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Sample records for acoustic agglomerators

  1. Numerical derivation of forces on particles and agglomerates in a resonant acoustic field

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2013-10-01

    Particles and agglomerates are investigated in gaseous acoustic flow fields. Acoustic fields exert forces on solid objects, which can influence the shape of the exposed bodies, even to the point of breakage of the structures. Motivated by experimentally observed breakage of agglomerates in an acoustic levitator (f = 20 kHz), a numerical study is presented that derives the acoustic forces on a complex model agglomerate from the pressure and velocity fields of a resonant standing ultrasound wave, calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is distinguished between the drag and lift/lateral forces on the overall agglomerate and on the different primary particles of the model.

  2. Acoustic agglomeration of fine particles based on a high intensity acoustical resonator

    Zhao, Yun; Zeng, Xinwu; Tian, Zhangfu

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic agglomeration (AA) is considered to be a promising method for reducing the air pollution caused by fine aerosol particles. Removal efficiency and energy consuming are primary parameters and generally have a conflict with each other for the industry applications. It was proved that removal efficiency is increased with sound intensity and optimal frequency is presented for certain polydisperse aerosol. As a result, a high efficiency and low energy cost removal system was constructed using acoustical resonance. High intensity standing wave is generated by a tube system with abrupt section driven by four loudspeakers. Numerical model of the tube system was built base on the finite element method, and the resonance condition and SPL increase were confirmd. Extensive tests were carried out to investigate the acoustic field in the agglomeration chamber. Removal efficiency of fine particles was tested by the comparison of filter paper mass and particle size distribution at different operating conditions including sound pressure level (SPL), and frequency. The experimental study has demonstrated that agglomeration increases with sound pressure level. Sound pressure level in the agglomeration chamber is between 145 dB and 165 dB from 500 Hz to 2 kHz. The resonance frequency can be predicted with the quarter tube theory. Sound pressure level gain of more than 10 dB is gained at resonance frequency. With the help of high intensity sound waves, fine particles are reduced greatly, and the AA effect is enhanced at high SPL condition. The optimal frequency is 1.1kHz for aerosol generated by coal ash. In the resonace tube, higher resonance frequencies are not the integral multiplies of the first one. As a result, Strong nonlinearity is avoided by the dissonant characteristic and shock wave is not found in the testing results. The mechanism and testing system can be used effectively in industrial processes in the future.

  3. Acoustic agglomeration of power-plant fly ash. A comprehensive semi-annual progress report

    Reethof, G.

    1980-02-01

    Results obtained during the reporting period are presented. The agglomeration of submicron fly ash particles has been studied as a function of sound pressure level, sound frequency, loading, and exposure time. A second generation model of the agglomeration process is being developed. A high-frequency, high-intensity variable speed siren delivering at least 600 W at frequencies up to 4000 Hz has been developed and tested. Details on the design and operation are presented. The agglomeration chamber has been completely cleaned and the aerosol generating system has been rebuilt. A mathematical model of the acoustics of agglomeration is being developed. Preliminary results of computerized electron microscopic scanning of fly ash particles during agglomeration are presented. (DMC)

  4. Nanoparticle agglomeration in an evaporating levitated droplet for different acoustic amplitudes

    Tijerino, Erick; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2013-01-01

    Radiatively heated levitated functional droplets with nanosilica suspensions exhibit three distinct stages namely pure evaporation, agglomeration, and finally structure formation. The temporal history of the droplet surface temperature shows two inflection points. One inflection point corresponds to a local maximum and demarcates the end of transient heating of the droplet and domination of vaporization. The second inflection point is a local minimum and indicates slowing down of the evaporation rate due to surface accumulation of nanoparticles. Morphology and final precipitation structures of levitated droplets are due to competing mechanisms of particle agglomeration, evaporation, and shape deformation. In this work, we provide a detailed analysis for each process and propose two important timescales for evaporation and agglomeration that determine the final diameter of the structure formed. It is seen that both agglomeration and evaporation timescales are similar functions of acoustic amplitude (sound pressure level), droplet size, viscosity, and density. However, we show that while the agglomeration timescale decreases with initial particle concentration, the evaporation timescale shows the opposite trend. The final normalized diameter can be shown to be dependent solely on the ratio of agglomeration to evaporation timescales for all concentrations and acoustic amplitudes. The structures also exhibit various aspect ratios (bowls, rings, spheroids) which depend on the ratio of the deformation timescale (tdef) and the agglomeration timescale (tg). For tdef

  5. A discrete element and ray framework for rapid simulation of acoustical dispersion of microscale particulate agglomerations

    Zohdi, T. I.

    2016-03-01

    In industry, particle-laden fluids, such as particle-functionalized inks, are constructed by adding fine-scale particles to a liquid solution, in order to achieve desired overall properties in both liquid and (cured) solid states. However, oftentimes undesirable particulate agglomerations arise due to some form of mutual-attraction stemming from near-field forces, stray electrostatic charges, process ionization and mechanical adhesion. For proper operation of industrial processes involving particle-laden fluids, it is important to carefully breakup and disperse these agglomerations. One approach is to target high-frequency acoustical pressure-pulses to breakup such agglomerations. The objective of this paper is to develop a computational model and corresponding solution algorithm to enable rapid simulation of the effect of acoustical pulses on an agglomeration composed of a collection of discrete particles. Because of the complex agglomeration microstructure, containing gaps and interfaces, this type of system is extremely difficult to mesh and simulate using continuum-based methods, such as the finite difference time domain or the finite element method. Accordingly, a computationally-amenable discrete element/discrete ray model is developed which captures the primary physical events in this process, such as the reflection and absorption of acoustical energy, and the induced forces on the particulate microstructure. The approach utilizes a staggered, iterative solution scheme to calculate the power transfer from the acoustical pulse to the particles and the subsequent changes (breakup) of the pulse due to the particles. Three-dimensional examples are provided to illustrate the approach.

  6. Experimental evaluation of acoustic agglomerators as an air cleaning system concept for emergency use in LMFBR plants. Final report

    In the development of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor, a major safety problem concerns the suppression of the sodium oxides aerosol particles produced during a hypothetical core disruptive accident. Some theoretical calculations are presented concerning sonic agglomeration rates of such a system in terms of acoustic frequency, intensity and particles. The information is useful in providing some guidelines for the evaluation and design of sonic systems for LMFBR emergency applications

  7. Varying the agglomeration position of particles in a micro-channel using Acoustic Radiation Force beyond the resonance condition.

    Dron, Olivier; Aider, Jean-Luc

    2013-09-01

    It is well-known that particles can be focused at mid-height of a micro-channel using Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) tuned at the resonance frequency (h=λ/2). The resonance condition is a strong limitation to the use of acoustophoresis (particles manipulation using acoustic force) in many applications. In this study we show that it is possible to focus the particles anywhere along the height of a micro-channel just by varying the acoustic frequency, in contradiction with the resonance condition. This result has been thoroughly checked experimentally. The different physical properties as well as wall materials have been changed. The wall materials is finally the only critical parameters. One of the specificity of the micro-channel is the thickness of the carrier and reflector layer. A preliminary analysis of the experimental results suggests that the acoustic focusing beyond the classic resonance condition can be explained in the framework of the multilayered resonator proposed by Hill [1]. Nevertheless, further numerical studies are needed in order to confirm and fully understand how the acoustic pressure node can be moved over the entire height of the micro channel by varying the acoustic frequency. Despite some uncertainties about the origin of the phenomenon, it is robust and can be used for improved acoustic sorting or manipulation of particles or biological cells in confined set-ups. PMID:23628114

  8. Defining urban agglomerations to detect agglomeration economies

    Cottineau, Clementine; Hatna, Erez; Arcaute, Elsa; Batty, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Agglomeration economies are a persistent subject of debate among economists and urban planners. Their definition turns on whether or not larger cities and regions are more efficient and more productive than smaller ones. We complement existing discussion on agglomeration economies and the urban wage premium here by providing a sensitivity analysis of estimated coefficients to different delineations of urban agglomeration as well as to different definitions of the economic measure that summarises the urban premium. This quantity can consist of total wages measured at the place of work, or of income registered at the place of residence. The chosen option influences the scaling behaviour of city size as well as the spatial distribution of the phenomenon at the city level. Spatial discrepancies between the distribution of jobs and the distribution of households at different economic levels makes city definitions crucial to the estimation of economic relations which vary with city size. We argue this point by regr...

  9. Agglomeration and Market Interaction

    Fujita, Masahisa; Thisse, Jacques-François

    2002-01-01

    The most salient feature of the spatial economy is the presence of a large variety of economic agglomerations. Our purpose is to review some of the main explanations for this universal phenomenon, as they are proposed in urban economics and modern economic geography. We first show why the competitive framework can hardly be the foundation for the economics of agglomeration. We then briefly review the alternative modelling strategies. In the hope of making our Paper accessible to a broad audie...

  10. Agglomeration and Co-Agglomeration of Services Industries

    Kolko, Jed

    2007-01-01

    Economic research on industry location and agglomeration has focused nearly exclusively on manufacturing. This paper shows that services are prominent among the most agglomerated industries, especially at the county level. Because traditional measures of knowledge spillovers, natural resource inputs, and labor pooling explain little of agglomeration in services industries, this paper takes an alternative approach and looks at co-agglomeration to assess why industries cluster together. By cons...

  11. Acoustics

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  12. Dynamic forces on agglomerated particles caused by high-intensity ultrasound.

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the acoustic forces on particles and agglomerates caused by high-intensity ultrasound in gaseous atmosphere are derived by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Sound induced forces cause an oscillating stress scenario where the primary particles of an agglomerate are alternatingly pressed together and torn apart with the frequency of the applied wave. A comparison of the calculated acoustic forces with respect to the inter particle adhesion forces from Van-der-Waals and liquid bridge interactions reveals that the separation forces may reach the same order of magnitude for 80 μm sized SiO2-particles. Hence, with finite probability acoustically agitated gases may de-agglomerate/disperse solid agglomerate structures. This effect is confirmed by dispersion experiments in an acoustic particle levitation setup. PMID:24152872

  13. Agglomeration Economies in Classical Music

    Borowiecki, Karol Jan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates agglomeration effects for classical music production in a wide range of cities for a global sample of composers born between 1750 and 1899. Theory suggests a trade-off between agglomeration economies (peer effects) and diseconomies (peer crowding). I test this hypothesis...

  14. Optical scattering on ferrofluid agglomerates

    Bacri, J. -C.; Salin, D.

    1982-01-01

    Direct microscopic observation of a thin sample of ionic ferrofluid, in the presence of a magnetic field, shows the existence of a locally hexagonal lattice of agglomerates. We have observed the unusual pattern of the light scattered by this array.

  15. Nucleation of point defect agglomerates

    A theory of the agglomeration of point defects into dislocation loops and voids is formulated. A critical comparison between theory and experiment is made for nickel and copper irradiated in a high voltage electron microscope

  16. Optimal agglomerations in dynamic economics

    Brock, William A.; Xepapadeas, Anastasios; Athanasios. N. Yannacopoulos

    2012-01-01

    We study rational expectations equilibrium problems and social optimum problems in innite horizon spatial economies in the context of a Ramsey type capital accumulation problem with geographical spillovers. We identify sufficient local and global conditions for the emergence (or not) of optimal agglomeration, using techniques from monotone operator theory and spectral theory in innite dimensional Hilbert spaces. We show that agglomerations may emerge, with any type of returns to scale (increa...

  17. Agglomeration processes in aging societies

    Theresa Grafeneder-Weissteiner; Klaus Prettner

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates agglomeration processes in aging societies by introducing an overlapping generation structure into a New Economic Geography model. Whether higher economic integration leads to spatial concentration of economic activity crucially hinges on the economies' demographic properties. While population aging as represented by declining birth rates strengthens agglomeration processes, declining mortality rates weaken them. This is due to the fact that we allow for nonconstant ...

  18. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs

  19. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs.

  20. Aerosol behaviour in an acoustic field

    The average size of an aerosol submitted to acoustic waves is increased. This results from coagulation of the finest particles on the largest ones. The mechanisms responsible for acoustic agglomeration are mentioned. An experimental apparatus was developed in order to control the evolution of aerosol distribution in an acoustic field. Important deposition on the walls of the agglomeration chamber was observed as a consequence of the acoustically induced turbulent flow. Finally, a dimensionless relationship was established between deposition rates and particle diameters as a function of experimental parameters (aeraulic and acoustic conditions, etc...)

  1. The problem of providing food resources in urban agglomerations (the case study of the Kuzbass agglomeration)

    ZOBOVA L.L.; SHABASHEV V.A.

    2016-01-01

    Urban agglomerations are the result of a process of spatial competition for resources. To analyze the functioning of specific urban centers, it is necessary to make a distinction between the process of agglomeration and the state of agglomeration in the spatial structure. This paper shows the interrelation of the process of urban agglomeration and the agglomeration of the production activity as its economic foundation. The study reveals the connection between the urban agglomeration process a...

  2. Metal extraction by solid-liquid agglomerates

    Dissolved metal values are extracted from a liquid e.g. uranium from phosphoric acid by contacting the liquid with agglomerates for a time to load the agglomerate with the metal value, separating the loaded agglomerates from the liquid phase and stripping the metal value from the loaded agglomerate. The agglomerate may be made by combining finely divided solid particles with a binding liquid to form a paste, adding a suspending liquid to form a mixture, the suspending liquid and binding liquid being immiscible in each other and the solid particles being insoluble in the suspending liquid and shearing the mixture to form the agglomerate. (author)

  3. Agglomeration and networks in spatial economies

    Johansson, Börje; Quigley, John M.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the parallel developments in the economics of agglomeration and the economics of networks. We explore the complementarities between the productivity benefits of agglomeration and those of network linkages, arguing that networks of actors dispersed over space may substitute for agglomerations of actors at a single point.

  4. Agglomeration effects : studying agglomeration e ffects from Norwegian hydroelectricity plants

    Johansen, Marius; Risa, Erling

    2015-01-01

    This thesis aims to answer the research question \\To what extent did the shocks to eco- nomic activity and population following openings of Norwegian hydroelectricity plants in the early 20th century lead to long run agglomeration eff ects?". The question is answered using data on population density and taxable income in 67 Norwegian municipalities in the period between 1876 and 2013. We utilize the fact that hydroelectricity plants opened before transportation of electricity o...

  5. Agglomeration, Integration and Tax Harmonization

    Richard Baldwin; Paul Krugman

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers tax competition and tax harmonization in the presence of agglomeration forces and falling trade costs. With agglomerative forces operating, industry is not indifferent to location in equilibrium, so perfectly mobile capital becomes a quasi-fixed factor. This suggests that the tax game is something subtler than a race to the bottom. Advanced 'core' nations may act like limit-pricing monopolists toward less advanced 'periphery' countries. Consequently, integration need not ...

  6. Agglomeration of food powder and applications.

    Dhanalakshmi, K; Ghosal, S; Bhattacharya, S

    2011-05-01

    Agglomeration has many applications in food processing and major applications include easy flow table salt, dispersible milk powder and soup mix, instant chocolate mix, beverage powder, compacted cubes for nutritional-intervention program, health bars using expanded/puffed cereals, etc. The main purpose of agglomeration is to improve certain physical properties of food powders such as bulk density, flowability, dispersability, and stability. Agglomerated products are easy to use by the consumers and hence are preferred over the traditional non-agglomerated products that are usually non-flowable in nature. The properties of food agglomerates and the process of agglomeration like employing pressure, extrusion, rewetting, spray-bed drying, steam jet, heat/sintering, and binders have been reviewed. The physical and instant properties of agglomerated food products have also been discussed. PMID:21491268

  7. Mechanisms for selective agglomeration of coals

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.-C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1989-05-01

    Work continued on the basic mechanisms which underlie various processes for beneficiating aqueous suspensions of coal by selective agglomeration with oil. A new method was demonstrated for characterizing the agglomerability of coal suspensions. This method utilizes a photometric dispersion analyzer to monitor changes in the turbidity of a particle suspension as increasing amounts of oil are added to the suspension in a batch agglomeration test. Agglomeration of the particles leads to a marked decrease in the turbidity of the suspension. Another experimental technique was also demonstrated for characterizing oil agglomeration. This technique involves measuring the rate of growth of agglomerates in a continuous flow system operating under stead-state conditions. The data are analyzed by means of a population balance. The results of a preliminary set of experiments in which Indiana V seam coal was agglomerated with tetralin seemed to fit a particular growth model very well. Equipment was also constructed for studying the kinetics of agglomeration in a batch process. While earlier work showed that quebracho (a commercially available dispersant) is a strong agglomeration depressant for pyrite, recent experiments with mixtures of Upper Freeport coal and mineral pyrite showed that quebracho does not appear to be sufficiently selective. Further consideration was given to the separation of mixtures of coal and pyrite agglomeration with heptane. 2 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Agglomeration and the product mix

    Dalvai, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide trade flows are dominated by high-productivity firms, that have a large range of products. Since the product range of firms reflects partly trade flows, it is a source of economic differences in space. In this paper, I analyze the effects of the product mix of firms on agglomeration. I build a theoretical model of multiproduct firms à la Mayer, Melitz, and Ottaviano (2014, AER), expand it with skilled, mobile workers and a spatial equilibrium. I show that a larger product mix of fir...

  9. Industrial Scope of Agglomeration Economies in Brazil

    Ana Maria Bonomi Barufi; Eduardo A. Haddad, Peter Nijkamp

    2015-01-01

    The tendency towards urbanization in the emerging world accompanied by the constant pursuit for higher productivity prompts an urge for studies aiming at understanding agglomeration economies. In the context of Brazil, a country with extremely high regional disparities, exploring this issue is important not only for private stakeholders, but also for public policy practitioners. In the framework of static agglomeration effects, we investigate the industrial scope of agglomeration economies in...

  10. Human Capital, Talent, Agglomeration and Regional Growth

    Karlsson, Charlie; Johansson, Börje; Stough, Roger R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an introductory overview highlighting some of the current knowledge as regards three critical questions related to the emerging knowledge economy: i) Why does human capital and talent tend to agglomerate in large urban regions?, ii) How does this agglomeration affect the location of different types of economic activities?, and iii) How does this agglomeration affect regional growth? There are different underlying agglomerative forces creating spatially concentrated increasing re...

  11. On the Mechanism of Ultrasound-Driven Deagglomeration of Nanoparticle Agglomerates in Aluminum Melt

    Kudryashova, Olga; Vorozhtsov, Sergey

    2016-05-01

    One of the promising directions in the technology of composite alloys with improved mechanical properties is reinforcement of the metallic matrix with nanopowders introduced in the liquid metal. Ultrasonic processing is known to significantly improve the introduction of submicrone particles to the metallic melt. This study focuses on the mechanisms of deagglomeration and wettability of such particles by the melt under the action of ultrasound. The suggested mechanism involves the penetration of the liquid metal into the pores and cracks of the agglomerates under the excess pressure created by imploding cavitation bubbles and further destruction of the agglomerate by the sound wave. The main dependences connecting the acoustic parameters and processing time with the physical and chemical properties of particles and the melt are obtained through analytical modeling. The mathematical description of the ultrasonic deagglomeration in liquid metal is presented; a dependence of the threshold intensity of ultrasound for the break-up of agglomerates on their size is reported.

  12. SPHERICAL AGGLOMERATION – DIRECT TABLETTING TECHNIQUE

    Patil Pradnya B.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Direct tabletting technique is the modern and the most efficient process used in tablet manufacturing and has been successfully employed for various poorly soluble and poorly compressible drugs. Spherical agglomeration is particle engineering technique which involves the transformation of fine crystals into spherical shape particles which enhances the powder properties such as particle size, shape, flow properties, solubility and bioavailability of pharmaceutical drug substances. This technique can also be applied to sustain the drug release from solid dosage forms. The present article is on the detailed comprehensive review about advantages and disadvantages, mechanism, different manufacturing methods of spherical agglomerates and characterization of spherical agglomerates.

  13. Study of aerosol behaviour in an acoustic field

    The average size of an aerosol submitted to acoustic waves is increased. This results from coagulation of the finer particles on the larger ones. An experimental apparatus was developed in order to control the evolution of aerosol distribution in an acoustic field. Important deposition on the walls of the agglomeration chamber was observed as a consequence of the acoustically induced turbulent flow. Consequently, we experimentally evaluated the turbulent properties of the system. A granular bed submitted to an acoustic field and set downstream an agglomerator constitutes an almost absolute filter for an usually penetrating aerosol

  14. Agglomeration of microparticles in complex plasmas

    Du, Cheng-Ran; Ivlev, Alexei; Konopka, Uwe; Morfill, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Agglomeration of highly charged microparticles was observed and studied in complex plasma experiments carried out in a capacitively coupled rf discharge. The agglomeration was caused by strong dust density waves triggered in a particle cloud by decreasing neutral gas pressure. Using a high-speed camera during this unstable regime, it was possible to resolve the motion of individual microparticles and to show that the relative velocities of some particles were sufficiently high to overcome the mutual Coulomb repulsion and hence to result in agglomeration. After stabilising the cloud again through the increase of the pressure, we were able to observe the aggregates directly with a long-distance microscope. We show that the agglomeration rate deduced from our experiments is in good agreement with theoretical estimates. In addition, we briefly discuss the mechanisms that can provide binding of highly charged microparticles in a plasma.

  15. Advances in food powder agglomeration engineering.

    Cuq, B; Gaiani, C; Turchiuli, C; Galet, L; Scher, J; Jeantet, R; Mandato, S; Petit, J; Murrieta-Pazos, I; Barkouti, A; Schuck, P; Rondet, E; Delalonde, M; Dumoulin, E; Delaplace, G; Ruiz, T

    2013-01-01

    Food powders are used in everyday life in many ways and offer technological solutions to the problem of food production. The natural origin of food powders, diversity in their chemical composition, variability of the raw materials, heterogeneity of the native structures, and physicochemical reactivity under hydrothermal stresses contribute to the complexity in their behavior. Food powder agglomeration has recently been considered according to a multiscale approach, which is followed in the chapter layout: (i) at the particle scale, by a presentation of particle properties and surface reactivity in connection with the agglomeration mechanisms, (ii) at the mechanisms scale, by describing the structuration dynamics of agglomerates, (iii) at the process scale, by a presentation of agglomeration technologies and sensors and by studying the stress transmission mode in the powder bed, and finally (iv) by an integration of the acquired knowledge, thanks to a dimensional analysis carried out at each scale. PMID:23522795

  16. Agglomeration process engineering approach to evaluate the ability of different technologies to agglomerate food powder.

    Hafsa, Ines; Mandato, Sandra; Lafond, Charleyne; Mejean, Serge; Dolivet, Anne; jin Kim, S.; Chevallier, S.; Le Bail, A.; Ruiz, Thierry; Cuq, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Agglomeration technologies are considered as a relevant way to improve functionalities of food powders. The agglomeration process makes it possible to limit segregation phenomena, to reduce dust production, to improve wettability and powders hydration during use, etc. Although largely used in the field of dairy or cereal food products, agglomeration processes are still managed with more or less empirical approaches, and tools. The objective of the present study is to investigate the agglomera...

  17. Industrial Agglomeration and Use of the Internet

    Chang, Chia-Lin; McAleer, Michael; Wu, Yu-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    textabstractTaiwan has been hailed as a world leader in the development of global innovation and industrial clusters for the past decade. This paper investigates the effects of industrial agglomeration on the use of the internet and internet intensity for Taiwan manufacturing firms, and analyses whether the relationships between industrial agglomeration and total expenditure on internet usage for industries are substitutes or complements. The sample observations are based on 153,081 manufactu...

  18. Industrial Agglomeration and Use of the Internet

    Chang, C-L; McAleer, M.J.; Wu, Y-C

    2015-01-01

    Taiwan has been hailed as a world leader in the development of global innovation and industrial clusters for the past decade. This paper investigates the effects of industrial agglomeration on the use of the internet and internet intensity for Taiwan manufacturing firms, and analyses whether the relationships between industrial agglomeration and total expenditure on internet usage for industries are substitutes or complements. The sample observations are based on 153,081 manufacturing plants,...

  19. Correcting agglomeration economies: How air pollution matters

    Drut, Marion; Mahieu, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to correct standard measures of agglomeration economies to account for air pollution generated by commuting. This paper examines the impact of nitrogen oxide (NOX) ? a pollutant mainly released by transportation ? on worker productivity. On one side, literature on agglomeration economies highlights the positive role of employment density on productivity, without accounting for the environmental impact of a better accessibility. On the other side, several studies (Graham, 2007;...

  20. Agglomeration of Charged Nanopowders in Suspensions

    Werth, J. H.; Linsenbuehler, M.; Dammer, S. M.; Farkas, Z.; Hinrichsen, H.; Wirth, K. -E.; Wolf, D. E.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work is to understand agglomeration of charged powders suspended in nonpolar fluids. The concerted influence of electromagnetic, hydrodynamic and van der Waals forces as well as Brownian motion leads to a complex agglomeration behaviour which depends on several parameters, e.g., the ratios of electric charges, particle sizes, temperature and concentrations of the particles. Both experimental and theoretical considerations are presented.

  1. The magnitude and causes of agglomeration economies

    Diego Puga

    2009-01-01

    Firms and workers are much more productive in large and dense urban environments. There is substantial evidence of such agglomeration economies based on three aproaches. First, on a clustering of production beyond what can be explained by chance or comparative advantage. Second, on spatial patterns in wages and rents. Third, on systematic variations in productivity with the urban environment. However, more needs to be learned about the causes of agglomeration economies. We have good models of...

  2. Control of optical active borates nanocrystals agglomeration

    I. Cieślik; R. Węgłowski; J. Żmija; K. Kurzydłowski; M. Płocińska; M. Oćwieja

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study explore the possibility of total control the agglomeration of nanoborates powders. The great potential of PDLCs can be enhanced by using dye-doped or nanoparticles-doped materials, such as borates [1]. It is important to know how to prepare nanoparticles in order to obtain a high level of dispersion in the composites. Otherwise, even small an agglomeration does not give a possibility on the appropriate characteristic of properties and interp...

  3. Theoretical studies on aerosol agglomeration processes

    Lehtinen, K.E.J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Use

    1997-12-31

    In this thesis, theoretical modeling of certain aerosol systems has been presented. At first, the aerosol general dynamic equation is introduced, along with a discretization routine for its numerical solution. Of the various possible phenomena affecting aerosol behaviour, this work is mostly focused on aerosol agglomeration. The fundamentals of aerosol agglomeration theory are thus briefly reviewed. The two practical applications of agglomeration studied in this thesis are flue gas cleaning using an electrical agglomerator and nanomaterial synthesis with a free jet reactor. In an electrical agglomerator the aerosol particles are charged and brought into an alternating electric field. The aim is to remove submicron particles from flue gases by collisions with larger particles before conventional gas cleaning devices that have a clear penetration window in the problematic 0.1-1{mu}m size range. A mathematical model was constructed to find out the effects of the different system parameters on the agglomerator`s performance. A crucial part of this task was finding out the collision efficiencies of particles of varying size and charge. The original idea was to use unipolar charging of the particles, and a laboratory scale apparatus was constructed for this purpose. Both theory and experiments clearly show that significant removal of submicron particles can not be achieved by such an arrangement. The theoretical analysis further shows that if the submicron particles and the large collector particles were charged with opposite polarity, significant removal of the submicron particles could be obtained. The second application of agglomeration considered in this thesis is predicting/controlling nanoparticle size in the gas-to-particle aerosol route to material synthesis. In a typical material reactor, a precursor vapor reacts to form molecules of the desired material. In a cooling environment, a particulate phase forms, the dynamics of which are determined by the rates of

  4. Compression Behaviour of Porous Dust Agglomerates

    Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    The early planetesimal growth proceeds through a sequence of sticking collisions of dust agglomerates. Very uncertain is still the relative velocity regime in which growth rather than destruction can take place. The outcome of a collision depends on the bulk properties of the porous dust agglomerates. Continuum models of dust agglomerates require a set of material parameters that are often difficult to obtain from laboratory experiments. Here, we aim at determining those parameters from ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our goal is to improveon the existing model that describe the interaction of individual monomers. We use a molecular dynamics approach featuring a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. The model includes normal forces, rolling, twisting and sliding between the dust grains. We present a new treatment of wall-particle interaction that allows us to perform customized simulations that directly correspond to laboratory experiments. We find that the existing i...

  5. Measuring Agglomeration Forces in a Financial Center

    Bourgain, Arnaud; Pieretti, Patrice

    2006-01-01

    Basing on Scitovsky's (1954) definition of external economies and applying the method of Caballero and Lyons (1990) to macro data of Luxembourg services industry, we find significant agglomeration forces between financial intermediaries (downstream industry) on the one hand and business services and computer industry (upstream industries) on the other.

  6. Industrial Agglomeration and Use of the Internet

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); M.J. McAleer (Michael); Y-C. Wu (Yu-Chieh)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractTaiwan has been hailed as a world leader in the development of global innovation and industrial clusters for the past decade. This paper investigates the effects of industrial agglomeration on the use of the internet and internet intensity for Taiwan manufacturing firms, and analyses whe

  7. Bipolar charged aerosol agglomeration and collection by a two zone agglomerator

    2001-01-01

    In older to collect fine particles more efficiently, a new-type electrostatic agglomerator with two sones was developed. The distinguishing feature of this electrostatic agglomerator is that the particles are bipolarly charged and coagulated in the same alternating electric field simultaneously. The silica flour with 2 μm mass median diameter and the smoke from burning wood powder were used as test aerosol. The comparison experimental results have shown that when the mean electric field is 4 kV/cm the collection efficiency of the new electrostatic agglomerator was 98.2% for silica flour and 67.4% for wood powder smoke. Under the same experimental condition, the collection efficiency of the electrostatic agglomerator with three zones was 97.4% for collecting silica flour and the collection efficiency of the electrostatic precipitator was 56.3% for wood powder smoke.

  8. Filtration behavior of silver nanoparticle agglomerates and effects of the agglomerate model in data analysis

    Buha, Jelena, E-mail: jelena.buha@empa.ch [Empa, Analytical Chemistry (Switzerland); Fissan, Heinz [Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology e.V. (IUTA) (Germany); Wang, Jing, E-mail: jing.wang@ifu.baug.ethz.ch [Empa, Analytical Chemistry (Switzerland)

    2013-07-15

    In many data evaluation procedures for particle measuring devices and in filtration models, spherical particles are assumed. However, significant fractions of aerosol particles are agglomerates of small primary spheres. The morphology of particles in filtration processes may not be known a priori and if the filtration data are processed with wrong assumption, errors can be induced. In this work, we have quantified such errors for the case of open-structured agglomerates. Filtration efficiency tests with polydisperse silver nanoparticle agglomerates and their sintered spheres were performed. After the sintering process, particles with a compact structure with the shape close to a sphere are obtained, which are referred to as sintered spheres in the present study. The testing method involved generation of particulate forms, passing the particles through the testing section, and measurement of the particle number concentrations and size distributions before and after the filter. Measurements of the aerosols upstream and downstream of the filter were conducted using scanning mobility particle sizers (SMPS, TSI Inc.), which covered the rage from 10 to 480 nm. Particles were additionally characterized from the electron microscopic images and the average primary particle size was determined to be 16.8 nm. The number-size distribution curves were obtained and used for penetration calculation. The penetration was dependent on the particle size and morphology. Silver-sintered spheres were captured with a lower efficiency than agglomerates with the same mobility diameter because of the stronger interception effect for agglomerates. Data analysis of the number-size distribution for agglomerates was processed based on sphere assumption and using the model for open-structured agglomerates developed by Lall and Friedlander. The efficiencies based on total concentrations of number, surface and volume were affected when the agglomerate model was used. The effect was weakest for the

  9. Filtration behavior of silver nanoparticle agglomerates and effects of the agglomerate model in data analysis

    In many data evaluation procedures for particle measuring devices and in filtration models, spherical particles are assumed. However, significant fractions of aerosol particles are agglomerates of small primary spheres. The morphology of particles in filtration processes may not be known a priori and if the filtration data are processed with wrong assumption, errors can be induced. In this work, we have quantified such errors for the case of open-structured agglomerates. Filtration efficiency tests with polydisperse silver nanoparticle agglomerates and their sintered spheres were performed. After the sintering process, particles with a compact structure with the shape close to a sphere are obtained, which are referred to as sintered spheres in the present study. The testing method involved generation of particulate forms, passing the particles through the testing section, and measurement of the particle number concentrations and size distributions before and after the filter. Measurements of the aerosols upstream and downstream of the filter were conducted using scanning mobility particle sizers (SMPS, TSI Inc.), which covered the rage from 10 to 480 nm. Particles were additionally characterized from the electron microscopic images and the average primary particle size was determined to be 16.8 nm. The number-size distribution curves were obtained and used for penetration calculation. The penetration was dependent on the particle size and morphology. Silver-sintered spheres were captured with a lower efficiency than agglomerates with the same mobility diameter because of the stronger interception effect for agglomerates. Data analysis of the number-size distribution for agglomerates was processed based on sphere assumption and using the model for open-structured agglomerates developed by Lall and Friedlander. The efficiencies based on total concentrations of number, surface and volume were affected when the agglomerate model was used. The effect was weakest for the

  10. Fibre agglomerate transport in a horizontal flow

    Loss of coolant accidents in the primary circuit of pressure and boiling water reactors can cause the damage of adjacent insulation materials. These materials may then find their way to the containment sump where water is drawn into the ECCS (emergency core cooling system). Strainers in the containment sump may become fully or partially blocked by the insulation materials. The consequences of such blockages are an increased pressure drop acting on the operating ECCS pumps. If the strainers are partially blocked smaller particles can also penetrate the strainers. These smaller particles can therefore enter the reactor coolant system and then accumulate in the reactor pressure vessel. An experimental and theoretical study that concentrates on mineral wool fibre transport in the containment sump and the ECCS is being performed. The study entails the generation of fibre agglomerates and the assessment of their transport in single and multi-effect experiments. The experiments include measurement of the terminal settling velocity, the strainer pressure drop, fibre sedimentation and resuspension in a channel flow, jet flow in a rectangular tank and the importance of chemical effects on any filter cake formed on the strainer. An integrated test facility is also operated to assess the compounded effects. Each experimental facility is used to provide data for the validation of equivalent computational fluid dynamic models. The channel flow facility allows the determination of the steady state distribution of the fibres at different flow velocities. The channel has a racetrack configuration with nine straight sections (1 m by 1 m by 0.1 m) and two 90 deg. bends with a radius of 0.5 m to the channel midpoint. The height of the bends is also 1 m and the channel width is 0.1 m. An elliptical section located upstream of one of the bends is used to house the impellers, which drives the flow into the next bend. Laser Doppler anemometry, particle image velocimetry, ultrasound

  11. Specialization and Agglomeration Patterns in Eastern Europe

    Chapman, Sheila A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates specialization and agglomeration trends in EU-27 NUTS2 regions over 1991-2011 by means of two versions of the relative Theil indicator that use employment data. The paper’s main focus is on Central and Eastern European Countries (CEECs regions. As a legacy of central planning, in the early ‘Nineties these regions presented significantly above-average specialization and agglomeration. The paper shows that over 1991-2011 these features change very little; moreover, while disproportions fall in the other EU members, they rise in CEECs, implying growing divergence among the two groups in real terms, notwithstanding EU emphasis on real convergence. Indicators disaggregated by sectors show that for CEECs specialization/agglomeration change most in agriculture, market services and manufacturing. The paper focuses on the last two sectors. It argues that performance in the service sector is largely due to capital regions catching up on previous underdevelopment in the sector, therefore getting closer to Western regions. Non-capital regions instead lag behind, moving away from the EU sectoral average. As far as manufacturing is concerned, CEECs regions continue to specialize in the more traditional lines of production, for which also agglomeration remains extremely high. Consideration of the changes over time gives a partially different picture and shows that the higher specialization in overall manufacturing results from the development of a small but dynamic medium-high technology sub-sector that is significantly disseminated across regions, thus appearing to result from successful industrial restructuring and reconversion.

  12. Encapsulation of hazardous wastes into agglomerates

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the cementitious properties and agglomeration characteristics of coal conversion byproducts to encapsulate and immobilize hazardous waste materials. The intention was to establish an economical way of co-utilization and co-disposal of wastes. In addition, it may aid in the eradication of air pollution problems associated with the fine-powdery nature of fly ash. Encapsulation into agglomerates is a novel approach of treating toxic waste. Although encapsulation itself is not a new concept, existing methods employ high-cost resins that render them economically unfeasible. In this investigation, the toxic waste was contained in a concrete-like matrix whereby fly ash and other cementitious waste materials were utilized. The method incorporates the principles of solidification, stabilization and agglomeration. Another aspect of the study is the evaluation of the agglomeration as possible lightweight aggregates. Since fly ash is commercially used as an aggregate, it would be interesting to study the effect of incorporating toxic wastes in the strength development of the granules. In the investigation, the fly ash self-cementation process was applied to electroplating sludges as the toxic waste. The process hoped to provide a basis for delisting of the waste as hazardous and, thereby greatly minimize the cost of its disposal. Owing to the stringent regulatory requirements for hauling and disposal of hazardous waste, the cost of disposal is significant. The current practice for disposal is solidifying the waste with portland cement and dumping the hardened material in the landfill where the cost varies between $700--950/ton. Partially replacing portland cement with fly ash in concrete has proven beneficial, therefore applying the same principles in the treatment of toxic waste looked very promising

  13. The Power of Hydroelectric Dams: Agglomeration Spillovers

    Severnini, Edson R.

    2014-01-01

    How much of the geographic clustering of economic activity is attributable to agglomeration spillovers as opposed to natural advantages? I present evidence on this question using data on the long-run effects of large scale hydroelectric dams built in the U.S. over the 20th century, obtained through a unique comparison between counties with or without dams but with similar hydropower potential. Until mid-century, the availability of cheap local power from hydroelectric dams conveyed an importa...

  14. Industry-specific firm growth and agglomeration

    Duschl, Matthias; Scholl, Tobias; Brenner, Thomas; Luxen, Dennis; Raschke, Falk

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the industry-specific relationship between industrial clustering and firm growth. The literature usually considers industrial clusters as positive for the general economic development of regions. In particular, their relationship with the formation rate of new firms and the survival rate of existing firms is well documented. However, the impact of agglomeration effects on growth prospects of firms is less clear. Because of the heterogeneity of industries, different agglomer...

  15. Sports Facilities, Agglomeration, and Urban Redevelopment

    Humphreys, Brad; Zhou, Li

    2013-01-01

    We develop a monopolistic competition model of urban service consumption and production that includes spatial structure and property values. The model shows that the introduction of a new professional sports facility and team generates agglomeration effects that change the mix of services and property values, and increases local welfare, part of which is transferred to the team as subsidies for the construction of the facility. The distributional consequences of the new facility and the impli...

  16. Control of optical active borates nanocrystals agglomeration

    I. Cieślik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purposes of this study explore the possibility of total control the agglomeration of nanoborates powders. The great potential of PDLCs can be enhanced by using dye-doped or nanoparticles-doped materials, such as borates [1]. It is important to know how to prepare nanoparticles in order to obtain a high level of dispersion in the composites. Otherwise, even small an agglomeration does not give a possibility on the appropriate characteristic of properties and interpretation of the results. The deagglomeration methods applied until now give the decrease of agglomeration to a lesser extent than our method. Characteristic size and shape of particles made with sol-gel process is difficult to perform. Design/methodology/approach: Nanopowders samples of YAB and LCBO were prepared with sol-gel method. Deagglomeration process was carried out using acetic acid. The morphology and size of nanopowders were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The crystallite sizes were determinated with IPS UA method. Findings: It was confirmed that the acetic acid influence on the decrease of agglomeration. It was also determined of conditions for preparation borates nanopowders samples (concentration acetic acind time and temperature of drying prepared samples. We have proved that a reagent used for deagglomeration process does not affect the structure of the investigated nanoborates used in an experimental. Research limitations/implications: The results can be used to the prepared of nanocompades of borates to observe a morphology and reliable assessment of nanocrystalline size. Originality/value: Our study shows how to prepare a sample of particles to observe morphology and measure the size of nanograins. In our study we found excellent solution, the medium, which not influence the inorganic nanomaterial structure. Result seems to be excellent and very perspective. We have showed as that measurement type influence the results of particles size.

  17. Development of a Gas-Promoted Oil Agglomeration Process

    C. Nelson; F. Zhang; J. Drzymala; M. Shen; R. Abbott; T. D. Wheelock

    1997-11-01

    The preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal was carried out with scale model mixing systems in which aqueous suspensions of ultrafine coal particles were treated with a liquid hydrocarbon and a small amount of air. The resulting agglomerates were recovered by screening. During a batch agglomeration test the progress of agglomeration was monitored by observing changes in agitator torque in the case of concentrated suspensions or by observing changes in turbidity in the case of dilute suspensions. Dilute suspensions were employed for investigating the kinetics of agglomeration, whereas concentrated suspensions were used for determining parameters that characterize the process of agglomeration. A key parameter turned out to be the minimum time te required to produce compact spherical agglomerates. Other important parameters included the projected area mean particle diameter of the agglomerates recovered at the end of a test as well as the ash content and yield of agglomerates. Batch agglomeration tests were conducted with geometrically similar mixing tanks which ranged in volume from 0.346 to 11.07 liters. Each tank was enclosed to control the amount of air present. A variable speed agitator fitted with a six blade turbine impeller was used for agitation. Tests were conducted with moderately hydrophobic Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and with more hydrophobic Upper Freeport coal using either n-heptane, i-octane, or hexadecane as an agglomerant.

  18. Models of agglomeration and glass transition

    Kerner, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This book is for any physicist interested in new vistas in the domain of non-crystalline condensed matter, aperiodic and quasi-crystalline networks and especially glass physics and chemistry. Students with an elementary background in thermodynamics and statistical physics will find the book accessible. The physics of glasses is extensively covered, focusing on their thermal and mechanical properties, as well as various models leading to the formation of the glassy states of matter from overcooled liquids. The models of agglomeration and growth are also applied to describe the formation of quasicrystals, fullerenes and, in biology, to describe virus assembly pathways.

  19. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    Steini Moura, Cassio [Faculty of Physics, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul, 90619-900, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Balzaretti, Naira Maria; Amaral, Livio [Institute of Physics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, C.P.: 15051, 91501-070, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Gribel Lacerda, Rodrigo; Pimenta, Marcos A. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, C.P.: 702, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  20. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  1. The soundscape dynamics of human agglomeration

    Ribeiro, H V; Lenzi, E K; Mendes, R S; Evangelista, L R

    2011-01-01

    We report a statistical analysis about people agglomeration soundscape. Specifically, we investigate the normalized sound amplitudes and intensities that emerge from people collective meetings. Our findings support the existence of nontrivial dynamics characterized by heavy tail distributions in the sound amplitudes, long-range correlations in the sound intensity and non-exponential distributions in the return interval distributions. Additionally, motivated by the time-dependent behavior present in the volatility/variance series, we compare the observational data with those obtained from a minimalist autoregressive stochastic model, a GARCH process, finding a good agreement.

  2. Analysis and synthesis of solutions for the agglomeration process modeling

    Babuk, V. A.; Dolotkazin, I. N.; Nizyaev, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The present work is devoted development of model of agglomerating process for propellants based on ammonium perchlorate (AP), ammonium dinitramide (ADN), HMX, inactive binder, and nanoaluminum. Generalization of experimental data, development of physical picture of agglomeration for listed propellants, development and analysis of mathematical models are carried out. Synthesis of models of various phenomena taking place at agglomeration implementation allows predicting of size and quantity, chemical composition, structure of forming agglomerates and its fraction in set of condensed combustion products. It became possible in many respects due to development of new model of agglomerating particle evolution on the surface of burning propellant. Obtained results correspond to available experimental data. It is supposed that analogical method based on analysis of mathematical models of particular phenomena and their synthesis will allow implementing of the agglomerating process modeling for other types of metalized solid propellants.

  3. Contributions to assessing the relative dimension of agglomeration theories

    Ion POHOAŢĂ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to structure, from a historical and spatial point of view, the existing specialists' concerns in developing theories about agglomeration. The complete and complex evaluation of agglomeration economies allows us to make important contributions to assessing the relative dimension of agglomeration theories, placing them within the research area of spatial economy and identifying them with the science of location and currently with the new economic geography (NEG.

  4. Agglomeration Economies in Semi-industrialized Countries: Evidence from Argentina

    José A. Borello; Hernán Morhorlang; Diego Silva Failde

    2011-01-01

    This paper identifies and problematizes three gaps in the existing literature on agglomeration economies. First, it argues that the ontology of agglomeration economies, the way in which these economies are conceptualized, needs to be revised. Far from being something “in the air” for all firms to profit from them, tapping these economies requires a conscious and sustained effort from firms. Second, it takes issue with the idea that the functioning of agglomeration economies in semi-industrial...

  5. Trade and Agglomeration: the Strategic use of Protection Revisited

    Thede, Susanna

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the strategic motive for protection present in trade and agglomeration models, in the so-called new economic geography framework, is sensitive to the standard assumption that there is a sole agglomeration industry. We first investigate unilateral trade policy effects on the international production and trade pattern and the resulting national welfare levels in a new economic geography model including several agglomeration industries. The strateg...

  6. The Structure of Agglomerates consisting of Polydisperse Particles

    Eggersdorfer, M. L.; Pratsinis, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Agglomeration is encountered in many natural or industrial processes, like growth of aerosol particles in the atmosphere and during material synthesis or even flocculation of suspensions, granulation, crystallization and with colloidal particle processing. These particles collide by different mechanisms and stick together forming irregular or fractal-like agglomerates. Typically, the structure of these agglomerates is characterized with the fractal dimension, Df, and pre-exponential factor, k...

  7. Mechanisms for selective agglomeration of coals

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1989-05-01

    The investigation of basic mechanisms which underlie various processes for cleaning coal by selective agglomeration with oil was continued. Further measurements were made of the heat of wetting or immersion of various types of coal and graphite. The heat of immersion is an indicator of hydrophobicity which appears to correlate with other indicators such as induction time. The heat of immersion of Upper Freeport coal was increased greatly by heating the material in air at 150{degree}C for 7 days. The increase appeared due to a combination of surface oxidation and other factors such as an increase in the heats of rehydration and swelling. Leaching Upper Freeport coal with boiling hydrochloric acid increased the heat of immersion at low pH. Further consideration was given to potential pyrite depressants and quebracho was selected for evaluation. The degree of suppression was observed to depend on the nature of the solids and the amount of agglomerant (heptane) as well as the concentration of quebracho. 12 figs.

  8. Effect of agglomeration on flowability of baby food powders.

    Szulc, Karolina; Lenart, Andrzej

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the wet agglomeration in a fluidized bed on flowability of agglomerated products, such as baby food powders. The agglomeration process was performed in the fluidized bed. The wetting liquid used to the process was: water, 2% lecithin solution, and 50% sugar solution. Food powders flowability was expressed as: Hausner Ratio, pouring time, angles of sliding and of repose and flow function. The composition of materials, used to prepare mixtures, has a significant influence on tested properties. The higher milk powder of the mixtures caused decreasing of their flowability. Wet agglomeration of baby food powders caused an increase in the mean diameter of particles, which made it possible to receive agglomerates with good flowability and decreased bulk density. The increase of milk powder content from 0 to 73% in the mixture before the agglomeration contributed to improve its flowability. Wet agglomeration with 2% lecithin solution and 50% sugar solution reduced particle size and bulk density, improved flowability of received agglomerates in relation to agglomerates received with water as a wetting liquid. PMID:20629874

  9. Agglomerates processing on in-flight images of granular products

    Ros, Frederic; Guillaume, S.; Sevila, Francis

    1993-11-01

    Image analysis can be used to characterize granular populations in many processes in food industry or in agricultural engineering. Either global or individual parameters can be extracted from the image. However, granular products may appear agglomerate on the image, bringing biasing on individual parameters. Combining statistical and neural network technics enables the build of a system which can recognize if products are agglomerate or not. To process images after agglomerates detection, two approaches have been studied: the first is based on erosion, followed by conditional dilation with the original image; the second takes advantage of the graph's properties of the agglomerate's skeleton.

  10. Agglomeration of coal fines for premium fuel application

    This paper reports on fine coal in liquid suspension, which can be agglomerated in a number of ways. One of the oldest procedures involves the addition of electrolyte to the suspension to cause a reduction in the zeta potential and allow colliding particles to agglomerate. A second method involves the use of polymeric flocculants to bridge between particles. Both of these technologies are being used in the wastewater treatment plants for removal of fine waste particles from contaminated water. A third method involves the addition of a second immiscible liquid preferentially to wet the particles and cause adhesion by capillary interfacial forces. While the bonding forces in the first two methods are small and result in rather weak and voluminous agglomerates, the third method is postulated to produce more dense and much stronger agglomerates. In the case of fine coals, the carbonaceous constituents can be agglomerated and recovered from the aqueous suspension with many different coagulants. Inorganic or ash-forming constituents are also agglomerated along with the fine coal particles. As the froth floatation, agglomeration using coal and colloidal dust to effect a separation. Froth floatation, however, becomes less effective where extremely fine particles of cal must be treated or if there is considerable clay-size particle present. In contrast, there appears to be virtually no lower limit on the particle size suitable for agglomeration uses

  11. Fluid bed agglomeration with a narrow droplet size distribution

    Schaafsma, SH; Vonk, P; Kossen, NWF

    2000-01-01

    In the fluid bed agglomeration processes liquid distribution influences the agglomerate growth. We developed a new nozzle that produces uniform droplets, which allows droplets to be easily controlled in size independently of liquid- and airflow of the nozzle. It was found that the spray rate and the

  12. Agglomeration effects on countries' competitiveness and entrepreneurial performance

    Páger, Balázs; Komlósi, Éva

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to elaborate the role of agglomeration effects on countries' competitiveness and entrepreneurial performance. Our research contributes to the understanding of the relationship that exists between a country's urban system characterized by spatial agglomeration (concentration) or deglomeration (deconcentration) processes, and its competitiveness and entrepreneurial performance, respectively. Urbanization economies refer to considerable cost savings generated through the locating...

  13. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-09-30

    Heap leaching is one of the methods being used to recover metal from low grade ore deposits. The main problem faced during heap leaching is the migration of fine grained particles through the heap, forming impermeable beds which result in poor solution flow. The poor solution flow leads to less contact between the leach solution and the ore, resulting in low recovery rates. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses prevents fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Currently, there is one facility in the United States which uses agglomeration. This operation agglomerates their ore using leach solution (raffinate), but is still experiencing undesirable metal recovery from the heaps due to agglomerate breakdown. The use of a binder, in addition to the leach solution, during agglomeration would help to produce stronger agglomerates that did not break down during processing. However, there are no known binders that will work satisfactorily in the acidic environment of a heap, at a reasonable cost. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. Increasing copper recovery in heap leaching by the use of binders and agglomeration would result in a significant decrease in the amount of energy consumed. Assuming that 70% of all the leaching heaps would convert to using agglomeration technology, as much as 1.64*10{sup 12} BTU per year would be able to be saved if a 25% increase in copper recovery was experienced, which is equivalent to saving approximately 18% of the energy currently being used in leaching heaps. For every week a leach cycle was decreased, a savings of as much as 1.23*10{sup 11} BTU per week would result. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures. These binders and experimental procedures will be able to be used for use in improving the energy efficiency of

  14. Effect of drug content and agglomerate size on tabletability and drug release characteristics of bromhexine hydrochloridetalc agglomerates prepared by crystallo-co-agglomeration.

    Jadhav, Namdeo; Pawar, Atmaram; Paradkar, Anant

    2010-03-01

    The objective of the investigation was to study the effect of bromhexine hydrochloride (BXH) content and agglomerate size on mechanical, compressional and drug release properties of agglomerates prepared by crystallo-co-agglomeration (CCA). Studies on optimized batches of agglomerates (BXT1 and BXT2) prepared by CCA have showed adequate sphericity and strength required for efficient tabletting. Trend of strength reduction with a decrease in the size of agglomerates was noted for both batches, irrespective of drug loading. However, an increase in mean yield pressure (14.189 to 19.481) with an increase in size was observed for BXT2 having BXH-talc (1:15.7). Surprisingly, improvement in tensile strength was demonstrated by compacts prepared from BXT2, due to high BXH load, whereas BXT1, having a low amount of BXH (BXH-talc, 1:24), showed low tensile strength. Consequently, increased tensile strength was reflected in extended drug release from BXT2 compacts (Higuchi model, R(2) = 0.9506 to 0.9981). Thus, it can be concluded that interparticulate bridges formed by BXH and agglomerate size affect their mechanical, compressional and drug release properties. PMID:20228039

  15. Operational source receptor calculations for large agglomerations

    Gauss, Michael; Shamsudheen, Semeena V.; Valdebenito, Alvaro; Pommier, Matthieu; Schulz, Michael

    2016-04-01

    For Air quality policy an important question is how much of the air pollution within an urbanized region can be attributed to local sources and how much of it is imported through long-range transport. This is critical information for a correct assessment of the effectiveness of potential emission measures. The ratio between indigenous and long-range transported air pollution for a given region depends on its geographic location, the size of its area, the strength and spatial distribution of emission sources, the time of the year, but also - very strongly - on the current meteorological conditions, which change from day to day and thus make it important to provide such calculations in near-real-time to support short-term legislation. Similarly, long-term analysis over longer periods (e.g. one year), or of specific air quality episodes in the past, can help to scientifically underpin multi-regional agreements and long-term legislation. Within the European MACC projects (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) and the transition to the operational CAMS service (Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service) the computationally efficient EMEP MSC-W air quality model has been applied with detailed emission data, comprehensive calculations of chemistry and microphysics, driven by high quality meteorological forecast data (up to 96-hour forecasts), to provide source-receptor calculations on a regular basis in forecast mode. In its current state, the product allows the user to choose among different regions and regulatory pollutants (e.g. ozone and PM) to assess the effectiveness of fictive emission reductions in air pollutant emissions that are implemented immediately, either within the agglomeration or outside. The effects are visualized as bar charts, showing resulting changes in air pollution levels within the agglomeration as a function of time (hourly resolution, 0 to 4 days into the future). The bar charts not only allow assessing the effects of emission

  16. Communication Acoustics

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  17. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-03-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily at a reasonable cost. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders currently encountered in this acidic environment process. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching. The active involvement of our industrial partners will help to ensure rapid commercialization of any agglomeration technologies developed by this project.

  18. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; J. A. Gurtler; K. Lewandowski

    2005-09-30

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily at a reasonable cost. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders currently encountered in this acidic environment process. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching. The active involvement of our industrial partners will help to ensure rapid commercialization of any agglomeration technologies developed by this project.

  19. Fragmentation and bond strength of airborne diesel soot agglomerates

    Messerer Armin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of diesel soot aerosol particles to break up into smaller units under mechanical stress was investigated by a direct impaction technique which measures the degree of fragmentation of individual agglomerates vs. impact energy. Diesel aerosol was generated by an idling diesel engine used for passenger vehicles. Both the aerosol emitted directly and aerosol that had undergone additional growth by Brownian coagulation ("aging" was investigated. Optionally a thermo-desoption technique at 280°C was used to remove all high-volatility and the majority of low-volatility HC adsorbates from the aerosol before aging. Results It was found that the primary soot agglomerates emitted directly from the engine could not be fragmented at all. Soot agglomerates permitted to grow additionally by Brownian coagulation of the primary emitted particles could be fragmented to a maximum of 75% and 60% respectively, depending on whether adsorbates were removed from their surface prior to aging or not. At most, these aged agglomerates could be broken down to roughly the size of the agglomerates from the primary emission. The energy required for a 50% fragmentation probability of all bonds within an agglomerate was reduced by roughly a factor of 2 when aging "dry" agglomerates. Average bond energies derived from the data were 0.52*10-16 and 1.2*10-16 J, respectively. This is about 2 orders of magnitude higher than estimates for pure van-der-Waals agglomerates, but agrees quite well with other observations. Conclusion Although direct conclusions regarding the behavior of inhaled diesel aerosol in contact with body fluids cannot be drawn from such measurements, the results imply that highly agglomerated soot aerosol particles are unlikely to break up into units smaller than roughly the size distribution emitted as tail pipe soot.

  20. Public Action and Innovationsupport Institutions in New Technological Agglomerations

    Borras, Susana; Bacaria, Jordi; Fernandez-Ribas, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    engaged in enhancing the technological capabilities and knowledge flow of the territory. Taking this consideration as a starting point, the article presents the dynamics of the technological agglomeration of the Vallès Occidental County, located within Catalonia, Spain. It has supplied information on the......In all industrial and technological agglomerations several types of public and semi-public actors coexist. The same happens with the levels of government. Consequently, the daily reality of agglomerations is characterized by a wide diversity of innovation-support institutions more or less actively...

  1. Colloidal agglomerates in tank sludge: Impact on waste processing

    'Insoluble colloidal sludges in hazardous waste streams such as tank wastes can pose serious problems for waste processing, interfering with retrieval, transport, separation, and solidification procedures. Properties of sediment layers and sludge suspensions such as slurry viscosities, sedimentation rates, and final sediment densities can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the particle types present, the degree to which the particles agglomerate or stick to each other, and on a wide range of processing parameters such as solution shear rates, pH, salt content, and temperature. The objectives of this work are to: (1) understand the factors controlling the nature and extent of colloidal agglomeration under expected waste processing conditions; (2) determine how agglomeration phenomena influence physical properties relevant to waste processing including rheology, sedimentation, and filtration; and (3) develop strategies for optimizing processing conditions via control of agglomeration phenomena. Insoluble colloidal sludges in hazardous waste streams such as tank wastes can pose serious problems for waste processing, interfering with retrieval, transport, separation, and solidification procedures. Properties of sediment layers and sludge suspensions such as slurry viscosities, sedimentation rates, and final sediment densities can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the particle types present, the degree to which the particles agglomerate or stick to each other, and on a wide range of processing parameters such as solution shear rates, pH, salt content, and temperature. The objectives of this work are to: (1) understand the factors controlling the nature and extent of colloidal agglomeration under expected waste processing conditions; (2) determine how agglomeration phenomena influence physical properties relevant to waste processing including rheology, sedimentation, and filtration; and (3) develop strategies for optimizing processing conditions via control

  2. WP/084 Measuring Industry Agglomeration and Identifying the Driving Forces

    Howard, Emma; Tarp, Finn; Newman, Carol

    Understanding industry agglomeration and its driving forces is critical for the formulation of industrial policy in developing countries. Crucial to this process is the definition and measurement of agglomeration. We propose a new measure and examine what it reveals about the importance of...... transport costs, labour market pooling, and technology transfer for agglomeration processes. We contrast this analysis with insights from existing measures in the literature and find very different underlying stories at work. An exceptionally rich set of data from Vietnam makes us confident that our measure...

  3. Externalities, Floating Population and Spatial Agglomeration

    Du Yu; Wang Chuansheng; Fan Jie

    2007-01-01

    With the further development of socialist market economy,the mobility of factor markets in China,especially the labor market.is strengthened.Extemalities interacts with the agglomeration of productive factors.Under the framework of new economic geographg this article presents a theoretical model involving the endogenous population density affected by urban externalities.Results show that the population density is more concentrated around the center because the degree and extent of interaction between individuals intensifies when the distance from the center decreases.When there are several extemalifies resonurces,the aggregation of externalities changes the configuration of spatial factor allocation.These results fit well with the empirical facts about the decreasing density of floating population along the cities of Guangzhou,Dongguan and Shenzhen in Guangdong Province which is situat d in the eastern coast of the Pearl River Delta.We find that under the impacts of externalities released from Hong Kong into the coast,floating population Was more concentrated around Shenzhen and Dongguan,which are more adjacent to Hong Kong compared with Guangzhou City.

  4. Acoustic Neuroma

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  5. Acoustic Neuroma

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor ... press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the symptoms ...

  6. Evolution of Zipf's Law for Indian Urban Agglomerations vis-\\`{a}-vis Chinese Urban Agglomerations

    Gangopadhyay, Kausik

    2012-01-01

    We investigate into the rank-size distributions of urban agglomerations for India between 1981 to 2011. The incidence of a power law tail is prominent. A relevant question persists regarding the evolution of the power tail coefficient. We have developed a methodology to meaningfully track the power law coefficient over time, when a country experience population growth. A relevant dynamic law, Gibrat's law, is empirically tested in this connection. We argue that these empirical findings for India goes in contrast with the findings in case of China, another country with population growth but monolithic political system.

  7. Amenability of Muzret bituminous coal to oil agglomeration

    Sahinoglu, E.; Uslu, T. [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Mining Engineering, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-12-15

    Laboratory scale agglomeration tests were undertaken to investigate the amenability of Muzret (Yusufeli-Artvin) bituminous coal to oil agglomeration. Kerosene was extensively used as oil in the tests. In addition, fuel oil, diesel oil, and hazelnut oil were also used in order to determine the effect of oil type. The effects of the parameters including coal content, kerosene content, agglomeration time, coal particle size, pH, oil type, and agitation rate, on the combustible matter recovery, ash reduction and pyritic sulphur reduction, were investigated. It was found that Muzret bituminous coal could be readily cleaned by oil agglomeration with substantial reductions in ash and pyritic sulphur content. Maximum combustible matter recovery, ash reduction and pyritic sulphur reduction were achieved to be 85.54%, 59.98%, and 85.17%, respectively. (author)

  8. Recent Advances in the Development and Application of Power Plate Transducers in Dense Gas Extraction and Aerosol Agglomeration Processes

    Riera, E.; Cardoni, A.; Gallego-Juárez, J. A.; Acosta, V. M.; Blanco, A.; Rodríguez, G.; Blasco, M.; Herranz, L. E.

    Power ultrasound (PU) is an emerging, innovative, energy saving and environmental friendly technology that is generating a great interest in sectors such as food and pharmaceutical industries, green chemistry, environmental pollution, and other processes, where sustainable and energy efficient methods are required to improve and/or produce specific effects. Two typical effects of PU are the enhancement of mass transfer in gases and liquids, and the induction of particle agglomeration in aerosols. These effects are activated by a variety of mechanisms associated to the nonlinear propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves such as diffusion, agitation, entrainment, turbulence, etc. During the last years a great effort has been jointly made by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the company Pusonics towards introducing novel processes into the market based on airborne ultrasonic plate transducers. This technology was specifically developed for the treatment of gas and multiphasic media characterized by low specific acoustic impedance and high acoustic absorption. Different strategies have been developed to mitigate the effects of the nonlinear dynamic behavior of such ultrasonic piezoelectric transducers in order to enhance and stabilize their response at operational power conditions. This work deals with the latter advances in the mitigation of nonlinear problems found in power transducers; besides it describes two applications assisted by ultrasound developed at semi-industrial and laboratory scales and consisting in extraction via dense gases and particle agglomeration. Dense Gas Extraction (DGE) assisted by PU is a new process with a potential to enhance the extraction kinetics with supercritical CO2. Acoustic agglomeration of fine aerosol particles has a great potential for the treatment of air pollution problems generated by particulate materials. Experimental and numerical results in both processes will be shown and discussed.

  9. Characterization of the geometrical properties of agglomerated aerosol particles

    A method for the absolute mass determination of agglomerated aerosol particles is presented. Based on this method it is possible to determine simultaneously and in situ mass, exposed surface and mobility diameter. From these measurements the fractal dimension of aerosol particles can be derived. For silver agglomerates produced by spark discharge it was found that they are bifractal. The fractal dimension was 3 in the free molecular regime and 1.9 in the transition regime. By variation of the gas mean free path it was shown that the region where the agglomerate structure changes from close-packed particle to low density agglomerates depends on the Knudsen number. In the free molecular regime the fractal dimension was not at all affected by any change of the generation conditions. Only sintering caused an increase in the density which was attributed to mass transport within the agglomerate. In the transition regime the fractal dimension remained constant with increasing monomer concentration and with increasing flow rate, but it increased with increasing pressure, increasing Ar:He ratio and with increasing sintering temperature. For sintering this effect was explained by the minimization of the surface free energy. It was found that the structure changing rate is proportional to the product of sintering temperature and residence time in the sintering oven. By carefully adjusting the temperature it is possible to produce agglomerates of a well defined structure. In desorption experiments of 136I from silver and carbon agglomerates it could be shown that the desorption behavior is different. It was found that the desorption enthalpy of iodine from graphite and silver particles were -142 kJ/mol and -184 kJ/mol, respectively. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the 136I attachment to particles is different for silver agglomerates with the same mobility, but different structures. (author) 41 figs., refs

  10. Defect agglomeration in ferroelectric ceramics under cyclic electric field

    2008-01-01

    The agglomeration of point defects in ferroelectric ceramics could be driven by repeated domain switching under cyclic electric field. The evolution equation of pore concentration under cyclic electric field is derived, with the help of a relation between the pore concentration and the extent of pore agglomeration. The results of the simulation agree quantitatively with the experimental data. An integrated framework about the mechanisms of electrically induced fatigue is proposed, which links the mechanisms at different scales.

  11. Does firm agglomeration drive product innovation and renewal?.

    De Beule, Filip; Van Beveren, Ilke

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses data from the Community Innovation Survey for Belgium to evaluate to what extent regional concentration (clusters) of firms, also known as agglomeration economies, may be enhancing for innovation. These agglomeration economies are positive externalities that benefit firms in various ways. For innovative performance, especially externalities related to knowledge spillovers matter. Knowledge spillovers or learning externalities typically emerge between firms that belong to the s...

  12. Differential labor mobility, agglomeration, and skill-biased migration policies

    Russek, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyzes the impact of skill-biased migration policies under the economics of agglomeration. It therefore develops an agglomeration model with two types of mobile worker who are heterogeneous and differ both within and between skill groups with respect to their migration propensity. On the one hand, the model reveals that the effectiveness of migration policies depends on the level on trade costs. On the other hand, it shows that increasing (reducing) political barriers to migration...

  13. Wet agglomeration of particles in a fluidized bed

    Jimenez-Munguia, Maria-Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Particles agglomeration allows to modify their initial physical properties (size, shape, density, porosity) and to improve powder end-use properties like flowability, mechanical resistance and dispersibility, very important for pharmaceutics and food products. Fluidized bed agglomeration is obtained by spraying a liquid (solvent, binder solution) on fluidized particles to allow liquid bridges formation when wet particles collide. These bridges consolidate due to drying by the hot fluidizing a...

  14. Industrial Performance, Agglomeration, and Foreign Manufacturing Investment in the UK

    Nigel Driffield; Max Munday

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between the comparative advantage of UK industries, and new inward investment into these industries. The paper demonstrates that the extent of foreign manufacturing investment in an industry, and the spatial agglomeration of that industry, are significant determinants of industry comparative advantage, thus providing evidence of agglomeration benefits to both domestic and foreign firms. The paper then shows that industry comparative advantage itself, toget...

  15. Viewpoint: Agglomeration research in the age of disaggregation

    William C. Strange

    2009-01-01

    This paper selectively reviews recent research on the economics of agglomeration. Theory offers a long list of forces that might explain the spatial concentration of economic activity. The increased availability of disaggregated data - by firm, by worker, and by geographical unit - presents opportunities to substantially advance the understanding of urban growth and industrial clustering. At present, however, there remains great uncertainty about the forces that produce agglomeration. This su...

  16. Using Raster Based Solutions to Identify Spatial Economic Agglomerations

    Marian DARDALA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficient economic activities incline to be concentrated in space, and therefore there is an increased attention over the forces of spatial economic agglomerations and the role of location in economic development. This paper proposes some solutions to automate the identification of spatial agglomerations and their intensities, function on the spatial distribution of items in the geographical areas. The software components developed to accomplish this task are Geographic Information Systems specific tools.

  17. Study on the Flow of Particle Agglomerates in Desulfurization Tower

    Zheng Jian-Xiang; Xu Chun-Xing; Zhang Wei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the flow feature of particle agglomerates in a desulfurization tower, a three-dimensional numerical simulation of the gas-solid two phase flow in the tower is carried out by use of the LES model and the cohesive particles kinetics theory. Based on the experimental model of the internal circulation multistage spray desulfurization tower, the simulation successfully captures the key flow features in a desulfurization tower, find that: agglomerates forming a stable fluidization...

  18. Marshallian Agglomeration Economies and Entrepreneurship: The Spanish Case

    Fernandez, Roberto Dopeso

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes to what extent marshallian agglomeration economies affect the creation of new entrepreneurial ventures at the metropolitan level. The measuring of agglomeration economies is based on the construction of indexes using the methodology of Glaeser and Kerr (2009). The indexes attempt to capture the effects of resource sharing, labor matching and knowledge spillovers according to the taxonomy proposed by Marshall (1920). Also an index to measure the influence of small suppliers...

  19. NOVEL BINDERS AND METHODS FOR AGGLOMERATION OF ORE

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele; J.A. Gurtler; C.A. Hardison; K. Lewandowski

    2004-04-01

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking.

  20. Kinetic modelling of methane hydrate formation and agglomeration with and without anti-agglomerants from emulsion in pipelines

    Pham, Trung-Kien; Melchuna, Aline; Cameirao, Ana; Herri, Jean-Michel; Duchet-Suchaux, Pierre; Glenat, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Offshore systems mainly containing crude oil, natural gas and water operate at low temperature and high pressure which favour conditions for gas hydrate formation and agglomeration. Gas hydrate is a serious issue in flow assurance; it may cause many troubles, especially, plugging in oil and gas pipeline. This work is to intend to develop a kinetic model to predict gas hydrate formation, agglomeration and plugging in flowlines based on the experimental data obtained from Archimede Flowloop fro...

  1. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  2. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    Chen Huanyang [School of Physical Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215006 (China); Chan, C T, E-mail: kenyon@ust.h, E-mail: phchan@ust.h [Department of Physics and the William Mong Institute of NanoScience and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong)

    2010-03-24

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  3. A revisit to agglomerates of early-type Hipparcos stars

    Caballero, J. A.; Dinis, L.

    2008-10-01

    % We study the spatial structure and sub-structure of regions rich in {Hipparcos} stars with blue B_T-V_T colours. These regions, which comprise large stellar complexes, OB associations, and young open clusters, are tracers of on-going star formation in the Galaxy. The DBSCAN (Density-Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise) data clustering algorithm is used to look for spatial overdensities of early-type stars. Once an overdensity, ``agglomerate'', is identified, we carry out a data and bibliographic compilation of their star member candidates. The actual membership in agglomerate of each early-type star is studied based on its heliocentric distance, proper motion, and previous spectro-photometric information. We identify 35 agglomerates of early-type {Hipparcos} stars. Most of them are associated to previously known clusters and OB associations. The previously unknown P Puppis agglomerate is subject of a dedicated study with Virtual Observatory tools. It is actually a new, nearby, young open cluster (d ˜ 470 pc, age ˜ 20 Ma) with a clear radial density gradient. We list P Puppis and other six agglomerates (including NGC 2451 A, vdBH 23, and Trumpler 10) as new sites for substellar searches because of their youth, closeness, and spatial density. We investigate in detail the sub-structure in the Orion, CMa-Pup and Pup-Vel OB complexes (``super-agglomerates''). We confirm or discover some stellar overdensities in the Orion complex, like the 25 Ori group, the Horsehead region (including the σ Orionis cluster), and the η Orionis agglomerate. Finally, we derive accurate parallactic distances to the Pleiades, NGC 2451 A, and IC 2391, describe several field early-type stars at d < 200 pc, and discuss the incompleteness of our search.

  4. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-12-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures that can be used for improving the energy efficiency of heap leaching, by preventing the ''ponding'' and ''channeling'' effects that currently cause reduced recovery and extended leaching cycle times. Methods have also been developed for iron ore

  5. Acoustical Imaging

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  6. Advanced physical fine coal cleaning spherical agglomeration. Final report

    1990-09-01

    The project included process development, engineering, construction, and operation of a 1/3 tph proof-of-concept (POC) spherical agglomeration test module. The POC tests demonstrated that physical cleaning of ultrafine coal by agglomeration using heptane can achieve: (1) Pyritic sulfur reductions beyond that possible with conventional coal cleaning methods; (2) coal ash contents below those which can be obtained by conventional coal cleaning methods at comparable energy recoveries; (3) energy recoveries of 80 percent or greater measured against the raw coal energy content; (4) complete recovery of the heptane bridging liquid from the agglomerates; and (5) production of agglomerates with 3/8-inch size and less than 30 percent moisture. Test results met or exceeded all of the program objectives. Nominal 3/8-inch size agglomerates with less than 20 percent moisture were produced. The clean coal ash content varied between 1.5 to 5.5 percent by weight (dry basis) depending on feed coal type. Ash reductions of the run-of-mine (ROM) coal were 77 to 83 percent. ROM pyritic sulfur reductions varied from 86 to 90 percent for the three test coals, equating to total sulfur reductions of 47 to 72 percent.

  7. Crystallo-co-agglomeration: A novel particle engineering technique

    Paradkar Anant

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystallo-co-agglomeration (CCA is a novel particle engineering/design technique developed by Kadam et al, to overcome the limitations of spherical crystallization (SC. Basically, it′s single step process used for size enlargement of single, two or more, small dose or large dose drugs, in combination with or without diluent. The process of CCA involves simultaneous crystallization and agglomeration of drug/s with/without excipients/s from good solvent and/or bridging liquid by addition of a non-solvent. Till date CCA has been applied for spherical agglomeration of talc, bromhexine hydrochloride-talc, ibuprofen-talc, ibuprofen-paracetamol, and naproxen-starch. The spherical agglomerates obtained by CCA can be used as intact beads (encapsulated spansules or directly compressible tablet intermediates having satisfactory micromeritic (flowability, mechanical (friability, crushing, compressional (compressibility, compactibility, and drug release properties. Modified drug release from agglomerates and compacts thereof can be achieved using suitable polymer composition in the process design. Thus, it can be concluded that, CCA is a simple and cost effective process, which can be tailor-made for particle design of all majority of drugs and combinations thereof.

  8. Theranostic potential of gold nanoparticle-protein agglomerates

    Sanpui, Pallab; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2015-11-01

    Owing to the ever-increasing applications, glittered with astonishing success of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in biomedical research as diagnostic and therapeutic agents, the study of Au NP-protein interaction seems critical for maximizing their theranostic efficiency, and thus demands comprehensive understanding. The mutual interaction of Au NPs and proteins at physiological conditions may result in the aggregation of protein, which can ultimately lead to the formation of Au NP-protein agglomerates. In the present article, we try to appreciate the plausible steps involved in the Au NP-induced aggregation of proteins and also the importance of the proteins' three-dimensional structures in the process. The Au NP-protein agglomerates can potentially be exploited for efficient loading and subsequent release of various therapeutically important molecules, including anticancer drugs, with the unique opportunity of incorporating hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic drugs in the same nanocarrier system. Moreover, the Au NP-protein agglomerates can act as `self-diagnostic' systems, allowing investigation of the conformational state of the associated protein(s) as well as the protein-protein or protein-Au NP interaction within the agglomerates. Furthermore, the potential of these Au NP-protein agglomerates as a novel platform for multifunctional theranostic application along with exciting future-possibilities is highlighted here.

  9. A Critical Study of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Diffusion

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Agglomerated multigrid techniques used in unstructured-grid methods are studied critically for a model problem representative of laminar diffusion in the incompressible limit. The studied target-grid discretizations and discretizations used on agglomerated grids are typical of current node-centered formulations. Agglomerated multigrid convergence rates are presented using a range of two- and three-dimensional randomly perturbed unstructured grids for simple geometries with isotropic and stretched grids. Two agglomeration techniques are used within an overall topology-preserving agglomeration framework. The results show that multigrid with an inconsistent coarse-grid scheme using only the edge terms (also referred to in the literature as a thin-layer formulation) provides considerable speedup over single-grid methods but its convergence deteriorates on finer grids. Multigrid with a Galerkin coarse-grid discretization using piecewise-constant prolongation and a heuristic correction factor is slower and also grid-dependent. In contrast, grid-independent convergence rates are demonstrated for multigrid with consistent coarse-grid discretizations. Convergence rates of multigrid cycles are verified with quantitative analysis methods in which parts of the two-grid cycle are replaced by their idealized counterparts.

  10. Reconstruction of Industrial Location in View of Industrial Agglomeration

    ZHU Huayou; DING Sibao

    2006-01-01

    The Industrial Agglomeration Theory has been evolving all the time. The study on the industrial location has become the focus of the massive theoretical location problems about agglomeration since the 1970s. The authors here analyze the evolution and the characteristics of the Industrial Agglomeration Theory and study its effect on the reconstruction of industrial location. The study suggests that the new idea of reconstruction of industrial location is to cultivate regional innovative system. On this basis, the authors analyze two cases of old industrial bases on their construction-Tiexi Industrial District in Shenyang City and Changchun Industrial Economic Development Zone. Finally, the authors put forward some suggestions that should be regarded, which include: 1) to combine industrial location reconstruction and enterprises' inner reform; 2) to speed up adjustment of resources and opening to the world; 3) to combine government mechanism with the market mechanism properly.

  11. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.-C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1990-01-01

    Numerous measurements of the heat of immersion of coal were conducting using several different particle size fractions of No. 2 Gas Seam coal from Raleigh County, West Virginia. The heat of immersion was determined in water, methanol, heptane, hexadecane and neohexane (2,2-dimethybutane). A comparison of the results with those determined previously for Illinois No. 6 coal is discussed. A number of potential pyrite depressants for use in oil agglomeration of coal were screened by testing the response of sulfidized mineral pyrite to agglomeration with heptane in the presence of the potential depressant. The following were tested; sodium dithionite, sodium thiosulfate, ferrous sulfate, ferric sulfate, titanous chloride, hydrogen peroxide, Oxone (a form of potassium monopersulfate), pyrogallol, quebracho (colloidal dispersant derived from tree bark), milk whey, and several organic thiols. Ferric chloride was applied to mixtures of Upper Freeport coal and sulfidized mineral pyrite before subjecting the mixtures to agglomeration with heptane. 7 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Ultrasonic de-agglomeration of barium titanate powder.

    Marković, S; Mitrić, M; Starcević, G; Uskoković, D

    2008-01-01

    BaTiO3 (BT) powder, with average particle size of 1.4 microm, was synthesized by solid-state reaction. A high-intensity ultrasound irradiation (ultrasonication) was used to de-agglomerate micro-sized powder to nano-sized one. The crystal structure, crystallite size, morphology, particle size, particle size distribution, and specific surface area of the BT powder de-agglomerated for different ultrasonication times (0, 10, 60, and 180 min) were determined. It was found that the particles size of the BT powder was influenced by ultrasonic treatment, while its tetragonal structure was maintained. Therefore, ultrasonic irradiation can be proposed as an environmental-friendly, economical, and effective tool for the de-agglomeration of barium titanate powders. PMID:17845864

  13. Radiation acoustics

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  14. Spray drying engineering: particle stickiness in relation with agglomeration

    Gianfrancesco, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Food instant powders like milk, soups, juices, coffee, are usually produced by spray drying followed by a further step of agglomeration to get larger particles (from 50-100 μm to 250-500 μm) with a narrow size distribution and modified structure (porosity) to obtain good handling and instant properties (wettability, dispersability, solubility). Agglomeration of spray dried powders is performed either outside or inside the drying chamber in a fluid bed, or by return of dry fines into the chamb...

  15. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1994-07-01

    The overall objective of this work is to determine the important principles and basic mechanisms which underlie various selective oil agglomeration processes for beneficiating fine-size coal in order to facilitate the technical development and application of such processes to various types of coal. The recent work described herein has involved a more detailed study of the effects of mild oxidation on the surface properties of different types of coal and the relationship between the agglomerability of oxidized coals and their surface properties. In addition, the work has involved developing more effective means for separating coal and pyrite by finding and applying selective depressants for pyrite.

  16. A revisit to agglomerates of early-type Hipparcos stars

    Caballero, J A

    2008-01-01

    We study the spatial structure and sub-structure of regions rich in Hipparcos stars with blue B_T-V_T colours. These regions, which comprise large stellar complexes, OB associations, and young open clusters, are tracers of on-going star formation in the Galaxy. The DBSCAN (Density-Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise) data clustering algorithm is used to look for spatial overdensities of early-type stars. Once an overdensity, "agglomerate", is identified, we carry out a data and bibliographic compilation of their star member candidates. The actual membership in agglomerate of each early-type star is studied based on its heliocentric distance, proper motion, and previous spectro-photometric information. We identify 35 agglomerates of early-type Hipparcos stars. Most of them are associated to previously known clusters and OB associations. The previously unknown P Puppis agglomerate is subject of a dedicated study with Virtual Observatory tools. It is actually a new, nearby, young open cluster (d ...

  17. Experimental studies of the gravitational agglomeration of aerosols. Pt. 2

    Experiments have been performed to investigate the influence of gravitational agglomeration as an aerosol depletion process in a small containment vessel. The resulting data will aid in the development of computer codes that describe aerosol transport processes following severe reactor accidents. (author)

  18. Quantitative characterization of nanoparticle agglomeration within biological media

    Hondow, Nicole, E-mail: n.hondow@leeds.ac.uk; Brydson, Rik [University of Leeds, Institute for Materials Research (United Kingdom); Wang, Peiyi [University of Leeds, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology (United Kingdom); Holton, Mark D.; Brown, M. Rowan; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D. [Swansea University, Centre for Nanohealth, College of Engineering (United Kingdom); Brown, Andy [University of Leeds, Institute for Materials Research (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Quantitative analysis of nanoparticle dispersion state within biological media is essential to understanding cellular uptake and the roles of diffusion, sedimentation, and endocytosis in determining nanoparticle dose. The dispersion of polymer-coated CdTe/ZnS quantum dots in water and cell growth medium with and without fetal bovine serum was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. Characterization by TEM of samples prepared by plunge freezing the blotted solutions into liquid ethane was sensitive to the dispersion state of the quantum dots and enabled measurement of agglomerate size distributions even in the presence of serum proteins where DLS failed. In addition, TEM showed a reduced packing fraction of quantum dots per agglomerate when dispersed in biological media and serum compared to just water, highlighting the effect of interactions between the media, serum proteins, and the quantum dots. The identification of a heterogeneous distribution of quantum dots and quantum dot agglomerates in cell growth medium and serum by TEM will enable correlation with the previously reported optical metrology of in vitro cellular uptake of this quantum dot dispersion. In this paper, we present a comparative study of TEM and DLS and show that plunge-freeze TEM provides a robust assessment of nanoparticle agglomeration state.

  19. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.C.; Tyson, D.; Ziaoping, Qiu, Lessa, A.

    1990-04-01

    The overall objective is to determine the basic principles and mechanisms which underlie a number of selective oil agglomeration processes that have been proposed for beneficiating fine-size coal. An understanding of the basic principles and mechanisms will greatly facilitate technical development and application of such processes to various types of coal. 5 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Acoustical Imaging

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  1. Acoustic telemetry

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To determine movements of green turtles in the nearshore foraging areas, we deployed acoustic tags and determined their movements through active and passive...

  2. Acoustics Research

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  3. Battlefield acoustics

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  4. Formation of the economic efficiency of industrial Dnipropetrovsk and Dniprodzerzhynsk agglomeration. O. V. Gladkyj

    Gladkyj O.V.

    2009-01-01

    The features are opened of the formation of polycentric economic efficiency of industrial agglomerations. An assessment of the effectiveness of industrial Dnipropetrovsk Dneprodzerzhinskoy agglomeration and recommendations on optimization of its functional structure.

  5. Formation of the economic efficiency of industrial Dnipropetrovsk and Dniprodzerzhynsk agglomeration. O. V. Gladkyj

    Gladkyj O.V.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The features are opened of the formation of polycentric economic efficiency of industrial agglomerations. An assessment of the effectiveness of industrial Dnipropetrovsk Dneprodzerzhinskoy agglomeration and recommendations on optimization of its functional structure.

  6. Effect of polymers on crystallo-co-agglomeration of ibuprofen-paracetamol: Factorial design

    Pawar A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to study the effect of concentration of polyethylene glycol and ethyl cellulose on the properties of agglomerates of ibuprofen-paracetamol obtained by crystallo-co-agglomeration technique. The process of crystallo-co-agglomeration involved recrystallization of ibuprofen and its simultaneous agglomeration with paracetamol in presence polymers. The effect of combination of polyethylene glycol and ethylcellulose was studied by 2 2 factorial design. Ibuprofen content of the agglomerate increased with increase in ethyl cellulose while paracetamol content was decreased with increase in polyethylene glycol. Differential scanning calorimetry thermograms of agglomerates showed the unchanged endotherm for ibuprofen melting, whereas paracetamol endotherm was diffused with low enthalpy. The agglomerates were spherical but increase in polyethylene glycol caused its deformation. Agglomerates containing ethylcellulose with polyethylene glycol have higher resistance for fragmentation, modulus of elasticity but impart high tensile strength.

  7. Effect of polymers on crystallo-co-agglomeration of ibuprofen-paracetamol: Factorial design

    Pawar A; Paradkar A; Kadam S; Mahadik K

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effect of concentration of polyethylene glycol and ethyl cellulose on the properties of agglomerates of ibuprofen-paracetamol obtained by crystallo-co-agglomeration technique. The process of crystallo-co-agglomeration involved recrystallization of ibuprofen and its simultaneous agglomeration with paracetamol in presence polymers. The effect of combination of polyethylene glycol and ethylcellulose was studied by 2 2 factorial design. Ibuprofen con...

  8. Flocculation, hydrophobic agglomeration and filtration of ultrafine coal

    Yu, Zhimin

    In coal preparation plant circuits, fine coal particles are aggregated either by oil agglomeration or by flocculation. In a new hydrophobic agglomeration process, recently developed hydrophobic latices are utilized. While the selectivity of such aggregation processes determines the beneficiation results, the degree of aggregation has a strong effect on fine coal filtration. The aim of this research was to study the fundamentals and analyze the common grounds for these processes, including the potential effect of the coal surface properties. The selective flocculation tests, in which three types of coal, which differed widely in surface wettability, and three additives (hydrophobic latices, a semi-hydrophobic flocculant and a typical hydrophilic polyelectrolyte) were utilized, showed that coal wettability plays a very important role in selective flocculation. The abstraction of a hydrophobic latex on coal and silica revealed that the latex had a much higher affinity towards hydrophobic coal than to hydrophilic mineral matter. As a result, the UBC-1 hydrophobic latex flocculated only hydrophobic coal particles while the polyelectrolyte (PAM) flocculated all the tested coal samples and minerals, showing no selectivity in the fine coal beneficiation. The oil agglomeration was tested using kerosene emulsified with various surfactants (e.g. cationic, anionic and non-ionic). Surfactants enhance not only oil emulsification, hence reducing oil consumption (down to 0.25--0.5%), but also entirely change the electrokinetic properties of the droplets and affect the interaction energy between oil droplets and coal particles. Consequently, the results found in the course of the experimental work strongly indicate that even oxidized coals can be agglomerated if cationic surfactants are used to emulsify the oil. Oil agglomeration of the Ford-4 ultrafine coal showed that even at extremely low oil consumption (0.25 to 0.5%), a clean coal product with an ash content around 5% at over

  9. Study on the Flow of Particle Agglomerates in Desulfurization Tower

    Zheng Jian-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the flow feature of particle agglomerates in a desulfurization tower, a three-dimensional numerical simulation of the gas-solid two phase flow in the tower is carried out by use of the LES model and the cohesive particles kinetics theory. Based on the experimental model of the internal circulation multistage spray desulfurization tower, the simulation successfully captures the key flow features in a desulfurization tower, find that: agglomerates forming a stable fluidization and stable internal circulation in the tower, present a typical ring-nuclear flow distribution trend. And the effects of the inlet gas velocity and inlet mass flux to the internal circulation are also analyzed.

  10. AGGLOMERATION AND RADIATION EFFECT OF THE PULL OF URBANIZATION

    QI Jin-li

    2003-01-01

    In order to explore the train of thought for China's urbanizing development and coordinated rural eco-nomic development, and to find good ways of solving rural problems through urbanization, this paper absorbs the push-and-pull forces theory and the systematic dynamic theory in the traditional population migration theories, views urbanization as a dynamic system, makes research on the push-and-pull mechanism of urbanization. The pull ingpower of urbanization is analyzed according to two aspects, the agglomeration effect and the radiation effect of cities. The agglomeration effect provides continuous propelling force for urbanization, and the radiation effect furtheraccelerates the urbanization process by pushing forward the development of rural economy. Of course, the slow de-velopment of urbanization can result in the hindrance to rural economic development.

  11. Bifurcation theory for hexagonal agglomeration in economic geography

    Ikeda, Kiyohiro

    2014-01-01

    This book contributes to an understanding of how bifurcation theory adapts to the analysis of economic geography. It is easily accessible not only to mathematicians and economists, but also to upper-level undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in nonlinear mathematics. The self-organization of hexagonal agglomeration patterns of industrial regions was first predicted by the central place theory in economic geography based on investigations of southern Germany. The emergence of hexagonal agglomeration in economic geography models was envisaged by Krugman. In this book, after a brief introduction of central place theory and new economic geography, the missing link between them is discovered by elucidating the mechanism of the evolution of bifurcating hexagonal patterns. Pattern formation by such bifurcation is a well-studied topic in nonlinear mathematics, and group-theoretic bifurcation analysis is a well-developed theoretical tool. A finite hexagonal lattice is used to express uniformly distri...

  12. Experimental study of fluidized bed agglomeration of acerola powder

    G. C. Dacanal

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the main effects of acerola powder on fluidized bed agglomeration. A 2(4-1 fractional factoring design was used to evaluate the main operating conditions (fluidizing air temperature, fluidizing air velocity, atomizing air flow and height of nozzle in the bed. The mechanical and physicochemical product changes were determined by analysis of particle diameter, moisture content, wetting time and bed porosity. The particle enlargement by agglomeration occurred when the relative humidity in the bed increased and, thus, the moisture of the product increased. However, the excessive increase in relative humidity resulted in a decrease in yield, caused by caking and product incrustation. The consolidation of small granules resulted in an increase in the instant properties, decreasing the wetting time and increasing the solubility in a short period of agitation.

  13. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Trace element removal study

    1993-09-01

    Southern Company Services, Inc., (SCS) was contracted in 1989 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a commercially acceptable selective agglomeration technology to enhance the use of high-sulfur coals by 1993. The project scope involved development of a bench-scale process and components, as well as the design, testing, and evaluation of a proof-of-concept (POC) facility. To that end, a two-ton-per-hour facility was constructed and tested near Wilsonville, Alabama. Although it was not the primary focus of the test program, SCS also measured the ability of selective agglomeration to remove trace elements from coal. This document describes the results of that program.

  14. Acoustic and turbulent agglomeration of sodium aerosols. Final report, October 1, 1975--July 31, 1978

    A suitability of 6 packing materials for removal of sodium fire aerosols in a wet cell scrubber was evaluated experimentally by measuring the efficiency and flow resistance of two 10.2 cm deep cells in series at air face velocities of 185 and 289 cm/sec, water flow rates of 0.210 ad 0.387 cm3/sec/cm2, with and without aerosol prehumidification. The most satisfactory material was found to be 50 μm diameter stainless steel fibers at a packing density of 30 kg/m3 (porosity = 0.99). Two 10.2 cm deep cells in series gave a removal efficiency of 85% for typical sodium fire aerosols at a face velocity of 289 cm/sec. Measurement of efficency as a function of particle size indicated a reduction in efficiency in the 0.4 to 1.1 μm size range for all packing materials

  15. Acoustic and turbulent agglomeration of sodium aerosols. Progress report, January 1, 1977--December 31, 1977

    Freshly formed and aged sodium aerosols generated by burning metallic sodium in air were decontaminated in wet cell washers of experimental design. Two wetted cells in series packed with curly glass fibers 35 μm in diameter gave removal efficiencies in excess of 90%. More efficient cell packings and a larger number of cells in series can be used to raise collection efficiency above 99%

  16. Potential pyrite depressants for use in oil agglomeration of fine-size coal

    Drzymala, J.; Wheelock, T.D. (Iowa State University, Ames, IA (USA). Ames Laboratory and Chemical Engineering Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Potential pyrite depressants for use in coal beneficiation involving oil agglomeration were identified. Particles of sulphurized pyrite, chosen because it was readily agglomerated, were treated with the potential depressants prior to agglomeration with heptane. The following suppressed the agglomeration of sulphurized pyrite, ferric chloride; potassium monopersulphate; hydrogen peroxide; ferrous sulphate; sodium dithionite; sodium thiosulphate; sodium sulphide; titanous chloride; pyrogallol; quebracho; and milk whey. The separation of Upper Freeport coal and sulphurized pyrite by agglomeration with heptane was greatly improved by treatment with ferric chloride. 20 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Spatial costs in a monocentric city (and implications for agglomeration)

    Hugh B. Wenban-Smith

    2009-01-01

    Using water supply as a model for a wider range of infrastructure services, the effect of a negative exponential density gradient on distribution costs is investigated for four monocentric urban development scenarios: (a) Densification; (b) Dispersion; (c) Suburbanisation; and (d) Constant density. It is shown that economies of scale in production can be outweighed by diseconomies in distribution in cases (b) and (c), suggesting that the agglomeration benefits of infrastructure cannot be take...

  18. Reynolds number effects on particle agglomeration in turbulent channel flow

    M Afkhami; A. Hassanpour; Fairweather, M.; Njobuenwu, DO

    2014-01-01

    The work described in this paper employs large eddy simulation and a discrete element method to study particle-laden flows, including particle dispersion and agglomeration, in a horizontal channel. The particle-particle interaction model is based on the Hertz- Mindlin approach with Johnson-Kendall-Roberts cohesion to allow the simulation of Van der Waals forces in a dry air flow. The influence of different flow Reynolds numbers, and therefore the impact of turbulence, on particle agglomeratio...

  19. Industry Relatedness, Agglomeration Externalities and Firm Survival in China

    Canfei He; Qi Guo; David Rigby

    2015-01-01

    The importance of agglomeration externalities for economic activities is widely recognized. Recent developments highlight the importance of industry relatedness to the performance of firms, industries and regions. This study explores the determinants of firm survival in China and tests the significance of industry relatedness using firm-level data over the period 1999-2007. Industry relatedness is developed from the co-occurrence analysis of paired industries. Results based on Cox regression ...

  20. Acquisition of skills, education subsidies, and agglomeration of firms

    Toulemonde, Eric

    2003-01-01

    An analytically solvable model of new economic geography is developed. Acquisition of skills is costly for workers but it allows them to earn wages that are larger than those of the unskilled. Moreover, skills acquisition can be subsidized by a regional government. For large transport costs, firms spread more or less evenly between regions, their precise location being determined by the level of education subsidies. For low transport costs, firms agglomerate in one region. We also identify eq...

  1. Do Agglomeration Economies Exist in the Hospital Services Industry

    Laurie J. Bates; Rexford E. Santerre

    2005-01-01

    Given the importance of knowledge flows and the continued emphasis on face-to-face encounters especially for medical care, close proximity of hospitals may be essential for the efficient delivery of medical care. That is, hospital productivity might be greater where hospitals cluster and allow knowledge to more easily and quickly disperse among personnel in the various organizations. To add to the understanding about agglomeration economies in the hospital services sector, this study analyzes...

  2. Computer simulation of aerosol dynamics with a unified agglomeration kernel

    Aerosol dynamics have been simulated with the computer code CONTAIN using a modified agglomeration kernel. The time (t) evolution of the size distribution (nk(t)) and the suspended mass concentration of particles of size index k was calculated for both the new kernel and the standard superposition kernel. In addition, the fractal nature of the particle geometry has been accounted for and the implications on the distributions are discussed. (author)

  3. Rural-to-urban migration, human capital, and agglomeration

    Stark, Oded; Fan, C. Simon

    2007-01-01

    A new general-equilibrium model that links together rural-to-urban migration, the externality effect of the average level of human capital, and agglomeration economies shows that in developing countries, unrestricted rural-to-urban migration reduces the average income of both rural and urban dwellers in equilibrium. Various measures aimed at curtailing rural-to-urban migration by unskilled workers can lead to a Pareto improvement for both the urban and rural dwellers. In addition, the governm...

  4. Heterogenous skills and homogeneous land: segmentation and agglomeration

    Wrede, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of skill heterogeneity on regional patterns of production and housing in the presence of pecuniary externalities within a general equilibrium framework assuming monopolistic competition at intermediate good markets. It shows that the interplay of heterogenous skills and relatively homogeneous land demand triggers skill segmentation and agglomeration. The core region, being more attractive to high skilled workers, has a disproportionately large share of productio...

  5. Heterogeneous Skills and Homogeneous Land: Segmentation and Agglomeration

    Wrede, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of skill heterogeneity on regional patterns of production and housing in the presence of pecuniary externalities within a general-equilibrium framework assuming monopolistic competition at intermediate good markets. It shows that the interplay of heterogeneous skills and relatively homogeneous land demand triggers skill segmentation and agglomeration. The core region, being more attractive to high skilled workers, has a disproportionately large share of producti...

  6. Estimating agglomeration economies in Spain: evidence from geographically disaggregated data

    Dapena, Alberto Díaz; Vázquez, Esteban Fernández; Morollón, Fernando Rubiera

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we estimate agglomeration economies in Spain in 2009 basing on Ciccone?s (2002) model, which explains average labor productivity in one spatial unit on employment density and other controls. The novelty of our analysis is that the empirical model is estimated at a highly disaggregated spatial scale, oppositely to the convention of taking as unit of analysis NUTS-2 or NUTS-3 regions. Recent contributions to New Economic Geography (NEG) base their theoretical analysis on geographi...

  7. Informality and agglomeration economies: in search of the missing links

    Ana Isabel Moreno Monroy; Michiel Gerritse

    2011-01-01

    The informal sector absorbs on average 50% of employment in developing countries. However, it has not been considered in New Economic Geography (NEG) models that try to explain urbanization and agglomeration in developing countries. In a first attempt to bridge this gap, we develop a NEG model that incorporates the informal sector. Empirical evidence shows that the informal sector is mainly composed of relatively small firms that are unskilled labor intensive, face capital restrictions and th...

  8. Reversible or not? Distinguishing agglomeration and aggregation at the nanoscale.

    Sokolov, Stanislav V; Tschulik, Kristina; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Compton, Richard G

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticles are prone to clustering either via aggregation (irreversible) or agglomeration (reversible) processes. It is exceedingly difficult to distinguish the two via conventional techniques such as dynamic light scattering (DLS), nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), or electron microscopy imaging (scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM)) as such techniques only generally confirm the presence of large particle clusters. Herein we develop a joint approach to tackle the issue of distinguishing between nanoparticle aggregation vs agglomeration by characterizing a colloidal system of Ag NPs using DLS, NTA, SEM imaging and the electrochemical nanoimpacts technique. In contrast to the conventional techniques which all reveal the presence of large clusters of particles, electrochemical nanoimpacts provide information regarding individual nanoparticles in the solution phase and reveal the presence of small nanoparticles (detection of small nanoparticles in high ionic strength media evidence the clustering to be a reversible process. As a result it is concluded that agglomeration rather than irreversible aggregation takes place. This observation is of general importance for all colloids as it provides a feasible analysis technique for a wide range of systems with an ability to distinguish subtly different processes. PMID:26352558

  9. One-step aerosol synthesis of nanoparticle agglomerate films: simulation of film porosity and thickness

    Maedler, Lutz; Lall, Anshuman A; Friedlander, Sheldon K [Nanoparticle Technology and Air Quality Laboratory, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), 5531-G Boelter Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2006-10-14

    A method is described for designing nanoparticle agglomerate films with desired film porosity and film thickness. Nanoparticle agglomerates generated in aerosol reactors can be directly deposited on substrates to form uniform porous films in one step, a significant advance over existing technologies. The effect of agglomerate morphology and deposition mechanism on film porosity and thickness are discussed. Film porosity was calculated for a given number and size of primary particles that compose the agglomerates, and fractal dimension. Agglomerate transport was described by the Langevin equation of motion. Deposition enhancing forces such as thermophoresis are incorporated in the model. The method was validated for single spherical particles using previous theoretical studies. An S-shape film porosity dependence on the particle Peclet number typical for spherical particles was also observed for agglomerates, but films formed from agglomerates had much higher porosities than films from spherical particles. Predicted film porosities compared well with measurements reported in the literature. Film porosities increased with the number of primary particles that compose an agglomerate and higher fractal dimension agglomerates resulted in denser films. Film thickness as a function of agglomerate deposition time was calculated from the agglomerate deposition flux in the presence of thermophoresis. The calculated film thickness was in good agreement with measured literature values. Thermophoresis can be used to reduce deposition time without affecting the film porosity.

  10. One-step aerosol synthesis of nanoparticle agglomerate films: simulation of film porosity and thickness

    A method is described for designing nanoparticle agglomerate films with desired film porosity and film thickness. Nanoparticle agglomerates generated in aerosol reactors can be directly deposited on substrates to form uniform porous films in one step, a significant advance over existing technologies. The effect of agglomerate morphology and deposition mechanism on film porosity and thickness are discussed. Film porosity was calculated for a given number and size of primary particles that compose the agglomerates, and fractal dimension. Agglomerate transport was described by the Langevin equation of motion. Deposition enhancing forces such as thermophoresis are incorporated in the model. The method was validated for single spherical particles using previous theoretical studies. An S-shape film porosity dependence on the particle Peclet number typical for spherical particles was also observed for agglomerates, but films formed from agglomerates had much higher porosities than films from spherical particles. Predicted film porosities compared well with measurements reported in the literature. Film porosities increased with the number of primary particles that compose an agglomerate and higher fractal dimension agglomerates resulted in denser films. Film thickness as a function of agglomerate deposition time was calculated from the agglomerate deposition flux in the presence of thermophoresis. The calculated film thickness was in good agreement with measured literature values. Thermophoresis can be used to reduce deposition time without affecting the film porosity

  11. Acoustic emission

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  12. Analysis on the Spatial-Temporal Dynamics of Financial Agglomeration with Markov Chain Approach in China

    Weimin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The standard approach to studying financial industrial agglomeration is to construct measures of the degree of agglomeration within financial industry. But such measures often fail to exploit the convergence or divergence of financial agglomeration. In this paper, we apply Markov chain approach to diagnose the convergence of financial agglomeration in China based on the location quotient coefficients across the provincial regions over 1993–2011. The estimation of Markov transition probability matrix offers more detailed insights into the mechanics of financial agglomeration evolution process in China during the research period. The results show that the spatial evolution of financial agglomeration changes faster in the period of 2003–2011 than that in the period of 1993–2002. Furthermore, there exists a very uneven financial development patterns, but there is regional convergence for financial agglomeration in China.

  13. Agglomeration and Collection of Fine Secondary Phases in Flowing Suspensions Utilizing Resonant Ultrasonic Fields.

    Tolt, Thomas Lester

    1990-01-01

    A novel separation process based on a forced coincident excitation at ultrasonic frequencies in fluid filled tubes has been studied and developed for the agglomeration and collection of fine secondary phases in flowing suspensions. Under appropriate conditions, acoustic radiation forces can act to drive second phase inclusions to the nodes (or antinodes) of a stationary sound field and trap them there with a strength which can exceed the hydrodynamic drag exerted on the particles by a flowing fluid matrix. A review of the theoretical development of the acoustic forces acting on and between inclusions in a sound field is presented. The fields generated in a water bath using a lead zirconate -lead titanate piezoelectric disk acting a source of ultrasonic waves a short distance in front of a parallel reflector and in later experiments utilizing simple cylindrical chambers are compared to calculated stationary fields in Fabry-Perot laser resonators with parallel, plane finite mirrors. It is suggested that diffraction at the transducer and reflector surfaces is responsible for the creation of guided standing waves which have a nonuniform transverse distribution of acoustic velocity and pressure along nodal planes of minimum pressure spaced at intervals equal to one half of the acoustic wavelength in the fluid. This leads to the existence of transverse components in the acoustic radiation force in addition to an axially directed force which act to collect fine secondary phases into thin lens-shaped zones. Broadband piezoelectric transducers bonded to the ends of fluid filled glass and aluminum tubes (up to 4 cm in diameter and 25 cm in length, and ranging from 0.9 to 2 mm in wall thickness) were driven with continuous a.c. voltages at unique frequencies in the range of 0.35 to 1.4 Mhz to obtain a forced coincidence response in which the flexural vibrations of the tube wall are matched in phase and geometry with higher-order acoustic duct modes in the liquid. This

  14. Insights into methane hydrate formation, agglomeration, and dissociation in water + diesel oil dispersed system

    Highlights: • Hydrate agglomeration occurs at initial hydrate formation or under shutting down stages. • The agglomeration of hydrate is inhibited and dispersed with the action of anti-agglomerants. • The appearance of surface water may cause the agglomeration of hydrate during hydrate dissociation. • A mechanism was proposed to describe hydrate dissociation from water in oil dispersed system. - Abstract: Methane hydrate formation and dissociation in (5 vol% water + 95 vol% diesel oil) dispersed system containing a combined anti-agglomerant were experimentally studied using a high pressure autoclave installed with particle video microscope and focused beam reflectance measurement probes. The agglomeration of hydrate was found to occur at the initial hydrate formation stage. With the continuous formation of hydrate, the agglomeration of hydrate will be inhibited and hydrate was dispersed with the action of the anti-agglomerant. The agglomeration of hydrate also occurs when the hydrate containing fluid is under static state for a certain time. Larger hydrate particles attached by gas bubble with grape-like shape were found during hydrate dissociation. The dissociated surface water would contact with un-dissociated hydrate and accumulate to larger water/hydrate particles may be the reason that causes the agglomeration during initial hydrate dissociation process. A mechanism was proposed to describe hydrate dissociation from water in oil dispersed system

  15. EVALUATION OF ACOUSTIC FORCES ON A PARTICLE IN AEROSOL MEDIUM

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-09-27

    The acoustic force exerted on a solid particle was evaluated to develop a fundamental understanding of the critical physical parameters or constraints affecting particle motion and capture in a collecting device. The application of an acoustic force to the collection of a range of submicron-to-micron particles in a highly turbulent airflow stream laden with solid particles was evaluated in the presence of other assisting and competing forces. This scoping estimate was based on the primary acoustic force acting directly on particles in a dilute aerosol system, neglecting secondary interparticle effects such as agglomeration of the sub-micron particles. A simplified analysis assuming a stable acoustic equilibrium with an infinite sound speed in the solid shows that for a solid-laden air flow in the presence of a standing wave, particles will move toward the nearest node. The results also show that the turbulent drag force on a 1-{micro}m particle resulting from eddy motion is dominant when compared with the electrostatic force or the ultrasonic acoustic force. At least 180 dB acoustic pressure level at 1 MHz is required for the acoustic force to be comparable to the electrostatic or turbulent drag forces in a high-speed air stream. It is noted that particle size and pressure amplitude are dominant parameters for the acoustic force. When acoustic pressure level becomes very large, the acoustic energy will heat up the surrounding air medium, which may cause air to expand. With an acoustic power of about 600 watts applied to a 2000-lpm air flow, the air temperature can increase by as much as 15 C at the exit of the collector.

  16. Agglomeration techniques for the production of spheres for packed beds

    One attractive fusion-breeder-blanket design features a lithium bearing ceramic in the form of spheres packed into a random array. The spheres have diameters of 3 mm and 0.3 mm. This report surveys techniques used to produce ceramic spheres on an industrial scale. The methods examined include tumbling and mixing granulation, extrusion, briquetting and pelletizing. It is concluded that the required quantities of 0.3 mm diameter spheres can be produced by the tumbling agglomeration of a feed powder. The 3 mm diameter spheres will be made using a process of extrusion, chopping and rolling

  17. Agglomeration and Deposition Behaviour of Solid Recovered Fuel

    Pedersen, Morten Nedergaard; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Hjuler, Klaus;

    2016-01-01

    formation, or accumulation of impurities. The combustion of polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), wood, and SRF were studied in a rotary drum furnace. The combustion was recorded on a camera (60 frames per second), so that any agglomeration or deposition of fuel or ash...... a careful combustion control. The ash from SRF or wood does not pose a significant risk of melting and deposits at temperatures up to 1000 °C, but the presence of glass impurities in some SRF may limit operation temperatures to 900 °C as a result of ash melting....

  18. Intra-metropolitan migration in the Warsaw agglomeration.

    Rykiel, Z

    1984-01-01

    "Two questions of intra-metropolitan migration are analyzed in the paper, intra-metropolitan hierarchy and intra-metropolitan spatial barriers. The former embraces four detailed questions: ranking of centers; spatial pattern of hierarchical subordination; degree of unequivocalness of the subordinations, or degree of dominance; and degree of hierarchicality of interrelationships. Two specialties of the Warsaw [Poland] agglomeration are discussed, the influence of the present crisis, and the administrative restrictions to migration to the city, or the spatial barriers. Social connotations of the latter are also presented." PMID:12312885

  19. Acoustic lenses

    Acoustic lenses focus ultrasound to produce pencil-like beams with reduced near fields. When fitted to conventional (flat-faced) transducers, such lenses greatly improve the ability to detect and size defects. This paper describes a program developed to design acoustic lenses for use in immersion or contact inspection, using normal or angle beam mode with flat or curved targets. Lens surfaces are circular in geometry to facilitate machining. For normal beam inspection of flat plate, spherical or cylindrical lenses are used. For angle beam or curved surface inspections, a compound lens is required to correct for the extra induced aberration. Such a lens is aspherical with one radius of curvature in the plane of incidence, and a different radius of curvature in the plane perpendicular to the incident plane. The resultant beam profile (i.e., location of the acoustic focus, beam diameter, 6 dB working range) depends on the degree of focusing and the transducer used. The operating frequency and bandwidth can be affected by the instrumentation used. Theoretical and measured beam profiles are in good agreement. Various applications, from zone focusing used for defect sizing in thick plate, to line focusing for pipe weld inspection, are discussed

  20. Influences of seed size and number on agglomeration in synthetic Bayer liquors

    ZHANG Bin; ZHOU Ke-chao; CHEN Qi-yuan

    2006-01-01

    By means of Malvern laser particle size analyzer and scanning electron microscopy, the influences of seed size and number on agglomeration in Bayer process were investigated. Agglomeration is almost finished in 8 h,seeds, below 5 μm, especially below 2 μm, gather together rapidly and almost disappear in 8 h. In the same supersaturation of aluminate solution and seed size, the smaller the number of seed is, the bigger the degree of agglomeration is. With the same primary number of seed, the agglomeration of larger seed is superior to that of small seed,and the agglomeration does not happen among the coarse seeds. The agglomeration mainly happens among fine particles, and the combinations among the fine particles are unconsolidated.

  1. Insight into morphology changes of nanoparticle laden droplets in acoustic field

    Basu, Saptarshi; Tijerino, Erick; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2013-04-01

    Hollow structures with unique morphologies form due to particle agglomeration in acoustically levitated nanofluid functional droplets when subjected to external heating. The final diameter of the structure depends only on the ratio of agglomeration to evaporation time scales for various nanoparticle laden droplets, and not on the type of the suspended particles. These time scales depend only on nanoparticle concentration. This valuable information may be exploited to form microstructures with desired properties from ceramic compounds. Phase diagrams for alumina and silica droplets indicate the transition from a bowl to ring structure depending on concentration.

  2. HYDROPHOBIC AGGLOMERATION OF MINERAL FINES IN AQUEOUS SUSPENSIONS AND ITS APPLICATION IN FLOTATION: A REVIEW

    BINGQIAO YANG; SHAOXIAN SONG

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobic agglomeration is originated from the hydrophobic attraction between particles, which is essentially different from electrolyte coagulation and polymer flocculation. It is applied to mineral processing in floc-flotation process to improve the recovery of mineral fines. In this paper, the applications of this phenomenon in mineral fines were summarized, including the origin of hydrophobic agglomeration, the main factors affect hydrophobic agglomeration (particle hydrophobicity, shea...

  3. Study on the Policy Factors of Innovative Talents Agglomeration in Jiangsu Province based on Data Analysis

    Li Wenfei; Li Min

    2016-01-01

    Innovative talent is the key factor to promote the development of innovative economy and realize innovative drive in Jiangsu Province. Innovative talent agglomeration can fully play the effect of innovative talents through the agglomeration efficiency. Among many factors that affect the agglomeration of innovative talents, the guiding role of government policy factors is becoming more and more important. Based on the survey of domestic and foreign literature, through questionnaire survey, thi...

  4. Impact of agglomeration on the regional growth of Latin American countries

    Rosero, Grace Carolina Guevara

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical approaches have been developed to examine the effect of agglomeration on growth. However, the understanding of the mechanisms of agglomeration in developing countries remains unaddressed. This paper aims to give empirical evidence of the role of agglomeration on the growth of Latin American regions. The study of the subcontinent is crucial because of the evidence of a rapid pace of urbanization process. Using a database with information of 162 regions of 8 Latin American countries...

  5. Large Agglomerations and Economic Growth in Urban India: An Application of Panel Data Model

    Tripathi, Sabyasachi

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of urban agglomeration on urban economic growth, using static and dynamic panel data approach, based on data of 52 large cities in India for the period 2000 to 2009. The results shows that agglomeration has a strong positive effect on urban economic growth and support the “Williamson hypothesis” that agglomeration increases economic growth only up to certain level of economic development. The critical level per-capita city income is estimated about Rs. 37049...

  6. Do urban social enterprises benefit from agglomeration? Evidence from four UK cities

    Pinch, Steven; Sunley, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pinch S. and Sunley P. Do urban social enterprises benefit from agglomeration? Evidence from four UK cities, Regional Studies. This paper examines the relevance of clustering theory for an understanding of the location of social enterprises (SEs). This is accomplished through an analysis of the extent to which managers of SEs in four major UK cities perceive themselves to benefit from agglomeration effects. The paper concentrates on two broad sets of agglomeration processes: the first is Mars...

  7. Automated Manufacture of Fertilizing Agglomerates from Burnt Wood Ash

    Svantesson, Thomas

    2002-12-01

    In Sweden, extensive research is conducted to find alternative sources of energy that should partly replace the electric power production from nuclear power. With the ambition to create a sustainable system for producing energy, the use of renewable energy is expected to grow further and biofuels are expected to account for a significant part of this increase. However, when biofuels are burned or gasified, ash appears as a by-product. In order to overcome the problems related to deposition in land fills, the idea is to transform the ashes into a product - agglomerates - that easily could be recycled back to the forest grounds; as a fertilizer, or as a tool to reduce the acidification in the forest soil at the spreading area. This work considers the control of a transformation process, which transforms wood ash produced at a district heating plant into fertilizing agglomerates. A robust machine, built to comply with the industrial requirements for continuous operation, has been developed and is controlled by an industrial control system in order to enable an automated manufacture.

  8. Directly Compressible Glibenclamide Tablet Prepared from Spherical Agglomerates: A Comparative Evaluation with Marketed Tablet

    Sachinkumar Patil*,

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Agglomerates were prepared using methanol, chloroform and water as good solvent, bridging liquid and poor solvent, respectively. Directcompressible tablets of the agglomerates showed appropriate hardness, friability, weight variation and disintegration time with improved drug release than conventional marketed tablets. Tablets were adequately stable as per regulatory guidelines. Pharmacokinetic study indicated rapid absorption with higher bioavailability of the drug from the prepared tablets of agglomerates than marketed tablet (Glyburide; Sandoz. Hence, the tablets prepared with the agglomerates of glibenclamide may reduce the total dose of drug and could improve the patient compliance by reducing the dose-related side effects.

  9. Coating and melt induced agglomeration in a poultry litter fired fluidized bed combustor

    The combustion of poultry litter, which is rich in phosphorus, in a fluidized bed combustor (FBC) is associated with agglomeration problems, which can lead to bed defluidization and consequent shutdown of the installation. Whereas earlier research indicated coating induced agglomeration as the dominant mechanism for bed material agglomeration, it is shown experimentally in this paper that both coating and melt induced agglomeration occur. Coating induced agglomeration mainly takes place at the walls of the FBC, in the freeboard above the fluidized bed, where at the prevailing temperature the bed particles are partially molten and hence agglomerate. In the ash, P2O5 forms together with CaO thermodynamically stable Ca3(PO4)2, thus reducing the amount of calcium silicates in the ash. This results in K/Ca silicate mixtures with lower melting points. On the other hand, in-bed agglomeration is caused by thermodynamically unstable, low melting HPO42− and H2PO4− salts present in the fuel. In the hot FBC these salts may melt, may cause bed particles to stick together and may subsequently react with Ca salts from the bed ash, forming a solid bridge of the stable Ca3(PO4)2 between multiple particles. - Highlights: • Coating induced agglomeration not due to K phosphates, but due to K silicates. • Melt induced agglomeration due to H2PO4− and HPO42− salts in the fuel. • Wall agglomeration corresponds to coating induced mechanism. • In-bed agglomeration corresponds to melt induced mechanism

  10. The characteristics of bed agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark

    The bed agglomeration behaviors were investigated experimentally when eucalyptus bark was burning tested in a laboratory scale fluidized bed reactor. The focuses of this work were the influences of operating conditions and bed materials on the bed agglomeration tendency and the elucidation in the behaviors of fuel inorganic elements and the governing mode of the agglomeration. It was found that the defluidization caused by the bed agglomeration was clearly detectable from the decrease in measured bed pressure. The growth of bed particle and accumulation of agglomerates during combustion provided the partial to complete defluidization. The defluidization was promoted by the increase of bed temperature and bed particle size, and the decrease of fluidizing air velocity. The SEM-EDS analyses revealed that the bed agglomeration was mainly attributed to the formation of potassium silicate compounds as liquid phase during the combustion. This was initiated by the chemical reaction between the bed particle and the released ash constituents. In this study, the inorganic migration from fuel particle to bed particle was likely dominated by the condensation/reaction. The thermodynamic examination by ternary phase diagram analysis corroborated that the liquid phase formation of the ash derived materials controlled the agglomeration. The alumina sand prevented the bed agglomeration since it was inactive in the formation of viscous molten substances during combustion at the observed temperatures. - Highlights: • The behaviors of bed agglomeration were studied during the fluidized bed combustion of eucalyptus bark. • The increase in bed temperature and sand size, and the decrease of air velocity promoted bed defluidization. • The formation of molten potassium silicate compounds conduced to the bed agglomeration. • Condensation/reaction was the dominant inorganic migration mechanism from fuel particle to bed particle. • The alumina sand prevented effectively the bed

  11. Remediation of Sucarnoochee soil by agglomeration with fine coal

    Fine-sized Blue Creek coal was used to remove high molecular weight hydrocarbons from Sucarnoochee soil, a fine-sized high-organic soil. Fine coal in slurry form was blended with Sucarnoochee soil contaminated with 15.0% by wt of crude oil, and agglomerates were removed in a standard flotation cell. Crude oil in the remediated soil was reduced from the original 15.0% to less than a tenth of a wt% by a two-step process. Oil removal of approx. 99.3% was obtained. An added benefit was that the low-grade coal used in the process was simultaneously upgraded. The final level of cleaning was not affected by initial oil concentration. The process compared favorably with a hot water wash technique used to recovery oils from contaminated soil

  12. Agglomeration and Deposition Behaviour of Solid Recovered Fuel

    Pedersen, Morten Nedergaard; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Nielsen, Mads;

    2015-01-01

    Waste derived fuels such as Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) are increasingly being used in the cement industry as a means to reduce cost [1]. SRF is produced by separating the combustible fraction from industrial or municipal solid waste (MSW). The recovered fraction has a higher content of combustible...... materials such as plastic and paper than mixed MSW [2]. The inhomogeneous nature of SRF [3] makes it difficult to combust and many problems may arise concerning e.g. combustion control, feeding of fuel [2,4], deposit formation [5], or accumulation of impurities [3]. Laboratory ash fusion tests typically...... contains significant quantities of common plastics such as polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Fluidized bed experiments to examine the pyrolysis of polymers have shown that bed agglomeration can result from melting plastics or sticky char residues in the case of...

  13. Gravitational agglomeration of post-HCDA LMFBR aerosols: nonspherical particles

    Aerosol behavior analysis computer programs have shown that temporal aerosol size distributions in nuclear reactor containments are sensitive to shape factors. This research investigates shape factors by a detailed theoretical analysis of hydrodynamic interactions between a nonspherical particle and a spherical particle undergoing gravitational collisions in an LMFBR environment. First, basic definitions and expressions for settling speeds and collisional efficiencies of nonspherical particles are developed. These are then related to corresponding quantities for spherical particles through shape factors. Using volume equivalent diameter as the defining length in the gravitational collision kernel, the aerodynamic shape factor, the density correction factor, and the gravitational collision shape factor, are introduced to describe the collision kernel for collisions between aerosol agglomerates. The Navier-Stokes equation in oblate spheroidal coordinates is solved to model a nonspherical particle and then the dynamic equations for two particle motions are developed. A computer program (NGCEFF) is constructed, and the dynamical equations are solved by Gear's method

  14. Discussion on the dispersion & agglomeration of aircraft industry

    Bo Chu

    2009-01-01

    The aircraft industry is crucial to the economy and security of a nation. In this paper, the spatial characteristics and patterns of the aircraft industry are analyzed on different spatial scales. It is found that there is a 'Matthew effect' in the global aircraft industry and the spatial evolution of the industry is consistent with the industrialization process of the whole country. It is also revealed that the spatial evolution of the country is driven by both the centripetal forces including capital, talents, technology and agglomeration economies and the centrifugal forces including the comparative advantage, cost &risk sharing, emerging markets, development policy for less-developed regions and the military imperative. These forces have both market-stabilizing and market-disrupting effects on the spatial evolution of the aircraft industry. The study suggests that lessons drawn from the experiences in the United States and France are expected to be conducive to the rise of China's aircraft industry in the future.

  15. Method and apparatus for preventing agglomeration within fluid hydrocarbons

    This invention relates to a process for treating a fluid hydrocarbon fuel for retarding the agglomeration between particles thereof and for retarding the growth of bacteria and fungi therein. The process includes that steps of transporting a plurality of unit volumes of said fluid hydrocarbon fuel through an irradiating location and irradiating each unit of the plurality of unit volumes at the irradiating location with either neutron or gamma radiation. An apparatus for treating the fluid hydrocarbon fuels with the nuclear radiation also is provided. The apparatus includes a generally conical central irradiating cavity which is surrounded by a spiral outer irradiating cavity. The fluid hydrocarbon fuel is transported through the cavities while being irradiated by the nuclear radiation

  16. Intensive drying and the related microstructure features in agglomerate spheres

    Kudlyk, Rostyslav

    Most metal ore concentrates are fine particulates with a wide particle-size distribution. Industrially they are pelletized by tumbling in balling discs or drums into spheres, an operation which requires the addition of typically up to 10% by weight of water. Further processing of these agglomerates involves first drying and then induration by heating up to 1250°C. The main objective of this thesis was the study of the interrelationship between the microstructure of the agglomerates with, on the one hand, the mechanical and physical properties of the pellets and their behaviour during intensive drying, on the other. The previously developed model of the drying process identified the loss of capillarity, resulting from the vapour lock, to be a critical component of the mechanism of intense as opposed to 'classical' drying. It was shown that the absence of the constant-rate drying period is a natural consequence of this effect. Several significant shortcomings of the previous model have been identified. This model treats the period of transition between surface- and shrinking-core drying as an instantaneous event. The new extended model, which overcomes the original model limitations, was developed in this project. In its formalism, the new model includes the pore-size distribution and thus simulates a gradual surface/shrinking-core transition. It was shown that the nature of the transition between the surface- and shrinking-core drying regimes during intensive drying is fundamentally different from that of classical drying, i.e. carried out at mild temperatures. In the latter case, liquid is being delivered to the surface through the network of interconnected small pores reaching the surface. The transition occurs when the larger pores, also reaching the surface, are being drained. On the other hand, under intense-drying conditions, the rate-limiting factor is the vapour lock. The latter phenomenon will occur in the smaller pores first, as they have smaller liquid

  17. Fluidization and mixing of nanoparticle agglomerates assisted via magnetic impaction

    Scicolone, James V.; Lepek, Daniel; Louie, Lin; Dave, Rajesh N., E-mail: dave@adm.njit.edu [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical, Biological and Pharmaceutical Engineering (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Mixing of nanopowders in an environmentally benign magnetically assisted fluidized bed (MAFB) system was studied. Examination of fluidization behavior of agglomerate particulate fluidization (APF; silica R974 or R972) and agglomerate bubbling fluidization (ABF; alumina or titania) nano-powders in un-assisted and MAFB systems confirmed previous results on decreased minimum fluidization velocity and increased bed expansion of APF and ABF powders due to magnetic assistance. APF and ABF powder mixtures behaved like APF powders with the bed expansions in between those of individual constituents. Unlike previous MAFB studies, fluidization as a function of time was studied to examine its influence on nano-mixing. With time, the bed expansion reduced, and reduction was faster as magnet-to-powder ratio increased from 0:1 to 5:1, although fluidization was sustained, confirmed via the pressure drop measurements. Reduction in bed expansion was attributed to change in the nature of nanoagglomerates, which showed increased density as a function of processing time, ruling out electrostatics or elutriation as major factors. Mixtures of silica (APF) and alumina (ABF), processed at various magnet-to-powder ratios, were characterized via statistical analysis from energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy using field emission scanning electron microscope to compute homogeneity of mixing (HoM). Magnetic assistance improved the HoM as a function of time, and was strongly related to the product of number of magnets and time, similar to previous results in magnetically assisted impaction mixing (MAIM). The best achievable HoM was significantly better than unassisted fluidization and comparable to previous results for rapid expansion of high-pressure suspensions and MAIM.

  18. Fluidization and mixing of nanoparticle agglomerates assisted via magnetic impaction

    Mixing of nanopowders in an environmentally benign magnetically assisted fluidized bed (MAFB) system was studied. Examination of fluidization behavior of agglomerate particulate fluidization (APF; silica R974 or R972) and agglomerate bubbling fluidization (ABF; alumina or titania) nano-powders in un-assisted and MAFB systems confirmed previous results on decreased minimum fluidization velocity and increased bed expansion of APF and ABF powders due to magnetic assistance. APF and ABF powder mixtures behaved like APF powders with the bed expansions in between those of individual constituents. Unlike previous MAFB studies, fluidization as a function of time was studied to examine its influence on nano-mixing. With time, the bed expansion reduced, and reduction was faster as magnet-to-powder ratio increased from 0:1 to 5:1, although fluidization was sustained, confirmed via the pressure drop measurements. Reduction in bed expansion was attributed to change in the nature of nanoagglomerates, which showed increased density as a function of processing time, ruling out electrostatics or elutriation as major factors. Mixtures of silica (APF) and alumina (ABF), processed at various magnet-to-powder ratios, were characterized via statistical analysis from energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy using field emission scanning electron microscope to compute homogeneity of mixing (HoM). Magnetic assistance improved the HoM as a function of time, and was strongly related to the product of number of magnets and time, similar to previous results in magnetically assisted impaction mixing (MAIM). The best achievable HoM was significantly better than unassisted fluidization and comparable to previous results for rapid expansion of high-pressure suspensions and MAIM.

  19. Humid storage conditions increase the dissolution rate of diazepam from solid dispersions prepared by melt agglomeration

    Jørgensen, Anna Cecilia; Torstenson, Anette Seo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of cooling mode and storage conditions on the dissolution rate of a solid dispersion prepared by melt agglomeration. The aim has been to relate this effect to the solid state properties of the agglomerates. The cooling mode had an effect on t...

  20. Gender Differences of Shoppers in the Marketing and Management of Retail Agglomerations

    Teller, C; Thomson, A

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to first identify gender differences in perception and evaluation of retail agglomerations, and second, discuss the implications of these differences for marketing and management. Based on a conceptual model 2151 agglomeration shoppers were surveyed using interviewer-administered questionnaires. Structural equation modelling revealed that accessibility, parking and infrastructure are perceived differently between gender groups. The attractiveness in terms of satisfaction, rete...

  1. Statistical Evaluation of Non-Agglomerating Coating for Granulated Natural Asphalt

    Tjokorde Walmiki Samadhi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Agglomeration of granulated Buton natural asphalt during storage is of major concern in its large-scale commercial application. This work develops a simple test method to evaluate the performance of agglomeration-resistant coating for granulated Buton asphalt, consisting of water-based polymeric primary coating and mineral-based secondary coating. The method uses a static load cell to measure the agglomerated granule count fraction under simulated storage conditions. A 24-1 fractional factorial experiment with two replications is employed to evaluate the effect of coating drying temperature, drying time, asphalt to secondary coating mass ratio, and secondary coating type on the agglomerated count fraction at ambient temperature and 60 oC. The test is able to measure a statistically significant increase in agglomeration resistance when the coating is applied, with an agglomerated fraction of 17.5% at 60 oC. The test identifies asphalt to secondary coating weight ratio as a significant factor, with an ANOVA p-value much lower than other effects. A decrease in this mass ratio from 5:1 to 5:2 increases the agglomeration, which is hypothesized to be attributed to the hydrated cementitious phase between granular external surfaces. More work is needed to identify the acceptable fraction of agglomerated granules.

  2. Prediction of mass fraction of agglomerated debris in a LWR severe accident

    Ex-vessel termination of accident progression in Swedish type Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) is contingent upon efficacy of melt fragmentation and solidification in a deep pool of water below reactor vessel. When liquid melt reaches the bottom of the pool it can create agglomerated debris and “cake” regions that increase hydraulic resistance of the bed and affect coolability of the bed. This paper discusses development and application of a conservative-mechanistic approach to quantify mass fractions of agglomerated debris. Experimental data from the DEFOR-A (Debris Bed Formation and Agglomeration) tests with high superheat of binary oxidic simulant material melt is used for validation of the methods. Application of the approach to plant accident analysis suggests that melt superheat has less significant influence on agglomeration of the debris than jet penetration depth. The paper also discusses the impact of the uncertainty in the jet disintegration and penetration behavior on the agglomeration mode map. (author)

  3. Simulation research on monomer agglomeration of nonmetallic inclusions in steel with a diffusion limited aggregation model

    2006-01-01

    The monomer agglomeration of nonmetallic inclusions was simulated with a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model of the fractal theory.The simulation study with a random two-dimensional diffusion was carried out.The results indicate that the DLA model can be used for the simulation of agglomeration behavior of the cluster-type inclusions.The morphology of clusters was observed with SEM and compared with the simulated agglomerates.The modelling procedure of the DLA model is applicable for the agglomeration process.The uncertainty of agglomeration process and the persuasive average agglomerative ratio was analyzed.The factors about the agglomerative ratio with the collision path distance and the size of particles or seed were discussed.The adherence of the nonmetallic inclusions on the dam, the weir and the walls of a tundish, and the absorption of inclusions by stopper or nozzle were also discussed.

  4. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE HYDROPHOBIC AGGLOMERATION CHARACTERISTICS OF EASY DEGRADATION COAL FINES IN WATER

    王力; 陈鹏

    1997-01-01

    The separation of ultrafine coal from three Chinese coal samples of easy degradation coal fines in water has been investigated by the application of a hydrophobic agglomeration process. In addition to yielding clean coal with high recovery, this process requires significantly less oil concentration for agglomeration (less than 0.4% in oil-water weight ratio) and produces stabler agglomerates than general oil agglomeration process, the cost of the oil would no longer be an important consideration for its commercial application. Neutral diesel oil was used to make oleophilic coal particles agglomerated with good rejection of clay minerals under little oil consumption and certain agitation speed at 2000 r/min. An important advantage of this process compared with other cleaning fine coal methods is that it can extremely reduce or eliminate the effects of coal degradation and some clay minerals on coal preparation.

  5. Acoustic hemostasis

    Crum, L.; Andrew, M.; Bailey, M.; Beach, K.; Brayman, A.; Curra, F.; Kaczkowski, P.; Kargl, S.; Martin, R.; Vaezy, S.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past several years, the Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound (CIMU) at the Applied Physics Laboratory in the University of Washington has undertaken a broad research program in the general area of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). Our principal emphasis has been on the use of HIFU to induce hemostasis; in particular, CIMU has sought to develop a small, lightweight, portable device that would use ultrasound for both imaging and therapy. Such a technology is needed because nearly 50% of combat casualty mortality results from exsanguinations, or uncontrolled bleeding. A similar percentage occurs for civilian death due to trauma. In this general review, a presentation of the general problem will be given, as well as our recent approaches to the development of an image-guided, transcutaneous, acoustic hemostasis device. [Work supported in part by the USAMRMC, ONR and the NIH.

  6. Acoustic telemetry.

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  7. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available Educational Video Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video ... for pre- and post-treatment acoustic neuroma patients. Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic ...

  8. Agglomeration behaviour of high ash Indian coals in fluidized bed gasification pilot plant

    Although gasification of high ash Indian coals is gaining importance, the resultant uncertainties associated with agglomerate formation are still unresolved. To address this, a suitable pilot scale Fluidized Bed Gasifier was utilized in this study. Stabilized operating conditions in terms of coal feed rate, air feed rate, bed temperature, etc., already identified for maximum possible carbon conversion, were maintained in all experiments and the steam flow rate was only varied. Though the ash fusion temperature of the coals were above 1200 °C, agglomerate was formed during gasification at 950 °C with ‘steam to coal ratio’ less than 0.15 (kg/kg). On increasing this ratio above 0.2 local heat-concentration and agglomeration could be avoided with certainty. Chemical composition alone was not sufficient to explain the relative strength of ash-agglomerates. Compositional variation and state of iron within the matrix were assessed through SEM-EDX and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study, respectively. The probing also required the ash-loading and iron-loading factors to be freshly defined in the context of gasification. Localized heat, large compositional variation, presence of iron in Fe2+ state, ash-loading/iron-loading factors influenced intensity of agglomerate formation. Finally, low temperature agglomerate formation was explained by SiO2–Al2O3–FeO phase diagram. - Highlights: • Pilot plant studies on agglomerate formation during high ash coal gasification. • AFT, chemical analysis of coal ash could not give proper indication. • Ash-/iron-loading factors, compositional variation, Fe2+ leads to agglomeration. • Steam to coal ratio was controlled judiciously to avoid agglomeration. • Cause for agglomeration investigated in depth and remedial adjustment was focused

  9. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...

  10. Acoustic dispersive prism

    Hussein Esfahlani; Sami Karkar; Herve Lissek; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic ...

  11. Spherically agglomerated solid dispersions of valsartan to improve solubility, dissolution rate and micromeritic properties

    Amit R. Tapas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to enhance the solubility and dissolution rate of valsartan (VAL a poorly water soluble antihypertensive, by spherically agglomerated solid dispersions using methanol, water and dichloromethane as good solvent, poor solvent and bridging liquid, respectively. The hydrophilic polymers like polyvinyl pyrrolidone, Hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin, Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose were used in agglomeration process. The pure drug (VAL and its agglomerates with different polymers were characterize by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, X-ray diffraction (XRD, IR spectroscopic studies and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The DSC results indicated that decrease in melting enthalpy related to disorder in the crystalline content. XRD studies also showed changes in crystallanity, IR spectroscopy revealed that there were no chemical changes in the recrystallized agglomerates. The spherically agglomerated solid dispersions with different polymers exhibited marked increase in solubility, dissolution rate and micromeritic properties (bulk density, flow property, compactability compared with VAL. The SEM studies showed that the agglomerates posseeses a good spherical shape.Keywords: Valsartan; Spherical agglomeration; Solid dispersion; Solubility; Dissolution rate; Micromeritic properties.

  12. Coke yield and heat transfer in reaction of liquid-solid agglomerates of Athabasca vacuum residue

    Ali, M.; Courtney, M.; Boddez, L.; Gray, M. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2010-02-15

    Delayed coking and fluid-bed coking are the most common commercial processes used by the petroleum industry for the thermal conversion of vacuum residues into petroleum distillate products. This paper presented the results of an experimental study of coke yield at long reaction times from agglomerates of coke particles and Athabasca vacuum residue (AVR). The ultimate coke yield was determined for a range of agglomerate thicknesses, liquid concentrations and reaction temperatures. The agglomerates were heated on Curie-point alloy strips in an induction furnace at 503 and 530 degrees C until all toluene-soluble material was converted. A simple heat transfer model was used to describe the temperature profile within the agglomerates. Coke yield results from agglomerates were compared to the coke yield results from reacting thin films of vacuum residue. The average coke yield from the agglomerates was 23 per cent, while the coke yield from thin films of 20 {mu}m thickness was 11 per cent, which supports the role of mass transfer in coke formation reactions. The ultimate coke yield was insensitive to vacuum residue concentration, agglomerate size, and reaction temperature. According to control experiments on thin films of liquid at different heating rates, the temperature-time history has little effect on the ultimata coke yield. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  13. APPLICATION OF SPHERICAL AGGLOMERATION TECHNIQUE TO IMPROVE MICROMERITIC PROPERTIES AND DISSOLUTION CHARACTERISTICS OF NABUMETONE

    Pradnya Patil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is aimed to enhance the solubility and dissolution rate of Nabumetone, 4-(6-methoxy-2-naphalenyl-2-butanone water insoluble anti-inflammatory drug by spherical agglomeration technique using a solvent change method consisting of acetone, water and dichloromethane as solvent, non solvent and bridging liquid respectively. The hydrophilic polymers like poly vinyl pyrrolidone K-30 (PVP and sodium alginate were used in the agglomeration process. Infrared (I.R spectroscopic studies, Differential scanning calorimetery (DSC and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM were used for characterization of pure drug and its agglomerates. The I.R spectroscopy revealed that there is no chemical interaction between drug and polymers, also indicated that no chemical changes in the crystallized agglomerates .The agglomerates exhibited significantly improved solubility, dissolution rate and micromeritic properties (angle of repose, Carr’s index, bulk density, tapped density. Hausner’s ratio compared with pure drug Nabumetone. The aqueous solubility and dissolution rate of the drug from spherical agglomerates was significantly (p < 0.05 increased (nearly two times. SEM studies revealed that the agglomerates possess a good spherical shape. The study revealed that Micromeritic Properties, Solubility and Invitro drug release rate is increased with increase in PVP concentration from 0.25% to 1% as compared to sodium alginate.

  14. Acoustic Neurinomas

    Mohammad Faraji Rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuromas (AN are schwann cell-derived tumors that commonly arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve also known as vestibular schwannoma(VS causes unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and unsteadiness. In many cases, the tumor size may remain unchanged for many years following diagnosis, which is typically made by MRI. In the majority of cases the tumor is small, leaving the clinician and patient with the options of either serial scanning or active treatment by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR or microneurosurgery. Despite the vast number of published treatment reports, comparative studies are few. The predominant clinical endpoints of AN treatment include tumor control, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Less focus has been put on symptom relief and health-related quality of life (QOL. It is uncertain if treating a small tumor leaves the patient with a better chance of obtaining relief from future hearing loss, vertigo or tinnitus than by observing it without treatment.   In this paper we review the literature for the natural course, the treatment alternatives and the results of AN. Finally, we present our experience with a management strategy applied for more than 30 years.

  15. Acoustic Spatiality

    Brandon LaBelle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of listening can be appreciated as intensely relational, bringing us into contact with surrounding events, bodies and things. Given that sound propagates and expands outwardly, as a set of oscillations from a particular source, listening carries with it a sensual intensity, whereby auditory phenomena deliver intrusive and disruptive as well as soothing and assuring experiences. The physicality characteristic of sound suggests a deeply impressionistic, locational "knowledge structure" – that is, the ways in which listening affords processes of exchange, of being in the world, and from which we extend ourselves. Sound, as physical energy reflecting and absorbing into the materiality around us, and even one's self, provides a rich platform for understanding place and emplacement. Sound is always already a trace of location.Such features of auditory experience give suggestion for what I may call an acoustical paradigm – how sound sets in motion not only the material world but also the flows of the imagination, lending to forces of signification and social structure, and figuring us in relation to each other. The relationality of sound brings us into a steady web of interferences, each of which announces the promise or problematic of being somewhere.

  16. MORPHOLOGICAL AND MICROSTRUCTURAL CHANGES DURING THE HEATING OF SPHERICAL CALCIUM ORTHOPHOSPHATE AGGLOMERATES PREPARED BY SPRAY PYROLYSIS

    Kiyoshi Itatani; Mari Abe; Tomohiro Umeda; Ian J. Davies; Seiichiro Koda

    2004-01-01

    The microstructural changes taking place during heating of calcium orthophosphate (Ca3(PO4)2) agglomerates were examined in this study. The starting powder was prepared by the spray-pyrolysis of calcium phosphate (Ca/P air-liquid nozzle. The spray-pyrolyzed powder was found to be composed of dense spherical agglomerates with a mean diameter of 1.3 μm. This powder was further heat-treated at a temperature between 800 and 1400 ℃ for 10 min. When the spray-pyrolyzed powder was heated up to 900 ℃, only βCa3(PO4)2 was detected, and the mean pore size of the spherical agglomerates increased via the (i) elimination of residual water and nitrates, (ii) rearrangement of primary particles within the agglomerates, (iii) coalescence of small pores (below 0.1 μm), and (iv) coalescence of agglomerates with diameters below 1 μm into the larger agglomerates. Among the heat-treated powders, pore sizes within the spherical agglomerates were observed to be the largest (mean diameter: 1.8 μm) for the powder heat-treated at 900 ℃ for 10 min.With an increase in heat-treatment temperature up to 1000 ℃, the spherical agglomerates were composed of dense shells. Upon further heating up to 1400 ℃, the hollow spherical agglomerates collapsed as a result of sintering via the phase transformation from β- to α-Ca3(PO4)2 (1150 ℃), thus leading to the formation of a three-dimensional porous network.

  17. Understanding lateritic ore agglomeration behaviour as a precursor to enhanced heap leaching

    Although nickel (Ni) laterite ores constitute the majority of Ni mineralization resource world-wide, in contrast to Ni sulphides, their processing via conventional beneficiation (e.g. multi-gravity and flotation) and hydrometallurgical routes is intractable as they are predominantly low grade and complex, both mineralogically and chemically. Due to their physico-chemical characteristics, low grade lateritic ores require more aggressive but costly chemical and hydrometallurgical techniques (e.g., leaching in high pressurized tanks) for value metal (Ni and Co) extraction. Processing such ores through cost-competitive heap (4-10 m high) leaching as an alternative, requires successful agglomeration of the feed into robust and porous granules. To date, producing of granules with desirable attributes poses a major geotechnical challenge to industry. In the present work, we investigate agglomeration behaviour of siliceous goethite Ni laterite ore and selected oxides and clay minerals (hematite, quartz and kao-linite) which constitute the predominant host gangue phases of typical low grade Ni laterite ores. Fundamental knowledge and understanding of the agglomeration mechanisms and kinetics which are essential for producing robust real ore granules, and pivotal to the subsequent heap leaching process, are gleaned. Isothermal, batch agglomeration tests involving 30 and 44 % w/w sulphuric acid solution as a binder indicated that 5 – 40 mm granules of differing roughness and morphologies were produced in 8-14 min. The results showed feed characteristics (e.g., mineralogy and particle size distribution) and binder content (15-25 wt.%) dependent agglomeration behaviour. Slow agglomerate nucleation and growth were displayed by the kaolinite clay mineral whilst the oxides exhibited faster agglomeration kinetics. Siliceous goethite feed ore fine/coarse ratio, H2SO4 binder dosage and acid content, product drying temperature and aging conditions, all showed significant impact on

  18. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  19. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton;

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design for the...... acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design was...... simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  20. Cooperative Game Among Cities in Urban Agglomerations and Economical Sustainable Development

    Shah Weidong

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses redounded profits of cooperation and non-cooperation among cities in urban agglomerations based on game theory. It discusses the problems of economical development among cities with feeble cooperation, and deduces the conclusion that only cooperation of cities produces the maximum profits and realizes Pareto efficiency for cities and urban agglomerations. The paper states that cooperation is the cornerstone of economic sustainable development in urban agglomerations in profits produced by cooperation among cities.Some suggestions to accelerate cooperation among cities are proposed.

  1. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 5, Bench- scale process testing

    1991-09-01

    Under the overall objectives of DOE Contract Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration,'' there were a number of specific objectives in the Task 5 program. The prime objectives of Task 5 are highlighted below: (1) Maximize process performance in pyritic sulfur rejection and BTU recovery, (2) Produce a low ash product, (3) Compare the performance of the heavy agglomerant process based on diesel and the light agglomerant process using heptane, (4) Define optimum processing conditions for engineering design, (5) Provide first-level evaluation of product handleability, and (6) Explore and investigate process options/ideas which may enhance process performance and/or product handleability.

  2. Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 5, Bench- scale process testing

    1991-09-01

    Under the overall objectives of DOE Contract ``Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration,`` there were a number of specific objectives in the Task 5 program. The prime objectives of Task 5 are highlighted below: (1) Maximize process performance in pyritic sulfur rejection and BTU recovery, (2) Produce a low ash product, (3) Compare the performance of the heavy agglomerant process based on diesel and the light agglomerant process using heptane, (4) Define optimum processing conditions for engineering design, (5) Provide first-level evaluation of product handleability, and (6) Explore and investigate process options/ideas which may enhance process performance and/or product handleability.

  3. Capillary condensation onto titania (TiO2) nanoparticle agglomerates.

    Kim, Seonmin; Ehrman, Sheryl H

    2007-02-27

    A capillary condensation process was developed for the purpose of forming interconnections between nanoparticles at low temperatures. The process was performed in a temperature-controlled flow chamber on nanoparticle agglomerates deposited at submonolayer coverage on a transmission electron microscope grid. The partial pressure of the condensing species, tetraethyl orthosilicate, and the temperature of the chamber were adjusted in order to obtain the various saturation conditions for capillary condensation. The modified samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, BET surface area method, and scanning transmission electron microscopy with electron energy-loss spectrometry. Experimental results show that bridge-shaped layers were dominantly formed in the neck region between particles and were composed of amorphous silica. The analysis of TEM micrographs verified that the coverage of the layers is strongly dependent on the saturation ratio. Image analysis of TEM micrographs shows that this dependency is qualitatively in agreement with theoretical predictions based on the classical Kelvin equation for the specific geometries in our system. PMID:17243733

  4. Assessment of Traffic Noise on Highway Passing from Urban Agglomeration

    Vijay, Ritesh; Kori, Chandan; Kumar, Manoj; Chakrabarti, T.; Gupta, Rajesh

    2014-09-01

    Assessment of traffic noise pollution in developing countries is complex due to heterogeneity in traffic conditions like traffic volume, road width, honking, etc. To analyze the impact of such variables, a research study was carried out on a national highway passing from an urban agglomeration. Traffic volume and noise levels (L10, Lmin, Lmax, Leq and L90) were measured during morning and evening peak hours. Contribution of noise by individual vehicle was estimated using passenger car noise unit. Extent of noise pollution and impact of noisy vehicles were estimated using noise pollution level and traffic noise index, respectively. Noise levels were observed to be above the prescribed Indian and International standards. As per audio spectrum analysis of traffic noise, honking contributed an additional 3-4 dB(A) noise. Based on data analysis, a positive relationship was observed between noise levels and honking while negative correlation was observed between noise levels and road width. The study suggests that proper monitoring and analysis of traffic data is required for better planning of noise abatement measures.

  5. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  6. Finite-difference lattice Boltzmann simulation on acoustics-induced particle deposition

    Fu, Sau-Chung; Yuen, Wai-Tung; Wu, Chili; Chao, Christopher Yu-Hang

    2015-10-01

    Particle manipulation by acoustics has been investigated for many years. By a proper design, particle deposition can be induced by the same principle. The use of acoustics can potentially be developed into an energy-efficient technique for particle removal or filtration system as the pressure drop due to acoustic effects is low and the flow velocity is not necessary to be high. Two nonlinear acoustic effects, acoustic streaming and acoustic radiation pressure, are important. Acoustic streaming introduces vortices and stagnation points on the surface of an air duct and removes the particles by deposition. Acoustic radiation pressure causes particles to form agglomerates and enhances inertial impaction and/or gravitational sedimentation. The objective of this paper is to develop a numerical model to investigate the particle deposition induced by acoustic effects. A three-step approach is adopted and lattice Boltzamnn technique is employed as the numerical method. This is because the lattice Boltzmann equation is hyperbolic and can be solved locally, explicitly, and efficiently on parallel computers. In the first step, the acoustic field and its mean square fluctuation values are calculated. Due to the advantage of the lattice Boltzmann technique, a simple, stable and fast lattice Boltzmann method is proposed and verified. The result of the first step is input into the second step to solve for acoustic streaming. Another finite difference lattice Boltzmann method, which has been validated by a number of flows and benchmark cases in the literature, is used. The third step consists in tracking the particle's motion by a Lagrangian approach where the acoustic radiation pressure is considered. The influence of the acoustics effects on particle deposition is explained. The numerical result matches with an experiment. The model is a useful tool for optimizing the design and helps to further develop the technique.

  7. Daqing Petrochemical Adopted Technology of Agglomeration New Energy Saving Production%Daqing Petrochemical Adopted Technology of Agglomeration New Energy Saving Production

    2011-01-01

    To reduce energy consumption of equipment and exhaust emission to the uttermost, Daqing Petrochemical Company has developed pre-agglomeration production flow successfully and confirmed an optimized energy-saving method of differential pressure agglomeration. For a long time, BR equipment of 80,000 tons per year in Daqing Petrochemical Company have been adopting general isobaric technology and elutriation method to separate polymer and solvent, which caused over 10 tons of steam per ton of rubber and restricted the energy conservation and emission reduction of the enterprise.

  8. Light-Induced Agglomeration and Diffusion of Different Particles with Optical Tweezers

    LI Xue-Cong; SUN Xiu-Dong; LIU Hong-Peng; ZHANG Jian-Long

    2010-01-01

    @@ The dynamic process of light-induced agglomeration of carbon nanotubes(CNTs),C60 and Escherichia coli(E.coli)in aqueous solutions is demonstrated using an optical tweezers system.Based on the results,the diameter of the agglomerated region and the agglomeration rate increase with the increasing laser power.After the saturation-stable period,CNTs diffuse completely,C60 dusters only diffuse partially,and E.coli never diffuses in the agglomeration region.Theoretical analyses show that the molecular polarization and thermal diffusion of particles play crucial roles in the diffusion process.The results indicate the possibility of using light to aggregate and sort nanoparticles.

  9. Agglomeration Evolution of Nano-Particles Aluminium in Normal Incident Shock Wave

    YAN Zheng-Xin; WU Jing-He; HU Dong; YANG Xiang-Dong

    2006-01-01

    Agglomeration behaviour of nano-particle aluminium (nano-Al) in normal incident shock waves is investigated by our devised shock tube technology. The morphology, particle size, agglomeration process of nano-Al studied in normal incident shock waves are comprehensible evaluated by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The above-mentioned techniques show that the high strength and temperature of incident shock wave give a chance for activity of nano-Al in the reactions and decrease the agglomeration, and the morphology of agglomeration is affected by the temperature of nano-Al reaction region. The dynamic temperature of reaction region determined by the intensity ratio of two AlO bands is 2602K, which is closer to nano-Al actual reacted temperature than the determined temperature of ordinary methods (i.e. six channel instantaneous optical pyrometer; plank black body radiation law, etc.)

  10. Role of Solvents in Improvement of Dissolution Rate of Drugs: Crystal Habit and Crystal Agglomeration

    Maryam Maghsoodi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization is often used for manufacturing drug substances. Advances of crystallization have achieved control over drug identity and purity, but control over the physical form remains poor. This review discusses the influence of solvents used in crystallization process on crystal habit and agglomeration of crystals with potential implication for dissolution. According to literature it has been known that habit modification of crystals by use of proper solvents may enhance the dissolution properties by changing the size, number and the nature of crystal faces exposed to the dissolution medium. Also, the faster dissolution rate of drug from the agglomerates of crystals compared with the single crystals may be related to porous structure of the agglomerates and consequently their better wettability. It is concluded from this review that in-depth understanding of role of the solvents in crystallization process can be applied to engineering of crystal habit or crystal agglomeration, and predictably dissolution improvement in poorly soluble drugs.

  11. Agglomeration Economies, Inventors and Entrepreneurs as Engines of European Regional Productivity

    Bosma, Niels; van Oort, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In economic agglomeration studies, the distinction of various externalities circumstances related to knowledge spillovers remains largely unclear. This paper introduces human capital, innovation and several types of entrepreneurship as potential drivers of regional economic performance with an impac

  12. Application of agglomerated acid heap leaching of clay-bearing uranium ore in China

    The permeability of ore mass has a great influence on the leaching period of heap leaching and the leaching efficiency, hence the uranium ores with high content of clay present a significant difficulty to acidic heap leaching. The Research Institute of Uranium Mining has engaged over years of studies on the cementing agents of acidic agglomeration, agglomeration method, as well as the curing measures of pelletted balls. On the basis of these studies, several types of clay-bearing ores have been tested with good results. The technique of agglomerated acid heap leaching has been successfully applied in a uranium mine. Since agglomeration has effectively increased the permeability of ore mass, its leaching period is decreased from 200 days to 60 days, the leaching efficiency from less than 40% up to 96%, comparing with direct heap leaching programme. (author)

  13. Particle Size Distribution, Powder Agglomerates and Their Effects on Sinterability of Ultrafine Alumina Powders

    2000-01-01

    An intensive study of the particle size distribution of four commercial ultrafine alumina powders to obtain information about the powder agglomeration and relate them to the compactibility and the sinterability has been made.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Agglomerate of early-type Hipparcos stars (Caballero+, 2008)

    Caballero, J. A.; Dinis, L.

    2009-01-01

    We study the spatial structure and sub-structure of regions rich in Hipparcos stars with blue BT-VT colours. These regions, which comprise large stellar complexes, OB associations, and young open clusters, are tracers of on-going star formation in the Galaxy. The DBSCAN (Density-Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise) data clustering algorithm is used to look for spatial overdensities of early-type stars. Once an overdensity, "agglomerate", is identified, we carry out a data and bibliographic compilation of their star member candidates. The actual membership in agglomerate of each early-type star is studied based on its heliocentric distance, proper motion, and previous spectro-photometric information. We identify 35 agglomerates of early-type Hipparcos stars. Most of them are associated to previously known clusters and OB associations. The previously unknown P Puppis agglomerate is subject of a dedicated study with Virtual Observatory tools. (2 data files).

  15. The Integration and Sustainable Development of Chengdu-Chongqing Urban Agglomeration

    Yang Jie; Mao Hanying

    2006-01-01

    Urban Agglomeration is an inevitable outcome of urbanization and industrialization, and a main form of urban development. Based on the analysis of urbanization and urban system situation, this paper will discuss the integration of urban agglomeration development, using the urban area of Cheng (Chengdu)-Yu (Chongqing)Urban agglomeration (CYUA) as a case study. By means of industries, population and spatial integrations, the function, strength and competition of CYUA will be improved and this urban agglomeration will transit from a budding state to a growing and mature one in future. The sustainable development of CYUA will depend on countermeasures, such as accelerating industrialization and urbanization, building a traffic network and express roads, strengthening the ability of self-sufficiency,enlarging the ecological construction and environmental protection, and establishing the synergetic institution of cross districts.

  16. Mechanism of Agglomerating Development of Industrial Space: A Case Study on Shenzhen

    2009-01-01

    <正>The agglomeration of industries refers to the concentration and aggregation of the same or different industries in a certain area. After analyzing the spatial pattern of the economic activities in the world, it can be found

  17. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask ... Options Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask ...

  18. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Join/Renew ... ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Search ANAUSA. ...

  19. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Join/Renew Ways to Give ANA Discussion Forum ... ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Search ANAUSA.org Connect with us! Educational Video ...

  20. Cystic acoustic neuromas

    Chitkara, Naveen; Chanda, Rakesh; Yadav, S. P. S.; N.K. Sharma

    2002-01-01

    Predominantly cystic acoustic neuromas are rare and they usually present with clinical and radiological features different from their more common solid counterparts. Two cases of cystic acoustic neuromas are reported here.

  1. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and...

  2. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  3. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... is ANA? Mission Statement Board of Directors ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic ... is ANA? Mission Statement Board of Directors ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic ...

  4. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Full Text Available ... Resources Patient Surveys Related Links Clinical Trials.gov Health Care Insurance Toolkit Additional Resources ANA Public Webinars © 2016 Acoustic Neuroma Association Acoustic Neuroma Association ® • ...

  5. Stable Partial Agglomeration in a New Economic Geography Model with Urban Frictions

    Barde, Sylvain

    2007-01-01

    This paper extends the Puga (1999) model by introducing urban frictions. It assumes that the agglomeration of manufacturing in a city imposes a cost on the inhabitants of the agglomerated region. Furthermore, an implicit function methodology is developed to provide a numerical stability function that does not require prior analytical work. Simulations reveal that these numerical stability conditions are consistent with the original Puga (1999) analytical predictions. The central finding is th...

  6. Hedonic and Utilitarian Shopper Types in Evolved and Created Retail Agglomerations

    Teller, C; Reutterer, T; Schnedlitz, P

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of hedonic and utilitarian values of shopping on retail agglomeration patronage issues, in particular on the shopping behaviour and the perception of retail agglomerations. Our empirical study is based on a discussion of agglomerations’ potential to attract utilitarian and hedonic shopper types. A sample of 2,139 customers were interviewed in a peripheral shopping mall and an inner city shopping street and confronted with a multi-item scale operationalising sh...

  7. Tourism agglomeration and its impact on social welfare: an empirical approach to the Spanish case

    2006-01-01

    This paper measures two descriptors of tourism namely, its scale and agglomeration level and subsequently evaluates both descriptors according to their direct and joint impacts on the host communities' quality of life. The key constructs for this research are the following: (1) a tourism evaluation function that incorporates the scale and agglomeration of tourism, which is constructed for each one of the 50 Spanish provinces; and (2) a measure of the host communities' quality of life that com...

  8. Agglomeration Economies, Inventors and Entrepreneurs as Engines of European Regional Productivity

    Bosma, Niels; van Oort, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In economic agglomeration studies, the distinction of various externalities circumstances related to knowledge spillovers remains largely unclear. This paper introduces human capital, innovation and several types of entrepreneurship as potential drivers of regional economic performance with an impact of agglomeration economies. We use measures of specific types of entrepreneurship, discerned at the individual level, as well as human capital and invention through patenting activity for the per...

  9. Spatial Agglomeration and Productivity of Textile and Leather Manufacturing in the Punjab Province of Pakistan

    Asim Iqba; Muhammad Wasif Siddiqi

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether spatial agglomeration of textile and leather industry facilitates to enhance its own productivity at establishment level in the Punjab province of Pakistan. The empirical analysis is based on the survey data for the years 1995-96, 2000-2001 and 2005-06 collected from the Punjab Bureau of Statistics (PBS). The production function framework has been utilized. The results of production function suggest that spatial agglomeration of textile and leather industry pla...

  10. Explaining the productivity advantages of manufacturing firms in Russian urban agglomerations

    Gonchar, Ksenia; Ratnikova, Tatyana

    2013-01-01

    This paper empirically analyzes the agglomeration-related productivity premium at the enterprise level of the manufacturing industry in Russia. A settlement is counted as part of an urban agglomeration in two cases: that of a large, central city and that of a town located within 50 kilometers of the central city. Data obtained from a 2009 manufacturing enterprise survey conducted by the Higher School of economics are used, along with linked data on hosting regions and cities. We employ a mult...

  11. A Treatise on the Geographical Scale of Agglomeration Externalities and the MAUP

    Burger, Martijn J.; van Oort, Frank G.; Bert van der Knaap

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we test to what extent the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (MAUP) moderates the effect of agglomeration externalities on areal sectoral employment growth by varying the initial geographical scale of analysis. Using spatial cross-regressive modelling, we find different effects of agglomeration forces across geographical scales. As the MAUP is a theoretical as well as a methodological problem, research should not only work with proper statistical specifications, but also relate t...

  12. Agglomeration in counter-current spray drying towers. Part B: Interaction between multiple spraying levels

    Francia, V; Martín, L; Bayly, AE; Simmons, MJH

    2016-01-01

    A new experimental method is developed here to investigate agglomeration in spray drying towers operating with multiple nozzles. It allows studying independently the contribution of each spray to the product and obtaining a valuable insight into the agglomeration processes. The paper studies a two level swirl counter-current dryer of detergent in a full-scale production system. It shows that operation with two nozzle levels increases the energy efficiency compared to the use of single sprays,...

  13. Competitors, Complementors, Parents and Places: Explaining Regional Agglomeration in the U.S. Auto Industry

    Luis Cabral; Zhu Wang; Daniel Yi Xu

    2013-01-01

    Taking the early U.S. automobile industry as an example, we evaluate four competing hypotheses on regional industry agglomeration: intra-industry local externalities, inter-industry local externalities, employee spinouts, and location fixed-effects. Our findings suggest that inter-industry spillovers, particularly the development of the carriage and wagon industry, play an important role. Spinouts play a secondary role and only contribute to agglomeration at later stages of industry evolution...

  14. How agglomeration in the financial services industry influences economic growth: Evidence from Chinese cities

    Liang, Lin; Lin, Shanglang; LI, YONG

    2014-01-01

    This paper empirically tests the effect of financial knowledge spillovers on agglomeration in China's financial services industry and examines the external effects on cities' economies. The authors apply hierarchical linear modeling to examine a data set that comprises 276 Chinese cities and draw the following conclusions. Firstly, they find that agglomeration in the financial services industry and the Jacobs spillovers of industry diversification both promote financial knowledge spillovers i...

  15. Strategic location behaviour: Temporal and spatial proximity in situation of agglomeration effects

    Mayer, Thierry; Mucchielli, Jean-Louis

    1996-01-01

    We address the question of competition within the location choices of firms. In a framework of agglomeration effects, both spatial and temporal dimensions of the firms' decisions are studied. We show that the competition consequences of preemptive move and optimal time of entry can interfere with the geographical decisions. Our results contrast with those of agglomeration economics models which generally provide extreme results of mono-location. The Stackelberg equilibria described here tend ...

  16. Distribution Characteristics and Compressibility of Agglomerates as a Reflection of Granulation Parameters

    Macho Oliver; Peciar Peter; Peciar Marián; Svěrák Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Selective adjustment of the properties of particular material agglomeration has its inherent place in the chemical, food, but especially in the pharmaceutical, industry. The requirement to produce an agglomerate with desired particle size at a given strength is often formulated. To create the targeted product, it is necessary to know the process parameters affecting the preparation of its features. This paper deals with survey distribution characteristics and compressibility changes of an agg...

  17. Laser-induced agglomeration of gold nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid

    Highlights: • Pulsed laser irradiation of dense gold nanoparticles colloidal solution can result in their agglomeration. • Gas bubbles in-phase pulsation induced by laser radiation accounts for nanoparticles agglomeration. • Time evolution of the size distribution function proceeds in activation mode. • The electrostatic-like model of nanoparticles agglomeration is in good correspondence with the experimental data. - Abstract: Dynamics of gold nanoparticles (NPs) ensemble in dense aqueous solution under exposure to picosecond laser radiation is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Properties of NPs are examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, and size-measuring disk centrifuge. Theoretical investigation of NPs ensemble behavior is based on the analytical model taking into account collisions and agglomeration of particles. It is shown that in case of dense NPs colloidal solutions (above 1014 particles per milliliter) the process of laser fragmentation typical for nanosecond laser exposure turns into laser-induced agglomeration which leads to formation of the particles with larger sizes. It is shown that there is a critical concentration of NPs: at higher concentrations agglomeration rate increases tremendously. The results of mathematical simulation are in compliance with experimental data

  18. Design of Agglomerated Crystals of Ibuprofen During Crystallization: Influence of Surfactant

    Maryam Maghsoodi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sIbuprofen is a problematic drug in tableting, and dissolution due to its poor solubility, hydrophobicity, and tendency to stick to surface. Because of the bad compaction behavior ibuprofen has to be granulated usually before tableting. However, it would be more satisfactory to obtain directly during the crystallization step crystalline particles that can be directly compressed and quickly dissolved. Materials and Methods Crystallization of ibuprofen was carried out using the quasi emulsion solvent diffusion method in presence of surfactant (sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS, Tween 80. The particles were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD and were evaluated for particle size, flowability, drug release and tableting behavior. ResultsIbuprofen particles obtained in the presence of surfactants consisted of numerous plate- shaped crystals which had agglomerated together as near spherical shape. The obtained agglomerates exhibited significantly improved micromeritic properties as well as tableting behavior than untreated drug crystals. The agglomerates size and size distribution was largely controlled by surfactant concentration, but there was no significant influence found on the tableting properties. The dissolution tests showed that the agglomerates obtained in presence of SLS exhibited enhanced dissolution rate while the agglomerates made in the presence of Tween 80 had no significant impact on dissolution rate of ibuprofen in comparison to untreated sample. The XRPD and DSC results showed that during the agglomeration process, ibuprofen did not undergo any polymorphic changes.Conclusion The study highlights the influence of surfactants on crystallization process leading to modified performance.

  19. A Study on the Density of Agglomerates Prepared from Cork Wastes

    2003-01-01

    The density of black regranulate (BR) of cork and of black agglomerate (BA) and composite agglomerate (CA) prepared fromsuch a waste by different methods was investigated. The preparation of the agglomerates was undertaken by controlling thespecimen thickness for BA and the particle size for BR and the binder dosage for CA. The mass changes produced in theoven-drying treatment at 376.15 K of the agglomerates and in their subsequent stabilization under ambient conditions werealso analyzed. The density was determined by standard methods. For BR, the bulk density first decreased and then increasedwith decreasing particle size. It was much lower than the apparent density of the agglomeration products of cork. Although toa lesser extent, the density was also lower for BA than for CA. It was higher for the smaller thickness specimens of BA. In thecase of CA, the density followed the same variation trends as for BR. Furthermore it increased significantly with the increasein resin dosage. This resulted in a noticeable increase in the weight loss during the oven-drying and in a significant decreasein the degree of moisture adsorption during the stabilization period of the agglomerate.

  20. Study on the Policy Factors of Innovative Talents Agglomeration in Jiangsu Province based on Data Analysis

    Li Wenfei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Innovative talent is the key factor to promote the development of innovative economy and realize innovative drive in Jiangsu Province. Innovative talent agglomeration can fully play the effect of innovative talents through the agglomeration efficiency. Among many factors that affect the agglomeration of innovative talents, the guiding role of government policy factors is becoming more and more important. Based on the survey of domestic and foreign literature, through questionnaire survey, this paper combines relevant analysis and regression analysis to study the mechanism between the of scientific research funds investment, household registration policy, outstanding achievement award and patent licensing and the innovative talent agglomeration. The results show that the investment of scientific research funds, the household registration policy, the outstanding achievement award and the patent authorization have remarkable influence on the innovation talent agglomeration. The conclusion of this study not only expands the theoretical research field of government policy and innovative talent agglomeration, but also provides practical guidance for the government of Jiangsu Province in the era of innovation knowledge.

  1. Effect of hydration repulsion on nanoparticle agglomeration evaluated via a constant number Monte–Carlo simulation

    The effect of hydration repulsion on the agglomeration of nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions was investigated via the description of agglomeration by the Smoluchowski coagulation equation using constant number Monte–Carlo simulation making use of the classical DLVO theory extended to include the hydration repulsion energy. Evaluation of experimental DLS measurements for TiO2, CeO2, SiO2, and α-Fe2O3 (hematite) at high IS (up to 900 mM) or low |ζ-potential| (≥1.35 mV) demonstrated that hydration repulsion energy can be above electrostatic repulsion energy such that the increased overall repulsion energy can significantly lower the agglomerate diameter relative to the classical DLVO prediction. While the classical DLVO theory, which is reasonably applicable for agglomeration of NPs of high |ζ-potential| (∼>35 mV) in suspensions of low IS (∼<1 mM), it can overpredict agglomerate sizes by up to a factor of 5 at high IS or low |ζ-potential|. Given the potential important role of hydration repulsion over a range of relevant conditions, there is merit in quantifying this repulsion energy over a wide range of conditions as part of overall characterization of NP suspensions. Such information would be of relevance to improved understanding of NP agglomeration in aqueous suspensions and its correlation with NP physicochemical and solution properties. (paper)

  2. Two-level hierarchical structure in nano-powder agglomerates in gas media

    de Martin, Lilian; Bouwman, Wim G.; van Ommen, J. Ruud

    2012-11-01

    Nanoparticles in high concentration in a gas form agglomerates due to the interparticle van der Waals forces. The size and the internal structure of these nanoparticles agglomerates strongly influence their dynamics and their interaction with other objects. This information is crucial, for example, when studying inhalation of nanoparticles. It is common to model the structure of these agglomerates using a fractal approach and to compare their dimension with the dimension obtained from aggregation models, such diffusion limited aggregation (DLA). In this work we have analyzed the structure of nanoparticles agglomerates in situ by means of Spin-Echo Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SESANS), while they were fluidized in a gas stream. The advantage of SESANS over conventional SANS is that SESANS can measure scales up to 20 microns, while SANS does not exceed a few hundred of nanometers. We have observed that when agglomerates interact, their structure cannot be characterized by using only one scaling parameter, the fractal dimension. We have found that there are at least two structure levels in the agglomerates and hence, we need at least two parameters to describe the autocorrelation function in each level.

  3. Quantitative characterization of agglomerate abrasion in a tumbling blender by using the Stokes number approach.

    Willemsz, Tofan A; Nguyen, Tien Thanh; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Frijlink, Henderik W; Vromans, Herman; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees

    2013-03-01

    Removal of microcrystalline cellulose agglomerates in a dry-mixing system (lactose, 100 M) predominantly occurs via abrasion. The agglomerate abrasion rate potential is estimated by the Stokes abrasion (StAbr) number of the system. The StAbr number equals the ratio between the kinetic energy density of the moving powder bed and the work of fracture of the agglomerate. Basically, the StAbr number concept describes the blending condition of the dry-mixing system. The concept has been applied to investigate the relevance of process parameters on agglomerate abrasion in tumbling blenders. Here, process parameters such as blender rotational speed and relative fill volumes were investigated. In this study, the StAbr approach revealed a transition point between abrasion rate behaviors. Below this transition point, a blending condition exists where agglomerate abrasion is dominated by the kinetic energy density of the powder blend. Above this transition point, a blending condition exists where agglomerates show (undesirable) slow abrasion rates. In this situation, the blending condition is mainly determined by the high fill volume of the filler. PMID:23250711

  4. Laser-induced agglomeration of gold nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid

    Serkov, A.A.; Shcherbina, M.E. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuzmin, P.G., E-mail: qzzzma@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kirichenko, N.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Pulsed laser irradiation of dense gold nanoparticles colloidal solution can result in their agglomeration. • Gas bubbles in-phase pulsation induced by laser radiation accounts for nanoparticles agglomeration. • Time evolution of the size distribution function proceeds in activation mode. • The electrostatic-like model of nanoparticles agglomeration is in good correspondence with the experimental data. - Abstract: Dynamics of gold nanoparticles (NPs) ensemble in dense aqueous solution under exposure to picosecond laser radiation is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Properties of NPs are examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, and size-measuring disk centrifuge. Theoretical investigation of NPs ensemble behavior is based on the analytical model taking into account collisions and agglomeration of particles. It is shown that in case of dense NPs colloidal solutions (above 10{sup 14} particles per milliliter) the process of laser fragmentation typical for nanosecond laser exposure turns into laser-induced agglomeration which leads to formation of the particles with larger sizes. It is shown that there is a critical concentration of NPs: at higher concentrations agglomeration rate increases tremendously. The results of mathematical simulation are in compliance with experimental data.

  5. Biomass equipments. Dryers. Drying, crushing, agglomeration of agro-industrial products; Materiels pour la biomasse. Les secheurs, sechage, broyage, agglomeration de produits agro-industriels

    Deur, O. [Promill (France)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the French Promill Company activity in the design and manufacturing of complete drying-crushing-agglomerating units for agro-industrial products (pulp of beet, lucerne, etc..). The paper focusses on the thermal and mechanical efficiency of the high temperature dryer and on the pulp granulating squeezer. (J.S.)

  6. Preparation of sustained release matrix pellets by melt agglomeration in the fluidized bed: influence of formulation variables and modelling of agglomerate growth.

    Pauli-Bruns, Anette; Knop, Klaus; Lippold, Bernhard C

    2010-03-01

    The one-step preparation of sustained release matrix pellets, using a melting procedure in a fluidized bed apparatus, was tested in a 2(3) full factorial design of experiments, using microcrystalline wax as lipophilic binder, theophylline as model drug and talc as additional matrix forming agent. The three influence parameters were (A) size of binder particles, (B) fraction of theophylline in solid particles and (C) fraction of microcrystalline wax in formulation. The response variables were agglomerate size and size distribution, dissolution time, agglomerate crush resistance, sphericity, yield and porosity. Nearly spherical pellets comprising a smooth, closed surface could be obtained with the used method, exhibiting the hollow core typical for the immersion and layering mechanism. The reproducibility was very good concerning all responses. The size of agglomerates is proportional to the size of the binder particles, which serve as cores for pellet formation in the molten state in the fluidized bed. Additionally, the agglomerate size is influenced by the volume of the solid particles in relation to the binder particles, with more solid particles leading to larger agglomerates and vice versa. Dissolution times vary in a very wide range, resulting from the interplay between amount of drug in relation to the meltable matrix substance microcrystalline wax and the non-meltable matrix substance talc. The change of binder particle size does not lead to a structural change of the matrix; both dissolution times and porosity are not significantly altered. Agglomerate crush resistance is low due to the hollow core of the pellets. However, it is significantly increased if the volume fraction of microcrystalline wax in the matrix is high, which means that the matrix is mechanically better stabilized. A theoretical model has been established to quantitatively explain agglomerate growth and very good accordance of the full particle size distributions between predicted and

  7. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    Blaeser, Susan B; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Susan B. Blaeser.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:27036268

  8. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  9. THE EFFECT OF OFFSET PRINTING INK ON LASER TONER INK AGGLOMERATION UNDER NEUTRAL PULPING CONDITIONS

    Sujin Xie,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available 1-octadecanol is known to be a highly effective agglomerating agent for laser toner ink. However, the office waste paper used in the actual production often contains various types of inks. The effect of the offset ink and types of surfactants with different charge characteristics were studied relative to the agglomeration of the laser toner ink under neutral pulping conditions. It was found that the addition of a small amount of the offset ink printed waste paper was beneficial for the agglomeration of the laser toner ink. The optimal percentage of addition is 12.5% to 25%. The offset printed ink had a positive charge of 0.001±0.0005 mEq/g when the offset ink was treated by 70˚C water at neutral conditions. Addition of a proper amount of cationic surfactant was beneficial to improve the agglomeration at any ratio of the mixed laser printed and offset waste papers. When the percentage of offset waste paper was less than 50%, the addition of anionic surfactant and nonionic surfactant was harmful for agglomeration, and there was no significant effect at higher offset content.

  10. Effect of Rubber Nanoparticle Agglomeration on Properties of Thermoplastic Vulcanizates during Dynamic Vulcanization

    Hanguang Wu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the dispersed rubber microparticles in ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM/polypropylene (PP thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs are actually agglomerates of rubber nanoparticles. In this study, based on this new understanding of the microstructure of TPV, we further revealed the microstructure-properties relationship of EPDM/PP TPV during dynamic vulcanization, especially the effect of the size of rubber nanoparticle agglomerates (dn, the thicknesses of PP ligaments (IDpoly and the rubber network on the properties of EPDM/PP TPV. We were able to simultaneously obtain a high tensile strength, elongation at break, elastic modulus, and elasticity for the EPDM/PP TPV by the achievement of a smaller dn, a thinner IDpoly and a denser rubber network. Interestingly, the effect of dn and IDpoly on the elastic modulus of EPDM/PP TPV composed of rubber nanoparticle agglomerates is different from that of EPDM/PP TPVs composed of rubber microparticles reported previously. The deformation behavior of the TPVs during stretching was studied to understand the mechanism for the achievement of good mechanical properties. Interestingly, the rubber nanoparticle agglomerates are oriented along the tensile direction during stretching. The TPV samples with smaller and more numerous rubber nanoparticle agglomerates can slow down the development of voids and cracks more effectively, thus leading to increase in tensile strength and elongation at break of the EPDM/PP TPV.