these parameters and their dependences from frequency and temperature are conducted in the special acoustic cells, that

  8. Acoustic leak detection at complicated geometrical structures using fuzzy logic and neural networks

    An acoustic method based on pattern recognition is being developed. During the learning phase, the localization classifier is trained with sound patterns that are generated with simulated leaks at all locations endangered by leak. The patterns are extracted from the signals of an appropriate sensor array. After training unknown leak positions can be recognized through comparison with the training patterns. The experimental part is performed at an acoustic 1:3 model of the reactor vessel and head and at an original VVER-440 reactor in the former NPP Greifswald. The leaks were simulated at the vessel head using mobile sound sources driven either by compressed air, a piezoelectric transmitter or by a thin metal blade excited through a jet of compressed air. The sound patterns of the simulated leaks are simultaneously detected with an AE-sensor array and with high frequency microphones measuring structure-borne sound and airborne sound, respectively. Pattern classifiers based on Fuzzy Pattern Classification (FPC) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) are currently tested for validation of the acoustic emission-sensor array (FPC), leak localization via structure-borne sound (FPC) and the leak localization using microphones (ANN). The initial results show the used classifiers principally to be capable of detecting and locating leaks, but they also show that further investigations are necessary to develop a reliable method applicable at NPPs. (orig./HP)

  9. Linear and Nonlinear Acoustic Measurements of Buried Landmines: Detection Schemes Near Resonance

    Sabatier, James M.

    2003-03-01

    Measurements of the acoustic impedance of an anti-personnel and anti-tank plastic, blast-hardened landmines reveal resonances in the frequency range between 100 and 1000 Hz. The top surface resonances are due to its complicated mechanical structure vibrating in air. The lowest mode results from the blast hardened design of the landmine. Typically, a portion or cavity of the landmine is designed to absorb the shock from an explosion that is intended to detonate the landmine but still allow the landmine to trigger its explosive device when a slow steady pressure is applied. The mechanical design of the blast hardened aspects results in a high Q simple harmonic oscillator resonance of the top surface. At higher frequencies the top surface behaves like thin circular plate acoustic modes. When these landmines are buried in soils, the modes are mass loaded. Resonances from measurements of the normal component of the acoustically induced soil surface particle velocity are used for detection schemes. Since the interface between the top plate and the soil responds to pressure fluctuations nonlinearly, characteristics of landmines, the soil, and the interface are rich in nonlinear physics and allow for new methods of landmine detection not previously exploited.

  10. Detecting acoustic emission during cyclic crack growth in simulated BWR environment

    An attempt is made to detect and analyze acoustic emissions from cyclic crack growth in SA 533 grade B steel in the simulated BWR water environment. Significant levels of signals caused by the environment-enhanced crack growth were obtained through appropriate noise reduction techniques. By reducing the frictional noises between the loading pins and the specimen, as well as characterizing the spectrum of signals emitted from various sources, discrete signal identification was made possible. The following empirical relationship was obtained between the energy of emission and the crack growth rate: da/dN = C(dΣE sub(AE)/mm/dN)sup(n) where C and n are material constant and exponent respectively. The possibility of utilizing this type of acoustic emission technique was also discussed in relation to future continuous monitoring of operating nuclear plants. (author)

  11. Mach-Zehnder interferometric photonic crystal fiber for low acoustic frequency detections

    Pawar, Dnyandeo; Rao, Ch. N.; Kale, S. N., E-mail: sangeetakale2004@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Defence Institute of Advanced Technology (DU), Girinagar, Pune 411 025, Maharashtra (India); Choubey, Ravi Kant [Department of Applied Physics, Amity Institute of Applied Sciences, Amity University, Noida 201 313 (India)

    2016-01-25

    Low frequency under-water acoustic signal detections are challenging, especially for marine applications. A Mach-Zehnder interferometric hydrophone is demonstrated using polarization-maintaining photonic-crystal-fiber (PM-PCF), spliced between two single-mode-fibers, operated at 1550 nm source. These data are compared with standard hydrophone, single-mode and multimode fiber. The PM-PCF sensor shows the highest response with a power shift (2.32 dBm) and a wavelength shift (392.8 pm) at 200 Hz. High birefringence values and the effect of the imparted acoustic pressure on this fiber, introducing the difference between the fast and slow axis changes, owing to the phase change in the propagation waves, demonstrate the strain-optic properties of the sensor.

  12. Mach-Zehnder interferometric photonic crystal fiber for low acoustic frequency detections

    Low frequency under-water acoustic signal detections are challenging, especially for marine applications. A Mach-Zehnder interferometric hydrophone is demonstrated using polarization-maintaining photonic-crystal-fiber (PM-PCF), spliced between two single-mode-fibers, operated at 1550 nm source. These data are compared with standard hydrophone, single-mode and multimode fiber. The PM-PCF sensor shows the highest response with a power shift (2.32 dBm) and a wavelength shift (392.8 pm) at 200 Hz. High birefringence values and the effect of the imparted acoustic pressure on this fiber, introducing the difference between the fast and slow axis changes, owing to the phase change in the propagation waves, demonstrate the strain-optic properties of the sensor

  13. Detection of ultra high energy neutrinos with an underwater very large volume array of acoustic sensors: A simulation study

    Karg, T

    2006-01-01

    This thesis investigates the detection of ultra high energy (E > 1 EeV) cosmic neutrinos using acoustic sensors immersed in water. The method is based on the thermoacoustic model describing the production of microsecond bipolar acoustic pulses by neutrino-induced particle cascades. These cascades locally heat the medium which leads to rapid expansion and a short sonic pulse detectable in water with hydrophones over distances of several kilometres. This makes acoustic detection an approach complementary to todays optical Cerenkov and radio Cerenkov detectors, and could help to reduce the respective systematic uncertainties. In this work a complete simulation / reconstruction chain for a submarine acoustic neutrino telescope is developed, and the sensitivity of such a detector to a diffuse flux of ultra highenergy cosmic neutrinos is estimated.

  14. Long-range acoustic detection and localization of blue whale calls in the northeast Pacific Ocean.

    Stafford, K M; Fox, C G; Clark, D S

    1998-12-01

    Analysis of acoustic signals recorded from the U.S. Navy's SOund SUrveillance System (SOSUS) was used to detect and locate blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) calls offshore in the northeast Pacific. The long, low-frequency components of these calls are characteristic of calls recorded in the presence of blue whales elsewhere in the world. Mean values for frequency and time characteristics from field-recorded blue whale calls were used to develop a simple matched filter for detecting such calls in noisy time series. The matched filter was applied to signals from three different SOSUS arrays off the coast of the Pacific Northwest to detect and associate individual calls from the same animal on the different arrays. A U.S. Navy maritime patrol aircraft was directed to an area where blue whale calls had been detected on SOSUS using these methods, and the presence of vocalizing blue whale was confirmed at the site with field recordings from sonobuoys. PMID:9857519

  15. Uncertainty quantification of relative acoustic nonlinearity parameter of guided waves for damage detection in composite structures

    Hong, Ming; Mao, Zhu; Todd, Michael D.; Su, Zhongqing; Qing, Xinlin

    2015-03-01

    Nonlinear guided waves have been studied extensively for the characterization of micro-damage in plate-like structures, such as early-stage fatigue and thermal degradation in metals. Meanwhile, an increasing number of studies have reported the use of nonlinear acoustic techniques for detection of impact damage, fatigue, and thermal fatigue in composite structures. Among these techniques, the (relative) acoustic nonlinearity parameter, extracted from acousto-ultrasonic waves based on second-harmonic generation, has been considered one of the most popular tools for quantifying the detection of nonlinearity in inspected structures. Considering the complex nature of nonlinearities involved in composite materials (even under healthy conditions), and operational/environmental variability and measurement noise, the calculation of the relative acoustic nonlinearity parameter (RANP) from experimental data may suffer from considerable uncertainties, which may impair the quality of damage detection. In this study, we aim to quantify the uncertainty of the magnitude of the RANP estimator in the context of impact damage identification in unidirectional carbon fiber laminates. First, the principles of nonlinear ultrasonics are revisited briefly. A general probability density function of the RANP is then obtained through numerical evaluation in a theoretical setting. Using piezoelectric wavers, continuous sine waves are generated in the sample. Steady-state responses are acquired and processed to produce histograms of the RANP estimates before and after the impact damage. These observed histograms are consistent with the predicted distributions, and examination of the distributions demonstrates the significance of uncertainty quantification when using the RANP for damage detection in composite structures.

  16. Acoustic tumour detection with early auditory evoked potentials and neuroradiological methods

    A total of 43 patients with surgically identified acoustic neuromas were tested. Results of early auditory evoked potentials (EAEP) and of neuroradiological methods were analysed. Abnormal EAEPs were observed in all patients. In 73% of the cases the EAEP indicated the retrocochlear site of the lesion; in 27%, however, the results did not localize the exact site of the lesion owing to a lack of waves I, II and III due to a pronounced hearing loss. Neuroradiological procedures provided an indication of the site and extent of the tumour. The number of true positives was 21 of 29 cases with polytomography of the petrous bone, 23 of 28 with computed tomography and in all cases when pontine angle cisternography and computed tomography combined with gas cisternography were performed. The EAEPs provide a screening-test for acoustic tumour detection at an early stage. Wave abnormalities indicative of a lesion at the acoustic nerve should lead to a neuroradiological investigation and are particularly valuable in cases with small intracanalicular tumours. (orig.)

  17. Detection of Volatile Organics Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Array System

    ANDERSON, LAWRENCE F.; BARTHOLOMEW, JOHN W.; CERNOSEK, RICHARD W.; COLBURN, CHRISTOPHER W.; CROOKS, R.M.; MARTINEZ, R.F.; OSBOURN, GORDON C.; RICCO, A.J.; STATON, ALAN W.; YELTON, WILLIAM G.

    1999-10-14

    A chemical sensing system based on arrays of surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay lines has been developed for identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The individual SAW chemical sensors consist of interdigital transducers patterned on the surface of an ST-cut quartz substrate to launch and detect the acoustic waves and a thin film coating in the SAW propagation path to perturb the acoustic wave velocity and attenuation during analyte sorption. A diverse set of material coatings gives the sensor arrays a degree of chemical sensitivity and selectivity. Materials examined for sensor application include the alkanethiol-based self-assembled monolayer, plasma-processed films, custom-synthesized conventional polymers, dendrimeric polymers, molecular recognition materials, electroplated metal thin films, and porous metal oxides. All of these materials target a specific chemical fi.mctionality and the enhancement of accessible film surface area. Since no one coating provides absolute analyte specificity, the array responses are further analyzed using a visual-empirical region-of-influence (VERI) pattern recognition algorithm. The chemical sensing system consists of a seven-element SAW array with accompanying drive and control electronics, sensor signal acquisition electronics, environmental vapor sampling hardware, and a notebook computer. Based on data gathered for individual sensor responses, greater than 93%-accurate identification can be achieved for any single analyte from a group of 17 VOCs and water.

  18. Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class A viral and bacterial detection.

    Branch, Darren W.; Huber, Dale L.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2008-10-01

    The rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms is critical to human health and safety. To achieve a high level of sensitivity for fluidic detection applications, we have developed a 330 MHz Love wave acoustic biosensor on 36{sup o} YX Lithium Tantalate (LTO). Each die has four delay-line detection channels, permitting simultaneous measurement of multiple analytes or for parallel detection of single analyte containing samples. Crucial to our biosensor was the development of a transducer that excites the shear horizontal (SH) mode, through optimization of the transducer, minimizing propagation losses and reducing undesirable modes. Detection was achieved by comparing the reference phase of an input signal to the phase shift from the biosensor using an integrated electronic multi-readout system connected to a laptop computer or PDA. The Love wave acoustic arrays were centered at 330 MHz, shifting to 325-328 MHz after application of the silicon dioxide waveguides. The insertion loss was -6 dB with an out-of-band rejection of 35 dB. The amplitude and phase ripple were 2.5 dB p-p and 2-3{sup o} p-p, respectively. Time-domain gating confirmed propagation of the SH mode while showing suppression of the triple transit. Antigen capture and mass detection experiments demonstrate a sensitivity of 7.19 {+-} 0.74{sup o} mm{sup 2}/ng with a detection limit of 6.7 {+-} 0.40 pg/mm{sup 2} for each channel.

  19. Dual fiber Bragg gratings configuration-based fiber acoustic sensor for low-frequency signal detection

    Yang, Dong; Wang, Shun; Lu, Ping; Liu, Deming

    2014-11-01

    We propose and fabricate a new type fiber acoustic sensor based on dual fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) configuration. The acoustic sensor head is constructed by putting the sensing cells enclosed in an aluminum cylinder space built by two Cband FBGs and a titanium diaphragm of 50 um thickness. One end of each FBG is longitudinally adhered to the diaphragm by UV glue. Both of the two FBGs are employed for reflecting light. The dual FBGs play roles not only as signal transmission system but also as sensing component, and they demodulate each other's optical signal mutually during the measurement. Both of the two FBGs are pre-strained and the output optical power experiences fluctuation in a linear relationship along with a variation of axial strain and surrounding acoustic interference. So a precise approach to measure the frequency and sound pressure of the acoustic disturbance is achieved. Experiments are performed and results show that a relatively flat frequency response in a range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz with the average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) above 21 dB is obtained. The maximum sound pressure sensitivity of 11.35mV/Pa is achieved with the Rsquared value of 0.99131 when the sound pressure in the range of 87.7-106.6dB. It has potential applications in low frequency signal detection. Owing to its direct self-demodulation method, the sensing system reveals the advantages of easy to demodulate, good temperature stability and measurement reliability. Besides, performance of the proposed sensor could be improved by optimizing the parameters of the sensor, especially the diaphragm.

  20. Combined optical fiber interferometric sensors for the detection of acoustic emission

    LIANG Yi-jun; MU Lin-lin; LIU Jun-feng; YU Xiao-tao

    2008-01-01

    A type of combined optical fiber interferometric acoustic emission sensor is proposed.The sensor can be independent on the laser source and make light interference by matching the lengths of two arms,so it can be used to monitor the health of large structure.Theoretical analyses indicate that the system can be equivalent to the Michelson interferometer with two optical fiber loop reflectors,and its sensitivity has been remarkably increased because of the decrease of the losses of light energy.PZT is powered by DC regulator to control the operating point of the system,so the system can accurately detect feeble vibration which is generated by ultrasonic waves propagating on the surface of solid.The amplitude and the frequency of feeble vibration signal are obtained by detecting the output light intensity of intefferometer and using Fourier transform technique.The results indicate that the system can be used to detect the acoustic emission signals by the frequency characteristics.

  1. A First Detection of the Acoustic Oscillation Phase Shift Expected from the Cosmic Neutrino Background

    Follin, Brent; Millea, Marius; Pan, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The freestreaming of cosmological neutrinos prior to recombination of the baryon-photon plasma alters gravitational potentials and therefore the details of the time-dependent gravitational driving of acoustic oscillations. We report here a first detection of the resulting shifts in the temporal phase of the oscillations, which we infer from their signature in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature power spectrum. The magnitude of the shift is proportional to the fraction of the total radiation density in neutrinos. Parameterizing the shift via an effective number of neutrino species we find $1.9 < N_\

  2. Generation and detection of gigahertz surface acoustic waves using an elastomeric phase-shift mask

    Li, Dongyao; Zhao, Peng; Zhao, Ji-Cheng; Cahill, David G.

    2013-10-01

    We describe a convenient approach for measuring the velocity vSAW of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) of the near-surface layer of a material through optical pump-probe measurements. The method has a lateral spatial resolution of elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane phase-shift mask which is fabricated using a commercially available Si grating as a mold. Time-domain electromagnetics calculations show, in agreement with experiment, that the efficiency of the phase-shift mask for generating and detecting SAWs decreases rapidly as the periodicity of the mask decreases below the optical wavelength. We validate the experimental approach using bulk and thin film samples with known elastic constants.

  3. Low power underwater acoustic DPSK detection: Theoretical prediction and experimental results

    Dunne, Andrew

    This thesis presents two methods of analyzing the effectiveness of a prototype differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) detection circuit. The first method is to make modifications to the existing hardware to reliably output and record the cross-correlation values of the DPSK detection process. The second method is to write a MATLAB detection algorithm which accurately simulates the detection results of the hardware system without the need of any electronics. These two systems were tested and verified with a bench test using computer generated DPSK signals. The hardware system was tested using real acoustic data from shallow and deep water at-sea tests to determine the effectiveness of the DPSK detection circuit in different ocean environments. The hydrophone signals from the tests were recorded so that the cross-correlation values could be verified using the MATLAB detector. As a result of this study, these two systems provided more insight into how well the DPSK detection prototype works and helped to identify ways of improving the detection reliability and overall performance of the prototype DPSK detection circuit.

  4. Acoustic signal detection through the cross-correlation method in experiments with different signal to noise ratio and reverberation conditions

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Bou-Cabo, M; Felis, I; Llorens, C; Martínez-Mora, J A; Saldaña, M

    2015-01-01

    The study and application of signal detection techniques based on cross-correlation method for acoustic transient signals in noisy and reverberant environments are presented. These techniques are shown to provide high signal to noise ratio, good signal discernment from very close echoes and accurate detection of signal arrival time. The proposed methodology has been tested on real data collected in environments and conditions where its benefits can be shown. This work focuses on the acoustic detection applied to tasks of positioning in underwater structures and calibration such those as ANTARES and KM3NeT deep-sea neutrino telescopes, as well as, in particle detection through acoustic events for the COUPP/PICO detectors. Moreover, a method for obtaining the real amplitude of the signal in time (voltage) by using cross correlation has been developed and tested and is described in this work.

  5. Detection of explosive events by monitoring acoustically-induced geomagnetic perturbations

    Lewis, J P; Rock, D R; Shaeffer, D L; Warshaw, S I

    1999-10-07

    The Black Thunder Coal Mine (BTCM) near Gillette, Wyoming was used as a test bed to determine the feasibility of detecting explosion-induced geomagnetic disturbances with ground-based induction magnetometers. Two magnetic observatories were fielded at distances of 50 km and 64 km geomagnetically north from the northernmost edge of BTCM. Each observatory consisted of three separate but mutually orthogonal magnetometers, Global Positioning System (GPS) timing, battery and solar power, a data acquisition and storage system, and a three-axis seismometer. Explosions with yields of 1 to 3 kT of TNT equivalent occur approximately every three weeks at BTCM. We hypothesize that explosion-induced acoustic waves propagate upward and interact collisionally with the ionosphere to produce ionospheric electron density (and concomitant current density) perturbations which act as sources for geomagnetic disturbances. These disturbances propagate through an ionospheric Alfven waveguide that we postulate to be leaky (due to the imperfectly conducting lower ionospheric boundary). Consequently, wave energy may be observed on the ground. We observed transient pulses, known as Q-bursts, with pulse widths about 0.5 s and with spectral energy dominated by the Schumann resonances. These resonances appear to be excited in the earth-ionosphere cavity by Alfven solitons that may have been generated by the explosion-induced acoustic waves reaching the ionospheric E and F regions and that subsequently propagate down through the ionosphere to the atmosphere. In addition, we observe late time (> 800 s) ultra low frequency (ULF) geomagnetic perturbations that appear to originate in the upper F region ({approximately}300 km) and appear to be caused by the explosion-induced acoustic wave interacting with that part of the ionosphere. We suggest that explosion-induced Q-bursts may be discriminated from naturally occurring Q-bursts by association of the former with the late time explosion-induced ULF

  6. Sound propagation tests for acoustic detection of simulated sodium-water reaction

    The characteristics of sound propagation in a steam generator were tested in order to investigate the feasibility of an acoustic leak detection by small leak sodium-water reactions. The test model was composed of the vessel filled with water, the inner pipe, the shroud, and two heat transfer coils. Transducers, gas leak nozzles and an underwater speaker were set up for the simulated sound source. The results indicate that the acoustic signal detected at the vessel wall has a comparable SN ratio to the guide pipe or the heat transfer tubes, and that the difference of the RMS values depend on the standing wave, rather than the attenuation by distance or diffractions, Therefore, it was estimated that the sound field in the vessel was reverberant, and the difference between one and two helical coils depends on the sound energy absorption by them. The RMS values in the high frequency range (more than 50 kHz) do not increase in proportion to the gas leak rate, more than about 200 cc/s, because of the attenuation by gas bubbles. (author)

  7. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  8. Applications of swept-frequency acoustic interferometer for nonintrusive detection and identification of chemical warfare compounds

    Sinha, D.N.; Springer, K.; Han, W.; Lizon, D.; Kogan, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Electronic Materials and Devices Group

    1997-12-01

    Swept-Frequency Acoustic Interferometry (SFAI) is a nonintrusive liquid characterization technique developed specifically for detecting and identifying chemical warfare (CW) compounds inside sealed munitions. The SFAI technique can rapidly (less than 20 seconds) and accurately determine sound speed and sound attenuation of a liquid inside a container over a wide frequency range (1 kHz-15 MHz). From the frequency-dependent sound attenuation measurement, liquid density is determined. These three physical properties are used to uniquely identify the CW compounds. In addition, various chemical relaxation processes in liquids and particle size distribution in emulsions can also be determined from the frequency-dependent attenuation measurement. The SFAI instrument is battery-operated and highly portable (< 6 lb.). The instrument has many potential application in industry ranging from sensitive detection (ppm level) of contamination to process control. The theory of the technique will be described and examples of several chemical industry applications will be presented.

  9. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  10. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures

    Herberg, J; Maxwell, R; Tittmann, B R; Lenahan, P M; Yerkes, S; Jayaraman, S

    2005-10-04

    This report reviews progress made on NA22 project LL251DP to develop a novel technique, Nuclear Acoustic Resonance (NAR), for remote, non-destructive, nonradiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs, including {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. We have met all milestones and deliverables for FY05, as shown in Table 1. In short, we have developed a magnetic shield chamber and magnetic field, develop a digital lock-in amplifier computer to integrate both the ultrasound radiation with the detector, developed strain measurements, and begin to perform initial measurements to obtain a NAR signal from aluminum at room temperature and near the earth's magnetic field. The results obtained in FY05 further support the feasibility of successful demonstration of an NAR experiment for remote, non-destructive, non-radiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs.

  11. Nanoparticle monolayer-based flexible strain gauge with ultrafast dynamic response for acoustic vibration detection

    Lizhi Yi[1; Weihong Jiao[1; Ke Wu[1; Lihua Qian[1; Xunxing Yu[2; Qi Xia[2; Kuanmin Mao[2; Songliu Yuan[1; Shuai Wang[3; Yingtao Jiang[4

    2015-01-01

    The relatively poor dynamic response of current flexible strain gauges has prevented their wide adoption in portable electronics. In this work, we present a greatly improved flexible strain gauge, where one strip of Au nanoparticle (NP) monolayer assembled on a polyethylene terephthalate film is utilized as the active unit. The proposed flexible gauge is capable of responding to applied stimuli without detectable hysteresis via electron tunneling between adjacent nanoparticles within the Au NP monolayer. Based on experimental quantification of the time and frequency domain dependence of the electrical resistance of the proposed strain gauge, acoustic vibrations in the frequency range of 1 to 20,000 Hz could be reliably detected. In addition to being used to measure musical tone, audible speech, and creature vocalization, as demonstrated in this study, the ultrafast dynamic response of this flexible strain gauge can be used in a wide range of applications, including miniaturized vibratory sensors, safe entrance guard management systems, and ultrasensitive pressure sensors.

  12. Detection of simulated pitting corrosion and noises in crude oil storage tank by acoustic emission

    The damage mechanisms associated with crude oil storage tanks can be complex and varied and include pitting corrosion due to presence of species such as sulphate reducing bacteria. Acoustic Emission (AE) could be used to characterise the pitting corrosion signal in crude oil storage tanks but it is extremely difficult to simulate the pitting corrosion in the laboratory using crude oil as electrolyte because crude oil is considered as non corrosive medium. In this study, induced current have been introduced onto a surface ASTM 516 steel as an electrical source to simulate the electrical noise produced during pitting corrosion process and AE sensor have been used to detect this current. It is found that AE system could detect AE signal release during current induction this current and is expected that if the exact simulation of the current magnitude produced during pitting corrosion process is made available, AE characterisation of pitting corrosion in such tank could be made possible. (Author)

  13. Rayleigh and acoustic gravity waves detection on magnetograms during the Japanese Tsunami, 2011

    Klausner, Virginia; Muella, Marcio T A H; Mendes, Odim; Domingues, Margarete O; Papa, Andres R R

    2015-01-01

    The continuous geomagnetic field survey holds an important potential in future prevention of tsunami damages, and also, it could be used in tsunami forecast. In this work, we were able to detected for the first time Rayleigh and ionospheric acoustic gravity wave propagation in the Z-component of the geomagnetic field due to the Japanese tsunami, 2011 prior to the tsunami arrival. The geomagnetic measurements were obtained in the epicentral near and far-field. Also, these waves were detected within minutes to few hours of the tsunami arrival. For these reasons, these results are very encouraging, and confirmed that the geomagnetic field monitoring could play an important role in the tsunami warning systems, and also, it could provide additional information in the induced ionospheric wave propagation models due to tsunamis.

  14. Calibrating passive acoustic monitoring: correcting humpback whale call detections for site-specific and time-dependent environmental characteristics.

    Helble, Tyler A; D'Spain, Gerald L; Campbell, Greg S; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the importance of accounting for environmental effects on passive underwater acoustic monitoring results. The situation considered is the reduction in shipping off the California coast between 2008-2010 due to the recession and environmental legislation. The resulting variations in ocean noise change the probability of detecting marine mammal vocalizations. An acoustic model was used to calculate the time-varying probability of detecting humpback whale vocalizations under best-guess environmental conditions and varying noise. The uncorrected call counts suggest a diel pattern and an increase in calling over a two-year period; the corrected call counts show minimal evidence of these features. PMID:24181982

  15. Acoustic detection of water leaks in sodium-heated steam generators using methods of the statistical decision theory

    Acoustic signals measured in normal state and during simulated H2O-microleaks in a sodium-heated steam generator are of random nature. This signal property is the starting-point for the derivation of a leak detection conception based on the statistical decision theory. By means of experimental results the statistical properties of acoustic signals are determined and suitable detection characteristics are proposed. A signal-theoretical model of the detection characteristic ''pulserate'' is presented and experimentally verified. The detection parameters are optimized by means of this model and by the use of a modified Neyman-Pearson-criterion providing minimum detection time. The limits of the proposed detection method are discussed

  16. Wideband excitation in nonlinear vibro-acoustic modulation for damage detection

    Klepka, A.; Adamczyk, M.; Pieczonka, L.; Staszewski, W. J.

    2016-04-01

    The paper discusses the use of wideband excitation in nonlinear vibro-acoustic modulation technique (VAM) used for damage detection. In its original form, two mono-harmonic signals (low and high frequency) are used for excitation. The low frequency excitation is typically selected based on a modal analysis test and high frequency excitation is selected arbitrarily in the ultrasonic frequency range. This paper presents a different approach with use of wideband excitation signals. The proposed approach gives the possibility to simplify the testing procedure by omitting the modal test used to determine the value of low frequency excitation. Simultaneous use of wideband excitation for high frequency solves the ambiguity related to the selection of the frequency of acoustic wave. Broadband excitation signals require, however, more elaborate signal processing methods to determine the intensity of modulation for a given bandwidth. The paper discusses the proposed approach and the related signal processing procedure. Experimental validation of the proposed technique is performed on a laminated composite plate with a barely visible impact damage that was generated in an impact test. Piezoceramic actuators are used for vibration excitation and a scanning laser vibrometer is used for noncontact data acquisition.

  17. Detection of Adult Beetles Inside the Stored Wheat Mass Based on Their Acoustic Emissions.

    Eliopoulos, P A; Potamitis, I; Kontodimas, D Ch; Givropoulou, E G

    2015-12-01

    The efficacy of bioacoustics in detecting the presence of adult beetles inside the grain mass was evaluated in the laboratory. A piezoelectric sensor and a portable acoustic emission amplifier connected with a computer were used. Adults of the most common beetle pests of stored wheat have been detected in varying population densities (0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2 adults per kilogram of wheat). The verification of the presence of the insect individuals was achieved through automated signal parameterization and classification. We tried out two different ways to detect impulses: 1) by applying a Hilbert transform on the audio recording and 2) by subtracting a noise estimation of the recording from the spectral content of the recording, thus allowing the frequency content of possible impulses to emerge. Prediction for infestation was rated falsely negative in 60-74%, 48-60%, 0-28%, and 0-4% of the cases when actual population density was 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2 adults per kilogram, respectively, irrespective of pest species. No significant differences were recorded in positive predictions among different species in almost all cases. The system was very accurate (72-100%) in detecting 1 or 2 insects per kilogram of hard wheat grain, which is the standard threshold for classifying a grain mass "clean" or "infested." Our findings are discussed on the basis of enhancing the use of bioacoustics in stored-product IPM framework. PMID:26470377

  18. An application of acoustic emission technique for detecting fatigue crack in steel bridge members

    The basic study about the application of acoustic emission technique was performed for detecting fatigue crack in steel bridge. The most serious problem of AE technique in steel bridge structure is the noise problem. The characteristics of crack signal and crack propagation should be identified to filter the noise effectively and to determine the crack detectability of the technique. Laboratory experiment was carried out to identify AE characteristics of real fatigue crack. Through all of tests, load amplitude of specimen affected significantly to the results such as the crack growth rate and the amount of generating AE signals. The straight curve obtained from theoretical calculation by Paris equation was well correlated to the experimental results. AE location events were not early detected although several AE hits from each sensor were generated in the early of the test. However the features of three parameters, that is, crack growth length, AE location events and cumulative AE events, shooed almost same trend in their increase with the number of cycles. Peak amplitude of AE signal which determining detectability increased in accordance with stress intensity factor. It implies that correlation between peak amplitude and stress intensity factor could be quantified. Although there were somewhat scattered location in the vicinity of upper flange, which were considered as environmental noises, good locations near the actual crack tip were obtained. Post filtering work was carried out to eliminate these unwanted location, good results were obtained from filtering work using AE parameters.

  19. Simulation study of melanoma detection in human skin tissues by laser-generated surface acoustic waves

    Chen, Kun; Fu, Xing; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Lu, Zimo; Li, Tingting; Li, Yanning; Wu, Sen; Hu, Xiaotang

    2014-07-01

    Air pollution has been correlated to an increasing number of cases of human skin diseases in recent years. However, the investigation of human skin tissues has received only limited attention, to the point that there are not yet satisfactory modern detection technologies to accurately, noninvasively, and rapidly diagnose human skin at epidermis and dermis levels. In order to detect and analyze severe skin diseases such as melanoma, a finite element method (FEM) simulation study of the application of the laser-generated surface acoustic wave (LSAW) technique is developed. A three-layer human skin model is built, where LSAW's are generated and propagated, and their effects in the skin medium with melanoma are analyzed. Frequency domain analysis is used as a main tool to investigate such issues as minimum detectable size of melanoma, filtering spectra from noise and from computational irregularities, as well as on how the FEM model meshing size and computational capabilities influence the accuracy of the results. Based on the aforementioned aspects, the analysis of the signals under the scrutiny of the phase velocity dispersion curve is verified to be a reliable, a sensitive, and a promising approach for detecting and characterizing melanoma in human skin.

  20. Neural Mechanisms for Acoustic Signal Detection under Strong Masking in an Insect.

    Kostarakos, Konstantinos; Römer, Heiner

    2015-07-22

    Communication is fundamental for our understanding of behavior. In the acoustic modality, natural scenes for communication in humans and animals are often very noisy, decreasing the chances for signal detection and discrimination. We investigated the mechanisms enabling selective hearing under natural noisy conditions for auditory receptors and interneurons of an insect. In the studied katydid Mecopoda elongata species-specific calling songs (chirps) are strongly masked by signals of another species, both communicating in sympatry. The spectral properties of the two signals are similar and differ only in a small frequency band at 2 kHz present in the chirping species. Receptors sharply tuned to 2 kHz are completely unaffected by the masking signal of the other species, whereas receptors tuned to higher audio and ultrasonic frequencies show complete masking. Intracellular recordings of identified interneurons revealed two mechanisms providing response selectivity to the chirp. (1) Response selectivity is when several identified interneurons exhibit remarkably selective responses to the chirps, even at signal-to-noise ratios of -21 dB, since they are sharply tuned to 2 kHz. Their dendritic arborizations indicate selective connectivity with low-frequency receptors tuned to 2 kHz. (2) Novelty detection is when a second group of interneurons is broadly tuned but, because of strong stimulus-specific adaptation to the masker spectrum and "novelty detection" to the 2 kHz band present only in the conspecific signal, these interneurons start to respond selectively to the chirp shortly after the onset of the continuous masker. Both mechanisms provide the sensory basis for hearing at unfavorable signal-to-noise ratios. Significance statement: Animal and human acoustic communication may suffer from the same "cocktail party problem," when communication happens in noisy social groups. We address solutions for this problem in a model system of two katydids, where one species

  1. Evaluation of PTCa/PEKK composite sensors for acoustic emission detection

    Marin-Franch, P

    2002-01-01

    This thesis reports for the first time the fabrication and characterisation of novel electroactive ceramic/polymer composite films of calcium modified lead titanate (PTCa) and poly (ether ketone ketone). Composite sensors with different concentrations of ceramic were fabricated using a hot pressing technique. The PTCa ceramic was treated using titanate coupling agent in order to improve sample quality. Dielectric measurements have been performed to study sample characteristics. Piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties of the composites have been measured and the mixed connectivity cube model used to determine the relative amounts of 0-3 and 1-3 connectivity. The advantages and limitations of the model have been discussed. Additionally, some mechanical properties of the composites have been assessed to study their potential ability to detect acoustic emission (AE) in carbon fibre reinforced composites (CFRC). The composite sensors were placed on and inserted into different panels in order to compare their abi...

  2. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures: Final Report

    Herberg, J; Maxwell, R; Tittmann, B R; Lenahan, P M; Yerkes, S; Jayaraman, S B

    2006-11-02

    This is final report on NA-22 project LL251DP, where the goal was to develop a novel technique, Nuclear Acoustic Resonance (NAR), for remote, non-destructive, nonradiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs, including {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. In short, we have developed a magnetic shield chamber and magnetic field, develop a digital lock-in amplifier computer to integrate both the ultrasound radiation with the detector, developed strain measurements, and begun to perform initial measurements to obtain a NAR signal from aluminum at room temperature and near the earth's magnetic field. Since our funding was cut in FY06, I will discuss where this project can go in the future with this technology.

  3. A Methodological Review of Piezoelectric Based Acoustic Wave Generation and Detection Techniques for Structural Health Monitoring

    Zhigang Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric transducers have a long history of applications in nondestructive evaluation of material and structure integrity owing to their ability of transforming mechanical energy to electrical energy and vice versa. As condition based maintenance has emerged as a valuable approach to enhancing continued aircraft airworthiness while reducing the life cycle cost, its enabling structural health monitoring (SHM technologies capable of providing on-demand diagnosis of the structure without interrupting the aircraft operation are attracting increasing R&D efforts. Piezoelectric transducers play an essential role in these endeavors. This paper is set forth to review a variety of ingenious ways in which piezoelectric transducers are used in today’s SHM technologies as a means of generation and/or detection of diagnostic acoustic waves.

  4. Acoustic detections of singing humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in the eastern North Pacific during their northbound migration.

    Norris, T F; McDonald, M; Barlow, J

    1999-07-01

    Numerous (84) acoustic detections of singing humpback whales were made during a spring (08 March-09 June 1997) research cruise to study sperm whales in the central and eastern North Pacific. Over 15,000 km of track-line was surveyed acoustically using a towed hydrophone array. Additionally, 83 sonobuoys were deployed throughout the study area. Detection rates were greatest in late March, near the Hawaiian Islands, and in early April, northeast of the islands. Only one detection was made after April. Detection rates for sonobuoys were unequal in three equally divided longitudinal regions of the study area. Two high density clusters of detections occurred approximately 1200-2000 km northeast of the Hawaiian Islands and were attributed to a large aggregation of migrating animals. The distribution of these detections corroborates findings of previous studies. It is possible that these animals were maintaining acoustic contact during migration. Two unexpected clusters of singing whales were detected approximately 900 to 1000 km west of central and southern California. The location of these detections may indicate a previously undocumented migration route between an offshore breeding area, such as the Revillagigedo Islands, Mexico, and possible feeding areas in the western North Pacific or Bering Sea. PMID:10420640

  5. Site specific passive acoustic detection and densities of humpback whale calls off the coast of California

    Helble, Tyler Adam

    Passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammal calls is an increasingly important method for assessing population numbers, distribution, and behavior. Automated methods are needed to aid in the analyses of the recorded data. When a mammal vocalizes in the marine environment, the received signal is a filtered version of the original waveform emitted by the marine mammal. The waveform is reduced in amplitude and distorted due to propagation effects that are influenced by the bathymetry and environment. It is important to account for these effects to determine a site-specific probability of detection for marine mammal calls in a given study area. A knowledge of that probability function over a range of environmental and ocean noise conditions allows vocalization statistics from recordings of single, fixed, omnidirectional sensors to be compared across sensors and at the same sensor over time with less bias and uncertainty in the results than direct comparison of the raw statistics. This dissertation focuses on both the development of new tools needed to automatically detect humpback whale vocalizations from single-fixed omnidirectional sensors as well as the determination of the site-specific probability of detection for monitoring sites off the coast of California. Using these tools, detected humpback calls are "calibrated" for environmental properties using the site-specific probability of detection values, and presented as call densities (calls per square kilometer per time). A two-year monitoring effort using these calibrated call densities reveals important biological and ecological information on migrating humpback whales off the coast of California. Call density trends are compared between the monitoring sites and at the same monitoring site over time. Call densities also are compared to several natural and human-influenced variables including season, time of day, lunar illumination, and ocean noise. The results reveal substantial differences in call densities

  6. AE (Acoustic Emission) for Flip-Chip CGA/FCBGA Defect Detection

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2014-01-01

    C-mode scanning acoustic microscopy (C-SAM) is a nondestructive inspection technique that uses ultrasound to show the internal feature of a specimen. A very high or ultra-high-frequency ultrasound passes through a specimen to produce a visible acoustic microimage (AMI) of its inner features. As ultrasound travels into a specimen, the wave is absorbed, scattered or reflected. The response is highly sensitive to the elastic properties of the materials and is especially sensitive to air gaps. This specific characteristic makes AMI the preferred method for finding "air gaps" such as delamination, cracks, voids, and porosity. C-SAM analysis, which is a type of AMI, was widely used in the past for evaluation of plastic microelectronic circuits, especially for detecting delamination of direct die bonding. With the introduction of the flip-chip die attachment in a package; its use has been expanded to nondestructive characterization of the flip-chip solder bumps and underfill. Figure 1.1 compares visual and C-SAM inspection approaches for defect detection, especially for solder joint interconnections and hidden defects. C-SAM is specifically useful for package features like internal cracks and delamination. C-SAM not only allows for the visualization of the interior features, it has the ability to produce images on layer-by-layer basis. Visual inspection; however, is only superior to C-SAM for the exposed features including solder dewetting, microcracks, and contamination. Ideally, a combination of various inspection techniques - visual, optical and SEM microscopy, C-SAM, and X-ray - need to be performed in order to assure quality at part, package, and system levels. This reports presents evaluations performed on various advanced packages/assemblies, especially the flip-chip die version of ball grid array/column grid array (BGA/CGA) using C-SAM equipment. Both external and internal equipment was used for evaluation. The outside facility provided images of the key features

  7. Detection of steam leaks into sodium in fast reactor steam generators by acoustic techniques - An overview of Indian programme

    Realising the potential of acoustic leak detection technique, an experimental programme was initiated a few years back at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) to develop this technique. The first phase of this programme consists of experiments to measure background noise characteristics on the steam generator modules of the 40 MW (thermal) Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at Kalpakkam and experiments to establish leak noise characteristics with the help of a leak simulation set up. By subjecting the measured data from these experiments to signal analysis techniques, a criterion for acoustic leak detection for FBTR steam generator will be evolved. Second phase of this programme will be devoted to developing an acoustic leak detection system suitable for installation in the 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR). This paper discusses the first phase of the experimental programme, results obtained from measurements carried out on FBTR steam generators and results obtained from leak simulation experiments. Acoustic leak detection system being considered for PFBR is also briefly described. 4 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  8. Development and Evaluation of Real-time Acoustic Detection System of Harmful Red-tide Using Ultrasonic Sound

    Donhyug Kang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The toxic, Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs caused by the Cochlodinium polykrikoides have a serious impact on the coastal waters of Korea. In this study, the acoustic detection system was developed for rapid HABs detection, based on the acoustic backscattering properties of the C. polykrikoides. The developed system was mainly composed of a pulser-receiver board, a signal processor board, a control board, a network board, a power board, ultrasonic sensors (3.5 and 5.0 MHz, an environmental sensor, GPS, and a land-based control unit. To evaluate the performance of the system, a trail was done at a laboratory, and two in situ trials were conducted: (1 when there was no red tide, and (2 when there was red tide. In the laboratory evaluation, the system performed well in accordance with the number of C. polykrikoides in the received level. Second, under the condition when there was no red tide in the field, there was a good correlation between the acoustic data and sampling data. Finally, under the condition when there was red tide in the field, the system successfully worked at various densities in accordance with the number of C. polykrikoides, and the results corresponded with the sampling data and monitoring result of NFRDI (National Fisheries Research & Development Institute. From the laboratory and field evaluations, the developed acoustic detection system for early detecting HABs has demonstrated that it could be a significant system to monitor the occurrence of HABs in coastal regions.

  9. The detection of multiple DNA targets with a single probe using a conformation-sensitive acoustic sensor.

    Tsortos, Achilleas; Grammoustianou, Aristea; Lymbouridou, Rena; Papadakis, George; Gizeli, Electra

    2015-07-21

    By using an acoustic wave methodology that allows direct sensing of biomolecular conformations, we achieved the detection of multiple target DNAs using a single probe, exploiting the fact that each bound target results in a hybridized product of a different shape. PMID:26097916

  10. Defect-detection algorithm for noncontact acoustic inspection using spectrum entropy

    Sugimoto, Kazuko; Akamatsu, Ryo; Sugimoto, Tsuneyoshi; Utagawa, Noriyuki; Kuroda, Chitose; Katakura, Kageyoshi

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, the detachment of concrete from bridges or tunnels and the degradation of concrete structures have become serious social problems. The importance of inspection, repair, and updating is recognized in measures against degradation. We have so far studied the noncontact acoustic inspection method using airborne sound and the laser Doppler vibrometer. In this method, depending on the surface state (reflectance, dirt, etc.), the quantity of the light of the returning laser decreases and optical noise resulting from the leakage of light reception arises. Some influencing factors are the stability of the output of the laser Doppler vibrometer, the low reflective characteristic of the measurement surface, the diffused reflection characteristic, measurement distance, and laser irradiation angle. If defect detection depends only on the vibration energy ratio since the frequency characteristic of the optical noise resembles white noise, the detection of optical noise resulting from the leakage of light reception may indicate a defective part. Therefore, in this work, the combination of the vibrational energy ratio and spectrum entropy is used to judge whether a measured point is healthy or defective or an abnormal measurement point. An algorithm that enables more vivid detection of a defective part is proposed. When our technique was applied in an experiment with real concrete structures, the defective part could be extracted more vividly and the validity of our proposed algorithm was confirmed.

  11. Leak detection evaluation of boiler tube for power plant using acoustic emission

    Main equipment of thermal power plant, such as boiler and turbine, are designed and manufactured by domestic techniques. And also the automatic control facilities controlling the main equipment are at the applying step of the localization. and many parts of BOP(Balance Of Plant) equipment are utilizing, localized. But because the special equipment monitoring the operation status of the main facilities such as boiler and turbine are still dependent upon foreign technology and especially boiler tube leak detection system is under the initial step of first application to newly-constructed plants and the manufacturing and application are done by foreign techniques mostly, fast localization development is required. Therefore, so as to study and develop boiler tube leak detection system, we performed studying on manufacturing, installation in site, acoustic emission(AE) signal analysis and discrimination etc. As a result of studying on boiler tube leak detection using AE, we conformed that diagnosis for boiler tube and computerized their trend management is possible, and also it is expected to contribute to safe operation of power generation facilities.

  12. Development of leak detection system of heat exchanger using acoustic emission technique

    Acoustic Emission(AE) technique has been applied to not only mechanical property testing but also on-line monitoring of the entire structure or a limit zone only. Although several AE devices have already been developed for on-line monitoring, the price of these systems is very high and it is difficult for the field to apply yet. In this study, we developed a specially designed PC-based leak detection system using A/D board. In this paper, AE technique has been applied to detect leak for heat exchanger by analyzing the characteristics of signal obtained from leak. It was confirmed that the characteristics of the signal generated by the turbulence of gas in the heat exchanger is narrow band signal having between 130-250kHz. Generally, the amplitude of leak signal is increased as the leak size increasing, but showed no significant change at frequency characteristic. Leak source location can be found by determining for the point of highest signal amplitude by comparing with several fixed sensors. In this paper, AE results are compared with the PC-based leak detection system using A/D board

  13. A Urinary Bcl-2 Surface Acoustic Wave Biosensor for Early Ovarian Cancer Detection

    Nathan D. Gallant

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the design, fabrication, surface functionalization and experimental characterization of an ultrasonic MEMS biosensor for urinary anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 detection with sub ng/mL sensitivity is presented. It was previously shown that urinary Bcl-2 levels are reliably elevated during early and late stages of ovarian cancer. Our biosensor uses shear horizontal (SH surface acoustic waves (SAWs on surface functionalized ST-cut Quartz to quantify the mass loading change by protein adhesion to the delay path. SH-SAWs were generated and received by a pair of micro-fabricated interdigital transducers (IDTs separated by a judiciously designed delay path. The delay path was surface-functionalized with monoclonal antibodies, ODMS, Protein A/G and Pluronic F127 for optimal Bcl-2 capture with minimal non-specific adsorption. Bcl-2 concentrations were quantified by the resulting resonance frequency shift detected by a custom designed resonator circuit. The target sensitivity for diagnosis and identifying the stage of ovarian cancer was successfully achieved with demonstrated Bcl-2 detection capability of 500 pg/mL. It was also shown that resonance frequency shift increases linearly with increasing Bcl-2 concentration.

  14. Detection of atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves through ionospheric measurements using dense GPS arrays

    Calais, E.; Haase, J. S.; Minster, B.

    2003-12-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is now widely used to measure ionospheric electron content at both global and regional scales. It is also capable of detecting small-scale high-frequency ionospheric disturbances caused by atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves. We show examples of ionospheric perturbations caused by earthquakes, rocket launches, and large surface explosions. The neutral atmospheric waves triggered by these events couple with the motion of free electrons and ionized plasma at ionospheric heights and induce coherent fluctuations of electron densities and ionization layer boundaries that are detectable with GPS. In all cases, the ionospheric perturbations match fairly well observations made through other techniques as well as numerical models. The development of permanent networks of densely spaced and continuously recording GPS stations open up new opportunities for the study of infrasonic waves in the atmosphere and their coupling with small scale processes in the ionosphere. We show examples of infrasonic waves detected using the 250-station GPS network that covers the Los Angeles area (SCIGN). Although the signal-to-noise ratio of these perturbations is relatively small, we show that it can be considerably improved by multi-station array processing techniques derived from seismic array analysis. These techniques can also be used to determine the perturbation propagation azimuth and velocity and, eventually, to recover information about the sources of these perturbations.

  15. Detection/classification/quantification of chemical agents using an array of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices

    Milner, G. Martin

    2005-05-01

    ChemSentry is a portable system used to detect, identify, and quantify chemical warfare (CW) agents. Electro chemical (EC) cell sensor technology is used for blood agents and an array of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors is used for nerve and blister agents. The combination of the EC cell and the SAW array provides sufficient sensor information to detect, classify and quantify all CW agents of concern using smaller, lighter, lower cost units. Initial development of the SAW array and processing was a key challenge for ChemSentry requiring several years of fundamental testing of polymers and coating methods to finalize the sensor array design in 2001. Following the finalization of the SAW array, nearly three (3) years of intensive testing in both laboratory and field environments were required in order to gather sufficient data to fully understand the response characteristics. Virtually unbounded permutations of agent characteristics and environmental characteristics must be considered in order to operate against all agents and all environments of interest to the U.S. military and other potential users of ChemSentry. The resulting signal processing design matched to this extensive body of measured data (over 8,000 agent challenges and 10,000 hours of ambient data) is considered to be a significant advance in state-of-the-art for CW agent detection.

  16. Classification of acoustic emission signals for drive systems coupling crack detection in semi-real time

    Early detection of mechanical failure in helicopter drive train components is a key safety and economical issue with both military and civil sectors of aviation. Of these components, couplings are particularly critical. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of designing and developing a reliable, real time monitoring methodology based on Supervised Pattern Recognition (SPR) for early detection of cracks in couplings used in helicopter and engine drive systems. Within this framework, a portable Acoustic Emission (AE) system was used, equipped with a semi-real time SPR software package. Results from AE tests performed in a gearbox-testing bench at different speeds and different torque values are presented. These results indicate that the energy content of different frequency bands in the AE signals power spectra is strongly correlated with the introduction of EDM notches in the main gear. Further tests indicate that a strong shift in the frequency of the AE signals is observed after spalling occurred in the pinion gear. The variation of displacement and velocity between signal classes are discussed as a potential feature in characterizing crack severity. Finally, a scope of the work for optimizing the methodology in detecting and evaluating coupling cracking in real time will be presented. (author)

  17. Detection of third-hand smoke on clothing fibers with a surface acoustic wave gas sensor.

    Cheng, Chi-Yung; Huang, Shih-Shen; Yang, Chia-Min; Tang, Kea-Tiong; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2016-01-01

    Third-hand smoke (THS) is a new cigarette-related issue defined as the residual contamination from cigarette smoke after a cigarette is extinguished. To detect THS on three commonly used clothing fibers-wool, cotton, and polyester, we applied two methods to measure the adsorption of THS: one was the gain of mass with an analytical balance after exposure to cigarette smoke; and the other was to detect the THS chemical compounds such as nicotine and 3-ethenylpyridine with a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor composed of coated oxidized hollow mesoporous carbon nanospheres. In the mass measurement, the gain of mass decreased in the order wool, cotton, and polyester; the latter gain was about one tenth that of wool. In the SAW detection, the frequency shift decreased in the same order-wool, cotton, and polyester. The residence period of THS on natural fiber (wool and cotton) is greater than on synthetic polyester fiber. These two tests provide quantitative results of THS on varied clothing fibers, to assess their risk after exposure to cigarette smoke. PMID:26909119

  18. Application of gas-coupled laser acoustic detection to gelatins and underwater sensing

    Caron, James N. [Research Support Instruments, Lanham, MD 20706, USA and Quarktet, Silver Spring, MD 20901 (United States); Kunapareddy, Pratima [Research Support Instruments, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Gas-coupled Laser Acoustic Detection (GCLAD) has been used as a method to sense ultrasound waves in materials without contact of the material surface. To sense the waveform, a laser beam is directed parallel to the material surface and displaced or deflected when the radiated waveform traverses the beam. We present recent tests that demonstrate the potential of using this technique for detecting ultrasound in gelatin phantoms and in water. As opposed to interferometric detection, GCLAD operates independently of the optical surface properties of the material. This allows the technique to be used in cases where the material is transparent or semi-transparent. We present results on sensing ultrasound in gelatin phantoms that are used to mimic biological materials. As with air-coupled transducers, the frequency response of GCLAD at high frequencies is limited by the high attenuation of ultrasound in air. In contrast, water has a much lower attenuation. Here we demonstrate the use of a GCLAD-like system in water, measuring the directivity response at 1 MHz and sensing waveforms with higher frequency content.

  19. A joint time-scale representation methodology for the detection of acoustic gravity wave induced by solar eclipses

    Roux, Stéphane; Sauli, Petra; Boska, Josef; Abry, Patrice

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a wavelet-based methodology to detect and characterize acoustic-gravity waves propagating through Ionosphere. It is based on data consisting of the time fluctuations of electron concentrations at different heights, collected from vertical Ionospheric sounding. First, we detect the local maxima of the continuous complex wavelet transforms, separately at each heights. Second, we connect the maxima that exist jointly within the same time-period neighborhood, over a continuous range ...

  20. PREFACE: ARENA 2006—Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino detection Activities

    Thompson, Lee

    2007-06-01

    The International Conference on Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino Activities, ARENA 2006 was jointly hosted by the Universities of Northumbria and Sheffield at the City of Newcastle Campus of the University of Northumbria in June 2006. ARENA 2006 was the latest in a series of meetings which have addressed, either separately or jointly, the use of radio and acoustic sensors for the detection of highly relativistic particles. Previous successful meetings have taken place in Los Angeles (RADHEP, 2000), Stanford (2003) and DESY Zeuthen (ARENA 2005). A total of 50 scientists from across Europe, the US and Japan attended the conference presenting status reports and results from a number of projects and initiatives spread as far afield as the Sweden and the South Pole. The talks presented at the meeting and the proceedings contained herein represent a `snapshot' of the status of the fields of acoustic and radio detection at the time of the conference. The three day meeting also included two invited talks by Dr Paula Chadwick and Dr Johannes Knapp who gave excellent summaries of the related astroparticle physics fields of high energy gamma ray detection and high energy cosmic ray detection respectively. As well as a full academic agenda there were social events including a Medieval themed conference banquet at Lumley Castle and a civic reception kindly provided by the Lord Mayor of Newcastle and hosted at the Mansion House. Thanks must go to the International Advisory Board members for their input and guidance, the Local Organising Committee for their hard work in bringing everything together and finally the delegates for the stimulating, enthusiastic and enjoyable spirit in which ARENA 2006 took place. Lee Thompson International Advisory Board G. Anton, ErlangenD. Besson, Kansas J. Blümer, KarlsruheA. Capone, Rome H. Falcke, BonnP. Gorham, Hawaii G. Gratta, StanfordF. Halzen, Madison J. Learned, HawaiiR. Nahnhauer, Zeuthen A. Rostovtzev, MoscowD. Saltzberg, Los Angeles L

  1. Prospects of Frequency-Time Correlation Analysis for Detecting Pipeline Leaks by Acoustic Emission Method

    In the current work the relevance of nondestructive test method development applied for pipeline leak detection is considered. It was shown that acoustic emission testing is currently one of the most widely spread leak detection methods. The main disadvantage of this method is that it cannot be applied in monitoring long pipeline sections, which in its turn complicates and slows down the inspection of the line pipe sections of main pipelines. The prospects of developing alternative techniques and methods based on the use of the spectral analysis of signals were considered and their possible application in leak detection on the basis of the correlation method was outlined. As an alternative, the time-frequency correlation function calculation is proposed. This function represents the correlation between the spectral components of the analyzed signals. In this work, the technique of time-frequency correlation function calculation is described. The experimental data that demonstrate obvious advantage of the time-frequency correlation function compared to the simple correlation function are presented. The application of the time-frequency correlation function is more effective in suppressing the noise components in the frequency range of the useful signal, which makes maximum of the function more pronounced. The main drawback of application of the time- frequency correlation function analysis in solving leak detection problems is a great number of calculations that may result in a further increase in pipeline time inspection. However, this drawback can be partially reduced by the development and implementation of efficient algorithms (including parallel) of computing the fast Fourier transform using computer central processing unit and graphic processing unit

  2. Photo-acoustic excitation and optical detection of fundamental flexural guided wave in coated bone phantoms.

    Moilanen, Petro; Zhao, Zuomin; Karppinen, Pasi; Karppinen, Timo; Kilappa, Vantte; Pirhonen, Jalmari; Myllylä, Risto; Haeggström, Edward; Timonen, Jussi

    2014-03-01

    Photo-acoustic (PA) imaging was combined with skeletal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) for assessment of human long bones. This approach permitted low-frequency excitation and detection of ultrasound so as to efficiently receive the thickness-sensitive fundamental flexural guided wave (FFGW) through a coating of soft tissue. The method was tested on seven axisymmetric bone phantoms, whose 1- to 5-mm wall thickness and 16-mm diameter mimicked those of the human radius. Phantoms were made of a composite material and coated with a 2.5- to 7.5-mm layer of soft material that mimicked soft tissue. Ultrasound was excited with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 1064-nm wavelength and received on the same side of the coated phantom with a heterodyne interferometer. The FFGW was detected at 30-kHz frequency. Fitting the FFGW phase velocity by the FLC(1,1) tube mode provided an accurate (9.5 ± 4.0%) wall thickness estimate. Ultrasonic in vivo characterization of cortical bone thickness may thus become possible. PMID:24361218

  3. Influence of the vibro-acoustic sensor position on cavitation detection in a Kaplan turbine

    Hydraulic turbines can be operated close to the limits of the operating range to meet the demand of the grid. When operated close to the limits, the risk increases that cavitation phenomena may occur at the runner and / or at the guide vanes of the turbine. Cavitation in a hydraulic turbine can cause material erosion on the runner and other turbine parts and reduce the durability of the machine leading to required outage time and related repair costs. Therefore it is important to get reliable information about the appearance of cavitation during prototype operation. In this experimental investigation the high frequency acoustic emissions and vibrations were measured at 20 operating points with different cavitation behaviour at different positions in a large prototype Kaplan turbine. The main goal was a comparison of the measured signals at different sensor positions to identify the sensitivity of the location for cavitation detection. The measured signals were analysed statistically and specific values were derived. Based on the measured signals, it is possible to confirm the cavitation limit of the examined turbine. The result of the investigation shows that the position of the sensors has a significant influence on the detection of cavitation

  4. Detecting leaks in gas-filled pressure vessels using acoustic resonances

    Gillis, K. A.; Moldover, M. R.; Mehl, J. B.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that a leak from a large, unthermostatted pressure vessel into ambient air can be detected an order of magnitude more effectively by measuring the time dependence of the ratio p/f2 than by measuring the ratio p/T. Here f is the resonance frequency of an acoustic mode of the gas inside the pressure vessel, p is the pressure of the gas, and T is the kelvin temperature measured at one point in the gas. In general, the resonance frequencies are determined by a mode-dependent, weighted average of the square of the speed-of-sound throughout the volume of the gas. However, the weighting usually has a weak dependence on likely temperature gradients in the gas inside a large pressure vessel. Using the ratio p/f2, we measured a gas leak (dM/dt)/M ≈ - 1.3 × 10-5 h-1 = - 0.11 yr-1 from a 300-liter pressure vessel filled with argon at 450 kPa that was exposed to sunshine-driven temperature and pressure fluctuations as large as (dT/dt)/T ≈ (dp/dt)/p ≈ 5 × 10-2 h-1 using a 24-hour data record. This leak could not be detected in a 72-hour record of p/T. (Here M is the mass of the gas in the vessel and t is the time.)

  5. Implementing wavelet packet transform for valve failure detection using vibration and acoustic emission signals

    The efficiency of reciprocating compressors relies heavily on the health condition of its moving components, most importantly its valves. Previous studies showed good correlation between the dynamic response and the physical condition of the valves. These can be achieved by employing vibration technique which is capable of monitoring the response of the valve, and acoustic emission technique which is capable of detecting the valves' material deformation. However, the relationship/comparison between the two techniques is rarely investigated. In this paper, the two techniques were examined using time-frequency analysis. Wavelet packet transform (WPT) was chosen as the multi-resolution analysis technique over continuous wavelet transform (CWT), and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). This is because WPT could overcome the high computational time and high redundancy problem in CWT and could provide detailed analysis of the high frequency components compared to DWT. The features of both signals can be extracted by evaluating the normalised WPT coefficients for different time window under different valve conditions. By comparing the normalised coefficients over a certain time frame and frequency range, the feature vectors revealing the condition of valves can be constructed. One way analysis of variance was employed on these feature vectors to test the significance of data under different valve conditions. It is believed that AE signals can give a better representation of the valve condition as it can detect both the fluid motion and material deformation of valves as compared to the vibration signals.

  6. Implementing wavelet packet transform for valve failure detection using vibration and acoustic emission signals

    Sim, H. Y.; Ramli, R.; Abdullah, M. A. K.

    2012-05-01

    The efficiency of reciprocating compressors relies heavily on the health condition of its moving components, most importantly its valves. Previous studies showed good correlation between the dynamic response and the physical condition of the valves. These can be achieved by employing vibration technique which is capable of monitoring the response of the valve, and acoustic emission technique which is capable of detecting the valves' material deformation. However, the relationship/comparison between the two techniques is rarely investigated. In this paper, the two techniques were examined using time-frequency analysis. Wavelet packet transform (WPT) was chosen as the multi-resolution analysis technique over continuous wavelet transform (CWT), and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). This is because WPT could overcome the high computational time and high redundancy problem in CWT and could provide detailed analysis of the high frequency components compared to DWT. The features of both signals can be extracted by evaluating the normalised WPT coefficients for different time window under different valve conditions. By comparing the normalised coefficients over a certain time frame and frequency range, the feature vectors revealing the condition of valves can be constructed. One way analysis of variance was employed on these feature vectors to test the significance of data under different valve conditions. It is believed that AE signals can give a better representation of the valve condition as it can detect both the fluid motion and material deformation of valves as compared to the vibration signals.

  7. The Basic Study on the Method of Acoustic Emission Signal Processing for the Failure Detection in the NPP Structures

    The thermal fatigue crack(TFC) is one of the life-limiting mechanisms at the nuclear power plant operating conditions. In order to evaluate the structural integrity, various non-destructive test methods such as radiographic test, ultrasonic test and eddy current are used in the industrial field. However, these methods have restrictions that defect detection is possible after the crack growth. For this reason, acoustic emission testing(AET) is becoming one of powerful inspection methods, because AET has an advantage that possible to monitor the structure continuously. Generally, every mechanism that affects the integrity of the structure or equipment is a source of acoustic emission signal. Therefore the noise filtering is one of the major works to the almost AET researchers. In this study, acoustic emission signal was collected from the pipes which were in the successive thermal fatigue cycles. The data were filtered based on the results from previous experiments. Through the data analysis, the signal characteristics to distinguish the effective signal from the noises for the TFC were proven as the waveform difference. The experiment results provide preliminary information for the acoustic emission technique to the continuous monitoring of the structure failure detection

  8. A new sparse design method on phased array-based acoustic emission sensor for partial discharge detection

    The acoustic detecting performance of a partial discharge (PD) ultrasonic sensor array can be improved by increasing the number of array elements. However, it will increase the complexity and cost of the PD detection system. Therefore, a sparse sensor with an optimization design can be chosen to ensure good acoustic performance. In this paper, first, a quantitative method is proposed for evaluating the acoustic performance of a square PD ultrasonic array sensor. Second, a method of sparse design is presented to combine the evaluation method with the chaotic monkey algorithm. Third, an optimal sparse structure of a 3 × 3 square PD ultrasonic array sensor is deduced. It is found that, under different sparseness and sparse structure, the main beam width of the directivity function shows a small variation, while the sidelobe amplitude shows a bigger variation. For a specific sparseness, the acoustic performance under the optimal sparse structure is close to that using a full array. Finally, some simulations based on the above method show that, for certain sparseness, the sensor with the optimal sparse structure exhibits superior positioning accuracy compared to that with a stochastic one. The sensor array structure may be chosen according to the actual requirements for an actual engineering application. (paper)

  9. The Basic Study on the Method of Acoustic Emission Signal Processing for the Failure Detection in the NPP Structures

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Jae Seong; Lee, Bo Young [Korea Aerospace University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung; Kwag, No Gwon [SAEAN, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The thermal fatigue crack(TFC) is one of the life-limiting mechanisms at the nuclear power plant operating conditions. In order to evaluate the structural integrity, various non-destructive test methods such as radiographic test, ultrasonic test and eddy current are used in the industrial field. However, these methods have restrictions that defect detection is possible after the crack growth. For this reason, acoustic emission testing(AET) is becoming one of powerful inspection methods, because AET has an advantage that possible to monitor the structure continuously. Generally, every mechanism that affects the integrity of the structure or equipment is a source of acoustic emission signal. Therefore the noise filtering is one of the major works to the almost AET researchers. In this study, acoustic emission signal was collected from the pipes which were in the successive thermal fatigue cycles. The data were filtered based on the results from previous experiments. Through the data analysis, the signal characteristics to distinguish the effective signal from the noises for the TFC were proven as the waveform difference. The experiment results provide preliminary information for the acoustic emission technique to the continuous monitoring of the structure failure detection

  10. A fast one-pass-training feature selection technique for GMM-based acoustic event detection with audio-visual data

    Butko, Taras; Nadeu Camprubí, Climent

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic event detection becomes a difficult task, even for a small number of events, in scenarios where events are produced rather spontaneously and often overlap in time. In this work, we aim to improve the detection rate by means of feature selection. Using a one-against-all detection approach, a new fast one-pass-training algorithm, and an associated highly-precise metric are developed. Choosing a different subset of multimodal features for each acoustic event class, the results obtain...

  11. Detection and localisation of very high energy particles in underwater acoustic; Detection et localisation de particules de tres hautes energies en acoustique sous-marine

    Juennard, N

    2007-12-15

    The theme of this thesis is included in the Antares international project whose object is to build a neutrino telescope located in a deep water environment in the Mediterranean sea. In deep water sea, a neutrino can interact with a water molecule. The collision generates a luminous flash and an acoustic wave. The goal of this work is to study this acoustic sound wave and develop a system able to detect the corresponding wave front and to estimate the initial direction of the particle. We first focus on the acoustic sound wave. Two different models are studied, and works made recently have led to a mathematical expression of both signal and wave front. Then, several detection methods are studied, from the most classical to the more recent ones. The experimental comparison in semi-real situation leads to the choice of a detection method: the Extended stochastic matched filter. Position and direction of the neutrino are now estimated with a Gauss-Newton inspired algorithm. This estimator is based on a wave front propagation model and on the time detection information given by the telescope hydro-phones. Performances of the system are then estimated. An antenna structure is then proposed and a global simulation finalizes this thesis. In this simulation, detection and estimation are based on the results found in the previous sections. Underwater sea noise is real and the results of the simulation valid our works. (author)

  12. Acoustic characteristics of voluntary expiratory sounds after swallow for detecting dysphagia.

    Yamashita, M; Yokoyama, K; Takei, Y; Furuya, N; Nakamichi, Y; Ihara, Y; Takahashi, K; Groher, M E

    2014-09-01

    This research was designed to investigate the acoustic characteristics of voluntary expiratory sounds after swallow for detecting dysphagia. Forty-nine patients with complaints of swallow difficulty received a videofluorographic (VF) examination. They were divided into three groups: nine who did not have any apparent disease (Group N), 22 patients with head and neck cancer (Group H&N) and 18 patients with other diseases including cerebrovascular disease (Group OD). After liquid barium swallows, they exhaled voluntarily without voicing. Videofluorographic findings were classified into four groups: normal (Normal), acceptable swallow (Acceptable), swallow with residue (Resid) and swallows with penetration or aspiration (Pen/Asp). The duration of expiratory sounds was measured on the time waveform. Frequency characteristics of expiratory sounds were obtained using one-third octave band analysis ranging from 62·5 to 2000·0 Hz of central frequency. The averaged level of the 1000·0-Hz band was chosen as the reference band level (RB level). The revised averaged level of each band was obtained by subtracting the RB level from the averaged level of each band. Zero decibel of the revised magnitude of the 125·0-Hz band was set as the critical value to differentiate dysphagia (Resid or Pen/Asp) from no dysphagia (Normal or Acceptable). Comparison of this assessment with VF findings showed a significant percentage agreement (85·4%). These results suggest that frequency characteristics of post-swallow expiratory sounds can differentiate dysphagia from no dysphagia among multiple dysphagic patient groups. PMID:24841831

  13. A Detection of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the Distribution of Galaxy Clusters

    Hong, Tao; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.

    2016-08-01

    We calculate the correlation function of 79,091 galaxy clusters in the redshift region of z≤slant 0.5, selected from the WH15 cluster catalog. With a weight of cluster mass, a significant baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is detected on the correlation function with a significance of 3.7σ . By fitting the correlation function with a ΛCDM model curve, we find {D}v(z=0.331){r}d{fid}/{r}d=1261.5+/- 48 Mpc, which is consistent with the Planck 2015 cosmology. We find that the correlation function of the higher mass sub-sample shows a higher amplitude at small scales of r\\lt 80 {h}-1 {{Mpc}}, which is consistent with our previous result. The two-dimensional correlation function of this large sample of galaxy clusters shows a faint BAO ring with a significance of 1.8σ , from which we find that the distance scale parameters on directions across and along the line of sight are {α }σ =1.02+/- 0.06 and {α }π =0.94+/- 0.10, respectively.

  14. A detection of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the distribution of galaxy clusters

    Hong, Tao; Wen, Z L

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the correlation function of 79,091 galaxy clusters in the redshift region of $0.05 \\leq z \\leq 0.5$ selected from the WH15 cluster catalog. With a weight of cluster mass, a significant baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is detected on the correlation function with a significance of $3.9 \\sigma$. By fitting the correlation function with a $\\Lambda$CDM model curve, we find $D_v(z = 0.331) r_d^{fid}/r_d = 1269.4 \\pm 58$ Mpc which is consistent with the Planck 2015 cosmology. We find that the correlation functions of the higher mass sub-samples show a higher amplitude at small scales of $r < 80~h^{-1}{\\rm Mpc}$, which is consistent with our precious result. We find a clear signal of the `Finger-of-God' effect on the 2D correlation function of the whole sample, which indicates the random peculiar motion of central bright galaxies in the gravitation potential well of clusters.

  15. Slew Bearings Damage Detection using Hilbert Huang Transformation and Acoustic Methods

    P. Nikolakopoulos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Slow speed slew bearings are widely used in many applications such us radar, aviation and aerospace units, bogie bearings for vehicles, harbor and shipyard cranes. Slew bearings are design to carry out high axial and radial loads, they have high titling rigidity and they lubricated with grease. Slew bearings consist of the rollers, the inner and the outer ring and the gear in general. One of the most common problems arising in such equipments is the vibration levels due to wear of either regarding the rollers or the other components. Actually, it is very critical for his safe operation and reliability to know from where the vibrations come from, and how much severe are. In this article, the acoustic emission method is used in order to excite slew bearings either for laboratory tests or real naval application receiving the sound waves in the time domain. The Hilbert Huang Transformation (HHT with the empirical mode decomposition (EMD is used in order to detect the possible defect and to estimate the healthy state from the measured sound signals of the bearing, through to investigation of the statistical index kurtosis.

  16. The design and calibration of particular geometry piezoelectric acoustic emission transducer for leak detection and localization

    Yalcinkaya, Hazim; Ozevin, Didem

    2013-09-01

    Pipeline leak detection using an acoustic emission (AE) method requires highly sensitive transducers responding to less attenuative and dispersive wave motion in order to place the discrete transducer spacing in an acceptable approach. In this paper, a new piezoelectric transducer geometry made of PZT-5A is introduced to increase the transducer sensitivity to the tangential direction. The finite element analysis of the transducer geometry is modeled in the frequency domain to identify the resonant frequency, targeting 60 kHz, and the loss factor. The numerical results are compared with the electromechanical characterization tests. The transducer response to wave motion generated in different directions is studied using a multiphysics model that couples mechanical and electrical responses of structural and piezoelectric properties. The directional dependence and the sensitivity of the transducer response are identified using the laser-induced load function. The transducer response is compared with a conventional thickness mode AE transducer under simulations and leak localization in a laboratory scale steel pipe.

  17. Acoustic emission detection with fiber optical sensors for dry cask storage health monitoring

    Lin, Bin; Bao, Jingjing; Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    The increasing number, size, and complexity of nuclear facilities deployed worldwide are increasing the need to maintain readiness and develop innovative sensing materials to monitor important to safety structures (ITS). In the past two decades, an extensive sensor technology development has been used for structural health monitoring (SHM). Technologies for the diagnosis and prognosis of a nuclear system, such as dry cask storage system (DCSS), can improve verification of the health of the structure that can eventually reduce the likelihood of inadvertently failure of a component. Fiber optical sensors have emerged as one of the major SHM technologies developed particularly for temperature and strain measurements. This paper presents the development of optical equipment that is suitable for ultrasonic guided wave detection for active SHM in the MHz range. An experimental study of using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as acoustic emission (AE) sensors was performed on steel blocks. FBG have the advantage of being durable, lightweight, and easily embeddable into composite structures as well as being immune to electromagnetic interference and optically multiplexed. The temperature effect on the FBG sensors was also studied. A multi-channel FBG system was developed and compared with piezoelectric based AE system. The paper ends with conclusions and suggestions for further work.

  18. Particle Filter with Integrated Voice Activity Detection for Acoustic Source Tracking

    Anders M. Johansson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In noisy and reverberant environments, the problem of acoustic source localisation and tracking (ASLT using an array of microphones presents a number of challenging difficulties. One of the main issues when considering real-world situations involving human speakers is the temporally discontinuous nature of speech signals: the presence of silence gaps in the speech can easily misguide the tracking algorithm, even in practical environments with low to moderate noise and reverberation levels. A natural extension of currently available sound source tracking algorithms is the integration of a voice activity detection (VAD scheme. We describe a new ASLT algorithm based on a particle filtering (PF approach, where VAD measurements are fused within the statistical framework of the PF implementation. Tracking accuracy results for the proposed method is presented on the basis of synthetic audio samples generated with the image method, whereas performance results obtained with a real-time implementation of the algorithm, and using real audio data recorded in a reverberant room, are published elsewhere. Compared to a previously proposed PF algorithm, the experimental results demonstrate the improved robustness of the method described in this work when tracking sources emitting real-world speech signals, which typically involve significant silence gaps between utterances.

  19. Remote ballistic emplacement of an electro-optical and acoustic target detection and localization system

    West, Aaron; Mellini, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Near real time situational awareness in uncontrolled non line of sight (NLOS) and beyond line of sight (BLOS) environments is critical in the asymmetric battlefield of future conflicts. The ability to detect and accurately locate hostile forces in difficult terrain or urban environments can dramatically increase the survivability and effectiveness of dismounted soldiers, especially when they are limited to the resources available only to the small unit. The Sensor Mortar Network (SMortarNet) is a 60mm Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) mortar designed to give the Squad near real time situational awareness in uncontrolled NLOS environments. SMortarNet is designed to track targets both acoustically and electro optically and can fuse tracks between, the acoustic, EO, and magnetic modalities on board. The system is linked to other mortar nodes and the user via a masterless frequency hopping spread spectrum ad-hoc mesh radio network. This paper will discuss SMortarNet in the context of a squad level dismounted soldier, its technical capabilities, and its benefit to the small unit Warfighter. The challenges with ballistic remote emplacement of sensitive components and the on board signal processing capabilities of the system will also be covered. The paper will also address how the sensor network can be integrated with existing soldier infrastructure, such as the NettWarrior platform, for rapid transition to soldier systems. Networks of low power sensors can have many forms, but the more practical networks for warfighters are ad hoc radio-based systems that can be rapidly deployed and can leverage a range of assets available at a given time. The low power long life networks typically have limited bandwidth and may have unreliable communication depending on the network health, which makes autonomous sensors a critical component of the network. SMortarNet reduces data to key information features at the sensor itself. The smart sensing approach enables

  20. Detection of bond failure in the anchorage zone of reinforced concrete beams via acoustic emission monitoring

    Abouhussien, Ahmed A.; Hassan, Assem A. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was utilised to identify the onset of bond failure in reinforced concrete beams. Beam anchorage specimens were designed and tested to fail in bond in the anchorage zone. The specimens included four 250 × 250 × 1500 mm beams with four variable bonded lengths (100, 200, 300, and 400 mm). Meanwhile, an additional 250 × 250 × 2440 mm beam, with 200 mm bonded length, was tested to investigate the influence of sensor location on the identification of bond damage. All beams were tested under four-point loading setup and continuously monitored using three distributed AE sensors. These attached sensors were exploited to record AE signals resulting from both cracking and bond deterioration until failure. The variations in the number of AE hits and cumulative signal strength (CSS) versus test time were evaluated to achieve early detection of crack growth and bar slippage. In addition, AE intensity analysis was performed on signal strength of collected AE signals to develop two additional parameters: historic index (H (t)) and severity (S r). The analysis of these AE parameters enabled an early detection of both first cracks (at almost the mid-span of the beam) and bar slip in either of the anchorage zones at the beams’ end before their visual observation, regardless of sensor location. The results also demonstrated a clear correlation between the damage level in terms of crack development/measured free end bar slip and AE parameters (number of hits, CSS, H(t), and S r).

  1. A poly(vinylidene fluoride)-coated ZnO film bulk acoustic resonator for nerve gas detection

    We apply the film bulk acoustic resonator for the detection of nerve gas. The resonator is consisted of a ZnO piezoelectric stack and a W/SiO2 Bragg reflector. Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) is used as the sensing coating to adsorb the analyte under test. The testing results show that our proposed sensor can yield a sensitive, reversible and reproducible response to nerve gas. The relationship between the frequency shifts and the concentrations of the nerve gas exhibits a perfect linear correlation in the range of 10–50 ppm. The gas sensitivity of the proposed sensor is 718 kHz ppm−1, which is several orders of magnitude higher than that of a quartz crystal microbalance with the same sensitive coating. This study proves that it is feasible to use the PVDF-coated thin film bulk acoustic resonator for the detection of the traced nerve gas

  2. Acoustic Emission Detection of Macro-Cracks on Engraving Tool Steel Inserts during the Injection Molding Cycle Using PZT Sensors

    Aleš Hančič

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved monitoring system for the failure detection of engraving tool steel inserts during the injection molding cycle. This system uses acoustic emission PZT sensors mounted through acoustic waveguides on the engraving insert. We were thus able to clearly distinguish the defect through measured AE signals. Two engraving tool steel inserts were tested during the production of standard test specimens, each under the same processing conditions. By closely comparing the captured AE signals on both engraving inserts during the filling and packing stages, we were able to detect the presence of macro-cracks on one engraving insert. Gabor wavelet analysis was used for closer examination of the captured AE signals’ peak amplitudes during the filling and packing stages. The obtained results revealed that such a system could be used successfully as an improved tool for monitoring the integrity of an injection molding process.

  3. Acoustic emission detection of macro-cracks on engraving tool steel inserts during the injection molding cycle using PZT sensors.

    Svečko, Rajko; Kusić, Dragan; Kek, Tomaž; Sarjaš, Andrej; Hančič, Aleš; Grum, Janez

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an improved monitoring system for the failure detection of engraving tool steel inserts during the injection molding cycle. This system uses acoustic emission PZT sensors mounted through acoustic waveguides on the engraving insert. We were thus able to clearly distinguish the defect through measured AE signals. Two engraving tool steel inserts were tested during the production of standard test specimens, each under the same processing conditions. By closely comparing the captured AE signals on both engraving inserts during the filling and packing stages, we were able to detect the presence of macro-cracks on one engraving insert. Gabor wavelet analysis was used for closer examination of the captured AE signals' peak amplitudes during the filling and packing stages. The obtained results revealed that such a system could be used successfully as an improved tool for monitoring the integrity of an injection molding process. PMID:23673677

  4. Battlefield acoustics

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  5. Online Doppler Effect Elimination Based on Unequal Time Interval Sampling for Wayside Acoustic Bearing Fault Detecting System

    Kesai Ouyang; Siliang Lu; Shangbin Zhang; Haibin Zhang; Qingbo He; Fanrang Kong

    2015-01-01

    The railway occupies a fairly important position in transportation due to its high speed and strong transportation capability. As a consequence, it is a key issue to guarantee continuous running and transportation safety of trains. Meanwhile, time consumption of the diagnosis procedure is of extreme importance for the detecting system. However, most of the current adopted techniques in the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system (ADBD) are offline strategies, which means that the s...

  6. Application of a novel optical fiber sensor to detection of acoustic emissions by various damages in CFRP laminates

    In this research, we applied a novel optical fiber sensor, phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating balanced sensor with high sensitivity and broad bandwidth, to acoustic emission (AE) detection in carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs). AE signals generated in the tensile testing of angle-ply and cross-ply CFRP laminates were both detected by the novel optical fiber sensor and traditional PZT sensors. The cumulative hits detected by both sensors coincided after applying simple data processing to eliminate the noise, and clearly exhibited Kaiser effect and Felicity effect. Typical AE signals detected by both sensors were discussed and were tried to relate to micro CFRP damages observed via microscope. These results demonstrate that this novel optical fiber sensor can reliably detect AE signals from various damages. It has the potential to be used in practical AE detection, as an alternative to the piezoelectric PZT sensor. (paper)

  7. Multi-bearing defect detection with trackside acoustic signal based on a pseudo time-frequency analysis and Dopplerlet filter

    Zhang, Haibin; Lu, Siliang; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of train bearing defects based on the acoustic signal acquired by a trackside microphone plays a significant role in the transport system. However, the wayside acoustic signal suffers from the Doppler distortion due to the high moving speed and also contains the multi-source signals from different train bearings. This paper proposes a novel solution to overcome the two difficulties in trackside acoustic diagnosis. In the method a pseudo time-frequency analysis (PTFA) based on an improved Dopplerlet transform (IDT) is presented to acquire the time centers for different bearings. With the time centers, we design a series of Dopplerlet filters (DF) in time-frequency domain to work on the signal's time-frequency distribution (TFD) gained by the short time Fourier transform (STFT). Then an inverse STFT (ISTFT) is utilized to get the separated signals for each sound source which means bearing here. Later the resampling method based on certain motion parameters eliminates the Doppler Effect and finally the diagnosis can be made effectively according to the envelope spectrum of each separated signal. With the effectiveness of the technique validated by both simulated and experimental cases, the proposed wayside acoustic diagnostic scheme is expected to be available in wayside defective bearing detection.

  8. The utility of a long-term acoustic recording system for detecting white seabass Atractoscion nobilis spawning sounds.

    Aalbers, S A; Sepulveda, C A

    2012-11-01

    This study reports the use of a long-term acoustic recording system (LARS) to remotely monitor white seabass Atractoscion nobilis spawning sounds at three sites along the southern California coastline, adjacent to Camp Pendleton. On the basis of previous studies of A. nobilis sound production relative to periods of known spawning activity, LARS were set to continuously record ambient sounds for a 2 h period around sunset from April to June 2009. Acoustic analyses identified A. nobilis courtship sounds on 89, 28 and 45% of the days at the three locations, respectively. From 474 h of acoustic data, spawning-related sounds (chants) were detected on 19 occasions in 2009 with an additional 11 spawning chants recorded during a 2007 validation period. Most spawning chants occurred within 30 min of sunset during the months of May and June at a mean ±S.D. surface temperature of 18.2 ± 1.2° C. Consecutive daily spawning activity was not apparent at any sites in 2009. Atractoscion nobilis spawning chants were recorded at all three sites, suggesting that shallow rocky reefs which support kelp forests provide suitable A. nobilis spawning habitat. Results confirm the utility of passive acoustic recorders for identifying A. nobilis spawning periods and locations. PMID:23130687

  9. Acoustic emission

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  10. Fiber Optic Sensor for Acoustic Detection of Partial Discharges in Oil-Paper Insulated Electrical Systems

    Julio Posada-Roman; Garcia-Souto, Jose A.; Jesus Rubio-Serrano

    2012-01-01

    A fiber optic interferometric sensor with an intrinsic transducer along a length of the fiber is presented for ultrasound measurements of the acoustic emission from partial discharges inside oil-filled power apparatus. The sensor is designed for high sensitivity measurements in a harsh electromagnetic field environment, with wide temperature changes and immersion in oil. It allows enough sensitivity for the application, for which the acoustic pressure is in the range of units of Pa at a frequ...

  11. Detecting and identifying damage in sandwich polymer composite by using acoustic emission

    McGugan, M.; Sørensen, Bent F.; Østergaard, R.;

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic emission is a useful monitoring tool for extracting extra information during mechanical testing of polymer composite sandwich materials. The study of fracture mechanics within test specimens extracted from wind turbine blade material ispresented. The contribution of the acoustic emission...... monitoring technique in defining different failure modes identified during the testing is discussed. The development of in-situ structural monitoring and control systems is considered....

  12. Detecting and identifying damage in sandwich polymer composite by using acoustic emission

    McGugan, M.; Soerensen, Bent F.; Oestergaard, R.; Bech, T.

    2006-12-15

    Acoustic emission is a useful monitoring tool for extracting extra information during mechanical testing of polymer composite sandwich materials. The study of fracture mechanics within test specimens extracted from wind turbine blade material is presented. The contribution of the acoustic emission monitoring technique in defining different failure modes identified during the testing is discussed. The development of in-situ structural monitoring and control systems is considered. (au)

  13. Detection and processing of electromagnetic and near-field acoustic signals in elasmobranch fishes.

    Kalmijn, A D

    2000-01-01

    The acoustic near field of quietly moving underwater objects and the bio-electric field of aquatic animals exhibit great similarity, as both are predominantly governed by Laplace's equation. The acoustic and electrical sensory modalities thus may, in directing fishes to their prey, employ analogous processing algorithms, suggesting a common evolutionary design, founded on the salient physical features shared by the respective stimulus fields. Sharks and rays are capable of orientating to the ...

  14. Experimental studies on acoustic detection of sodium-water steam generator leaks in the USSR

    The paper reports that the acoustic leak indicators have been developed in two versions. The first one is based upon using the immersible acoustic hydrophones and the parallel frequency analysis of their signals. The second one uses the waveguide sensors with microprocessor system of noise signals processing. Brief description of both versions is given. The result of these systems tests at the experimental facilities, BN-600 and BOR-60 reactors are also provided. 4 refs, 15 figs

  15. Acoustic detection of biosonar activity of deep diving odontocetes at Josephine Seamount High Seas Marine Protected Area.

    Giorli, Giacomo; Au, Whitlow W L; Ou, Hui; Jarvis, Susan; Morrissey, Ronald; Moretti, David

    2015-05-01

    The temporal occurrence of deep diving cetaceans in the Josephine Seamount High Seas Marine Protected Area (JSHSMPA), south-west Portugal, was monitored using a passive acoustic recorder. The recorder was deployed on 13 May 2010 at a depth of 814 m during the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation cruise "Sirena10" and recovered on 6 June 2010. The recorder was programmed to record 40 s of data every 2 min. Acoustic data analysis, for the detection and classification of echolocation clicks, was performed using automatic detector/classification systems: M3R (Marine Mammal Monitoring on Navy Ranges), a custom matlab program, and an operator-supervised custom matlab program to assess the classification performance of the detector/classification systems. M3R CS-SVM algorithm contains templates to detect beaked whales, sperm whales, blackfish (pilot and false killer whales), and Risso's dolphins. The detections of each group of odontocetes was monitored as a function of time. Blackfish and Risso's dolphins were detected every day, while beaked whales and sperm whales were detected almost every day. The hourly distribution of detections reveals that blackfish and Risso's dolphins were more active at night, while beaked whales and sperm whales were more active during daylight hours. PMID:25994682

  16. Co-detection of acoustic emissions during failure of heterogeneous media: new perspectives for natural hazard early warning

    Faillettaz, J; Reiweger, I

    2015-01-01

    A promising method for real time early warning of gravity driven rupture that considers both the heterogeneity of natural media and characteristics of acoustic emissions attenuation is proposed. The method capitalizes on co-detection of elastic waves emanating from micro-cracks by multiple and spatially separated sensors. Event co-detection is considered as surrogate for large event size with more frequent co-detected events marking imminence of catastrophic failure. Using a spatially explicit fiber bundle numerical model with spatially correlated mechanical strength and two load redistribution rules, we constructed a range of mechanical failure scenarios and associated failure events (mapped into AE) in space and time. Analysis considering hypothetical arrays of sensors and consideration of signal attenuation demonstrate the potential of the co-detection principles even for insensitive sensors to provide early warning for imminent global failure.

  17. Wavelet packet transform for detection of single events in acoustic emission signals

    Bianchi, Davide; Mayrhofer, Erwin; Gröschl, Martin; Betz, Gerhard; Vernes, András

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic emission signals in tribology can be used for monitoring the state of bodies in contact and relative motion. The recorded signal includes information which can be associated with different events, such as the formation and propagation of cracks, appearance of scratches and so on. One of the major challenges in analyzing these acoustic emission signals is to identify parts of the signal which belong to such an event and discern it from noise. In this contribution, a wavelet packet decomposition within the framework of multiresolution analysis theory is considered to analyze acoustic emission signals to investigate the failure of tribological systems. By applying the wavelet packet transform a method for the extraction of single events in rail contact fatigue test is proposed. The extraction of such events at several stages of the test permits a classification and the analysis of the evolution of cracks in the rail.

  18. Multivariate data-driven modelling and pattern recognition for damage detection and identification for acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonics

    Different methods are commonly used for non-destructive testing in structures; among others, acoustic emission and ultrasonic inspections are widely used to assess structures. The research presented in this paper is motivated by the need to improve the inspection capabilities and reliability of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems based on ultrasonic guided waves with focus on the acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonics techniques. The use of a guided wave based approach is driven by the fact that these waves are able to propagate over relatively long distances, and interact sensitively and uniquely with different types of defect. Special attention is paid here to the development of efficient SHM methodologies. This requires robust signal processing techniques for the correct interpretation of the complex ultrasonic waves. Therefore, a variety of existing algorithms for signal processing and pattern recognition are evaluated and integrated into the different proposed methodologies. As a contribution to solve the problem, this paper presents results in damage detection and classification using a methodology based on hierarchical nonlinear principal component analysis, square prediction measurements and self-organizing maps, which are applied to data from acoustic emission tests and acousto-ultrasonic inspections. At the end, the efficiency of these methodologies is experimentally evaluated in diverse anisotropic composite structures. (paper)

  19. Shear acoustic wave biosensor for detecting DNA intrinsic viscosity and conformation: a study with QCM-D.

    Tsortos, Achilleas; Papadakis, George; Gizeli, Electra

    2008-12-01

    Direct biosensors are devices operating by monitoring the amount of surface-bound analyte. In this work a new approach is presented where a label-free acoustic biosensor, based on a QCM-D device, and solution viscosity theory, are used to study DNA intrinsic viscosity. The latter is quantitatively related to the DNA conformation and specifically the molecule's shape and size, in a manner that is independent of the amount of bound DNA mass. It is shown that acoustic measurements can clearly distinguish between ds-DNA of same shape (straight rod) but various sizes (from 20 to 198bp (base pairs)) and same mass and size (90bp) but various shapes ("straight", "bent", "triangle"). These results are discussed in the broader context of "coil" and sphere-like molecules detected on surfaces. A mathematical formula is presented relating the length of straight, surface-protruding DNA to the acoustic ratio DeltaD/Deltaf. The development of real-time rapid techniques for the characterization of DNA intrinsic curvature as well as DNA conformational changes upon interaction with proteins is of significance to analytical biotechnology due to the large number of DNA sequences and potential DNA bending proteins involved in genome analysis and drug screening. PMID:18723337

  20. Advanced signal processing techniques for acoustic detection of sodium/water reaction

    In this paper results of development of a neural network technique for processing of acoustic background noise and injection noise of various media (argon, water steam, hydrogen) at test rigs and industrial steam generator are presented. (author). 3 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs

  1. Accounting for false-positive acoustic detections of bats using occupancy models

    Clement, Matthew J.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.; Ormsbee, Patricia C.; Szewczak, Joseph M.; Nichols, James D.

    2014-01-01

    1. Acoustic surveys have become a common survey method for bats and other vocal taxa. Previous work shows that bat echolocation may be misidentified, but common analytic methods, such as occupancy models, assume that misidentifications do not occur. Unless rare, such misidentifications could lead to incorrect inferences with significant management implications.

  2. Feasibility of grape root borer, Vitacea polistiformis Harris, larval acoustic detection in Florida vineyards

    Grape root borer (GRB) is an important pest of grapes in the Eastern U.S. The larvae feed on grape roots, reducing vine vigor and increasing susceptibility to pathogens and drought. A study was conducted in 3 vineyards to test whether infestations could be identified using acoustic methods. Sound...

  3. Detection and localization of defects in complex structures by Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy and Acoustic Emission

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Chlada, Milan; Krofta, Josef; Kober, Jan; Dos Santos, S.

    Le Mans: The University of Maine in Le Mans, 2013 - (Bentahar, M.; Kenderian, S.; Green, R.). s. 95 [Internanational Symposium on Nondestructive Characterization of Materials /13./. 20.05.2013-24.05.2013, Le Mans] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy * acoustic emission * nondestructive testing * damage initiation * civil structure Subject RIV: JS - Reliability ; Quality Management, Testing

  4. A 90 nm CMOS, 6 μW Power-Proportional Acoustic Sensing Frontend for Voice Activity Detection

    Badami, Komail; Lauwereins, Steven; Meert, Wannes; Verhelst, Marian

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a sub-6 µW acoustic front-end for speech/non-speech classification in a voice activity detection (VAD) in 90 nm CMOS. Power consumption of the VAD system is minimized by architectural design around a new Power-Proportional sensing paradigm and the use of machine-learning assisted moderate-precision analog analytics for classification. Power-Proportional sensing allows for hierarchical and context-aware scaling of the frontend’s power consumption depending on the complexity ...

  5. Simulation of a Hybrid Optical/Radio/Acoustic Extension to IceCube for EeV Neutrino Detection

    Besson, D; Ahrens, J; Atlee, D W; Bahcall, J N; Bai, X; Baret, B; Bartelt, M; Bay, R; Barwick, S W; Beattie, K; Becka, T; Becker, K H; Becker, J K; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Blaufuss, E; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Boser, S; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Braun, J; Burgess, C; Burgess, T; Castermans, T; Chirkin, D; Clem, J; Conrad, J; Cooley, J; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Davour, A; Day, C T; De Clercq, C; Desiati, P; De Young, T R; Dreyer, J; Duvoort, M R; Edwards, W R; Ehrlich, R; Ekstrom, P; Ellsworth, R W; Evenson, P A; Fazely, A R; Feser, T; Filimonov, K; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Ganugapati, R; Geenen, H; Gerhardt, L; Greene, M G; Grullon, S; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J; Gro, A; Gunasingha, R M; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hardtke, D; Hardtke, R; Harenberg, T; Hart, J E; Hauschildt, T; Hays, D; Heise, J; Helbing, K; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hill, G C; Hodges, J; Hoffman, K D; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Hughey, B; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hundertmark, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jones, A; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K H; Karle, A; Kawai, H; Kelley, J L; Kestel, M; Kitamura, N; Klein, S R; Klepser, S; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Krasberg, M; Kühn, K; Kujawski, E; Landsman, H; Lang, R; Leich, H; Liubarsky, I; Lundberg, J; Madsen, J; Marciniewski, P; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McCauley, T; McParland, C P; Meli, A; Messarius, T; Mészáros, P; Minor, R H; Miocinovic, P; Miyamoto, H; Mokhtarani, A; Montaruli, T; Morey, A; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Munich, K; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Ogelman, H; Olbrechts, P; Olivas, A; Patton, S; Peña-Garay, C; Perez de los Heros, C; Pieloth, D; Pohl, A C; Porrata, R; Pretz, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Razzaque, S; Refflinghaus, F; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richter, S; Rizzo, A; Robbins, S; Rott, C; Rutledge, D; Sander, H G; Schlenstedt, S; Schneider, D; Schwarz, R; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Silvestri, A; Smith, A J; Solarz, M; Song, C; Sopher, J E; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Steffen, P; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoufer, M; Stoyanov, S; Sulanke, K H; Sullivan, G W; Sumner, T J; Taboada, I; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Thollander, L; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Turcan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Voigt, B; Wagner, W; Walck, C; Waldmann, H; Walter, M; Wang, Y R; Wendt, C; Wiebusch, C; Wikström, G; Williams, D; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Xu, X W; Yoshida, S; Yodh, G; Böser, S; Vandenbroucke, J A

    2005-01-01

    Astrophysical neutrinos at $\\sim$EeV energies promise to be an interesting source for astrophysics and particle physics. Detecting the predicted cosmogenic ("GZK") neutrinos at 10$^{16}$ - 10$^{20}$ eV would test models of cosmic ray production at these energies and probe particle physics at $\\sim$100 TeV center-of-mass energy. While IceCube could detect $\\sim$1 GZK event per year, it is necessary to detect 10 or more events per year in order to study temporal, angular, and spectral distributions. The IceCube observatory may be able to achieve such event rates with an extension including optical, radio, and acoustic receivers. We present results from simulating such a hybrid detector.

  6. On-line low and high frequency acoustic leak detection and location for an automated steam generator protection system

    Two on-line acoustic leak detection systems were operated and installed on a 76 MW hockey stick steam generator in the Sodium Components Test Installation (SCTI) at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) in Southern California. The low frequency system demonstrated the capability to detect and locate leaks, both intentional and unintentional. No false alarms were issued during the two year test program even with adjacent blasting activities, pneumatic drilling, shuttle rocket engine testing nearby, scrams of the SCTI facility, thermal/hydraulic transient testing, and pump/control valve operations. For the high frequency system the capability to detect water into sodium reactions was established utilizing frequencies as high as 300 kHz. The high frequency system appeared to be sensitive to noise generated by maintenance work and system valve operations. Subsequent development work which is incomplete as of this date showed much more promise for the high frequency system. (author). 13 figs

  7. On the measurement of high-energetic neutrinos with the IceCube neutrino telescope and with acoustic detection methods

    In this thesis, two subjects have been addressed to enhance the detection of astrophysical neutrinos with the existing IceCube neutrino telescope as well as to explore new detection methods, namely the acoustic detection. In the first part of this thesis, the determination of the acoustic attenuation length in South-Pole ice is presented. This is part of a feasibility study to investigate the acoustic neutrino detection as a possibility to enhance the detection of the highest-energy neutrinos. For this, the acoustic properties of the ice have to be known, and the South-Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been built to determine these. The attenuation length is determined using in-situ measurements with SPATS and a retrievable transmitter (pinger), which was deployed in a depth between 190 and 500 m into the water-filled drilling holes. Even though, the unknown angular-dependent sensitivities of the SPATS sensor channels cannot be avoided and are considered as the dominant systematic effect for these measurements. In this thesis, the acoustic attenuation length is calculated by comparing the energy contents of the pinger pulses recorded by the various SPATS sensor channels for different distances between the pinger and the respective channel. The energy was calculated from the Fourier spectra of the pinger pulses for a frequency range between 5 and 35 kHz. The attenuation coefficient is calculated for each channel individually and the weighted mean over the distribution of all considered channels leads to an attenuation length of 264+52-37 m. The dependence of the attenuation on both depth and frequency has been investigated, showing no indications for either. In the second part, a new event reconstruction method based on a Top-Down approach is presented. The method has been implemented for the IC40 detector and applied to the muon energy reconstruction. The Top-Down method is based on the direct comparison of single measured events with a large sample of simulated

  8. On the measurement of high-energetic neutrinos with the IceCube neutrino telescope and with acoustic detection methods

    Schunck, Matthias

    2011-10-07

    In this thesis, two subjects have been addressed to enhance the detection of astrophysical neutrinos with the existing IceCube neutrino telescope as well as to explore new detection methods, namely the acoustic detection. In the first part of this thesis, the determination of the acoustic attenuation length in South-Pole ice is presented. This is part of a feasibility study to investigate the acoustic neutrino detection as a possibility to enhance the detection of the highest-energy neutrinos. For this, the acoustic properties of the ice have to be known, and the South-Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been built to determine these. The attenuation length is determined using in-situ measurements with SPATS and a retrievable transmitter (pinger), which was deployed in a depth between 190 and 500 m into the water-filled drilling holes. Even though, the unknown angular-dependent sensitivities of the SPATS sensor channels cannot be avoided and are considered as the dominant systematic effect for these measurements. In this thesis, the acoustic attenuation length is calculated by comparing the energy contents of the pinger pulses recorded by the various SPATS sensor channels for different distances between the pinger and the respective channel. The energy was calculated from the Fourier spectra of the pinger pulses for a frequency range between 5 and 35 kHz. The attenuation coefficient is calculated for each channel individually and the weighted mean over the distribution of all considered channels leads to an attenuation length of 264{sup +52} {sub -37} m. The dependence of the attenuation on both depth and frequency has been investigated, showing no indications for either. In the second part, a new event reconstruction method based on a Top-Down approach is presented. The method has been implemented for the IC40 detector and applied to the muon energy reconstruction. The Top-Down method is based on the direct comparison of single measured events with a large sample

  9. Effects of using inclined parametric echosounding on sub-bottom acoustic imaging and advances in buried object detection

    Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Held, Philipp; Feldens, Peter; Wilken, Dennis

    2016-04-01

    This study reports an adaptation of a parametric echosounder system using 15 kHz as secondary frequency to investigate the angular response of sub-bottom backscatter strength of layered mud, providing a new method for enhanced acoustic detection of buried targets. Adaptions to achieve both vertical (0°) and non-vertical inclination (1-15°, 30°, 45° and 60°) comprise mechanical tilting of the acoustic transducer and electronic beam steering. Data were acquired at 18 m water depth at a study site characterized by a flat, muddy seafloor where a 0.1 m diameter power cable lies 1-2 m below the seafloor. Surveying the cable with vertical incidence revealed that the buried cable can hardly be discriminated against the backscatter strength of the layered mud. However, the backscatter strength of layered mud decreases strongly at >3±0.5° incidence and the layered mud echo pattern vanishes beyond 5°. As a consequence, the backscatter pattern of the buried cable is very pronounced in acoustic images gathered at 15°, 30°, 45° and 60° incidence. The size of the cable echo pattern increases linearly with incidence. These effects are attributed to reflection loss from layered mud at larger incidence and to the scattering of the 0.1 m diameter buried cable. Data analyses support the visual impression of superior detection of the cable with an up to 2.6-fold increase of the signal-to-noise ratio at 40° incidence compared to the vertical incidence case.

  10. Simulation and measurement of different hydrophone components for acoustic particle detection; Simulation und Messung verschiedener Hydrophonkomponenten zur akustischen Teilchendetektion

    Salomon, K.S.

    2007-01-26

    A study of piezoceramics as sensitive elements for the use in acoustical astroparticle physics is presented in this work. This study aims to develop underwater microphones (hydrophones) in order to detect thermoacoustic sound pulses, which are produced in neutrino interactions. The sensitive elements of the acoustical detectors, the piezo ceramics, are under investigation in this work. Therefore the equations of a piezo are solved in simulations to derive its macroscopic properties. Especially the impedance and the displacement of the piezo as response to applied voltage are of interest. This is correlated with the electrical and mechanical answer of a piezo when sending. For receiving the resulting voltage or the electrical charge due to applied stress are of interest. In the present studies cylinder and hollow cylinder were analyzed. Insight of the interrelationship between the displacement and the impedance is given. The impedance is fitted with an equivalent circuit, to derive the mechanical analog properties. Furthermore the effect of the piezo geometry to the resonance frequencies is explored. Further calculations were made to reveal the sound field produced by a piezo. Measurements of the impedance with a phase-gain-analyser are made. On the other side the displacement is measured using optical interferometry. Beside the simulation and measurements of the piezosensitive elements a study for a trigger-algorithm using the crosscorrelation is introduced. In this study in situ measurements with low signal amplitudes are used to describe noise. To this noise data signals were added and it was examined how well the signals can be reconstructed. Based on the result of this work and taking commercial available piezoceramic materials into account, the optimal sensitive element of an acoustic neutrino detector is a PZT-5A disc with a diameter of 5 mm and a height of 10 mm. A single detector of this kind is able to detect neutrinos with energies more then one PeV as it