WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustic clinical measurements

  1. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.; Jolly, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/ Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in the article on page 8. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro- ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that provides an intuitive graphical user interface through which an operator at the control server

  2. Clinical and acoustical variability in hypokinetic dysarthria

    Ten male patients with parkinsonism secondary to Parkinson's disease or progressive supranuclear palsy had clinical neurological, speech, and acoustical speech evaluations. In addition, seven of the patients were evaluated by x-ray computed tomography (CT) and (F-18)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Extensive variability of speech features, both clinical and acoustical, were found and seemed to be independent of the severity of any parkinsonian sign, CT, or FDG PET. In addition, little relationship existed between the variability across each measured speech feature. What appeared to be important for the appearance of abnormal acoustic measures was the degree of overall severity of the dysarthria. These observations suggest that a better understanding of hypokinetic dysarthria may result from more extensive examination of the variability between patients. Emphasizing a specific feature such as rapid speaking rate in characterizing hypokinetic dysarthria focuses on a single and inconstant finding in a complex speech pattern

  3. Acoustic Measurements of Small Solid Rocket Motor

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Rocket acoustic noise can induce loads and vibration on the vehicle as well as the surrounding structures. Models have been developed to predict these acoustic loads based on scaling existing solid rocket motor data. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center acoustics team has measured several small solid rocket motors (thrust below 150,000 lbf) to anchor prediction models. This data will provide NASA the capability to predict the acoustic environments and consequent vibro-acoustic response of larger rockets (thrust above 1,000,000 lbf) such as those planned for the NASA Constellation program. This paper presents the methods used to measure acoustic data during the static firing of small solid rocket motors and the trends found in the data.

  4. USE OF SCALE MODELING FOR ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS

    ERÖZ, Ferhat

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, acoustic science and hearing has become important. Acoustic design used in tests of acoustic devices is crucial. Sound propagation is a complex subject, especially inside enclosed spaces. From the 19th century on, the acoustic measurements and tests were carried out using modeling techniques that are based on room acoustic measurement parameters.In this study, the effects of architectural acoustic design of modeling techniques and acoustic parameters were studied. In this con...

  5. Optical measurement of acoustic radiation pressure of the near-field acoustic levitation through transparent object

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Sasao, Yasuhiro; Katsura, Kogure; Naoki, Kondo

    2013-01-01

    It is known that macroscopic objects can be levitated for few to several hundred micrometers by near-field acoustic field and this phenomenon is called near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL). Although there are various experiments conducted to measure integrated acoustic pressure on the object surface, up to now there was no direct method to measure pressure distribution. In this study we measured the acoustic radiation pressure of the near-field acoustic levitation via pressure-sensitive paint.

  6. Simultaneous measurements of room acoustic parameters using different measuring equipment

    Halmrast, Tor; Gade, Anders Christian; Winsvold, Bjørn

    1996-01-01

    In a cooperation between Stattsbyg, Norway, Norsonic, Norway, and Department of Acoustic Technology, a number of room acoustic parameters have been determined in Oslo Concert Hall. All measurements were carried out on the same day, using the same amplifier, microphone and loudspeaker, and the sam...

  7. Acoustic Emission Stethoscope - Measurements with Acoustic Emission on Wind Turbines

    Krystof Kryniski [AaF Infrastructure, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-15

    A remote ultrasonic stethoscope, designed on mobile devices to help a maintenance team in diagnosing drive train problems, has been demonstrated. By implementing an acoustic emission technology, the operating conditions of wind turbines have been assessed by trending techniques and ultrasonic acoustic emission converted into audible sound. The new approach has been developed and tested and compared to other monitoring techniques. Acoustic emission has generally been shown to provide a number of advantages over vibration and shock pulse methods because the system is operating in a substantially higher frequency range (100 kHz) and therefore it is more immune to operation of surrounding machines and components. Quick attenuation of ultrasonic propagation waves in the drive-train structure helps to pin-point the origin of any fault as the signals are sharper and more pronounced. Further, with the intensity measurements a direction of the source of ultrasonic energy can be identified. Using a high frequency thus makes the method suitable for measuring local effects and to determine local defects since the disturbing signals from other parts are damped. Recently developed programmable sensors capable of processing signals onboard, producing quality outputs with extremely low noise-to-signal ratio, have been used. It is discussed how the new approach can lower the cost of a wind-turbine monitoring system, while at the same time making it simple and more reliable, see Appendix A. The method has been tested on rotating parts of wind-turbines, including traditionally difficult areas such as low speed main bearings and planetary gearboxes. The method developed in the project was designed to see physical processes such as friction, impacts and metal removal, occurring when machinery degrades, can be detected and notified with the developed notification system. Apart from reporting the status and displaying the changes of the pre-defined parameters or symptoms, the system has

  8. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  9. Acoustical measurements in ancient Roman theatres

    Farnetani, Andrea; Fausti, Patrizio; Pompoli, Roberto; Prodi, Nicola

    2001-05-01

    The Greek and Roman theatres are among the most precious and spectacular items of cultural heritage in the Mediterranean countries. The theatres are famous not only for their impressive architecture, but also for the acoustic qualities. For this reason it is important to consider these theatres as an acoustical heritage and to study their sound field. Within the activities of the ERATO (identification Evaluation and Revival of the Acoustical heritage of ancient Theatres and Odea) project, acoustical measurements were taken in well-preserved ancient Roman theatres at Aspendos (Turkey) and Jerash (Jordan). Roman theatres have an impressive stage building that forms a back wall in the orchestra area, and it was found that, from the analysis of the acoustical parameters, the reverberation time (e.g., 1.7 s at middle frequencies in the theatre of Aspendos) is quite long compared not only with other open-space theatres but also with closed spaces. Contrary to modern halls the clarity is high and this fact, together with a low sound level in most of the seats, gives the sound field a unique character.

  10. Measuring Acoustic Wave Transit Time in Furnace Based on Active Acoustic Source Signal

    Zhen Luo; Feng Tian; Xiao-Ping Sun

    2007-01-01

    Accurate measurement of transit time for acoustic wave between two sensors installed on two sides of a furnace is a key to implementing the temperature field measurement technique based on acoustical method. A new method for measuring transit time of acoustic wave based on active acoustic source signal is proposed in this paper, which includes the followings: the time when the acoustic source signal arrives at the two sensors is measured first; then, the difference of two arriving time arguments is computed, thereby we get the transit time of the acoustic wave between two sensors installed on the two sides of the furnace. Avoiding the restriction on acoustic source signal and background noise, the new method can get the transit time of acoustic wave with higher precision and stronger ability of resisting noise interference.

  11. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring

  12. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: Stephen.Avery@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien [Ion Beam Applications SA, Louvain-la-Neuve 1348 (Belgium); Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A. [School of Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Sehgal, Chandra M. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  13. Acoustic measurement of potato cannon velocity

    Courtney, M; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article describes measurement of potato cannon velocity with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. The potato's flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato velocity is simply the flight distance divided by the flight time.

  14. New methods of measuring normal acoustic impedance

    Wayman, James L.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years new methods based on signal processing technical have been developed to measure the normal acoustic impedance of materials. These methods proved to be considerably faster easier to implement than the SRW method rhey replace. Mathematical, hardware and software aspects of these techniques are discussed and results obtained over a frequency range of 200-4000 Hz for several architectural materials are presented. NPS Foundation Research Program http://archive....

  15. Outdoor synthetic aperture acoustic ground target measurements

    Bishop, Steven; Ngaya, Therese-Ann; Vignola, Joe; Judge, John; Marble, Jay; Gugino, Peter; Soumekh, Mehrdad; Rosen, Erik

    2010-04-01

    A novel outdoor synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) system consists of a microphone and loudspeaker traveling along a 6.3-meter rail system. This is an extension from a prior indoor laboratory measurement system in which selected targets were insonified while suspended in air. Here, the loudspeaker and microphone are aimed perpendicular to their direction of travel along the rail. The area next to the rail is insonified and the microphone records the reflected acoustic signal, while the travel of the transceiver along the rail creates a synthetic aperture allowing imaging of the scene. Ground surfaces consisted of weathered asphalt and short grass. Several surface-laid objects were arranged on the ground for SAA imaging. These included rocks, concrete masonry blocks, grout covered foam blocks; foliage obscured objects and several spherical canonical targets such as a bowling ball, and plastic and metal spheres. The measured data are processed and ground targets are further analyzed for characteristics and features amenable for discrimination. This paper includes a description of the measurement system, target descriptions, synthetic aperture processing approach and preliminary findings with respect to ground surface and target characteristics.

  16. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia

    Abdou, Adel A.

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition.

  17. Stroboscopic and acoustic measures of inspiratory phonation.

    Kelly, C L; Fisher, K V

    1999-09-01

    Inspiratory phonation (IP) is the production of voice as air is taken into the lungs. Although IP is promoted as a laryngeal assessment and voice treatment technique, it has been described quantitatively in very few speakers. This study quantified changes in laryngeal adduction, fundamental frequency, and intensity during IP relative to expiratory phonation (EP). We hypothesized that IP would increase laryngeal abduction and fundamental frequency. The experiment was a within-subjects, repeated measures design with each subject serving as her own control. Participants were 10 females (ages 19-50 years) who underwent simultaneous transoral videostrobolaryngoscopy and acoustic voice recording. We found that membranous vocal fold contact decreased significantly during IP relative to EP, while the trends for change of ventricular fold squeeze during IP varied across individuals. Vocal fundamental frequency increased significantly during IP relative to EP, but intensity did not vary consistently across conditions. Without teaching or coaching, changes that occurred during IP did not carry over to EP produced immediately following IP within the same respiratory cycle. PMID:10498055

  18. Relationships between subjective and objective acoustical measures in churches

    António P. Carvalho; António E. Morgado; Luís Henrique

    1997-01-01

    This study reports on subjective and objective acoustical field measurements made in a survey of 36 Catholic churches in Portugal built in the last 14 centuries. Monaural acoustical measurements (RT, EDT, C80, D50, TS and L) were taken at several source/receiver locations in each church and a group of college students was asked to judge the subjective quality of music. The listeners in each church evaluated live music performances at similar locations in each room. Evaluation sheets were used...

  19. Acoustic neuroma ingrowth in the cochlear nerve: does it influence the clinical presentation?

    Forton, G.E.J.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Offeciers, E.E.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the clinical presentation in patients with a histologically proven ingrowth of the cochlear nerve by acoustic neuroma to see whether this differs from what is known from large acoustic neuroma series. In total, 85 acoustic neuromas had an en bloc dissection to study histologically the re

  20. Signal processing and field measurements for underwater acoustic communications

    Zhang, Guosong

    2013-01-01

    The present dissertation presents new developments in the signal processing of receiver structures for high-rate underwater acoustic communications, and describes the field measurements that test the structures in real oceanic environments. The signalling methods of spectrally efficient spread spectrum are also investigated to achieve long range underwater acoustic communications. The digital signal processing is of significance in recovering distorted information, and compensating waveform d...

  1. Effect of contralateral stimulation on acoustic reflectance measurements

    Tathiany Silva Pichelli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Acoustic reflectance is an important tool in the assessment of middle ear afflictions, and the method is considered advantageous in relation to tympanometry. There has been a growing interest in the study of contralateral acoustic stimulation and its effect on the activation of the efferent auditory pathway. Studies have shown that the introduction of simultaneous stimulation in the contralateral ear generates alterations in auditory response patterns. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of contralateral stimulation on acoustic reflectance measurements. METHODS: Case study of 30 subjects with normal hearing, of both genders, aged 18-30 years. The test and retest acoustic reflectance was conducted in the frequency range 200-6000 Hz. The procedure was repeated with the simultaneous presence of contralateral white noise at 30 dBNS. RESULTS: The analysis of the conditions of test, retest, and test with contralateral noise showed statistical difference at the frequency of 2 kHz (p = 0.011 and p = 0.002 in test and retest, respectively in the right ear. CONCLUSION: The activation of the auditory efferent pathways through contralateral acoustic stimulation produces alterations in response patterns of acoustic reflectance, increasing sound reflection and modifying middle ear acoustical energy transfer.

  2. Acoustic levitator for containerless measurements on low temperature liquids

    Benmore, Chris J [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Weber, Richard [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Rey, Charles A A [Charles Ray, Inc.

    2009-01-01

    A single-axis acoustic levitator was constructed and used to levitate liquid and solid drops at temperatures from -40 to +40 C. The levitator consisted of: (i) two acoustic transducers mounted on a rigid vertical support that was bolted to an optical breadboard, (ii) a acoustic power supply that controlled acoustic intensity, relative phase of the drive to the transducers, and could modulate the acoustic forces at frequencies up to 1kHz, (iii) a video camera, and (iv) a system for providing a stream of controlled temperature gas flow over the sample. The acoustic transducers were operated at their resonant frequency of ~ 22 kHz and could produce sound pressure levels up to 160 dB. The force applied by the acoustic field could be modulated using a frequency generator to excite oscillations in the sample. Sample temperature was controlled using a modified Cryostream Plus and measured using thermocouples and an infrared thermal imager. The levitator was installed at x-ray beamline 11 ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source and used to investigate the structure of supercooled liquids.

  3. Measurement of vibration, flow and acoustic characteristics

    Horáček, Jaromír; Bula, Vítězslav; Veselý, Jan

    Plzeň : University of West Bohemia, 2012 - (Adámek, V.; Zajíček, M.; Jonášová, A.). s. 1-2 ISBN 978-80-261-0157-4. [Computational mechanics 2012 /28./. 12.11.2012-14.11.2012, Špičák] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/12/1306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : biomechanics of voice * impact stress * voice production modelling Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  4. Acoustic sensor for remote measuring of pressure

    Kataev V. F.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with sensors based on delay lines on surface acoustic waves (SAW, having a receiving-emitting and a reflective interdigital transducers (IDT. The dependence of the reflection coefficient of SAW on type and intensity of the load was studied. The authors propose a composite delay line in which the phase of the reflection coefficient depends on the pressure. Pressure leads to a shift of the reflective IDT relative to the transceiver, because they are located on different substrates. The paper also presents functional diagrams of the interrogator.

  5. Hydrothermal vent flow and turbulence measurements with acoustic scintillation instrumentation

    di Iorio, D.; Xu, G.

    2009-12-01

    Acoustically derived measurements of hydrothermal vent flow and turbulence were obtained from the active black smoker Dante in the Main Endeavour vent field, using scintillation analysis from one-way transmissions. The scintillation transmitter and receiver array formed a 93 m acoustic path through the buoyant plume 20 m above the structure. The acoustic path was parallel to the valley sidewall where the M2 tidal currents are approximately aligned along ridge due to topographic steering by the valley walls and hence most of the plume displacement is expected to occur along the acoustic path. On one deployment, data were collected for 6.5 weeks and vertical velocities range from 0.1 to 0.2 m/s showing a strong dependence on the spring/neap tidal cycle. The refractive index fluctuations which can be paramaterized in terms of the root-mean-square temperature fluctuations also shows a strong tidal modulation during spring tide.

  6. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  7. Acoustic measurements of models of military style supersonic nozzle jets

    Kuo, C.W.; Veltin, J.; McLaughlin, D.K.

    2014-01-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable-geometry nozzles to provide optimal thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. However, acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and t

  8. Acoustic field measurements in austenitic welds and dissimilar welds

    Acoustic field measurements were performed in identical specimen geometries of NPP components, in order to contribute the results to the interpretation of US testing results and evaluation of the testing reliability. With an electrodynamic probe of type T, the sonic fields were scanned by scanning heads at 45 T, 45 L, 60 L, and 70 L. The following selected groups of measured data are discussed in the paper: (a) acoustic fields in a narrow-gap weld and a dissimilar weld; (b) longitudinal sound impact testing of welds for detection of transverse defects; (c) variation of transmissibility of acoustic waves along a welded seam; (d) strength and range of the secondary creep wave; (e) multiply reflected sonic modes. (orig./CB)

  9. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-10-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters.

  10. A new method to measure the acoustic surface impedance outdoors

    In the European countries noise pollution is considered to be one of the most important environmental problems. With respect to traffic noise, different researchers are working on the reduction of noise at the source, on the modelling of the acoustic absorption of the road structure and on the effects of the pavement on the propagation. The aim of this paper is to propose a new method to measure the acoustic impedance of surfaces located outdoors, which allows us to further noise propagation models, in order to evaluate exactly the noise exposure. (authors)

  11. Acoustic measuring of partial discharge in power transformers

    Power transformers' reliability can be seriously affected by partial discharges. For this reason, it is necessary to implement technical methods to identify endangered equipment before catastrophic failures occur. A well-known method that can be applied either in the laboratory or in the field is the detection and localization of partial discharges, by means of the analysis of the acoustic signals they produced. An innovative partial discharge detector was developed based on the analysis of an acoustic or electrical PD signal envelope. This paper describes the architecture of the developed acoustic detector, which is composed of a set of ultrasonic sensors, signal conditioning and control modules, a graphical interface and the required software for the location of the affected area within the transformer. The conditioning and control modules perform analog to digital conversion, arrival time measurement, communication and control operations. Finally, some power transformer diagnostic testing is presented and discussed

  12. Acoustic impedances of ear canals measured by impedance tube

    Ciric, Dejan; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2007-01-01

    During hearing sensitivity tests, the sound field is commonly generated by an earphone placed on a subject ear. One of the factors that can affect the sound transmission in the ear is the acoustic impedance of the ear canal. Its importance is related to the contribution of other elements involved...... in the transmission such as the earphone impedance. In order to determine the acoustic impedances of human ear canals, the standardized method for measurement of complex impedances used for the measurement of the audiometric earphone impedances is applied. It is based on the transfer function between...... two microphone locations in an impedance tube. The end of the tube representing the measurement plane is placed at the ear canal entrance. Thus, the impedance seen from the entrance inward is measured on 25 subjects. Most subjects participated in the previous measurement of the ratio between the...

  13. Measurement of acoustic attenuation in workrooms

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    1997-01-01

    Experimental work has been done in nine halls with volumes ranging from 693 to 123.978 cubic metres. The equivalent absorption area has been determined from absorption coefficients of the surfaces, calculated from reverberation time measurements and estimated from sound pressure level measurement...

  14. Energy Based Acoustic Measurement Senors Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research focuses on fully developing energy density sensors that will yield a significant benefit both for measurements of interest to NASA, as well as for...

  15. A System for Acoustic Field Measurement Employing Cartesian Robot

    Szczodrak Maciej

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A system setup for measurements of acoustic field, together with the results of 3D visualisations of acoustic energy flow are presented in the paper. Spatial sampling of the field is performed by a Cartesian robot. Automatization of the measurement process is achieved with the use of a specialized control system. The method is based on measuring the sound pressure (scalar and particle velocity(vector quantities. The aim of the system is to collect data with a high precision and repeatability. The system is employed for measurements of acoustic energy flow in the proximity of an artificial head in an anechoic chamber. In the measurement setup an algorithm for generation of the probe movement path is included. The algorithm finds the optimum path of the robot movement, taking into account a given 3D object shape present in the measurement space. The results are presented for two cases, first without any obstacle and the other - with an artificial head in the sound field.

  16. Acoustic transmission in SGUs: Plant and laboratory measurements

    As part of the UK development work an experimental programme is in progress to measure the acoustic transmission through an actual reactor SGU and also through a model tube bundle in the laboratory. This paper gives an outline of the experimental arrangements and examples of the preliminary results. The data from the laboratory measurements in particular is being used for comparison with theoretical studies carried out at the University of Keele which are reported in a separate paper to this Specialist's Meeting. The plant measurements are being carried out on a Superheater unit of the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) at Dounreay. These measurements are primarily aimed at providing information for a loose parts condition monitoring system which is operated on the PFR SGU, but results obtained will make a significant contribution to the acoustic leak detection programme. The Superheater used for the experiment has six blank steam tubes for experimental purposes. An impacting device has been inserted into one of the blank tubes and acoustic signals recorded on waveguides which are attached to the SGU shell. Recordings were made during a reactor shutdown with static sodium in the superheater and with the impacting device at five axial positions in both the inner and outer legs of the 'U' tube. Results are given for signal attenuation and location of the acoustic noise source. The laboratory measurements are being made using a 721-tube model tube bundle in a water tank. The tube bundle which is approximately 0.75m diameter x 3 metres long is not modelled to a specific design but is of realistic size and construction. A piezo-electric acoustic source is mounted centrally in the tube bundle and the transmitted signal is received by underwater microphones on the periphery of the bundle. Results from the first experiments with water filled tubes are given covering a frequency range of 6KHz to 80KHz. The preliminary results of the experimental programme are encouraging and

  17. The information content of anisotropic Baryon Acoustic Oscillation scale measurements

    Ross, Ashley J.; Percival, Will J.; Manera, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Anisotropic measurements of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature within a galaxy survey enable joint inference about the Hubble parameter $H(z)$ and angular diameter distance $D_A(z)$. These measurements are typically obtained from moments of the measured 2-point clustering statistics, with respect to the cosine of the angle to the line of sight $\\mu$. The position of the BAO features in each moment depends on a combination of $D_A(z)$ and $H(z)$, and measuring the positions in two o...

  18. Acoustics and Surface Pressure Measurements from Tandem Cylinder Configurations

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic and unsteady surface pressure measurements from two cylinders in tandem configurations were acquired to study the effect of spacing, surface trip and freestream velocity on the radiated noise. The Reynolds number ranged from 1.15x10(exp 5) to 2.17x10(exp 5), and the cylinder spacing varied between 1.435 and 3.7 cylinder diameters. The acoustic and surface pressure spectral characteristics associated with the different flow regimes produced by the cylinders' wake interference were identified. The dependence of the Strouhal number, peak Sound Pressure Level and spanwise coherence on cylinder spacing and flow velocity was examined. Directivity measurements were performed to determine how well the dipole assumption for the radiation of vortex shedding noise holds for the largest and smallest cylinder spacing tested.

  19. Measurements of acoustic pressure at high amplitudes and intensities

    Crum, L A [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th Street, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); Bailey, M R [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th Street, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); Kaczkowski, P [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, 1013 NE 40th Street, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States); McAteer, J A [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Indiana University, 635 Barnhill Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Pishchalnikov, Y A [Department of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, M V Lomosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Sapozhnikov, O A [Department of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, M V Lomosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2004-01-01

    In our research group, we desire measurements of the large pressure amplitudes generated by the shock waves used in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and the large acoustic intensities used in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Conventional piezoelectric or PVDF hydrophones can not be used for such measurements as they are damaged either by cavitation, in SWL applications, or heat, in HIFU applications. In order to circumvent these difficulties, we have utilized optical fiber hydrophones in SWL that do not cavitate, and small glass probes and a scattering technique for measurements of large HIFU intensities. Descriptions of these techniques will be given as well as some typical data.

  20. Measurement of incident sound power using near field acoustic holography

    Jacobsen, Finn; Tiana Roig, Elisabet

    2009-01-01

    The conventional method of measuring the insertion loss of a partition relies on an assumption of the sound field in the source room being diffuse and the classical relation between the spatial average of the mean square pressure in the source room and the incident sound power per unit area; and it...... has always been regarded as impossible to measure the sound power that is incident on a wall directly. This paper examines a new method of determining this quantity from sound pressure measurements at positions on the wall using ‘statistically optimised near field acoustic holography’ (SONAH). The...

  1. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution

  2. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Didenkulov, Igor, E-mail: din@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov str., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay, E-mail: nikvas@rf.unn.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  3. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  4. Acoustic doppler methods for remote measurements of ocean flows - a review

    Joseph, A.

    The evolution of acoustic doppler methods for remote measurements of ocean flows has been briefly reviewed in historical perspective. Both Eulerian and profiling methods have been discussed. Although the first acoustic Doppler current meter has been...

  5. Three-dimensional broadband intensity probe for measuring acoustical parameters

    Miah, Khalid Hossain

    Measuring different acoustical properties have been the key in reducing noise and improving the sound quality from various sources. In this report, a broadband (200 Hz -- 6.5 kHz) three-dimensional seven-microphone intensity probe system is developed to measure the sound intensity, and total energy density in different acoustical environments. Limitations of most commercial intensity probes in measuring the three-dimensional intensity for a broadband sound field was the main motivation in developing this probe. The finite-difference error and the phase mismatch error which are the two main errors associated with the intensity measurements are addressed in this report. As for the physical design, seven microphones were arranged in a two-concentric arrays with one microphone located at the center of the probe. The outer array is for low-frequencies (200 Hz -- 1.0 kHz), and the inner one is for high-frequencies (1.0 kHz -- 6.5 kHz). The screw adjustable center microphone is used for the microphone calibration, and as the reference microphone of the probe. The simultaneous calibrations of all the microphones in the probe were done in the anechoic room. Theories for the intensity and the energy densities calculations for the probe were derived from the existing four-microphone probe configuration. Reflection and diffraction effects on the intensity measurements due to the presence of the microphones, and the supporting structures were also investigated in this report. Directivity patterns of the calculated intensity showed the omnidirectional nature of the probe. The intensity, and total energy density were calculated and compared with the ideal values in the anechoic room environment. Characterization of sound fields in a reverberant enclosed space, and sound source identification are some applications that were investigated using this probe. Results of different measurements showed effectiveness of the probe as a tool to measure key acoustical properties in many

  6. Acoustic wave measurements in reactor-grade concretes

    In this paper, five reactor grade concretes were investigated during their initial cure period to gather information which is a suitable data base for interpreting the results of confirmatory reactor safety research programs. In particular, the concretes studied were the concrete proposed for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR), which is a limestone mix with flyash, and two other limestone aggregate mixes and two basaltic-aggregate mixes. The curing process in these concretes was followed with strength tests and with acoustic-wave velocity measurements. The choice of the latter technique was based on the successful programs of several investigators who used acoustic waves to follow the curing process in concrete and this information was also required for instrumentation techniques that are proposed for accident simulation studies. (Auth.)

  7. Nonintrusive Monitoring and Control of Metallurgical Processes by Acoustic Measurements

    Yu, Hao-Ling; Khajavi, Leili Tafaghodi; Barati, Mansoor

    2011-06-01

    The feasibility of developing a new online monitoring technique based on the characteristic acoustic response of gas bubbles in a liquid has been investigated. The method is intended to monitor the chemistry of the liquid through its relation to the bubble sound frequency. A low-temperature model consisting of water and alcohol mixtures was established, and the frequency of bubbles rising under varying concentrations of methanol was measured. It was shown that the frequency of the sound created by bubble pulsation varies with the percentage of alcohol in water. The frequency drops sharply with the increase in methanol content up to 20 wt pct, after which the decreases is gradual. Surface tension seems to be a critical liquid property affecting the sound frequency through its two-fold effects on the bubble size and the pulsation domain. The dependence between the frequency and the liquid composition suggests the feasibility of developing an acoustic-based technique for process control purposes.

  8. Determination of the elastic modulus of snow via acoustic measurements

    Gerling, Bastian; van Herwijnen, Alec; Löwe, Henning

    2016-04-01

    The elastic modulus of snow is a key quantity from the viewpoint of avalanche research and forecasting, snow engineering or materials science in general. Since it is a fundamental property, many measurements have been reported in the literature. Due to differences in measurement methods, there is a lot of variation in the reported values. Especially values derived via computer tomography (CT) based numerical calculations using finite element methods are not corresponding to the results of other methods. The central issue is that CT based moduli are purely elastic whereas other methods may include viscoelastic deformation. In order to avoid this discrepancy we derived the elastic modulus of snow via wave propagation measurements and compared our results with CT based calculations. We measured the arrival times of acoustic pulses propagating through the snow samples to determine the P-wave velocity and in turn derive the elastic modulus along the direction of wave propagation. We performed a series of laboratory experiments to derive the P-wave modulus of snow in relation to density. The P-wave modulus ranged from 10 to 280 MPa for a snow density between 150 and 370 kg/m³. The moduli derived from the acoustic measurements correlated well with the CT-based values and both exhibited a power law trend over the entire density range. Encouraged by these results we used the acoustic method to investigate the temporal evolution of the elastic modulus. The rate of increase was very close to values mentioned in literature on the sintering rate of snow. Overall, our results are a first but important step towards a new measurement method to attain the elastic properties of snow.

  9. Simultaneous measurements of room-acoustic parameters using different measuring equipment?

    Halmrast, Tor; Gade, Anders Christian; Winsvold, Bjorn

    1998-01-01

    Often the results from different room-acoustic measurements in the same hall disagree, and the disagreement is just said to be due to different measuring equipment, or different rigging/temperature, etc. The room acoustic of the Oslo Concert Hall was measured simultaneously, using the following...... different measuring equipment: (1) MLS/MLSSA (Statsbygg), (2) Sweep-Tone (Tech. Univ. Denmark), and (3) Norsonic 840 with MLS+MatLab. For some of the measurements (4) Pistol and (5) Electrical Impulse were also used. The paper will compare the results from the different measuring equipment, for the most...... known room-acoustic parameters. For the reverberation time parameters RT and EDT, very good agreement was found between the three main measuring equipments. For Ts and C80 the agreement between these three is good/fair for the higher frequencies, but less good for the bass, especially C80. The...

  10. A method of estimating inspiratory flow rate and volume from an inhaler using acoustic measurements

    Inhalers are devices employed to deliver medication to the airways in the treatment of respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A dry powder inhaler (DPI) is a breath actuated inhaler that delivers medication in dry powder form. When used correctly, DPIs improve patients' clinical outcomes. However, some patients are unable to reach the peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR) necessary to fully extract the medication. Presently clinicians have no reliable method of objectively measuring PIFR in inhalers. In this study, we propose a novel method of estimating PIFR and also the inspiratory capacity (IC) of patients' inhalations from a commonly used DPI, using acoustic measurements. With a recording device, the acoustic signal of 15 healthy subjects using a DPI over a range of varying PIFR and IC values was obtained. Temporal and spectral signal analysis revealed that the inhalation signal contains sufficient information that can be employed to estimate PIFR and IC. It was found that the average power (Pave) in the frequency band 300–600 Hz had the strongest correlation with PIFR (R2 = 0.9079), while the power in the same frequency band was also highly correlated with IC (R2 = 0.9245). This study has several clinical implications as it demonstrates the feasibility of using acoustics to objectively monitor inhaler use. (paper)

  11. Acoustical measurements on stages of nine U.S. concert halls

    Gade, Anders Christian; Bradley, J S

    1993-01-01

    A measurement tour of nine U.S. concert halls included acoustical measurements on the stage of each hall. Two teams (from the National Research Council of Canada, and the Technical University of Denmark) made measurements of the acoustical quantities suggested by Gade: the ``support'' family of...... measures describing the acoustical conditions for the musicians on stage. This paper compares the results from the two measurement teams and discusses the influence of hall designs....

  12. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements

    Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian E; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; Brownstein, Joel R; Burden, Angela; Busca, Nicolás G; Carithers, William; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Cuesta, Antonio J; Dawson, Kyle S; Delubac, Timothée; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Goff, J -M Le; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Gott, J Richard; Gunn, James E; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Howlett, Cullan; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco S; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Lee, Khee-Gan; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; McBride, Cameron K; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Myers, Adam D; Nichol, Robert C; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M; Prada, Francisco; Reid, Beth; Roe, Natalie A; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Sánchez, Ariel G; Samushia, Lado; Santos, Ricardo Tanausú Génova; Scóccola, Claudia G; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin; Simmons, Audrey; Skibba, Ramin A; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Viel, Matteo; Wake, David A; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; Wood-Vasey, W M; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2014-01-01

    We derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) and Type Ia supernova (SN) data. We take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Ly-alpha forest (LyaF) in the BOSS survey of SDSS-III. BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy, and in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Combining BAO and SN data into an "inverse distance ladder" yields a 1.7% measurement of $H_0=67.3 \\pm1.1$ km/s/Mpc. This measurement assumes standard pre-recombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat LCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For open LCDM, our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields $\\Omega_m=0.301 \\pm 0.008$ and curvature $\\Omega_k=-0.003 \\pm ...

  13. Reliability of Phase Velocity Measurements of Flexural Acoustic Waves in the Human Tibia In-Vivo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Axial-transmission acoustics have shown to be a promising technique to measure individual bone properties and detect bone pathologies. With the ultimate goal being the in-vivo application of such systems, quantification of the key aspects governing the reliability is crucial to bring this method towards clinical use. Materials and Methods This work presents a systematic reliability study quantifying the sources of variability and their magnitudes of in-vivo measurements using axial-transmission acoustics. 42 healthy subjects were measured by an experienced operator twice per week, over a four-month period, resulting in over 150000 wave measurements. In a complementary study to assess the influence of different operators performing the measurements, 10 novice operators were trained, and each measured 5 subjects on a single occasion, using the same measurement protocol as in the first part of the study. Results The estimated standard error for the measurement protocol used to collect the study data was ∼ 17 m/s (∼ 4% of the grand mean) and the index of dependability, as a measure of reliability, was Φ = 0.81. It was shown that the method is suitable for multi-operator use and that the reliability can be improved efficiently by additional measurements with device repositioning, while additional measurements without repositioning cannot improve the reliability substantially. Phase velocity values were found to be significantly higher in males than in females (p bone pathologies, as well as for monitoring programmes without any radiation exposure for the patient. PMID:27015093

  14. CLINICAL OUTCOME MEASURES OF PSORIASIS

    E. Berardesca; Bonifati, C

    2011-01-01

    Several tools have been introduced in clinical trials to quantify the severity and the response to a given therapeutic regimen of both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Each method present specific advantages and limitations. Here we will discuss some of the most popular clinical outcome measures of both psoriasis (Psoriasis Severity Index, Physician Global Assessment, National Psoriasis Fundation-Psoriasis Score, Dermatology Life Quality Index) and psoriatic arthritis (American College Rheu...

  15. Patch near field acoustic holography based on particle velocity measurements

    Zhang, Yong-Bin; Jacobsen, Finn; Bi, Chuan-Xing; Chen, Xin-Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Patch near field acoustic holography (PNAH) based on sound pressure measurements makes it possible to reconstruct the source field near a source by measuring the sound pressure at positions on a surface. that is comparable in size to the source region of concern. Particle velocity is an alternative...... examines the use of particle velocity as the input of PNAH. Because the particle velocity decays faster toward the edges of the measurement aperture than the pressure does and because the wave number ratio that enters into the inverse propagator from pressure to velocity amplifies high spatial frequencies......, PNAH based on particle velocity measurements can give better results than the pressure-based PNAH with a reduced number of iterations. A simulation study, as well as an experiment carried out with a pressure-velocity sound intensity probe, demonstrates these findings....

  16. Fundamental developments in acoustic emission measurements: The NBS program

    Recent NBS progress in the development of standards and improved measurement methods for quantitative acoustic emission measurements are reviewed. Results on generalizing the NBS AE transducer calibration service and on its relation to other methods are presented. Recent improvements in the design of a new piezoelectric AE transducer are presented. The new transducer measures normal surface displacement nearly as faithfully as the NBS standard capacitive transducer but with much greater sensitivity. It holds promise for use as a secondary calibration device and for application relying on causal signal processing. AE system calibration is also briefly discussed. Recent results on the determination of AE sources from remote measurement are mentioned. An indentation method for generating AE has been used to produce repeatable signals in temper and hydrogen embrittled A533B steel. A multichannel AE system for characterizing AE events in A533B steel and multichannel operation has been tested with a Nd-YAG laser thermoelastic source

  17. Acoustics

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  18. Classification of heart valve condition using acoustic measurements

    Clark, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Prosthetic heart valves and the many great strides in valve design have been responsible for extending the life spans of many people with serious heart conditions. Even though the prosthetic valves are extremely reliable, they are eventually susceptible to long-term fatigue and structural failure effects expected from mechanical devices operating over long periods of time. The purpose of our work is to classify the condition of in vivo Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave (BSCC) heart valves by processing acoustic measurements of heart valve sounds. The structural failures of interest for Bscc valves is called single leg separation (SLS). SLS can occur if the outlet strut cracks and separates from the main structure of the valve. We measure acoustic opening and closing sounds (waveforms) using high sensitivity contact microphones on the patient`s thorax. For our analysis, we focus our processing and classification efforts on the opening sounds because they yield direct information about outlet strut condition with minimal distortion caused by energy radiated from the valve disc.

  19. Acoustic measurements of models of military style supersonic nozzle jets

    Ching-Wen Kuo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable-geometry nozzles to provide optimal thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. However, acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometries of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at Pennsylvania State University (PSU in partnership with GE Aviation and the NASA Glenn Research Center is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles, and to identify and test promising noise reduction techniques. An equally important objective is to develop methodology for using data obtained from small- and moderate-scale experiments to reliably predict the full-scale engine noise. The experimental results presented show reasonable agreement between small-scale and medium-scale jets, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones.

  20. Measuring the Acoustic Impedance of Pipes and Musical Instruments

    Jaeger, Herbert

    2007-05-01

    Using a small electret microphone and a piezo-buzzer we have constructed a simple impedance transducer to measure the input impedance of air columns, such as cylindrical pipes, as well as musical instruments. The input impedance of an air column is given as the ratio of the pressure to the volume flow of air at the input of the air column. The microphone serves as the pressure transducer, while the piezo-buzzer is controlled to provide a constant velocity amplitude. Therefore the microphone signal is proportional to the acoustical impedance and, if required, can be calibrated using a simple air column for which the impedance can be calculated. This impedance transducer is currently in use as demonstration equipment for a physical acoustics class. It is simple to use and robust, so that it is well-suited for an undergraduate introductory laboratory environment. This talk will discuss the function of the impedance transducer and show examples of the type of measurements that can be performed. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.OSS07.C1.1

  1. Acoustic measurements of models of military style supersonic nozzle jets

    Ching-Wen Kuo; Jérémy Veltin; Dennis K. McLaughlin

    2014-01-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable-geometry nozzles to provide optimal thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. How-ever, acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometries of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at Pennsylvania State University (PSU) in partnership with GE Aviation and the NASA Glenn Research Center is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles, and to identify and test promising noise reduction techniques. An equally important objective is to develop methodology for using data obtained from small-and moderate-scale experiments to reliably predict the full-scale engine noise. The experimental results presented show reasonable agreement between small-scale and medium-scale jets, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones.

  2. Influence of architectural features and styles on various acoustical measures in churches

    António Pedro Oliveira de Carvalho

    1994-01-01

    This work reports on acoustical field measurements made in a major survey of 41 Catholic churches in Portugal that were built in the last 14 centuries. A series of monaural and binaural acoustical measurements was taken at multiple source/receiver positions in each church using the impulse response with noise burst method. The acoustical measures were Reverberation Time (RT), Early Decay Time (EDT), Clarity (C80), Definition (D), Center Time (TS), Loudness (L), Bass Ratios based on the Reverb...

  3. A mixed method for measuring low-frequency acoustic properties of macromolecular materials

    LIU; Hongwei; YAO; Lei; ZHAO; Hong; ZHANG; Jichuan; XUE; Zhaohong

    2006-01-01

    A mixed method for measuring low-frequency acoustic properties of macromolecular materials is presented.The dynamic mechanical parameters of materials are first measured by using Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Apparatus(DMTA) at low frequencies,usually less than 100 Hz; then based on the Principles of Time-Temperature Super position (TTS),these parameters are extended to the frequency range that acousticians are concerned about,usually from hundreds to thousands of hertz; finally the extended dynamic mechanical parameters are transformed into acoustic parameters with the help of acoustic measurement and inverse analysis.To test the feasibility and accuracy,we measure a kind of rubber sample in DMTA and acquire the basic acoustic parameters of the sample by using this method.While applying the basic parameters to calculating characteristics of the sample in acoustic pipe,a reasonable agreement of sound absorption coefficients is obtained between the calculations and measurements in the acoustic pipe.

  4. Aero-acoustic Measurement and Monitoring of Dynamic Pressure Fields Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovative and practical measurement and monitoring system optimally defines dynamic pressure fields, including sound fields. It is based on passive acoustic...

  5. Instrumentation Suite for Acoustic Propagation Measurements in Complex Shallow Water Environments

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Obtain at-sea measurements to test theoretical and modeling predictions of acoustic propagation in dynamic, inhomogeneous, and nonisotropic shallow water...

  6. Acoustic Environment of Admiralty Inlet: Broadband Noise Measurements

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the highly endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines at Admiralty Inlet. Of particular concern is the potential for blade strike or other negative interactions between the SRKW and the tidal turbine. A variety of technologies including passive and active monitoring systems are being considered as potential tools to determine the presence of SRKW in the vicinity of the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for the determination of design and operation specifications of all marine and hydrokinetic energy capture technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array (VLA) with four calibrated hydrophones. The sound pressure level (SPL) power spectrum density was estimated based on the fast Fourier transform. This study describes the first broadband SPL measurements for this site at different depths with frequency ranging from 10 kHz to 480 kHz in combination with other information. To understand the SPL caused by this bedload transport, three different pressure sensors with temperature and conductivity were also assembled on the VLA to measure the conditions at the hydrophone deployment depth. The broadband SPL levels at frequency ranges of 3 kHz to 7 kHz as a function of depth were estimated. Only the hydrophone at an average depth of 40 m showed the strong dependence of SPL with distance from the bottom, which was possibly caused by the cobbles shifting on the seabed. Automatic Identification System data were also studied to understand the SPL measurements.

  7. CLINICAL OUTCOME MEASURES OF PSORIASIS

    E. Berardesca

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Several tools have been introduced in clinical trials to quantify the severity and the response to a given therapeutic regimen of both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Each method present specific advantages and limitations. Here we will discuss some of the most popular clinical outcome measures of both psoriasis (Psoriasis Severity Index, Physician Global Assessment, National Psoriasis Fundation-Psoriasis Score, Dermatology Life Quality Index and psoriatic arthritis (American College Rheumatology response criteria, Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria. Key words: Psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, outcome

  8. Acoustic measurements above a plate carrying Lamb waves

    Talberg, Andreas Sørbrøden

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a set of acoustic measurements conducted on the Statoil funded Behind Casing Logging Set-Up, designed by SINTEF Petroleum Research to resemble an oil well casing. A set of simple simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics were also conducted and the results compared with the measurements. The experiments consists of measuring the pressure wave radiated of a set of Lamb waves propagating in a 3 mm thick steel plate, using the so called pitch-catch method. The Lamb waves were excited by a broadband piezoelectric immersion transducer with center frequency of 1 MHz. Through measurements and analysis the group velocity of the fastest mode in the plate was found to be 3138.5 m/s. Measuring the wave radiated into the water in a grid consisting of 8x33 measuring points, the spreading of the plate wave normal to the direction of propagation was investigated. Comparing the point where the amplitude had decreased 50 % relative to the amplitude measured at the axis pointing straight forward from the tran...

  9. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  10. Thermodynamic properties of liquid gallium from picosecond acoustic velocity measurements

    Due to discrepancies in the literature data the thermodynamic properties of liquid gallium are still in debate. Accurate measurements of adiabatic sound velocities as a function of pressure and temperature have been obtained by the combination of laser picosecond acoustics and surface imaging on sample loaded in diamond anvil cell. From these results the thermodynamic parameters of gallium have been extracted by a numerical procedure up to 10 GPa and 570 K. It is demonstrated that a Murnaghan equation of state accounts well for the whole data set since the isothermal bulk modulus BT has been shown to vary linearly with pressure in the whole temperature range. No evidence for a previously reported liquid–liquid transition has been found in the whole pressure and temperature range explored. (paper)

  11. Precise measurement technique for the stable acoustic cavitation bubble

    HUANG Wei; CHEN Weizhong; LIU Yanan; GAO Xianxian; JIANG Lian; XU Junfeng; ZHU Yifei

    2005-01-01

    Based on the periodic oscillation of the stable acoustic cavitation bubble, we present a precise measurement technique for the bubble evolution. This technique comprises the lighting engineering of pulsing laser beam whose phase can be digitally shifted, and the long distance microphotographics. We used a laser, an acousto-optic modulator, a pulse generator, and a long distance microscope. The evolution of a levitated bubble can be directly shown by a series of bubble's images at different phases. Numerical simulation in the framework of the Rayleigh-Plesset bubble dynamics well supported the experimental result, and the ambient radius of the bubble, an important parameter related to the mass of the gas inside the bubble, was obtained at the same time.

  12. Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter for Biological Media.

    Cobb, Wesley Nelson

    In vitro measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter are presented for several biological media. With these measurements it is possible to predict the distortion of a finite amplitude wave in biological tissues of current diagnostic and research interest. The measurement method is based on the finite amplitude distortion of a sine wave that is emmitted by a piston source. The growth of the second harmonic component of this wave is measured by a piston receiver which is coaxial with and has the same size as the source. The experimental measurements and theory are compared in order to determine the nonlinearity parameter. The density, sound speed, and attenuation for the medium are determined in order to make this comparison. The theory developed for this study accounts for the influence of both diffraction and attenuation on the experimental measurements. The effects of dispersion, tissue inhomogeneity and gas bubbles within the excised tissues are studied. To test the measurement method, experimental results are compared with established values for the nonlinearity parameter of distilled water, ethylene glycol and glycerol. The agreement between these values suggests that the measurement uncertainty is (+OR-) 5% for liquids and (+OR-) 10% for solid tissues. Measurements are presented for dog blood and bovine serum albumen as a function of concentration. The nonlinearity parameters for liver, kidney and spleen are reported for both human and canine tissues. The values for the fresh tissues displayed little variation (6.8 to 7.8). Measurements for fixed, normal and cirrhotic tissues indicated that the nonlinearity parameter does not depend strongly on pathology. However, the values for fixed tissues were somewhat higher than those of the fresh tissues.

  13. Ultrasonic flow measurement and wall acoustic impedance effects.

    Willatzen, M

    2004-03-01

    An examination of the influence of wall acoustic impedance effects on sound propagation in flowing liquids confined by cylindrical walls is presented. Special focus is given to the importance of the wall acoustic impedance value for ultrasonic flow meter performance. The mathematical model presented allows any radially-dependent axial flow profile to be examined in the linear flow acoustics regime where fluid flow speed is much smaller than the fluid sound speed everywhere in the fluid medium. PMID:14996531

  14. Glacier studies on the basis of acoustic measurements

    V. P. Epifanov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of glacier ice flow studies using the method of acoustic emission (AE in frequency range from 15 Hz to 20 kHz has been considered. A portable acoustic line system has been developed and a number of methodological issues (mounting of acoustic sensors into glacial ice, their location, reliability of acoustic coupling, etc. have been solved. Acoustic studies of glacial ice have been performed; rock fall effect, ice cracking and ice movement on bedrock have been simulated. Correspondences of AE parameters to specific sources have been identified. The results of acoustic studies on Aldegondabreen (Spitsbergen, Central Tuyuksu and Molodezhny glaciers (northern Tien Shan have been summarized. The dependence of the adhesive strength of ice with smooth substrate (serpentenite on the shear rate has been considered; the effect of tor-shaped obstacle on shear force has been estimated. It is shown that the acoustic effects at cohesive ice failure on obstacles are similar to the observed natural acoustic vibrations generated in glaciers from distant sources. The results might be applied in development of the mobile ice lab and system for remote acoustic monitoring the processes in the bottom layers of glaciers.

  15. Outcomes Measurement in Voice Disorders: Application of an Acoustic Index of Dysphonia Severity

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Roy, Nelson

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this experiment was to assess the ability of an acoustic model composed of both time-based and spectral-based measures to track change following voice disorder treatment and to serve as a possible treatment outcomes measure. Method: A weighted, four-factor acoustic algorithm consisting of shimmer, pitch sigma, the ratio of…

  16. Clinical Concerns About Clinical Performance Measurement

    Werner, Rachel M.; Asch, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Performance measurement has become one of the foundations of current efforts to improve health care quality and has successfully increased compliance with practice guidelines in many settings. Despite the successes of performance measurement, many physicians remain apprehensive about its use because performance measurement “gets in the way of” delivering good care. There are several reasons clinicians might feel this way. First, performance measurement is increasingly being extended to areas ...

  17. Acoustic emission measurements in petroleum-related rock mechanics

    Unander, Tor Erling

    2002-07-01

    Acoustic emission activity in rock has usually been studied in crystalline rock, which reflects that rock mechanics has also mostly been occupied with such rocks in relations to seismology, mining and tunneling. On the other hand, petroleum-related rock mechanics focuses on the behaviour of sedimentary rock. Thus, this thesis presents a general study of acoustic emission activity in sedimentary rock, primarily in sandstone. Chalk, limestone and shale have also been tested, but to much less degree because the AE activity in these materials is low. To simplify the study, pore fluids have not been used. The advent of the personal computer and computerized measuring equipment have made possible new methods both for measuring and analysing acoustic emissions. Consequently, a majority of this work is devoted to the development and implementation of new analysis techniques. A broad range of topics are treated: (1) Quantification of the AE activity level, assuming that the event rate best represents the activity. An algorithm for estimating the event rate and a methodology for objectively describing special changes in the activity e.g., onset determination, are presented. (2) Analysis of AE waveform data. A new method for determining the source energy of an AE event is presented, and it is shown how seismic source theory can be used to analyze even intermediate quality data. Based on these techniques, it is shown that a major part of the measured AE activity originates from a region close to the sensor, not necessarily representing the entire sample. (3) An improved procedure for estimating source locations is presented. The main benefit is a procedure that better handles arrival time data with large errors. Statistical simulations are used to quantify the uncertainties in the locations. The analysis techniques are developed with the application to sedimentary rock in mind, and in two articles, the techniques are used in the study of such materials. The work in the first

  18. Responsiveness of Clinical Outcome Measures

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein

    Background The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) is one of two standardised functional health measurement scales (HMS) recommended. Despite extensive psychometric testing, little is known about HMS behaviour and the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in subgroups of LBP patients. Moreover...... in the primary (PrS) and secondary sectors (SeS) of the Danish health care system. The prospective acceptable outcome study. A method for estimating LBP patients' view of an acceptable change before treatment begins (MCIDpre was developed and compared to a well established retrospective method of determining...... measurement error and 1.5-4.5 times larger compared to the MCIDpost. Furthermore, the MCIDpre was almost comparable to patients' post-treatment acceptable change, but only for the pain scale. Conclusion The Danish version of the ODI is a reliable, valid and responsive HMS which is psychometrically more...

  19. Optimization of Acoustic Pressure Measurements for Impedance Eduction

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; Nark, D. M.

    2007-01-01

    As noise constraints become increasingly stringent, there is continued emphasis on the development of improved acoustic liner concepts to reduce the amount of fan noise radiated to communities surrounding airports. As a result, multiple analytical prediction tools and experimental rigs have been developed by industry and academia to support liner evaluation. NASA Langley has also placed considerable effort in this area over the last three decades. More recently, a finite element code (Q3D) based on a quasi-3D implementation of the convected Helmholtz equation has been combined with measured data acquired in the Langley Grazing Incidence Tube (GIT) to reduce liner impedance in the presence of grazing flow. A new Curved Duct Test Rig (CDTR) has also been developed to allow evaluation of liners in the presence of grazing flow and controlled, higher-order modes, with straight and curved waveguides. Upgraded versions of each of these two test rigs are expected to begin operation by early 2008. The Grazing Flow Impedance Tube (GFIT) will replace the GIT, and additional capabilities will be incorporated into the CDTR. The current investigation uses the Q3D finite element code to evaluate some of the key capabilities of these two test rigs. First, the Q3D code is used to evaluate the microphone distribution designed for the GFIT. Liners ranging in length from 51 to 610 mm are investigated to determine whether acceptable impedance eduction can be achieved with microphones placed on the wall opposite the liner. This analysis indicates the best results are achieved for liner lengths of at least 203 mm. Next, the effects of moving this GFIT microphone array to the wall adjacent to the liner are evaluated, and acceptable results are achieved if the microphones are placed off the centerline. Finally, the code is used to investigate potential microphone placements in the CDTR rigid wall adjacent to the wall containing an acoustic liner, to determine if sufficient fidelity can be

  20. The Belt voice: Acoustical measurements and esthetic correlates

    Bounous, Barry Urban

    This dissertation explores the esthetic attributes of the Belt voice through spectral acoustical analysis. The process of understanding the nature and safe practice of Belt is just beginning, whereas the understanding of classical singing is well established. The unique nature of the Belt sound provides difficulties for voice teachers attempting to evaluate the quality and appropriateness of a particular sound or performance. This study attempts to provide answers to the question "does Belt conform to a set of measurable esthetic standards?" In answering this question, this paper expands on a previous study of the esthetic attributes of the classical baritone voice (see "Vocal Beauty", NATS Journal 51,1) which also drew some tentative conclusions about the Belt voice but which had an inadequate sample pool of subjects from which to draw. Further, this study demonstrates that it is possible to scientifically investigate the realm of musical esthetics in the singing voice. It is possible to go beyond the "a trained voice compared to an untrained voice" paradigm when evaluating quantitative vocal parameters and actually investigate what truly beautiful voices do. There are functions of sound energy (measured in dB) transference which may affect the nervous system in predictable ways and which can be measured and associated with esthetics. This study does not show consistency in measurements for absolute beauty (taste) even among belt teachers and researchers but does show some markers with varying degrees of importance which may point to a difference between our cognitive learned response to singing and our emotional, more visceral response to sounds. The markers which are significant in determining vocal beauty are: (1) Vibrancy-Characteristics of vibrato including speed, width, and consistency (low variability). (2) Spectral makeup-Ratio of partial strength above the fundamental to the fundamental. (3) Activity of the voice-The quantity of energy being produced. (4

  1. Design of an Acoustic Probe to Measure Otoacoustic Emissions Below 0.5 kHz

    Christensen, Anders Tornvig; Ordoñez, Rodrigo; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    Our ability to hear is reflected in low-level acoustic signals emitted from the ear. These otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) can be measured with an acoustic probe assembly coupling one or more small loudspeakers and microphones into the sealed ear canal. The electroacoustic instrumentation of...

  2. Deriving content-specific measures of room acoustic perception using a binaural, nonlinear auditory model

    Van Dorp Schuitman, J.; De Vries, D.; Lindau, A.

    2013-01-01

    Acousticians generally assess the acoustic qualities of a concert hall or any other room using impulse response-based measures such as the reverberation time, clarity index, and others. These parameters are used to predict perceptual attributes related to the acoustic qualities of the room. Various

  3. Precision evaluation for intensive GPS acoustic measurements along Japan trench

    Kido, M.; Fujimoto, H.; Osada, Y.; Ohta, Y.; Tadokoro, K.; Watanabe, T.; Nagai, S.; Yasuda, K.; Okuda, T.; Yamamoto, J.

    2013-12-01

    After the Tohoku-oki earthquake in 2011, researchers recognized the importance of the state of inter-plate coupling close to the trench for giant earthquakes, in where seafloor geodetic surveys were few or not available. To overcome this limitation, we have developed GPS/acoustic instrument for greater depth up to 6000m, which can cover the region close to the trench for most subduction zones. MEXT, Japan promotes to construct a network of GPS/acoustic survey sites along the Japan trench to elucidate post-seismic behavior after the giant earthquake. In 2012, research group in Tohoku and Nagoya Universities constructed 20 new survey sites along the Japan trench and started their initial positioning. Three to six transponders were installed for each site, which were 86 transponders in total. The network covers large portion of the Japan trench, mainly along the deep land-side of the trench, covering the region of expected significant afterslip as well as of the large coseismic slip. In this year second phase surveys are planned to detect displacement of roughly 1-yesr since the last survey. These are the first intensive surveys that we have never been experienced, and with new survey style. Therefore, in advance to the second phase survey, we summarize the first phase survey in 2012 in the presentation. As one of the most important key to obtain precise positioning of seafloor transponders is how to estimate horizontal variation of sound speed in ocean, which are neglected in the past analysis. For this purpose, some of the sites consist of six transponders, with which such variation can be potentially estimated. For this context, in the second phase surveys, we are going to introduce automatic surface vehicle to enable simultaneous measurement from two points from sea surface, which will provide information of the horizontal variation in sound speed even for three or four transponders. In addition we have made both moving and stationary surveys, in which we can

  4. Measuring Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the clustering of voids

    Liang, Yu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Tao, Charling

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the necessary methodology to optimally measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal, from voids based on galaxy redshift catalogues. To this end, we study the dependency of the BAO signal on the population of voids classified by their sizes. We find for the first time the characteristic features of the correlation function of voids including the first robust detection of BAOs in mock galaxy catalogues. These show an anti-correlation around the scale corresponding to the smallest size of voids in the sample (the void exclusion effect), and dips at both sides of the BAO peak, which can be used to determine the significance of the BAO signal without any priori model. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that there is a scale dependent bias for different populations of voids depending on the radius, with the peculiar property that the void population with the largest BAO significance corresponds to tracers with approximately zero bias on the largest scales. We further investigate the meth...

  5. Influence of Architectural Features and Styles on Various Acoustical Measures in Churches

    Carvalho, Antonio Pedro Oliveira De.

    This work reports on acoustical field measurements made in a major survey of 41 Catholic churches in Portugal that were built in the last 14 centuries. A series of monaural and binaural acoustical measurements was taken at multiple source/receiver positions in each church using the impulse response with noise burst method. The acoustical measures were Reverberation Time (RT), Early Decay Time (EDT), Clarity (C80), Definition (D), Center Time (TS), Loudness (L), Bass Ratios based on the Reverberation Time and Loudness rm (BR_-RT and rm BR_-L), Rapid Speech Transmission Index (RASTI), and the binaural Coherence (COH). The scope of this research is to investigate how the acoustical performance of Catholic churches relates to their architectural features and to determine simple formulas to predict acoustical measures by the use of elementary architectural parameters. Prediction equations were defined among the acoustical measures to estimate values at individual locations within each room as well as the mean values in each church. Best fits with rm R^2~0.9 were not uncommon among many of the measures. Within and interchurch differences in the data for the acoustical measures were also analyzed. The variations of RT and EDT were identified as much smaller than the variations of the other measures. The churches tested were grouped in eight architectural styles, and the effect of their evolution through time on these acoustical measures was investigated. Statistically significant differences were found regarding some architectural styles that can be traced to historical changes in Church history, especially to the Reformation period. Prediction equations were defined to estimate mean acoustical measures by the use of fifteen simple architectural parameters. The use of the Sabine and Eyring reverberation time equations was tested. The effect of coupled spaces was analyzed, and a new algorithm for the application of the Sabine equation was developed, achieving an average of

  6. Thickness measurement of Ni thin film using dispersion characteristics of a surface acoustic wave

    In this study, we suggest a method to measure the thickness of thin films nondestructively using the dispersion characteristics of a surface acoustic wave propagating along the thin film surface. To measure the thickness of thin films, we deposited thin films with different thicknesses on a Si (100) wafer substrate by controlling the deposit time using the E-beam evaporation method. The thickness of the thin films was measured using a scanning electron microscope. Subsequently, the surface wave velocity of the thin films with different thicknesses was measured using the V(z) curve method of scanning acoustic microscopy. The correlation between the measured thickness and surface acoustic wave velocity was verified. The wave velocity of the film decreased as the film thickness increased. Therefore, thin film thickness can be determined by measuring the dispersion characteristics of the surface acoustic wave velocity.

  7. Application of an acoustic noise removal method to aircraft-based atmospheric temperature measurements

    Hugo, Ronald J.; Nowlin, Scott R.; Hahn, Ila L.; Eaton, Frank D.; McCrae, Kim A.

    2003-01-01

    An acoustic noise removal method is used to reject engine acoustical disturbances from aircraft-based atmospheric temperature measurements. Removal of engine noise from atmospheric temperature measurements allows a larger wave number range to be fit while quantifying the magnitude of atmospheric temperature turbulence. The larger wave number range was found to result in a more statistically certain spectral slope estimate, with up to a 50% reduction in the standard deviation of measured spectral slopes. The noise removal technique was found to break down under conditions of weak atmospheric temperature turbulence where the engine acoustical disturbance can be several orders of magnitude larger than atmospheric temperature turbulence.

  8. Measuring Turbulence from Moored Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters. A Manual to Quantifying Inflow at Tidal Energy Sites

    Kilcher, Levi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thomson, Jim [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Talbert, Joe [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); DeKlerk, Alex [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This work details a methodology for measuring hub height inflow turbulence using moored acoustic Doppler velocimiters (ADVs). This approach is motivated by the shortcomings of alternatives. For example, remote velocity measurements (i.e., from acoustic Doppler profilers) lack sufficient precision for device simulation, and rigid tower-mounted measurements are very expensive and technically challenging in the tidal environment. Moorings offer a low-cost, site-adaptable and robust deployment platform, and ADVs provide the necessary precision to accurately quantify turbulence.

  9. ATK Launch Vehicle (ALV-X1) Liftoff Acoustic Environments: Prediction vs. Measurement

    Houston, J.; Counter, Douglas; Kenny, Jeremy; Murphy, John

    2010-01-01

    Launched from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) Pad 01B on August 22, 2008, the ATK Launch Vehicle (ALV-X1) provided an opportunity to measure liftoff acoustic noise data. Predicted lift-off acoustic environments were developed by both NASA MSFC and ATK engineers. ATK engineers developed predictions for use in determining vibro-acoustic loads using the method described in the monograph NASA SP-8072. The MSFC ALV-X1 lift-off acoustic prediction was made with the Vehicle Acoustic Environment Prediction Program (VAEPP). The VAEPP and SP-8072 methods predict acoustic pressures of rocket systems generally scaled to existing rocket motor data based upon designed motor or engine characteristics. The predicted acoustic pressures are sound-pressure spectra at specific positions on the vehicle. This paper presents the measured liftoff acoustics on the vehicle and tower. This data is useful for the ALV-X1 in validating the pre-launch environments and loads predictions.

  10. The Development and Clinical Application of Acoustical Technique in Hip Joint

    黄晓琳; 邝适存; 郑振耀

    2002-01-01

    Summary: A non-invasive acoustical system was developed for the measurement of transmissionproperties of acoustic waves in the hip joints. The instrumentation consisted of three sub-systems.An excitation system employed a vibratory force at the sacrum of the test subjects. A transductionsystem included a pair of identical microphones installed in the tubes of two stethoscopes, whichwere placed at the greater trochanters on both sides for picking up the acoustical signals transmit-ted across the hip joints. The data acquisition and analysis system was a portable signal analyzerwith a program of dual channel digital filter for measuring the power of acoustical signal in 1/3-oc-tave frequency bands. 27 normal adults, 20 normal pre-school children and 40 normal neonateswere randomly selected for testing. Coherence function (CF) and discrepancy(D) was measuredduring the testing. Results from the three groups showed that there was a high coherence of thesignals (CF>0. 9) and a small discrepancy (D<3 dB) between bilateral hips in the frequencyrange of 200-315 Hz. For normal neonates, there was a wider frequency range of 160-315 Hz inwhich the acoustical signals maintained a high coherence (CF>0. 93) and a smaller discrepancy (D<2 dB) was observed. This study showed that the development of the acoustical technique pro-vided a practical method with objective parameters. The results obtained in this study can offer abaseline for further investigation of hip disorders particularly those related to structural abnormali-ties of the hip.

  11. Measuring baryon acoustic oscillations from the clustering of voids

    Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Tao, Charling

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the necessary methodology to optimally measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal from voids, based on galaxy redshift catalogues. To this end, we study the dependence of the BAO signal on the population of voids classified by their sizes. We find for the first time the characteristic features of the correlation function of voids including the first robust detection of BAOs in mock galaxy catalogues. These show an anti-correlation around the scale corresponding to the smallest size of voids in the sample (the void exclusion effect), and dips at both sides of the BAO peak, which can be used to determine the significance of the BAO signal without any priori model. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that there is a scale-dependent bias for different populations of voids depending on the radius, with the peculiar property that the void population with the largest BAO significance corresponds to tracers with approximately zero bias on the largest scales. We further investigate the methodology on an additional set of 1000 realistic mock galaxy catalogues reproducing the SDSS-III/BOSS CMASS DR11 data, to control the impact of sky mask and radial selection function. Our solution is based on generating voids from randoms including the same survey geometry and completeness, and a post-processing cleaning procedure in the holes and at the boundaries of the survey. The methodology and optimal selection of void populations validated in this work have been used to perform the first BAO detection from voids in observations, presented in a companion paper.

  12. Comparison of acoustic and strain gauge techniques for crack closure measurements

    Buck, O.; Inman, R. V.; Frandsen, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    A quantitative study on the systems performances of the COD gauge and the acoustic transmission techniques to elastic deformation of part-through crack and compact tension specimens has been conducted. It is shown that the two instruments measure two completely different quantities: The COD gauge yields information on the length change of the specimen whereas the acoustic technique is sensitive directly to the amount of contract area between two surfaces, interfering with the acoustic signal. In another series of experiments, compression tests on parts with specifically prepared surfaces were performed so that the surface contact area could be correlated with the transmitted acoustic signal, as well as the acoustic with the COD gauge signal. A linear relation between contact area and COD gauge signal was obtained until full contact had been established.

  13. Identification of vibration excitations from acoustic measurements using near field acoustic holography and the force analysis technique

    Pézerat, C.; Leclère, Q.; Totaro, N.; Pachebat, M.

    2009-10-01

    This study presents a method of using acoustic holography and the force analysis technique to identify vibration sources from radiated noise measurements. The structure studied is a plate excited by a shaker on which three measurements were performed: the first is a reference measurement of plate velocity obtained by scanning laser vibrometry, the second is based on sound pressure measurements in the near field of the structure, and the third is the measurement of normal acoustic velocities by using a p-U probe recently developed by Microflown Technologies. This was followed by the application of classical NAH, known as pressure-to-velocity holography and velocity-to-velocity holography to predict the plate velocity field from acoustic measurements at distances of 1 and 5 cm. Afterwards, the force analysis technique, also known as the RIFF technique, is applied with these five data sets. The principle is to inject the displacement field of the structure into its equation of motion and extract the resulting force distribution. This technique requires regularization done by a low-pass filter in the wavenumber domain. Apart from pressure-to-velocity holography at 5 cm, the reconstructed force distribution allows localizing the excitation point in the measurement area. FAT regularization is also shown to improve results as its cutoff wavenumber is optimized with the natural wavenumber of the plate. Lastly, quantitative force values are extracted from force distributions at all frequencies of the band 0-4 kHz studied and compared with the force spectrum measured directly by a piezoelectric sensor.

  14. A Low-Cost System for Measurement and Spectral Analysis of Motor Acoustic Noise

    Kumar, Binoj; Narayanan, G.

    2001-01-01

    Workplace noise has become one of the major issues in industry not only because of workers’ health but also due to safety. Electric motors, particularly, inverter fed induction motors emit objectionably high levels of noise. This has led to the emergence of a research area, concerned with measurement and mitigation of the acoustic noise. This paper presents a lowcost option for measurement and spectral analysis of acoustic noise emitted by electric motors. The system consists of an electre...

  15. Underwater hybrid near-field acoustical holography based on the measurement of vector hydrophone array

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid near-field acoustical holography(NAH) is developed for reconstructing acoustic radiation from a cylindrical source in a complex underwater environment. In hybrid NAH,we combine statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography(SONAH) and broadband acoustical holography from intensity measurements(BAHIM) to reconstruct the underwater cylindrical source field. First,the BAHIM is utilized to regenerate as much acoustic pressures on the hologram surface as necessary,and then the acoustic pressures are taken as input to the formulation implemented numerically by SONAH. The main advantages of this technology are that the complex pressure on the hologram surface can be reconstructed without reference signal,and the measurement array can be smaller than the source,thus the practicability and efficiency of this technology are greatly enhanced. Numerical examples of a cylindrical source are demonstrated. Test results show that hybrid NAH can yield a more accurate reconstruction than conventional NAH. Then,an experiment has been carried out with a vector hydrophone array. The experimental results show the advantage of hybrid NAH in the reconstruction of an acoustic field and the feasibility of using a vector hydrophone array in an underwater NAH measurement,as well as the identification and localization of noise sources.

  16. Ellipsoidal reflector for measuring oto-acoustic emissions

    Epp, Bastian; Pulkki, Ville; Heiskanen, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    A truncated prolate ellipsoidal reflector having the ear canal of a listener at one focal point and large- diaphragm low-noise microphone at the other focal point is proposed for free-field recordings of oto-acoustic emissions. A prototype reflector consisting of three pieces is presented, which...

  17. Measurements and Simulation Studies of Piezoceramics for Acoustic Particle Detection

    Salomon, K; Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Naumann, C

    2005-01-01

    Calibration sources are an indispensable tool for all detectors. In acoustic particle detection the goal of a calibration source is to mimic neutrino signatures as expected from hadronic cascades. A simple and promising method for the emulation of neutrino signals are piezo ceramics. We will present results of measruements and simulations on these piezo ceramics.

  18. Exploring the feasibility of smart phone microphone for measurement of acoustic voice parameters and voice pathology screening.

    Uloza, Virgilijus; Padervinskis, Evaldas; Vegiene, Aurelija; Pribuisiene, Ruta; Saferis, Viktoras; Vaiciukynas, Evaldas; Gelzinis, Adas; Verikas, Antanas

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the reliability of acoustic voice parameters obtained using smart phone (SP) microphones and investigate the utility of use of SP voice recordings for voice screening. Voice samples of sustained vowel/a/obtained from 118 subjects (34 normal and 84 pathological voices) were recorded simultaneously through two microphones: oral AKG Perception 220 microphone and SP Samsung Galaxy Note3 microphone. Acoustic voice signal data were measured for fundamental frequency, jitter and shimmer, normalized noise energy (NNE), signal to noise ratio and harmonic to noise ratio using Dr. Speech software. Discriminant analysis-based Correct Classification Rate (CCR) and Random Forest Classifier (RFC) based Equal Error Rate (EER) were used to evaluate the feasibility of acoustic voice parameters classifying normal and pathological voice classes. Lithuanian version of Glottal Function Index (LT_GFI) questionnaire was utilized for self-assessment of the severity of voice disorder. The correlations of acoustic voice parameters obtained with two types of microphones were statistically significant and strong (r = 0.73-1.0) for the entire measurements. When classifying into normal/pathological voice classes, the Oral-NNE revealed the CCR of 73.7% and the pair of SP-NNE and SP-shimmer parameters revealed CCR of 79.5%. However, fusion of the results obtained from SP voice recordings and GFI data provided the CCR of 84.60% and RFC revealed the EER of 7.9%, respectively. In conclusion, measurements of acoustic voice parameters using SP microphone were shown to be reliable in clinical settings demonstrating high CCR and low EER when distinguishing normal and pathological voice classes, and validated the suitability of the SP microphone signal for the task of automatic voice analysis and screening. PMID:26162450

  19. On Mass Loading and Dissipation Measured with Acoustic Wave Sensors: A Review

    Marina V. Voinova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize current trends in the analysis of physical properties (surface mass density, viscosity, elasticity, friction, and charge of various thin films measured with a solid-state sensor oscillating in a gaseous or liquid environment. We cover three different types of mechanically oscillating sensors: the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D monitoring, surface acoustic wave (SAW, resonators and magnetoelastic sensors (MESs. The fourth class of novel acoustic wave (AW mass sensors, namely thin-film bulk acoustic resonators (TFBARs on vibrating membranes is discussed in brief. The paper contains a survey of theoretical results and practical applications of the sensors and includes a comprehensive bibliography.

  20. Field evaluation of boat-mounted acoustic Doppler instruments used to measure streamflow

    Mueller, D.S.

    2003-01-01

    The use of instruments based on the Doppler principle for measuring water velocity and computing discharge is common within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The instruments and software have changed appreciably during the last 5 years; therefore, the USGS has begun field validation of the instruments used to make discharge measurements from a moving boat. Instruments manufactured by SonTek/YSI and RD Instruments, Inc. were used to collect discharge data at five different sites. One or more traditional discharge measurements were made using a Price AA current meter and standard USGS procedures concurrent with the acoustic instruments at each site. Discharges measured with the acoustic instruments were compared with discharges measured with Price AA current meters and the USGS stage-discharge rating for each site. The mean discharges measured by each acoustic instrument were within 5 percent of the Price AA-based measurement and (or) discharge from the stage-discharge rating.

  1. Towards Measuring Continuous Acoustic Feature Convergence in Unconstrained Spoken Dialogues

    Kousidis, Spyros; Dorran, David; Wang, Yi; Vaughan, Brian; Cullen, Charlie; Campbell, Dermot; McDonnell, Ciaran; Coyle, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic/prosodic feature (a/p) convergence has been known to occur both in dialogues between humans, as well as in human-computer interactions. Understanding the form and function of convergence is desirable for developing next generation conversational agents, as this will help increase speech recognition performance and naturalness of synthesized speech. Currently, the underlying mechanisms by which continuous and bi-directional convergence occurs are not well understood. In this study, a ...

  2. Accuracy of measurement of acoustic rhinometry applied to small experimental animals

    Kaise, Toshihiko; Ukai, Kotara; Pedersen, Ole Finn;

    1999-01-01

    -sectional areas as a function of the distance from the nostril. We modified the equipment used on humans to assess dimensions of nasal airway geometry of small experimental animals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of measurement of the modified acoustic rhinometry applied to small...... experimental animals using nasal cavity models and guinea pigs. Measurement of the nasal cavity models (made of cylindrical silicone tubes) showed that the acoustic rhinometry estimated 85.5% of actual area and 79.0% of actual volume. In guinea pigs, nasal cavity volume determined by the acoustic rhinometry......Nasal obstruction is one of the major symptoms of allergic rhinitis. In the study of the mechanism of nasal obstruction, experiments on animal are useful. In adult humans, acoustic rhinometry has been used to evaluate nasal obstruction by determining nasal cavity dimensions in terms of cross...

  3. Comparison between psycho-acoustics and physio-acoustic measurement to determine optimum reverberation time of pentatonic angklung music concert hall

    Sudarsono, Anugrah S.; Merthayasa, I. G. N.; Suprijanto

    2015-09-01

    This research tried to compare psycho-acoustics and Physio-acoustic measurement to find the optimum reverberation time of soundfield from angklung music. Psycho-acoustic measurement was conducted using a paired comparison method and Physio-acoustic measurement was conducted with EEG Measurement on T3, T4, FP1, and FP2 measurement points. EEG measurement was conducted with 5 persons. Pentatonic angklung music was used as a stimulus with reverberation time variation. The variation was between 0.8 s - 1.6 s with 0.2 s step. EEG signal was analysed using a Power Spectral Density method on Alpha Wave, High Alpha Wave, and Theta Wave. Psycho-acoustic measurement on 50 persons showed that reverberation time preference of pentatonic angklung music was 1.2 second. The result was similar to Theta Wave measurement on FP2 measurement point. High Alpha wave on T4 measurement gave different results, but had similar patterns with psycho-acoustic measurement

  4. The acoustical cues to sound location in the rat: Measurements of directional transfer functions

    Koka, Kanthaiah; Read, Heather L.; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    The acoustical cues for sound location are generated by spatial- and frequency-dependent filtering of propagating sound waves by the head and external ears. Although rats have been a common model system for anatomy, physiology, and psychophysics of localization, there have been few studies of the acoustical cues available to rats. Here, directional transfer functions (DTFs), the directional components of the head-related transfer functions, were measured in six adult rats. The cues to locatio...

  5. Acoustic Measurements of a Large Civil Transport Main Landing Gear Model

    Ravetta, Patricio A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Wisda, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Microphone phased array acoustic measurements of a 26 percent-scale, Boeing 777-200 main landing gear model with and without noise reduction fairings installed were obtained in the anechoic configuration of the Virginia Tech Stability Tunnel. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.17 with the latter speed used as the nominal test condition. The fully and partially dressed gear with the truck angle set at 13 degrees toe-up landing configuration were the two most extensively tested configurations, serving as the baselines for comparison purposes. Acoustic measurements were also acquired for the same two baseline configurations with the truck angle set at 0 degrees. In addition, a previously tested noise reducing, toboggan-shaped fairing was re-evaluated extensively to address some of the lingering questions regarding the extent of acoustic benefit achievable with this device. The integrated spectra generated from the acoustic source maps reconfirm, in general terms, the previously reported noise reduction performance of the toboggan fairing as installed on an isolated gear. With the recent improvements to the Virginia Tech tunnel acoustic quality and microphone array capabilities, the present measurements provide an additional, higher quality database to the acoustic information available for this gear model.

  6. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.; Collier, Hughbert A.; Bennett, Michael

    2002-01-29

    The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate NMR techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in hydrocarbon reservoirs. This is accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using NMR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurement techniques and core imaging are being linked with a balanced petrographical analysis of the core and theoretical model.

  7. Acoustic sensor for in-pile fuel rod fission gas release measurement

    We have developed a specific acoustic sensor to improve the knowledge of fission gas release in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel rods when irradiated in materials testing reactors. In order to perform experimental programs related to the study of the fission gas release kinetics, the CEA (French Nuclear Energy Commission) acquired the ability to equip a pre-irradiated PWR fuel rod with three sensors, allowing the simultaneous on-line measurements of the following parameters: - fuel temperature with a centre-line thermocouple type C, - internal pressure with a specific counter-pressure sensor, - fraction of fission gas released in the fuel rod with an innovative acoustic sensor. The third detector is the subject of this paper. This original acoustic sensor has been designed to measure the molar mass and pressure of the gas contained in the fuel rod plenum. For in-pile instrumentation, the fraction of fission gas, such as Krypton and Xenon, in Helium, can be deduced online from this measurement. The principle of this acoustical sensor is the following: a piezoelectric transducer generates acoustic waves in a cavity connected to the fuel rod plenum. The acoustic waves are propagated and reflected in this cavity and then detected by the transducer. The data processing of the signal gives the velocity of the acoustic waves and their amplitude, which can be related respectively to the molar mass and to the pressure of the gas. The piezoelectric material of this sensor has been qualified in nuclear conditions (gamma and neutron radiations). The complete sensor has also been specifically designed to be implemented in materials testing reactors conditions. For this purpose some technical points have been studied in details: - fixing of the piezoelectric sample in a reliable way with a suitable signal transmission, - size of the gas cavity to avoid any perturbation of the acoustic waves, - miniaturization of the sensor because of narrow in-pile experimental devices

  8. Analyzing excitation forces acting on a plate based on measured acoustic pressure.

    Wu, Sean F; Zhou, Pan

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on "seeing" through an elastic structure to uncover the root cause of sound and vibration by using nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) and normal modes expansion. This approach is of generality because vibro-acoustic responses on the surface of a vibrating structure can always be reconstructed, exactly or approximately. With these vibro-acoustic responses, excitation forces acting on the structure can always be determined, analytically or numerically, given any set of boundary conditions. As an example, the explicit formulations for reconstructing time-harmonic excitation forces, including point, line and surface forces, and their arbitrary combinations acting on a rectangular thin plate in vacuum mounted on an infinite baffle are presented. The reason for choosing this example is that the analytic solutions to vibro-acoustic responses are available, and in-depth analyses of results are possible. Results demonstrate that this approach allows one to identify excitation forces based on measured acoustic pressures and reveal their characteristics such as locations, types and amplitudes, as if one could "see" excitation forces acting behind the plate based on acoustic pressure measured on the opposite side. This approach is extendable to general elastic structures, except that in such circumstance numerical results must be sought. PMID:27475174

  9. Results of acoustic measurements during leak simulation experiments on a sodium-heated modular steam generator

    After a short description of the experimental arrangement at the micro-modular steam generator of the BOR-60 LMFBR Power Plant the acoustic measuring chains and their main properties are introduced. Acoustic signals of the background as well as the leak-induced noise have been analysed in frequency and time domain, respectively. One essential result is that frequency analysis of acoustic signals cannot be recommended as leak detection method. On the other hand, certain signal characteristics derived from signal analysis in time domain have been shown to meet the expectation of a considerable change in magnitude, even if a small water-to-sodium leak is occurring. Besides direct sound emitted in the leak region a secondary sound initiated in the vicinity of the acoustic transducer by reaction products of the sodium-water-reaction has been measured. Both of them have been used for acoustic detection of small leaks. The acoustic response of the modular steam generator to a large leak is characterized by a sudden considerable increase in sound level. Finally, some conclusions drawn from experimental results are presented. (author)

  10. Long-term continuous acoustical suspended-sediment measurements in rivers - Theory, application, bias, and error

    Topping, David J.; Wright, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    It is commonly recognized that suspended-sediment concentrations in rivers can change rapidly in time and independently of water discharge during important sediment‑transporting events (for example, during floods); thus, suspended-sediment measurements at closely spaced time intervals are necessary to characterize suspended‑sediment loads. Because the manual collection of sufficient numbers of suspended-sediment samples required to characterize this variability is often time and cost prohibitive, several “surrogate” techniques have been developed for in situ measurements of properties related to suspended-sediment characteristics (for example, turbidity, laser-diffraction, acoustics). Herein, we present a new physically based method for the simultaneous measurement of suspended-silt-and-clay concentration, suspended-sand concentration, and suspended‑sand median grain size in rivers, using multi‑frequency arrays of single-frequency side‑looking acoustic-Doppler profilers. The method is strongly grounded in the extensive scientific literature on the incoherent scattering of sound by random suspensions of small particles. In particular, the method takes advantage of theory that relates acoustic frequency, acoustic attenuation, acoustic backscatter, suspended-sediment concentration, and suspended-sediment grain-size distribution. We develop the theory and methods, and demonstrate the application of the method at six study sites on the Colorado River and Rio Grande, where large numbers of suspended-sediment samples have been collected concurrently with acoustic attenuation and backscatter measurements over many years. The method produces acoustical measurements of suspended-silt-and-clay and suspended-sand concentration (in units of mg/L), and acoustical measurements of suspended-sand median grain size (in units of mm) that are generally in good to excellent agreement with concurrent physical measurements of these quantities in the river cross sections at

  11. Acoustic P-wave velocity measurements of cataclastic effects in rock salt

    Model tests are carried out, in order to investigate the cataclastic thermo-mechanical behaviour of rock salt around a simulated repository borehole. The measurements are performed during a transient period of heating and subsequent cooling. Acoustic crosshole measurements are carried out under conditions of compression, scale 1: 41/2. The relationship between cataclastic effects and the acoustic velocity differences is described. Macrofracturing only occurred under circumstances of cooling, when a heater was switched off. One of the model tests was used in the CEC benchmark exercise ''COSA''. Acoustic measuring tubes have been developed for the in situ research on structural changes in rock salt. The tests involved the performance of so-called hole measurements in two parallel boreholes, containing the measuring tubes. The most important observations of a test in an old room in the Asse Mine are the following. A bifurcating open fissure, about 6 to 8 mm wide, prevented the propagation of the acoustic wave; this demonstrates that such cracks and fissures are easily detectable by the applied method. The microcataclasis, particularly that near the roomside wall, causes a reduction of the acoustic velocities, the more so as the angle between the measuring direction and the roomside wall increases. During the injection of a gallery wall with epoxy resins (by GSF) acoustic crosshole measurements were carried out as well. A detailed picture was obtained of the process of the closing of the fractures. By core drilling after this test confirmation was obtained that the fractures were closed. The information that has been gathered, will be used for the interpretation of the crosshole measurements in the near future; these measurements will be carried out around a heater borehole in the HAW field, a large underground test (GSF-ECN)

  12. Pseudo working-point control measurement scheme for acoustic sensitivity of interferometric fiber-optic hydrophones

    Zefeng Wang; Yongming Hu; Zhou Meng; Ming Ni

    2008-01-01

    A novel pseudo working-point control measurement scheme for the acoustic sensitivity of interferometric fiber-optic hydrophones is described and demonstrated.The measurement principle is introduced in detail.An experimental system,which interrogates an interferometric fiber-optic hydrophone with this method,is designed.The acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of the fiber-optic hydrophone is measured over the frequency range of 20-2500Hz.The measured acoustic sensitivity is about-156.5dB re 1rad/μPa with a fluctuation lower than ±1.2dB,which is in good agreement with the results obtained by the method of phase generated carrier.The experimental results testify the validity of this new method which has the advantages of no electric elements in the sensing head,the simplicity of signal processing,and wide working bandwidth.

  13. Clinical Studies of Real-Time Monitoring of Lithotripter Performance Using Passive Acoustic Sensors

    Leighton, T. G.; Fedele, F.; Coleman, A. J.; McCarthy, C.; Ryves, S.; Hurrell, A. M.; De Stefano, A.; White, P. R.

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the development and clinical testing of a passive device which monitors the passive acoustic emissions generated within the patient's body during Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL). Designed and clinically tested so that it can be operated by a nurse, the device analyses the echoes generated in the body in response to each ESWL shock, and so gives real time shock-by-shock feedback on whether the stone was at the focus of the lithotripter, and if so whether the previous shock contributed to stone fragmentation when that shock reached the focus. A shock is defined as being `effective' if these two conditions are satisfied. Not only can the device provide real-time feedback to the operator, but the trends in shock `effectiveness' can inform treatment. In particular, at any time during the treatment (once a statistically significant number of shocks have been delivered), the percentage of shocks which were `effective' provides a treatment score TS(t) which reflects the effectiveness of the treatment up to that point. The TS(t) figure is automatically delivered by the device without user intervention. Two clinical studies of the device were conducted, the ethics guidelines permitting only use of the value of TS(t) obtained at the end of treatment (this value is termed the treatment score TS0). The acoustically-derived treatment score was compared with the treatment score CTS2 given by the consultant urologist at the three-week patient's follow-up appointment. In the first clinical study (phase 1), records could be compared for 30 out of the 118 patients originally recruited, and the results of phase 1 were used to refine the parameter values (the `rules') with which the acoustic device provides its treatment score. These rules were tested in phase 2, for which records were compared for 49 of the 85 patients recruited. Considering just the phase 2 results (since the phase 1 data were used to draw up the `rules' under which phase 2 operated

  14. Measurement of acoustic velocity in the stack of a thermoacoustic refrigerator using particle image velocimetry

    Berson, Arganthael; Michard, Marc; Blanc-Benon, Philippe [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, LMFA - UMR CNRS 5509, Ecully Cedex (France)

    2008-06-15

    Thermoacoustic refrigeration systems generate cooling power from a high-amplitude acoustic standing wave. There has recently been a growing interest in this technology because of its simple and robust architecture and its use of environmentally safe gases. With the prospect of commercialization, it is necessary to enhance the efficiency of thermoacoustic cooling systems and more particularly of some of their components such as the heat exchangers. The characterization of the flow field at the end of the stack plates is a crucial step for the understanding and optimization of heat transfer between the stack and the heat exchangers. In this study, a specific particle image velocimetry measurement is performed inside a thermoacoustic refrigerator. Acoustic velocity is measured using synchronization and phase-averaging. The measurement method is validated inside a void resonator by successfully comparing experimental data with an acoustic plane wave model. Velocity is measured inside the oscillating boundary layers, between the plates of the stack, and compared to a linear model. The flow behind the stack is characterized, and it shows the generation of symmetric pairs of counter-rotating vortices at the end of the stack plates at low acoustic pressure level. As the acoustic pressure level increases, detachment of the vortices and symmetry breaking are observed. (orig.)

  15. Theory and signal processing of acoustic correlation techniques for current velocity measurement

    ZHU Weiqing; FENG Lei; WANG Changhong; WANG Yuling; QIU Wei

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model and signal processing of acoustic correlation measurements to estimate current velocity are discussed. The sonar space-time correlation function of vol-ume reverberations within Fraunhofer zone is derived. The function, which is in exponential forms, is the theoretical model of acoustic correlation measurements. The characteristics of the correlation values around the maximum of the amplitude of the correlation function, where most information about current velocity is contained, are primarily analyzed. Localized Least Mean Squares (LLMS) criterion is put forward for velocity estimation. Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) method is adopted as the optimization method. So the systematic sig-nal processing method of acoustic correlation techniques for current velocity measurement is established. A prototype acoustic correlation current profiler (ACCP) underwent several sea trials, the results show that theoretical model approximately coincides with experimental re-sults. Current profiles including the speed and direction from ACCP are compared with those from acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). The current profiles by both instruments agree reasonably well. Also, the standard deviation of velocity measurement by ACCP is statistically calculated and it is a little larger than predicted value.

  16. Measurement of Aqueous Foam Rheology by Acoustic Levitation

    McDaniel, J. Gregory; Holt, R. Glynn; Rogers, Rich (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An experimental technique is demonstrated for acoustically levitating aqueous foam drops and exciting their spheroidal modes. This allows fundamental studies of foam-drop dynamics that provide an alternative means of estimating the viscoelastic properties of the foam. One unique advantage of the technique is the lack of interactions between the foam and container surfaces, which must be accounted for in other techniques. Results are presented in which a foam drop with gas volume fraction phi = 0.77 is levitated at 30 kHz and excited into its first quadrupole resonance at 63 +/- 3 Hz. By modeling the drop as an elastic sphere, the shear modulus of the foam was estimated at 75 +/- 3 Pa.

  17. Acoustic measurement of boiling instabilities in a solar receiver

    Beattie, A. G.

    1980-11-01

    An acoustic technique was developed and used to search for boiling instabilities in the prototype receiver for the Barstow 10 MW Solar Thermal Pilot Plant. Instabilities, consisting of movements of the transition zone between regions of nucleate and film boiling, were observed. The periods of these fluctuations ranged between three and fifteen seconds with no indications of preferred frequencies. The peak to peak amplitudes of the fluctuations averaged 0.4 meters under steady state conditions at absorbed power levels between 2.0 and 3.2 MW. Transient fluctuations with amplitudes up to 2.0 meters were also seen. These transients usually lasted between 30 and 300 seconds. It was not possible to pinpoint the causes of these transients.

  18. Final Report: Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress

    Normann, Randy A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  19. Final Report. Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress

    Normann, Randy A [Perma Works LLC, Pattonville, TX (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  20. Comparisons of auditorium acoustics measurements as a function of location in halls (A)

    Bradley, J. S.; Gade, Anders Christian; Siebein, G W

    1993-01-01

    In a measurement tour of nine U.S. concert halls measurements were made at 30 or more combinations of source and receiver position in each hall. Each of the three measurement teams (the University of Florida, the Danish Technical University, and the National Research Council of Canada) made...... parallel measurements of a number of modern room acoustics quantities using different equipment and measurement procedures. These results are compared on a seat-by-seat basis and the differences are explained in terms of earlier systematic studies of the effects of measurement procedure details. The...... measurement results were also used to examine the influence of different measurement equipment and measurement procedures on the within hall variations of the various acoustical quantities. [Work partially supported by the Concert Hall Research Group.]...

  1. Producing of Impedance Tube for Measurement of Acoustic Absorption Coefficient of Some Sound Absorber Materials

    R. Golmohammadi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Noise is one of the most important harmful agents in work environment. In spit of industrial improvements, exposure with over permissible limit of noise is counted as one of the health complication of workers. In Iran, do not exact information of the absorption coefficient of acoustic materials. Iranian manufacturer have not laboratory for measured of sound absorbance of their products, therefore using of sound absorber is limited for noise control in industrial and non industrial constructions. The goal of this study was to design an impedance tube based on pressure method for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient of acoustic materials.Materials & Methods: In this study designing of measuring system and method of calculation of sound absorption based on a available equipment and relatively easy for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient related to ISO10534-1 was performed. Measuring system consist of heavy asbestos tube, a pure tone sound generator, calibrated sound level meter for measuring of some commonly of sound absorber materials was used. Results: In this study sound absorption coefficient of 23 types of available acoustic material in Iran was tested. Reliability of results by three repeat of measurement was tested. Results showed that the standard deviation of sound absorption coefficient of study materials was smaller than .Conclusion: The present study performed a necessary technology of designing and producing of impedance tube for determining of acoustical materials absorption coefficient in Iran.

  2. Traveling wave tube measurements for low-frequency properties of underwater acoustic materials

    2007-01-01

    A traveling wave tube measurement technique for measuring acoustic properties of underwater acoustic materials was developed. Water temperature and pressure environments of the ocean can be simulated in a water-filled tube, and the acoustic parameters of samples of underwater acoustic materials are measured in the range of low-frequency. A tested sample is located at central position of the tube. A pair of projectors is separately located at both ends of the tube. Using an active anechoic technique, the sound wave transmitting the tested sample is hardly reflected by the surface of secondary transducer. So the traveling sound field is built up in the tube. By separately calculating the transfer functions of every pair of double hydrophones in the sound fields from the both sides of the sample, its reflection coefficients and transmission coefficients are obtained. In the measurement system, the inside diameter of the tube is Φ208 mm, the working frequency range is from 100 to 4000 Hz, the maximum pressure is 5 MPa. The reflection coefficients and transmission coefficients of a water layer and a stainless steel layer samples are measured actually and calculated theoretically. The results show that the measured values are in good agreement with the values calculated, and the measurement uncertainty is not greater than 1.5 dB.

  3. Use of Acoustic Doppler Instruments for Measuring Discharge in Streams with Appreciable Sediment Transport

    Mueller, D.S.

    2002-01-01

    The use of Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) for measuring discharge in streams with sediment transport was discussed. The studies show that the acoustic frequency of an ADCP in combination with the sediment transport characteristics in a river causes the ADCP bottom-tracking algorithms to detect a moving bottom. A moving bottom causes bottom-tracking-referenced water velocities and discharges to be biased low. The results also show that the use of differential global positioning system (DGPS) data allows accurate measurement of water velocities and discharges in such cases.

  4. Measurement system for experimental determination of acoustic properties of gels at INRIM

    Due to the large diffusion of ultrasonic technique in medicine, use of tissue mimicking materials to understand physical interaction of ultrasound has grown in importance. From this view measuring acoustic properties of such materials is crucial. This work shows the settlement at INRIM laboratory of a simple system for acoustic properties measurements with particular interest in attenuation of ultrasound. The system is based on substitution method and Fourier analysis and allow the evaluation of speed of sound, impedance and attenuation in the frequency range between 3 MHz and 12 MHz.

  5. Measurement system for experimental determination of acoustic properties of gels at INRIM

    Musacchio, C; Durando, G; Bernardi, A; Troia, A, E-mail: c.musacchio@inrim.it [INRIM - Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica-, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 - Torino (Italy)

    2011-02-01

    Due to the large diffusion of ultrasonic technique in medicine, use of tissue mimicking materials to understand physical interaction of ultrasound has grown in importance. From this view measuring acoustic properties of such materials is crucial. This work shows the settlement at INRIM laboratory of a simple system for acoustic properties measurements with particular interest in attenuation of ultrasound. The system is based on substitution method and Fourier analysis and allow the evaluation of speed of sound, impedance and attenuation in the frequency range between 3 MHz and 12 MHz.

  6. Applications of digital holography in visualized measurement of acoustic and flow fields

    Zhao, Jianlin; Li, Enpu; Sun, Weiwei; Di, Jianglei

    2010-03-01

    Digital holography allows recording the hologram using digitally imaging devices such as CCD, and reconstructing the holographic image by numerically simulating the diffraction of the hologram. Its main advantages are by which one can directly obtain the complex amplitude distribution of the object field, so that more impersonally measure the detail information of the object field, such as the distribution of the refractive index changing in crystals induced by light irradiation, deformation of the object surface, particle distribution, as well as acoustic field, flow field and temperature distribution in air. In this paper, we summarize the principle and some of our experimental results on the applications of digital holography in visualized measurement of acoustic standing wave (acoustic levitation field), plasma plume and water flow (Karman vortex street) fields.

  7. The influence of the group delay of digital filters on acoustic decay measurements

    Sobreira-Seoane, Manuel A.; Cabo, David Pérez; Jacobsen, Finn

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the error due to the phase response of digital filters on acoustic decay measurements is analyzed. There are two main sources of errors when an acoustic decay is filtered: the error due to the bandwidth of the filters related to their magnitude response, and the error due...... to their phase response. In this investigation the two components are separated and the phase error analyzed in terms of the group delay of the filters. Linear phase FIR filters and minimum phase IIR filters fulfilling the class 1 requirements of the IEC 61260 standard have been designed, and their errors...... compared. This makes it possible to explain the behavior of the phase error and develop recommendations for the use of each filtering technique. The paper is focused on the filtering techniques covered by current versions of the standards for measurement of acoustic decays and in the evaluation...

  8. Picosecond acoustics in vegetal cells: non invasive in vitro measurements at a sub-cell scale

    Audoin, Bertrand; Rossignol, Clément; Chigarev, Nikolay; Ducousso, Mathieu; Forget, Guillaume; Guillemot, Fabien; Durrieu, Marie-Christine

    2010-01-01

    A 100 fs laser pulse passes through a single transparent cell and is absorbed at the surface of a metallic substrate. Picosecond acoustic waves are generated and propagate through the cell in contact with the metal. Interaction of the high frequency acoustic pulse with a probe laser light gives rise to stimulated Brillouin oscillations. The measurements are thus made with lasers for both the opto-acoustic generation and the acousto-optic detection. The technique offers perspectives for single cell imaging. The in plane resolution is limited by the pump and probe spot sizes, i.e ˜1 μm, and the in depth resolution is provided by the acoustic frequencies, typically in the GHz range. The effect of the technique on cell safety is discussed. Experiments achieved in vegetal cells illustrate reproducibility and sensitivity of the measurements. The acoustic responses of cell organelles are significantly different. The results support the potentialities of the hypersonic non invasive technique in the fields of bio-engineering and medicine.

  9. Measurements and computational fluid dynamics predictions of the acoustic impedance of orifices

    Su, J.; Rupp, J.; Garmory, A.; Carrotte, J. F.

    2015-09-01

    The response of orifices to incident acoustic waves, which is important for many engineering applications, is investigated with an approach combining both experimental measurements and numerical simulations. This paper presents experimental data on acoustic impedance of orifices, which is subsequently used for validation of a numerical technique developed for the purpose of predicting the acoustic response of a range of geometries with moderate computational cost. Measurements are conducted for orifices with length to diameter ratios, L/D, of 0.5, 5 and 10. The experimental data is obtained for a range of frequencies using a configuration in which a mean (or bias) flow passes from a duct through the test orifices before issuing into a plenum. Acoustic waves are provided by a sound generator on the upstream side of the orifices. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations of the same configuration have also been performed. These have been undertaken using an unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) approach with a pressure based compressible formulation with appropriate characteristic based boundary conditions to simulate the correct acoustic behaviour at the boundaries. The CFD predictions are in very good agreement with the experimental data, predicting the correct trend with both frequency and orifice L/D in a way not seen with analytical models. The CFD was also able to successfully predict a negative resistance, and hence a reflection coefficient greater than unity for the L / D = 0.5 case.

  10. Does enriched acoustic environment in humans abolish chronic tinnitus clinically and electrophysiologically? A double blind placebo controlled study.

    Vanneste, Sven; van Dongen, Marijn; De Vree, Bjorn; Hiseni, Senad; van der Velden, Eddy; Strydis, Christos; Joos, Kathleen; Norena, Arnaud; Serdijn, Wouter; De Ridder, Dirk

    2013-02-01

    Animal research has shown that loss of normal acoustic stimulation can increase spontaneous firing in the central auditory system and induce cortical map plasticity. Enriched acoustic environment after noise trauma prevents map plasticity and abolishes neural signs of tinnitus. In humans, the tinnitus spectrum overlaps with the area of hearing loss. Based on these findings it can be hypothesized that stimulating the auditory system by presenting music compensating specifically for the hearing loss might also suppress chronic tinnitus. To verify this hypothesis, a study was conducted in three groups of tinnitus patients. One group listened just to unmodified music (i.e. active control group), one group listened to music spectrally tailored to compensate for their hearing loss, and a third group received music tailored to overcompensate for their hearing loss, associated with one (in presbycusis) or two notches (in audiometric dip) at the edge of hearing loss. Our data indicate that applying overcompensation to the hearing loss worsens the patients' tinnitus loudness, the tinnitus annoyance and their depressive feelings. No significant effects were obtained for the control group or for the compensation group. These clinical findings were associated with an increase in current density within the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex in the alpha2 frequency band and within the left pregenual anterior cingulate cortex in beta1 and beta2 frequency band. In addition, a region of interest analysis also demonstrated an associated increase in gamma band activity in the auditory cortex after overcompensation in comparison to baseline measurements. This was, however, not the case for the control or the compensation groups. In conclusion, music therapy compensating for hearing loss is not beneficial in suppressing tinnitus, and overcompensating hearing loss actually worsens tinnitus, both clinically and electrophysiologically. PMID:23104014

  11. OASIS in the sea: Measurement of the acoustic reflectivity of zooplankton with concurrent optical imaging

    Jaffe, J. S.; Ohman, M. D.; De Robertis, A.

    A new instrument Optical-Acoustic Submersible Imaging System (OASIS) has been developed for three-dimensional acoustic tracking of zooplankton with concurrent optical imaging to verify the identity of the insonified organisms. OASIS also measures in situ target strengths (TS) of freely swimming zooplankton and nekton of known identity and 3-D orientation. The system consists of a three-dimensional acoustic imaging system (FishTV), a sensitive optical CCD camera with red-filtered strobe illumination, and ancillary oceanographic sensors. The sonar triggers the acquisition of an optical image when it detects the presence of a significant target in the precise location where the camera, strobe and sonar are co-registered. Acoustic TS can then be related to the optical image, which permits identification of the animal and its 3-D aspect. The system was recently deployed (August 1996) in Saanich Inlet, B.C., Canada. Motile zooplankton and nekton were imaged with no evidence of reaction to or avoidance of the OASIS instrument package. Target strengths of many acoustic reflectors were recorded in parallel with the optical images, triggered by the presence of an animal in the correct location of the sonar system. Inspection of the optical images, corroborated with zooplankton sampling with a MOCNESS net, revealed that the joint optically and acoustically sensed taxa at the site were the euphausiid Euphausia pacifica, the gammarid amphipod Orchomene obtusa, and a gadid fish. The simultaneous optical and acoustic images permitted an exact correlation of TS and taxa. Computer simulations from a model of the backscattered strength from euphausiids are in good agreement with the observed data.

  12. Functions of diffraction correction and analytical solutions in nonlinear acoustic measurement

    Alliès, Laurent; Nadi, M

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical formulation for correcting the diffraction associated to the second harmonic of an acoustic wave, more compact than that usually used. This new formulation, resulting from an approximation of the correction applied to fundamental, makes it possible to obtain simple solutions for the second harmonic of the average acoustic pressure, but sufficiently precise for measuring the parameter of nonlinearity B/A in a finite amplitude method. Comparison with other expressions requiring numerical integration, show the solutions are precise in the nearfield.

  13. Statistical relations among architectural features and objective acoustical measurements of concert halls

    Gade, Anders Christian; Siebein, G. W.; Chiang, W.;

    1993-01-01

    A statistical analysis of architectural features and detailed objective acoustical measurements made in eight concert halls and several multi-use rooms in their concert configuration will be presented. A method for evaluating the architectural features of rooms that affect their acoustical...... properties was developed. Architectural features of interest include both room average values and more-detailed subdivisions of surfaces including shape, volume, height, width, and sound absorption properties of materials. Regression modeling was performed for individual source–receiver paths as well as for...

  14. Remote sensing of temperature and wind using acoustic travel-time measurements

    Manuela Barth

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A remote sensing technique to detect area-averaged temperature and flow properties within an area under investigation, utilizing acoustic travel-time measurements, is introduced. This technique uses the dependency of the speed of acoustic signals on the meteorological parameters temperature and wind along the propagation path. The method itself is scalable: It is applicable for investigation areas with an extent of some hundred square metres as well as for small-scale areas in the range of one square metre. Moreover, an arrangement of the acoustic transducers at several height levels makes it possible to determine profiles and gradients of the meteorological quantities. With the help of two examples the potential of this remote sensing technique for simultaneously measuring averaged temperature and flow fields is demonstrated. A comparison of time histories of temperature and wind values derived from acoustic travel-time measurements with point measurements shows a qualitative agreement whereas calculated root-mean-square errors differ for the two example applications. They amount to 1.4 K and 0.3 m/s for transducer distances of 60 m and 0.4 K and 0.2 m/s for transducer distances in the range of one metre.

  15. Experimental investigation of air pressure and acoustic characteristics of human voice. Part 1: Measurement in vivo

    Horáček, Jaromír; Radolf, Vojtěch; Bula, Vítězslav; Veselý, Jan; Laukkanen, A. M.

    Prague : ITAM AS CR, v. v. i., 2012 - (Náprstek, J.; Fischer, C.). s. 104-105 ISBN 978-80-86246-39-0. [Engineering Mechanics 2012 /18./. 14.05.2012-17.05.2012, Svratka] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : biomechanics of voice * measurement of oral pressure * voice exercises * phonation into tubes Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  16. Effect of Foreshortening on Center-to-Limb Variations of Measured Acoustic Travel Times

    Zhao, Junwei; Stejko, Andrey; Chen, Ruizhu

    2016-03-01

    We use data observed near the solar disk center by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (SDO/HMI) to mimic observations at high-latitude areas after applying geometric transform and projection. These data are then used to study how foreshortening affects the time-distance measurements of acoustic travel times. We find that foreshortening reduces the measured mean travel-times through altering the acoustic-power weighting in different harmonic degrees, but the level of reduction and the latitude dependence are not as strong as those measured from the observation data at the same latitude. Foreshortening is not found to be accountable for the systematic center-to-limb effect in the measured acoustic travel-time differences, which is an essential factor for a reliable inference of the Sun's meridional-circulation profile. The differences in the acoustic power spectrum between the mimicked data and the observation data in high-latitude areas suggest that the optical spectrum-line formation height or convection cells in these areas may be the primary cause of the center-to-limb effect in helioseismic analyses.

  17. Design and development of a synthetic acoustic antenna for highly directional sound measurements

    Boone, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    Design and development of an acoustic microphone array for sound measurements outdoors, with applications in industrial noise and traffic noise. The microphone array has a flexible length of 10 to 76 m and covers the octave band from 125 to 1000 Hz (later extended to 2000 Hz). The angular resolution is 1.5 degrees.

  18. High accuracy acoustic relative humidity measurement in duct flow with air

    Cees van der Geld; Twan Wernaart; Mart Grooten; Wilhelm van Schaik

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH) instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0–12 m/s with an error of ±0.13 m/s, temp...

  19. Acoustic Reflex Measurements in Normal, Cochlear, and Retrocochlear Lesions -Part1

    Navid Shahnaz

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available The cut off points of 90th percentile of acoustic reflex thresholds were determined in the normal and sensory hearing loss.All subjects had measurable hearing(ANSI-1969≤110 dBHL in three frequencies of 500,1000 and 2000Hz.While hearing loss was more than 55dB, The cut off point was higher in studies that NR responses was included.In cases that hearing loss was less than 75dB, 90th percentile can be used in diganosis of retrochochlear lesions.Since Acoustic reflexes are absent in both mentioned pathologies in greater amount of hearing loss,It would be less efficient in diffrential diganisis of cochlear and retrochochlear lesions to use acoustic reflex thresholds under the mentioned circumstances.

  20. Acoustic Sensor for In-Pile Fuel Rod Fission Gas Release Measurement

    Innovative in-pile instrumentation is crucial for advanced experimental programs in research reactors. In this field, we developed a specific acoustic sensor to improve the knowledge of fission gas release in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel rods when irradiated in Material Testing Reactors (MTR). In order to perform experimental programs related to the study of the fission gas release kinetics, the CEA (French Nuclear Energy Commission) acquired the ability to equip a pre-irradiated PWR fuel rod with three sensors, allowing the simultaneous on-line measurements of the following parameters: -fuel temperature with a centreline thermocouple type C -internal pressure with a specific counter-pressure sensor, -fraction of fission gas released in the fuel rod with an innovative acoustic sensor. The third detector, which has been developed and is patent pending by CEA, SCK.CEN (Belgian Nuclear Research Center) and IES (French research laboratory of Montpellier II University and French National Research Center), is the subject of this paper. This original acoustic sensor has been designed to measure the molar mass and pressure of the gas contained in the fuel rod plenum. For in-pile instrumentation, the fraction of fission gas, such as Krypton and Xenon, in Helium, can be deduced on-line from this measurement. The principle of this non destructive and on-line acoustical sensor is the following: a piezoelectric transducer generates acoustic waves in a cavity connected to the fuel rod plenum. The acoustic waves are propagated and reflected in this cavity and then detected by the transducer. The data processing of the signal gives the velocity of the acoustic waves and their amplitude, which can be related respectively to the molar mass and to the pressure of the gas. The piezoelectric material of this sensor has been qualified in nuclear conditions (gamma and neutron radiations). The complete sensor has also been specifically designed to be implemented in MTR conditions

  1. Measurement and mathematical simulation of acoustic characteristics of an artificially lengthened vocal tract

    Radolf, Vojtěch; Horáček, Jaromír; Dlask, Pavel; Otčenášek, Zdeněk; Geneid, Ahmed; Laukkanen, Anne-Maria

    2016-03-01

    Phonation into tubes is used for voice training and therapy. In the present study, the formant frequencies were estimated from measurements of the acoustic pressure and the acoustic input impedance for a plexiglass model of the vocal tract (VT) prolonged by a glass tube. Similar transfer function measurements were performed with a human VT in vivo. The experimental results matched the mathematical modelling and confirmed the legitimacy of assuming rigid walls in mathematical simulations of the acoustic characteristics of an artificial VT model prolonged by a tube. However, this study also proved a considerable influence from soft tissues in the yielding walls of human VT cavities on the first formant frequency, F1. The measured F1 for the VT model corresponded to the computed value of 78 Hz. The experiments in a human instead resulted in a much higher value of F1: about 200 Hz. The results confirm that a VT model with yielding walls must be considered for mathematical modelling of the occluded or semi-occluded human vocal tract, e.g. prolonged by tubes or straws. This is explained by an acoustic-structural interaction of the vocal tract cavities with a mechanical low-frequency resonance of the soft tissue in the larynx.

  2. Numerical and experimental investigation of a low-frequency measurement technique: differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    Yin, Hanjun; Zhao, Jianguo; Tang, Genyang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Wang, Shangxu

    2016-06-01

    Differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy (DARS) has been developed to determine the elastic properties of saturated rocks within the kHz frequency range. This laboratory technique is based on considerations from perturbation theory, wherein the resonance frequencies of the resonant cavity with and without a perturbation sample are used to estimate the acoustic properties of the test sample. In order to better understand the operating mechanism of DARS and therefore optimize the procedure, it is important to develop an accurate and efficient numerical model. Accordingly, this study presents a new multiphysics model by coupling together considerations from acoustics, solid mechanics, and electrostatics. The numerical results reveal that the newly developed model can successfully simulate the acoustic pressure field at different resonance modes, and that it can accurately reflect the measurement process. Based on the understanding of the DARS system afforded by the numerical simulation, we refine the system configuration by utilizing cavities of different lengths and appropriate radii to broaden the frequency bandwidth and ensure testing accuracy. Four synthetic samples are measured to test the performance of the optimized DARS system, in conjunction with ultrasonic and static measurements. For nonporous samples, the estimated bulk moduli are shown to be independent of the different measurement methods (i.e. DARS or ultrasonic techniques). In contrast, for sealed porous samples, the differences in bulk moduli between the low- and high-frequency techniques can be clearly observed; this discrepancy is attributed to frequency dispersion. In summary, the optimized DARS system with an extended frequency range of 500–2000 Hz demonstrates considerable utility in investigating the frequency dependence of the acoustic properties of reservoir rocks.

  3. Pressure transducer for measuring acoustic radiation force based on a magnetic sensor

    This work presents a pressure transducer based on a magnetic sensor to measure acoustic radiation force (ARF) and small displacements. The methodology presented in this paper allowed this transducer to be calibrated for use as an acoustic pressure and intensity meter. It can control the acoustic intensity emitted by ultrasound used, for example, in ARF impulse imaging, vibro-acoustography and high-intensity focused ultrasound techniques. The device comprises a magnet, a membrane, a magnetoresistive sensor and a coil to cancel the external magnetic field. When ARF is applied to the membrane, the magnetic field on the sensor changes due to the magnetic target displacement. The variation of the output signal from the magnetic transducer is proportional to the acoustic pressure applied to the membrane. A focused ultrasound transducer with a central frequency of 3 MHz was used to apply a continuous ARF. The sensitivities of the magnetic transducer as an acoustic pressure and intensity meter, evaluated in water, were respectively 0.597 µV MPa−1 and 0.073 µV (W cm−2)−1/2, while those of the needle hydrophone (Onda model HNP-0400) used in the magnetic transducer calibration were respectively, 0.5024 mV MPa−1 and 6.153 mV (W cm−2)−1/2. The transducer resolution to displacement is 5 nm and 6 dB of signal attenuation occurs for 7° of misalignment. The transducer responded well to acoustic pressure in water above 200 kPa

  4. Measurements of Broadband Negative Index in Space-Coiling Acoustic Metamaterials

    Xie, Yangbo; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Zigoneanu, Lucian; Cummer, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of broadband negative refractive index obtained in a labyrinthine acoustic metamaterial structure. Two different approaches were employed to prove the metamaterial negative index nature: one-dimensional extractions of effective parameters from reflection and transmission measurements, and two-dimensional prism-based measurements that convincingly show the transmission angle corresponding to negative refraction. The transmission angles observed in the l...

  5. Coherent Combination of Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Statistics and Peculiar Velocity Measurements from Redshift Survey

    Song, Yong-Seon

    2010-01-01

    New statistical method is proposed to coherently combine Baryon Acoustic Oscillation statistics (BAO) and peculiar velocity measurements exploiting decomposed density-density and velocity-velocity spectra in real space from the observed redshift distortions in redshift space, 1) to achieve stronger dark energy constraints, \\sigma(w)=0.06 and \\sigma(w_a)=0.20, which are enhanced from BAO or velocity measurements alone, and 2) to cross-check consistency of dark energy constraints from two diffe...

  6. Acoustic measurement of overall voice quality in sustained vowels and continuous speech

    Maryn, Youri

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of dysphonia severity involves auditory-perceptual evaluations and acoustic analyses of sound waves. Meta-analysis of proportional associations between these two methods showed that many popular perturbation metrics and noise-to-harmonics and others ratios do not yield reasonable results. However, this meta-analysis demonstrated that the validity of specific autocorrelation- and cepstrum-based measures was much more convincing, and appointed ‘smoothed cepstral peak prominence’ as ...

  7. Non-contact liquid level measurement with electromagnetic–acoustic resonator sensors

    Electromagnetic–acoustic transduction represents an alternative to piezoelectric transduction with unique properties and advantages for resonator sensors. We have shown that such devices are suitable as mass microbalances similar to quartz crystal resonators, and as liquid density and viscosity sensors by exciting a suitable in-plane mode featuring dominant shear vibration. Generating out-of-plane vibrations we have applied these devices also as liquid level sensors. In contrast to classic time-of-flight ultrasonic liquid level sensors, the resolution is not limited by the wavelength, since small frequency changes due to interference effects with a standing acoustic wave are evaluated. For this contribution we have extensively evaluated this liquid level sensing and will present and compare new measurement and modeling results. The model comprises electromagnetic–acoustic interaction with a lossy transmission line representing the acoustic wave in the liquid. In impedance measurements with standard lab equipment a resolution as low as 3 µm at a liquid level of 10 mm and an operating frequency of 275 kHz has been achieved

  8. Underwater Acoustic Measurements to Estimate Wind and Rainfall in the Mediterranean Sea

    Sara Pensieri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic ambient noise measurements can be analyzed to obtain qualitative and quantitative information about wind and rainfall phenomena over the ocean filling the existing gap of reliable meteorological observations at sea. The Ligurian Sea Acoustic Experiment was designed to collect long-term synergistic observations from a passive acoustic recorder and surface sensors (i.e., buoy mounted rain gauge and anemometer and weather radar to support error analysis of rainfall rate and wind speed quantification techniques developed in past studies. The study period included combination of high and low wind and rainfall episodes and two storm events that caused two floods in the vicinity of La Spezia and in the city of Genoa in 2011. The availability of high resolution in situ meteorological data allows improving data processing technique to detect and especially to provide effective estimates of wind and rainfall at sea. Results show a very good correspondence between estimates provided by passive acoustic recorder algorithm and in situ observations for both rainfall and wind phenomena and demonstrate the potential of using measurements provided by passive acoustic instruments in open sea for early warning of approaching coastal storms, which for the Mediterranean coastal areas constitutes one of the main causes of recurrent floods.

  9. Acoustic Measurement of Surface Wave Damping by a Meniscus.

    Michel, Guillaume; Pétrélis, François; Fauve, Stéphan

    2016-04-29

    We investigate the reflection of gravity-capillary surface waves by a plane vertical barrier. The size of the meniscus is found to strongly affect reflection: the energy of the reflected wave with a pinned contact line is around twice the one corresponding to a fully developed meniscus. To perform these measurements, a new experimental setup similar to an acousto-optic modulator is developed and offers a simple way to measure the amplitude, frequency and direction of propagation of surface waves. PMID:27176523

  10. Measurement of a broadband negative index with space-coiling acoustic metamaterials.

    Xie, Yangbo; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Zigoneanu, Lucian; Cummer, Steven A

    2013-04-26

    We report the experimental demonstration of a broadband negative refractive index obtained in a labyrinthine acoustic metamaterial structure. Two different approaches were employed to prove the metamaterial negative index nature: one-dimensional extractions of effective parameters from reflection and transmission measurements and two-dimensional prism-based measurements that convincingly show the transmission angle corresponding to negative refraction. The transmission angles observed in the latter case also agree very well with the refractive index obtained in the one-dimensional measurements and numerical simulations. We expect this labyrinthine metamaterial to become the unit cell of choice for practical acoustic metamaterial devices that require broadband and significantly negative indices of refraction. PMID:23679743

  11. Flow acoustics modelling and implications for ultrasonic flow measurement based on the transit-time method.

    Willatzen, M

    2004-05-01

    A comparison between three mathematical models frequently used in flow acoustics is presented and discussed with respect to ultrasonic flow-meter performance based on the transit-time method. The flow-meter spoolpiece geometry is assumed to be a cylindrical pipe. Semi-analytical calculations employing the Frobenius power series expansion method are shown for the cases of a constant-, linear-, parabolic-, and cubic-flow profiles although the Frobenius method presented can be applied to any smooth flow profile. It is shown that the so-called deviation of measurement, often used as a measure of the flow-meter accuracy, is strongly dependent on the acoustic mode excited and the flow profile. Furthermore, differences with respect to deviation of measurement results exist among the three mathematical models analyzed. PMID:15110538

  12. Calculus of the uncertainty in acoustic field measurements: comparative study between the uncertainty propagation method and the distribution propagation method

    Navacerrada Saturio, Maria Angeles; Díaz Sanchidrián, César; Pedrero González, Antonio; Iglesias Martínez, Luis

    2008-01-01

    The new Spanish Regulation in Building Acoustic establishes values and limits for the different acoustic magnitudes whose fulfillment can be verify by means field measurements. In this sense, an essential aspect of a field measurement is to give the measured magnitude and the uncertainty associated to such a magnitude. In the calculus of the uncertainty it is very usual to follow the uncertainty propagation method as described in the Guide to the expression of Uncertainty in Measurements (GUM...

  13. Acoustic containerless experiment system: A non-contact surface tension measurement

    Elleman, D. D.; Wang, T. G.; Barmatz, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Acoustic Containerless Experiment System (ACES) was flown on STS 41-B in February 1984 and was scheduled to be reflown in 1986. The primary experiment that was to be conducted with the ACES module was the containerless melting and processing of a fluoride glass sample. A second experiment that was to be conducted was the verification of a non-contact surface tension measurement technique using the molten glass sample. The ACES module consisted of a three-axis acoustic positioning module that was inside an electric furnace capable of heating the system above the melting temperature of the sample. The acoustic module is able to hold the sample with acoustic forces in the center of the chamber and, in addition, has the capability of applying a modulating force on the sample along one axis of the chamber so that the molten sample or liquid drop could be driven into one of its normal oscillation modes. The acoustic module could also be adjusted so that it could place a torque on the molten drop and cause the drop to rotate. In the ACES, a modulating frequency was applied to the drop and swept through a range of frequencies that would include the n = 2 mode. A maximum amplitude of the drop oscillation would indicate when resonance was reached and from that data the surface tension could be calculated. For large viscosity samples, a second technique for measuring surface tension was developed. The results of the ACES experiment and some of the problems encountered during the actual flight of the experiment will be discussed.

  14. Sub-Microsecond Temperature Measurement in Liquid Water Using Laser Induced Thermal Acoustics

    Alderfer, David W.; Herring, G. C.; Danehy, Paul M.; Mizukaki, Toshiharu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Using laser-induced thermal acoustics, we demonstrate non-intrusive and remote sound speed and temperature measurements over the range 10 - 45 C in liquid water. Averaged accuracy of sound speed and temperature measurements (10 s) are 0.64 m/s and 0.45 C respectively. Single-shot precisions based on one standard deviation of 100 or greater samples range from 1 m/s to 16.5 m/s and 0.3 C to 9.5 C for sound speed and temperature measurements respectively. The time resolution of each single-shot measurement was 300 nsec.

  15. Near-field acoustic holography with sound pressure and particle velocity measurements

    Fernandez Grande, Efren

    . Measurement of the particle velocity has notable potential in NAH, and furthermore, combined measurement of sound pressure and particle velocity opens a new range of possibilities that are examined in this study. On this basis, sound field separation methods have been studied, and a new measurement principle......, and studied under the light of different measurement principles. A direct formulation in space domain has been proposed, and the experimental validity of the quantity has been demonstrated. Additionally, the use of rigid spherical microphone arrays in near-field acoustic holography has been examined...

  16. Measuring Mortality Information in Clinical Data Warehouses.

    Jones, Barrett; Vawdrey, David K

    2015-01-01

    The ability to track and report long-term outcomes, especially mortality, is essential for advancing clinical research. The purpose of this study was to present a framework for assessing the quality of mortality information in clinical research databases. Using the clinical data warehouse (CDW) at Columbia University Medical Center as a case study, we measured: 1) agreement in vital status between our institution's patient registration system and the U.S. Social Security Administration's Death Master File (DMF), 2) the proportion of patients marked as deceased according to the DMF records who had subsequent visits to our institution, and 3) the proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age. Of 33,295 deaths recorded in our institution's patient registration system, 13,167 (39.5%) did not exist in the DMF. Of 315,037 patients in our CDW who marked as deceased according to the DMF, 2.1% had a subsequent clinical encounter at our institution. The proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age was 43.6% and 43.1%, respectively. These measures may be useful to other clinical research investigators seeking to assess the quality of mortality data (1-4). PMID:26306284

  17. In-situ optical and acoustical measurements of the buoyant cyanobacterium p. Rubescens: spatial and temporal distribution patterns.

    Hofmann, Hilmar; Peeters, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Optical (fluorescence) and acoustic in-situ techniques were tested in their ability to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of plankton in freshwater ecosystems with special emphasis on the harmful and buoyant cyanobacterium P. rubescens. Fluorescence was measured with the multi-spectral FluoroProbe (Moldaenke FluoroProbe, MFP) and a Seapoint Chlorophyll Fluorometer (SCF). In-situ measurements of the acoustic backscatter strength (ABS) were conducted with three different acoustic devices covering multiple acoustic frequencies (614 kHz ADCP, 2 MHz ADP, and 6 MHz ADV). The MFP provides a fast and reliable technique to measure fluorescence at different wavelengths in situ, which allows discriminating between P. rubescens and other phytoplankton species. All three acoustic devices are sensitive to P. rubescens even if other scatterers, e.g., zooplankton or suspended sediment, are present in the water column, because P. rubescens containing gas vesicles has a strong density difference and hence acoustic contrast to the ambient water and other scatterers. After calibration, the combination of optical and acoustical measurements not only allows qualitative and quantitative observation of P. rubescens, but also distinction between P. rubescens, other phytoplankton, and zooplankton. As the measuring devices can sample in situ at high rates they enable assessment of plankton distributions at high temporal (minutes) and spatial (decimeters) resolution or covering large temporal (seasonal) and spatial (basin scale) scales. PMID:24303028

  18. In-situ optical and acoustical measurements of the buoyant cyanobacterium p. Rubescens: spatial and temporal distribution patterns.

    Hilmar Hofmann

    Full Text Available Optical (fluorescence and acoustic in-situ techniques were tested in their ability to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of plankton in freshwater ecosystems with special emphasis on the harmful and buoyant cyanobacterium P. rubescens. Fluorescence was measured with the multi-spectral FluoroProbe (Moldaenke FluoroProbe, MFP and a Seapoint Chlorophyll Fluorometer (SCF. In-situ measurements of the acoustic backscatter strength (ABS were conducted with three different acoustic devices covering multiple acoustic frequencies (614 kHz ADCP, 2 MHz ADP, and 6 MHz ADV. The MFP provides a fast and reliable technique to measure fluorescence at different wavelengths in situ, which allows discriminating between P. rubescens and other phytoplankton species. All three acoustic devices are sensitive to P. rubescens even if other scatterers, e.g., zooplankton or suspended sediment, are present in the water column, because P. rubescens containing gas vesicles has a strong density difference and hence acoustic contrast to the ambient water and other scatterers. After calibration, the combination of optical and acoustical measurements not only allows qualitative and quantitative observation of P. rubescens, but also distinction between P. rubescens, other phytoplankton, and zooplankton. As the measuring devices can sample in situ at high rates they enable assessment of plankton distributions at high temporal (minutes and spatial (decimeters resolution or covering large temporal (seasonal and spatial (basin scale scales.

  19. Study on the High Precision Acoustic Measurement Techniques for Determining Temperature Field Around Seafloor Hydrothermal Vent

    CAI Yong; FAN Wei; ZHOU Yan; FU Xian-qiao; FANG Hui; JIN Tao

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the basis of acoustic method used for temperature field measurement of seafloor hydrothermal vent and two techniques of the parabolic interpolation and the bending compensation of propagation paths of acoustic signal are introduced.Experimental research is performed to exactly rebuild the temperature field around hot springs on the floor of Qiezishan Lake,Yunnan,China.The accuracy of the travel time estimation has been improved based on the aforementioned technique and method.At the same time,by comparison of the results of temperature field with different means,the max absolute error,the maximum relative error and the root mean square error are given.It shows that the technique and the method presented in the paper can be applied to the temperature field measurement detector around the seafloor hydrothermal vent.It also has a good accuracy.

  20. Self-oscillation acoustic system destined to measurement of stresses in mass rocks

    Kwasniewski, Janusz; Dominik, Ireneusz; Dorobczynski, Lech

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents an electronic self-oscillation acoustic system (SAS) destined to measure of stresses variations in the elastic media. The system consists of piezoelectric detector, amplifier-limiter, pass-band filter, piezoelectric exciter and the frequency meter. The mass rock plays a role of delaying element, in which variations in stresses causing the variations of acoustic wave velocity of propagation, and successive variation in frequency of oscillations generated by system. The laboratory test permitted to estimate variations in frequency caused by variations in stresses of elastic medium. The principles of selection of frequency and other parameters of the electronic system in application to stresses measurement in condition of the mine were presented.

  1. Acoustic emission measurement in a 20MJ superconducting magnet system of the cluster test coil

    This paper describes acoustic emission (AE) results which were measured during the second major experiment on the Cluster Test Coil at JAERI. This is the largest superconducting magnet system to date on which acoustic emission measurement has been carried out. The amplitudes and the counting rates of AE are shown as functions of coil operating current on three full current excursions. The amplitude results show the on-going process of emission and reduction during successive runs. A strong tendency of the AE counting rate to increase was observed at high currents after successive runs. The phenomenon of amplitude reduction and counting rate increase is attributed to an energy release change from larger single events to numerous smaller events. (author)

  2. Local Measurement of Electron Density and Temperature in High Temperature Laser Plasma Using the Ion-Acoustic Dispersion

    The dispersion of ion-acoustic fluctuations has been measured using a novel technique that employs multiple color Thomson-scattering diagnostics to measure the frequency spectrum for two separate thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations with significantly different wave vectors. The plasma fluctuations are shown to become dispersive with increasing electron temperature. We demonstrate that this technique allows a time resolved local measurement of electron density and temperature in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

  3. Breath air measurement using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy

    Kistenev, Yury V.; Borisov, Alexey V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Bulanova, Anna A.; Boyko, Andrey A.; Kostyukova, Nadezhda Y.; Karapuzikov, Alexey A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of measuring of biomarkers in breath air of patients with broncho-pulmonary diseases using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy and the methods of data mining are presented. We will discuss experimental equipment and various methods of intellectual analysis of the experimental spectra in context of above task. The work was carried out with partial financial support of the FCPIR contract No 14.578.21.0082 (ID RFMEFI57814X0082).

  4. Forecasting the Dark Energy Measurement with Baryon Acoustic Oscillations: Prospects for the LAMOST surveys

    Wang, Xin; Chen, Xuelei; Zheng, Zheng; Wu, Fengquan; Zhang, Pengjie; Zhao, Yongheng

    2008-01-01

    The Large Area Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) is a dedicated spectroscopic survey telescope being built in China, with an effective aperture of 4 meters and equiped with 4000 fibers. Using the LAMOST telescope, one could make redshift survey of the large scale structure (LSS). The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) features in the LSS power spectrum provide standard rulers for measuring dark energy and other cosmological parameters. In this paper we investigate the meaurement pr...

  5. Experimental investigation of air pressure and acoustic characteristics of human voice. Part 1: Measurement in vivo

    Horáček, Jaromír; Radolf, Vojtěch; Bula, Vítězslav; Veselý, Jan; Laukkanen, A. M.

    Prague : ITAM AS CR, v. v. i., 2012 - (Náprstek, J.; Fischer, C.), s. 403-417 ISBN 978-80-86246-40-6. [Engineering Mechanics 2012 /18./. Svratka (CZ), 14.05.2012-17.05.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/12/1306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : biomechanics of voice * measurement of oral pressure * voice exercises * phonation into tubes Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  6. Continuous measurements of discharge from a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler in a tidal river

    A. J. F. Hoitink; F. A. Buschman; Vermeulen, B.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can be mounted horizontally at a river bank, yielding single-depth horizontal array observations of velocity across the river. This paper presents a semideterministic, semistochastic method to obtain continuous measurements of discharge from horizontal ADCP (HADCP) data in a tidal river. In the deterministic part, single-depth velocity data are converted to specific discharge by applying the law of the wall, which requires knowledge of local values o...

  7. Constraints on dark energy models from radial baryon acoustic scale measurements

    Samushia, Lado; Ratra, Bharat

    2008-01-01

    We use the radial baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements of Gaztanaga et al. (2008) to constrain parameters of dark energy models. These constraints are comparable with constraints from other "non-radial" BAO data. The radial BAO data are consistent with the time-independent cosmological constant model but do not rule out time-varying dark energy. When we combine radial BAO and the Kowalski et al. (2008) Union type Ia supernova data we get very tight constraints on dark energy.

  8. Application of Wavelet Packet Analysis to the Measurement of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation

    Kadowaki, Kevin; Garcia, Noel; Ford, Taurean; Pando, Jesus; SDSS-FAST Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We develop a method of wavelet packet analysis to measure the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) peak and apply this method to the CMASS galaxy catalog from the SDSS Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) collaboration. We compare our results to a fiducial ?CDM flat cosmological model and detect a BAO signature in the power spectrum comparable to the previous consensus results of the BOSS collaboration. We find DA = 1365rd /rd , fid at z = . 54 . Member ID Forthcoming.

  9. Measurements of body protein for clinical investigation

    Body protein (nitrogen) is determined by bilaterally irradiating the body with neutrons using Pu-Be sources and measuring the resultant 10.8 MeV gamma rays from the reaction 14N(n,8) 15N. In the authors lab the whole body can be scanned or separate segments of the body can be measured independently. A nitrogen index has been developed based on body size and is used as a predictor of normal total body nitrogen (TBN). They have found that TBN, when normalized to body size in this way, provides a reliable index of protein status which cannot be accurately determined by body weight, anthropometry, or body potassium measurements. Changes in body composition with age were studied by measuring the composition of 56 healthy female volunteers aged 20-80. Measurements were made for K(40K), Ca and N. It was shown that protein and bone mineral decrease with age but that this is not reflected in K or anthropometry measurements. Results of other studies to be presented include: body protein measurements pre and post TPN (total parenteral nutrition), nutritional status of patients on long term CAPD (continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis) and changes in body composition as a result of TPN in patients with small cell lung cancer receiving chemotherapy. Clinical results show that indirect measurements of body protein based on weight, potassium, or anthropometry, do not give an accurate measure of body protein. For an accurate measurement, direct measurement of body protein is necessary

  10. The Application of Acoustic Measurements and Audio Recordings for Diagnosis of In-Flight Hardware Anomalies

    Welsh, David; Denham, Samuel; Allen, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    In many cases, an initial symptom of hardware malfunction is unusual or unexpected acoustic noise. Many industries such as automotive, heating and air conditioning, and petro-chemical processing use noise and vibration data along with rotating machinery analysis techniques to identify noise sources and correct hardware defects. The NASA/Johnson Space Center Acoustics Office monitors the acoustic environment of the International Space Station (ISS) through periodic sound level measurement surveys. Trending of the sound level measurement survey results can identify in-flight hardware anomalies. The crew of the ISS also serves as a "detection tool" in identifying unusual hardware noises; in these cases the spectral analysis of audio recordings made on orbit can be used to identify hardware defects that are related to rotating components such as fans, pumps, and compressors. In this paper, three examples of the use of sound level measurements and audio recordings for the diagnosis of in-flight hardware anomalies are discussed: identification of blocked inter-module ventilation (IMV) ducts, diagnosis of abnormal ISS Crew Quarters rack exhaust fan noise, and the identification and replacement of a defective flywheel assembly in the Treadmill with Vibration Isolation (TVIS) hardware. In each of these examples, crew time was saved by identifying the off nominal component or condition that existed and in directing in-flight maintenance activities to address and correct each of these problems.

  11. The measurement of rain kinetic energy and rain intensity using an acoustic disdrometer

    Microwave engineers and geomorphologists require rainfall data with a much greater temporal resolution and a better representation of the numbers of large raindrops than is available from current commercial instruments. This paper describes an acoustic instrument that determines rain parameters from the sound of raindrops falling into a tank of water. There is a direct relationship between the kinetic energy (KE) of a raindrop and the acoustic energy that it creates upon impact. Rain KE flux density is estimated from measurements of the sound field in the tank, and these have been compared to measurements from a co-sited commercial disdrometer. Eight months of data have been collected in the eastern UK. Comparisons of rain KE estimated by the two instruments are presented and links between the KE and rainfall intensity are discussed. The sampling errors of the two instruments are analysed to show that the acoustic instrument can produce rain KE measurements with a 1 s integration time with sampling uncertainty of the same size as commercial instruments using a 1 min integration time

  12. Optimizing stepwise rotation of dodecahedron sound source to improve the accuracy of room acoustic measures.

    Martellotta, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Dodecahedron sound sources are widely used for acoustical measurement purposes as they produce a good approximation of omnidirectional radiation. Evidence shows that such an assumption is acceptable only in the low-frequency range (namely below 1 kHz), while at higher frequencies sound radiation is far from being uniform. In order to improve the accuracy of acoustical measurements obtained from dodecahedron sources, international standard ISO 3382 suggests an averaging of results after a source rotation. This paper investigates the effects of such rotations, both in terms of variations in acoustical parameters and spatial distribution of sound reflections. Taking advantage of a spherical microphone array, the different reflection patterns were mapped as a function of source rotation, showing that some reflections may be considerably attenuated for different aiming directions. This paper investigates the concept of averaging results while changing rotation angles and the minimum number of rotations required to improve the accuracy of the average value. Results show that averages of three measurements carried out at 30° angular steps are closer to actual values and show much less fluctuation. In addition, an averaging of the directional intensity components of the selected responses stabilizes the spatial distribution of the reflections. PMID:23967936

  13. Complete velocity distribution in river cross-sections measured by acoustic instruments

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    To fully understand the hydraulic properties of natural rivers, velocity distribution in the river cross-section should be studied in detail. The measurement task is not straightforward because there is not an instrument that can measure the velocity distribution covering the entire cross-section. Particularly, the velocities in regions near the free surface and in the bottom boundary layer are difficult to measure, and yet the velocity properties in these regions play the most significant role in characterizing the hydraulic properties. To further characterize river hydraulics, two acoustic instruments, namely, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and a "BoogieDopp" (BD) were used on fixed platforms to measure the detailed velocity profiles across the river. Typically, 20 to 25 stations were used to represent a river cross-section. At each station, water velocity profiles were measured independently and/or concurrently by an ADCP and a BD. The measured velocity properties were compared and used in computation of river discharge. In a tow-tank evaluation of a BD, it has been confirmed that BD is capable of measuring water velocity at about 11 cm below the free-surface. Therefore, the surface velocity distribution across the river was extracted from the BD velocity measurements and used to compute the river discharge. These detailed velocity profiles and the composite velocity distribution were used to assess the validity of the classic theories of velocity distributions, conventional river discharge measurement methods, and for estimates of channel bottom roughness.

  14. Clinical utility of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging for identification of malignant liver lesions: a meta-analysis

    To assess the performance of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging for identification of malignant liver lesions using meta-analysis. PubMed, the Cochrane Library, the ISI Web of Knowledge and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched. The studies published in English or Chinese relating to evaluation accuracy of ARFI imaging for identification of malignant liver lesions were collected. A hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic (HSROC) curve was used to examine the ARFI imaging accuracy. Clinical utility of ARFI imaging for identification of malignant liver lesions was evaluated by Fagan plot analysis. A total of eight studies which included 590 liver lesions were analysed. The summary sensitivity and specificity for identification of malignant liver lesions were 0.86 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.74-0.93) and 0.89 (95 % CI 0.81-0.94), respectively. The HSROC was 0.94 (95 % CI 0.91-0.96). After ARFI imaging results over the cut-off value for malignant liver lesions (''positive'' result), the corresponding post-test probability for the presence (if pre-test probability was 50 %) was 89 %; in ''negative'' measurement, the post-test probability was 13 %. ARFI imaging has a high accuracy in the classification of liver lesions. (orig.)

  15. Acoustic measurement method of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Measuring fluxes (volume, chemical, heat, etc.) of the deep sea hydrothermal vents has been a crucial but challenging task faced by the scientific community since the discovery of the vent systems. However, the great depths and complexities of the hydrothermal vents make traditional sampling methods laborious and almost daunting missions. Furthermore, the samples, in most cases both sparse in space and sporadic in time, are hardly enough to provide a result with moderate uncertainty. In September 2010, our Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar System (COVIS, http://vizlab.rutgers.edu/AcoustImag/covis.html) was connected to the Neptune Canada underwater ocean observatory network (http://www.neptunecanada.ca) at the Main Endeavour vent field on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. During the experiment, the COVIS system produced 3D images of the buoyant plume discharged from the vent complex Grotto by measuring the back-scattering intensity of the acoustic signal. Building on the methodology developed in our previous work, the vertical flow velocity of the plume is estimated from the Doppler shift of the acoustic signal using geometric correction to compensate for the ambient horizontal currents. A Gaussian distribution curve is fitted to the horizontal back-scattering intensity profile to determine the back-scattering intensity at the boundary of the plume. Such a boundary value is used as the threshold in a window function for separating the plume from background signal. Finally, the volume flux is obtained by integrating the resulting 2D vertical velocity profile over the horizontal cross-section of the plume. In this presentation, we discuss preliminary results from the COVIS experiment. In addition, several alternative approaches are applied to determination of the accuracy of the estimated plume vertical velocity in the absence of direct measurements. First, the results from our previous experiment (conducted in 2000 at the same vent complex using a

  16. Combined surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance measurement of collagen and fibrinogen layers

    Friedt, J M; Francis, L; Zhou, C; Campitelli, A; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Denis, Frederic; Francis, Laurent; Zhou, Cheng; Campitelli, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    We use an instrument combining optical (surface plasmon resonance) and acoustic (Love mode acoustic wave device) real-time measurements on a same surface for the identification of water content in collagen and fibrinogen protein layers. After calibration of the surface acoustic wave device sensitivity by copper electrodeposition, the bound mass and its physical properties -- density and optical index -- are extracted from the complementary measurement techniques and lead to thickness and water ratio values compatible with the observed signal shifts. Such results are especially usefully for protein layers with a high water content as shown here for collagen on an hydrophobic surface. We obtain the following results: collagen layers include 70+/-20 % water and are 16+/-3 to 19+/-3 nm thick for bulk concentrations ranging from 30 to 300 ug/ml. Fibrinogen layers include 50+/-10 % water for layer thicknesses in the 6+/-1.5 to 13+/-2 nm range when the bulk concentration is in the 46 to 460 ug/ml range.

  17. Acoustic measurements for the combustion diagnosis of diesel engines fuelled with biodiesels

    Zhen, Dong; Wang, Tie; Gu, Fengshou; Tesfa, Belachew; Ball, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, an experimental investigation was carried out on the combustion process of a compression ignition (CI) engine running with biodiesel blends under steady state operating conditions. The effects of biodiesel on the combustion process and engine dynamics were analysed for non-intrusive combustion diagnosis based on a four-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection and turbocharged diesel engine. The signals of vibration, acoustic and in-cylinder pressure were measured simultaneously to find their inter-connection for diagnostic feature extraction. It was found that the sound energy level increases with the increase of engine load and speed, and the sound characteristics are closely correlated with the variation of in-cylinder pressure and combustion process. The continuous wavelet transform (CWT) was employed to analyse the non-stationary nature of engine noise in a higher frequency range. Before the wavelet analysis, time synchronous average (TSA) was used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the acoustic signal by suppressing the components which are asynchronous. Based on the root mean square (RMS) values of CWT coefficients, the effects of biodiesel fractions and operating conditions (speed and load) on combustion process and engine dynamics were investigated. The result leads to the potential of airborne acoustic measurements and analysis for engine condition monitoring and fuel quality evaluation.

  18. Design and Instrumentation of a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System

    Zhiqun Deng

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS is an active sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used primarily for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a Measurement and Calibration System (MCS for evaluating the JSATS components, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The MCS consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated MCS has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. The MCS provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The MCS has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS.

  19. Design and instrumentation of a measurement and calibration system for an acoustic telemetry system.

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark; Carlson, Thomas; Eppard, M Brad

    2010-01-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used primarily for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more "fish-friendly" hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a Measurement and Calibration System (MCS) for evaluating the JSATS components, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The MCS consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated MCS has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. The MCS provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The MCS has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS. PMID:22319288

  20. Measurements of the acoustic field on austenitic welds: a way to higher reliability in ultrasonic tests

    In nuclear power plants many of the welds in austenitic tubes have to be inspected by means of ultrasonic techniques. If component-identical test pieces are available, they are used to qualify the ultrasonic test technology. Acoustic field measurements on such test blocks give information whether the beam of the ultrasonic transducer reaches all critical parts of the weld region and which transducer type is best suited. Acoustic fields have been measured at a bimetallic, a V-shaped and a narrow gap weld in test pieces of wall thickness 33, 25 and 17 mm, respectively. Compression wave transducers 45, 60 and 70 and 45 shear wave transducers have been included in the investigation. The results are presented: (1) as acoustic C-scans for one definite probe position, (2) as series of C-scans for the probe moving on a track perpendicular to the weld, (3) as scan along the weld and (4) as effective beam profile. The influence of the scanning electrodynamic probe is also discussed. (orig.)

  1. Acoustic measurements for the combustion diagnosis of diesel engines fuelled with biodiesels

    In this paper, an experimental investigation was carried out on the combustion process of a compression ignition (CI) engine running with biodiesel blends under steady state operating conditions. The effects of biodiesel on the combustion process and engine dynamics were analysed for non-intrusive combustion diagnosis based on a four-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection and turbocharged diesel engine. The signals of vibration, acoustic and in-cylinder pressure were measured simultaneously to find their inter-connection for diagnostic feature extraction. It was found that the sound energy level increases with the increase of engine load and speed, and the sound characteristics are closely correlated with the variation of in-cylinder pressure and combustion process. The continuous wavelet transform (CWT) was employed to analyse the non-stationary nature of engine noise in a higher frequency range. Before the wavelet analysis, time synchronous average (TSA) was used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the acoustic signal by suppressing the components which are asynchronous. Based on the root mean square (RMS) values of CWT coefficients, the effects of biodiesel fractions and operating conditions (speed and load) on combustion process and engine dynamics were investigated. The result leads to the potential of airborne acoustic measurements and analysis for engine condition monitoring and fuel quality evaluation. (paper)

  2. Linear and Nonlinear Acoustic Measurements of Buried Landmines: Detection Schemes Near Resonance

    Sabatier, James M.

    2003-03-01

    Measurements of the acoustic impedance of an anti-personnel and anti-tank plastic, blast-hardened landmines reveal resonances in the frequency range between 100 and 1000 Hz. The top surface resonances are due to its complicated mechanical structure vibrating in air. The lowest mode results from the blast hardened design of the landmine. Typically, a portion or cavity of the landmine is designed to absorb the shock from an explosion that is intended to detonate the landmine but still allow the landmine to trigger its explosive device when a slow steady pressure is applied. The mechanical design of the blast hardened aspects results in a high Q simple harmonic oscillator resonance of the top surface. At higher frequencies the top surface behaves like thin circular plate acoustic modes. When these landmines are buried in soils, the modes are mass loaded. Resonances from measurements of the normal component of the acoustically induced soil surface particle velocity are used for detection schemes. Since the interface between the top plate and the soil responds to pressure fluctuations nonlinearly, characteristics of landmines, the soil, and the interface are rich in nonlinear physics and allow for new methods of landmine detection not previously exploited.

  3. Fish species identification based on its acoustic target strength using in situ measurement

    Raja-Bidin Raja-Hassan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is fish species identification using acoustic target strength (TS. Insitu measurement has been deployed at the South China Sea of Terengganu Malaysia using Furuno FQ-80 Scientific Echo Sounder which included in the research vessel of KK Senangin II. The transducer isplaced 2.8 meter under sea surface while fish put in the net cage under the vessel. TS data have beencollected independently for commercial fish in Malaysia, there are Selar boops (Oxeye scad, Alepesdjedaba (Shrimp scad, Megalaspis cordyla (Torpedo scad, and Decapterus maruadsi/b> (Japanese scad.TS value, depth, and position of specific target have been observed using echogram. TS of every speciesis different although similar size and at the similar range from transducer. Thus, the specific fish specieshas been identified based on its acoustic target strength.

  4. Impact of acoustic velocity structure to measurement of ocean bottom crustal deformation

    Ikuta, R.; Tadokoro, K.; Okuda, T.; Sugimoto, S.; Watanabe, T.; Eto, S.; Ando, M.

    2010-12-01

    We are developing a geodetic method of monitoring crustal deformation under the ocean using kinematic GPS and acoustic ranging. The goal of our research is to achieve sub-centimeter accuracy in measuring oceanic crustal deformation by a very short-time measurement like 10 hours. In this study, we focused on lateral variation of acoustic velocity structure in seawater and introduced an inclined acoustic velocity structure model to improve accuracy of the measurement. We have a few measurement sites along Nankai trough, Japan. In each sites, we deployed a trio of transponders on ocean floor (seafloor benchmark units) within distance comparable with the depth. An ultrasonic signal is generated from a surface vessel drifting over the benchmark unit, which is received and replied by the benchmark unit. In this system, both acoustic velocity structure and the benchmark unit positions were determined simultaneously for the each measurement using a tomographic technique. This tomographic technique was adopted on an assumption that the acoustic velocity structure is horizontally layered and changes only in time, not in space. Ikuta et al., (AGU fall meeting 2009) reported an approach to improve accuracy of benchmark positioning using a new additional assumption. The additional assumption was that the configuration of the transponders trio constituting one benchmark unit does not change. They determined the time evolution of weight center for the fixed transponder triangle between different measurements using all repetitively obtained data sets at once. This is contrasting to the previous method in which each data set for different measurement was solved independently. This assumption worked well in reducing number of unknown parameters. As a result, repeatability of benchmark positioning improved from 5 cm to 3 cm. We conducted numerical experiments synthesizing acoustic travel-time data to evaluate the robustness of this new approach. When acoustic travel-time data is

  5. Measurement of Vertical Temperature Distribution Using a Single Pair of Loudspeaker and Microphone with Acoustic Reflection

    Saito, Ikumi; Mizutani, Koichi; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Kawabe, Satoshi

    2009-07-01

    It is important to maintain an adequate indoor temperature for comfortable working conditions, improvement of the rate of production of farm goods grown in greenhouses, and for saving energy. Thus, it is necessary to measure the temperature distribution to realize efficient air-conditioning systems. However, we have to use many conventional instruments to measure the temperature distribution. We proposed a measurement system for vertical temperature distribution using a single pair of loudspeaker (SP) and microphone (MIC), and acoustic reflectors. This system consists of SP, MIC, and multiple acoustic reflectors, and it can be used to determine the temperature distribution from the mean temperature of the area bounded by two reflectors. In experiments, the vertical temperature distribution was measured using five sound probes in a large facility every 20 s for 24 h. From the results of this experiment, it was verified that this system can be used to measure the vertical temperature distribution from the mean temperature of each area bounded by two reflectors. This system could be used to measure the change in the temperature distribution over time. We constructed a simple system to measure the vertical temperature distribution.

  6. Twin-tube practical acoustic thermometry: theory and measurements up to 1000 °C

    Sutton, G.; Edwards, G.; Veltcheva, R.; de Podesta, M.

    2015-08-01

    We present details of a Practical Acoustic Thermometer (PAT), in which temperature is inferred from measurements of the speed of sound along acoustic waveguides. We describe both the theory of operation, and measurements on three devices at temperatures up to 1000 °C. Because the relationship between the speed of sound in a simple gas and absolute temperature is well understood, the mean temperature along a tube may be estimated from measurements of the frequency-dependent propagation constant. A PAT device made from two tubes of different lengths allows the temperature measurement region to be localised, creating an instrument functionally similar to conventional contact thermometers. Three twin-tube PAT devices were constructed and tested. PAT-A, made of silica, served to validate the technique with differences between the acoustic thermometer and a reference thermocouple of less than 2 °C at temperatures in the range from 100 °C to 1000 °C. PAT-B and PAT-C were made of Inconel-600, potentially more suitable for use in harsh environments. The Inconel devices deviated from expected behaviour in a reproducible manner, which after calibration allowed measurements with errors of less than  ±1 °C in the range to 700 °C. No drift was observed up to 700 °C. The drift observed during prolonged exposure to higher temperatures is described and its likely causes discussed. In the longer term, similar technology may provide a means for the measurement of temperature in harsh environments such as those found in the nuclear industry.

  7. Measuring acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis using a simple and rapid light-intensity method

    Barnkob, Rune; Iranmanesh, Ida; Wiklund, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and rapid method for measuring the acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis based on light-intensity measurements of a suspension of particles. The method relies on the assumption that each particle in the suspension undergoes single-particle acoustophoresis. It...... is validated by the single-particle tracking method, and we show by proper re-scaling that the re-scaled light intensity plotted versus re-scaled time falls on a universal curve. The method allows for analysis of moderate-resolution images in the concentration range encountered in typical experiments...

  8. The influence of phonetic context and formant measurement location on acoustic vowel space

    Turner, Greg S.; Hutchings, David T.; Sylvester, Betsy; Weismer, Gary

    2003-04-01

    One way of depicting vowel production is by describing vowels within an F1/F2 acoustic vowel space. This acoustic measure illustrates the dispersion of F1 and F2 values at a specific moment in time (e.g., the temporal midpoint of a vowel) for the vowels of a given language. This measure has recently been used to portray vowel production in individuals with communication disorders such as dysarthria and is moderately related to the severity of the speech disorder. Studies aimed at identifying influential factors effecting measurement stability of vowel space have yet to be completed. The focus of the present study is to evaluate the influence of phonetic context and spectral measurement location on vowel space in a group of neurologically normal American English speakers. For this study, vowel space was defined in terms of the dispersion of the four corner vowels produced within a CVC syllable frame, where C includes six stop consonants in all possible combinations with each vowel. Spectral measures were made at the midpoint and formant extremes of the vowels. A discussion will focus on individual and group variation in vowel space as a function of phonetic context and temporal measurement location.

  9. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube

    William J Murphy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF. Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB, 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs ® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL.

  10. Acoustic Noise Levels of Dental Equipments and Its Association with Fear and Annoyance Levels among Patients Attending Different Dental Clinic Setups in Jaipur, India

    Ganta, Shravani; Nagaraj, Anup; Pareek, Sonia; Atri, Mansi; Singh, Kushpal; Sidiq, Mohsin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Noise is a source of pervasive occupational hazard for practicing dentists and the patients. The sources of dental sounds by various dental equipments can pose as a potential hazard to hearing system and add to the annoyance levels of the patients. The aim of the study was to analyze the noise levels from various equipments and evaluate the effect of acoustic noise stimulus on dental fear and annoyance levels among patients attending different dental clinic setups in Jaipur, India. Methodology: The sampling frame comprised of 180 patients, which included 90 patients attending 10 different private clinics and 90 patients attending a Dental College in Jaipur. The levels of Acoustic Noise Stimulus originating from different equipments were determined using a precision sound level meter/decibulometer. Dental fear among patients was measured using Dental Fear Scale (DFS). Results: Statistical analysis was performed using chi square test and unpaired t-test. The mean background noise levels were found to be maximum in the pre-clinical setup/ laboratory areas (69.23+2.20). Females and the patients attending dental college setup encountered more fear on seeing the drill as compared to the patients attending private clinics (p<0.001). Conclusion: The sources of dental sounds can pose as a potential hazard to hearing system. It was analyzed that the environment in the clinics can directly have an effect on the fear and annoyance levels of patients. Hence it is necessary control the noise from various dental equipments to reduce the fear of patients from visiting a dental clinic. PMID:24959512

  11. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  12. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    Studenski, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.studenski@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xiao Ying; Harrison, Amy S. [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  13. System and method for sonic wave measurements using an acoustic beam source

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2015-08-11

    A method and system for investigating structure near a borehole are described herein. The method includes generating an acoustic beam by an acoustic source; directing at one or more azimuthal angles the acoustic beam towards a selected location in a vicinity of a borehole; receiving at one or more receivers an acoustic signal, the acoustic signal originating from a reflection or a refraction of the acoustic wave by a material at the selected location; and analyzing the received acoustic signal to characterize features of the material around the borehole.

  14. Measurement of pipe wall thinning by ultra acoustic resonance technique using optical fiber

    This is the novel system for Pipe Wall Thickness measurement which is combined EAMT(Electro Magnetic Acoustic Transducer) and Optical Fiber Sensor. The conventional ultrasonic thickness meter is using in pipe wall thickness measurement. However, it is necessary to remove a heat insulator from pipe line. A characteristic of this novel system is that it is possible to measure without removing a heat insulator and on-line monitoring, because of measurement probe is attached between pipe surface and heat insulator. As a result of measured with this system, we could measure 30 mm thickness of carbon and stainless steel at the maximum and pipe specimen of elbow shape. Heat-resistant characteristic confirmed at 200 degrees C until about 7000 hours. (author)

  15. Angular measurement of acoustic reflection coefficients by the inversion of V(z, t) data with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy

    Chen, Jian; Bai, Xiaolong; Yang, Keji; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2012-01-01

    For inspection of mechanical properties and integrity of critical components such as integrated circuits or composite materials by acoustic methodology, it is imperative to evaluate their acoustic reflection coefficients, which are in close correlation with the elastic properties, thickness, density, and attenuation and interface adhesion of these layered structures. An experimental method based on angular spectrum to evaluate the acoustic coefficient as a function of the incident angle, θ, and frequency, ω, is presented with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy. In order to achieve a high spatial resolution for evaluation of thin plates with thicknesses about one or two wavelengths, a point focusing transducer with a nominal center frequency of 25 MHz is adopted. By measuring the V(z, t) data in pulse mode, the reflection coefficient, R(θ, ω), can be reconstructed from its two-dimensional spectrum. It brings simplicity to experimental setup and measurement procedure since only single translation of the transducer in the vertical direction is competent for incident angle and frequency acquisition. It overcomes the disadvantages of the conventional methods requiring the spectroscopy for frequency scanning and/or ultrasonic goniometer for angular scanning. Two substrates of aluminum and Plexiglas and four stainless plates with various thicknesses of 100 μm, 150 μm, 200 μm, and 250 μm were applied. The acoustic reflection coefficients are consistent with the corresponding theoretical calculations. It opened the way of non-destructive methodology to evaluate the elastic and geometrical properties of very thin multi-layers structures simultaneously.

  16. Indirect calibration of a large microphone array for in-duct acoustic measurements

    Leclère, Q.; Pereira, A.; Finez, A.; Souchotte, P.

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of in situ calibration of a pin hole-mounted microphone array for in-duct acoustic measurements. One approach is to individually measure the frequency response of each microphone, by submitting the probe to be calibrated and a reference microphone to the same pressure field. Although simple, this task may be very time consuming for large microphone arrays and eventually suffer from lack of access to microphones once they are installed on the test bench. An alternative global calibration procedure is thus proposed in this paper. The approach is based on the fact that the acoustic pressure can be expanded onto an analytically known spatial basis. A projection operator is defined allowing the projection of measurements onto the duct modal basis. The main assumption of the method is that the residual resulting from the difference between actual and projected measurements is mainly dominated by calibration errors. An iterative procedure to estimate the calibration factors of each microphone is proposed and validated through an experimental set-up. In addition, it is shown that the proposed scheme allows an optimization of physical parameters such as the sound speed and parameters associated to the test bench itself, such as the duct radius or the termination reflection coefficient.

  17. Korean Clinic Based Outcome Measure Studies

    Jongbae Park

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence based medicine has become main tools for medical practice. However, conducting a highly ranked in the evidence hierarchy pyramid is not easy or feasible at all times and places. There remains a room for descriptive clinical outcome measure studies with admitting the limit of the intepretation. Aims: Presents three Korean clinic based outcome measure studies with a view to encouraging Korean clinicians to conduct similar studies. Methods: Three studies are presented briefly here including 1 Quality of Life of liver cancer patients after 8 Constitutional acupuncture; 2 Developing a Korean version of Measuring yourself Medical Outcome profile (MYMOP; and 3 Survey on 5 Shu points: a pilot In the first study, we have included 4 primary or secondary liver cancer patients collecting their diagnostic X-ray film and clinical data f개m their hospital, and asked them to fill in the European Organization Research and Treatment of Cancer, Quality of Life Questionnaire before the commencement of the treatment. The acupuncture treatment is set up format but not disclosed yet. The translation and developing a Korean version of outcome measures that is Korean clinician friendly has been sought for MYMOP is one of the most appropriate one. The permission was granted, the translation into Korean was done, then back translated into English only based on the Korean translation by the researcher who is bilingual in both languages. The back translation was compared by the original developer of MYMOP and confirmed usable. In order to test the existence of acupoints and meridians through popular forms of Korean acupuncture regimes, we aim at collecting opinions from 101 Korean clinicians that have used those forms. The questions asked include most effective symptoms, 5 Shu points, points those are least likely to use due to either adverse events or the lack of effectiveness, theoretical reasons for the above proposals, proposing outcome measures

  18. Cystic acoustic neuromas

    Chitkara, Naveen; Chanda, Rakesh; Yadav, S. P. S.; N.K. Sharma

    2002-01-01

    Predominantly cystic acoustic neuromas are rare and they usually present with clinical and radiological features different from their more common solid counterparts. Two cases of cystic acoustic neuromas are reported here.

  19. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... Resources Patient Surveys Related Links Clinical Trials.gov Health Care Insurance Toolkit Additional Resources ANA Public Webinars © 2016 Acoustic Neuroma Association Acoustic Neuroma Association ® • ...

  20. Southeast Alaska Acoustic Measurement Facility (SEAFAC) environmental data base review, evaluation, and upgrade

    Strand, J.A.; Skalski, J.R.; Faulkner, L.L.; Rodman, C.W.; Carlile, D.W.; Ecker, R.M.; Nicholls, A.K.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Scott, M.J.

    1986-04-01

    This report summarizes the principal issues of public concern, the adequacy of the environmental data base to answer the issues of concern, and the additional data collection required to support a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review of the proposed Southeast Alaska Acoustic Measurement Facility (SEAFAC). The report is based on a review of the readily available environmental literature and a site visit. Representatives of local, state, and federal agencies were also interviewed for their personal insights and concerns not discovered during the literature review.

  1. Design and implementation of an efficient acoustically levitated drop reactor for in stillo measurements.

    Field, Christopher R; Scheeline, Alexander

    2007-12-01

    We present the details necessary for building an efficient acoustic drop levitator with reduced electrical power consumption and greater drop stability compared to previous designs. The system is optimized so that the levitated drop may be used as a chemical reactor. By introducing a temperature, pressure, and relative humidity sensor for feedback control of a linear actuator for adjusting resonator length, we have built a completely automated system capable of continuous levitation for extended periods of time. The result is a system capable of portable operation and interfacing with a variety of detection instrumentation for in stillo (in drop) measurements. PMID:18163744

  2. Measuring the distance-redshift relation with the baryon acoustic oscillations of galaxy clusters

    Veropalumbo, A.; Marulli, F.; Moscardini, L.; Moresco, M.; Cimatti, A.

    2016-05-01

    We analyse the largest spectroscopic samples of galaxy clusters to date, and provide observational constraints on the distance-redshift relation from baryon acoustic oscillations. The cluster samples considered in this work have been extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at three median redshifts, z = 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5. The number of objects is 12 910, 42 215 and 11 816, respectively. We detect the peak of baryon acoustic oscillations for all the three samples. The derived distance constraints are rs/DV(z = 0.2) = 0.18 ± 0.01, rs/DV(z = 0.3) = 0.124 ± 0.004 and rs/DV(z = 0.5) = 0.080 ± 0.002. Combining these measurements with the sound horizon scale measured from the cosmic microwave background, we obtain robust constraints on cosmological parameters. Our results are in agreement with the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model. Specifically, we constrain the Hubble constant in a ΛCDM model, H_0 = 64_{-8}^{+17} km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1} , the density of curvature energy, in the oΛCDM context, Ω _K = -0.01_{-0.33}^{+0.34}, and finally the parameter of the dark energy equation of state in the wCDM case, w = -1.06_{-0.52}^{+0.49}. This is the first time the distance-redshift relation has been constrained using only the peak of baryon acoustic oscillations of galaxy clusters.

  3. High accuracy acoustic relative humidity measurement in duct flow with air.

    van Schaik, Wilhelm; Grooten, Mart; Wernaart, Twan; van der Geld, Cees

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH) instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0-12 m/s with an error of ± 0.13 m/s, temperature 0-100 °C with an error of ± 0.07 °C and relative humidity 0-100% with accuracy better than 2 % RH above 50 °C. Main advantage over conventional humidity sensors is the high sensitivity at high RH at temperatures exceeding 50 °C, with accuracy increasing with increasing temperature. The sensors are non-intrusive and resist highly humid environments. PMID:22163610

  4. High Accuracy Acoustic Relative Humidity Measurement inDuct Flow with Air

    Cees van der Geld

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0–12 m/s with an error of ±0.13 m/s, temperature 0–100 °C with an error of ±0.07 °C and relative humidity 0–100% with accuracy better than 2 % RH above 50 °C. Main advantage over conventional humidity sensors is the high sensitivity at high RH at temperatures exceeding 50 °C, with accuracy increasing with increasing temperature. The sensors are non-intrusive and resist highly humid environments.

  5. Investigation of An Acoustic Temperature Transducer and its Application for Heater Temperature Measurement

    Mohammad A.K. Alia

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in temperature measurement have encouraged researchers to develop low-cost, simple structure, computerized generic transducers for environmental monitoring and industrial process control. The research presents a computerized technique which allows to measure temperature according to the variation of acoustic velocity (frequency in a closed waveguide. Signal conditioning and processing was carried out using labVIEW (G Language VIs. In order to evaluate the time characteristic of the transducer its response was compared with that of a reference detector (PT 100 for the same step input. Static characteristics of the transducer show a quasi-linear relationship between the measured temperature and the resonance frequency. Results of practical experiments show that in order to improve the response curve of the transducer and decrease the rising time interval it is advisable to implement thin-wall glass tubes or another material with lower thermal impedance.

  6. Noninvasive Measurement of Acoustic Properties of Fluids Using Ultrasonic Interferometry Technique

    Han, W.; Sinha, D.N.; Springer, K.N.; Lizon, D.C.

    1997-06-15

    A swept-frequency ultrasonic interferometry technique is used for noninvasively determining acoustic properties of fluids inside containers. Measurements over a frequency range 1-15 MHz on six liquid chemicals are presented. Measurements were made with the liquid inside standard rectangular optical glass cells and stainless steel cylindrical shells. A theoretical model based on one-dimensional planar acoustic wave propagation through multi-layered media is employed for the interpretation of the observed resonance (interference) spectrum. Two analytical methods, derived from the transmission model are used for determination of sound speed, sound attenuation coefficient, and density of liquids from the relative amplitude and half-power peak width of the observed resonance peaks. Effects of the container material and geometrical properties, path-length, wall thickness are also studied. This study shows that the interferometry technique and the experimental method developed are capable of accurate determination of sound speed, sound attenuation, and density in fluids completely noninvasively. It is a capable and versatile fluid characterization technique and has many potential NDE applications.

  7. Direct and indirect measurement of rain drop size distributions using an acoustic water tank disdrometer

    Several rain drop size distribution (DSD) point measurement technologies exist, but all are unable to sample either short timescales or the large drop tail of the DSD due to inherent instrumental limitations. The development of an acoustic water tank disdrometer (AWTD) is described, which improves the sampling statistics by increasing the catchment area. This is achieved by distinguishing individual drops, locating them on the surface of the tank then converting the impact pressure into a drop size. Wavelet decomposition is used to distinguish the broadband, short duration impact events and a fast multilateration method is used to position the drop. Issues relating to the different types of noise are also investigated and mitigated. Also, further work on inverting the measured acoustic intensity into a DSD, by fitting sampling distributions, is presented. Six months of data were collected in the Eastern UK. The AWTD then converted the data into DSDs and the results were compared to a commercially available co-located laser precipitation monitor. The sampling errors are far lower due to the increased catchment size, and hence the large drop sized tail of the DSD is greatly improved. DSD results compare favourably to other disdrometers for drop diameters greater than 1.8 mm. Below this size individual drops become increasingly difficult to detect and are underestimated. (paper)

  8. Acoustic and geophysical measurement of infrasound from turbines at wind farms

    Hepburn, H.G. [Hepburn Exploration Inc., Canmore, AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    An experiment was conducted at the Castle River Wind Farm in southern Alberta to measure and characterize infrasound from the turbines. The wind farm contains one 600 MW turbine and fifty-nine 660 MW wind turbines. Three types of sensors were used to measure both the low and high frequency acoustic energy and geophysical sound levels. These included low frequency geophones, acoustic microphones and a precision sound analyzer. Data was recorded for low, medium and high wind states, with the entire wind turbine array operating, and with the entire wind farm stopped. Downwind telemetry measurements were recorded for 30 continuous 50 metre offsets, up to a distance of 1450 metres from the wind farm. The objective of the project was to characterize the ambient noise levels and sound emitted by the turbines. Measurements were taken for wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, atmospheric temperature and turbine related data. Visual observations included atmospheric conditions, extraneous sources of noise such as aircraft, trains, motor vehicle traffic, highway noise, bird song, crickets and the rotational state of the turbines. It was concluded that for studying low frequency sound, the linear dB scale should be used instead of the dBA scale. Measurements of frequencies down to 6.3 Hz, showed that infrasound emission from the Castle River Wind Farm is not a significant concern. Lower frequencies down to about 2.5 Hz also confirmed that infrasound emissions are not significantly above the ambient noise levels. Any infrasound emissions were strongly coupled to the ground and were attenuated quickly. Time domain measurements showed that at all wind speeds and for frequencies up to 270 Hz, wind noise was actually attenuated when the wind farm is in operation. The noise levels were higher when the turbines were not turning. This finding was confirmed through spectral analysis. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 46 figs.

  9. Acoustic measurement of sediment dynamics in the coastal zones using wireless sensor networks

    Sudhakaran, A., II; Paramasivam, A.; Seshachalam, S.; A, C.

    2014-12-01

    Analyzing of the impact of constructive or low energy waves and deconstructive or high energy waves in the ocean are very much significant since they deform the geometry of seashore. The deformation may lead to productive result and also to the end of deteriorate damage. Constructive waves results deposition of sediment which widens the beach where as deconstructive waves results erosion which narrows the beach. Validation of historic sediment transportation and prediction of the direction of movement of seashore is essential to prevent unrecoverable damages by incorporating precautionary measurements to identify the factors that influence sediment transportation if feasible. The objective of this study is to propose a more reliable and energy efficient Information and communication system to model the Coastal Sediment Dynamics. Various factors influencing the sediment drift at a particular region is identified. Consequence of source depth and frequency dependencies of spread pattern in the presence of sediments is modeled. Property of source depth and frequency on sensitivity to values of model parameters are determined. Fundamental physical reasons for these sediment interaction effects are given. Shallow to deep water and internal and external wave model of ocean is obtained intended to get acoustic data assimilation (ADA). Signal processing algorithms are used over the observed data to form a full field acoustic propagation model and construct sound speed profile (SSP). The inversions of data due to uncertainties at various depths are compared. The impact of sediment drift over acoustic data is identified. An energy efficient multipath routing scheme Wireless sensor networks (WSN) is deployed for the well-organized communication of data. The WSN is designed considering increased life time, decreased power consumption, free of threats and attacks. The practical data obtained from the efficient system to model the ocean sediment dynamics are evaluated with remote

  10. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    Drawz, Paul E; ABDALLA, MOHAMED; Rahman, Mahboob

    2012-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk...

  11. Measuring acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis using a simple and rapid light-intensity method.

    Barnkob, Rune; Iranmanesh, Ida; Wiklund, Martin; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-07-01

    We present a simple and rapid method for measuring the acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis based on light-intensity measurements of a suspension of particles. The method relies on the assumption that each particle in the suspension undergoes single-particle acoustophoresis. It is validated by the single-particle tracking method, and we show by proper re-scaling that the re-scaled light intensity plotted versus re-scaled time falls on a universal curve. The method allows for analysis of moderate-resolution images in the concentration range encountered in typical experiments, and it is an attractive alternative to particle tracking and particle image velocimetry for quantifying acoustophoretic performance in microchannels. PMID:22522812

  12. Phased Acoustic Array Measurements of a 5.75 Percent Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft

    Burnside, Nathan J.; Horne, William C.; Elmer, Kevin R.; Cheng, Rui; Brusniak, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Detailed acoustic measurements of the noise from the leading-edge Krueger flap of a 5.75 percent Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft model were recently acquired with a traversing phased microphone array in the AEDC NFAC (Arnold Engineering Development Complex, National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The spatial resolution of the array was sufficient to distinguish between individual support brackets over the full-scale frequency range of 100 to 2875 Hertz. For conditions representative of landing and take-off configuration, the noise from the brackets dominated other sources near the leading edge. Inclusion of flight-like brackets for select conditions highlights the importance of including the correct number of leading-edge high-lift device brackets with sufficient scale and fidelity. These measurements will support the development of new predictive models.

  13. Measurement of the acoustic-to-optical phonon coupling in multicomponent systems

    Caretta, Antonio; Donker, Michiel C.; Perdok, Diederik W.; Abbaszadeh, Davood; Polyakov, Alexey O.; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Palstra, Thomas T. M.; van Loosdrecht, Paul H. M.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the acoustic-to-optical up-conversion phonon processes in a multicomponent system. These processes take place during heat transport and limit the efficiency of heat flow. By combining time-resolved optical and heat capacity experiments we quantify the thermal coupling constant to be g ˜0.4 1017 W/Km3 . The method is based on selective excitation of a part of a multicomponent system, and the measurement of the thermalization dynamics by probing the linear birefringence of the sample with femtosecond resolution. In particular, we study a layered multiferroic organic-inorganic hybrid, in the vicinity of the ferroelectric phase transition. A diverging term of the heat capacity is associated to soft-mode dynamics, in agreement with previous spectroscopy measurements.

  14. Digital image processing of sectorial oscillations for acoustically levitated drops and surface tension measurement

    2010-01-01

    A type of non-axisymmetric oscillations of acoustically levitated drops is excited by modulating the ultrasound field at proper frequencies. These oscillations are recorded by a high speed camera and analyzed with a digital image processing method. They are demonstrated to be the third mode sectorial oscillations, and their frequencies are found to decrease with the increase of equatorial radius of the drops, which can be described by a modified Rayleigh equation. These oscillations decay exponentially after the cessation of ultrasound field modulation. The decaying rates agree reasonably with Lamb’s prediction. The rotating rate of the drops accompanying the shape oscillations is found to be less than 1.5 rounds per second. The surface tension of aqueous ethanol has been measured according to the modified Rayleigh equation. The results agree well with previous reports, which demonstrates the possible application of this kind of sectorial oscillations in noncontact measurement of liquid surface tension.

  15. An innovative acoustic sensor for in-pile fission gas composition measurements

    In this article we propose a new method able to determine the fission gas composition using in situ ultrasonic waves measurements. To do so an acoustic resonator was connected to a fuel rodlet, in order to perform speed of sound measurements of gas mixture (Helium and fission gases) inside the plenum. By using a dedicated signal processing the peaks due to resonant frequencies inside the gas mixture were successfully extracted from the output signal. From these data, the variations of helium and fission gas molar fraction were calculated using an adapted virial state equation. It will be proved that these data provide important information about the kinetics of gas release and about the effects of high neutron and gamma irradiation on piezo-ceramic sensors. (authors)

  16. Electrical Resistance and Acoustic Emission Measurements for Monitoring the Structural Behavior of CFRP Laminate

    Zhou, Wei

    2015-07-12

    Electrical resistance and acoustic emission (AE) measurement are jointly used to monitor the degradation in CFRP laminates subjected to tensile tests. The objective of this thesis is to perform a synergertic analysis between a passive and an active methods to better access how these perform when used for Structural Health Moni- toring (SHM). Laminates with three different stacking sequences: [0]4, [02/902]s and [+45/ − 45]2s are subjected to monotonic and cyclic tensile tests. In each laminate, we carefully investigate which mechanisms of degradation can or cannot be detect- ed by each technique. It is shown that most often, that acoustic emission signals start before any electrical detection is possible. This is is explained based on the redundance of the electrical network that makes it less sensitive to localized damages. Based on in depth study of AE signals clustering, a new classification is proposed to recognize the different damage mechanims based on only two parameters: the RA (rise time/amplitude) and the duration of the signal.

  17. Laboratory acoustic measurements of the attenuation factor Q in petroleum reservoirs during simulated pore pressure reduction

    Donald, A.; Frempong, P.; Butt, S. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, NS (Canada); Nouri, A. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, NS (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2003-07-01

    The relationship between seismic attenuation and mechanical changes in rock structure caused by pressure depletion encountered during the producing life of a hydrocarbon reservoir has not been the focus of many research efforts to date. This paper describes a series of time lapsed acoustic measurements that were conducted on saturated synthetic and reservoir rock under in-situ stress and pore pressure conditions. A weakly consolidated synthetic sandstone specimen and a stronger natural Cheverie sandstone were placed in a triaxial loading cell where axial and confining pressures were maintained constant and pore pressure reductions were applied to induce volumetric pore collapse. During the entire test, acoustic sensors, which had been placed on the apparatus, were subjected to high frequency compressional waves pulsed through the structure and sample. Throughout the test, the authors examined the seismic quality attenuation factor Q, and calculated over a broad frequency range. The proportional relationship between Q and effective stress from past studies was verified by the experimental results obtained. At the point of accelerated mechanical deformation, Q values decreased suddenly. They were proportional to the rate of change in pore volume within the specimen during pore pressure reduction. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  18. High-Frequency CTD Measurements for Accurate GPS/acoustic Sea-floor Crustal Deformation Measurement System

    Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Taniguchi, S.; Uemura, Y.; Matsuhiro, K.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement system has developed as a useful tool to observe tectonic deformation especially at subduction zones. One of the factors preventing accurate GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement is horizontal heterogeneity of sound speed in the ocean. It is therefore necessary to measure the gradient directly from sound speed structure. We report results of high-frequency CTD measurements using Underway CTD (UCTD) in the Kuroshio region. We perform the UCTD measurements on May 2nd, 2015 at two stations (TCA and TOA) above the sea-floor benchmarks installed across the Nankai Trough, off the south-east of Kii Peninsula, middle Japan. The number of measurement points is six at each station along circles with a diameter of 1.8 nautical miles around the sea-floor benchmark. The stations TCA and TOA are located on the edge and the interior of the Kuroshio current, respectively, judging from difference in sea water density measured at the two stations, as well as a satellite image of sea-surface temperature distribution. We detect a sound speed gradient of high speeds in the southern part and low speeds in the northern part at the two stations. At the TCA station, the gradient is noticeable down to 300 m in depth; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 5 m/s. The sound speed difference is as small as +/- 1.3 m/s at depths below 300 m, which causes seafloor benchmark positioning error as large as 1 m. At the TOA station, the gradient is extremely small down to 100 m in depth. The maximum difference in sound speed is less than +/- 0.3 m/s that is negligible small for seafloor benchmark positioning error. Clear gradient of high speed is observed to the depths; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 0.8-0.9 m/s, causing seafloor benchmark positioning error of several tens centimeters. The UCTD measurement is effective tool to detect sound speed gradient. We establish a method for accurate sea

  19. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.; Ni, Qingwen; Collier, Hughbert A.

    2000-09-22

    This report contains eight sections. Some individual subsections contain lists of references as well as figures and conclusions when appropriate. The first section includes the introduction and summary of the first-year project efforts. The next section describes the results of the project tasks: (1) implementation of theoretical relations between effect dispersion and the stochastic medium, (2) imaging analyses using core and well log data, (3) construction of dispersion and attenuation models at the core and borehole scales in poroelastic media, (4) petrophysics and a catalog of core and well log data from Siberia Ridge field, (5) acoustic/geotechnical measurements and CT imaging of core samples from Florida carbonates, and (6) development of an algorithm to predict pore size distribution from NMR core data. The last section includes a summary of accomplishments, technology transfer activities and follow-on work for Phase II.

  20. Acoustic-seismic monitoring of an underground final repository - a measurement project

    When spent fuel from nuclear power plants is deposited without reprocessing, the produced plutonium - which could be used for nuclear weapons - is still contained in it. Thus, safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are needed for final repositories to detect potential access, during and after the emplacement phase. To find out if acoustic and seismic methods can be used to detect undeclared activities in an underground repository in salt, the German Support Programme for the IAEA has tasked us to do measurements in the exploratory mine in Gorleben, a potential site. To gain the source properties we record sound and vibration at several positions underground and at the surface while various mining activities are carried out singly and in parallel. The evaluations will investigate source detection, localisation and recognition.

  1. The effect of two different rooms on acoustical and perceptual measures of SATB choir sound

    Hom, Kathryn S.

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of two different rooms (choir rehearsal room, performance hall) on acoustical (LTAS, one-third octave bands) and perceptual (singer [N = 11] survey, listener [N = 33] survey, Pitch Analyzer 2.1) measures of soprano, alto, tenor, and bass (SATB) choir sound. Primary findings of this investigation indicated: (a) significant differences in spectral energy comparisons of choir sound between rooms, (b) choristers' perceptions of hearing and monitoring their own voices differed significantly depending on room, (c) most choristers (82%) perceived that the choir performed best within the Performance Hall, (d) perceived pitch of selected sung vowels within recordings differed significantly based on room conditions, (e) 97% of listeners perceived a difference in choir sound between room recordings, and (f) most listeners (91%) indicated preference for the Rehearsal Room recording.

  2. Measurement of the open porosity of agricultural soils with acoustic waves

    Luong, Jeanne; Mercatoris, Benoit; Destain, Marie-France

    2015-04-01

    soil, since there are more voids filled with air and water, increasing the viscous losses. Fellah et al. (2003) showed that porosity can be determined from phase speed and reflection coefficient. The propagation of acoustic waves in soil is investigated to develop a rapid method for the quantification of the porosity level of agricultural soils. In the present contribution, correlations are determined between the acoustic signatures of agricultural soil in function of its structural properties. In laboratory, compression tests are performed on unsaturated soil samples to reproduce different porosity levels. Ultrasonic pulses are sent through the considered samples. The propagated signals are treated in both time and frequency domains in order to determine the speed of the phase velocity and the reflection. Porosity is then determined and compared with water content measured by gravimetric method. Alaoui, A., Lipiec, J. & Gerke, H.H., 2011. A review of the changes in the soil pore system due to soil deformation: A hydrodynamic perspective. Soil and Tillage Research, 115-116, pp.1-15. Fellah Z.E.A., Berger S., Lauriks W., Depollier C., Aristegui C., Chapelon J.Y., 2003. Measuring the porosity and the tortuosity of porous materials via reflected waves at oblique incidence. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 113 (5), pp 2424-2433 Hamza, M.A. & Anderson, W.K., 2005. Soil compaction in cropping systems. Soil and Tillage Research, 82(2), pp.121-145. Lu, Z., 2005. Role of hysteresis in propagating acousitcs waves in soils. Geophysical Research Letter, pp.32:1-4. Lu, Z., Hickey, C.J. & Sabatier, J.M., 2004. Effects of compaction on the acoustic velocity in soils. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 68(1), pp.7-16. Lu, Z. & Sabatier, J.M., 2009. Effects of soil water potential and moisture content on sound speed. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 73(5), pp.1614-1625. Le Maitre, D.C., Kotzee, I.M. & O'Farrell, P.J., 2014. Impacts of land-cover change on

  3. Correcting acoustic Doppler current profiler discharge measurements biased by sediment transport

    Mueller, D.S.; Wagner, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) is attributed to the movement of sediment on or near the streambed, and is an issue widely acknowledged by the scientific community. The integration of a differentially corrected global positioning system (DGPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic bias associated with a moving bed. DGPS, however, cannot provide consistently accurate positions because of multipath errors and satellite signal reception problems on waterways with dense tree canopy along the banks, in deep valleys or canyons, and near bridges. An alternative method of correcting for the moving-bed bias, based on the closure error resulting from a two-way crossing of the river, is presented. The uncertainty in the mean moving-bed velocity measured by the loop method is shown to be approximately 0.6cm/s. For the 13 field measurements presented, the loop method resulted in corrected discharges that were within 5% of discharges measured utilizing DGPS to compensate for moving-bed conditions. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  4. Acoustical environment measurement at a very shallow port: Trial case in Hashirimizu Port

    Ogasawara, Hanako; Mori, Kazuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the needs for coastal environment measurement has been increasing for many purposes, such as fishing, weather forecasting, ocean noise measurement for power plants, and coastal security. Acoustical measurement is one of the solutions because it can cover a wide area with few sensors, and it is possible to monitor long term or in real time. In this study, a small-scale reciprocal sound travel experiment was carried out in Hashirimizu Port for coastal environment measurement, such as current speed and water temperature. Since the distance between the surface and the transducer becomes short according to the tidal effect, the direct signal is canceled by the surface-reflected signal under a specific condition. However, even under such a condition, mean water temperature could be estimated from the reciprocal travel time using bottom-reflected signals. The current along the travel path was a reasonable value. It is possible to obtain a special current speed with another reciprocal path, which is in a direction perpendicular to the current travel path.

  5. Temperature compensation of ball surface acoustic wave sensor by two-frequency measurement using undersampling

    Tsuji, Toshihiro; Oizumi, Toru; Takeda, Nobuo; Akao, Shingo; Tsukahara, Yusuke; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2015-07-01

    To realize a practical two-frequency measurement (TFM) system for precise temperature compensation in a ball surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor, the application of undersampling (US) was investigated. The subtraction coefficient for the temperature compensation in US was theoretically explained. The principle of the TFM system using US was simulated by the decimation of the oversampling (OS) waveform after applying a narrow band-pass filter, and the delay time was measured using a wavelet transform. In the application of the method to trace moisture measurement, the delay time response due to US matched that due to OS with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.9999. Although rms noise was increased by US, the response to the concentration change of 4-17 nmol/mol was measured with a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 20. From these results, it was shown that the precise output of the ball SAW sensor could be obtained even when using US, which was equivalent to that using OS.

  6. Measurements of high-frequency acoustic scattering from glacially eroded rock outcrops.

    Olson, Derek R; Lyons, Anthony P; Sæbø, Torstein O

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of acoustic backscattering from glacially eroded rock outcrops were made off the coast of Sandefjord, Norway using a high-frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) system. A method by which scattering strength can be estimated from data collected by a SAS system is detailed, as well as a method to estimate an effective calibration parameter for the system. Scattering strength measurements from very smooth areas of the rock outcrops agree with predictions from both the small-slope approximation and perturbation theory, and range between -33 and -26 dB at 20° grazing angle. Scattering strength measurements from very rough areas of the rock outcrops agree with the sine-squared shape of the empirical Lambertian model and fall between -30 and -20 dB at 20° grazing angle. Both perturbation theory and the small-slope approximation are expected to be inaccurate for the very rough area, and overestimate scattering strength by 8 dB or more for all measurements of very rough surfaces. Supporting characterization of the environment was performed in the form of geoacoustic and roughness parameter estimates. PMID:27106331

  7. Measurements of high-frequency acoustic scattering from glacially-eroded rock outcrops

    Olson, Derek R; Sæbo, Torstein

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of acoustic backscattering from glacially-eroded rock outcrops were made off the coast of Sandefjord, Norway using a high-frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) system. A method by which scattering strength can be estimated from data collected by a SAS system is detailed, as well as a method to estimate an effective calibration parameter for the system. Scattering strength measurements from very smooth areas of the rock outcrops agree with predictions from both the small-slope approximation and perturbation theory, and range between -33 and -26 dB at 20$^\\circ$ grazing angle. Scattering strength measurements from very rough areas of the rock outcrops agree with the sine-squared shape of the empirical Lambertian model and fall between -30 and -20 dB at 20$^\\circ$ grazing angle. Both perturbation theory and the small-slope approximation are expected to be inaccurate for the very rough area, and overestimate scattering strength by 8 dB or more for all measurements of very rough surfaces. Supportin...

  8. Effects of measurement procedure and equipment on average room acoustic measurements

    Gade, Anders Christian; Bradley, J S; Siebein, G W

    1993-01-01

    . In some of the halls measurements were repeated using the procedures of the other teams to make it possible to separate the effects of different equipment and different procedures. The paper will present position-averaged results from the three teams and will discuss reasons for the differences......This paper reports the results of a measurement tour of nine U.S. concert halls. Three measurements teams, from the University of Florida, the National Research Council of Canada, and the Technical University of Denmark, made parallel sets of measurements using their own equipment and procedures...

  9. Particle Filter Based Fault-tolerant ROV Navigation using Hydro-acoustic Position and Doppler Velocity Measurements

    Zhao, Bo; Blanke, Mogens; Skjetne, Roger

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a fault tolerant navigation system for a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). The navigation system uses hydro-acoustic position reference (HPR) and Doppler velocity log (DVL) measurements to achieve an integrated navigation. The fault tolerant functionality is based on a modied p...

  10. Acoustic and Perceptual Measurement of Expressive Prosody in High-Functioning Autism: Increased Pitch Range and What it Means to Listeners

    Nadig, Aparna; Shaw, Holly

    2012-01-01

    Are there consistent markers of atypical prosody in speakers with high functioning autism (HFA) compared to typically-developing speakers? We examined: (1) acoustic measurements of pitch range, mean pitch and speech rate in conversation, (2) perceptual ratings of conversation for these features and overall prosody, and (3) acoustic measurements of…

  11. The application of acoustic emission measurements on laboratory testpieces to large scale pressure vessel monitoring

    A test pressure vessel containing 4 artificial defects was monitored for emission whilst pressure cycling to failure. Testpieces cut from both the failed vessel and from as-rolled plate material were tested in the laboratory. A marked difference in emission characteristics was observed between plate and vessel testpieces. Activity from vessel material was virtually constant after general yield and emission amplitudes were low. Plate testpieces showed maximum activity at general yield and more frequent high amplitude emissions. An attempt has been made to compare the system sensitivities between the pressure vessel test and laboratory tests. In the absence of an absolute calibration device, system sensitivities were estimated using dummy signals generated by the excitation of an emission sensor. The measurements have shown an overall difference in sensitivity between vessel and laboratory tests of approximately 25db. The reduced sensitivity in the vessel test is attributed to a combination of differences in sensors, acoustic couplant, attenuation, and dispersion relative to laboratory tests and the relative significance of these factors is discussed. Signal amplitude analysis of the emissions monitored from laboratory testpieces showed that, whith losses of the order of 25 to 30db, few emissions would be detected from the pressure vessel test. It is concluded that no reliable prediction of acoustic behaviour of a structure may be made from laboratory test unless testpieces of the actual structural material are used. A considerable improvement in detection sensitivity, is also required for reliable detection of defects in low strength ductile materials and an absolute method of system calibration is required between tests

  12. Resource Evaluation and Energy Production Estimate for a Tidal Energy Conversion Installation using Acoustic Flow Measurements

    Gagnon, Ian; Baldwin, Ken; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The ``Living Bridge'' project plans to install a tidal turbine at Memorial Bridge in the Piscataqua River at Portsmouth, NH. A spatio-temporal tidal energy resource assessment was performed using long term bottom-deployed Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers ADCP. Two locations were evaluated: at the planned deployment location and mid-channel. The goal was to determine the amount of available kinetic energy that can be converted into usable electrical energy on the bridge. Changes in available kinetic energy with ebb/flood and spring/neap tidal cycles and electrical energy demand were analyzed. A system model is used to calculate the net energy savings using various tidal generator and battery bank configurations. Differences in the tidal characteristics between the two measurement locations are highlighted. Different resource evaluation methodologies were also analyzed, e.g., using a representative ADCP ``bin'' vs. a more refined, turbine-geometry-specific methodology, and using static bin height vs. bin height that move w.r.t. the free surface throughout a tidal cycle (representative of a bottom-fixed or floating turbine deployment, respectively). ADCP operating frequencies and bin sizes affect the standard deviation of measurements, and measurement uncertainties are evaluated. Supported by NSF-IIP grant 1430260.

  13. Temperature Measurements on Hot Spots of Power Substations Utilizing Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Cavaco, M. A. M.; Benedet, M. E.; Neto, L. R.

    2011-12-01

    In several applications in the field of metrology, the direct connection of the sensor element with the respective signal-processing unit of the measurement system is not trivial. It can be mentioned, as an example, the measurement of hot points in electric power substations because of the high electrical potential. To solve that problem, two alternatives were studied, one using active surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and other using passive SAW tags. For the passive sensor, a SAW radio-frequency identification (RFID) temperature detector was used. That technology is widely applied for typical transport identification (grain transportation, road traffic control), but its application in the field of metrology is innovative. The variation in temperature makes an alteration in the characteristics of the piezoelectric material of the SAW matrix, changing mostly the resonance frequency. Using SAW-RFID, the problem of measuring temperature basically is directed to the identification of the frequency of resonance of the SAW. The use of active SAW sensors has been demonstrated to be much more satisfactory for the solution of such a problem because of the limitation in the range of the passive sensors.

  14. Measurement of the acoustic reflectivity of sirenia (Florida manatees) at 171 kHz.

    Jaffe, Jules S; Simonet, Fernando; Roberts, Paul L D; Bowles, Ann E

    2007-01-01

    The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is an endangered sirenian. At present, its adult population (approximately 2200) seems stable, but tenuous. Manatee-boat collisions are a significant proportion (approximately 25%) of mortalities. Here, the potential use of active sonar for detecting manatees by quantifying sonic reflectivity is explored. In order to estimate reflectivity two methods were used. One method measured live reflections from captive animals using a carefully calibrated acoustic and co-registered optical system. The other method consisted of the analysis of animal tissue in order to obtain estimates of the sound speed and density and to predict reflectivity. The impedance measurement predicts that for a lateral view, the tissue reflectivity is close to 0.13, with a critical grazing angle of 28 degrees. Data measured from live animals indicate that substantial reflections can be recorded, however in many instances observed "empirical target strengths" were less than an experimentally dependent -48-dB threshold. Conclusions favor the hypothesis that the animals reflect substantial amounts of sound; however, the reflections can often be specular, and therefore impractical for observation by a manatee detection sonar operating at 171 kHz. PMID:17297771

  15. Numerical simulation and measurements of acoustic transmissions from Heard Island to the equatorial Indian Ocean

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Navelkar, G.S.; Murty, T.V.R.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Saran, A.K.; Murty, C.S.

    Simulated acoustic propagation showed a gradual deepening of the ray paths from the southern ocean towards tropics. Also the axis of the sound channel deepens from 150 m to 1600 m. Sudden jumps were noticed in the acoustic ray paths in the vicinity...

  16. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED THERMAL-ACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeffrey J. Swetelitsch

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project is to explore microwave-excited thermal-acoustic (META) phenomena for quantitative analysis of granular and powdered materials, with the culmination of the research to be an on-line carbon-in-ash monitor for coal-fired power plants. This technique of analyzing unburned carbon in fly ash could be a less tedious and time consuming method as compared to the traditional LOI manual procedure. Phase 1 of the research focused on off-line single-frequency thermal-acoustic measurements where an off-line fly ash monitor was constructed that could operate as analytical tool to explore instrument and methodology parameters for quantifying the microwave-excited thermal-acoustic effect of carbon in fly ash, and it was determined that the off-line thermal-acoustic technique could predict the carbon content of a random collection of fly ashes with a linear correlation constant of R{sup 2} = 0.778. Much higher correlations are expected for fly ashes generated from a single boiler. Phase 2 of the research developing a methodology to generate microwave spectra of various powders, including fly ash, coal, and inorganic minerals, and to determine if these microwave spectra could be used for chemical analyses. Although different minerals produced different responses, higher resolution microwave spectra would be required to be able to distinguish among minerals. Phase 3 of the research focused on the development of an on-line fly ash monitor that could be adapted to measure either a thermal-acoustic or thermal-elastic response to due microwave excitation of fly ash. The thermal-acoustic response was successfully employed for this purpose but the thermal-elastic response was too weak to yield a useful on-line device.

  17. A Novel Device for Total Acoustic Output Measurement of High Power Transducers

    Howard, S.; Twomey, R.; Morris, H.; Zanelli, C. I.

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a device for ultrasound power measurement applicable over a broad range of medical transducer types, orientations and powers, and which supports automatic measurements to simplify use and minimize errors. Considering all the recommendations from standards such as IEC 61161, an accurate electromagnetic null-balance has been designed for ultrasound power measurements. The sensing element is placed in the water to eliminate errors due to surface tension and water evaporation, and the motion and detection of force is constrained to one axis, to increase immunity to vibration from the floor, water sloshing and water surface waves. A transparent tank was designed so it could easily be submerged in a larger tank to accommodate large transducers or side-firing geometries, and can also be turned upside-down for upward-firing transducers. A vacuum lid allows degassing the water and target in situ. An external control module was designed to operate the sensing/driving loop and to communicate to a local computer for data logging. The sensing algorithm, which incorporates temperature compensation, compares the feedback force needed to cancel the motion for sources in the "on" and "off" states. These two states can be controlled by the control unit or manually by the user, under guidance by a graphical user interface (the system presents measured power live during collection). Software allows calibration to standard weights, or to independently calibrated acoustic sources. The design accommodates a variety of targets, including cone, rubber, brush targets and an oil-filled target for power measurement via buoyancy changes. Measurement examples are presented, including HIFU sources operating at powers from 1 to 100.

  18. Interpretation of acoustic parameters obtained by EMAR measurement for non-destructive hydrogen concentration measurement in Zr alloy

    An obvious quantitative relation between hydrogen concentrations in zirconium alloy and acoustic anisotropy parameters obtained by the electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR) method was reported. To elucidate the mechanism, the acoustic parameters were calculated based on the elastic theory and the equation of motion. The acoustic parameters of obtained by the EMAR method were interpreted quantitatively using the anisotropic elastic constants of the specimen, and value calculated from texture data for non-hydrogen charged specimens showed good agreement with those obtained by the EMAR method. Calculated temperature dependence of the acoustic anisotropy for the non-hydrogen charged specimen also agreed well with that by the EMAR method. The consistencies demonstrated that the absolute values of the acoustic parameters for non-hydrogen charged specimen can be calculated from both the texture data of (0002) pole figure and the elastic constants of the specimen. Hydrogen addition up to approximately 650ppm was found not to change the original (0002) pole figure and, correspondingly, no hydrogen concentration dependence of the acoustic parameters was obtained from the calculation. These results implied that the zirconium hydride itself played an important role for the change in the acoustic parameters of the hydrogen charged specimens, and the importance of obtaining the information on the elastic constants of the zirconium hydride was pointed out. (author)

  19. Vibro-acoustic model of a piezoelectric-based stethoscope for chest sound measurements

    Nelson, G.; Rajamani, R.; Erdman, A.

    2015-09-01

    This article focuses on the influence of noise and vibration on chest sound measurements with a piezoelectric stethoscope. Two types of vibrations, namely inputs through the patient chest and disturbances from the physician, influence the acoustic measurement. The goal of this work is to develop a model to understand the propagation of these vibrational noises through the stethoscope and to the piezoelectric sensing element. Using the model, methods to reduce the influence of disturbances acting on the stethoscope from the physician handling the device are explored. A multi-DOF rigid body vibration model consisting of discrete connected components is developed for the piezoelectric stethoscope. Using a two-port lumped parameter model, the mechanical vibrations are related to the resulting electrical signal. The parameterized state space model is experimentally validated and its parameters are identified by using a thorax simulator and vibration shaker. Based on predictions from the model, the introduction of vibration isolation to reduce the influence of physician noise on the transducer is then pursued. It is shown that direct vibration isolation between the transducer and the rest of the stethoscope structure leads to a reduction in coupling with the patient’s chest. However, if isolation is instead introduced between the transducer housing and the rest of the stethoscope, then vibration isolation from the physician is achieved with far less reduction in patient coupling. Experimental results are presented to study the influence of the proposed design changes and confirm the predicted model behavior.

  20. An assessment of the FlowCapt acoustic sensor for measuring snowdrift in the Indian Himalayas

    R K Das; P Datt; A Acharya

    2012-12-01

    Wind caused snow drifting plays a dominant role in the redistribution of snow mass that restructures a snowpack. Strong wind activity at the mountain tops results in uneven distribution of snow with erosion on windward side and deposition on leeward areas. Such snowdrift events are responsible for the formation of cornices, increase in the loading of avalanche release zones on the leeward side and consequent increase in the level of avalanche hazard. In this paper, we present the results of snowdrift measurement using an acoustic snow-drift meter, the FlowCapt, built by IAV Engineering, which was used during winter seasons of 2007–2010 at a field research station of Snow and Avalanche Study Establishment (SASE) in the western Himalayas. The aim of the study was to evaluate the suitability of the instrument in measuring snowdrift in the Himalayan weather conditions. Results proved the utility of the instrument as a useful tool to study drifting snow in remote areas. However, in the absence of conventional snow gauges for validation, the quality of the absolute snow flux data could not be ascertained.

  1. A Study of Acoustic Reflections in Full-Scale Rotor Low Frequency Noise Measurements Acquired in Wind Tunnels

    Barbely, Natasha L.; Sim, Ben W.; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Goulding, Pat, II

    2010-01-01

    Difficulties in obtaining full-scale rotor low frequency noise measurements in wind tunnels are addressed via residual sound reflections due to non-ideal anechoic wall treatments. Examples illustrated with the Boeing-SMART rotor test in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel facility demonstrated that these reflections introduced distortions in the measured acoustic time histories that are not representative of free-field rotor noise radiation. A simplified reflection analysis, based on the method of images, is used to examine the sound measurement quality in such "less-than-anechoic" environment. Predictions of reflection-adjusted acoustic time histories are qualitatively shown to account for some of the spurious fluctuations observed in wind tunnel noise measurements

  2. Development of an Acoustic Sensor On-Line Gas Temperature Measurement in Gasifiers

    Peter Ariessohn

    2008-06-30

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 2 - Gasification Technologies. The project team includes Enertechnix, Inc. as the main contractor and ConocoPhillips Company as a technical partner, who also provides access to the SG Solutions Gasification Facility (formerly Wabash River Energy Limited), host for the field-testing portion of the research. The objective of this project was to adapt acoustic pyrometer technology to make it suitable for measuring gas temperature inside a coal gasifier, to develop a prototype sensor based on this technology, and to demonstrate its performance through testing on a commercial gasifier. The project was organized in three phases, each of approximately one year duration. The first phase consisted of researching a variety of sound generation and coupling approaches suitable for use with a high pressure process, evaluation of the impact of gas composition variability on the acoustic temperature measurement approach, evaluation of the impact of suspended particles and gas properties on sound attenuation, evaluation of slagging issues and development of concepts to deal with this issue, development and testing of key prototype components to allow selection of the best approaches, and development of a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor that could be tested on an operating gasifier. The second phase consisted of designing and fabricating a series of prototype sensors, testing them in the laboratory, and developing a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor. The third phase consisted of designing and fabricating the field prototype, and testing it in the lab and in a commercial gasifier to demonstrate the ability to obtain accurate measurements of gas temperature in an operating gasifier. Following the completion of the initial 3 year project, several continuations

  3. Cell Deformation by Single-beam Acoustic Trapping: A Promising Tool for Measurements of Cell Mechanics

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Jihun; Park, Jin Man; Lee, Changyang; Jung, Hayong; Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a noncontact single-beam acoustic trapping method for the quantification of the mechanical properties of a single suspended cell with label-free. Experimentally results show that the single-beam acoustic trapping force results in morphological deformation of a trapped cell. While a cancer cell was trapped in an acoustic beam focus, the morphological changes of the immobilized cell were monitored using bright-field imaging. The cell deformability was then compared with that of a trapped polystyrene microbead as a function of the applied acoustic pressure for a better understanding of the relationship between the pressure and degree of cell deformation. Cell deformation was found to become more pronounced as higher pressure levels were applied. Furthermore, to determine if this acoustic trapping method can be exploited in quantifying the cell mechanics in a suspension and in a non-contact manner, the deformability levels of breast cancer cells with different degrees of invasiveness due to acoustic trapping were compared. It was found that highly-invasive breast cancer cells exhibited greater deformability than weakly-invasive breast cancer cells. These results clearly demonstrate that the single-beam acoustic trapping technique is a promising tool for non-contact quantitative assessments of the mechanical properties of single cells in suspensions with label-free.

  4. Uncertainties in acoustical transfer functions : modeling, measurement and derivation of parameters for airborne and structure-borne sound

    Dietrich, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Measured transfer functions of acoustic systems are often used to derive single-number parameters. The uncertainty analysis is commonly focused on the derived parameters but not on the transfer function as the primary quantity. This thesis presents an approach to assess the uncertainty contri- butions in these transfer functions by using analytic models. Uncertainties caused by the measurement method are analyzed with a focus on the un- derlying signal processing. In particular, the influence...

  5. Assessment of Microphone Phased Array for Measuring Launch Vehicle Lift-off Acoustics

    Garcia, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The specific purpose of the present work was to demonstrate the suitability of a microphone phased array for launch acoustics applications via participation in selected firings of the Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test is a part of the discontinued Constellation Program Ares I Project, but the basic understanding gained from this test is expected to help development of the Space Launch System vehicles. Correct identification of sources not only improves the predictive ability, but provides guidance for a quieter design of the launch pad and optimization of the water suppression system. This document contains the results of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center assessment.

  6. Measurement of surface acoustic wave velocity using phase shift mask and application on thin film of thermoelectric material

    Li, Dongyao; Zhao, Peng; Gunning, Noel; Johnson, David; Zhao, Ji-Cheng; Cahill, David

    2014-03-01

    We describe a convenient approach for measuring the velocity vSAW of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) of the near-surface layer of a material through optical pump-probe measurements and apply this method, in combination with conventional picosecond acoustics, to determine a subset of the elastic constants of thin films of semiconducting misfit layered compounds. SAWs with a wavelength of 700 nm are generated and detected using an elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phase-shift mask which is fabricated using a commercially-available Si grating as a mold. The velocity of SAWs of [(SnSe)1.04]m[MoSe2]n synthesized by elemental reactants show subtle variations in their elastic constants as a function of m and n. Precise measurements of elastic constants will enable a better understanding of interfacial stiffness in nanoscale multilayers and the effects of phonon focusing on thermal conductivity.

  7. ESRD - Clinical Performance Measures (CPM) Project

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 4558 (b) of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) requires CMS to develop and implement by January 1, 2000, a method to measure and report the quality of renal...

  8. Three dimensional measurements of Geodesic Acoustic Mode with correlation Doppler reflectometers

    Correlation Doppler reflectometers have been newly developed in the HL-2A Tokamak. Owing to the flexibility of the diagnostic arrangements, the multi-channel systems allow us to study, simultaneously, the radial properties of edge turbulence and its long-range correlation in both the poloidal and toroidal direction. With these reflectometers, three-dimensional spatial structure of Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) is surveyed, including the symmetric feature of Er fluctuations in both poloidal and toroidal directions, and the radial propagation of GAMs. The bi-coherence analysis for the Er fluctuations suggests that the three-wave nonlinear interaction could be the mechanism for the generation of GAM. The temporal evolution of GAM during the plasma density modulation experiments has been studied. The results show that the collisional damping plays a role in suppressing the GAM magnitudes, and hence, weakening the regulating effects of GAM on ambient turbulence. Three dimensional correlation Doppler measurements of GAM activity demonstrate that the newly developed correlation Doppler reflectometers in HL-2A are powerful tools for edge turbulence studies with high reliability. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: ''1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics''

  9. Method for Estimating the Acoustic Pressure in Tissues Using Low-Amplitude Measurements in Water.

    Keravnou, Christina P; Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Averkiou, Michalakis A

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a simple, reliable and reproducible method for accuracy in estimating the acoustic pressure delivered in tissue exposed to ultrasound. Such a method would be useful for therapeutic applications of ultrasound with microbubbles, for example, sonoporation. The method is based on (i) low-amplitude water measurements that are easily made and do not suffer from non-linear propagation effects, and (ii) the attenuation coefficient of the tissue of interest. The range of validity of the extrapolation method for different attenuation and pressure values was evaluated with a non-linear propagation theoretical model. Depending on the specific tissue attenuation, the method produces good estimates of pressures in excess of 10 MPa. Ex vivo machine-perfused pig liver tissue was used to validate the method for source pressures up to 3.5 MPa. The method can be used to estimate the delivered pressure in vivo in diagnostic and therapeutic applications of ultrasound. PMID:26320668

  10. A comparison of airway dimensions, measured by acoustic reflectometry and ultrasound before and after general anaesthesia.

    Ushiroda, J; Inoue, S; Kirita, T; Kawaguchi, M

    2014-12-01

    Changes in airway dimensions can occur during general anaesthesia and surgery for a variety of reasons. This study explored factors associated with postoperative changes in airway dimensions. Patient airway volume was measured by acoustic reflectometory and neck muscle diameter by ultrasound echography in the pre- and post-anaesthetic periods in a total of 281 patients. Neck circumference was also assessed during these periods. A significant decrease in median (IQR [range]) total airway volume (from 63.8 (51.8-75.7 [14.7-103]) ml to 45.9 (33.5-57.2 [6.4-96.3]) ml, p muscle diameter (from 4.3 (3.3-5.6 [2.2-9.0]) mm to 5.8 (4.7-7.3 [2.8-1.3]) mm, p intra-oral space can significantly decrease and neck thickness increase after general anaesthesia, and might increase the risk of difficult laryngoscopy and intubation if airway management is required after extubation following general anaesthesia. PMID:25123382