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Sample records for acoustic chemometrics monitoring

  1. Near infrared and acoustic chemometrics monitoring of volatile fatty acids and dry matter during co-digestion of manure and maize silage

    Lomborg, Carina J.; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr; Esbensen, Kim H.

    2009-01-01

    accuracy) and RPD between 2.8 and 3.6 (acceptable precision). A second experiment employed at-line monitoring with both near infrared spectroscopy and acoustic chemometrics. A larger calibration span was obtained for total solids by spiking. Both process analytical modalities were validated with respect to......In this study, two process analytical technologies, near infrared spectroscopy and acoustic chemometrics, were investigated as means of monitoring a maize silage spiked biogas process. A reactor recirculation loop which enables sampling concomitant with on-line near infrared characterisation was...... applied. Near infrared models resulted in multivariate models for total and volatile solids with ratio of standard error of performance to standard deviation (RPD) values of 5 and 5.1. indicating good on-line monitoring prospects. The volatile fatty acid models had slopes between 0.83 and 0.92 (good...

  2. Acoustic chemometric prediction of total solids in bioslurry

    Ihunegbo, Felicia; Madsen, Michael; Esbensen, Kim;

    2012-01-01

    several earlier dedicated attempts. A full-scale feasibility study based on standard addition experiments involving natural plant biomass was conducted using multivariate calibration (Partial Least Squares Regression, PLS-R) of acoustic signatures against dry matter content (total solids, TS). Prediction...... range of 5.8–10.8% w/w dry matter. Based on these excellent prediction performance measures, it is concluded that acoustic chemometrics has come of age as a full grown PAT approach for on-line monitoring of dry matter (TS) in complex bioslurry, with a promising application potential in other biomass...

  3. Acoustic multivariate condition monitoring - AMCM

    Rosenhave, P.E. [Vestfold College, Maritime Dept., Toensberg (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    In Norway, Vestfold College, Maritime Department presents new opportunities for non-invasive, on- or off-line acoustic monitoring of rotating machinery such as off-shore pumps and diesel engines. New developments within acoustic sensor technology coupled with chemometric data analysis of complex signals now allow condition monitoring of hitherto unavailable flexibility and diagnostic specificity. Chemometrics paired with existing knowledge yields a new and powerful tool for condition monitoring. By the use of multivariate techniques and acoustics it is possible to quantify wear and tear as well as predict the performance of working components in complex machinery. This presentation describes the AMCM method and one result of a feasibility study conducted onboard the LPG/C `Norgas Mariner` owned by Norwegian Gas Carriers as (NGC), Oslo. (orig.) 6 refs.

  4. Acoustic monitoring method and device

    The present invention provides a method of eliminating resonance noises upon acoustically monitoring the operation state of power plants and plant equipments whether they are normal or not, to improve sensitivity for detecting abnormalities. Namely, a microphone detects acoustic signals including leaking sounds and converts them into electric signals. An amplifier amplifies the electric signals to an appropriate level. A noise eliminating section eliminates resonance noises other than the leaking sounds. An abnormality judging section judges presence of abnormality based on the level of the acoustic signals of the leaking sounds. With such a constitution, a plurality of resonance noises generated also during normal plant operation are automatically eliminated. Since resonance noises as a factor of lowering the sensitivity for abnormal sound detection are not included in the acoustic signals, the sensitivity for the abnormal sound detection is improved. Accordingly, the performance of the acoustic monitoring device is improved. (I.S.)

  5. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-07-20

    The Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) has been designed to record and monitor the acoustic signal in natural gas transmission lines. In particular the three acoustic signals associated with a line leak. The system is portable ({approx}30 lbs) and is designed for line pressures up to 1000 psi. It has become apparent that cataloging of the various background acoustic signals in natural gas transmission line is very important if a system to identify leak signals is to be developed. The low-pressure (0-200 psig) laboratory test phase has been completed and a number of field trials have been conducted. Before the cataloging phase could begin, a few problems identified in field trials identified had to be corrected such as: (1) Decreased microphone sensitivity at line pressures above 250 psig. (2) The inability to deal with large data sets collected when cataloging the variety of signals in a transmission line. (3) The lack of an available online acoustic calibration system. These problems have been solved and the WVU PAMP is now fully functional over the entire pressure range found in the Natural Gas transmission lines in this region. Field portability and reliability have been greatly improved. Data collection and storage have also improved to the point were the full acoustic spectrum of acoustic signals can be accurately cataloged, recorded and described.

  6. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    John l. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-07-01

    The 1st generation acoustic monitoring package was designed to detect and analyze weak acoustic signals inside natural gas transmission lines. Besides a microphone it housed a three-inch diameter aerodynamic acoustic signal amplifier to maximize sensitivity to leak induced {Delta}p type signals. The theory and test results of this aerodynamic signal amplifier was described in the master's degree thesis of our Research Assistant Deepak Mehra who is about to graduate. To house such a large three-inch diameter sensor required the use of a steel 300-psi rated 4 inch weld neck flange, which itself weighed already 29 pounds. The completed 1st generation Acoustic Monitoring Package weighed almost 100 pounds. This was too cumbersome to mount in the field, on an access port at a pipeline shut-off valve. Therefore a 2nd generation and truly Portable Acoustic Monitor was built. It incorporated a fully self-contained {Delta}p type signal sensor, rated for line pressures up to 1000 psi with a base weight of only 6 pounds. This is the Rosemont Inc. Model 3051CD-Range 0, software driven sensor, which is believed to have industries best total performance. Its most sensitive unit was purchased with a {Delta}p range from 0 to 3 inch water. This resulted in the herein described 2nd generation: Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) for pipelines up to 1000 psi. Its 32-pound total weight includes an 18-volt battery. Together with a 3 pound laptop with its 4-channel data acquisition card, completes the equipment needed for field acoustic monitoring of natural gas transmission pipelines.

  7. Acoustic emission leak monitoring system LMS-96

    On-line acoustic emission leak monitoring under industrial conditions of nuclear power plants is a problem with specific features setting specific demands on the leak monitoring system. The paper briefly reviews those problems (attenuation pattern of a real structure, acoustic background, alarm system, etc.) and the solution of some of them is discussed. Information is presented on the Acoustic Emission Leak Monitoring System LMS-96 by SKODA NUCLEAR MACHINERY and the system's function is briefly described. (author)

  8. Acoustic transducer for nuclear reactor monitoring

    Disclosed is a transducer to monitor a parameter and produce an acoustic signal from which the monitored parameter can be recovered. The transducer comprises a modified Galton whistle which emits a narrow band acoustic signal having a frequency dependent upon the parameter being monitored, such as the temperature of the cooling media of a nuclear reactor. Multiple locations within a reactor are monitored simultaneously by a remote acoustic receiver by providing a plurality of transducers each designed so that the acoustic signal it emits has a frequency distinct from the frequencies of signals emitted by the other transducers, whereby each signal can be unambiguously related to a particular transducer. 8 claims, 1 figure

  9. Chemometrics and visible-near infrared spectroscopic monitoring of red wine fermentation in a pilot scale.

    Cozzolino, Daniel; Parker, Mango; Dambergs, Robert G; Herderich, Markus; Gishen, Mark

    2006-12-20

    The modern wine industry needs tools for process control and quality assessment in order to better manage fermentation or bottling processes. During wine fermentation it is important to measure both substrate and product concentrations (e.g. sugars, phenolic compounds), however, the analysis of these compounds by traditional means requires sample preparation and in some cases several steps of purification are needed. The combination of visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy and chemometrics potentially provides an ideal solution to accurately and rapidly monitor physical or chemical changes in wine during processing without the need for chemical analysis. The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of combining spectral and multivariate techniques, such as principal component analysis (PCA), discriminant partial least squares (DPLS), or linear discriminant analysis (LDA), to monitor time-related changes that occur during red wine fermentation. Samples (n = 652) were collected at various times from several pilot scale fermentations with grapes from either Cabernet Sauvignon or Shiraz varieties, over three vintages (2001-2003) and scanned using a monochromator instrument (Foss-NIRSystems 6500, Silver Spring, MD) in transmission mode (400-2,500 nm). PCA was used to demonstrate consistent progressive spectral changes that occur through the time course of the fermentation. LDA using PCA scores showed that regardless of variety or vintage, samples belonging to a particular time point in fermentation could be correctly classified. This study demonstrates the potential of Vis/NIR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics, as a tool for the rapid monitoring of red wine fermentation. PMID:16817241

  10. An acoustical model based monitoring network

    Wessels, P.W.; Basten, T.G.H.; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the approach for an acoustical model based monitoring network is demonstrated. This network is capable of reconstructing a noise map, based on the combination of measured sound levels and an acoustic model of the area. By pre-calculating the sound attenuation within the network the noi

  11. Acoustic Monitoring for Spaceflight Vehicle Applications Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR will develop and demonstrate acoustic sensor technology enabling real-time, remotely performed measuring and monitoring of sound pressure levels and noise...

  12. Prototype acoustic resonance spectroscopy monitor

    This report reports on work performed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) through the Program Office for Technical Assistance (POTAS). In this work, we investigate possible applications of nondestructive acoustics measurements to facilitate IAEA safeguards at bulk processing facilities. Two different acoustic techniques for verifying the internal structure of a processing tank were investigated. During this effort we also examined two acoustic techniques for assessing the fill level within a processing tank. The fill-level measurements could be made highly portable and have an added safeguards advantage that they can also detect stratification of fill material. This later application may be particularly useful in confirming the absence of stratification in plutonium processing tanks before accountability samples are withdrawn

  13. Chemometrical exploration of the wet precipitation chemistry from the Austrian Monitoring Network (1988-1999).

    Stanimirova, I; Daszykowski, M; Massart, D L; Questier, F; Simeonov, V; Puxbaum, H

    2005-03-01

    The present paper deals with the application of different chemometric methods to an environmental data set derived from the monitoring of wet precipitation in Austria (1988-1999). These methods are: principal component analysis (PCA); projection pursuit (PP); density-based spatial clustering of application with noise (DBSCAN); ordering points to identify the clustering structures (OPTICS); self-organizing maps (SOM), also called the Kohonen network; and the neural gas (NG) network. The aim of the study is to introduce some new approaches into environmetrics and to compare their usefulness with already existing techniques for the classification and interpretation of environmental data. The density-based approaches give information about the occurrence of natural clusters in the studied data set, which, however, do not occur in the case presented here; information about high-density zones (very similar samples) and extreme samples is also obtained. The partitioning techniques (clustering, but also neural gas and Kohonen networks) offer an opportunity to classify the objects of interest into several defined groups, the patterns of ionic concentration of which can be studied in detail. The visual aids, such as the color map and the Kohonen map, for each site are very helpful in understanding the relationships between samples and between samples and variables. All methods, and in particular projection pursuit, give information about samples with extreme characteristics. PMID:15737459

  14. Distributed acoustic sensing: towards partial discharge monitoring

    Rohwetter, Philipp; Eisermann, René; Krebber, Katerina

    2015-09-01

    We report on the successful application of distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) to the detection of partial discharge (PD). A detection limit of about 1 nC discharge magnitude was achieved for PD in a real-scale model of a high voltage termination. Dedicated ultrasonic fibre-optic transducers were interrogated using coherent optical time-domain Rayleigh backscatter reflectometry (C-OTDR). Random quadrature demodulation was employed for retrieving relevant acoustic information from the raw C-OTDR backscatter traces. To our knowledge, our results are a first-time demonstration that quasi-distributed fibre-optic acoustic sensing is a candidate technology for the acoustic partial discharge monitoring of power cable joints and terminations.

  15. Ultrasonic wavequide sensor for NPP acoustic monitoring

    Design of a waveguide sensor for NPP equipment acoustic testing is considered taking as an example a water coolant steam content monitor designed for application in an active emission-receipt regime. The sensor comprises an acoustic transducer, a waveguide with a suspension and a sensitive element. The transducer includes a disk piezoelement of TsTS-19 ceramics. A longitudinal wave waveguide, produced of a steel wire 0.8-1.2 mm in diameter, can transmit signals within the 50-1000 kHz range. A capillar tube 1.6x0.2 mm in diameter and 200 mm long with sealed ends is used as a sensitive element. The sensor operation is based on determining ultrasonic pulse attennuation in the capillar, which changes depending on acoustic wave resistance of the following-round coolant and depends on steam content. In passive regime the sensor may be applied for acoustic-emission monitoring of various equipment. In this case a matching device, providing for emission signal transmission from the monitored object surface to the waveguide, should be introduced instead of the sensitive element

  16. Sensor combination and chemometric modelling for improved process monitoring in recombinant E. coli fed-batch cultivations.

    Clementschitsch, Franz; Jürgen, Kern; Florentina, Pötschacher; Karl, Bayer

    2005-11-01

    The key objective for the optimisation of recombinant protein production in bacteria is to optimize the exploitation of the host cell's synthesis potential. Recent studies show that the novel concept of transcription rate control allows the tuning of recombinant gene expression in relation to the metabolic capacity of the host cell. To adjust the inducer-biomass ratio to a tolerable level, real-time knowledge about key process variables is paramount. Since there are no reliable online-sensors for key variables such as biomass or recombinant product, it is necessary to relate available online signals to process variables by mathematical models. To improve chemometric modelling of process variables, dielectric spectroscopy and a multi-wavelength online fluorescence sensor for two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy were applied in a series of recombinant Escherichia coli fed-batch cultivations applying two different process operation states. Dielectric spectroscopy signals were closely correlated to biomass, while two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy allowed the monitoring of fluorescent biogenic components. Chemometric modelling of key process variables with two different modelling techniques showed that this sensor combination greatly improved the estimation (i.e. reduce error magnitude) of process variables in recombinant E. coli cultivations, thereby enhancing process monitoring capabilities. PMID:16139381

  17. Acoustic Emission Health Monitoring of Steel Bridges

    Pahlavan, Pooria Lotfollah; Paulissen, Joep; Pijpers, Richard; Hakkesteegt, Henk; Jansen, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive developments in the field of Acoustic Emission (AE) for monitoring fatigue cracks in steel structures, the implementation of AE systems for large-scale bridges is hindered by limitations associated with instrumentation costs and signal processing complexities. This paper sheds light on some of the most important challenges in the utilization of AE systems for steel bridge decks. These challenges are mainly related to the multi-modal character of guided waves, and the expensi...

  18. Acoustic emission monitoring of composite containment systems

    This paper considers two different types of composite containment system, and two different types of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring approach. The first system is a composite reinforced pressure vessel (CRPV) which is monitored both during construction and in-service using a broadband modal acoustic emission (MAE) technique. The second system is a membrane cargo containment system which is monitored using both a global as well as a local AE technique. For the CRPV, the damage assessment is concerned mainly with the integrity of the composite outer layer at the construction stage, and possible fatigue cracking of the inner steel liner at the in-service stage. For the membrane tank, the damage assessment is concerned with locating and quantifying any abnormal porosities that might develop in-service. By comparing and contrasting the different types of structural system and different monitoring approaches inferences are drawn as to what role AE monitoring could take in the damage assessment of other types of composite containment system. (Detailed technical data have not been included, due to client confidentiality constraints.)

  19. Distributed acoustic sensing for pipeline monitoring

    Hill, David; McEwen-King, Magnus [OptaSense, QinetiQ Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Optical fibre is deployed widely across the oil and gas industry. As well as being deployed regularly to provide high bandwidth telecommunications and infrastructure for SCADA it is increasingly being used to sense pressure, temperature and strain along buried pipelines, on subsea pipelines and downhole. In this paper we present results from the latest sensing capability using standard optical fibre to detect acoustic signals along the entire length of a pipeline. In Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) an optical fibre is used for both sensing and telemetry. In this paper we present results from the OptaSense{sup TM} system which has been used to detect third party intervention (TPI) along buried pipelines. In a typical deployment the system is connected to an existing standard single-mode fibre, up to 50km in length, and was used to independently listen to the acoustic / seismic activity at every 10 meter interval. We will show that through the use of advanced array processing of the independent, simultaneously sampled channels it is possible to detect and locate activity within the vicinity of the pipeline and through sophisticated acoustic signal processing to obtain the acoustic signature to classify the type of activity. By combining spare fibre capacity in existing buried fibre optic cables; processing and display techniques commonly found in sonar; and state-of-the-art in fibre-optic distributed acoustic sensing, we will describe the new monitoring capabilities that are available to the pipeline operator. Without the expense of retrofitting sensors to the pipeline, this technology can provide a high performance, rapidly deployable and cost effective method of providing gapless and persistent monitoring of a pipeline. We will show how this approach can be used to detect, classify and locate activity such as; third party interference (including activity indicative of illegal hot tapping); real time tracking of pigs; and leak detection. We will also show how an

  20. Multipurpose Acoustic Sensor for Downhole Fluid Monitoring

    Pantea, Cristian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04

    The projects objectives and purpose are to: (1) development a multipurpose acoustic sensor for downhole fluid monitoring in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) reservoirs over typical ranges of pressures and temperatures and demonstrate its capabilities and performance for different EGS systems; (2) determine in real-time and in a single sensor package several parameters - temperature, pressure, fluid flow and fluid properties; (3) needed in nearly every phase of an EGS project, including Testing of Injection and Production Wells, Reservoir Validation, Inter-well Connectivity, Reservoir Scale Up and Reservoir Sustainability. (4) Current sensors are limited to operating at lower temperatures, but the need is for logging at high temperatures. The present project deals with the development of a novel acoustic-based sensor that can work at temperatures up to 374 C, in inhospitable environments.

  1. Condition Monitoring and Management from Acoustic Emissions

    Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik Bohl

    2005-01-01

    In the following, I will use technical terms without explanation as it gives the freedom to describe the project in a shorter form for those who already know. The thesis is about condition monitoring of large diesel engines from acoustic emission signals. The experiments have been focused on a...... this work is the analysis of the angular position changes of the engine related events such as fuel injection and valve openings, caused by operational load changes. With inspiration from speech recognition and voice effects the angular timing changes have been inverted with the event alignment...

  2. Detection of respiratory compromise by acoustic monitoring, capnography, and brain function monitoring during monitored anesthesia care.

    Tanaka, Pedro P; Tanaka, Maria; Drover, David R

    2014-12-01

    Episodes of apnea in sedated patients represent a risk of respiratory compromise. We hypothesized that acoustic monitoring would be equivalent to capnography for detection of respiratory pauses, with fewer false alarms. In addition, we hypothesized that the patient state index (PSI) would be correlated with the frequency of respiratory pauses and therefore could provide information about the risk of apnea during sedation. Patients undergoing sedation for surgical procedures were monitored for respiration rate using acoustic monitoring and capnography and for depth of sedation using the PSI. A clinician blinded to the acoustic and sedation monitor observed the capnograph and patient to assess sedation and episodes of apnea. Another clinician retrospectively reviewed the capnography and acoustic waveform and sound files to identify true positive and false positive respiratory pauses by each method (reference method). Sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio for detection of respiratory pause was calculated for acoustic monitoring and capnography. The correlation of PSI with respiratory pause events was determined. For the 51 respiratory pauses validated by retrospective analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio positive for detection were 16, 96 %, and 3.5 for clinician observation; 88, 7 %, and 1.0 for capnography; and 55, 87 %, and 4.1 for acoustic monitoring. There was no correlation between PSI and respiratory pause events. Acoustic monitoring had the highest likelihood ratio positive for detection of respiratory pause events compared with capnography and clinician observation and, therefore, may provide the best method for respiration rate monitoring during these procedures. PMID:24420342

  3. Acoustic monitoring techniques for corrosion degradation in cemented waste canisters

    This report describes work carried out to investigate acoustic emission as a monitor of corrosion and degradation of wasteforms where the waste is potentially reactive metal. Electronic monitoring equipment has been designed, built and tested to allow long-term monitoring of a number of waste packages simultaneously. Acoustic monitoring experiments were made on a range of 1 litre cemented Magnox and aluminium samples cast into canisters comparing the acoustic events with hydrogen gas evolution rates and electrochemical corrosion rates. The attenuation of the acoustic signals by the cement grout under a range of conditions has been studied to determine the volume of wasteform that can be satisfactorily monitored by one transducer. The final phase of the programme monitored the acoustic events from full size (200 litre) cemented, inactive, simulated aluminium swarf wastepackages prepared at the AEA waste cementation plant at Winfrith. (Author)

  4. Introducing passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring: Motor bike piston-bore fault identification

    Jena, D. P.; Panigrahi, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    Requirement of designing a sophisticated digital band-pass filter in acoustic based condition monitoring has been eliminated by introducing a passive acoustic filter in the present work. So far, no one has attempted to explore the possibility of implementing passive acoustic filters in acoustic based condition monitoring as a pre-conditioner. In order to enhance the acoustic based condition monitoring, a passive acoustic band-pass filter has been designed and deployed. Towards achieving an efficient band-pass acoustic filter, a generalized design methodology has been proposed to design and optimize the desired acoustic filter using multiple filter components in series. An appropriate objective function has been identified for genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization technique with multiple design constraints. In addition, the sturdiness of the proposed method has been demonstrated in designing a band-pass filter by using an n-branch Quincke tube, a high pass filter and multiple Helmholtz resonators. The performance of the designed acoustic band-pass filter has been shown by investigating the piston-bore defect of a motor-bike using engine noise signature. On the introducing a passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring reveals the enhancement in machine learning based fault identification practice significantly. This is also a first attempt of its own kind.

  5. Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing

    This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results

  6. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Cementitious Wasteforms

    A summary is presented of the potential of non-destructive acoustic emission (AE) method to be applied for structures immobilising nuclear wastes. The use and limitations of the method are discussed with given examples of experimental configurations and results obtained from AE monitoring and data analysis of two different processes addressing particular issues related to the nuclear waste immobilisation. These are (a) corrosion of aluminium, classified as intermediate level waste (ILW) in the UK, encapsulated in cementitious structures and (b) partial melting and solidification during cooling of granite at a pressure of 0.15 GPa which simulates the conditions in a deep borehole disposal of canisters of vitrified high level waste (HLW). Methodology for analysis of the collected data and characterisation of the potential AE sources is performed at different steps including simple signals count and more complex signal parameter-based approach and advanced signal processing. The AE method has been shown as a potential tool for monitoring and inspection of structures immobilising nuclear wastes in relation to the time progress of different interactions of the waste with the encapsulating matrix or the wasteform with the hosting environment for permanent disposal. (author)

  7. Acoustic Monitoring of the Arctic Ice Cap

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Chayes, D. N.

    2012-12-01

    Introduction The monitoring of the Arctic Ice Cap is important economically, tactically, and strategically. In the scenario of ice cap retreat, new paths of commerce open, e.g. waterways from Northern Europe to the Far East. Where ship-going commerce is conducted, the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard have always stood guard and been prepared to assist from acts of nature and of man. It is imperative that in addition to measuring the ice from satellites, e.g. Icesat, that we have an ability to measure the ice extent, its thickness, and roughness. These parameters play an important part in the modeling of the ice and the processes that control its growth or shrinking and its thickness. The proposed system consists of three subsystems. The first subsystem is an acoustic source, the second is an array of geophones and the third is a system to supply energy and transmit the results back to the analysis laboratory. The subsystems are described below. We conclude with a plan on how to tackle this project and the payoff to the ice cap modeler and hence the users, i.e. commerce and defense. System Two historically tested methods to generate a large amplitude multi-frequency sound source include explosives and air guns. A new method developed and tested by the University of Texas, ARL is a combustive Sound Source [Wilson, et al., 1995]. The combustive sound source is a submerged combustion chamber that is filled with the byproducts of the electrolysis of sea water, i.e. Hydrogen and Oxygen, an explosive mixture which is ignited via a spark. Thus, no additional compressors, gases, or explosives need to be transported to the Arctic to generate an acoustic pulse capable of the sediment and the ice. The second subsystem would be geophones capable of listening in the O(10 Hz) range and transmitting that data back to the laboratory. Thus two single arrays of geophones arranged orthogonal to each other with a range of 1000's of kilometers and a combustive sound source where the two

  8. In-situ monitoring of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ITV01 bioethanol process using near-infrared spectroscopy NIRS and chemometrics.

    Corro-Herrera, Víctor Abel; Gómez-Rodríguez, Javier; Hayward-Jones, Patricia Margaret; Barradas-Dermitz, Dulce María; Aguilar-Uscanga, María Guadalupe; Gschaedler-Mathis, Anne Christine

    2016-03-01

    The application feasibility of in-situ or in-line monitoring of S. cerevisiae ITV01 alcoholic fermentation process, employing Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) and Chemometrics, was investigated. During the process in a bioreactor, in the complex analytical matrix, biomass, glucose, ethanol and glycerol determinations were performed by a transflection fiber optic probe immersed in the culture broth and connected to a Near-Infrared (NIR) process analyzer. The NIR spectra recorded between 800 and 2,200 nm were pretreated using Savitzky-Golay smoothing and second derivative in order to perform a partial least squares regression (PLSR) and generate the calibration models. These calibration models were tested by external validation and then used to predict concentrations in batch alcoholic fermentations. The standard errors of calibration (SEC) for biomass, ethanol, glucose and glycerol were 0.212, 0.287, 0.532, and 0.296 g/L and standard errors of prediction (SEP) were 0.323, 0.369, 0.794, and 0.507 g/L, respectively. Calibration and validation criteria were defined and evaluated in order to generate robust and reliable models for an alcoholic fermentation process matrix. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:510-517, 2016. PMID:26743160

  9. Acoustic Signature Monitoring and Management of Naval Platforms

    Basten, T.G.H.; Jong, C.A.F. de; Graafland, F.; Hof, J. van 't

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic signatures make naval platforms susceptible to detection by threat sensors. The variable operational conditions and lifespan of a platform cause variations in the acoustic signature. To deal with these variations, a real time signature monitoring capability is being developed, with advisory

  10. Time Reversal Processing in Acoustic Emission Monitoring

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Krofta, Josef; Farová, Zuzana; Chlada, Milan; Dos Santos, S.

    Singapore, 2013. s. 65-65. [International Congress on ULTRASONICS. 02.05.2013-05.05.2013, Singapore] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : time reveresal * acoustic emission * deconvolution * source identification Subject RIV: JS - Reliability ; Quality Management, Testing

  11. Acoustic monitoring of BWR main steam safety relief valves

    Main steam safety relief valves (SRVs) are important equipment in boiling water reactor plants, so monitoring of leakage and valve opening of SRVs is also important. To detect leakage and valve opening, thermocouples are installed on exhaust pipes and limit switches or position sensors on valve stems. The acoustic detection technique with AE sensors and accelerometers is adopted not only to increase the accuracy and response speed of leak detection, but also to estimate leak rate and to detect valve opening. The acoustic leak detection technique was found effective by the mock-up experiment in which an actual SRV and steam under the same condition as the actual use were used to measure the signals from AE sensors and accelerometers attached to the SRV with artificial cuttings on its thermal disk. The acoustic monitoring tests of SRVs have been carried out at a nuclear power plant to prove the acoustic leak detection technique to be effective. The results of the acoustic monitoring tests at the plant are discussed. As a result of the on-site test, the acoustic leak monitoring system was found effective in the plant

  12. OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR THE PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-08-29

    The Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) has been designed to record and monitor acoustic signals in high-pressure natural gas (NG) transmission lines. Of particular interest are the three acoustic signals associated with a pipeline fracture. The system is portable (less than 30 lbm) and can be used at all line pressures up to 1000 psig. The PAMP requires a shut-off valve equipped 1/2 inch NPT access port in the pipeline. It is fully functional over the typical pressure range found in the natural gas transmission pipelines in the West Virginia, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Ohio areas. With the use of the PAMP, a full spectrum of acoustic signals can be recorded and defined in terms of acoustic energy in decibels. To detect natural gas pipeline infringements and leaks, the acoustic energy generated inside the line is monitored with a sensitive pressure-equalized microphone and a step function type {Delta}p transducer. The assembly is mounted on a 1000 psig pipe fitting-tree called the PAMP. The electronics required to record, store and analyze the data are described within this report in the format of an operating manual.

  13. Ultrasonic waveguide sensor for acoustic monitoring of nuclear power plants

    Waveguide sensors are being increasingly used for acoustic emission monitoring of equipment in nuclear power plants and in systems for acoustic diagnostics of the coolant. In this paper we examine the construction of a waveguide sensor for acoustic monitoring for the example of an impedance sensor for the steam content of water coolant, intended for use in the active emission-reception mode. The dynamic properties of the sensor are determined by the construction and the dimensions of the transducer, and are usually represented by its amplitude-frequency characteristic, which, as a rule, is of the resonance type. The longitudinal-wave waveguide, made from steel wire 0.8-1.2 mm in diameter, can transmit signals in the band 50-1000 kHz. To increase the reliability and the ease of maintenance of the monitoring system the transducer and the waveguide are connected in a detachable manner

  14. Urban air quality assessment using monitoring data of fractionized aerosol samples, chemometrics and meteorological conditions.

    Yotova, Galina I; Tsitouridou, Roxani; Tsakovski, Stefan L; Simeonov, Vasil D

    2016-06-01

    The present article deals with assessment of urban air by using monitoring data for 10 different aerosol fractions (0.015-16 μm) collected at a typical urban site in City of Thessaloniki, Greece. The data set was subject to multivariate statistical analysis (cluster analysis and principal components analysis) and, additionally, to HYSPLIT back trajectory modeling in order to assess in a better way the impact of the weather conditions on the pollution sources identified. A specific element of the study is the effort to clarify the role of outliers in the data set. The reason for the appearance of outliers is strongly related to the atmospheric condition on the particular sampling days leading to enhanced concentration of pollutants (secondary emissions, sea sprays, road and soil dust, combustion processes) especially for ultra fine and coarse particles. It is also shown that three major sources affect the urban air quality of the location studied-sea sprays, mineral dust and anthropogenic influences (agricultural activity, combustion processes, and industrial sources). The level of impact is related to certain extent to the aerosol fraction size. The assessment of the meteorological conditions leads to defining of four downwind patterns affecting the air quality (Pelagic, Western and Central Europe, Eastern and Northeastern Europe and Africa and Southern Europe). Thus, the present study offers a complete urban air assessment taking into account the weather conditions, pollution sources and aerosol fractioning. PMID:26942452

  15. Acoustic monitoring of a fluidized bed coating process

    Naelapaa, Kaisa; Veski, Peep; Pedersen, Joan G.; Anov, Dan; Jørgensen, Pia; Kristensen, Henning Gjelstrup; Bertelsen, Poul

      The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of acoustic monitoring of a production scale fluidized bed coating process. The correlation between sensor signals and the estimated amount of film applied and percentage release, respectively, were investigated in coating potassium chloride...

  16. Monitoring of rapid sand filters using an acoustic imaging technique

    Allouche, N.; Simons, D.G.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2012-01-01

    A novel instrument is developed to acoustically image sand filters used for water treatment and monitor their performance. The instrument consists of an omnidirectional transmitter that generates a chirp with a frequency range between 10 and 110 kHz, and an array of hydrophones. The instrument was e

  17. Monitoring of rapid sand filters using an acoustic imaging technique

    Allouche, N.; Simons, D.G.; Rietveld, L. C.

    2012-01-01

    A novel instrument is developed to acoustically image sand filters used for water treatment and monitor their performance. The instrument consists of an omnidirectional transmitter that generates a chirp with a frequency range between 10 and 110 kHz, and an array of hydrophones. The instrument was extensively tested in a lab before being deployed in an industrial rapid sand filter, made available by a Dutch drinking water company. This filter was monitored over a period of 10 days. We perform...

  18. Acoustic monitoring of safety/relief valves for leak detection

    The results presented here indicate that there is a high probability of confidentially detecting pilot stage leakage in safety/relief valves through the use of acoustic monitoring, especially in the frequency range 30-60 kHz. This should be particularly true if the sensors and signal processing equipment are designed for sensitivity to this range, and if routine or continuous monitoring is performed so that trends can be recognized

  19. Acoustic monitoring systems tests at Indian Point Unit 1. Final report

    This report describes the results of a program to test acoustic monitoring systems on Indian Point Unit No. 1 under actual plant operating conditions, less the reactor core. The two types of systems evaluated were the monitoring of acoustic emissions generated by growing flaws and the monitoring of acoustic signals from leaks

  20. Acoustic emission/flaw relationships for inservice monitoring of LWRs

    The program concerning Acoustic Emission/Flaw Relationships for Inservice Monitoring of LWRs was initiated in FY76 with the objective of validating the application of acoustic emission (AE) to monitor nuclear reactor pressure-containing components during operation to detect cracking. The program has been supported by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Research and development has been performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle Memorial Institute. The program has shown the feasibility of continuous, on-line AE monitoring to detect crack growth and produced validated methods for applying the technology. Included are relationships for estimating flaw severity from AE data and field applications at Watts Bar Unit 1 Reactor, Limerick Unit 1 Reactor, and the High Flux Isotope Reactor. This report discusses the program scope and organization, the three program phases and the results obtained, standard and code activities, and instrumentation and software developed under this program

  1. Monitoring of hard turning using acoustic emission signal

    Bhaskaran, J.; Murugan, M. [B.S. Abdur Rahman University, Chennai (India); Balashanmugam, N.; Chellamalai, M. [Central Manufacturing Technology Institute, Bangalore (India)

    2012-02-15

    Monitoring of tool wear during hard turning is essential. Many investigators have analyzed the acoustic emission (AE) signals generated during machining to understand the metal cutting process and for monitoring tool wear and failure. In the current study on hard turning, the skew and kurtosis parameters of the root mean square values of AE signal (AERMS) are used to monitor tool wear. The rubbing between the tool and the workpiece increases as the tool wear crosses a threshold, thereby shifting the mass of AERMS distribution to right, leading to a negative skew. The increased rubbing also led to a high kurtosis value in the AERMS distribution curve.

  2. Smart acoustic emission system for wireless monitoring of concrete structures

    Yoon, Dong-Jin; Kim, Young-Gil; Kim, Chi-Yeop; Seo, Dae-Cheol

    2008-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) has emerged as a powerful nondestructive tool to detect preexisting defects or to characterize failure mechanisms. Recently, this technique or this kind of principle, that is an in-situ monitoring of inside damages of materials or structures, becomes increasingly popular for monitoring the integrity of large structures. Concrete is one of the most widely used materials for constructing civil structures. In the nondestructive evaluation point of view, a lot of AE signals are generated in concrete structures under loading whether the crack development is active or not. Also, it was required to find a symptom of damage propagation before catastrophic failure through a continuous monitoring. Therefore we have done a practical study in this work to fabricate compact wireless AE sensor and to develop diagnosis system. First, this study aims to identify the differences of AE event patterns caused by both real damage sources and the other normal sources. Secondly, it was focused to develop acoustic emission diagnosis system for assessing the deterioration of concrete structures such as a bridge, dame, building slab, tunnel etc. Thirdly, the wireless acoustic emission system was developed for the application of monitoring concrete structures. From the previous laboratory study such as AE event patterns analysis under various loading conditions, we confirmed that AE analysis provided a promising approach for estimating the condition of damage and distress in concrete structures. In this work, the algorithm for determining the damage status of concrete structures was developed and typical criteria for decision making was also suggested. For the future application of wireless monitoring, a low energy consumable, compact, and robust wireless acoustic emission sensor module was developed and applied to the concrete beam for performance test. Finally, based on the self-developed diagnosis algorithm and compact wireless AE sensor, new AE system for practical

  3. Signal processing methodologies for an acoustic fetal heart rate monitor

    Pretlow, Robert A., III; Stoughton, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Research and development is presented of real time signal processing methodologies for the detection of fetal heart tones within a noise-contaminated signal from a passive acoustic sensor. A linear predictor algorithm is utilized for detection of the heart tone event and additional processing derives heart rate. The linear predictor is adaptively 'trained' in a least mean square error sense on generic fetal heart tones recorded from patients. A real time monitor system is described which outputs to a strip chart recorder for plotting the time history of the fetal heart rate. The system is validated in the context of the fetal nonstress test. Comparisons are made with ultrasonic nonstress tests on a series of patients. Comparative data provides favorable indications of the feasibility of the acoustic monitor for clinical use.

  4. Nonintrusive Monitoring and Control of Metallurgical Processes by Acoustic Measurements

    Yu, Hao-Ling; Khajavi, Leili Tafaghodi; Barati, Mansoor

    2011-06-01

    The feasibility of developing a new online monitoring technique based on the characteristic acoustic response of gas bubbles in a liquid has been investigated. The method is intended to monitor the chemistry of the liquid through its relation to the bubble sound frequency. A low-temperature model consisting of water and alcohol mixtures was established, and the frequency of bubbles rising under varying concentrations of methanol was measured. It was shown that the frequency of the sound created by bubble pulsation varies with the percentage of alcohol in water. The frequency drops sharply with the increase in methanol content up to 20 wt pct, after which the decreases is gradual. Surface tension seems to be a critical liquid property affecting the sound frequency through its two-fold effects on the bubble size and the pulsation domain. The dependence between the frequency and the liquid composition suggests the feasibility of developing an acoustic-based technique for process control purposes.

  5. Acoustic emission monitoring for assessment of steel bridge details

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing was deployed on details of two large steel Interstate Highway bridges: one cantilever through-truss and one trapezoidal box girder bridge. Quantitative measurements of activity levels at known and suspected crack locations were made by monitoring AE under normal service loads (e.g., live traffic and wind). AE indications were used to direct application of radiography, resulting in identification of a previously unknown flaw, and to inform selection of a retrofit detail.

  6. Acoustic module of the Acquabona (Italy debris flow monitoring system

    A. Galgaro

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of debris flows aimed to the assessment of their physical parameters is very important both for theoretical and practical purposes. Peak discharge and total volume of debris flows are crucial for designing effective countermeasures in many populated mountain areas where losses of lives and property damage could be avoided. This study quantifies the relationship between flow depth, acoustic amplitude of debris flow induced ground vibrations and front velocity in the experimental catchment of Acquabona, Eastern Dolomites, Italy. The analysis of data brought about the results described in the following. Debris flow depth and amplitude of the flow-induced ground vibrations show a good positive correlation. Estimation of both mean front velocity and peak discharge can be simply obtained monitoring the ground vibrations, through geophones installed close to the flow channel; the total volume of debris flow can be so directly estimated from the integral of the ground vibrations using a regression line. The application of acoustic technique to debris flow monitoring seems to be of the outmost relevance in risk reduction policies and in the correct management of the territory. Moreover this estimation is possible in other catchments producing debris flows of similar characteristics by means of their acoustic characterisation through quick and simple field tests (Standard Penetration Tests and seismic refraction surveys.

  7. Acoustic module of the Acquabona (Italy) debris flow monitoring system

    Galgaro, A.; Tecca, P. R.; Genevois, R.; Deganutti, A. M.

    2005-02-01

    Monitoring of debris flows aimed to the assessment of their physical parameters is very important both for theoretical and practical purposes. Peak discharge and total volume of debris flows are crucial for designing effective countermeasures in many populated mountain areas where losses of lives and property damage could be avoided. This study quantifies the relationship between flow depth, acoustic amplitude of debris flow induced ground vibrations and front velocity in the experimental catchment of Acquabona, Eastern Dolomites, Italy. The analysis of data brought about the results described in the following. Debris flow depth and amplitude of the flow-induced ground vibrations show a good positive correlation. Estimation of both mean front velocity and peak discharge can be simply obtained monitoring the ground vibrations, through geophones installed close to the flow channel; the total volume of debris flow can be so directly estimated from the integral of the ground vibrations using a regression line. The application of acoustic technique to debris flow monitoring seems to be of the outmost relevance in risk reduction policies and in the correct management of the territory. Moreover this estimation is possible in other catchments producing debris flows of similar characteristics by means of their acoustic characterisation through quick and simple field tests (Standard Penetration Tests and seismic refraction surveys).

  8. SAMARUC a Programmable system for Passive acoustic monitoring of cetaceans

    Miralles Ricós, Ramón; Lara Martínez, Guillermo-Fernan; CARRIÓN GARCÍA, ALICIA; Esteban, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the work carried out by iTEAM researchers in Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) for underwater monitoring of cetaceans. It includes a description of novel signal processing algorithms for detection and classification of aquatic mammal species as well as a hardware system called SAMARUC specially designed in collaboration with marine biologists. Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación within the Project number TEC2011-23403 Miralles Ricós, R.; Lara Martínez, G.; Carrión Gar...

  9. A passive acoustic monitor of treatment effectiveness during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    Fedele, F; Coleman, A J [Medical Physics Department, Guy' s and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Westminster Bridge Road, SE1 7EH, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, K; Ryves, S; Phillips, D [Urology Department, Guy' s and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Great Maze Pond, SE1 9RT, London (United Kingdom); Leighton, T G, E-mail: fiammetta.fedele@gstt.nhs.uk [Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, Highfield, S017 1BJ, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been in the clinic for at least three decades, there has been little advance in efforts (i) to estimate the efficacy of the treatment whilst it is in progress, or (ii) to determine the end-point of a treatment session in terms of the degree of stone fragmentation achieved. Previous in vitro experimentation and clinical trials have shown that a passive acoustic monitor has the potential to provide evidence of the effectiveness and end-point of lithotripsy. The system exploits secondary emissions generated during shock-tissue interaction, whose features depend on the quality of tissue at the beam focus. This prototype was developed into the first commercially available clinical ESWL treatment monitor (Precision Acoustic Ltd, Dorchester, UK), and a unit has been acquired and tested in the clinical routine by urologists at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Trust in March 2009. This paper critically assesses the performance of the new system for the first 25 treatments monitored. The ESWL monitor correctly predicted the treatment outcome of 15 of the 18 treatments that were followed-up clinically. In addition, it was noted that the measure of treatment effectiveness provided by the monitor after 500 shocks was predictive of the final treatment outcome (p < 0.001). This suggests that the system could be used in pre-assessment; indicating if the stone is susceptible to ESWL or if the patient should be sent for surgery.

  10. Acoustical monitoring of diesel engines in reverberant environment

    The feed-back knowledge of emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants shows that some malfunctions, mainly affecting fuel-injection or distribution system of the engine can be heard and detected by experienced maintenance agents. This study consists in the feasibility,v of acoustical monitoring of those diesel engines, taking into account the reverberant environment of the machine. The operating cycle of the diesel is composed of transient events (injection, combustion, valve closure...) which generate highly non stationary acoustical signals. The detection of a malfunction appearing on such transients requires the use of adapted signal processing techniques. Visual analysis of the phenomena is first proceeded using time-frequency and time-scale representations. The second step will be parametric modeling of acoustical signatures for the extraction of characteristic parameters, in order to characterize the fault and to use an automatic classification system. The lest part of the study will concern the evaluation of the robustness of the detection methods in regard to acoustical reverberation. (author). 10 refs., 6 figs

  11. Employing Acoustic Emission for Monitoring Oil Film Regimes

    David Mba

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The major purpose of a gear lubricant is to provide adequate oil film thickness to reduce and prevent gear tooth surface failures. Real time monitoring for gear failures is important in order to predict and prevent unexpected failures which would have a negative impact on the efficiency, performance and safety of the gearbox. This paper presents experimental results on the influence of specific oil film thickness on Acoustic Emission (AE activity for operational helical gears. Variation in film thickness during operations was achieved by spraying liquid nitrogen onto the rotating gear wheel. The experimental results demonstrated a clear relationship between the root mean square (r.m.s value of the AE signal and the specific film thickness. The findings demonstrate the potential of Acoustic Emission technology to quantify lubrication regimes on operational gears.

  12. Application of acoustic emission technique for check valve monitoring

    Very limited choice is available in monitoring the health of check valves during service. Ultrasonics, magnetic flux leakage and acoustic emission (AE) monitoring are three methods, of which AE is the prominent. The paper describes work done on swing check valves in the ECCS circuit of Cirus using AE. It indicates that the valves can be monitored for any abnormal behaviour during their stable operation and during opening and closing. AE can also sense any abnormality at the hinge pin, hinge arm, disc etc., if they give AE emission. However, many of these may require background data from a spare valve of similar design or a working stand by. In absence of such a valve, data from the present study will be used as a baseline data for comparison with signatures taken during future inspections. (author). 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  13. Monitoring of Robot Assisted Polishing through parameters of acoustic emission

    Lazarev, Ruslan; Top, Søren; Bilberg, Arne

    duration of each process stage and predict the end of process in a precise and unmanned way. This paper presents and analyses the utilization of acoustic emission for generation of control signals in the stone polishing process for achieving these control objectives in an industrial set-up prototype....... determination of the point in time to change a polishing media or stop the process is needed for computer controlled functional surface generation. During the last years, several research works have been done in order to build grinding/polishing monitoring systems to determine process characteristics, the...

  14. Use of acoustic monitoring system for debris flow discharge evaluation

    Galgaro, A. G.; Tecca, P. R.; Genevois, R.; Deganutti, A. M.

    2003-04-01

    In 1997 an automated system for monitoring of debris flows has been installed in the Acquabona channel Dolomites, Italy. Induction geophones, with a specific frequency of 10 Hz, measure the amplitude of vertical ground vibrations generated by the passage of a flowing mass along the channel. Continuous acoustic logs and ultrasonic hydrograph recorded at the lower-channel measurement station for the debris flow of August 17, 1998, show a striking correspondence. This correspondence, already observed in different flow sites, is represented by the best fit between flow depth and flow sensor amplitude. Average front velocity for surges, calculated from the signal peak time shift and the distance between the sensors along the flow path, range between 2.00 and 7.7 m/s. As the ultrasonic sensor provides a way to measure the variation of the flow section area with the flow depth, the debris flow peak discharge may be estimated; obtained values of debris flow peak discharge range from 4 and 30 m3/s. Volumes were calculated by integrating instantaneous discharges through the hydrograph and by integrating the geophone log (acoustic flux). Volumes of 13700 m3 and 15500 m3 have been respectively obtained. The slight difference between the two values may result from the fact that acoustic records: i) are sensitive to the high frequencies, typical of the debris flow tails; ii) sum up the contributions sent by the whole flowing mass, while the ecometer detect the flow depth at every time at only one section. As a consequence the rising of the whole geophone log gives a higher value at the integration result. This only acoustic system can give a reasonably proxy for discharge and total volumes involved, which are among the most important parameters for debris flow hazard assessment and planning countermeasures. This methodology can be used in other debris flow sites if they are calibrated by the acoustic characterization of debris, obtained by both seismic surveys and SPT tests, and

  15. Aero-acoustic Measurement and Monitoring of Dynamic Pressure Fields Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovative and practical measurement and monitoring system optimally defines dynamic pressure fields, including sound fields. It is based on passive acoustic...

  16. SensIs - Underwater acoustic network for ice-monitoring

    Reinen, Tor Arne; Knudsen, Finn Tore

    2016-01-01

    Routing for low latency underwater acoustic network-communication is investigated. The application is monitoring of ice-threats to offshore operations in the Arctic - to provide warnings that enable operators to react to such threats. The scenario produces relatively high traffic load, and the network should favour low delay and adequate reliability rather than energy usage minimization. The ICRP (Information-Carrying based Routing Protocol), originally proposed by Wei Liang et al. in 2007, is chosen as basis. ICRP obtains unicast routing paths by sending data payload as broadcast packets when no route information is available. Thus, data can be delivered without the cost of reactive signalling latency. In this paper we explore the capabilities of a slightly enhanced/adapted ICRP, tailored to the ice monitoring application. By simulations and experiments at sea it is demonstrated that the protocol performs well and can manage the applications high traffic load - this provided that the point-to-point links pro...

  17. Acoustics

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  18. Overview of chemometrics

    Schlager, Kenneth J.; Ruchti, Timothy L.

    1995-04-01

    Chemometrics is a broad field concerned with the application of mathematical and statistical methods to problems in chemistry. Biotronics Technologies has applied chemometrics to demanding chemical applications involving noninvasive medical diagnostic measurement instrumentation using advanced signal processing and calibration techniques. The chemometrics methods have also been extended to quantitative analysis in microbiology. Signal processing transforms data measurements to enhance the extraction of physically significant information. Examples include the Fourier Transform, first and second derivatives, and digital and adaptive filtering. Calibration is the process of relating data measurements to a chemical concentration for the purpose of estimation. Standard methods of calibration include linear regression, multiple-linear regression, partial linear regression, and principal components regression. For more demanding applications, novel techniques involving artificial neural networks, genetic algorithms, and rotated principal components have been developed. This paper summarizes the chemometric experience of Biotronics Technologies including relevant theoretical background.

  19. Intraoperative monitoring during surgery for acoustic neuroma: benefits of an extratympanic intrameatal electrode

    Mullatti, N; Coakham, H; Maw, A; Butler, S; Morgan, M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the utility of an extratympanic intrameatal electrode for intraoperative monitoring during acoustic neuroma and other cerebellopontine angle tumour surgery and to define the neurophysiological and surgical factors which influence hearing preservation.
METHODS—Twenty two patients, 18 with acoustic neuromas and four with other cerebellopontine angle tumours, underwent intraoperative monitoring during tumour excision. The extratympanic intrameatal electrode...

  20. Remote Acoustic Monitoring of North Atlantic Right Whales (Eubalaena glacialis) Reveals Seasonal and Diel Variations in Acoustic Behavior

    Matthews, Leanna P.; Jessica A McCordic; Susan E Parks

    2014-01-01

    Remote acoustic monitoring is a non-invasive tool that can be used to study the distribution, behavior, and habitat use of sound-producing species. The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) is an endangered baleen whale species that produces a variety of stereotyped acoustic signals. One of these signals, the "gunshot" sound, has only been recorded from adult male North Atlantic right whales and is thought to function for reproduction, either as reproductive advertisement for femal...

  1. A multi-channel acoustics monitor for perioperative respiratory monitoring: preliminary data.

    Jafarian, Kamal; Amineslami, Majid; Hassani, Kamran; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Lahiji, Mohammad Niakan; Doyle, D John

    2016-02-01

    This study pertains to a six-channel acoustic monitoring system for use in patient monitoring during or after surgery. The base hardware consists of a USB data acquisition system, a custom-built six-channel amplification system, and a series of microphones of various designs. The software is based on the MATLAB platform with data acquisition drivers installed. The displayed information includes: time domain signals, frequency domain signals, and tools to aid in the detection of endobronchial intubation. We hypothesize that the above mentioned arrangement may be helpful to the anesthesiologist in recognizing clinical conditions like wheezing, bronchospasm, endobronchial intubation, and apnea. The study also evaluated various types of microphone designs used to transduce breath sounds. The system also features selectable band-pass filtering using MATLAB algorithms as well as a collection of recordings obtained with the system to establish what respiratory acoustic signals look like under various conditions. PMID:25869899

  2. Operational Performance Analysis of Passive Acoustic Monitoring for Killer Whales

    Matzner, Shari; Fu, Tao; Ren, Huiying; Deng, Zhiqun; Sun, Yannan; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-09-30

    For the planned tidal turbine site in Puget Sound, WA, the main concern is to protect Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW) due to their Endangered Species Act status. A passive acoustic monitoring system is proposed because the whales emit vocalizations that can be detected by a passive system. The algorithm for detection is implemented in two stages. The first stage is an energy detector designed to detect candidate signals. The second stage is a spectral classifier that is designed to reduce false alarms. The evaluation presented here of the detection algorithm incorporates behavioral models of the species of interest, environmental models of noise levels and potential false alarm sources to provide a realistic characterization of expected operational performance.

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring of recycled aggregate concrete under bending

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    The amount of construction and demolition waste has increased considerably over the last few years, making desirable the reuse of this waste in the concrete industry. In the present study concrete specimens are subjected at the age of 28 days to four-point bending with concurrent monitoring of their acoustic emission (AE) activity. Several concrete mixtures prepared using recycled aggregates at various percentages of the total coarse aggregate and also a reference mix using natural aggregates, were included to investigate their influence of the recycled aggregates on the load bearing capacity, as well as on the fracture mechanisms. The results reveal that for low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates on the flexural strength is negligible while higher levels of substitution lead into its deterioration. The total AE activity, as well as the AE signals emitted during failure, was related to flexural strength. The results obtained during test processing were found to be in agreement with visual observation.

  4. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation

    Siegfried Hohmann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application.

  5. Chemometric Methods in Plant Metabolomics

    Isomaa, Keijo

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on chemometric analysis of instrumental data that has been obtained from chemical analysis of plant extracts. Chemometric analysis applies statistical and mathematical tools on chemical data, aiming to find new information or classifying samples in categories defined by the analyst. Chemometric analysis is based on computational pattern recognition and reveals any features that studied samples may have in common. In the literature part of this study, chemometrics and r...

  6. Passive acoustic monitoring of human physiology during activity indicates health and performance of soldiers and firefighters

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-04-01

    The Army Research Laboratory has developed a unique gel-coupled acoustic physiological monitoring sensor that has acoustic impedance properties similar to the skin. This facilitates the transmission of body sounds into the sensor pad, yet significantly repels ambient airborne noises due to an impedance mismatch. The sensor's sensitivity and bandwidth produce excellent signatures for detection and spectral analysis of diverse physiological events. Acoustic signal processing detects heartbeats, breaths, wheezes, coughs, blood pressure, activity, motion, and voice for communication and automatic speech recognition. The health and performance of soldiers, firefighters, and other first responders in strenuous and hazardous environments can be continuously and remotely monitored with body-worn acoustic sensors. Comfortable acoustic sensors can be in a helmet or in a strap around the neck, chest, and wrist. Noise-canceling sensor arrays help remove out-of-phase motion noise and enhance covariant physiology by using two acoustic sensors on the front sides of the neck and two additional acoustic sensors on each wrist. Pulse wave transit time between neck and wrist acoustic sensors will indicate systolic blood pressure. Larger torso-sized arrays can be used to acoustically inspect the lungs and heart, or built into beds for sleep monitoring. Acoustics is an excellent input for sensor fusion.

  7. ONKALO POSE experiment. Phase 3: acoustic and ultrasonic monitoring

    Reyes-Montes, J.; Flynn, W.; Huang, J. [Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    The objectives of the third phase of the POSE experiment are to determine the in situ state of stress at Olkiluoto and the spalling strength of Olkiluoto rock, by internal heating of the experimental hole (ONK-EH3) using 8 vertically installed heaters. This report presents the results from the Acoustic and ultrasonic monitoring carried out around the third experimental hole of the POSE niche between November 2012 and May 2013. The experiment was monitored using an array of 24 transducers installed along 4 monitoring drillholes and data was automatically acquired and processed using the system installed at the niche by Applied Seismology Consultants in May 2012. Daily ultrasonic surveys were carried out between 14{sup th} November 2012 and 21{sup st} May 2013, monitoring the changes in transmission velocities of P and S-waves with an estimated error of ±2 m x s{sup -1} (ASC, 2013). Changes in transmission velocities closely follow the evolution of the temperature profile in the hole wall. An increase in both P-and S-wave transmission velocities is observed at all depth levels and surveyed raypaths during the heating phase, with the highest changes observed in raypaths skimming the hole surface and depths between 2.33 m and 3.7 m. This observation indicates the closure of in situ and excavation-induced microcracks due to thermal stress. After the heaters were switched off, P-wave velocities show a marked decrease, in all raypaths reaching values below those measured at the start of the monitoring approximately 4 weeks after the heaters were switched off. The highest decrease was observed along raypaths surveying the region skimming the hole wall. This decrease below original background values indicates the induction of rock degradation as microcracking induced through the heating-cooling cycle. Changes in P- and S-wave transmission velocity were used to calculate changes in Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio along the different raypaths and depth levels

  8. ONKALO POSE experiment. Phase 3: acoustic and ultrasonic monitoring

    The objectives of the third phase of the POSE experiment are to determine the in situ state of stress at Olkiluoto and the spalling strength of Olkiluoto rock, by internal heating of the experimental hole (ONK-EH3) using 8 vertically installed heaters. This report presents the results from the Acoustic and ultrasonic monitoring carried out around the third experimental hole of the POSE niche between November 2012 and May 2013. The experiment was monitored using an array of 24 transducers installed along 4 monitoring drillholes and data was automatically acquired and processed using the system installed at the niche by Applied Seismology Consultants in May 2012. Daily ultrasonic surveys were carried out between 14th November 2012 and 21st May 2013, monitoring the changes in transmission velocities of P and S-waves with an estimated error of ±2 m x s-1 (ASC, 2013). Changes in transmission velocities closely follow the evolution of the temperature profile in the hole wall. An increase in both P-and S-wave transmission velocities is observed at all depth levels and surveyed raypaths during the heating phase, with the highest changes observed in raypaths skimming the hole surface and depths between 2.33 m and 3.7 m. This observation indicates the closure of in situ and excavation-induced microcracks due to thermal stress. After the heaters were switched off, P-wave velocities show a marked decrease, in all raypaths reaching values below those measured at the start of the monitoring approximately 4 weeks after the heaters were switched off. The highest decrease was observed along raypaths surveying the region skimming the hole wall. This decrease below original background values indicates the induction of rock degradation as microcracking induced through the heating-cooling cycle. Changes in P- and S-wave transmission velocity were used to calculate changes in Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio along the different raypaths and depth levels. An overall

  9. Continuous acoustic emission monitoring of reinforced concrete under accelerated corrosion

    Di Benedetti, M.; Loreto, G.; Nanni, A.; Matta, F.; Gonzalez-Nunez, M. A.

    2011-04-01

    The development of techniques capable of evaluating deterioration of reinforced concrete (RC) structures is instrumental to the advancement of techniques for the structural health monitoring (SHM) and service life estimate for constructed facilities. One of the main causes leading to degradation of RC is the corrosion of the steel reinforcement. This process can be modeled phenomenologically, while laboratory tests aimed at studying durability responses are typically accelerated in order to provide useful results within a realistic period of time. To assess the condition of damage in RC, a number of nondestructive methods have been recently studied. Acoustic emission (AE) is emerging as a nondestructive tool to detect the onset and progression of deterioration mechanisms. In this paper, the development of accelerated corrosion and continuous AE monitoring test set-up for RC specimens are presented. Relevant information are provided with regard to the characteristics of the corrosion circuit, continuous measurement and acquisition of corrosion potential, selection of AE sensors and AE parameter setting. The effectiveness of the setup in detecting and characterizing the initiation and progression of the corrosion phenomenon is discussed on the basis of preliminary results from small-scale, pre-cracked RC specimens, which are representative of areas near the clear cover in typical RC bridge members.

  10. Early corrosion monitoring of prestressed concrete piles using acoustic emission

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul H.

    2013-04-01

    The depassivation and corrosion of bonded prestressing steel strands in concrete bridge members may lead to major damage or collapse before visual inspections uncover evident signs of damage, and well before the end of the design life. Recognizing corrosion in its early stage is desirable to plan and prioritize remediation strategies. The Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is a rational means to develop structural health monitoring and prognosis systems for the early detection and location of corrosion in concrete. Compelling features are the sensitivity to events related to micro- and macrodamage, non-intrusiveness, and suitability for remote and wireless applications. There is little understanding of the correlation between AE and the morphology and extent of early damage on the steel surface. In this paper, the evidence collected from prestressed concrete (PC) specimens that are exposed to salt water is discussed vis-à-vis AE data from continuous monitoring. The specimens consist of PC strips that are subjected to wet/dry salt water cycles, representing portions of bridge piles that are exposed to tidal action. Evidence collected from the specimens includes: (a) values of half-cell potential and linear polarization resistance to recognize active corrosion in its early stage; and (b) scanning electron microscopy micrographs of steel areas from two specimens that were decommissioned once the electrochemical measurements indicated a high probability of active corrosion. These results are used to evaluate the AE activity resulting from early corrosion.

  11. Oxidação de glicerol sobre nanopartículas de ouro suportadas em carvão ativado: monitoramento quimiométrico da reação por ESI-MS e MIR Glycerol oxidation over gold nanoparticles supported on activated carbon: chemometric monitoring of the reaction by ESI-MS and MIR

    Cleiton A. Nunes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A study on the monitoring of glycerol oxidation catalyzed by gold nanoparticles supported on activated carbon under mild conditions by chemometric methods is presented. The reaction was monitored by mass spectrometry-electrospray ionization (ESI-MS and comparatively by mid infrared spectroscopy (MIR. Concentration profiles of reagent and products were determined by chemometric tools such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA, Evolving Factor Analysis (EFA and Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR. The gold nanoparticle catalyst was relatively active in glycerol oxidation, favoring formation of high added value products. It was found that the reaction stabilization was reached at four hours, with approximately 70% glycerol conversion and high selectivity for glycerate.

  12. Hydraulic Fracturing of Heterogeneous Rock Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    Stanchits, Sergey; Burghardt, Jeffrey; Surdi, Aniket

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the results of laboratory studies of hydraulic fracture in homogeneous sandstone blocks with man-made interfaces and heterogeneous shale blocks with weak natural interfaces are reported. Tests were conducted under similar stress conditions, with fluids of different viscosity and at different injection rates. The measurements and analysis allows the identification of fracture initiation and behavior. Fracturing with high-viscosity fluids resulted in stable fracture propagation initiated before breakdown, while fracturing with low-viscosity fluids resulted in unstable fracture propagation initiated almost simultaneously with breakdown. Analysis also allows us to measure the fluid volume entering the fracture and the fracture volume. Monitoring of acoustic emission hypocenter localizations, indicates the development of created fractured area including the intersection with interfaces, fluid propagation along interfaces, crossing interfaces, and approaching the boundaries of the block. We observe strong differences in hydraulic fracture behavior, fracture geometry and fracture propagation speed, when fracturing with water and high-viscosity fluids. We also observed distinct differences between sandstone blocks and shale blocks, when a certain P-wave velocity ray path is intersected by the hydraulic fracture. The velocity increases in sandstones and decreases in shale.

  13. Passive acoustic monitoring of Cook Inlet beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas).

    Lammers, Marc O; Castellote, Manuel; Small, Robert J; Atkinson, Shannon; Jenniges, Justin; Rosinski, Anne; Oswald, Julie N; Garner, Chris

    2013-09-01

    The endangered beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) population in Cook Inlet, AK faces threats from a variety of anthropogenic factors, including coastal development, oil and gas exploration, vessel traffic, and military activities. To address existing gaps in understanding about the occurrence of belugas in Cook Inlet, a project was developed to use passive acoustic monitoring to document the year-round distribution of belugas, as well as killer whales (Orcinus orca), which prey on belugas. Beginning in June 2009, ten moorings were deployed throughout the Inlet and refurbished every two to eight months. Despite challenging conditions consisting of strong tidal currents carrying debris and seasonal ice cover, 83% of mooring deployments were successfully recovered. Noise from water flow, vessel traffic, and/or industrial activities was present at several sites, potentially masking some signals. However, belugas were successfully detected at multiple locations. Detections were relatively common in the upper inlet and less common or absent at middle and lower inlet locations. Killer whale signals were also recorded. Some seasonal variability in the occurrence of both belugas and killer whales was evident. PMID:23968047

  14. Acoustical method of whole-body hydration status monitoring

    Sarvazyan, A. P.; Tsyuryupa, S. N.; Calhoun, M.; Utter, A.

    2016-07-01

    An acoustical handheld hydration monitor (HM) for assessing the water balance of the human body was developed. Dehydration is a critical public health problem. Many elderly over age of 65 are particularly vulnerable as are infants and young children. Given that dehydration is both preventable and reversible, the need for an easy-to-perform method for the detection of water imbalance is of the utmost clinical importance. The HM is based on an experimental fact that ultrasound velocity in muscle is a linear function of water content and can be referenced to the hydration status of the body. Studies on the validity of HM for the assessment of whole-body hydration status were conducted in the Appalachian State University, USA, on healthy young adults and on elderly subjects residing at an assisted living facility. The HM was able to track changes in total body water during periods of acute dehydration and rehydration in athletes and day-to-day and diurnal variability of hydration in elderly. Results of human studies indicate that HM has a potential to become an efficient tool for detecting abnormal changes in the body hydration status.

  15. Acoustic Emissions (AE) Electrical Systems' Health Monitoring Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Acoustic Emissions (AE) are associated with physical events, such as thermal activity, dielectric breakdown, discharge inception, as well as crack nucleation and...

  16. Time Reversal Acoustic Structural Health Monitoring Using Array of Embedded Sensors Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) structural health monitoring with an embedded sensor array represents a new approach to in-situ nondestructive evaluation of air-space...

  17. Automatic classification of urban traffic noise onboard an acoustic monitoring system

    Wessels, P.W.; Zon, A.T. van; Basten, T.G.H.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in acoustic monitoring systems make it possible to measure complex noise situations, like urban traffic noise, continuously. Monitoring provides more insight in the noise situation, from which more specific and (cost) effective measures can be taken. Monitoring also allows direct

  18. A stationary acoustic system for monitoring undisturbed and vessel affected fish behaviour

    Godø, Olav Rune; Totland, Atle

    1996-01-01

    Thorough knowledge of the dynamics of natural fish behaviour and distribution within a survey and among surveys is fundamental for reliability of time series of abundance indices. Further, vessel/trawl affected avoidance may greatly affect density estimates from trawl and acoustic surveys. Means for monitoring behaviour of fish during surveys or in special experiments have been limited, time consuming and expensive. This paper describes an acoustic buoy system for monitoring...

  19. Listening to the Deep: Live monitoring of ocean noise and cetacean acoustic signals

    André, Michel; Van der Schaar, Mike Connor Roger Malcolm; Zaugg, Serge Alain; Houégnigan, Ludwig; A..M. Sánchez; Castell, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The development and broad use of passive acoustic monitoring techniques have the potential to help assessing the large-scale influence of artificial noise on marine organisms and ecosystems. Deep-sea observatories have the potential to play a key role in understanding these recent acoustic changes. LIDO(Listening to the Deep Ocean Environment) is an international project that is allowing the real-time longterm monitoring of marine ambient noise as well as marine mammal sounds at cabled and...

  20. Surface Acoustic Wave Monitor for Deposition and Analysis of Ultra-Thin Films

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) based thin film deposition monitor device and system for monitoring the deposition of ultra-thin films and nanomaterials and the analysis thereof is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include differential delay line device designs, and which can optionally have integral reference devices fabricated on the same substrate as the sensing device, or on a separate device in thermal contact with the film monitoring/analysis device, in order to provide inherently temperature compensated measurements. These deposition monitor and analysis devices can include inherent temperature compensation, higher sensitivity to surface interactions than quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, and the ability to operate at extreme temperatures.

  1. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring

    Haycox, Jon; Pettitt, Will; Young, R. Paul [Applied Seismology Consultants Ltd., Shrewsbury (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    This report describes the results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring of the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The APSE is being undertaken to demonstrate the current capability to predict spalling in a fractured rock mass using numerical modelling techniques, and to demonstrate the effect of backfill and confining pressure on the propagation of micro-cracks in rock adjacent to deposition holes within a repository. An ultrasonic acquisition system has provided acoustic emission and ultrasonic survey monitoring throughout the various phases of the experiment. Results from the entire data set are provided with this document so that they can be effectively compared to several numerical modelling studies, and to mechanical and thermal measurements conducted around the pillar volume, in an 'integrated analysis' performed by SKB staff. This document provides an in-depth summary of the AE and ultrasonic survey results for future reference. The pillar has been produced by excavating two 1.8 m diameter deposition holes 1 m apart. These were bored in 0.8 m steps using a Tunnel Boring Machine specially adapted for vertical drilling. The first deposition hole was drilled in December 2003. Preceding this a period of background monitoring was performed so as to obtain a datum for the results. The hole was then confined to 0.7 MPa internal over pressure using a specially designed water-filled bladder. The second deposition hole was excavated in March 2004. Heating of the pillar was performed over a two month period between ending in July 2004, when the confined deposition hole was slowly depressurised. Immediately after depressurisation the pillar was allowed to cool with cessation of monitoring occurring a month later. A total of 36,676 AE triggers were recorded over the reporting period between 13th October 2003 and 14th July 2004. Of these 15,198 have produced AE locations. The AE data set

  2. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring

    This report describes the results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring of the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The APSE is being undertaken to demonstrate the current capability to predict spalling in a fractured rock mass using numerical modelling techniques, and to demonstrate the effect of backfill and confining pressure on the propagation of micro-cracks in rock adjacent to deposition holes within a repository. An ultrasonic acquisition system has provided acoustic emission and ultrasonic survey monitoring throughout the various phases of the experiment. Results from the entire data set are provided with this document so that they can be effectively compared to several numerical modelling studies, and to mechanical and thermal measurements conducted around the pillar volume, in an 'integrated analysis' performed by SKB staff. This document provides an in-depth summary of the AE and ultrasonic survey results for future reference. The pillar has been produced by excavating two 1.8 m diameter deposition holes 1 m apart. These were bored in 0.8 m steps using a Tunnel Boring Machine specially adapted for vertical drilling. The first deposition hole was drilled in December 2003. Preceding this a period of background monitoring was performed so as to obtain a datum for the results. The hole was then confined to 0.7 MPa internal over pressure using a specially designed water-filled bladder. The second deposition hole was excavated in March 2004. Heating of the pillar was performed over a two month period between ending in July 2004, when the confined deposition hole was slowly depressurised. Immediately after depressurisation the pillar was allowed to cool with cessation of monitoring occurring a month later. A total of 36,676 AE triggers were recorded over the reporting period between 13th October 2003 and 14th July 2004. Of these 15,198 have produced AE locations. The AE data set shows an intense

  3. Remote acoustic monitoring of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis reveals seasonal and diel variations in acoustic behavior.

    Leanna P Matthews

    Full Text Available Remote acoustic monitoring is a non-invasive tool that can be used to study the distribution, behavior, and habitat use of sound-producing species. The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis is an endangered baleen whale species that produces a variety of stereotyped acoustic signals. One of these signals, the "gunshot" sound, has only been recorded from adult male North Atlantic right whales and is thought to function for reproduction, either as reproductive advertisement for females or as an agonistic signal toward other males. This study uses remote acoustic monitoring to analyze the presence of gunshots over a two-year period at two sites on the Scotian Shelf to determine if there is evidence that North Atlantic right whales may use these locations for breeding activities. Seasonal analyses at both locations indicate that gunshot sound production is highly seasonal, with an increase in the autumn. One site, Roseway West, had significantly more gunshot sounds overall and exhibited a clear diel trend in production of these signals at night. The other site, Emerald South, also showed a seasonal increase in gunshot production during the autumn, but did not show any significant diel trend. This difference in gunshot signal production at the two sites indicates variation either in the number or the behavior of whales at each location. The timing of the observed seasonal increase in gunshot sound production is consistent with the current understanding of the right whale breeding season, and our results demonstrate that detection of gunshots with remote acoustic monitoring can be a reliable way to track shifts in distribution and changes in acoustic behavior including possible mating activities.

  4. Remote acoustic monitoring of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) reveals seasonal and diel variations in acoustic behavior.

    Matthews, Leanna P; McCordic, Jessica A; Parks, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    Remote acoustic monitoring is a non-invasive tool that can be used to study the distribution, behavior, and habitat use of sound-producing species. The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) is an endangered baleen whale species that produces a variety of stereotyped acoustic signals. One of these signals, the "gunshot" sound, has only been recorded from adult male North Atlantic right whales and is thought to function for reproduction, either as reproductive advertisement for females or as an agonistic signal toward other males. This study uses remote acoustic monitoring to analyze the presence of gunshots over a two-year period at two sites on the Scotian Shelf to determine if there is evidence that North Atlantic right whales may use these locations for breeding activities. Seasonal analyses at both locations indicate that gunshot sound production is highly seasonal, with an increase in the autumn. One site, Roseway West, had significantly more gunshot sounds overall and exhibited a clear diel trend in production of these signals at night. The other site, Emerald South, also showed a seasonal increase in gunshot production during the autumn, but did not show any significant diel trend. This difference in gunshot signal production at the two sites indicates variation either in the number or the behavior of whales at each location. The timing of the observed seasonal increase in gunshot sound production is consistent with the current understanding of the right whale breeding season, and our results demonstrate that detection of gunshots with remote acoustic monitoring can be a reliable way to track shifts in distribution and changes in acoustic behavior including possible mating activities. PMID:24646524

  5. MONITORING OF THE METAL STRUCTURAL STATE BY ACOUSTICAL STRUCTURAL NOISE

    V. V. Muraviev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available To determine the structural state of the metal as an informative parameter the structural acoustic noise is proposed. The paper represents the experimental results of the use at acoustical structural noise for the determination at the structural state of carbon pipe steels exposed by heat treatment, corrosion and tensile loads. The effect of grain size, corrosion and tensile loads on the level of structural noise is discussed.

  6. Real Time Monitoring of Containerless Microreactions in Acoustically Levitated Droplets via Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Crawford, Elizabeth A; Esen, Cemal; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2016-09-01

    Direct in-droplet (in stillo) microreaction monitoring using acoustically levitated micro droplets has been achieved by combining acoustic (ultrasonic) levitation for the first time with real time ambient tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The acoustic levitation and inherent mixing of microliter volumes of reactants (3 μL droplets), yielding total reaction volumes of 6 μL, supported monitoring the acid-catalyzed degradation reaction of erythromycin A. This reaction was chosen to demonstrate the proof-of-principle of directly monitoring in stillo microreactions via hyphenated acoustic levitation and ambient ionization mass spectrometry. The microreactions took place completely in stillo over 30, 60, and 120 s within the containerless stable central pressure node of an acoustic levitator, thus readily promoting reaction miniaturization. For the evaluation of the miniaturized in stillo reactions, the degradation reactions were also carried out in vials (in vitro) with a total reaction volume of 400 μL. The reacted in vitro mixtures (6 μL total) were similarly introduced into the acoustic levitator prior to ambient ionization MS/MS analysis. The in stillo miniaturized reactions provided immediate real-time snap-shots of the degradation process for more accurate reaction monitoring and used a fraction of the reactants, while the larger scale in vitro reactions only yielded general reaction information. PMID:27505037

  7. Real-time monitoring of acoustic linear and nonlinear behavior of titanium alloys during cyclic loading

    Frouin, J.; Maurer, J.; Sathish, S.; Eylon, D.; Na, J.K.; Matikas, T.E.

    2000-07-01

    Variation in acoustic nonlinearity has been monitored in real time during fatigue, on four dog-bone specimens of Ti-6Al-4V, under low cycle fatigue conditions, from the virgin state all the way to fracture. The results of these experiments show that the acoustic nonlinearity undergoes large changes during the fatigue and follows a similar trend for the material under given fatigue test conditions. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) examination of the samples with similar composition fatigues to different stages indicates a gradual change in the microstructure and dislocation density, which correlates with the changes in acoustic nonlinearity.

  8. Acoustic emission (AT) monitoring of metallic Ariane 5 boostervessel from MAN Technologie AG

    The Ariane 5 comprises high-grade products and components, including those qualified and tested by acoustic emission: The steel boostervessel, the SPELTRA structure consisting of a CFRP/aluminium honeycomb and the GAT/GAM high-pressure vessel of CFRP/steel. Classic nondestructive test methods like X-ray and ultrasound cannot be applied, so acoustic emission testing was used instead. It was applied for detecting and localizing active acoustic sources in order to monitor the test stand and initiate pressure reduction if necessary. (orig.)

  9. A novel sensor for monitoring acoustic cavitation. Part I: Concept, theory, and prototype development.

    Zeqiri, Bajram; Gélat, Pierre N; Hodnett, Mark; Lee, Nigel D

    2003-10-01

    This paper describes a new concept for an ultrasonic cavitation sensor designed specifically for monitoring acoustic emissions generated by small microbubbles when driven by an applied acoustic field. Its novel features include a hollow, open-ended, cylindrical shape, with the sensor being a right circular cylinder of height 32 mm and external diameter 38 mm. The internal diameter of the sensor is 30 mm; its inner surface is fabricated from a 110-microm layer of piezoelectrically active film whose measurement bandwidth is sufficient to enable acoustic emissions up to and beyond 10 MHz to be monitored. When in use, the sensor is immersed within the liquid test medium and high frequency (megahertz) acoustic emissions occurring within the hollow body of the sensor are monitored. In order to shield the sensor response from events occurring outside the cylinder, the outer surface of the sensor cylinder is encapsulated within a special 4-mm thick polyurethane-based cavitation shield with acoustic properties specifically developed to be minimally perturbing to the 40 kHz applied acoustic field but attenuating to ultrasound generated at megahertz frequencies (plane-wave transmission loss > 30 dB at 1 MHz). This paper introduces the rationale behind the new sensor, describing details of its construction and the materials formulation program undertaken to develop the cavitation shield. PMID:14609074

  10. An effective sensor for tool wear monitoring in face milling : acoustic emmision

    Mathew, M. T.; P S Pai; Rocha, L A

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) has been widely used for monitoring manufacturing processes particularly those involving metal cutting. Monitoring the condition of the cutting tool in the machining process is very important since tool condition will affect the part size, quality and an unexpected tool failure may damage the tool, work-piece and sometimes the machine tool itself. AE can be effectively used for tool condition monitoring applications because the emissions from process c...

  11. LOCAL TO BASIN SCALE ARRAYS FOR PASSIVE ACOUSTIC MONITORING IN THE ATLANTIC SECTOR OF THE SOUTHERN OCEAN

    Rettig, Stefanie; Boebel, Olaf; Menze, Sebastian; Kindermann, Lars; Thomisch, Karolin; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Passive acoustic data provide a prime source of information on marine mammal distribution and behaviour. Particularly in the Southern Ocean, where ship-based data collection can be severely hampered by weather and ice conditions, passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) of marine mammals forms an important source of year-round information on acoustic presence. Array data can be used to obtain directional information on the species present in the recordings to derive movement patterns. Acoustic array...

  12. Acoustic emission monitoring of fracturing process of migmatite samples

    Petružálek, Matěj; Lokajíček, Tomáš; Svitek, Tomáš

    Montréal: Canadian Institute of Mining , Metallurgy and Petroleum, 2015. ISBN 978-1-926872-25-4. [International Congress of Rock Mechanics /13./. Montréal (CA), 10.05.2015-13.05.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP104/12/0915; GA MŠk LH13102 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropy * fracturing process * acoustic emission * ultrasonic sounding Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  13. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  14. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Human Factors, Controls, and Statistics; Smith, James A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Fuel Performance and Design; Jewell, James Keith [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Fuel Performance and Design

    2015-02-01

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  15. Ultrasonic acoustic health monitoring of ball bearings using neural network pattern classification of power spectral density

    Kirchner, William; Southward, Steve; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a generic passive non-contact based approach using ultrasonic acoustic emissions (UAE) to facilitate the neural network classification of bearing health, and more specifically the bearing operating condition. The acoustic emission signals used in this study are in the ultrasonic range (20-120 kHz). A direct benefit of microphones capable of measurements in this frequency range is their inherent directionality. Using selected bands from the UAE power spectrum signature, it is possible to pose the health monitoring problem as a multi-class classification problem, and make use of a single neural network to classify the ultrasonic acoustic emission signatures. Artificial training data, based on statistical properties of a significantly smaller experimental data set is used to train the neural network. This specific approach is generic enough to suggest that it is applicable to a variety of systems and components where periodic acoustic emissions exist.

  16. Chemometrics review for chemical sensor development, task 7 report

    NONE

    1994-05-01

    This report, the seventh in a series on the evaluation of several chemical sensors for use in the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) site characterization and monitoring programs, concentrates on the potential use of chemometrics techniques in analysis of sensor data. Chemometrics is the chemical discipline that uses mathematical, statistical, and other methods that employ formal logic to: design or select optimal measurement procedures and experiments and provide maximum relevant chemical information by analyzing chemical data. The report emphasizes the latter aspect. In a formal sense, two distinct phases are in chemometrics applications to analytical chemistry problems: (1) the exploratory data analysis phase and (2) the calibration and prediction phase. For use in real-world problems, it is wise to add a third aspect - the independent validation and verification phase. In practical applications, such as the ERWM work, and in order of decreasing difficulties, the most difficult tasks in chemometrics are: establishing the necessary infrastructure (to manage sampling records, data handling, and data storage and related aspects), exploring data analysis, and solving calibration problems, especially for nonlinear models. Chemometrics techniques are different for what are called zeroth-, first-, and second-order systems, and the details depend on the form of the assumed functional relationship between the measured response and the concentrations of components in mixtures. In general, linear relationships can be handled relatively easily, but nonlinear relationships can be difficult.

  17. Chemometrics review for chemical sensor development, task 7 report

    This report, the seventh in a series on the evaluation of several chemical sensors for use in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) site characterization and monitoring programs, concentrates on the potential use of chemometrics techniques in analysis of sensor data. Chemometrics is the chemical discipline that uses mathematical, statistical, and other methods that employ formal logic to: design or select optimal measurement procedures and experiments and provide maximum relevant chemical information by analyzing chemical data. The report emphasizes the latter aspect. In a formal sense, two distinct phases are in chemometrics applications to analytical chemistry problems: (1) the exploratory data analysis phase and (2) the calibration and prediction phase. For use in real-world problems, it is wise to add a third aspect - the independent validation and verification phase. In practical applications, such as the ERWM work, and in order of decreasing difficulties, the most difficult tasks in chemometrics are: establishing the necessary infrastructure (to manage sampling records, data handling, and data storage and related aspects), exploring data analysis, and solving calibration problems, especially for nonlinear models. Chemometrics techniques are different for what are called zeroth-, first-, and second-order systems, and the details depend on the form of the assumed functional relationship between the measured response and the concentrations of components in mixtures. In general, linear relationships can be handled relatively easily, but nonlinear relationships can be difficult

  18. Experimental study of advanced continuous acoustic-emission monitoring of BWR components. Final report

    This report presents the results of a four year research program on the utilization of acoustic emission techniques on light water reactor component applications. Two techniques of the acoustic emission technology were applied to specific problems occurring within the light water reactor system. Crack detection AE monitoring was applied to thermal cycle fatigue cracking problems and stress corrosion cracking problems. Leak detection AE monitoring was applied to valve leakage in the main steam safety relief valves and incontainment packing gland valves. The report provides AE data showing how AE crack detection can be used as an on-line diagnostic monitoring tool. By having an active monitor on light water reactor components, the inservice inspection of the components is being performed during operation rather than refueling periods, thereby reducing critical path time during outages. The resultant benefit is increased plant availability and a reduction in accumulated radiation exposure

  19. A scalable acoustic sensor network for model based monitoring of urban traffic noise

    Basten, T.G.H.; Wessels, P.W.; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2012-01-01

    A good understanding of the acoustic environment due to traffic in urban areas is very important. Long term monitoring within large areas provides a clear insight in the actual noise situation. This is needed to take appropriate and cost efficient measures; to asses the effect of measures by compari

  20. Statistical fracture of E-glass fibres using a bundle tensile test and acoustic emission monitoring

    R'Mili, M.; Moevus, M.; Godin, N.

    2009-01-01

    Statistical fracture of E-glass fibres using a bundle tensile test and acoustic emission monitoring correspondance: Corresponding author.Tel.: +33472436127; fax: +33472438528. (R?Mili, M.) (R?Mili, M.) Universite de Lyon--> , INSA-Lyon--> , MATEIS--> , 7 Avenue Jean Capelle--> , 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex--> - FRANCE (R?Mili, M.) Universite de Lyon--> , INSA-Lyo...

  1. An integrated vision for environmental monitoring and the role of acoustic communication networks

    Jesus, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Current pace of ocean resources exploitation have set the alarm for tighter environmental monitoring. Recent European legislation requires very accurate measurements of reference values for all types of ocean pollution, including acoustic noise. For near shore or offshore construction, platforms or infrastructures extensive measurements should be carried out before during and after exploitation activities have taken place. Environmental monitoring requires the deployment of sensors with speci...

  2. Acoustic impedance rhinometry (AIR): a technique for monitoring dynamic changes in nasal congestion

    We describe a simple and inexpensive method for monitoring nasal air flow resistance using measurement of the small-signal acoustic input impedance of the nasal passage, similar to the audiological measurement of ear drum compliance with acoustic tympanometry. The method requires generation of a fixed sinusoidal volume–velocity stimulus using ear-bud speakers, and an electret microphone to monitor the resultant pressure fluctuation in the nasal passage. Both are coupled to the nose via high impedance silastic tubing and a small plastic nose insert. The acoustic impedance is monitored in real-time using a laptop soundcard and custom-written software developed in LabView 7.0 (National Instruments). The compact, lightweight equipment and fast time resolution lends the technique to research into the small and rapid reflexive changes in nasal resistance caused by environmental and local neurological influences. The acoustic impedance rhinometry technique has the potential to be developed for use in a clinical setting, where the need exists for a simple and inexpensive objective nasal resistance measurement technique. (paper)

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring of preservice testing at Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Plant in the US during hot functional preservice testing is described. Background, methodology, and results are included. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by the US NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing to AE monitoring during reactor operation. 3 refs., 6 figs

  4. Distributed feedback fiber laser acoustic emission sensor for concrete structure health monitoring

    Hao, Gengjie; Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Sun, Baochen; Li, Fang

    2014-05-01

    This paper introduces a highly-sensitive fiber optical acoustic emission (AE) sensor and a parameter analysis method aiming at concrete structure health monitoring. Distributed feedback fiber-laser (DFB-FL), which is encapsulated to have a high acoustic sensitivity, is used for sensor unit of the AE sensor. The AE signal of concrete beam in different work stages, based on the four-point bending experiment of the concrete beam, is picked up, and the relationship between the concrete beam work stages and the AE parameter is found. The results indicate that DFB-FLAES can be used as sensitive transducers for recording acoustic events and forecasting the imminent failure of the concrete beam.

  5. Acoustic emission analysis for structural health monitoring of hot metal components

    For the application of acoustic emission analysis on hot components such as pipes special application techniques are necessary to protect the sensor from the heat. The Fraunhofer IKTS-MD has developed a waveguide solution that meets these requirements. Major challenges in the application of acoustic emission analysis in an industrial environment is the strong ambient noise. This requirement meets the developed acoustic measurement system at the Fraunhofer Institute by a high measurement dynamics, storage and assessment of the complete waveforms and by special algorithms. The attractiveness of the method lies in the relatively low number of sensors with which the integrity of large plant areas (e.g. several meters under high alternating load standing superheated steam pipe) can be permanently monitored.

  6. An Automated Acoustic System to Monitor and Classify Birds

    Ho KC

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel bird monitoring and recognition system in noisy environments. The project objective is to avoid bird strikes to aircraft. First, a cost-effective microphone dish concept (microphone array with many concentric rings is presented that can provide directional and accurate acquisition of bird sounds and can simultaneously pick up bird sounds from different directions. Second, direction-of-arrival (DOA and beamforming algorithms have been developed for the circular array. Third, an efficient recognition algorithm is proposed which uses Gaussian mixture models (GMMs. The overall system is suitable for monitoring and recognition for a large number of birds. Fourth, a hardware prototype has been built and initial experiments demonstrated that the array can acquire and classify birds accurately.

  7. An Automated Acoustic System to Monitor and Classify Birds

    Ho KC; Li Y.; Stanford V; Rochet C; Kwan C; Mei G; Ren Z; Xu R; Zhang Y; Lao D; Stevenson M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a novel bird monitoring and recognition system in noisy environments. The project objective is to avoid bird strikes to aircraft. First, a cost-effective microphone dish concept (microphone array with many concentric rings) is presented that can provide directional and accurate acquisition of bird sounds and can simultaneously pick up bird sounds from different directions. Second, direction-of-arrival (DOA) and beamforming algorithms have been developed for the circular a...

  8. The Doppler Effect based acoustic source separation for a wayside train bearing monitoring system

    Zhang, Haibin; Zhang, Shangbin; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2016-01-01

    Wayside acoustic condition monitoring and fault diagnosis for train bearings depend on acquired acoustic signals, which consist of mixed signals from different train bearings with obvious Doppler distortion as well as background noises. This study proposes a novel scheme to overcome the difficulties, especially the multi-source problem in wayside acoustic diagnosis system. In the method, a time-frequency data fusion (TFDF) strategy is applied to weaken the Heisenberg's uncertainty limit for a signal's time-frequency distribution (TFD) of high resolution. Due to the Doppler Effect, the signals from different bearings have different time centers even with the same frequency. A Doppler feature matching search (DFMS) algorithm is then put forward to locate the time centers of different bearings in the TFD spectrogram. With the determined time centers, time-frequency filters (TFF) are designed with thresholds to separate the acoustic signals in the time-frequency domain. Then the inverse STFT (ISTFT) is taken and the signals are recovered and filtered aiming at each sound source. Subsequently, a dynamical resampling method is utilized to remove the Doppler Effect. Finally, accurate diagnosis for train bearing faults can be achieved by applying conventional spectrum analysis techniques to the resampled data. The performance of the proposed method is verified by both simulated and experimental cases. It shows that it is effective to detect and diagnose multiple defective bearings even though they produce multi-source acoustic signals.

  9. Acoustic emission monitoring and ultrasonic examination correlation on a reactor pressure vessel. Final report

    The acoustic emission monitoring and corroborative ultrasonic examination of the acoustic emission (AE) locations established during the hydrostatic pressure test of a BWR primary pressure vessel is described. Descriptive information regarding AE is provided as a background and details of the AE and ultrasonic instrumentation, procedures, problems encountered, and test results are discussed. In total, 42 acoustic emission locations were detected, located, and ultrasonically examined during this project. At all 42 AE locations ultrasonic indications were obtained. Of the AE locations, 76% (or 32 of the 42) were confirmed at amplitudes greater than or equal to 2.5% Distance Amplitude Correction (DAC) by either L-wave or shear wave ultrasonic examination, the largest of these being 18% DAC. The remainder of the AE locations were confirmed at amplitudes less than 2.5% DAC. ASME Code requires that ultrasonic examination record for permanent reference indications of 50% DAC or greater. As is to be expected ultrasonic examination detected examinations which were not located by AE monitoring since AE locates only active flaws. Results show the complementary value of AE monitoring to ultrasonic examination in two primary uses: determining the existence and the location of active discontinuities; and assuring that active discontinuities are not overlooked. Results reflect the position that AE monitoring and ultrasonics are supplementary to each other, not replacements for one another

  10. A fully automatic wildlife acoustic monitor and survey system

    Boucher, Neil; Jinnai, Michihiro; Smolders, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    International audience We describe a fully automated, PC based wildlife monitoring and survey system that is used for diverse species studies. The system uses a wide-area recorder that can record over areas of up to several square kilometres. The recorder can run, unattended for more than a month. The recordings can either be analysed in real time to produce a particular response (e.g. send an SMS if a rare parrot is detected), or can be analysed later on a PC. Any number of different spec...

  11. Wireless surface acoustic wave sensors for displacement and crack monitoring in concrete structures

    Perry, M.; McKeeman, I.; Saafi, M.; Niewczas, P.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that wireless surface acoustic wave devices can be used to monitor millimetre displacements in crack opening during the cyclic and static loading of reinforced concrete structures. Sensors were packaged to extend their gauge length and to protect them against brittle fracture, before being surface-mounted onto the tensioned surface of a concrete beam. The accuracy of measurements was verified using computational methods and optical-fibre strain sensors. After packaging, the displacement and temperature resolutions of the surface acoustic wave sensors were 10 μ {{m}} and 2 °C respectively. With some further work, these devices could be retrofitted to existing concrete structures to facilitate wireless structural health monitoring.

  12. Monitoring suspended sediment transport in an ice-affected river using acoustic Doppler current profilers

    Moore, S. A.; Ghareh Aghaji Zare, S.; Rennie, C. D.; Ahmari, H.; Seidou, O.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying sediment budgets and understanding the processes which control fluvial sediment transport is paramount to monitoring river geomorphology and ecological habitat. In regions that are subject to freezing there is the added complexity of ice. River ice processes impact flow distribution, water stage and sediment transport. Ice processes typically have the largest impact on sediment transport and channel morphodynamics when ice jams occur during ice cover formation and breakup. Ice jams may restrict flow and cause local acceleration when released. Additionally, ice can mechanically scour river bed and banks. Under-ice sediment transport measurements are lacking due to obvious safety and logistical reasons, in addition to a lack of adequate measurement techniques. Since some rivers can be covered in ice during six months of the year, the lack of data in winter months leads to large uncertainty in annual sediment load calculations. To address this problem, acoustic profilers are being used to monitor flow velocity, suspended sediment and ice processes in the Lower Nelson River, Manitoba, Canada. Acoustic profilers are ideal for under-ice sediment flux measurements since they can be operated autonomously and continuously, they do not disturb the flow in the zone of measurement and acoustic backscatter can be related to sediment size and concentration. In March 2012 two upward-facing profilers (1200 kHz acoustic Doppler current profiler, 546 KHz acoustic backscatter profiler) were installed through a hole in the ice on the Nelson River, 50 km downstream of the Limestone Generating Station. Data were recorded for four months, including both stable cover and breakup periods. This paper presents suspended sediment fluxes calculated from the acoustic measurements. Velocity data were used to infer the vertical distribution of sediment sizes and concentrations; this information was then used in the interpretation of the backscattered intensity data. It was found that

  13. Acoustic Telemetry Validates a Citizen Science Approach for Monitoring Sharks on Coral Reefs

    Vianna, Gabriel M. S.; Meekan, Mark G; Bornovski, Tova H.; Jessica J Meeuwig

    2014-01-01

    Citizen science is promoted as a simple and cost-effective alternative to traditional approaches for the monitoring of populations of marine megafauna. However, the reliability of datasets collected by these initiatives often remains poorly quantified. We compared datasets of shark counts collected by professional dive guides with acoustic telemetry data from tagged sharks collected at the same coral reef sites over a period of five years. There was a strong correlation between the number of ...

  14. The use of acoustic monitoring to manage concrete structures in the nuclear industry

    Concrete and steel are widely used in containment vessels within the nuclear industry. Both are excellent acoustic transmitters. In many structures tensioned wire elements are used within containment structures. However, tensioned wire can be vulnerable to corrosion. To reduce the probability of corrosion sophisticated protection systems are used. To confirm that the design strength is available through time, extensive inspection and maintenance regimes are implemented. These regimes include tests to confirm the condition of the post-tensioning, and pressure tests (leak tests) to verify the performance of vessel. This paper presents an acoustic monitoring technology which uses widely distributed sensors to detect and locate wire failures using the energy released at failure. The technology has been used on a range of structures including post-tensioned concrete bridges, suspension bridges, buildings, pre-cast concrete cylinder pipelines (PCCP) and prestressed concrete containment vessels (PCCV), where it has increased confidence in structures and reduced maintenance costs. Where the level of ambient noise is low then SoundPrint acoustic monitoring can detect concrete cracking. This has been shown in PCCP pipelines, on laboratory test structures and also in nuclear structures. The programme has shown that distributed sensors can locate internal cracking well before there is any external evidence. Several projects have been completed on nuclear vessels. The first has been completed on an Electricite de France (EDF) concrete test pressure vessel at Civaux in France. The second at the Sandia PCCV Test Vessel in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, which involved the testing of a steel lined concrete vessel. The third was on a PCCV in Maryland, USA. Acoustic monitoring is also able to monitor the deterioration of post-tensioned concrete structures as a result of seismic activity. Summary details of a case history are presented. (author)

  15. Monitoring of firmness evolution of peaches during storage by combining acoustic and impact methods

    Diezma Iglesias, Belen; Valero Ubierna, Constantino; García Ramos, Francisco Javier; Ruiz-Altisent, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    Firmness is a very important quality property in peach. The storage of peach affects its subsequent softening process and shelf life. The temperature and duration of storage mainly influence the firmness of stored fruit, and monitoring the evolution of fruits enables producers to manage its commercial life. The objective of the present study was to use non-destructive acoustic and impact tests to estimate firmness of peaches and to elucidate the influence of storage temperature and of time on...

  16. The use of acoustic monitoring to manage concrete structures in the nuclear industry

    Concrete and steel are widely used in containment vessels within the nuclear industry. Both are excellent acoustic transmitters. In many structures tensioned wire elements are used within containment structures. However, tensioned wire can be vulnerable to corrosion. To reduce the probability of corrosion sophisticated protection systems are used. To confirm that the design strength is available through time, extensive inspection and maintenance regimes are implemented. These regimes include tests to confirm the condition of the post-tensioning, and pressure tests (leak tests) to verify the performance of vessel. This paper presents an acoustic monitoring technology which uses widely distributed sensors to detect and locate wire failures using the energy released at failure. The technology has been used on a range of structures including post-tensioned concrete bridges, suspension bridges, buildings, pre-cast concrete cylinder pipelines (PCCP) and prestressed concrete containment vessels (PCCV), where it has increased confidence in structures and reduced maintenance costs. Where the level of ambient noise is low then SoundPrint acoustic monitoring can detect concrete cracking. This has been shown in PCCP pipelines, on laboratory test structures and also in nuclear structures. The programme has shown that distributed sensors can locate internal cracking well before there is any external evidence. Several projects have been completed on nuclear vessels. The first has been completed on an Electricite de France (EDF) concrete test pressure vessel at Civaux in France. The second at the Sandia PCCV Test Vessel in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, which involved the testing of a steel lined concrete vessel. The third was on a PCCV in Maryland, USA. Acoustic monitoring is also able to monitor the deterioration of post-tensioned concrete structures as a result of seismic activity. Summary details of a case history are presented. (authors)

  17. EDP-assisted system solutions in machine monitoring and quality assurance based on acoustic signals

    In many fields of engineering and technology, experienced staff are able to assess the condition of machines, plants and production processes by changes in both noise and vibrations ('old hand's touch'). Similar to these subjective methods based on mental expertise, complete EDP-assisted system solutions are needed to implement reliable and objective monitoring based on acoustic signals. The author describes such a system including its mature hardware components, problem-oriented software and engineering people ware. (orig./DG)

  18. Development of Acoustic Emission Technology for Condition Monitoring and Diagnosis of Rotating Machines; Bearings, Pumps, Gearboxes, Engines and Rotating Structures.

    Mba, David; Rao, Raj B. K. N.

    2006-01-01

    One of the earliest documented applications of Acoustic Emission Technology (AET) to rotating machinery monitoring was in the late 1960s. Since then there has been an explosion in research and application based studies covering bearings, pumps, gearboxes, engines and rotating structures. This paper presents a comprehensive and critical review to date on the application of Acoustic Emission Technology to condition monitoring and diagnostics of rotating machinery.

  19. Field trials of a tactile acoustic monitor for the profoundly deaf.

    Summers, I R; Peake, M A; Martin, M C

    1981-08-01

    Profoundly deaf subjects were given information about sound level in their environment by means of a body-worn unit coupled to a small vibrator worn on the finger. Results of trials on 19 adults are discussed. The Tactile Acoustic Monitor was found to be useful for identifying domestic sounds by means of their distinctive timing patterns. No significant overall improvement in subject's control of voice level was observed, although some subjects found that having a voice level monitor gave them greater confidence to join conversations. Various design improvements were suggested by the trials. Modifications which have been incorporated into an improved unit are described. PMID:7296098

  20. STUDY ON STABILITY OF UNDERGROUND STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING BY ACOUSTIC EMISSION MONITORING SYSTEM

    来兴平; 张冰川; 蔡美峰

    2000-01-01

    A simulation acoustic emission (AE) signal was processed. And an effective algorithm was presented to obtain the useful signal about the place information from the simulation signal. This paper introduces the artificial monitoring system, its application at underground roadway and its monitoring results, and tries to explore theoretically analyzing method of stability of underground concrete roadway by AE parameters. A simulation AE signal was processed. And an effective algorithm was presented to obtain the useful signal about the place information from the simulation signal It shows the nice future of the application in the active damage detection of composite material.

  1. Acoustic emission-based in-process monitoring of surface generation in robot-assisted polishing

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo;

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) measurements for in-process monitoring of surface generation in the robot-assisted polishing (RAP) was investigated. Surface roughness measurements require interruption of the process, proper surface cleaning and measurements that sometimes necessitate...... removal of the part from the machine tool. In this study, stabilisation of surface roughness during polishing rotational symmetric surfaces by the RAP process was monitored by AE measurements. An AE sensor was placed on a polishing arm in direct contact with a bonded abrasive polishing tool...

  2. Assessment of Groundwater Quality by Chemometrics.

    Papaioannou, Agelos; Rigas, George; Kella, Sotiria; Lokkas, Filotheos; Dinouli, Dimitra; Papakonstantinou, Argiris; Spiliotis, Xenofon; Plageras, Panagiotis

    2016-07-01

    Chemometric methods were used to analyze large data sets of groundwater quality from 18 wells supplying the central drinking water system of Larissa city (Greece) during the period 2001 to 2007 (8.064 observations) to determine temporal and spatial variations in groundwater quality and to identify pollution sources. Cluster analysis grouped each year into three temporal periods (January-April (first), May-August (second) and September-December (third). Furthermore, spatial cluster analysis was conducted for each period and for all samples, and grouped the 28 monitoring Units HJI (HJI=represent the observations of the monitoring site H, the J-year and the period I) into three groups (A, B and C). Discriminant Analysis used only 16 from the 24 parameters to correctly assign 97.3% of the cases. In addition, Factor Analysis identified 7, 9 and 8 latent factors for groups A, B and C, respectively. PMID:27329059

  3. Volatile organic compound monitoring by photo acoustic radiometry

    Two methods for sampling and analyzing volatile organics in subsurface pore gas were developed for use at the Hazardous Waste Disposal Site at Los Alamos National Laboratory. One is Thermal Desorption Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (TDGCMS), the other is Photoacoustic Radiometry (PAR). Presented here are two years worth of experience and lessons learned as both techniques matured. The sampling technique is equally as important as the analysis method. PAR is a nondispersive infrared technique utilizing band pass filters in the region from 1 to 15 μm. A commercial instrument, the Model 1302 Multigas Analyzer, made by Bruel and Kjaer, was adapted for field use. To use the PAR there must be some a priori knowledge of the constellation of analytes to be measured. The TDGCMS method is sensitive to 50 analytes. Hence TDGCMS is used in an initial survey of the site to determine what compounds are present and at what concentration. Once the major constituents of the soil-gas vapor plume are known the PAR can be configured to monitor for the five analytes of most interest. The PAR can analyse a sample in minutes, while in the field. The PAR is also quite precise in controlled situations

  4. A Device for Fetal Monitoring by Means of Control Over Cardiovascular Parameters Based on Acoustic Data

    Khokhlova, L. A.; Seleznev, A. I.; Zhdanov, D. S.; Zemlyakov, I. Yu; Kiseleva, E. Yu

    2016-01-01

    The problem of monitoring fetal health is topical at the moment taking into account a reduction in the level of fertile-age women's health and changes in the concept of perinatal medicine with reconsideration of live birth criteria. Fetal heart rate monitoring is a valuable means of assessing fetal health during pregnancy. The routine clinical measurements are usually carried out by the means of ultrasound cardiotocography. Although the cardiotocography monitoring provides valuable information on the fetal health status, the high quality ultrasound devices are expensive, they are not available for home care use. The recommended number of measurement is also limited. The passive and fully non-invasive acoustic recording provides an alternative low-cost measurement method. The article describes a device for fetal and maternal health monitoring by analyzing the frequency and periodicity of heart beats by means of acoustic signal received on the maternal abdomen. Based on the usage of this device a phonocardiographic fetal telemedicine system, which will allow to reduce the antenatal fetal mortality rate significantly due to continuous monitoring over the state of fetus regardless of mother's location, can be built.

  5. Online monitoring of the two-dimensional temperature field in a boiler furnace based on acoustic computed tomography

    Online monitoring of the temperature field is crucial to optimally adjust combustion within a boiler. In this paper, acoustic computed tomography (CT) technology was used to obtain the temperature profile of a furnace cross-section. The physical principles behind acoustic CT, acoustic signals and time delay estimation were studied. Then, the technique was applied to a domestic 600-MW coal-fired boiler. Acoustic CT technology was used to monitor the temperature field of the cross-section in the boiler furnace, and the temperature profile was reconstructed through ART iteration. The linear sweeping frequency signal was adopted as the sound source signal, whose sweeping frequency ranged from 500 to 3000 Hz with a sweeping cycle of 0.1 s. The generalized cross-correlation techniques with PHAT and ML were used as the time delay estimation method when the boiler was in different states. Its actual operation indicated that the monitored images accurately represented the combustion state of the boiler, and the acoustic CT system was determined to be accurate and reliable. - Highlights: • An online monitoring approach to monitor temperature field in a boiler furnace. • The paper provides acoustic CT technology to obtain the temperature profile of a furnace cross-section. • The temperature profile was reconstructed through ART iteration. • The technique is applied to a domestic 600-MW coal-fired boiler. • The monitored images accurately represent the combustion state of the boiler

  6. Acoustic remote monitoring of rock and concrete structures for nuclear waste repositories

    Excavation and thermally induced damage is of significance for many types of engineering structures but no more so than in the case of nuclear waste repository design. My research and that of my group, formally at Queen's University Canada and Keele University UK and now at the University of Liverpool UK, has focused on the development of acoustic techniques for the in situ detection and quantification of induced damage and fracturing. The application of earthquake seismology to this problem has provided the opportunity to study the micro mechanics of damage mechanisms in situ and provide validation data for predictive geomechanical models used for engineering design. Since 1987 I have been a principal investigator at Atomic Energy of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory (URL), responsible for the development of acoustic emission techniques (AE). In the last twelve years, the application of acoustic techniques to rock damage assessment has been pioneered by my group at the URL and successfully applied in several other major international projects including the ZEDEX, Retrieval and Prototype repository experiments at the Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) of SKB Sweden. In this paper I describe what information is available by remote acoustic monitoring of rock and concrete structures and demonstrate this with reference to two international scientific experiments carried out at the URL Canada and the HRL Sweden. (author)

  7. Dual instrument passive acoustic monitoring of belugas in Cook Inlet, Alaska.

    Castellote, Manuel; Small, Robert J; Lammers, Marc O; Jenniges, Justin J; Mondragon, Jeff; Atkinson, Shannon

    2016-05-01

    As part of a long-term research program, Cook Inlet beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) presence was acoustically monitored with two types of acoustic sensors utilized in tandem in moorings deployed year-round: an ecological acoustic recorder (EAR) and a cetacean and porpoise detector (C-POD). The EAR was used primarily to record the calls, whistles, and buzzes produced by belugas and killer whales (Orcinus orca). The C-POD was used to log and classify echolocation clicks from belugas, killer whales, and porpoises. This paper describes mooring packages that maximized the chances of successful long-term data collection in the particularly challenging Cook Inlet environment, and presents an analytical comparison of odontocete detections obtained by the collocated EAR and C-POD instruments from two mooring locations in the upper inlet. Results from this study illustrate a significant improvement in detecting beluga and killer whale presence when the different acoustic signals detected by EARs and C-PODs are considered together. Further, results from concurrent porpoise detections indicating prey competition and feeding interference with beluga, and porpoise displacement due to ice formation are described. PMID:27250163

  8. An acoustic-array based structural health monitoring technique for wind turbine blades

    Aizawa, Kai; Poozesh, Peyman; Niezrecki, Christopher; Baqersad, Javad; Inalpolat, Murat; Heilmann, Gunnar

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a non-contact measurement technique for health monitoring of wind turbine blades using acoustic beamforming techniques. The technique works by mounting an audio speaker inside a wind turbine blade and observing the sound radiated from the blade to identify damage within the structure. The main hypothesis for the structural damage detection is that the structural damage (cracks, edge splits, holes etc.) on the surface of a composite wind turbine blade results in changes in the sound radiation characteristics of the structure. Preliminary measurements were carried out on two separate test specimens, namely a composite box and a section of a wind turbine blade to validate the methodology. The rectangular shaped composite box and the turbine blade contained holes with different dimensions and line cracks. An acoustic microphone array with 62 microphones was used to measure the sound radiation from both structures when the speaker was located inside the box and also inside the blade segment. A phased array beamforming technique and CLEAN-based subtraction of point spread function from a reference (CLSPR) were employed to locate the different damage types on both the composite box and the wind turbine blade. The same experiment was repeated by using a commercially available 48-channel acoustic ring array to compare the test results. It was shown that both the acoustic beamforming and the CLSPR techniques can be used to identify the damage in the test structures with sufficiently high fidelity.

  9. Effects of different analysis techniques and recording duty cycles on passive acoustic monitoring of killer whales.

    Riera, Amalis; Ford, John K; Ross Chapman, N

    2013-09-01

    Killer whales in British Columbia are at risk, and little is known about their winter distribution. Passive acoustic monitoring of their year-round habitat is a valuable supplemental method to traditional visual and photographic surveys. However, long-term acoustic studies of odontocetes have some limitations, including the generation of large amounts of data that require highly time-consuming processing. There is a need to develop tools and protocols to maximize the efficiency of such studies. Here, two types of analysis, real-time and long term spectral averages, were compared to assess their performance at detecting killer whale calls in long-term acoustic recordings. In addition, two different duty cycles, 1/3 and 2/3, were tested. Both the use of long term spectral averages and a lower duty cycle resulted in a decrease in call detection and positive pod identification, leading to underestimations of the amount of time the whales were present. The impact of these limitations should be considered in future killer whale acoustic surveys. A compromise between a lower resolution data processing method and a higher duty cycle is suggested for maximum methodological efficiency. PMID:23968036

  10. Acoustic emission for on-line reactor monitoring: results of intermediate vessel test monitoring and reactor hot functional testing

    The objective of the acoustic emission (AE)/flaw characterization program is to provide an experimental feasibility evaluation of using the AE method on a continuous basis (during operation and during hydrotest) to detect and analyze flaw growth in reactor pressure vessels and primary piping. This effort is based on earlier results showing that AE has potential for being a valuable addition to nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods with the added unique capability for continuous monitoring, high sensitivity and remote flaw location. Results are reported for the ZB-1 vessel test and the Watts Bar-1 hot functional test

  11. Development of acoustic emission monitoring system for fault detection of thermal reduction reactor

    The research on the development of the fault monitoring system for the thermal reduction reactor has been performed preliminarily in order to support the successful operation of the thermal reduction reactor. The final task of the development of the fault monitoring system is to assure the integrity of the thermal reduction reactor by the Acoustic Emission (AE) method. The objectives of this paper are to identify and characterize the fault-induced signals for the discrimination of the various AE signals acquired during the reactor operation. The AE data acquisition and analysis system was constructed and applied to the fault monitoring of the small-scale reduction reactor. Through the series of experiments, the various signals such as background noise, operating signals, and fault-induced signals were measured and their characteristics were identified, which will be used in the signal discrimination for further application to full-scale thermal reduction reactor

  12. On-line Acoustic Emission monitoring of nuclear reactor systems - Status and future

    Development of Acoustic Emission (AE) technology for on-line monitoring of nuclear reactors has been going on to one degree or another for the past 20 years. The concept has received a wide variety of support and condemnation. Initially, it suffered from over enthusiasm on the part of proponents which resulted in some disappointing application efforts and a premature effort to gain ASME Code acceptance. Some very pessimistic assessments of AE for continuous monitoring grew out of all this. These critical reviews, however, served a valuable function because they helped focus what had to be accomplished to make the technology useful. The topic of this paper is, ''Where do we stand on achieving the needed accomplishments, and what is the future direction to implement effective on-line AE monitoring of nuclear reactor systems?''

  13. Monitoring the viscosity of diesel engine lubricating oil by using acoustic emission technique, the selection of measurement parameters

    Acoustic emission technique has been developed through years of monitoring and diagnosis of bearing, but it is still new in the diagnosis and monitoring of lubrication oil to bearings drive. The propagation of acoustic emission signal is generated when the signal piston on the cylinder liner lubricating oil which is a par. The signal is analyzed in time domain to obtain the parameters of root mean squared, amplitude, energy and courtesy. Lubricant viscosity will undergo changes due to temperature, pressure and useful. This study focuses on the appropriate parameters for the diagnosis and monitoring of lubricating oil viscosity. Studies were conducted at a constant rotational speed and temperature, but use a different age. The results showed that the energy parameter is the best parameter used in this monitoring. However, this parameter cannot be used directly and it should be analyzed using mathematical formulas. This mathematical formula is a relationship between acoustic emission energy with the viscosity of lubricating oil. (author)

  14. On-line acoustic emission monitoring for crack growth in LWRs

    Program activities to develop Acoustic Emission/Flaw Relationships for Inservice Monitoring of LWRs are discussed in this paper. The program is supported by the NRC Research Office with supplemental funding provided by the TVA. Accomplishments for FY87 and plans for FY88 are presented under the topics of technology development, validation on a reactor, standard and code acceptance, and dissemination of the technology. Subjects include detection of very slow crack growth, pattern recognition, on-reactor AE system performance testing, ASTM Standard, ASME Code item, and technology dissemination through application. The current program work continues to emphasize technology transfer. (author)

  15. Damage Accumulation in Cyclically-Loaded Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    Aggelis, D. G.; Dassios, K. G.; Kordatos, E. Z.; Matikas, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    Barium osumilite (BMAS) ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE) sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism. PMID:24381524

  16. Laser ablation of absorbing liquids under transparent cover: acoustical and optical monitoring

    Samokhin, A. A.; Il'ichev, N. N.; Pivovarov, P. A.; Sidorin, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Phase transition induced with infrared (λ = 2920 nm and λ = 2940 nm) nanosecond laser pulses in strongly absorbing liquids (water, ethanol) under transparent solid cover is investigated with the help of acoustical and optical monitoring. LiNbO3 transducer is used for registration of pressure pulses generated in irradiated liquids. Optical signals due to scattering and specular reflection of probing optical beams are explored with the schemes involving total internal reflection and interference effects. Combination of these two optical diagnostic methods permits for the first time to show that irradiation of covered liquids leads to vapor cavity formation which is divided from the cover with thin (submicron) liquid film despite the fact that radiation intensity maximum is located just at the liquid-plate boundary. The cavity formation is due to explosive boiling which occurs when the superheated liquid reaches its superheating limit in near critical region. After the first acoustical signal, the second signal is observed with several hundreds microseconds time delay which is caused by the vapor cavity collapse. Some results of optical and acoustical diagnostics in the case of free liquid surface are also presented.

  17. Impact-acoustics-based health monitoring of tile-wall bonding integrity using principal component analysis

    Tong, F.; Tso, S. K.; Hung, M. Y. Y.

    2006-06-01

    The use of the acoustic features extracted from the impact sounds for bonding integrity assessment has been extensively investigated. Nonetheless, considering the practical implementation of tile-wall non-destructive evaluation (NDE), the traditional defects classification method based directly on frequency-domain features has been of limited application because of the overlapping feature patterns corresponding to different classes whenever there is physical surface irregularity. The purpose of this paper is to explore the clustering and classification ability of principal component analysis (PCA) as applied to the impact-acoustics signature in tile-wall inspection with a view to mitigating the adverse influence of surface non-uniformity. A clustering analysis with signature acquired on sample slabs shows that impact-acoustics signatures of different bonding quality and different surface roughness are well separated into different clusters when using the first two principal components obtained. By adopting as inputs the feature vectors extracted with PCA applied, a multilayer back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) classifier is developed for automatic health monitoring and defects classification of tile-walls. The inspection results obtained experimentally on the prepared sample slabs are presented and discussed, confirming the utility of the proposed method, particularly in dealing with tile surface irregularity.

  18. Health monitoring of Ceramic Matrix Composites from waveform-based analysis of Acoustic Emission

    Maillet Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs are anticipated for use in the hot section of aircraft engines. Their implementation requires the understanding of the various damage modes that are involved and their relation to life expectancy. Acoustic Emission (AE has been shown to be an efficient technique for monitoring damage evolution in CMCs. However, only a waveform-based analysis of AE can offer the possibility to validate and precisely examine the recorded AE data with a view to damage localization and identification. The present work fully integrates wave initiation, propagation and acquisition in the analysis of Acoustic Emission waveforms recorded at various sensors, therefore providing more reliable information to assess the relation between Acoustic Emission and damage modes. The procedure allows selecting AE events originating from damage, accurate determination of their location as well as the characterization of effects of propagation on the recorded waveforms. This approach was developed using AE data recorded during tensile tests on carbon/carbon composites. It was then applied to melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composites.

  19. Acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB)

    O' Donnell, Matthew (Ann Arbor, MI); Ye, Jing Yong (Ann Arbor, MI); Norris, Theodore B. (Dexter, MI); Baker, Jr., James R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Balogh, Lajos P. (Ann Arbor, MI); Milas, Susanne M. (Ann Arbor, MI); Emelianov, Stanislav Y. (Ann Arbor, MI); Hollman, Kyle W. (Fenton, MI)

    2008-05-06

    An acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB) provides information which characterize material which is broken down, microbubbles in the material, and/or the microenvironment of the microbubbles. In one embodiment of the invention, femtosecond laser pulses are focused just inside the surface of a volume of aqueous solution which may include dendrimer nanocomposite (DNC) particles. A tightly focused, high frequency, single-element ultrasonic transducer is positioned such that its focus coincides axially and laterally with this laser focus. When optical breakdown occurs, a microbubble forms and a shock or pressure wave is emitted (i.e., acoustic emission). In addition to this acoustic signal, the microbubble may be actively probed with pulse-echo measurements from the same transducer. After the microbubble forms, received pulse-echo signals have an extra pulse, describing the microbubble location and providing a measure of axial microbubble size. Wavefield plots of successive recordings illustrate the generation, growth, and collapse of microbubbles due to optical breakdown. These same plots can also be used to quantify LIOB thresholds.

  20. Experimental study of advanced continuous acoustic emission monitoring of BWR components. Final report

    The program consisted of installing, maintaining, and monitoring AE sensors located on primary piping, nozzles, and valves in the BWR system. Analysis of the AE data was correlated to the results of supplementary nondestructive testing techniques used during the in-service inspection, performed at refueling outages. Purpose of the program was to develop the on-line surveillance acoustic emission technique in order to identify areas of possible structural degradation. Result of reducing inspection time was to reduce accumulated radiation exposure to inspecting personnel and to reduce the amount of critical plant outage time by identifying the critical inspection areas during operation. The program demonstrated the capability of acoustic emission instrumentation to endure the nuclear reactor environment. The acoustic emission sensors withstood 12 months of reactor operation at temperatures of 4000F and greater in high radiation fields. The preamplifiers, also mounted in the reactor environment, operated for the 12-month period in 100% humidity, 2500F conditions. The remaining cable and AE instrumentation were operated in controlled environments

  1. Experimental study of advanced continuous acoustic emission monitoring of BWR components. Final report

    McElroy, J W; Hartman, W F

    1980-09-01

    The program consisted of installing, maintaining, and monitoring AE sensors located on primary piping, nozzles, and valves in the BWR system. Analysis of the AE data was correlated to the results of supplementary nondestructive testing techniques used during the in-service inspection, performed at refueling outages. Purpose of the program was to develop the on-line surveillance acoustic emission technique in order to identify areas of possible structural degradation. Result of reducing inspection time was to reduce accumulated radiation exposure to inspecting personnel and to reduce the amount of critical plant outage time by identifying the critical inspection areas during operation. The program demonstrated the capability of acoustic emission instrumentation to endure the nuclear reactor environment. The acoustic emission sensors withstood 12 months of reactor operation at temperatures of 400/sup 0/F and greater in high radiation fields. The preamplifiers, also mounted in the reactor environment, operated for the 12-month period in 100% humidity, 250/sup 0/F conditions. The remaining cable and AE instrumentation were operated in controlled environments.

  2. Acoustic monitoring of laboratory faults: locating the origin of unstable slip events

    Korkolis, Evangelos; Niemeijer, André; Spiers, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Over the past several decades, much work has been done on studying the frictional properties of fault gouges at earthquake nucleation velocities. In addition, post-experiment microstructural analyses have been performed in an attempt to link microphysical mechanisms to the observed mechanical data. However, all observations are necessarily post-mortem and it is thus difficult to directly link transients to microstructural characteristics. We are developing an acoustic monitoring system to be used in sliding experiments using a ring shear apparatus. The goal is to locate acoustic emission sources in sheared granular assemblages and link them to processes that act on microstructures responsible for the frictional stability of the simulated fault gouge. The results will be used to develop and constrain microphysical models that explain the relation of these processes to empirical friction laws, such as rate- and state-dependent friction. The acoustic monitoring setup is comprised of an array of 16 piezo-electric sensors installed on the top and bottom sides of an annular sample, at 45 degree intervals. Acoustic emissions associated with slip events can be recorded at sampling rates of up to 50 MHz, in triggered mode. Initial experiments on 0.1 to 0.2 mm and 0.4 to 0.5 mm diameter glass beads, at 1 to 5 MPa normal stress and 1 to 30 um/s load point velocity, have been conducted to estimate the sensitivity of the sensor array. Preliminary results reveal that the intensity of the audible signal is not necessarily proportional to the magnitude of the associated stress drop for constant loading conditions, and that acoustic emissions precede slip events by a small amount of time, in the order of a few milliseconds. Currently, our efforts are focused on developing a suitable source location algorithm with the aim to identify differences in the mode of (unstable) sliding for different types of materials. This will help to identify the micromechanical mechanisms operating

  3. Near-real-time acoustic monitoring of beaked whales and other cetaceans using a Seaglider™.

    Klinck, Holger; Mellinger, David K; Klinck, Karolin; Bogue, Neil M; Luby, James C; Jump, William A; Shilling, Geoffrey B; Litchendorf, Trina; Wood, Angela S; Schorr, Gregory S; Baird, Robin W

    2012-01-01

    In most areas, estimating the presence and distribution of cryptic marine mammal species, such as beaked whales, is extremely difficult using traditional observational techniques such as ship-based visual line transect surveys. Because acoustic methods permit detection of animals underwater, at night, and in poor weather conditions, passive acoustic observation has been used increasingly often over the last decade to study marine mammal distribution, abundance, and movements, as well as for mitigation of potentially harmful anthropogenic effects. However, there is demand for new, cost-effective tools that allow scientists to monitor areas of interest autonomously with high temporal and spatial resolution in near-real time. Here we describe an autonomous underwater vehicle--a glider--equipped with an acoustic sensor and onboard data processing capabilities to passively scan an area for marine mammals in near-real time. The glider was tested extensively off the west coast of the Island of Hawai'i, USA. The instrument covered approximately 390 km during three weeks at sea and collected a total of 194 h of acoustic data. Detections of beaked whales were successfully reported to shore in near-real time. Manual analysis of the recorded data revealed a high number of vocalizations of delphinids and sperm whales. Furthermore, the glider collected vocalizations of unknown origin very similar to those made by known species of beaked whales. The instrument developed here can be used to cost-effectively screen areas of interest for marine mammals for several months at a time. The near-real-time detection and reporting capabilities of the glider can help to protect marine mammals during potentially harmful anthropogenic activities such as seismic exploration for sub-sea fossil fuels or naval sonar exercises. Furthermore, the glider is capable of under-ice operation, allowing investigation of otherwise inaccessible polar environments that are critical habitats for many

  4. Near-real-time acoustic monitoring of beaked whales and other cetaceans using a Seaglider™.

    Holger Klinck

    Full Text Available In most areas, estimating the presence and distribution of cryptic marine mammal species, such as beaked whales, is extremely difficult using traditional observational techniques such as ship-based visual line transect surveys. Because acoustic methods permit detection of animals underwater, at night, and in poor weather conditions, passive acoustic observation has been used increasingly often over the last decade to study marine mammal distribution, abundance, and movements, as well as for mitigation of potentially harmful anthropogenic effects. However, there is demand for new, cost-effective tools that allow scientists to monitor areas of interest autonomously with high temporal and spatial resolution in near-real time. Here we describe an autonomous underwater vehicle--a glider--equipped with an acoustic sensor and onboard data processing capabilities to passively scan an area for marine mammals in near-real time. The glider was tested extensively off the west coast of the Island of Hawai'i, USA. The instrument covered approximately 390 km during three weeks at sea and collected a total of 194 h of acoustic data. Detections of beaked whales were successfully reported to shore in near-real time. Manual analysis of the recorded data revealed a high number of vocalizations of delphinids and sperm whales. Furthermore, the glider collected vocalizations of unknown origin very similar to those made by known species of beaked whales. The instrument developed here can be used to cost-effectively screen areas of interest for marine mammals for several months at a time. The near-real-time detection and reporting capabilities of the glider can help to protect marine mammals during potentially harmful anthropogenic activities such as seismic exploration for sub-sea fossil fuels or naval sonar exercises. Furthermore, the glider is capable of under-ice operation, allowing investigation of otherwise inaccessible polar environments that are critical

  5. Acoustic emission-based condition monitoring methods: Review and application for low speed slew bearing

    Caesarendra, Wahyu; Kosasih, Buyung; Tieu, Anh Kiet; Zhu, Hongtao; Moodie, Craig A. S.; Zhu, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an acoustic emission-based method for the condition monitoring of low speed reversible slew bearings. Several acoustic emission (AE) hit parameters as the monitoring parameters for the detection of impending failure of slew bearings are reviewed first. The review focuses on: (1) the application of AE in typical rolling element bearings running at different speed classifications, i.e. high speed (>600 rpm), low speed (10-600 rpm) and very low speed (<10 rpm); (2) the commonly used AE hit parameters in rolling element bearings and (3) AE signal processing, feature extraction and pattern recognition methods. In the experiment, impending failure of the slew bearing was detected by the AE hit parameters after the new bearing had run continuously for approximately 15 months. The slew bearing was then dismantled and the evidence of the early defect was analysed. Based on the result, we propose a feature extraction method of the AE waveform signal using the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) algorithm and demonstrate that the LLE feature can detect the sign of failure earlier than the AE hit parameters with improved prediction of the progressive trend of the defect.

  6. Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbine Blades: Acoustic Source Localization Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    Omar Mabrok Bouzid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring (SHM is important for reducing the maintenance and operation cost of safety-critical components and systems in offshore wind turbines. This paper proposes an in situ wireless SHM system based on an acoustic emission (AE technique. By using this technique a number of challenges are introduced due to high sampling rate requirements, limitations in the communication bandwidth, memory space, and power resources. To overcome these challenges, this paper focused on two elements: (1 the use of an in situ wireless SHM technique in conjunction with the utilization of low sampling rates; (2 localization of acoustic sources which could emulate impact damage or audible cracks caused by different objects, such as tools, bird strikes, or strong hail, all of which represent abrupt AE events and could affect the structural health of a monitored wind turbine blade. The localization process is performed using features extracted from aliased AE signals based on a developed constraint localization model. To validate the performance of these elements, the proposed system was tested by testing the localization of the emulated AE sources acquired in the field.

  7. Laser tattoo removal as an ablation process monitored by acoustical and optical methods

    Cencič, Boris; Gregorčič, Peter; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2013-07-01

    Strength of the laser-tissue interaction varies even within a single tattoo because of the inhomogeneous distribution of the tattoo pigment embedded in the skin. A monitoring system is therefore developed for simultaneous monitoring of the laser tattoo removal process based on acoustical and optical techniques. A laser-beam-deflection probe is used for measuring the acoustical signals accompanying the breakdown, and a CCD camera captures the level and the spatial distribution of the plasma radiation. Using these methods we examine the degree of excitation-pulse absorption within the pigment and the degree of the structural changes of the skin. A Nd:YAG laser with a top-hat beam profile, designed for tattoo removal, is used as the excitation source in our experiments. Special attention is given to structural changes in the skin, which depend on the applied fluence. Tattoo removal with multiple pulses is also analyzed. Experiments are made in vitro (skin phantoms) and ex vivo (marking tattoos on the pig skin). The presented results are important for the understanding and optimization of the process used in medical therapies.

  8. Monitoring accelerated carbonation on standard Portland cement mortar by nonlinear resonance acoustic test

    Eiras, J. N.; Kundu, T.; Popovics, J. S.; Monzó, J.; Borrachero, M. V.; Payá, J.

    2015-03-01

    Carbonation is an important deleterious process for concrete structures. Carbonation begins when carbon dioxide (CO2) present in the atmosphere reacts with portlandite producing calcium carbonate (CaCO3). In severe carbonation conditions, C-S-H gel is decomposed into silica gel (SiO2.nH2O) and CaCO3. As a result, concrete pore water pH decreases (usually below 10) and eventually steel reinforcing bars become unprotected from corrosion agents. Usually, the carbonation of the cementing matrix reduces the porosity, because CaCO3 crystals (calcite and vaterite) occupy more volume than portlandite. In this study, an accelerated carbonation-ageing process is conducted on Portland cement mortar samples with water to cement ratio of 0.5. The evolution of the carbonation process on mortar is monitored at different levels of ageing until the mortar is almost fully carbonated. A nondestructive technique based on nonlinear acoustic resonance is used to monitor the variation of the constitutive properties upon carbonation. At selected levels of ageing, the compressive strength is obtained. From fractured surfaces the depth of carbonation is determined with phenolphthalein solution. An image analysis of the fractured surfaces is used to quantify the depth of carbonation. The results from resonant acoustic tests revealed a progressive increase of stiffness and a decrease of material nonlinearity.

  9. Preliminary studies for monitoring erosion in pipelines by the acoustic emission technique

    Tiboni, G.B. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais; Marquardt, T.A.S; SantaMaria, V.A.R.; Silva, C.H. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work is to present some applications of Acoustic Emission (AE), which is a powerful technique for nondestructive testing in Tribology, treated here as tests of friction, wear by contact fatigue, wear by slip and wear by erosion. In this work a special attention is given to solid particle erosion and hydro-abrasive erosion, problems found in almost every pipeline that lead to local loss of material and eventually rupture of the line. The technique of AE can be used as an efficient online tool when, primarily, to monitor tribological aspects such as the rate of wear of materials, as well as detect the spread of flaws in them. In wear by erosion, specifically, the parameters of RMS and acoustic energy are capable of correlation with the type of mechanism for removal of material. As a preliminary goal, erosive tests were performed with gas (air) without erosive particles, monitored by AE, varying the surface of the samples and the internal diameter the nozzle, taking the differences in signs of AE. Correlation between parameters of RMS and amplitude were noticed with the variables of the tests, such as roughness and fluid velocity. The RMS parameter showed a exponential correction with the fluid velocity, however the amplitude signals had a linear behavior. The knowledge of these parameters is essential for the development of a system that is able to quantify the wear rate of a pipeline without taking it out of operation. (author)

  10. A portable Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopic system for the identification and environmental monitoring of algal cells.

    Wood, Bayden R; Heraud, Philip; Stojkovic, Slobodanka; Morrison, Danielle; Beardall, John; McNaughton, Don

    2005-08-01

    We report the coupling of a portable Raman spectrometer to an acoustic levitation device to enable environmental monitoring and the potential taxonomic identification of microalgae. Spectra of living cells were recorded at 785 nm using a fiber-optic probe coupled to a portable Raman spectrometer. The spectra exhibit an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and clearly show bands from chlorophyll a and beta-carotene. Spectra of levitated photobleached microalgae clearly show a reduction in chlorophyll a concentration relative to beta-carotene after 10 min of exposure to a quartz halogen lamp. Spectra recorded from levitated nitrogen-limited cells also show a significant reduction in bands associated with chlorophyll a, as compared to nitrogen-replete cells. To investigate the diagnostic capability of the technique, four species of microalgae were analyzed. Good quality spectra of all four species were obtained showing varying ratios of beta-carotene to chlorophyll. The combination of an acoustic levitation device and a portable Raman spectrometer shows potential as a taxonomic and environmental monitoring tool with direct application to field studies in remote environments. PMID:16053309

  11. Acoustic emission (AE) health monitoring of diaphragm type couplings using neural network analysis

    Godinez-Azcuaga, Valery F.; Shu, Fong; Finlayson, Richard D.; O'Donnell, Bruce

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the latest results obtained from Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring and detection of cracks and/or damage in diaphragm couplings, which are used in some aircraft and engine drive systems. Early detection of mechanical failure in aircraft drive train components is a key safety and economical issue with both military and civil sectors of aviation. One of these components is the diaphragm-type coupling, which has been evaluated as the ideal drive coupling for many application requirements such as high speed, high torque, and non-lubrication. Its flexible axial and angular displacement capabilities have made it indispensable for aircraft drive systems. However, diaphragm-type couplings may develop cracks during their operation. The ability to monitor, detect, identify, and isolate coupling cracks on an operational aircraft system is required in order to provide sufficient advance warning to preclude catastrophic failure. It is known that metallic structures generate characteristic Acoustic Emission (AE) during crack growth/propagation cycles. This phenomenon makes AE very attractive among various monitoring techniques for fault detection in diaphragm-type couplings. However, commercially available systems capable of automatic discrimination between signals from crack growth and normal mechanical noise are not readily available. Positive classification of signals requires experienced personnel and post-test data analysis, which tend to be a time-consuming, laborious, and expensive process. With further development of automated classifiers, AE can become a fully autonomous fault detection technique requiring no human intervention after implementation. AE has the potential to be fully integrated with automated query and response mechanisms for system/process monitoring and control.

  12. Monitoring of the deformation and fracture process of dual phase steels employing acoustic emission techniques

    Highlights: ► Acoustic emission (AE) signals from a tensile test of dual phase steels (DPS)s with various morphologies were captured. ► By utilizing sentry function we tried to relate the AE signals and micromechanisms of fracture of these steels. ► SEM observations for verification of results, indicate that AE monitoring is an efficient tool to detect micromechanisms identifying failure in DPSs. - Abstract: In this paper, continuing our previous works, a new approach for detection of fracture micro mechanisms of ferrite–martensite dual-phase steels (DPSs) with various microstructures was investigated. For this purpose, dual phase steels with different volume fractions of martensite (VM) were produced by various heat treatment methods on a low carbon steel (0.1% C), and acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was then used during tensile testing of these DPSs. The AE signals from a tensile test using DPS in the range of 12–73% VM and various morphologies, like equiaxed or fibrous martensite phase, were captured. Principally, to understand the AE response and behavior of the martensite or ferrite phase separately, some samples of martensite and heat treated ferrite were tested. After the tests, by utilizing a new function named “sentry function”, we tried to relate the AE signals to various failure mechanisms of these steels. In confirmation of our earlier works, the results show that AE monitoring and sentry function are efficient tools to detect failure micromechanisms, consisting of ferrite–martensite interface decohesion and/or martensite phase fracture, identifying the correlation of failure mechanisms to microstructure in DPS. The results were verified with scanning electron microscopic observations and they indicate that AE monitoring is an efficient tool to detect micromechanisms identifying failure in DPSs.

  13. Passive acoustic monitoring of coastally associated Hawaiian spinner dolphins, Stenella longirostris, ground-truthed through visual surveys.

    Heenehan, Heather L; Tyne, Julian A; Bejder, Lars; Van Parijs, Sofie M; Johnston, David W

    2016-07-01

    Effective decision making to protect coastally associated dolphins relies on monitoring the presence of animals in areas that are critical to their survival. Hawaiian spinner dolphins forage at night and rest during the day in shallow bays. Due to their predictable presence, they are targeted by dolphin-tourism. In this study, comparisons of presence were made between passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) and vessel-based visual surveys in Hawaiian spinner dolphin resting bays. DSG-Ocean passive acoustic recording devices were deployed in four bays along the Kona Coast of Hawai'i Island between January 8, 2011 and August 30, 2012. The devices sampled at 80 kHz, making 30-s recordings every four minutes. Overall, dolphins were acoustically detected on 37.1% to 89.6% of recording days depending on the bay. Vessel-based visual surveys overlapped with the PAM surveys on 202 days across the four bays. No significant differences were found between visual and acoustic detections suggesting acoustic surveys can be used as a proxy for visual surveys. Given the need to monitor dolphin presence across sites, PAM is the most suitable and efficient tool for monitoring long-term presence/absence. Concomitant photo-identification surveys are necessary to address changes in abundance over time. PMID:27475147

  14. Acoustic emission for on-line reactor monitoring: results of intermediate vessel test monitoring and reactor hot functional

    The objective of the acoustic emission (AE)/flaw characterization program presented is to develop use of the AE method on a continuous basis during operation and during hydrotest, to detect and analyze flow growth in reactor pressure vessels and primary piping. The program scope is described by three primary areas of effort: develop a method to identify crack growth AE signals; develop a relationship between measured AE and crack growth; demonstrate the total concept through off-reactor vessel tests; and, on-reactor monitoring. The laboratory speciments used to determine fundamental feasibility of program objectives were ASTM A533 B, Class 1 steel. The ZB-1 vessel test is described, and the results are presented. Reactor hot functional testing was done on the Watts Bar Unit 1. Evidence shows that AE from cracking in inaccessible parts of the reactor system such as the vessel beltline should be detectable

  15. Chemometrics and in-line near infrared spectroscopic monitoring of a biopharmaceutical Chinese hamster ovary cell culture: prediction of multiple cultivation variables.

    Clavaud, Matthieu; Roggo, Yves; Von Daeniken, Ralph; Liebler, André; Schwabe, Jan-Oliver

    2013-07-15

    In the present study near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was used to monitor the cultivation of mammalian Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells producing a monoclonal antibody in a fed-batch cell culture process. A temperature shift was applied during the cultivation. The cells were incubated at 37 °C and 33 °C. The Fourier transform near infrared (FT-NIR) multiplex process analyzer spectroscopy was investigated to monitor cultivation variables of the CHO cell culture from 10 independent batches using two channels of the FT-NIR. The measurements were performed on production scale bioreactors of 12,500 L. The cell cultures were analyzed with the spectrometer coupled to a transflection sterilizable fiber optic probe inserted into the bioreactors. Multivariate data analysis (MVDA) employing unsupervised principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression methods (PLS) were applied. PCA demonstrated that 96% of the observed variability was explained by the process trajectory and the inter-batch variability. PCA was found to be a significant tool in identifying batch homogeneity between lots and in detecting abnormal fermentation runs. Seven different cell culture parameters such as osmolality, glucose concentration, product titer, packed cell volume (PCV), integrated viable packed cell volume (ivPCV), viable cell density (VCD), and integrated viable cell count (iVCC) were monitored inline and predicted by NIR. NIR spectra and reference analytics data were computed using control charts to evaluate the monitoring abilities. Control charts of each media component were under control by NIR spectroscopy. The PLS calibration plots offered accurate predictive capabilities for each media. This paper underlines the capability for inline prediction of multiple cultivation variables during bioprocess monitoring. PMID:23622522

  16. An effective sensor for tool wear monitoring in face milling: Acoustic emission

    M T Mathew; P Srinivasa Pai; L A Rocha

    2008-06-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) has been widely used for monitoring manufacturing processes particularly those involving metal cutting. Monitoring the condition of the cutting tool in the machining process is very important since tool condition will affect the part size, quality and an unexpected tool failure may damage the tool, work-piece and sometimes the machine tool itself. AE can be effectively used for tool condition monitoring applications because the emissions from process changes like tool wear, chip formation i.e. plastic deformation, etc. can be directly related to the mechanics of the process. Also AE can very effectively respond to changes like tool fracture, tool chipping, etc. when compared to cutting force and since the frequency range is much higher than that of machine vibrations and environmental noises, a relatively uncontaminated signal can be obtained. AE signal analysis was applied for sensing tool wear in face milling operations. Cutting tests were carried out on a vertical milling machine. Tests were carried out for a given cutting condition, using single insert, two inserts (adjacent and opposite) and three inserts in the cutter. AE signal parameters like ring down count and rms voltage were measured and were correlated with flank wear values (VB max). The results of this investigation indicate that AE can be effectively used for monitoring tool wear in face milling operations.

  17. Estimating population size of a nocturnal burrow-nesting seabird using acoustic monitoring and habitat mapping

    Steffen Oppel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Population size assessments for nocturnal burrow-nesting seabirds are logistically challenging because these species are active in colonies only during darkness and often nest on remote islands where manual inspections of breeding burrows are not feasible. Many seabird species are highly vocal, and recent technological innovations now make it possible to record and quantify vocal activity in seabird colonies. Here we test the hypothesis that remotely recorded vocal activity in Cory’s shearwater (Calonectris borealis breeding colonies in the North Atlantic increases with nest density, and combined this relationship with cliff habitat mapping to estimate the population size of Cory’s shearwaters on the island of Corvo (Azores. We deployed acoustic recording devices in 9 Cory’s shearwater colonies of known size to establish a relationship between vocal activity and local nest density (slope = 1.07, R2 = 0.86, p < 0.001. We used this relationship to predict the nest density in various cliff habitat types and produced a habitat map of breeding cliffs to extrapolate nest density around the island of Corvo. The mean predicted nest density on Corvo ranged from 6.6 (2.1–16.2 to 27.8 (19.5–36.4 nests/ha. Extrapolation of habitat-specific nest densities across the cliff area of Corvo resulted in an estimate of 6326 Cory’s shearwater nests (95% confidence interval: 3735–10,524. This population size estimate is similar to previous assessments, but is too imprecise to detect moderate changes in population size over time. While estimating absolute population size from acoustic recordings may not be sufficiently precise, the strong positive relationship that we found between local nest density and recorded calling rate indicates that passive acoustic monitoring may be useful to document relative changes in seabird populations over time.

  18. Monitoring and failure analysis of corroded bridge cables under fatigue loading using acoustic emission sensors.

    Li, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping; Lan, Chengming; Li, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Cables play an important role in cable-stayed systems, but are vulnerable to corrosion and fatigue damage. There is a dearth of studies on the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cable. In the present study, the acoustic emission (AE) technology is adopted to monitor the fatigue damage evolution process. First, the relationship between stress and strain is determined through a tensile test for corroded and non-corroded steel wires. Results show that the mechanical performance of corroded cables is changed considerably. The AE characteristic parameters for fatigue damage are then established. AE energy cumulative parameters can accurately describe the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cables. The failure modes in each phase as well as the type of acoustic emission source are determined based on the results of scanning electron microscopy. The waveform characteristics, damage types, and frequency distribution of the corroded cable at different damage phases are collected. Finally, the number of broken wires and breakage time of the cables are determined according to the variation in the margin index. PMID:22666009

  19. Monitoring and Failure Analysis of Corroded Bridge Cables under Fatigue Loading Using Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Hui Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cables play an important role in cable-stayed systems, but are vulnerable to corrosion and fatigue damage. There is a dearth of studies on the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cable. In the present study, the acoustic emission (AE technology is adopted to monitor the fatigue damage evolution process. First, the relationship between stress and strain is determined through a tensile test for corroded and non-corroded steel wires. Results show that the mechanical performance of corroded cables is changed considerably. The AE characteristic parameters for fatigue damage are then established. AE energy cumulative parameters can accurately describe the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cables. The failure modes in each phase as well as the type of acoustic emission source are determined based on the results of scanning electron microscopy. The waveform characteristics, damage types, and frequency distribution of the corroded cable at different damage phases are collected. Finally, the number of broken wires and breakage time of the cables are determined according to the variation in the margin index.

  20. Stress-Induced Fracturing of Reservoir Rocks: Acoustic Monitoring and μCT Image Analysis

    Pradhan, Srutarshi; Stroisz, Anna M.; Fjær, Erling; Stenebråten, Jørn F.; Lund, Hans K.; Sønstebø, Eyvind F.

    2015-11-01

    Stress-induced fracturing in reservoir rocks is an important issue for the petroleum industry. While productivity can be enhanced by a controlled fracturing operation, it can trigger borehole instability problems by reactivating existing fractures/faults in a reservoir. However, safe fracturing can improve the quality of operations during CO2 storage, geothermal installation and gas production at and from the reservoir rocks. Therefore, understanding the fracturing behavior of different types of reservoir rocks is a basic need for planning field operations toward these activities. In our study, stress-induced fracturing of rock samples has been monitored by acoustic emission (AE) and post-experiment computer tomography (CT) scans. We have used hollow cylinder cores of sandstones and chalks, which are representatives of reservoir rocks. The fracture-triggering stress has been measured for different rocks and compared with theoretical estimates. The population of AE events shows the location of main fracture arms which is in a good agreement with post-test CT image analysis, and the fracture patterns inside the samples are visualized through 3D image reconstructions. The amplitudes and energies of acoustic events clearly indicate initiation and propagation of the main fractures. Time evolution of the radial strain measured in the fracturing tests will later be compared to model predictions of fracture size.

  1. Passive wireless surface acoustic wave sensors for monitoring sequestration sites CO2 emission

    Wang, Yizhong [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Chyu, Minking [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wang, Qing-Ming [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-02-14

    University of Pittsburgh’s Transducer lab has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient CO2 measuring technologies for geological sequestration sites leakage monitoring. A passive wireless CO2 sensing system based on surface acoustic wave technology and carbon nanotube nanocomposite was developed. Surface acoustic wave device was studied to determine the optimum parameters. Delay line structure was adopted as basic sensor structure. CNT polymer nanocomposite was fabricated and tested under different temperature and strain condition for natural environment impact evaluation. Nanocomposite resistance increased for 5 times under pure strain, while the temperature dependence of resistance for CNT solely was -1375ppm/°C. The overall effect of temperature on nanocomposite resistance was -1000ppm/°C. The gas response of the nanocomposite was about 10% resistance increase under pure CO2 . The sensor frequency change was around 300ppm for pure CO2 . With paralyne packaging, the sensor frequency change from relative humidity of 0% to 100% at room temperature decreased from over 1000ppm to less than 100ppm. The lowest detection limit of the sensor is 1% gas concentration, with 36ppm frequency change. Wireless module was tested and showed over one foot transmission distance at preferred parallel orientation.

  2. Electrical Resistance and Acoustic Emission Measurements for Monitoring the Structural Behavior of CFRP Laminate

    Zhou, Wei

    2015-07-12

    Electrical resistance and acoustic emission (AE) measurement are jointly used to monitor the degradation in CFRP laminates subjected to tensile tests. The objective of this thesis is to perform a synergertic analysis between a passive and an active methods to better access how these perform when used for Structural Health Moni- toring (SHM). Laminates with three different stacking sequences: [0]4, [02/902]s and [+45/ − 45]2s are subjected to monotonic and cyclic tensile tests. In each laminate, we carefully investigate which mechanisms of degradation can or cannot be detect- ed by each technique. It is shown that most often, that acoustic emission signals start before any electrical detection is possible. This is is explained based on the redundance of the electrical network that makes it less sensitive to localized damages. Based on in depth study of AE signals clustering, a new classification is proposed to recognize the different damage mechanims based on only two parameters: the RA (rise time/amplitude) and the duration of the signal.

  3. Passive acoustic monitoring of toothed whales with implications for mitigation, management and biology

    Kyhn, Line Anker

    Toothed whales are vocal animals and their social life as well as successful orientation and feeding depends on emission and reception of sound. Such sounds may e.g. be clicks used for echolocation or whistles used for communication and they can be monitored in time and space by means of passive......-recapture design to describe the detection function. From the detection function we then calculated the effective detection radius, which we then used to estimate the density of porpoises in the area. As cue for the acoustic detections we tested different durations with click trains. We obtained the cue production...... is in accordance with new molecular phylogenies. In chapter I use the information I have gathered on spectral source properties as well as on source levels and directionality and use this information to challenge the theories for the evolution of the NBHF click type. I conclude that the NBHF signals likely evolved...

  4. Acoustic emission condition monitoring of a nuclear power plant check valve using artificial neural networks

    Lee, Joon Hyun; Lee, Min Rae [Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Teak [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-11-15

    In this study, an advanced condition monitoring technique based on acoustic emission (AE) detection and artificial neural networks was applied to a check valve, one of the components being used extensively in a safety system of a nuclear power plant (Npp). AE testing for a check valve under controlled flow loop conditions was performed to detect and evaluate disk movement for valve degradation such as wear and leakage due to foreign object interference in a check valve. It is clearly demonstrated that the evaluation of different types of failure modes such as disk wear and check valve leakage were successful by systematically analyzing the characteristics of various AE parameters. It is also shown that the leak size can be determined with an artificial neural network.

  5. Acoustic emission condition monitoring of a nuclear power plant check valve using artificial neural networks

    In this study, an advanced condition monitoring technique based on acoustic emission (AE) detection and artificial neural networks was applied to a check valve, one of the components being used extensively in a safety system of a nuclear power plant (Npp). AE testing for a check valve under controlled flow loop conditions was performed to detect and evaluate disk movement for valve degradation such as wear and leakage due to foreign object interference in a check valve. It is clearly demonstrated that the evaluation of different types of failure modes such as disk wear and check valve leakage were successful by systematically analyzing the characteristics of various AE parameters. It is also shown that the leak size can be determined with an artificial neural network

  6. Acoustic Monitoring of a Previously Unstudied Whale Shark Aggregation in the Red Sea

    Cochran, Jesse

    2012-01-01

    The whale shark (Rhincodon, typus), is a large, pelagic, filter feeder for which the available information is limited. The Red Sea populations in particular are practically unstudied. An aggregation site was recently discovered off the western coast of Saudi Arabia. We report the use of passive acoustic monitoring to assess the spatial and temporal behavior patterns of whale sharks in this new site. The aggregation occurs in the spring and peaks in April/ May. Whale sharks showed a preference for a single near shore reef and even a specific area within it. There is no evidence of sexual segregation as the genders were present in roughly equal proportion and used the same habitat at similar times. This information can be used to guide future studies in the area and to inform local management. Continued study will add to the collective knowledge on Red Sea whale sharks, including the population dynamics within the region and how they interact with the global whale shark community.

  7. Fatigue damage monitoring for basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites using acoustic emission technique

    Wang, Wentao; Li, Hui; Qu, Zhi

    2012-04-01

    Basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) is a structural material with superior mechanical properties. In this study, unidirectional BFRP laminates with 14 layers are made with the hand lay-up method. Then, the acoustic emission technique (AE) combined with the scanning electronic microscope (SEM) technique is employed to monitor the fatigue damage evolution of the BFRP plates in the fatigue loading tests. Time-frequency analysis using the wavelet transform technique is proposed to analyze the received AE signal instead of the peak frequency method. A comparison between AE signals and SEM images indicates that the multi-frequency peaks picked from the time-frequency curves of AE signals reflect the accumulated fatigue damage evolution and fatigue damage patterns. Furthermore, seven damage patterns, that is, matrix cracking, delamination, fiber fracture and their combinations, are identified from the time-frequency curves of the AE signals.

  8. A study of condition monitoring of check valve using acoustic emission and neural network technique

    The check valve is one of typical component being extensively used in safety systems of nuclear power plants. The failures of check valves have resulted in significant maintenance efforts, on occasion, have resulted in water hammer, over-pressurization of low-pressure systems, and damage to flow system components. The objective of this research is to demonstrate condition-monitoring system based on acoustic emission, AE detection that can provide timely detection of check valve degradation and service aging so that maintenance/ replacement could be preformed prior to loss of safety function. This work is also focused on the capability of neural network technique to provide diagnostic information useful in determining check valve aging and degradation, check valve failures and undesirable operating modes

  9. Nuclear safeguards for an underground final repository - Research for acoustic-seismic monitoring

    Final repositories for spent nuclear fuel need to be put under safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to detect potential access, during and after the emplacement phase. Tasked by the German Support Programme for the IAEA we have measured acoustic and seismic signals from various mining activities in the Gorleben exploratory mine. Geophone spectra show excitation up to several kHz, often with considerable broad-band content. With periodic machinery harmonic series appear. Seismic signal strengths from different sources vary by three (including blast shots by six) orders of magnitude, in power-law fits the decrease with distance is with exponents -2 to -0.8. Many sources could be detected by amplitude at several 100 m distance, blasts at several km. By a ring of underground geophones around a repository in salt monitoring for undeclared activities seems principally possible.

  10. A Methodological Review of Piezoelectric Based Acoustic Wave Generation and Detection Techniques for Structural Health Monitoring

    Zhigang Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric transducers have a long history of applications in nondestructive evaluation of material and structure integrity owing to their ability of transforming mechanical energy to electrical energy and vice versa. As condition based maintenance has emerged as a valuable approach to enhancing continued aircraft airworthiness while reducing the life cycle cost, its enabling structural health monitoring (SHM technologies capable of providing on-demand diagnosis of the structure without interrupting the aircraft operation are attracting increasing R&D efforts. Piezoelectric transducers play an essential role in these endeavors. This paper is set forth to review a variety of ingenious ways in which piezoelectric transducers are used in today’s SHM technologies as a means of generation and/or detection of diagnostic acoustic waves.

  11. Gaussian mixture modeling of acoustic emissions for structural health monitoring of reinforced concrete structures

    Farhidzadeh, Alireza; Dehghan-Niri, Ehsan; Salamone, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    Reinforced Concrete (RC) has been widely used in construction of infrastructures for many decades. The cracking behavior in concrete is crucial due to the harmful effects on structural performance such as serviceability and durability requirements. In general, in loading such structures until failure, tensile cracks develop at the initial stages of loading, while shear cracks dominate later. Therefore, monitoring the cracking modes is of paramount importance as it can lead to the prediction of the structural performance. In the past two decades, significant efforts have been made toward the development of automated structural health monitoring (SHM) systems. Among them, a technique that shows promises for monitoring RC structures is the acoustic emission (AE). This paper introduces a novel probabilistic approach based on Gaussian Mixture Modeling (GMM) to classify AE signals related to each crack mode. The system provides an early warning by recognizing nucleation of numerous critical shear cracks. The algorithm is validated through an experimental study on a full-scale reinforced concrete shear wall subjected to a reversed cyclic loading. A modified conventional classification scheme and a new criterion for crack classification are also proposed.

  12. Acoustic telemetry validates a citizen science approach for monitoring sharks on coral reefs.

    Vianna, Gabriel M S; Meekan, Mark G; Bornovski, Tova H; Meeuwig, Jessica J

    2014-01-01

    Citizen science is promoted as a simple and cost-effective alternative to traditional approaches for the monitoring of populations of marine megafauna. However, the reliability of datasets collected by these initiatives often remains poorly quantified. We compared datasets of shark counts collected by professional dive guides with acoustic telemetry data from tagged sharks collected at the same coral reef sites over a period of five years. There was a strong correlation between the number of grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) observed by dive guides and the telemetry data at both daily and monthly intervals, suggesting that variation in relative abundance of sharks was detectable in datasets collected by dive guides in a similar manner to data derived from telemetry at these time scales. There was no correlation between the number or mean depth of sharks recorded by telemetry and the presence of tourist divers, suggesting that the behaviour of sharks was not affected by the presence of divers during our study. Data recorded by dive guides showed that current strength and temperature were important drivers of the relative abundance of sharks at monitored sites. Our study validates the use of datasets of shark abundance collected by professional dive guides in frequently-visited dive sites in Palau, and supports the participation of experienced recreational divers as contributors to long-term monitoring programs of shark populations. PMID:24760081

  13. Acoustic telemetry validates a citizen science approach for monitoring sharks on coral reefs.

    Gabriel M S Vianna

    Full Text Available Citizen science is promoted as a simple and cost-effective alternative to traditional approaches for the monitoring of populations of marine megafauna. However, the reliability of datasets collected by these initiatives often remains poorly quantified. We compared datasets of shark counts collected by professional dive guides with acoustic telemetry data from tagged sharks collected at the same coral reef sites over a period of five years. There was a strong correlation between the number of grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos observed by dive guides and the telemetry data at both daily and monthly intervals, suggesting that variation in relative abundance of sharks was detectable in datasets collected by dive guides in a similar manner to data derived from telemetry at these time scales. There was no correlation between the number or mean depth of sharks recorded by telemetry and the presence of tourist divers, suggesting that the behaviour of sharks was not affected by the presence of divers during our study. Data recorded by dive guides showed that current strength and temperature were important drivers of the relative abundance of sharks at monitored sites. Our study validates the use of datasets of shark abundance collected by professional dive guides in frequently-visited dive sites in Palau, and supports the participation of experienced recreational divers as contributors to long-term monitoring programs of shark populations.

  14. On-line quantitative monitoring of liquid-liquid extraction of Lonicera japonica and Artemisia annua using near-infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics

    Sha Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liquid liquid extraction of Lonicera japonica and Artemisia annua (JQ plays a significant role in manufacturing Reduning injection. Many process parameters may influence liquid liquid extraction and cause fluctuations in product quality. Objective: To develop a near infrared (NIR spectroscopy method for on line monitoring of liquid liquid extraction of JQ. Materials and Methods: Eleven batches of JQ extraction solution were obtained, ten for building quantitative models and one for assessing the predictive accuracy of established models. Neochlorogenic acid (NCA, chlorogenic acid (CA, cryptochlorogenic acid (CCA, isochlorogenic acid B (ICAB, isochlorogenic acid A (ICAA, isochlorogenic acid C (ICAC and soluble solid content (SSC were selected as quality control indicators, and measured by reference methods. NIR spectra were collected in transmittance mode. After selecting the spectral sub ranges, optimizing the spectral pretreatment and neglecting outliers, partial least squares regression models were built to predict the content of indicators. The model performance was evaluated by the coefficients of determination (R2, the root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP and the relative standard error of prediction (RSEP. Results: For NCA, CA, CCA, ICAB, ICAA, ICAC and SSC, R2 was 0.9674, 0.9704, 0.9641, 0.9514, 0.9436, 0.9640, 0.9809, RMSEP was 0.0280, 0.2913, 0.0710, 0.0590, 0.0815, 0.1506, 1.167, and RSEP was 2.32%, 4.14%, 3.86%, 5.65%, 7.29%, 6.95% and 4.18%, respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that NIR spectroscopy could provide good predictive ability in monitoring of the content of quality control indicators in liquid liquid extraction of JQ.

  15. Validation of an acoustic location system to monitor Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii) long calls.

    Spillmann, Brigitte; van Noordwijk, Maria A; Willems, Erik P; Mitra Setia, Tatang; Wipfli, Urs; van Schaik, Carel P

    2015-07-01

    The long call is an important vocal communication signal in the widely dispersed, semi-solitary orangutan. Long calls affect individuals' ranging behavior and mediate social relationships and regulate encounters between dispersed individuals in a dense rainforest. The aim of this study was to test the utility of an Acoustic Location System (ALS) for recording and triangulating the loud calls of free-living primates. We developed and validated a data extraction protocol for an ALS used to record wild orangutan males' long calls at the Tuanan field site (Central Kalimantan). We installed an ALS in a grid of 300 ha, containing 20 SM2+ recorders placed in a regular lattice at 500 m intervals, to monitor the distribution of calling males in the area. The validated system had the following main features: (i) a user-trained software algorithm (Song Scope) that reliably recognized orangutan long calls from sound files at distances up to 700 m from the nearest recorder, resulting in a total area of approximately 900 ha that could be monitored continuously; (ii) acoustic location of calling males up to 200 m outside the microphone grid, which meant that within an area of approximately 450 ha, call locations could be calculated through triangulation. The mean accuracy was 58 m, an error that is modest relative to orangutan mobility and average inter-individual distances. We conclude that an ALS is a highly effective method for detecting long-distance calls of wild primates and triangulating their position. In combination with conventional individual focal follow data, an ALS can greatly improve our knowledge of orangutans' social organization, and is readily adaptable for studying other highly vocal animals. PMID:25773926

  16. The application of acoustic emission measurements on laboratory testpieces to large scale pressure vessel monitoring

    A test pressure vessel containing 4 artificial defects was monitored for emission whilst pressure cycling to failure. Testpieces cut from both the failed vessel and from as-rolled plate material were tested in the laboratory. A marked difference in emission characteristics was observed between plate and vessel testpieces. Activity from vessel material was virtually constant after general yield and emission amplitudes were low. Plate testpieces showed maximum activity at general yield and more frequent high amplitude emissions. An attempt has been made to compare the system sensitivities between the pressure vessel test and laboratory tests. In the absence of an absolute calibration device, system sensitivities were estimated using dummy signals generated by the excitation of an emission sensor. The measurements have shown an overall difference in sensitivity between vessel and laboratory tests of approximately 25db. The reduced sensitivity in the vessel test is attributed to a combination of differences in sensors, acoustic couplant, attenuation, and dispersion relative to laboratory tests and the relative significance of these factors is discussed. Signal amplitude analysis of the emissions monitored from laboratory testpieces showed that, whith losses of the order of 25 to 30db, few emissions would be detected from the pressure vessel test. It is concluded that no reliable prediction of acoustic behaviour of a structure may be made from laboratory test unless testpieces of the actual structural material are used. A considerable improvement in detection sensitivity, is also required for reliable detection of defects in low strength ductile materials and an absolute method of system calibration is required between tests

  17. Monitoring the quality consistency of Fufang Danshen Pills using micellar electrokinetic chromatography fingerprint coupled with prediction of antioxidant activity and chemometrics.

    Ji, Zhengchao; Sun, Wanyang; Sun, Guoxiang; Zhang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    A fast micellar electrokinetic chromatography fingerprint method combined with quantification was developed and validated to evaluate the quality of Fufang Danshen Pills, a traditional Chinese Medicine, which has been used in the treatment of cardiovascular system diseases, in which the tetrahedron optimization method was first used to optimize the background electrolyte solution. Subsequently, the index of the fingerprint information amount of I was performed as an excellent objective indictor to investigate the experimental conditions. In addition, a systematical quantified fingerprint method was constructed for evaluating the quality consistency of 20 batches of test samples obtained from the same drug manufacturer. The fingerprint analysis combined with quantitative determination of two components showed that the quality consistency of the test samples was quite good within the same commercial brand. Furthermore, the partial least squares model analysis was used to explore the fingerprint-efficacy relationship between active components and antioxidant activity in vitro, which can be applied for the assessment of anti-oxidant activity of Fufang Danshen pills and provide valuable medicinal information for quality control. The result illustrated that the present study provided a reliable and reasonable method for monitoring the quality consistency of Fufang Danshen pills. PMID:27279557

  18. Remote erosion and corrosion monitoring of subsea pipelines using acoustic telemetry and wet-mate connector technology

    Painter, Howard; Barlow, Stewart [Teledyne ODI, Thousand Oaks, CA (United States); Clarke, Daniel [Teledyne Cormon, Thousand Oaks, CA (United States); Green, Dale [Teledyne Benthos, North Falmouth, MA (United States)

    2009-07-01

    This paper will present a novel approach for monitoring erosion and corrosion using proven sub sea technologies: intrusive erosion and corrosion monitoring, acoustic telemetry and wet-mateable connector technology. Intrusive metal loss based monitoring systems on sub sea pipelines are increasingly being used because of their ability to directly measure erosion and corrosion. These systems are integrated with the sub sea production control system or located close to the platform and hard-wired. However, locations remote from a sub sea control system or platform requires a dedicated communication system and long lengths of cable that can be cost prohibitive to procure and install. The system presented consists of an intrusive erosion or corrosion monitor with pressure and temperature transmitters, a retrievable electronics module with an acoustic modem, a data storage module, and a replaceable power module. Time-stamped erosion and corrosion data can be transmitted via an acoustic link to a surface platform, a vessel of opportunity or to a relaying modem. Acoustic signals can be transmitted up to 6 km from the monitoring location. The power module along with data module and acoustic modem are mounted on the erosion and corrosion module using wet-mateable connectors, allowing retrieval by remotely operated vehicles. The collected data can be used to assess the cumulative erosion and corrosion as well as use the real-time metal loss rate data to correlate with operational parameters. Benefits include optimization of corrosion inhibitor dosage rates, mitigation of damage caused by solids production, and increased flow assurance. (author)

  19. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED THERMAL-ACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeffrey J. Swetelitsch

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project is to explore microwave-excited thermal-acoustic (META) phenomena for quantitative analysis of granular and powdered materials, with the culmination of the research to be an on-line carbon-in-ash monitor for coal-fired power plants. This technique of analyzing unburned carbon in fly ash could be a less tedious and time consuming method as compared to the traditional LOI manual procedure. Phase 1 of the research focused on off-line single-frequency thermal-acoustic measurements where an off-line fly ash monitor was constructed that could operate as analytical tool to explore instrument and methodology parameters for quantifying the microwave-excited thermal-acoustic effect of carbon in fly ash, and it was determined that the off-line thermal-acoustic technique could predict the carbon content of a random collection of fly ashes with a linear correlation constant of R{sup 2} = 0.778. Much higher correlations are expected for fly ashes generated from a single boiler. Phase 2 of the research developing a methodology to generate microwave spectra of various powders, including fly ash, coal, and inorganic minerals, and to determine if these microwave spectra could be used for chemical analyses. Although different minerals produced different responses, higher resolution microwave spectra would be required to be able to distinguish among minerals. Phase 3 of the research focused on the development of an on-line fly ash monitor that could be adapted to measure either a thermal-acoustic or thermal-elastic response to due microwave excitation of fly ash. The thermal-acoustic response was successfully employed for this purpose but the thermal-elastic response was too weak to yield a useful on-line device.

  20. Calibrating passive acoustic monitoring: correcting humpback whale call detections for site-specific and time-dependent environmental characteristics.

    Helble, Tyler A; D'Spain, Gerald L; Campbell, Greg S; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the importance of accounting for environmental effects on passive underwater acoustic monitoring results. The situation considered is the reduction in shipping off the California coast between 2008-2010 due to the recession and environmental legislation. The resulting variations in ocean noise change the probability of detecting marine mammal vocalizations. An acoustic model was used to calculate the time-varying probability of detecting humpback whale vocalizations under best-guess environmental conditions and varying noise. The uncorrected call counts suggest a diel pattern and an increase in calling over a two-year period; the corrected call counts show minimal evidence of these features. PMID:24181982

  1. Clinical Studies of Real-Time Monitoring of Lithotripter Performance Using Passive Acoustic Sensors

    Leighton, T. G.; Fedele, F.; Coleman, A. J.; McCarthy, C.; Ryves, S.; Hurrell, A. M.; De Stefano, A.; White, P. R.

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the development and clinical testing of a passive device which monitors the passive acoustic emissions generated within the patient's body during Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL). Designed and clinically tested so that it can be operated by a nurse, the device analyses the echoes generated in the body in response to each ESWL shock, and so gives real time shock-by-shock feedback on whether the stone was at the focus of the lithotripter, and if so whether the previous shock contributed to stone fragmentation when that shock reached the focus. A shock is defined as being `effective' if these two conditions are satisfied. Not only can the device provide real-time feedback to the operator, but the trends in shock `effectiveness' can inform treatment. In particular, at any time during the treatment (once a statistically significant number of shocks have been delivered), the percentage of shocks which were `effective' provides a treatment score TS(t) which reflects the effectiveness of the treatment up to that point. The TS(t) figure is automatically delivered by the device without user intervention. Two clinical studies of the device were conducted, the ethics guidelines permitting only use of the value of TS(t) obtained at the end of treatment (this value is termed the treatment score TS0). The acoustically-derived treatment score was compared with the treatment score CTS2 given by the consultant urologist at the three-week patient's follow-up appointment. In the first clinical study (phase 1), records could be compared for 30 out of the 118 patients originally recruited, and the results of phase 1 were used to refine the parameter values (the `rules') with which the acoustic device provides its treatment score. These rules were tested in phase 2, for which records were compared for 49 of the 85 patients recruited. Considering just the phase 2 results (since the phase 1 data were used to draw up the `rules' under which phase 2 operated

  2. A novel technique for acoustic emission monitoring in civil structures with global fiber optic sensors

    The application of acoustic emission (AE)-based damage detection is gaining interest in the field of civil structural health monitoring. Damage progress can be detected and located in real time and the recorded AEs hold information on the fracture process which produced them. One of the drawbacks for on-site application in large-scale concrete and masonry structures is the relatively high attenuation of the ultrasonic signal, which limits the detection range of the AE sensors. Consequently, a large number of point sensors are required to cover a certain area. To tackle this issue, a global damage detection system, based on AE detection with a polarization-modulated, single mode fiber optic sensor (FOS), has been developed. The sensing principle, data acquisition and analysis in time and frequency domain are presented. During experimental investigations, this AE-FOS is applied for the first time as a global sensor for the detection of crack-induced AEs in a full-scale concrete beam. Damage progress is monitored during a cyclic four-point bending test and the AE activity, detected with the FOS, is related to the subsequent stages of damage progress in the concrete element. The results obtained with the AE-FOS are successfully linked to the mechanical behavior of the concrete beam and a qualitative correspondence is found with AE data obtained by a commercial system. (papers)

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring of medieval towers considered as sensitive earthquake receptors

    A. Carpinteri

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Many ancient masonry towers are present in Italian territory. In some cases these structures are at risk on account of the intensity of the stresses they are subjected to due to the high level of regional seismicity. In order to preserve this inestimable cultural heritage, a sound safety assessment should take into account the evolution of damage phenomena. In this connection, acoustic emission (AE monitoring can be highly effective. This study concerns the structural stability of three medieval towers rising in the centre of Alba, a characteristic town in Piedmont (Italy. During the monitoring period a correlation between peaks of AE activity in the masonry of these towers and regional seismicity was found. Earthquakes always affect structural stability. Besides that, the towers behaved as sensitive earthquake receptors. Here a method to correlate bursts of AE activity in a masonry building and regional seismicity is proposed. In particular, this method permits to identify the premonitory signals that precede a catastrophic event on a structure, since, in most cases, these warning signs can be captured well in advance.

  4. Environmental influences on the spatial ecology of juvenile smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata: results from acoustic monitoring.

    Colin A Simpfendorfer

    Full Text Available To aid recovery efforts of smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata populations in U.S. waters a research project was developed to assess how changes in environmental conditions within estuarine areas affected the presence, movements, and activity space of this endangered species. Forty juvenile P. pectinata were fitted with acoustic tags and monitored within the lower 27 km of the Caloosahatchee River estuary, Florida, between 2005 and 2007. Sawfish were monitored within the study site from 1 to 473 days, and the number of consecutive days present ranged from 1 to 125. Residency index values for individuals varied considerably, with annual means highest in 2005 (0.95 and lowest in 2007 (0.73 when several P. pectinata moved upriver beyond detection range during drier conditions. Mean daily activity space was 1.42 km of river distance. The distance between 30-minute centers of activity was typically <0.1 km, suggesting limited movement over short time scales. Salinity electivity analysis demonstrated an affinity for salinities between 18 and at least 24 psu, suggesting movements are likely made in part, to remain within this range. Thus, freshwater flow from Lake Okeechobee (and its effect on salinity affects the location of individuals within the estuary, although it remains unclear whether or not these movements are threatening recovery.

  5. Acoustic emission detection with fiber optical sensors for dry cask storage health monitoring

    Lin, Bin; Bao, Jingjing; Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    The increasing number, size, and complexity of nuclear facilities deployed worldwide are increasing the need to maintain readiness and develop innovative sensing materials to monitor important to safety structures (ITS). In the past two decades, an extensive sensor technology development has been used for structural health monitoring (SHM). Technologies for the diagnosis and prognosis of a nuclear system, such as dry cask storage system (DCSS), can improve verification of the health of the structure that can eventually reduce the likelihood of inadvertently failure of a component. Fiber optical sensors have emerged as one of the major SHM technologies developed particularly for temperature and strain measurements. This paper presents the development of optical equipment that is suitable for ultrasonic guided wave detection for active SHM in the MHz range. An experimental study of using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as acoustic emission (AE) sensors was performed on steel blocks. FBG have the advantage of being durable, lightweight, and easily embeddable into composite structures as well as being immune to electromagnetic interference and optically multiplexed. The temperature effect on the FBG sensors was also studied. A multi-channel FBG system was developed and compared with piezoelectric based AE system. The paper ends with conclusions and suggestions for further work.

  6. Acoustic monitoring in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, using hydrophone of the Ocean Bottom Seismometer

    Yun, Sukyoung; Lee, Won Sang; Kuk Hong, Jong; Yoo, Hyun Jae; Park, Yongcheol; Schmidt-Aursch, Mechita; Geissler, Wolfram H.

    2016-04-01

    Although a number of active source seismic experiments have been conducted over the last few decades to investigate the crustal structure in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, long-term observation to monitor underwater tectonic activities and changes in the cryospheric environment still remains challenging due to existence of sea ice in the study region. Korea Polar Research Institute has accomplished successful deployment of ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) in the Ross Sea collaborating with Alfred Wegener Institute during the period of 2011-2012 and 2014 by Korean icebreaker RV Araon. The OBS system manufactured by K.U.M. contains a hydrophone sensor that allow us to monitor underwater acoustics generated by tectonic and ice-related events. We present spectrograms of the continuous hydroacoustic data and various types of signals, e.g. seismic T-waves, iceequakes, and tremors. There are periodic and harmonic tremors that might be related with tidal modulation, and the seasonal variation of the background noise seems to be related with sea ice concentration.

  7. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Lightning-Damaged CFRP Laminates during Compression-after-Impact Test

    Carbon-fiber reinforced plastic(CFRP) laminates made of nano-particle-coated carbon fibers and damaged by a simulated lightning strike were tested under compression-after-impact(CAI) mode, during which the damage progress due to compressive loading has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). The impact damage was induced not by mechanical loading but by a simulated lightning strike. Conductive nano-particles were coated directly on the fibers, from which CFRP coupons were made. The coupon were subjected to the strikes with a high voltage/current impulse of 10-40 kA within a few . The effects of nano-particle coating and the degree of damage induced by the simulated lightning strikes on AE activities were examined, and the relationship between the compressive residual strength and AE behavior has been evaluated in terms of AE event counts and the onset of AE activity with the compressive loading. The degree of impact damage was also measured in terms of damage area by using ultrasonic C-scan images. The assessment during the CAI tests of damaged CFRP showed that AE monitoring appeared to be useful to differentiate the degree of damage hence the mechanical integrity of composite structures damaged by lightning strikes.

  8. Challenge of Using Passive Acoustic Monitoring in High-Energy Environments: UK Tidal Environments and Other Case Studies.

    Booth, Cormac G

    2016-01-01

    The use of passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) around marine developments is commonplace. A buffer-based PAM system (e.g., C-POD) is a cost-effective method for assessing cetacean acoustic presence. Devices have been deployed by Sea Mammal Research Unit (SMRU) Marine around the United Kingdom, allowing an examination of the performance of C-PODs with respect to background noise, tilt angle, and environmental factors. C-PODs were found to often only monitor for a few seconds of each minute, resulting in significant loss of monitoring time. Issues were likely driven by environmental and deployment factors. The practical limitations of buffer-based PAM systems in high-energy/noisy environments are indicated here. PMID:26610949

  9. Acoustic monitoring of sodium boiling in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor from autoregressive models

    Highlights: • The work deals with sodium boiling detection in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. • The authors choose to use acoustic data instead of thermal data. • The method is designed to not to be disturbed by the environment noises. • A real time boiling detection methods are proposed in the paper. - Abstract: This paper deals with acoustic monitoring of sodium boiling in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) based on auto regressive (AR) models which have low computational complexities. Some authors have used AR models for sodium boiling or sodium–water reaction detection. These works are based on the characterization of the difference between fault free condition and current functioning of the system. However, even in absence of faults, it is possible to observe a change in the AR models due to the change of operating mode of the LMFBR. This sets up the delicate problem of how to distinguish a change in operating mode in absence of faults and a change due to presence of faults. In this paper we propose a new approach for boiling detection based on the estimation of AR models on sliding windows. Afterwards, classification of the models into boiling or non-boiling models is made by comparing their coefficients by two statistical methods, multiple linear regression (LR) and support vectors machines (SVM). The proposed approach takes into account operating mode information in order to avoid false alarms. Experimental data include non-boiling background noise data collected from Phenix power plant (France) and provided by the CEA (Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux énergies alternatives, France) and boiling condition data generated in laboratory. High boiling detection rates as well as low false alarms rates obtained on these experimental data show that the proposed method is efficient for boiling detection. Most importantly, it shows that the boiling phenomenon introduces a disturbance into the AR models that can be clearly detected

  10. Complex monitoring and alert network for electromagnetic, infrasound, acoustic seismotectonic phenomena

    -Emilian Toader, Victorin; Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Constantin, Ionescu

    2014-05-01

    The Romanian seismicity recorded in 2013 three important events: the largest seismic "silence", the shortest sequence of two earthquakes greater than 4.8R in less than 14 days after the "Romanian National Institute for Earth Physics" (NIEP) developed a digital network, and a very high crustal activity in Galati area. We analyze the variations of the telluric currents and local magnetic field, variations of the atmospheric electrostatic field, infrasound, temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, variations in the earth crust with inclinometers and animal behavior. The general effect is the first high seismic energy discontinuity that could be a precursor factor. Since 1977 Romania did not register any important earthquake that would generate a sense of fear among the population. In parallel with the seismic network NIEP developed a magneto-telluric, bioseismic, VLF and acoustic network. A large frequency spectrum is covered for mechanical vibration, magnetic and electric field with ground and air sensors. Special software was designed for acquisition, analysis and real time alert using internet direct connection, web page, email and SMS. Many examples show the sensitivity of telluric current, infrasound, acoustic records (from air-ground), and the effect of tectonic stress on the magnetic field or ground deformation. The next update of the multidisciplinary monitoring network will include measurement of ionization, radon emission, sky color, solar radiation and extension of infrasound and VL/LF equipment. NOAA Space Weather satellites transmit solar activity magnetic field data, X ray flux, electron, and proton flux information useful for complex analysis.

  11. Acoustic monitoring of sodium boiling in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor from autoregressive models

    Geraldo, Issa Cherif [Laboratoire d’Automatique, Génie Informatique et Signal (LAGIS UMR CNRS 8219), Université Lille 1, Sciences et technologies, Avenue Paul Langevin, BP 48, 59651 Villeneuve d’Ascq CEDEX (France); Bose, Tanmoy [Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal (India); Pekpe, Komi Midzodzi, E-mail: midzodzi.pekpe@univ-lille1.fr [Laboratoire d’Automatique, Génie Informatique et Signal (LAGIS UMR CNRS 8219), Université Lille 1, Sciences et technologies, Avenue Paul Langevin, BP 48, 59651 Villeneuve d’Ascq CEDEX (France); Cassar, Jean-Philippe [Laboratoire d’Automatique, Génie Informatique et Signal (LAGIS UMR CNRS 8219), Université Lille 1, Sciences et technologies, Avenue Paul Langevin, BP 48, 59651 Villeneuve d’Ascq CEDEX (France); Mohanty, A.R. [Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal (India); Paumel, Kévin [CEA, DEN, Nuclear Technology Department, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The work deals with sodium boiling detection in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. • The authors choose to use acoustic data instead of thermal data. • The method is designed to not to be disturbed by the environment noises. • A real time boiling detection methods are proposed in the paper. - Abstract: This paper deals with acoustic monitoring of sodium boiling in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) based on auto regressive (AR) models which have low computational complexities. Some authors have used AR models for sodium boiling or sodium–water reaction detection. These works are based on the characterization of the difference between fault free condition and current functioning of the system. However, even in absence of faults, it is possible to observe a change in the AR models due to the change of operating mode of the LMFBR. This sets up the delicate problem of how to distinguish a change in operating mode in absence of faults and a change due to presence of faults. In this paper we propose a new approach for boiling detection based on the estimation of AR models on sliding windows. Afterwards, classification of the models into boiling or non-boiling models is made by comparing their coefficients by two statistical methods, multiple linear regression (LR) and support vectors machines (SVM). The proposed approach takes into account operating mode information in order to avoid false alarms. Experimental data include non-boiling background noise data collected from Phenix power plant (France) and provided by the CEA (Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux énergies alternatives, France) and boiling condition data generated in laboratory. High boiling detection rates as well as low false alarms rates obtained on these experimental data show that the proposed method is efficient for boiling detection. Most importantly, it shows that the boiling phenomenon introduces a disturbance into the AR models that can be clearly detected.

  12. Analysis of acoustic emission signals of fatigue crack growth and corrosion processes. Investigation of the possibilities for continuous condition monitoring of transport containers by acoustic emission testing

    Fatigue crack growth and active corrosion processes are the main causes of structural failures of transport products like road tankers, railway tank cars and ships. To prevent those failures, preventive, time-based maintenance is performed. However, preventive inspections are costly and include the risk of not detecting a defect, which could lead to a failure within the next service period. An alternative is the idea of continuous monitoring of the whole structure by means of acoustic emission testing (AT). With AT, defects within the material shall be detected and repaired directly after their appearance. Acoustic emission testing is an online non-destructive testing method. Acoustic emission (AE) arises from changes within the material and is transported by elastic waves through the material. If the AE event generates enough energy, the elastic wave propagates to the boundaries of the component, produces a displacement in the picometre scale and can be detected by a piezoelectric sensor. The sensor produces an electrical signal. From this AE signal, AE features such as the maximum amplitude or the frequency can be extracted. Methods of signal analysis are used to investigate the time and frequency dependency of signal groups. The purpose of the signal analysis is to connect the AE signal with the originating AE source. If predefined damage mechanisms are identified, referencing the damage condition of the structure is possible. Acoustic emission from events of the actual crack propagation process can for example lead to the crack growth rate or the stress intensity factor, both specific values from fracture mechanics. A new development in the domain of acoustic emission testing is the pattern recognition of AE signals. Specific features are extracted from the AE signals to assign them to their damage mechanisms. In this thesis the AE signals from the damage mechanisms corrosion and fatigue crack growth are compared and analysed. The damage mechanisms were

  13. Size Distribution of Sperm Whales Acoustically Identified during Long Term Deep-Sea Monitoring in the Ionian Sea.

    Caruso, Francesco; Sciacca, Virginia; Bellia, Giorgio; De Domenico, Emilio; Larosa, Giuseppina; Papale, Elena; Pellegrino, Carmelo; Pulvirenti, Sara; Riccobene, Giorgio; Simeone, Francesco; Speziale, Fabrizio; Viola, Salvatore; Pavan, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) emits a typical short acoustic signal, defined as a "click", almost continuously while diving. It is produced in different time patterns to acoustically explore the environment and communicate with conspecifics. Each emitted click has a multi-pulse structure, resulting from the production of the sound within the sperm whale's head. A Stable Inter Pulse Interval (Stable IPI) can be identified among the pulses that compose a single click. Applying specific algorithms, the measurement of this interval provides useful information to assess the total length of the animal recorded. In January 2005, a cabled hydrophone array was deployed at a depth of 2,100 m in the Central Mediterranean Sea, 25 km offshore Catania (Ionian Sea). The acoustic antenna, named OνDE (Ocean noise Detection Experiment), was in operation until November 2006. OνDE provided real time acoustic data used to perform Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) of cetacean sound emissions. In this work, an innovative approach was applied to automatically measure the Stable IPI of the clicks, performing a cepstrum analysis to the energy (square amplitude) of the signals. About 2,100 five-minute recordings were processed to study the size distribution of the sperm whales detected during the OνDE long term deep-sea acoustic monitoring. Stable IPIs were measured in the range between 2.1 ms and 6.4 ms. The equations of Gordon (1991) and of Growcott (2011) were used to convert the IPIs into measures of size. The results revealed that the sperm whales recorded were distributed in length from about 7.5 m to 14 m. The size category most represented was from 9 m to 12 m (adult females or juvenile males) and specimens longer than 14 m (old males) seemed to be absent. PMID:26675588

  14. Acoustic habitat and shellfish mapping and monitoring in shallow coastal water - Sidescan sonar experiences in The Netherlands

    van Overmeeren, Ronnie; Craeymeersch, Johan; van Dalfsen, Jan; Fey, Frouke; van Heteren, Sytze; Meesters, Erik

    2009-11-01

    Sidescan sonar has been applied in a number of shallow water environments along the Dutch coast to map and monitor shellfish and seabed habitats. The littoral setting of these surveys may hamper data acquisition flying the towfish in zones of turbulence and waves, but also offers valuable opportunities for understanding, interpreting and validating sidescan sonar images because of the ability to ground-truth during low water periods, enabling easy identification and validation. Acoustical images of some of the mussel banks on the tidal flats of the Wadden Sea, recorded at high tide, show a marked resemblance with optical Google Earth images of the same banks. These sonar images may thus serve as ' acoustic type signatures' for the interpretation of sonar patterns recorded in deeper water where ground-truthing is more difficult and more expensive. Similarly, acoustic type signatures of (Japanese) oyster banks were obtained in the estuaries in the southwest of the Netherlands. Automated acoustic pattern recognition of different habitats and acoustical estimation of faunal cover and density are possible applications of sidescan sonar. Both require that the backscattering observed on the sidescan sonar images is directly caused by the biological component of the seafloor. Filtering offers a simple and effective pre-processing technique to separate the faunal signals from linear trends such as emanating from wave ripples or the central tracks of the towfish. Acoustically estimating the faunal density is approached by in-situ counting peaks in backscattering in unit squares. These counts must be calibrated by ground-truthing. Ground-truthing on littoral mussel banks in the Wadden Sea has been carried out by measuring their cover along lines during low tide. Due to its capacity of yielding full-cover, high resolution images of large surfaces, sidescan sonar proves to be an excellent, cost-effective tool for quantitative time-lapse monitoring of habitats.

  15. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock walls

    L. Girard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a custom acoustic emission (AE monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node integrated into a wireless sensor network (WSN customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  16. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock-walls

    L. Girard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a custom acoustic emission (AE monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock-walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node integrated into a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock-wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock-wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock-wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock-fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  17. Autonomous hydrophone array for long-term acoustic monitoring in the open ocean

    D'Eu, J.-F.; Brachet, C.; Goslin, J.; Royer, J.-Y.; Ammann, J.

    2009-04-01

    We are developing an array of new autonomous hydrophones, benefiting from a long-lasting collaboration with the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (NOAA and Oregon state University). The hydrophones are deployed on a mooring line anchored to the seafloor by an expendable anchor weight. The length of the line is adjusted so that the sensor (and buoy) lies in the middle of the SOFAR channel at about 1000m depth for mid-latitudes (depending on the speed-of-sound profile). The buoy at depth keeps the line under tension and prevents wave-motion noise from the sensor. The instrument continuously samples and records the acoustic signals at 240Hz for seismic studies, or 480Hz (or more) for marine mammal studies. The SOFAR channel acts as an acoustic wave-guide in the ocean so that acoustic waves can propagate with little attenuation over long distances. Autonomous hydrophones allow the detection and localization of the low-magnitude (Mw>2.5) seismic activity along oceanic ridges and in deformed intraplate areas, which remains generally undetected or poorly localized by land-based seismic networks. An array of hydrophones can monitor a much wider area (more than 1000 km across) than ocean-bottom seismometers, which suffer from the rapid attenuation of seismic waves in the crust and upper mantle. Arrays of autonomous hydrophones thus succeed in detecting and locating 30 to 50 times more earthquakes than those listed in the catalogs from land-based seismograph stations. Data are buffered on flash cards and then regularly stored on hard disks or on solid-state drives (e.g. 20Gb of data per year at 240Hz sampling rate). We use 24-bit sigma-delta converters with programmable gain amplifiers. As timing is a key issue for an accurate localisation of the seismic events, instruments are synchronized with GPS time and have a low-power, highly stable calibrated clock (10-8 drift). All electronics and batteries (Li or alcaline) are placed in titanium pressure cases for long

  18. Soundscapes of the Southern Ocean: Passive Acoustic Monitoring in the Weddell Sea

    Menze, Sebastian; Kindermann, Lars; van Opzeeland, Ilse; Rettig, Stefanie; Bombosch, Annette; Zitterbart, Daniel; Boebel, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    The Southern Ocean provides an important habitat for marine mammals, both residential and migratory, yet long term studies of their habitat usage are hampered by the region’s seasonal inaccessibility. To overcome this problem, two autonomous underwater passive acoustic recorders were deployed in the Weddell Sea in 2008 to collect multiyear passive acoustic data. The recorders were retrieved in 2010 and the acoustic recordings were analyzed in terms of broad- and narrow-band noise. Noise in th...

  19. Wireless Acoustic Signal Monitoring Using MEMS sensor and ATmega on LabVIEW Platform

    Swathy L; Lizy Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics and vibrations caused on machine structures can result in faulty or collapse of the whole mechanical system. These acoustics produced by machinery are vital indicators of machine health. Acoustic signals analysis can be used as a tool for locating the problem and thus taking necessary actions. MEMS sensors provide high accurate low size and low cost microphones which can be even used in low cost space applications such as sounding rockets, nano-satellites etc. This paper...

  20. Software conception of acoustic emission system for monitoring failure formation and propagation in material of primary circuit component

    The subsystem for monitoring the formation and propagation of material defects of the primary circuit using the method of acoustic emission will be a relatively independent part of the system of in-service diagnostics at the Temelin nuclear power plant. The subsystem will, like the other subsystems, be able to communicate with the central computer. The individual conceptual problems are outlined of the software of the subsystem. The concept proceeds on the one hand from the possibilities of the testing instruments and on the other from the concept of the content and form of output data for the diagnostic system. A detailed list is given of demands on software with regard to the operation of the acoustic emission subsystem in the pressure test mode and in the mode of monitoring the condition of the material of the primary circuit, which differ substantially. (Z.M.)

  1. Acoustic emission monitoring of cement-based structures immobilising radioactive waste

    The long term performance of cementitious structures immobilising radioactive waste can be affected by physical and chemical processes within the encapsulating materials such as formation of new phases (e.g., vaterite, brucite), degradation of cement phases (e.g., CSH gel, portlandite), degradation of some waste components (e.g., organics), corrosion of metallic constituents (aluminium, magnesium), gas emission, further hydration etc. The corrosion of metals in the high pH cementitious environment is of especial concern as it can potentially cause wasteform cracking. One of the perspective non-destructive methods used to monitor and assess the mechanical properties of materials and structures is based on an acoustic emission (AE) technique. In this study an AE non-destructive technique was used to evaluate the mechanical performance of cementitious structures with encapsulated metallic waste such as aluminium. AE signals generated as a result of aluminium corrosion in a small-size blast furnace slag (BFS)/ordinary Portland cement (OPC) sample were detected, recorded and analysed. A procedure for AE data analysis including conventional parameter-based AE approach and signal-based analysis was applied and demonstrated to provide information on the aluminium corrosion process and its impact on the mechanical performance of the encapsulating cement matrix. (authors)

  2. Acoustic emission monitoring of the fatigue crack activity in steel bridge members

    Acoustic emission technique was employed for the monitoring of crack activity in steel bridge members. Laboratory experiment was carried out to identify active fatigue crack for the several test condition such as a different specimen type, a varying of cyclic load ratio. The results of this test indicated that the crack propagation characteristics for fatigue cycles did not change significantly with different type of beam. Through all of tests, load ratio of specimen affected significantly to the results such as the crack growth rate and the amount of generating AE signals. From fracture mechanics point of view, the straight curve obtained from theoretical calculation by Paris equation was well correlated to the experimental results. AE location events were not early detected although several AE hits from each sensor were generated in the early of the test. However the features of three parameters, that is, crack growth length, AE location events and cumulative AE events, showed almost same trend in their increase with the number of cycles. Although there were somewhat scattered location in the vicinity of upper flange, which were considered as environmental noises, good locations near the actual crack tip were obtained. Post filtering work was carried out to eliminate these unwanted location, good results were obtained from filtering work using AE parameters.

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring of concrete columns and beams strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer sheets

    Ma, Gao; Li, Hui; Zhou, Wensong; Xian, Guijun

    2012-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is an effective method in the nondestructive testing (NDT) field of civil engineering. During the last two decades, Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) has been widely used in repairing and strengthening concrete structures. The damage state of FRP strengthened concrete structures has become an important issue during the service period of the structure and it is a meaningful work to use AE technique as a nondestructive method to assess its damage state. The present study reports AE monitoring results of axial compression tests carried on basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) confined concrete columns and three-point-bending tests carried on BFRP reinforced concrete beams. AE parameters analysis was firstly utilized to give preliminary results of the concrete fracture process of these specimens. It was found that cumulative AE events can reflect the fracture development trend of both BFRP confined concrete columns and BFRP strengthened concrete beams and AE events had an abrupt increase at the point of BFRP breakage. Then the fracture process of BFRP confined concrete columns and BFRP strengthened concrete beams was studied through RA value-average frequency analysis. The RA value-average frequency tendencies of BFRP confined concrete were found different from that of BFRP strengthened concrete beams. The variation tendency of concrete crack patterns during the loading process was revealed.

  4. Frequency Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signal to Monitor Damage Evolution in Masonry Structures

    A crucial aspect in damage evaluation of masonry structures is the analysis of long-term behaviour and for this reason fatigue analysis has a great influence on safety assessment of this structures. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced and unreinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude and static loading has been carried out. During these tests, the AE signals were recorded. The AE signals were analysed using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to examine the frequency distribution of the micro and macro cracking. It possible to evaluate the evolution of the wavelength of the AE signal through the two characteristic peak in the AE spectrum signals and the wave speed of the P or S waves. This wavelength evolution can be represent the microcrak and macrocrack evolution in masonry walls. This procedure permits to estimate the fracture dimension characteristic in several loading condition and for several masonry reinforced condition.

  5. Condition monitoring of a check valve for nuclear power plants by means of acoustic emission technique

    The primary object of this work is to investigate advanced condition monitoring systems based on acoustic emission (AE) detection that can provide timely detection of check valve degradation and service aging so that maintenance/replacement could be performed prior to loss of safety function. The research is focused on the capability of AE technique to provide diagnostic information useful in determining check valve aging and degradation, check valve failures and undesirable operating modes. The systematic approach to classify the dynamic responses of AE signatures associated with typical failure modes of check valve for nuclear power plants is performed in this study. The characteristics of AE signature responses of internal parts of check valves due to local aging and degradation is analyzed by extracting effective AE parameters. This work also includes the investigation and adaptation of several advanced sensor technologies such as accelerometer and advanced ultrasonic technique. In addition, this work will develop advanced sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms from check valve degradation. (author)

  6. Fatigue crack growth monitoring of idealized gearbox spline component using acoustic emission

    Zhang, Lu; Ozevin, Didem; Hardman, William; Kessler, Seth; Timmons, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. The acoustic emission (AE) method is a direct way of detecting active flaws; however, the method suffers from the influence of background noise and location/sensor based pattern recognition method. It is important to identify the source mechanism and adapt it to different test conditions and sensors. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method in a laboratory environment. The test sample has the major details of the spline component on a flattened geometry. The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges strategically positions on the structure. The fatigue test characteristics are 4 Hz frequency and 0.1 as the ratio of minimum to maximum loading in tensile regime. It is observed that there are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The frequency spectra of continuous emissions and burst emissions are compared to understand the difference of sudden crack growth and gradual crack growth. The predicted crack growth rate is compared with the AE data using the cumulative AE events at the notch tip. The source mechanism of sudden crack growth is obtained solving the inverse mathematical problem from output signal to input signal. The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges. There are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The source mechanism of

  7. Detection of bond failure in the anchorage zone of reinforced concrete beams via acoustic emission monitoring

    Abouhussien, Ahmed A.; Hassan, Assem A. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was utilised to identify the onset of bond failure in reinforced concrete beams. Beam anchorage specimens were designed and tested to fail in bond in the anchorage zone. The specimens included four 250 × 250 × 1500 mm beams with four variable bonded lengths (100, 200, 300, and 400 mm). Meanwhile, an additional 250 × 250 × 2440 mm beam, with 200 mm bonded length, was tested to investigate the influence of sensor location on the identification of bond damage. All beams were tested under four-point loading setup and continuously monitored using three distributed AE sensors. These attached sensors were exploited to record AE signals resulting from both cracking and bond deterioration until failure. The variations in the number of AE hits and cumulative signal strength (CSS) versus test time were evaluated to achieve early detection of crack growth and bar slippage. In addition, AE intensity analysis was performed on signal strength of collected AE signals to develop two additional parameters: historic index (H (t)) and severity (S r). The analysis of these AE parameters enabled an early detection of both first cracks (at almost the mid-span of the beam) and bar slip in either of the anchorage zones at the beams’ end before their visual observation, regardless of sensor location. The results also demonstrated a clear correlation between the damage level in terms of crack development/measured free end bar slip and AE parameters (number of hits, CSS, H(t), and S r).

  8. Wear monitoring of single point cutting tool using acoustic emission techniques

    P Kulandaivelu; P Senthil Kumar; S Sundaram

    2013-04-01

    This paper examines the flank and crater wear characteristics of coated carbide tool inserts during dry turning of steel workpieces. A brief review of tool wear mechanisms is presented together with new evidence showing that wear of the TiC layer on both flank and rake faces is dominated by discrete plastic deformation, which causes the coating to be worn through to the underlying carbide substrate when machining at high cutting speeds and feed rates. Wear also occurs as a result of abrasion, as well as cracking and attrition, with the latter leading to the wearing through the coating on the rake face under low speed conditions. When moderate speeds and feeds are used, the coating remains intact throughout the duration of testing. Wear mechanism maps linking the observed wear mechanisms to machining conditions are presented for the first time. These maps demonstrate clearly that transitions from one dominant wear mechanism to another may be related to variations in measured tool wear rates. Comparisons of the present wear maps with similar maps for uncoated carbide tools show that TiC coatings dramatically expand the range of machining conditions under which acceptable rates of tool wear might be experienced. However, the extent of improvement brought about by the coatings depends strongly on the cutting conditions, with the greatest benefits being seen at higher cutting speeds and feed rates. Among these methods, tool condition monitoring using Acoustic Techniques (AET) is an emerging one. Hence, the present work was carried out to study the stability, applicability and relative sensitivity of AET in tool condition monitoring in turning.

  9. Chemometrics in Fingerprinting by Means of Thin Layer Chromatography

    Łukasz Komsta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is written as an introductory review, presenting summary of current knowledge about chemometric fingerprinting in the context of TLC, due to a rather small interest in the literature about joining TLC and chemometrics. The paper shortly covers the most important aspects of the chemometric fingerprinting in general, creating the TLC fingerprints, denoising, baseline removal, warping/registering, and chemometric processing itself. References being good candidates as a starting point are given for each topic and processing step.

  10. Development of Generic Methodology for Designing a Structural Health Monitoring Installation Based on the Acoustic Emission Technique

    Gagar, D.; Martinez, M.J.; Foote, P.

    2014-01-01

    The Acoustic Emission (AE) technique can be used to perform damage detection and localisation for structural health monitoring purposes. Implementation in aircraft structures however poses a significant challenge as its performance in terms of damage detection and localisation is not well understood when used with complex structural geometries and variable operational service environments. This paper presents initial developments towards a generic methodology for optimal design of a structura...

  11. Real-time temperature estimation and monitoring of HIFU ablation through a combined modeling and passive acoustic mapping approach

    Jensen, C. R.; Cleveland, R. O.; Coussios, C. C.

    2013-09-01

    Passive acoustic mapping (PAM) has been recently demonstrated as a method of monitoring focused ultrasound therapy by reconstructing the emissions created by inertially cavitating bubbles (Jensen et al 2012 Radiology 262 252-61). The published method sums energy emitted by cavitation from the focal region within the tissue and uses a threshold to determine when sufficient energy has been delivered for ablation. The present work builds on this approach to provide a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring software that displays both real-time temperature maps and a prediction of the ablated tissue region. This is achieved by determining heat deposition from two sources: (i) acoustic absorption of the primary HIFU beam which is calculated via a nonlinear model, and (ii) absorption of energy from bubble acoustic emissions which is estimated from measurements. The two sources of heat are used as inputs to the bioheat equation that gives an estimate of the temperature of the tissue as well as estimates of tissue ablation. The method has been applied to ex vivo ox liver samples and the estimated temperature is compared to the measured temperature and shows good agreement, capturing the effect of cavitation-enhanced heating on temperature evolution. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by using PAM and predictions of heating it is possible to produce an evolving estimate of cell death during exposure in order to guide treatment for monitoring ablative HIFU therapy. Portions presented at the 13th International Symposium on Therapeutic Ultrasound, Heidelberg, Germany (2012).

  12. Real-time temperature estimation and monitoring of HIFU ablation through a combined modeling and passive acoustic mapping approach

    Passive acoustic mapping (PAM) has been recently demonstrated as a method of monitoring focused ultrasound therapy by reconstructing the emissions created by inertially cavitating bubbles (Jensen et al 2012 Radiology 262 252–61). The published method sums energy emitted by cavitation from the focal region within the tissue and uses a threshold to determine when sufficient energy has been delivered for ablation. The present work builds on this approach to provide a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring software that displays both real-time temperature maps and a prediction of the ablated tissue region. This is achieved by determining heat deposition from two sources: (i) acoustic absorption of the primary HIFU beam which is calculated via a nonlinear model, and (ii) absorption of energy from bubble acoustic emissions which is estimated from measurements. The two sources of heat are used as inputs to the bioheat equation that gives an estimate of the temperature of the tissue as well as estimates of tissue ablation. The method has been applied to ex vivo ox liver samples and the estimated temperature is compared to the measured temperature and shows good agreement, capturing the effect of cavitation-enhanced heating on temperature evolution. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by using PAM and predictions of heating it is possible to produce an evolving estimate of cell death during exposure in order to guide treatment for monitoring ablative HIFU therapy. (paper)

  13. Does chemometrics enhance the performance of electroanalysis?

    Ni Yongnian [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China); Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China)], E-mail: ynni@ncu.edu.cn; Kokot, Serge [Inorganic Materials Research Program, School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia)

    2008-09-26

    This review explores the question whether chemometrics methods enhance the performance of electroanalytical methods. Electroanalysis has long benefited from the well-established techniques such as potentiometric titrations, polarography and voltammetry, and the more novel ones such as electronic tongues and noses, which have enlarged the scope of applications. The electroanalytical methods have been improved with the application of chemometrics for simultaneous quantitative prediction of analytes or qualitative resolution of complex overlapping responses. Typical methods include partial least squares (PLS), artificial neural networks (ANNs), and multiple curve resolution methods (MCR-ALS, N-PLS and PARAFAC). This review aims to provide the practising analyst with a broad guide to electroanalytical applications supported by chemometrics. In this context, after a general consideration of the use of a number of electroanalytical techniques with the aid of chemometrics methods, several overviews follow with each one focusing on an important field of application such as food, pharmaceuticals, pesticides and the environment. The growth of chemometrics in conjunction with electronic tongue and nose sensors is highlighted, and this is followed by an overview of the use of chemometrics for the resolution of complicated profiles for qualitative identification of analytes, especially with the use of the MCR-ALS methodology. Finally, the performance of electroanalytical methods is compared with that of some spectrophotometric procedures on the basis of figures-of-merit. This showed that electroanalytical methods can perform as well as the spectrophotometric ones. PLS-1 appears to be the method of practical choice if the %relative prediction error of {approx}{+-}10% is acceptable.

  14. Does chemometrics enhance the performance of electroanalysis?

    This review explores the question whether chemometrics methods enhance the performance of electroanalytical methods. Electroanalysis has long benefited from the well-established techniques such as potentiometric titrations, polarography and voltammetry, and the more novel ones such as electronic tongues and noses, which have enlarged the scope of applications. The electroanalytical methods have been improved with the application of chemometrics for simultaneous quantitative prediction of analytes or qualitative resolution of complex overlapping responses. Typical methods include partial least squares (PLS), artificial neural networks (ANNs), and multiple curve resolution methods (MCR-ALS, N-PLS and PARAFAC). This review aims to provide the practising analyst with a broad guide to electroanalytical applications supported by chemometrics. In this context, after a general consideration of the use of a number of electroanalytical techniques with the aid of chemometrics methods, several overviews follow with each one focusing on an important field of application such as food, pharmaceuticals, pesticides and the environment. The growth of chemometrics in conjunction with electronic tongue and nose sensors is highlighted, and this is followed by an overview of the use of chemometrics for the resolution of complicated profiles for qualitative identification of analytes, especially with the use of the MCR-ALS methodology. Finally, the performance of electroanalytical methods is compared with that of some spectrophotometric procedures on the basis of figures-of-merit. This showed that electroanalytical methods can perform as well as the spectrophotometric ones. PLS-1 appears to be the method of practical choice if the %relative prediction error of ∼±10% is acceptable

  15. A study of the characteristics of the acoustic emission signals for condition monitoring of check valves in nuclear power plants

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate that a condition-monitoring system based on acoustic emission (AE) detection can provide timely detection of check valve degradation and service aging so that maintenance or replacement can be preformed prior to the loss of safety function. This research is focused on the investigation and understanding of the capability of the acoustic emission technique to provide diagnostic information on check valve failures. AE testing for a check valve under controlled flow loop conditions was performed to detect and valve degradation such as wear and leakage due to foreign object interference. It is clearly demonstrated that the distinction of different types of failure were successful by systematically analyzing the characteristics of various AE parameters

  16. A study of the characteristics of the acoustic emission signals for condition monitoring of check valves in nuclear power plants

    Lee, Joon-Hyun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, San 30 Jangjeon-dong, Kumjeong-gu, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: johlee@pusan.ac.kr; Lee, Min-Rae [Department of Mechanical Design Engineering, Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Teak [Man-Machine Interface System Team, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Luk, Vincent [Sandia National Laboratories, Risk and Reliability Analysis Department, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jung, Yoong-Ho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, San 30 Jangjeon-dong, Kumjeong-gu, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-15

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate that a condition-monitoring system based on acoustic emission (AE) detection can provide timely detection of check valve degradation and service aging so that maintenance or replacement can be preformed prior to the loss of safety function. This research is focused on the investigation and understanding of the capability of the acoustic emission technique to provide diagnostic information on check valve failures. AE testing for a check valve under controlled flow loop conditions was performed to detect and valve degradation such as wear and leakage due to foreign object interference. It is clearly demonstrated that the distinction of different types of failure were successful by systematically analyzing the characteristics of various AE parameters.

  17. Near-Real-Time Acoustic Monitoring of Beaked Whales and Other Cetaceans Using a Seaglider™

    Klinck, Holger; Mellinger, David K.; Klinck, Karolin; Bogue, Neil M.; Luby, James C.; Jump, William A.; Shilling, Geoffrey B.; Litchendorf, Trina; Wood, Angela S.; Schorr, Gregory S.; Baird, Robin W.

    2012-01-01

    In most areas, estimating the presence and distribution of cryptic marine mammal species, such as beaked whales, is extremely difficult using traditional observational techniques such as ship-based visual line transect surveys. Because acoustic methods permit detection of animals underwater, at night, and in poor weather conditions, passive acoustic observation has been used increasingly often over the last decade to study marine mammal distribution, abundance, and movements, as well as for m...

  18. Wireless Acoustic Signal Monitoring Using MEMS sensor and ATmega on LabVIEW Platform

    Swathy L

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acoustics and vibrations caused on machine structures can result in faulty or collapse of the whole mechanical system. These acoustics produced by machinery are vital indicators of machine health. Acoustic signals analysis can be used as a tool for locating the problem and thus taking necessary actions. MEMS sensors provide high accurate low size and low cost microphones which can be even used in low cost space applications such as sounding rockets, nano-satellites etc. This paper explains the algorithm to extract acoustic signals from ADMP401, which is a high quality, high performance, low power, analog output, bottom-ported omnidirectional MEMS microphone. The sensor output will give the error free data even in noisy conditions. ATmega microcontroller is used to read the data from the sensor and send to LabVIEW software running on the computer which will extract and display the data from the serial port in real time. As rotating structures are those machine parts which may experience high vibration and acoustic noises, the same is implemented in wireless also which helps in extracting acoustic signals from rotating as well as inaccessible parts of the machinery.

  19. Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project

    Worthington, Monty [Project Director - AK

    2014-02-05

    Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the

  20. A new setup for studying thermal microcracking through acoustic emission monitoring

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Thermal stressing is common in geothermal environments and has been shown in the laboratory to induce changes in the physical and mechanical properties of rocks. These changes are generally considered to be a consequence of the generation of thermal microcracks and debilitating chemical reactions. Thermal microcracks form as a result of the build-up of internal stresses due to: (1) the thermal expansion mismatch between the different phases present in the material, (2) thermal expansion anisotropy within individual minerals, and (3) thermal gradients. The generation of cracks during thermal stressing has been monitored in previous studies using the output of acoustic emissions (AE), a common proxy for microcrack damage, and through microstructural observations. Here we present a new experimental setup which is optimised to record AE from a rock sample at high temperatures and under a servo-controlled uniaxial stress. The design is such that the AE transducer is embedded in the top of the piston, which acts as a continuous wave guide to the sample. In this way, we simplify the ray path geometry whilst minimising the number of interfaces between the microcrack and the transducer, maximising the quality of the signal. This allows for an in-depth study of waveform attributes such as energy, amplitude, counts and duration. Furthermore, the capability of this device to apply a servo-controlled load on the sample, whilst measuring strain in real time, leads to a spectrum of possible tests combining mechanical and thermal stress. It is also an essential feature to eliminate the build-up of stresses through thermal expansion of the pistons and the sample. We plan a systematic experimental study of the AE of thermally stressed rock during heating and cooling cycles. We present results from pilot tests performed on Darley Dale sandstone and Westerly granite. Understanding the effects of thermal stressing in rock is of particular interest at a geothermal site, where

  1. Assessment of the application of acoustic emission technology for monitoring the presence of sand under multiphase flow condition

    The monitoring of multiphase flow is an established process that has spanned several decades. This paper demonstrates the use of acoustic emission (AE) technology to investigate sand transport characteristic in three-phase (air-water-sand) flow in a horizontal pipe where the superficial gas velocity (VSG) had a range of between 0.2 ms−1 to 2.0 ms−1 and superficial liquid velocity (VSL) had a range of between 0.2 ms−1 to 1.0 ms−1. The experimental findings clearly show a correlation exists between AE energy levels, sand concentration, superficial gas velocity (VSG) and superficial liquid velocity (VSL)

  2. Passive Acoustic Monitoring of the Environmental Impact of Oil Exploration on Marine Mammals in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Sidorovskaia, Natalia A; Ackleh, Azmy S; Tiemann, Christopher O; Ma, Baoling; Ioup, Juliette W; Ioup, George E

    2016-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a region densely populated by marine mammals that must adapt to living in a highly active industrial environment. This paper presents a new approach to quantifying the anthropogenic impact on the marine mammal population. The results for sperm and beaked whales of a case study of regional population dynamics trends after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, derived from passive acoustic-monitoring data gathered before and after the spill in the vicinity of the accident, are presented. PMID:26611062

  3. Acoustic emission analysis for structural health monitoring of hot metal components; Schallemissionsanalyse zur Zustandsueberwachung von heissen Metallkomponenten

    Schulze, Eberhard [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Keramische Technologien und Systeme, Dresden (Germany). Institutsteil Materialdiagnostik

    2015-07-01

    For the application of acoustic emission analysis on hot components such as pipes special application techniques are necessary to protect the sensor from the heat. The Fraunhofer IKTS-MD has developed a waveguide solution that meets these requirements. Major challenges in the application of acoustic emission analysis in an industrial environment is the strong ambient noise. This requirement meets the developed acoustic measurement system at the Fraunhofer Institute by a high measurement dynamics, storage and assessment of the complete waveforms and by special algorithms. The attractiveness of the method lies in the relatively low number of sensors with which the integrity of large plant areas (e.g. several meters under high alternating load standing superheated steam pipe) can be permanently monitored. [German] Fuer die Anwendung der Schallemissionsanalyse an heissen Komponenten wie Rohrleitungen sind besondere Applikationstechniken notwendig, um den Sensor vor der Hitze zu schuetzen. Das Fraunhofer IKTS-MD hat dafuer eine Wellenleiterloesung entwickelt, die diese Anforderungen erfuellt. Wesentliche Herausforderung bei der Anwendung der Schallemissionsanalyse in industrieller Umgebung ist das starke Umgebungsrauschen. Dieser Anforderung begegnet das am Fraunhofer-Institut entwickelte akustische Messsystem durch eine hohe Messwertdynamik, Speicherung und Bewertung der vollstaendigen Wellenformen sowie durch spezielle Auswertealgorithmen. Die Attraktivitaet des Verfahrens liegt in der vergleichsweise geringen Anzahl von Sensoren, mit denen die Integritaet grosser Anlagenbereiche (z.B. mehrere Meter unter hoher Wechsellast stehender Heissdampfleitung) dauerhaft ueberwacht werden kann.

  4. A Permanent Automated Real-Time Passive Acoustic Monitoring System for Bottlenose Dolphin Conservation in the Mediterranean Sea

    Brunoldi, Marco; Bozzini, Giorgio; Casale, Alessandra; Corvisiero, Pietro; Grosso, Daniele; Magnoli, Nicodemo; Alessi, Jessica; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Mandich, Alberta; Morri, Carla; Povero, Paolo; Wurtz, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Christian; Viano, Gianni; Cappanera, Valentina; Fanciulli, Giorgio; Bei, Massimiliano; Stasi, Nicola; Taiuti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the EU Life+ project named LIFE09 NAT/IT/000190 ARION, a permanent automated real-time passive acoustic monitoring system for the improvement of the conservation status of the transient and resident population of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) has been implemented and installed in the Portofino Marine Protected Area (MPA), Ligurian Sea. The system is able to detect the simultaneous presence of dolphins and boats in the area and to give their position in real time. This information is used to prevent collisions by diffusing warning messages to all the categories involved (tourists, professional fishermen and so on). The system consists of two gps-synchronized acoustic units, based on a particular type of marine buoy (elastic beacon), deployed about 1 km off the Portofino headland. Each one is equipped with a four-hydrophone array and an onboard acquisition system which can record the typical social communication whistles emitted by the dolphins and the sound emitted by boat engines. Signals are pre-filtered, digitized and then broadcast to the ground station via wi-fi. The raw data are elaborated to get the direction of the acoustic target to each unit, and hence the position of dolphins and boats in real time by triangulation. PMID:26789265

  5. A Permanent Automated Real-Time Passive Acoustic Monitoring System for Bottlenose Dolphin Conservation in the Mediterranean Sea.

    Brunoldi, Marco; Bozzini, Giorgio; Casale, Alessandra; Corvisiero, Pietro; Grosso, Daniele; Magnoli, Nicodemo; Alessi, Jessica; Bianchi, Carlo Nike; Mandich, Alberta; Morri, Carla; Povero, Paolo; Wurtz, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Christian; Viano, Gianni; Cappanera, Valentina; Fanciulli, Giorgio; Bei, Massimiliano; Stasi, Nicola; Taiuti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the EU Life+ project named LIFE09 NAT/IT/000190 ARION, a permanent automated real-time passive acoustic monitoring system for the improvement of the conservation status of the transient and resident population of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) has been implemented and installed in the Portofino Marine Protected Area (MPA), Ligurian Sea. The system is able to detect the simultaneous presence of dolphins and boats in the area and to give their position in real time. This information is used to prevent collisions by diffusing warning messages to all the categories involved (tourists, professional fishermen and so on). The system consists of two gps-synchronized acoustic units, based on a particular type of marine buoy (elastic beacon), deployed about 1 km off the Portofino headland. Each one is equipped with a four-hydrophone array and an onboard acquisition system which can record the typical social communication whistles emitted by the dolphins and the sound emitted by boat engines. Signals are pre-filtered, digitized and then broadcast to the ground station via wi-fi. The raw data are elaborated to get the direction of the acoustic target to each unit, and hence the position of dolphins and boats in real time by triangulation. PMID:26789265

  6. Artificial Neural Network Model for Monitoring Oil Film Regime in Spur Gear Based on Acoustic Emission Data

    Yasir Hassan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The thickness of an oil film lubricant can contribute to less gear tooth wear and surface failure. The purpose of this research is to use artificial neural network (ANN computational modelling to correlate spur gear data from acoustic emissions, lubricant temperature, and specific film thickness (λ. The approach is using an algorithm to monitor the oil film thickness and to detect which lubrication regime the gearbox is running either hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, or boundary. This monitoring can aid identification of fault development. Feed-forward and recurrent Elman neural network algorithms were used to develop ANN models, which are subjected to training, testing, and validation process. The Levenberg-Marquardt back-propagation algorithm was applied to reduce errors. Log-sigmoid and Purelin were identified as suitable transfer functions for hidden and output nodes. The methods used in this paper shows accurate predictions from ANN and the feed-forward network performance is superior to the Elman neural network.

  7. Passive acoustic monitoring to detect spawning in large-bodied catostomids

    Straight, Carrie A.; Freeman, Byron J.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    Documenting timing, locations, and intensity of spawning can provide valuable information for conservation and management of imperiled fishes. However, deep, turbid or turbulent water, or occurrence of spawning at night, can severely limit direct observations. We have developed and tested the use of passive acoustics to detect distinctive acoustic signatures associated with spawning events of two large-bodied catostomid species (River Redhorse Moxostoma carinatum and Robust Redhorse Moxostoma robustum) in river systems in north Georgia. We deployed a hydrophone with a recording unit at four different locations on four different dates when we could both record and observe spawning activity. Recordings captured 494 spawning events that we acoustically characterized using dominant frequency, 95% frequency, relative power, and duration. We similarly characterized 46 randomly selected ambient river noises. Dominant frequency did not differ between redhorse species and ranged from 172.3 to 14,987.1 Hz. Duration of spawning events ranged from 0.65 to 11.07 s, River Redhorse having longer durations than Robust Redhorse. Observed spawning events had significantly higher dominant and 95% frequencies than ambient river noises. We additionally tested software designed to automate acoustic detection. The automated detection configurations correctly identified 80–82% of known spawning events, and falsely indentified spawns 6–7% of the time when none occurred. These rates were combined over all recordings; rates were more variable among individual recordings. Longer spawning events were more likely to be detected. Combined with sufficient visual observations to ascertain species identities and to estimate detection error rates, passive acoustic recording provides a useful tool to study spawning frequency of large-bodied fishes that displace gravel during egg deposition, including several species of imperiled catostomids.

  8. Continuous wavelet transform analysis and modal location analysis acoustic emission source location for nuclear piping crack growth monitoring

    Full-text: Source location is an important feature of acoustic emission (AE) damage monitoring in nuclear piping. The ability to accurately locate sources can assist in source characterisation and early warning of failure. This paper describe the development of a novelAE source location technique termed Wavelet Transform analysis and Modal Location (WTML) based on Lamb wave theory and time-frequency analysis that can be used for global monitoring of plate like steel structures. Source location was performed on a steel pipe of 1500 mm long and 220 mm outer diameter with nominal thickness of 5 mm under a planar location test setup using H-N sources. The accuracy of the new technique was compared with other AE source location methods such as the time of arrival (TOA) technique and DeltaTlocation. The results of the study show that the WTML method produces more accurate location results compared with TOA and triple point filtering location methods. The accuracy of the WTML approach is comparable with the deltaT location method but requires no initial acoustic calibration of the structure. (author)

  9. Non-contact acoustic emission measurement for condition monitoring of bearings in rotating machines using laser interferometry

    For advanced maintenance and safety in nuclear power plants, it is necessary to combine various technologies that are used to monitor the status of different equipment. Non-contact measurement methods offer technical advantages over contact measurement methods, such as the ability to perform spot measurements, adapt to high-temperature environments, and inspect dynamic parts. The acoustic emission (AE) method can detect earlier abnormal signs in bearings than vibration analysis, which is commonly used in power plants. The AE method is also able to detect various other events such as wear and leakage of materials. However, currently, non-contact AE measurement is not used for condition monitoring in power plants. To verify the feasibility of a non-contact AE measurement method using laser interferometry for condition monitoring technology, laboratory tests were conducted using a rotating machine fitted with bearings that had deliberately been made defective. The AE signals propagating from these defects were measured using a Michelson interferometer on the rotating polished shaft, and a piezoelectric sensor positioned on the bearing housing. This paper demonstrates that the non-contact AE method can detect various stages of deterioration in bearings, and therefore, the method can be considered as a useful future tool for condition monitoring of bearings in rotating machines. (author)

  10. Detection of explosive events by monitoring acoustically-induced geomagnetic perturbations

    Lewis, J P; Rock, D R; Shaeffer, D L; Warshaw, S I

    1999-10-07

    The Black Thunder Coal Mine (BTCM) near Gillette, Wyoming was used as a test bed to determine the feasibility of detecting explosion-induced geomagnetic disturbances with ground-based induction magnetometers. Two magnetic observatories were fielded at distances of 50 km and 64 km geomagnetically north from the northernmost edge of BTCM. Each observatory consisted of three separate but mutually orthogonal magnetometers, Global Positioning System (GPS) timing, battery and solar power, a data acquisition and storage system, and a three-axis seismometer. Explosions with yields of 1 to 3 kT of TNT equivalent occur approximately every three weeks at BTCM. We hypothesize that explosion-induced acoustic waves propagate upward and interact collisionally with the ionosphere to produce ionospheric electron density (and concomitant current density) perturbations which act as sources for geomagnetic disturbances. These disturbances propagate through an ionospheric Alfven waveguide that we postulate to be leaky (due to the imperfectly conducting lower ionospheric boundary). Consequently, wave energy may be observed on the ground. We observed transient pulses, known as Q-bursts, with pulse widths about 0.5 s and with spectral energy dominated by the Schumann resonances. These resonances appear to be excited in the earth-ionosphere cavity by Alfven solitons that may have been generated by the explosion-induced acoustic waves reaching the ionospheric E and F regions and that subsequently propagate down through the ionosphere to the atmosphere. In addition, we observe late time (> 800 s) ultra low frequency (ULF) geomagnetic perturbations that appear to originate in the upper F region ({approximately}300 km) and appear to be caused by the explosion-induced acoustic wave interacting with that part of the ionosphere. We suggest that explosion-induced Q-bursts may be discriminated from naturally occurring Q-bursts by association of the former with the late time explosion-induced ULF

  11. Chemometrics and modernization of traditional Chinese medicine

    2008-01-01

    Development of chromatographic fingerprinting and its related chemometric methods in the research of quality control of traditional Chinese medicines(TCMs) are discussed. The quality control methods for guarantying the authentication and stability of products and semi-products of TCMs are firstly assessed. The technique based on chromatographic fingerprinting is essentially a kind of high-through put and integral tools to explore the complexity of herbal medicines. In order to further control the comprehensive quality of TCMs,confirmation and identification of their important chemical components are necessary. Some new strategies are proposed to trace the chemical changes of chromatographic fingerprints both in product processing and/or after their administration by modern chromatographic techniques and chemometrics. Combined with systems biology and bioinformatics,it seems possible for one to reveal the working mechanism of TCMs and to further control their intrinsic quality comprehensively.

  12. Acoustic emission for on-line reactor monitoring: results of intermediate vessel test monitoring and reactor hot functional testing

    This article discusses a program designed to develop the use of acoustic emission (AE) methods for continuous surveillance to detect and evaluate flaw growth in reactor pressure boundaries. Technology developed in the laboratory for identifying AE from crack growth and for using AE information to estimate flaw severity is now being evaluated on an intermediate vessel test and on a reactor facility. A vessel, designated ZB-1, has been tested under fatigue loadings with simulated reactor conditions at Mannheim, West Germany, in collaboration with the German Materialpruefungsanstalt (MPA), Stuttgart. Fatigue cracking from machined flaws and in a fabrication weld were both detected clearly by AE. AE data were measured on a US nuclear reactor (Watts Bar, Unit 1) during hot functional preservice testing. This demonstrated that coolant flow noise is a manageable problem and that AE can be detected under operational coolant flow and temperature conditions. (author)

  13. In situ monitoring the pulse CO 2 laser interaction with 316-L stainless steel using acoustical signals and plasma analysis

    Khosroshahi, M. E.; pour, F. Anoosheh; Hadavi, M.; Mahmoodi, M.

    2010-10-01

    In most laser material processing, material removal by different mechanisms is involved. Here, application of acoustic signals with thermoelastic (below threshold) and breakdown origin (above threshold) together with plasma plume analysis as a simple monitoring system of interaction process is suggested. In this research the interaction of pulse CO 2 laser with 200 ns duration and maximum energy of 1.3 J operating at 1 Hz with austenitic stainless steel (316-L) is reported. The results showed that the non-linear point of the curve can serve as a useful indicator of melting fluence threshold (in this case ≈830 J cm -2) with corresponding temperature calculated using plasma plume analysis. Higher acoustic amplitudes and larger plasma plume volume indicates more intense interaction. Also, analysis showed that a phase explosion process with material removal (ejecta) in the form of non-adiabatic (i.e., dt ≫ α-1) is at play after laser pulse is ended. Also, SEM photographs show different surface quality medication at different laser intensities, which indicates the importance of recoil momentum pressure and possibly electrons and ions densities in heat transfer. Finally, electrochemical test indicate an improved corrosion resistance for laser treated samples compared to untreated ones.

  14. In situ monitoring the pulse CO2 laser interaction with 316-L stainless steel using acoustical signals and plasma analysis

    In most laser material processing, material removal by different mechanisms is involved. Here, application of acoustic signals with thermoelastic (below threshold) and breakdown origin (above threshold) together with plasma plume analysis as a simple monitoring system of interaction process is suggested. In this research the interaction of pulse CO2 laser with 200 ns duration and maximum energy of 1.3 J operating at 1 Hz with austenitic stainless steel (316-L) is reported. The results showed that the non-linear point of the curve can serve as a useful indicator of melting fluence threshold (in this case ∼830 J cm-2) with corresponding temperature calculated using plasma plume analysis. Higher acoustic amplitudes and larger plasma plume volume indicates more intense interaction. Also, analysis showed that a phase explosion process with material removal (ejecta) in the form of non-adiabatic (i.e., dt >> α-1) is at play after laser pulse is ended. Also, SEM photographs show different surface quality medication at different laser intensities, which indicates the importance of recoil momentum pressure and possibly electrons and ions densities in heat transfer. Finally, electrochemical test indicate an improved corrosion resistance for laser treated samples compared to untreated ones.

  15. Contribution of acoustic emission to monitor the effect of phosphate based inhibitor on the corrosion behavior of steel reinforcement

    Nahali, Haifa [Laboratoire MATEIS CNRS UMR5511 (Equipe CorrIS), INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Univ. de Tunis El Manar, Belvedere (Tunisia). Unite de Recherche ' ' Mecanique-Energetique' ' ; Dhouibi, Leila [Univ. de Tunis El Manar, Belvedere (Tunisia). Unite de Recherche ' ' Mecanique-Energetique' ' ; Idrissi, Hassane [Laboratoire MATEIS CNRS UMR5511 (Equipe CorrIS), INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France)

    2014-11-01

    One of the most important causes of reinforced concrete structures deterioration is the corrosion of the reinforcement steel. This corrosion depends on the presence of aggressive agents such as chlorides in the surrounding medium. Numerous protection techniques have been employed to mitigate this corrosion. Among them, the use of corrosion inhibitors has been considered as one of the most effective solutions. In the present work, the influence of phosphate based inhibitor on the corrosion of reinforcing steels embedded in mortar, and immersed in sodium chloride solution, was investigated by acoustic emission technique. The monitoring of specimens shows that the phosphate based inhibitor addition in the mortar increase the threshold of chloride concentrations, causing the breakdown of steel passivation layer. Thus, the acoustic signatures of concrete fracture and of structure degradation during the corrosion of these specimens have been highlighted. Similarly, the mechanism of phosphate action in terms of preventing steel from corrosion in mortar specimens was analysed by characterization methods (SEM, XRD) of the steel-mortar interface.

  16. Contribution of acoustic emission to monitor the effect of phosphate based inhibitor on the corrosion behavior of steel reinforcement

    One of the most important causes of reinforced concrete structures deterioration is the corrosion of the reinforcement steel. This corrosion depends on the presence of aggressive agents such as chlorides in the surrounding medium. Numerous protection techniques have been employed to mitigate this corrosion. Among them, the use of corrosion inhibitors has been considered as one of the most effective solutions. In the present work, the influence of phosphate based inhibitor on the corrosion of reinforcing steels embedded in mortar, and immersed in sodium chloride solution, was investigated by acoustic emission technique. The monitoring of specimens shows that the phosphate based inhibitor addition in the mortar increase the threshold of chloride concentrations, causing the breakdown of steel passivation layer. Thus, the acoustic signatures of concrete fracture and of structure degradation during the corrosion of these specimens have been highlighted. Similarly, the mechanism of phosphate action in terms of preventing steel from corrosion in mortar specimens was analysed by characterization methods (SEM, XRD) of the steel-mortar interface.

  17. Assessment of the application of acoustic emission technology for monitoring the presence of sand under multiphase flow condition

    El-Alej, M., E-mail: m.elalej@cranfield.ac.uk; Mba, D., E-mail: m.elalej@cranfield.ac.uk; Yeung, H., E-mail: m.elalej@cranfield.ac.uk [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 OAL (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-11

    The monitoring of multiphase flow is an established process that has spanned several decades. This paper demonstrates the use of acoustic emission (AE) technology to investigate sand transport characteristic in three-phase (air-water-sand) flow in a horizontal pipe where the superficial gas velocity (VSG) had a range of between 0.2 ms{sup −1} to 2.0 ms{sup −1} and superficial liquid velocity (VSL) had a range of between 0.2 ms{sup −1} to 1.0 ms{sup −1}. The experimental findings clearly show a correlation exists between AE energy levels, sand concentration, superficial gas velocity (VSG) and superficial liquid velocity (VSL)

  18. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r2  =  0.77) (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r2  =  0.82) (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  brain and assessing the pharmacokinetics of the compounds delivered can also be achieved by monitoring and controlling the stable cavitation emissions.

  19. Comparison of optical and acoustical monitoring during a crack propagation, implication for slow earthquake dynamics

    Lengliné, Olivier; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Elkhoury, Jean; Toussaint, Renaud; Daniel, Guillaume; Maloy, Knut Jurgen

    2010-05-01

    Observations of aseismic transients in several tectonic context suggest that they might be linked to seismicity. However a clear observation and description of these phenomena and their interaction is lacking. This owes to the difficulty of characterizing with a sufficient resolution processes taking place at depth. Here we aim to study these interactions between aseismic and seismic slip taking advantage of an unique experimental setup. We conducted a series of mode I crack propagation experiments on transparent materials (PMMA). The crack advance is trapped in a weakness plane which is the interface between two previously sandblasted and annealed plexiglass plates. A fast video camera taking up to 500 frames per second ensures the tracking of the front rupture. The acoustic system is composed of a maximum of 44 channels continuously recording at 5 MHz for a few tens of seconds. Piezo-electric sensors are composed of a 32 elements linear array and individual sensors surrounding the crack front. An automatic detection and localization procedure allows us to obtain the position of acoustic emission (A.E.) that occurred during the crack advance. Crack front image processing reveals an intermittent opening which might be linked to the time and space clustering of the AE. An analogy between the mode I (opening) and the mode III (antiplane slip) allows us to interpret our results in term of slip on faults. Our experiment thus helps to reveal the interplay between seismic and aseismic slip on faults.

  20. Neural Network Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signals for Drill Wear Monitoring

    The objective of the proposed study is to produce a tool-condition monitoring (TCM) strategy that will lead to a more efficient and economical drilling tool usage. Drill-wear monitoring is an important attribute in the automatic cutting processes as it can help preventing damages of the tools and workpieces and optimizing the tool usage. This study presents the architectures of a multi-layer feed-forward neural network with back-propagation training algorithm for the monitoring of drill wear. The input features to the neural networks were extracted from the AE signals using the wavelet transform analysis. Training and testing were performed under a moderate range of cutting conditions in the dry drilling of steel plates. The results indicated that the extracted input features from AE signals to the supervised neural networks were effective for drill wear monitoring and the output of the neural networks could be utilized for the tool life management planning.

  1. Integrated acoustic phase separator and multiphase fluid composition monitoring apparatus and method

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2016-01-12

    An apparatus and method for down hole gas separation from the multiphase fluid flowing in a wellbore or a pipe, for determining the quantities of the individual components of the liquid and the flow rate of the liquid, and for remixing the component parts of the fluid after which the gas volume may be measured, without affecting the flow stream, are described. Acoustic radiation force is employed to separate gas from the liquid, thereby permitting measurements to be separately made for these two components; the liquid (oil/water) composition is determined from ultrasonic resonances; and the gas volume is determined from capacitance measurements. Since the fluid flows around and through the component parts of the apparatus, there is little pressure difference, and no protection is required from high pressure differentials.

  2. Failure monitoring of E-glass/vinylester composites using fiber grating acoustic sensor

    Azmi, A. I.; Raju; Peng, G. D.

    2013-06-01

    This paper reports an application of an optical fiber sensor in a continuous and in situ failure testing of an E-glass/vinylester top hat stiffener (THS). The sensor head was constructed from a compact phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating (PS-FBG). The narrow transmission channel of the PS-FBG is highly sensitive to small perturbation, hence suitable to be used in acoustic emission (AE) assessment technique. The progressive failure of THS was tested under transverse loading to experimentally simulate the actual loading in practice. Our experimental tests have demonstrated, in good agreement with the commercial piezoelectric sensors, that the important failures information of the THS was successfully recorded by the simple intensity-type PS-FBG sensor.

  3. Acoustic-seismic monitoring of an underground final repository - a measurement project

    When spent fuel from nuclear power plants is deposited without reprocessing, the produced plutonium - which could be used for nuclear weapons - is still contained in it. Thus, safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are needed for final repositories to detect potential access, during and after the emplacement phase. To find out if acoustic and seismic methods can be used to detect undeclared activities in an underground repository in salt, the German Support Programme for the IAEA has tasked us to do measurements in the exploratory mine in Gorleben, a potential site. To gain the source properties we record sound and vibration at several positions underground and at the surface while various mining activities are carried out singly and in parallel. The evaluations will investigate source detection, localisation and recognition.

  4. Project of a Near-Real-Time Sismo-acoustic Submarine Station for offshore monitoring (NRTSSS)

    D'Anna, Giuseppe; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione CNT, Roma, Italia; Calore, Daniele; Envirtech S.p.A.; Mangano, Giorgio; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione CNT, Roma, Italia; D'Alessandro, Antonino; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione CNT, Roma, Italia; Favali, Paolo; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia

    2011-01-01

    The INGV seismic network ensures reliable and continuous monitoring of the Italian territory. However, the peculiarity of the Italian peninsula, characterised by an intense offshore geodynamic and seismic activity, requires the extension of the seismic monitoring to the sea. The aim of this project is: - to identify bottleneck is related to the construction, installation and use of underwater seismic station; - to define the most appropriate and low-cost architecture to guarantee the...

  5. Efficacy assessment of local doxycycline treatment in periodontal patients using multivariate chemometric approach.

    Bogdanovska, Liljana; Poceva Panovska, Ana; Nakov, Natalija; Zafirova, Marija; Popovska, Mirjana; Dimitrovska, Aneta; Petkovska, Rumenka

    2016-08-25

    The aim of our study was application of chemometric algorithms for multivariate data analysis in efficacy assessment of the local periodontal treatment with doxycycline (DOX). Treatment efficacy was evaluated by monitoring inflammatory biomarkers in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples and clinical indices before and after the local treatment as well as by determination of DOX concentration in GCF after the local treatment. The experimental values from these determinations were submitted to several chemometric algorithms: principal component analysis (PCA), partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The data structure and the mutual relations of the selected variables were thoroughly investigated by PCA. The PLS-DA model identified variables responsible for discrimination of classes of data, before and after DOX treatment. The OPLS-DA model compared the efficacy of the two commonly used medications in periodontal treatment, chlorhexidine (CHX) and DOX, at the same time providing insight in their mechanism of action. The obtained results indicate that application of multivariate chemometric algorithms can be used as a valuable approach for assessment of treatment efficacy. PMID:27283484

  6. Chemometric applications to assess quality and critical parameters of virgin and extra-virgin olive oil. A review.

    Gómez-Caravaca, Ana M; Maggio, Rubén M; Cerretani, Lorenzo

    2016-03-24

    Today virgin and extra-virgin olive oil (VOO and EVOO) are food with a large number of analytical tests planned to ensure its quality and genuineness. Almost all official methods demand high use of reagents and manpower. Because of that, analytical development in this area is continuously evolving. Therefore, this review focuses on analytical methods for EVOO/VOO which use fast and smart approaches based on chemometric techniques in order to reduce time of analysis, reagent consumption, high cost equipment and manpower. Experimental approaches of chemometrics coupled with fast analytical techniques such as UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence, vibrational spectroscopies (NIR, MIR and Raman fluorescence), NMR spectroscopy, and other more complex techniques like chromatography, calorimetry and electrochemical techniques applied to EVOO/VOO production and analysis have been discussed throughout this work. The advantages and drawbacks of this association have also been highlighted. Chemometrics has been evidenced as a powerful tool for the oil industry. In fact, it has been shown how chemometrics can be implemented all along the different steps of EVOO/VOO production: raw material input control, monitoring during process and quality control of final product. PMID:26944986

  7. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Compression-after-Impact Test of Nano-Particles-Coated CFRP Damaged by Simulated Lightning Strikes

    Nanoparticles-coated and impact-damaged carbon-fiber reinforced plastics(CFRP) laminates were tested under compression-after-impact(CAI) mode and the propagation of damage due to compressive loading has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). The impact damage was induced not by mechanical loading but by a simulated lightning strike. CFRP laminates were made of carbon prepregs prepared by coating of conductive nano-particles directly on the fibers and the coupons were subjected to simulated lightning strikes with a high voltage/current impulse of 10∼40 kA within a few microseconds. The effects of nano-particles coating and the degree of damage induced by the simulated lightning strikes on the AE activities were examined, and the relationship between the compressive residual strength and AE behavior has been evaluated in terms of AE event counts and the onset of AE activity with the compressive loading. The degree of impact damage was also measured in terns of damage area by using ultrasonic C-scan images. From the results assessed during the CAI tests of damaged CFRP showed that AE monitoring appeared to be very useful to differentiate the degree of damage hence the mechanical integrity of composite structures damaged by lightning strikes

  8. On-line acoustic monitoring of EDF nuclear plants in operation and loose-part diagnosis

    In order to detect incipient failures in nuclear power plant components, EDF has now put into operation more than 50 loose-part monitoring systems, on its 900 MW and 1 300 MW units. This paper first reviews the experience gained on the 900 MW reactors in recent years. It then focuses on the 1 300 MW loose part monitoring system (IDEAL) and to the tools developed for the diagnosis off site within a specific Expertise Laboratory at the Research and Development Division. New studies have been undertaken within the Monitoring and Aid to Diagnosis Station (PSAD) in order to extend the capabilities of loose part diagnosis on site. The new tools here presented integrate the recent progress in acquisition technology (SMART system) and in artificial intelligence (MIGRE expert system)

  9. Monitoring the habitat use of common Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus using passive acoustics in a Mediterranean marine protected area

    G. LA MANNA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean Tursiops truncatus subpopulation has been classified as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List because of its decline. This species in coastal areas is exposed to a wide variety of threats: directed kills, bycatch, reduced prey availability caused by environmental degradation and overfishing, habitat degradation including disturbances from boat traffic and noise. Despite the increase in boat traffic in the Mediterranean Sea, the effect on T. truncatus’ habitat use has been studied in little detail and few data have been published. This study represents the first attempt to characterise spatial and temporal habitat use by T. truncatus and its relation to boat traffic in the Isole Pelagie Marine Protected Area (Italy on the basis of an originally developed passive acoustic monitoring system (PAM. The devices were deployed in 2 areas in the southern waters of Lampedusa, during 2 separate years (2006 and 2009, each time for 3 months (from July to September and in 6 time slots (3 diurnal and 3 nocturnal. Acoustic analysis showed that T. truncatus used the Southern coastal area of Lampedusa independently of the year, primarily during the early summer, a period coinciding with the peak of calving season. Dolphin occurrences appeared independent of boat traffic, with the exception of the smallest temporal scale (time slots: dolphin occurrences were more prevalent during the night when the level of boat traffic was lower. This study provides evidence on T. truncatus habitat use in the Mediterranean Sea and reveals that boat traffic could be one of the factors influencing it, thus stressing the need for further detailed investigation regarding this topic.

  10. Functional Data Analysis Applied in Chemometrics

    Muller, Martha

    nutritional status and metabolic phenotype. We want to understand how metabolomic spectra can be analysed using functional data analysis to detect the in uence of dierent factors on specic metabolites. These factors can include, for example, gender, diet culture or dietary intervention. In Paper I we apply...... novelty of heart plots for spectral data. The important aspect of registration, also called warping or alignment, emerges from both the chemometric and statistical perspectives. In Paper III we apply functional registration in the context of biomechanics, specically to data from a juggling experiment. The...